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Sample records for femtosecond electron diffraction

  1. Tip-based electron source for femtosecond electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Jan-Paul; Hoffrogge, Johannes; Schenk, Markus; Krueger, Michael; Baum, Peter; Hommelhoff, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Illumination of a sharp tungsten tip with femtosecond laser pulses leads to the emission of ultrashort, high brightness electron pulses that are ideally suited for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) experiments [1]. The tip's small virtual source size ({proportional_to}5 nm) results in a large transverse coherence length of the electron pulse and therefore better spatial resolution as compared to a conventional flat cathode design. The enhanced electric field at the tip apex (2 GV/m) is about two orders of magnitude larger than the maximum electric field applicable in a plate capacitor based setup (20 MV/m). This reduces the influence of the initial energy distribution on the pulse duration at the target and improves the timing jitter. Simulations show that a setup with a sharp tip as the cathode in combination with two anodes yields an electron pulse duration of about 50 fs at the sample. The electron energy is 30 keV and the gun to sample distance is 3 cm. We implemented the two anode setup with the tip experimentally. We present the experimental characteristics of the emitted electron beam both in static field emission and in laser triggered emission.

  2. Compression of Electron Pulses for Femtosecond Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Omid; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Our goal is to improve the temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments to 100 fs by compressing the electron pulses using a time-varying electric field. The compressed pulse can be used for a better understanding of the dynamics of molecules under study. A bunch of 3 million electrons is generated at a photocathode by femtosecond UV laser pulses and accelerated to 100 keV in a static electric field. Then, the longitudinal component of the electric field of a microwave cavity is employed to compress the bunch. The cavity's frequency and phase are accurately tuned in such a way that the electric field is parallel to the bunch motion at its arrival and antiparallel to it at its exit. Compression in the transverse directions is done by magnetic lenses. Simulations have been done to predict the bunch profile at different positions and times by General Particle Tracer code. A streak camera has been built to measure the duration of the pulses. It uses the electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor to rotate the bunch so that angular spreading of the bunch is proportional to its duration. The capacitor is discharged by a laser pulse incident on a photo switch.

  3. Femtosecond Electron Diffraction: Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine i...

  4. Femtosecond electron diffraction: heralding the era of atomically resolved dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2011-09-01

    One of the great dream experiments in Science is to directly observe atomic motions as they occur. Femtosecond electron diffraction provided the first 'light' of sufficient intensity to achieve this goal by attaining atomic resolution to structural changes on the relevant timescales. This review covers the technical progress that made this new level of acuity possible and gives a survey of the new insights gained from an atomic level perspective of structural dynamics. Atomic level views of the simplest possible structural transition, melting, are discussed for a number of systems in which both thermal and purely electronically driven atomic displacements can be correlated with the degree of directional bonding. Optical manipulation of charge distributions and effects on interatomic forces/bonding can be directly observed through the ensuing atomic motions. New phenomena involving strongly correlated electron-lattice systems are also discussed in which optically induced changes in the potential energy landscape lead to ballistic structural changes. Concepts such as the structural order parameters are now directly observable at the atomic level of inspection to give a remarkable view of the extraordinary degree of cooperativity involved in strongly correlated electron-lattice systems. These recent examples, in combination with time-resolved real space imaging now possible with electron probes, are truly defining an emerging field that holds great promise to make a significant impact in how we understand structural dynamics. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor David John Hugh Cockayne, a world leader in electron microscopy, who sadly passed away in December.

  5. Femtosecond Electron Diffraction Study of the Cyclization Reaction in Crystalline Diarylethene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciaini G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron diffraction is used to directly resolve the atomic motions involved in the ring closing reaction induced in a photochromic single crystal. The measurements were performed using our newly developed setup capable of delivering sub-500 fs electron bunches containing 106 electrons per pulse. Theoretical calculations were also performed.

  6. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  7. High current table-top setup for femtosecond gas electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zandi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed an experimental setup for gas phase electron diffraction with femtosecond resolution and a high average beam current. While gas electron diffraction has been successful at determining molecular structures, it has been a challenge to reach femtosecond resolution while maintaining sufficient beam current to retrieve structures with high spatial resolution. The main challenges are the Coulomb force that leads to broadening of the electron pulses and the temporal blurring that results from the velocity mismatch between the laser and electron pulses as they traverse the sample. We present here a device that uses pulse compression to overcome the Coulomb broadening and deliver femtosecond electron pulses on a gas target. The velocity mismatch can be compensated using laser pulses with a tilted intensity front to excite the sample. The temporal resolution of the setup was determined with a streak camera to be better than 400 fs for pulses with up to half a million electrons and a kinetic energy of 90 keV. The high charge per pulse, combined with a repetition rate of 5 kHz, results in an average beam current that is between one and two orders of magnitude higher than previously demonstrated.

  8. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  9. X-ray laser-induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A; Putkunz, Corey T; Martin, Andrew V; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M

    2016-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration.

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA; Trigo, M. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Reid, A. H. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Li, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Vecchione, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Shen, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Weathersby, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Coffee, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Hartmann, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA; PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  11. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  12. Diffractive imaging of a molecular rotational wavepacket with femtosecond Megaelectronvolt electron pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jie; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Centurion, Martin; Wang, Xijie

    2015-01-01

    Imaging changes in molecular geometries on their natural femtosecond timescale with sub-Angstrom spatial precision is one of the critical challenges in the chemical sciences, since the nuclear geometry changes determine the molecular reactivity. For photoexcited molecules, the nuclear dynamics determine the photoenergy conversion path and efficiency. We performed a gas-phase electron diffraction experiment using Megaelectronvolt (MeV) electrons, where we captured the rotational wavepacket dynamics of nonadiabatically laser-aligned nitrogen molecules. We achieved an unprecedented combination of 100 fs root-mean-squared (RMS) temporal resolution and sub-Angstrom (0.76 {\\AA}) spatial resolution that makes it possible to resolve the position of the nuclei within the molecule. In addition, the diffraction patterns reveal the angular distribution of the molecules, which changes from prolate (aligned) to oblate (anti-aligned) in 300 fs. Our results demonstrate a significant and promising step towards making atomical...

  13. Coherent femtosecond low-energy single-electron pulses for time-resolved diffraction and imaging: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, A.; Mueller, M.; Ernstorfer, R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Gulde, M.; Schaefer, S.; Schweda, S.; Maiti, M.; Ropers, C. [Courant Research Center Physics and Material Physics Institute, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Xu, C. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, 390, Qinghe Road, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China); Hohage, T. [Institute of Numerical and Applied Mathematics, University of Goettingen, Lotzestr. 16-18, 37083 Goettingen (Germany); Schenk, F. [Courant Research Center Physics and Material Physics Institute, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Institute of Numerical and Applied Mathematics, University of Goettingen, Lotzestr. 16-18, 37083 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    We numerically investigate the properties of coherent femtosecond single electron wave packets photoemitted from nanotips in view of their application in ultrafast electron diffraction and non-destructive imaging with low-energy electrons. For two different geometries, we analyze the temporal and spatial broadening during propagation from the needle emitter to an anode, identifying the experimental parameters and challenges for realizing femtosecond time resolution. The simple tip-anode geometry is most versatile and allows for electron pulses of several ten of femtosecond duration using a very compact experimental design, however, providing very limited control over the electron beam collimation. A more sophisticated geometry comprising a suppressor-extractor electrostatic unit and a lens, similar to typical field emission electron microscope optics, is also investigated, allowing full control over the beam parameters. Using such a design, we find {approx}230 fs pulses feasible in a focused electron beam. The main limitation to achieve sub-hundred femtosecond time resolution is the typical size of such a device, and we suggest the implementation of more compact electron optics for optimal performance.

  14. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  15. Femtosecond electron pulse generation and measurement for diffractive imaging of isolated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Omid; Wilkin, Kyle J.; DeSimone, Alice J.; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We have constructed an electron gun that delivers highly charged femtosecond electron pulses to a target with kHz repetition rate. Electron pulses are generated by femtosecond laser pulses in a photoemission process and are accelerated up to 100 kV and compressed to sub-picosecond duration. Compression is essential to compensate for the space charge effect that increases the size of electron pulses in all directions significantly. The pulses are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by the longitudinal electric field of a radio-frequency cavity. The longitudinal compression is achieved by decelerating the electrons in the leading edge of the pulse, and accelerating the electrons in the trailing edge of the pulse. This results in the pulse compressing and reaching the minimum pulse duration at a known distance from the compression cavity. The short pulse duration and high repetition rate will be essential to observe subpicosecond dynamic processes in molecules in gas phase with a good signal to noise ratio. A streak camera, consisting of a millimeter-sized parallel plate capacitor, was used to measure the pulse duration in situ.

  16. Measurements of Long-range Electronic Correlations During Femtosecond Diffraction Experiments Performed on Nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Rebecca A; Williams, Sophie; Martin, Andrew V; Dilanian, Ruben A; Darmanin, Connie; Putkunz, Corey T; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor A; Jones, Michael W M; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sebastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Curwood, Evan K; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G; Nugent, Keith A; Quiney, Harry M; Abbey, Brian

    2017-08-22

    The precise details of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter are a topic of intense interest to researchers attempting to interpret the results of femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) experiments. An increasing number of experimental observations have shown that although nuclear motion can be negligible, given a short enough incident pulse duration, electronic motion cannot be ignored. The current and widely accepted models assume that although electrons undergo dynamics driven by interaction with the pulse, their motion could largely be considered 'random'. This would then allow the supposedly incoherent contribution from the electronic motion to be treated as a continuous background signal and thus ignored. The original aim of our experiment was to precisely measure the change in intensity of individual Bragg peaks, due to X-ray induced electronic damage in a model system, crystalline C60. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that at the highest X-ray intensities, the electron dynamics in C60 were in fact highly correlated, and over sufficiently long distances that the positions of the Bragg reflections are significantly altered. This paper describes in detail the methods and protocols used for these experiments, which were conducted both at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Australian Synchrotron (AS) as well as the crystallographic approaches used to analyse the data.

  17. Flow-aligned, single-shot fiber diffraction using a femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Loh, N Duane; Zorgati, Habiba; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Liow, Lu Ting; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Larsson, Mårten; DePonte, Daniel P; Bean, Richard; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Gati, Cornelius; Oberthuer, Dominik; Arnlund, David; Brändén, Gisela; Berntsen, Peter; Cascio, Duilio; Chavas, Leonard M G; Chen, Joe P J; Ding, Ke; Fleckenstein, Holger; Gumprecht, Lars; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Mossou, Estelle; Sawaya, Michael R; Brewster, Aaron S; Hattne, Johan; Sauter, Nicholas K; Seibert, Marvin; Seuring, Carolin; Stellato, Francesco; Tilp, Thomas; Eisenberg, David S; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Makowski, Lee; Millane, Rick P; Forsyth, Trevor; Boutet, Sébastien; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Chen, Swaine L; Liang, Mengning; Neutze, Richard; Robinson, Robert C

    2017-06-02

    A major goal for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) based science is to elucidate structures of biological molecules without the need for crystals. Filament systems may provide some of the first single macromolecular structures elucidated by XFEL radiation, since they contain one-dimensional translational symmetry and thereby occupy the diffraction intensity region between the extremes of crystals and single molecules. Here, we demonstrate flow alignment of as few as 100 filaments (Escherichia coli pili, F-actin, and amyloid fibrils), which when intersected by femtosecond X-ray pulses result in diffraction patterns similar to those obtained from classical fiber diffraction studies. We also determine that F-actin can be flow-aligned to a disorientation of approximately 5 degrees. Using this XFEL-based technique, we determine that gelsolin amyloids are comprised of stacked β-strands running perpendicular to the filament axis, and that a range of order from fibrillar to crystalline is discernable for individual α-synuclein amyloids. © 2017 The Authors Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Henry N.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastian; /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC /Uppsala U., Biomed. Ctr.; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Marchesini, Stefano; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; /LLNL, Livermore; London, Richard A.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; /CERN; Spiller, Eberhard; /Spiller X-ray Optics, Livermore; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; /Berlin, Tech. U.; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  19. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  20. Electron transfer in a virtual quantum state of LiBH4 induced by strong optical fields and mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, J; Zamponi, F; Freyer, B; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T; Borgschulte, A

    2012-10-05

    Transient polarizations connected with a spatial redistribution of electronic charge in a mixed quantum state are induced by optical fields of high amplitude. We determine for the first time the related transient electron density maps, applying femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction as a structure probe. The prototype ionic material LiBH4 driven nonresonantly by an intense sub-40 fs optical pulse displays a large-amplitude fully reversible electron transfer from the BH4(-) anion to the Li+ cation during excitation. Our results establish this mechanism as the source of the strong optical polarization which agrees quantitatively with theoretical estimates.

  1. Feasibility study on temporal-resolved diffraction of high-energy electrons produced in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Jun; Cang Yu; Chen Qing; Peng Lian Mao; Wang Huai Bin; Zhong Jia Yong

    2002-01-01

    The high-energy electrons can be produced in the interaction between intense ultra-short laser pulses and Al targets. The diffraction may take place when high-energy electrons pass through an Al single crystal. Feasibility is studied using such diffraction as a method to analyze the structures of crystals

  2. Ultrafast molecular processes mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    X-ray diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution allows for mapping photoinduced structural dynamics on the length scale of a chemical bond and in the time domain of atomic and molecular motion. In a pump-probe approach, a femtosecond excitation pulse induces structural changes which are probed by diffracting a femtosecond hard x-ray pulse from the excited sample. The transient angular positions and intensities of diffraction peaks give insight into the momentary atomic or molecular positions and into the distribution of electronic charge density. The simultaneous measurement of changes on different diffraction peaks is essential for determining atom positions and charge density maps with high accuracy. Recent progress in the generation of ultrashort hard x-ray pulses (Cu Kα, wavelength λ=0.154 nm) in laser-driven plasma sources has led to the implementation of the powder diffraction and the rotating crystal method with a time resolution of 100 fs. In this contribution, we report new results from powder diffraction studies of molecular materials. A first series of experiments gives evidence of a so far unknown concerted transfer of electrons and protons in ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], a centrosymmetric structure. Charge transfer from the sulfate groups results in the sub-100 fs generation of a confined electron channel along the c-axis of the unit cell which is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps display a periodic modulation of the channel's charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A second study addresses atomic rearrangements and charge dislocations in the non-centrosymmetric potassium dihydrogen phosphate [KH2PO4, KDP]. Photoexcitation generates coherent low-frequency motions along the LO and TO phonon coordinates, leaving the average atomic positions unchanged

  3. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R., E-mail: g.chabrol@ecam-strasbourg.eu [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Ciceron, Adline [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Télécom Physique Strasbourg – Pôle API – 300 Bd Sébastien Brant – CS 10413, Illkirch Graffenstaden F 67400 (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • A method for rapid manufacturing of optical diffractive element in BK7 is proposed. • A binary grating in BK7 was successfully machined by femtosecond laser pulses. • Process relying on nonlinear absorption in the dielectric due to photoionization. • The binary grating was analysed by SEM and interferometric microscopy. • Simulations by Fourier modal method supported the measured diffractive efficiency. - Abstract: This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  4. Dynamics of Femtosecond Electron Bunches

    OpenAIRE

    Khachatryan, A. G.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F. A.; Boller, K. -J.

    2007-01-01

    In the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) a short intense laser pulse, with a duration of the order of a plasma wave period, excites an unusually strong plasma wake wave (laser wakefield). Recent experiments on laser wakefield acceleration [Nature (London) 431, p.535, p.538, p.541 (2004)] demonstrated generation of ultra-short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low energy spread of the order of a few percent. We have studied the dynamics of s...

  5. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  6. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  7. Femtosecond laser induced surface structuring on silicon by diffraction-assisted micropatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying

    2015-02-01

    Femtosecond laser micropatterning of silicon with nanometric surface modulation is demonstrated by irradiating through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the melting threshold are characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and reveal a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. LIPSS have been generated in the micropatterning surface. We found Ripples spacing were found of 550-680 nm. Based on the Sipe and Drude model, the theoretical period of LIPSS is closer to experimental measurements. Due to the diffraction, the LIPPS having a different period appear in a diffraction micropatterning.

  8. Perspective: Structural dynamics in condensed matter mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaesser, T.; Woerner, M. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Ultrashort soft and hard x-ray pulses are sensitive probes of structural dynamics on the picometer length and femtosecond time scales of electronic and atomic motions. Recent progress in generating such pulses has initiated new directions of condensed matter research, exploiting a variety of x-ray absorption, scattering, and diffraction methods to probe photoinduced structural dynamics. Atomic motion, changes of local structure and long-range order, as well as correlated electron motion and charge transfer have been resolved in space and time, providing a most direct access to the physical mechanisms and interactions driving reversible and irreversible changes of structure. This perspective combines an overview of recent advances in femtosecond x-ray diffraction with a discussion on ongoing and future developments.

  9. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B; Hunter, Mark S; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander T; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M Marvin; Spence, John C H; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Stephen M; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  10. The rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, B; Stingl, J; Zamponi, F; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2011-08-01

    We report the first implementation of the rotating-crystal method in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Applying a pump-probe scheme with 100 fs hard X-ray probe pulses from a laser-driven plasma source, the novel technique is demonstrated by mapping structural dynamics of a photoexcited bismuth crystal via changes of the diffracted intensity on a multitude of Bragg reflections. The method is compared to femtosecond powder diffraction and to Bragg diffraction from a crystal with stationary orientation.

  11. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus; Anielski, Denis; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Bomme, Cédric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; De, Sankar; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André; Holmegaard, Lotte; Johnsson, Per; Kienitz, Jens S; Kierspel, Thomas; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Moshammer, Robert; Müller, Nele L M; Rudek, Benedikt; Savelyev, Evgeny; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Scholz, Frank; Schorb, Sebastian; Schulz, Joachim; Seltmann, Jörn; Stener, Mauro; Stern, Stephan; Techert, Simone; Thøgersen, Jan; Trippel, Sebastian; Viefhaus, Jens; Vrakking, Marc; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Küpper, Jochen; Ullrich, Joachim; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C(8)H(5)F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C(6)H(4)Br(2)) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  12. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Boll, R; Adolph, M; Anielski, D; Aquila, A; Bari, S; Bomme, C; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Chapman, H N; Christensen, L; Coffee, R; Coppola, N; De, S; Decleva, P; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Filsinger, F; Foucar, L; Gorkhover, T; Gumprecht, L; Hoemke, A; Holmegaard, L; Johnsson, P; Kienitz, J S; Kierspel, T; Krasniqi, F; Kuehnel, K -U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Moshammer, R; Mueller, Nele L M; Rudek, B; Savelyev, E; Schlichting, I; Schmidt, C; Scholz, F; Schorb, S; Schulz, J; Seltmann, J; Stener, M; Stern, S; Techert, S; Thogersen, J; Trippel, S; Viefhaus, J; Vrakking, M; Stapelfeldt, H; Kuepper, J; Ullrich, J; Rudenko, A; Rolles, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laseraligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  13. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Han Dao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  14. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; Sankar,; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Adolph, Marcus; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump–probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffrac...

  15. Effects of thermal treatment on femtosecond laser fabricated diffraction gratings in polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepak, K.L.N. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, S. Venugopal [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2011-09-01

    We report the fabrication of efficient, buried diffraction gratings and micro-craters in bulk polystyrene using femtosecond laser direct writing technique. We recorded a maximum diffraction efficiency of 10% for a buried grating fabricated at 1 {mu}J energy, 1 mm/s speed, and a period of 30 {mu}m. Buried micro-craters, with typical dimensions of {approx}2 {mu}m, were achieved at low energies and high scanning speeds. From the field emission scanning electron microscope studies, the observed emission is attributed as due to the inner surface modifications and the debris settled around the voids. The fabricated gratings subjected to heat treatment were tested for the diffraction efficiency and emission at different excitation wavelengths and the observed results are presented. Raman spectra collected from the femtosecond laser modified regions revealed the disappearance of few Raman modes at high peak intensities associated with incident Gaussian laser pulse. Potential applications of these luminescent micro-craters are highlighted.

  16. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  17. Enhancing electron diffraction through precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavia, Giuseppe; Benner, Gerd; Niebel, Harald [Carl Zeiss NTS, Oberkochen (Germany); Patout, Loic [ONERA, Paris (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nanostructures are often investigated in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and electron diffraction (ED) can be used to solve nanocrystals. Electrons interact very strongly with matter, and the diffracted intensities are highly dynamical. Precession Electron Diffraction (PED) is a recent technique delivering more kinematical diffraction patterns. We have used an in column energy filtered TEM equipped with precession electron diffraction hardware, which allows working up to 3 precession angle, and energy filtering of the precession patterns. High Order Laue Zones, useful for space group symmetry determination and to enhance fine structure details, appear more clearly. We have compared a microdiffraction pattern and a precession microdiffraction pattern performed along the orientation [010] of a sample TiSi{sub 2} with a space group Fddd. For cubic systems, this orientation allows to distinguish the Bravais lattice and the presence of glide mirrors. We show that with precession, we conserve the distinction of the gap and the difference of periodicity between the ZOLZ and the FOLZ is improved.

  18. Femtosecond electron bunches, source and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongbai, C. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand)], E-mail: chlada@chiangmai.ac.th; Kusoljariyakul, K. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); Rimjaem, S. [DESY Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, Zeuthen 15738 (Germany); Rhodes, M.W. [IST, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); Saisut, J. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); Thamboon, P.; Wichaisirimongkol, P. [IST, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); Vilaithong, T. [FNRF, Department of Physics, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand)

    2008-03-11

    A femtosecond electron source has been developed at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF), Chiang Mai University, Thailand. So far, it has produced electron bunches as short as {sigma}{sub z}{approx}180 fs with (1-6)x10{sup 8} electrons per microbunch. The system consists of an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha-magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. Coherent transition radiation emitted at wavelengths equal to and longer than the bunch length is used in a Michelson interferometer to determine the bunch length by autocorrelation technique. The experimental setup and results of the bunch length measurement are described.

  19. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO{sub 2} laser polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hun-Kook [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Tae [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahsan, Shamim [Khulna University, Khulna (Bangladesh)

    2014-11-15

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO{sub 2} laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO{sub 2} laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO{sub 2} laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  20. Concept of a laser-plasma based electron source for sub-10 fs electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, J; Beaurepaire, B; Gallé, G; Vernier, A; Lifschitz, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new concept of an electron source for ultrafast electron diffraction with sub-10~fs temporal resolution. Electrons are generated in a laser-plasma accelerator, able to deliver femtosecond electron bunches at 5 MeV energy with kHz repetition rate. The possibility of producing this electron source is demonstrated using Particle-In-Cell simulations. We then use particle tracking simulations to show that this electron beam can be transported and manipulated in a realistic beamline, in order to reach parameters suitable for electron diffraction. The beamline consists of realistic static magnetic optics and introduces no temporal jitter. We demonstrate numerically that electron bunches with 5~fs duration and containing 1.5~fC per bunch can be produced, with a transverse coherence length exceeding 2~nm, as required for electron diffraction.

  1. Femtosecond Studies of Electrons at Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles

    2000-03-01

    Binding energies and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of image electrons reflect the nature of the electronic interaction with both the substrate and the adsorbed layer[1,2]. We demonstrate that a positive(attractive) affinity materials, such as Xe overlayers, lead to quantum well states at the interface. Negative(repulsive) affinity materials, such a n-alkane overlayers, present a tunneling barrier that dominates the energies and lifetimes of the image electrons. With the time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission technique(TPPE), it is possible to directly observe the dynamics of interfacial electrons with specific energy and parallel momentum. Oscillation in the lifetime of image state electrons as a function of Xe layer thickness is attributed to a quantum size effect and the formation of quantum wells at the Xe/Ag(111) interface[3]. Binding energy measurements as a function of Xe layer thickness in combination with parallel dispersion measurements allow the mapping of the three dimensional electronic structure of bulk Xe. At the n-alkane/Ag(111) interface, image electrons become spatially localized and self-trap into a small polaron state within a few hundred femtosecond[4]. The energy dependence of the self-trapping rate has been modeled with a theory analogous to electron transfer theory. Finally, the immediate extension of this research to study other electron dynamic processes, such as two dimensional electron solvation at interfaces, will be discussed. [1] Fauster, T.; Steinmann, W. Two-Photon Photoemission Spectroscopy of Image States. In Photonic Probes of Surfaces; Halevi, P., Ed.; Elsevier: Amsterdam, 1995; pp. 346-411. [2] Harris, C.B.; Ge, N.-H.; Lingle, Jr., R.L.; McNeill, J.D.; Wong, C.M. Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 1997, 48, 711. [3] McNeill, J.D.; Lingle, R.L.,Jr.; Ge, N.-H.; Wong, C.M.; Jordan, R.E.; Harris, C.B. Phys. Rev. Lett. 1997, 79, 4645. [4] Ge, N.-H.; Wong, C.M.; Lingle, R.L., Jr.; McNeill, J.D.; Gaffney, K.J.; Harris, C.B. Science 1998

  2. Femtosecond powder diffraction with a laser-driven hard X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, F; Ansari, Z; Woerner, M; Elsaesser, T

    2010-01-18

    X-ray powder diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution is introduced to map ultrafast structural dynamics of polycrystalline condensed matter. Our pump-probe approach is based on photoexcitation of a powder sample with a femtosecond optical pulse and probing changes of its structure by diffracting a hard X-ray pulse generated in a laser-driven plasma source. We discuss the key aspects of this scheme including an analysis of detection sensitivity and angular resolution. Applying this technique to the prototype molecular material ammonium sulfate, up to 20 powder diffraction rings are recorded simultaneously with a time resolution of 100 fs. We describe how to derive transient charge density maps of the material from the extensive set of diffraction data in a quantitative way.

  3. Femtosecond index grating in barium flouride: efficient self-diffraction and enhancement of surface SHG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Th; Wolfframm, D.; Mitzner, R.; Reif, J.

    2000-02-01

    A transient refractive index grating is formed in barium fluoride crystals under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses from two non-collinear beams. At low intensities energy coupling takes place. At high intensities, a typical self-diffraction pattern is obtained with a diffraction efficiency better than 10%. Simultaneously, an enhancement of the SHG signal from the surface, as well as the generation and diffraction of the third harmonic is observable. For all effects the nonlinear Kerr-effect is responsible, with the response time being limited only by the temporal pulse shape.

  4. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  5. Large amplitude femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Daligault, J

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical model that allows us to study linear and non-linear aspects of the femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters. The theoretical approach consists in the classical limit of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The electrons are described by a phase-space distribution function which satisfies a Vlasov-like equation while the ions are treated classically. This allows simulations for clusters containing several hundreds of atoms and extending up to several hundreds of femtoseconds during which the description conserves the fermionic character of the electron distribution. This semi-quantal approach compares very well with the purely quantal treatment. As an application of this approach, we show the prominent role of the electron dynamics during and after the interaction with an intense femtosecond laser pulse.

  6. Dynamic diffraction effects and coherent breathing oscillations in ultrafast electron diffraction in layered 1T-TaSeTe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropic lattice movements due to the difference between intralayer and interlayer bonding are observed in the layered transition-metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaSeTe following femtosecond laser pulse excitation. Our ultrafast electron diffraction investigations using 4D-transmission electron microscopy (4D-TEM clearly reveal that the intensity of Bragg reflection spots often changes remarkably due to the dynamic diffraction effects and anisotropic lattice movement. Importantly, the temporal diffracted intensity from a specific crystallographic plane depends on the deviation parameter s, which is commonly used in the theoretical study of diffraction intensity. Herein, we report on lattice thermalization and structural oscillations in layered 1T-TaSeTe, analyzed by dynamic diffraction theory. Ultrafast alterations of satellite spots arising from the charge density wave in the present system are also briefly discussed.

  7. Generation of surface electrons in femtosecond laser-solid interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Miaohua; LI; Yutong; YUAN; Xiaohui; ZHENG; Zhiyuan; LIANG; Wenxi; YU; Quanzhi; ZHANG; Yi; WANG; Zhaohua; WEI; Zhiyi; ZHANG; Jie

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of hot electrons produced by p-polarized femtosecond laser-solid interactions are studied. The experimental results show that the outgoing electrons are mainly emitted in three directions: along the target surface, the normal direction and the laser backward direction. The electrons flowing along the target surface are due to the confinement of the electrostatic field and the surface magnetic field, while the electrons in the normal direction due to the resonant absorption.

  8. Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und - pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-04

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

  9. A high-resolution time-of-flight energy analyzer for femtosecond electron pulses at 30 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliserin, Alexander; Walbran, Matthew; Baum, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We report a time-of-flight spectrometer for electron pulses at up to 30 keV, which is a suitable energy for atomic-resolution femtosecond investigations via time-resolved electron diffraction, microscopy, and energy loss spectroscopy. For realistic femtosecond beams without apertures, the instrument's energy resolution is ˜0.5 eV (full width at half maximum) or 2 × 10-5 at a throughput of 50%-90%. We demonstrate the analyzer's versatility by three first applications, namely, femtosecond electron pulse metrology via optical streaking, in situ drift correction in laser-microwave synchronization for electron pulse compression, and time-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy of aluminum, showing the instrument's capability of tracking plasmonic loss peak positions with few-meV accuracy.

  10. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Irman, A.; Goor, van F.A.; Boller, K.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent) energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift s

  11. Atomic resolution 3D electron diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; O' Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Electron lens aberration is the major barrier limiting the resolution of electron microscopy. Here we describe a novel form of electron microscopy to overcome electron lens aberration. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a 2 x 2 x 2 unit cell nano-crystal (framework of LTA [Al12Si12O48]8) can be ab initio determined at the resolution of 1 Angstrom from a series of simulated noisy diffraction pattern projections with rotation angles ranging from -70 degrees to +70 degrees in 5 degrees increments along a single rotation axis. This form of microscopy (which we call 3D electron diffraction microscopy) does not require any reference waves, and can image the 3D structure of nanocrystals, as well as non-crystalline biological and materials science samples, with the resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction.

  12. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  13. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Khachatryan, A. G.; Irman, A.; Goor, van de, AAAM; Boller, K. -J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent) energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum) and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitra...

  14. Self-focusing of femtosecond diffraction-resistant vortex beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffler, Stacy; Polynkin, Pavel; Moloney, Jerome

    2011-10-01

    We report experiments on self-focusing of femtosecond diffraction-resistant vortex beams in water. These beams are higher-order Bessel beams with weak azimuthal modulation of the transverse intensity patterns. The modulation overrides the self-focusing dynamics and results in the formation of regular bottlelike filament distributions. The peak-power thresholds for filamentation, at a particular distance, are relatively accurately estimated by the adaptation of the Marburger formula derived earlier for Gaussian beams. The nonlinear conversion of the incident conical waves into the localized spatial wave packets propagating near the beam axis is observed.

  15. Evanescent-wave acceleration of femtosecond electron bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Zawadzka, J; Carey, J J; Wynne, K

    2000-01-01

    A 150-fs 800-nm 1-mu J laser was used to excited surface plasmons in the Kretschmann geometry in a 500-A silver film. Multiphoton excitation results in the emission of femtosecond electron bunches (40 fC) as had been seen before. The electron beam is highly directional and perpendicular to the prism surface. A time-of-flight setup has been used to measure the kinetic-energy distribution of the photoelectrons. Surprisingly, we find that this distribution extends to energies as high as 40 eV. Theoretical calculations show that these high energies may be due to acceleration in the evanescent laser field that extends from the silver film out into the vacuum. These results suggest that femtosecond pulses with more energy per pulse or longer wavelength may be used to accelerate electrons to the keV or even MeV level.

  16. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  17. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  18. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersby, S P; Brown, G; Centurion, M; Chase, T F; Coffee, R; Corbett, J; Eichner, J P; Frisch, J C; Fry, A R; Gühr, M; Hartmann, N; Hast, C; Hettel, R; Jobe, R K; Jongewaard, E N; Lewandowski, J R; Li, R K; Lindenberg, A M; Makasyuk, I; May, J E; McCormick, D; Nguyen, M N; Reid, A H; Shen, X; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Vecchione, T; Vetter, S L; Wu, J; Yang, J; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  19. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Brown, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Centurion, M. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 855 N 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588, USA; Chase, T. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Coffee, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Corbett, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Eichner, J. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Frisch, J. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Fry, A. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Gühr, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Hartmann, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Hast, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Hettel, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Jobe, R. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Jongewaard, E. N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Lewandowski, J. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Li, R. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Lindenberg, A. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Makasyuk, I. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; May, J. E. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Nguyen, M. N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Reid, A. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Shen, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, 47048 Duisburg, Germany; Vecchione, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Vetter, S. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Yang, J. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 855 N 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588, USA; Dürr, H. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  20. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-15

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  1. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  2. Small angle electron diffraction and deflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron optical system is constructed in order to obtain small angle diffraction and Lorentz deflection of electrons at the order of down to 10-6 radian in the reciprocal space. Long-distance camera length up to 3000 m is achieved in a conventional transmission electron microscope with LaB6 thermal emission type. The diffraction pattern at 5 × 10-6 radian is presented in a carbon replica grating with 500 nm lattice spacing while the magnetic deflection pattern at 2 × 10-5 radian is exhibited in Permalloy elements. A simultaneous recording of electron diffraction and Lorentz deflection is also demonstrated in 180 degree striped magnetic domains of La0.825Sr0.175MnO3.

  3. Femtosecond undulator radiation from sliced electron bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Mitzner, R; Quast, T

    2006-08-18

    At the 1.7-GeV electron storage ring BESSY II, a first source of synchrotron radiation with 100 fs pulse duration, variable (linear and circular) polarization, tunable photon energy (300 to 1400 eV), and excellent signal-to-background ratio was constructed and is now in routine operation.

  4. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-12-01

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  5. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei, E-mail: lixiaowei@bit.edu.cn; Liu, Yang [Laser Micro/Nano-Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  7. Development of Quantitative electron nano-diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is a step towards development of quantitative parallel beam electron nano-diffraction (PBED). It is focused on the superstructure determination of zig-zag and zig-zig NaxCoO2 and analysis of charge distribution in the two polymorphs Nb12O29 using PBED. It has been shown that quantitative

  8. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Feist, Armin; da Silva, Nara Rubiano; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the G\\"ottingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 {\\AA} focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free electron beams.

  9. Vibrationally-induced electronic population inversion with strong femtosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Sampedro, Pablo; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-01-01

    We discover a new mechanism of electronic population inversion using strong femtosecond pulses, where the transfer is mediated by vibrational motion on a light-induced potential. The process can be achieved with a single pulse tuning its frequency to the red of the Franck-Condon window. We show the determinant role that the sign of the slope of the transition dipole moment can play on the dynamics, and extend the method to multiphoton processes with odd number of pulses. As an example, we show how the scheme can be applied to population inversion in Na2.

  10. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  11. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement. PMID:26503116

  12. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  14. Imaging an aligned polyatomic molecule with laser-induced electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, Michael; Le, Anh-Thu; Baudisch, Matthias; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Lin, Chii-Dong; Biegert, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced electron diffraction is an evolving tabletop method, which aims to image ultrafast structural changes in gas-phase polyatomic molecules with sub-{\\AA}ngstr\\"om spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. Here, we provide the general foundation for the retrieval of multiple bond lengths from a polyatomic molecule by simultaneously measuring the C-C and C-H bond lengths in aligned acetylene. Our approach takes the method beyond the hitherto achieved imaging of simple diatomic molecules and is based upon the combination of a 160 kHz mid-IR few-cycle laser source with full three-dimensional electron-ion coincidence detection. Our technique provides an accessible and robust route towards imaging ultrafast processes in complex gas phase molecules with atto- to femto-second temporal resolution.

  15. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  16. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  17. Tip-based source of femtosecond electron pulses at 30 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes; Paul Stein, Jan [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krüger, Michael; Förster, Michael; Hammer, Jakob; Ehberger, Dominik; Hommelhoff, Peter, E-mail: peter.hommelhoff@fau.de [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department für Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Baum, Peter [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    We present a nano-scale photoelectron source, optimized for ultrashort pulse durations and well-suited for time-resolved diffraction and advanced laser acceleration experiments. A tungsten tip of several-ten-nanometers diameter mounted in a suppressor-extractor electrode configuration allows the generation of 30 keV electron pulses with an estimated pulse duration of 9 fs (standard deviation; 21 fs full width at half maximum) at the gun exit. We infer the pulse duration from particle tracking simulations, which are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the electron-optical properties of the source in the spatial domain. We also demonstrate femtosecond-laser triggered operation of the apparatus. The temporal broadening of the pulse upon propagation to a diffraction sample can be greatly reduced by collimating the beam. Besides the short electron pulse duration, a tip-based source is expected to feature a large transverse coherence and a nanometric emittance.

  18. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sawaya, Michael R. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McFarlane, Heather T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenberg, David S. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Sauter, Nicholas K., E-mail: nksauter@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  19. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  20. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Angstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Hartsock, R; Kozina, M; Minitti, M P; Nelson, S; Robinson, J; Sato, T; van Driel, T; Welch, G; Weninger, C; Zhi, D; Bucksbaum, P H

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with time and space resolution of $30~$fs and $0.3$ \\AA . The high spatial fidelity is due to interference between the moving excitation and the static initial charge distribution. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on \\AA ngstrom and femtosecond scales. Coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  1. Improved accuracy in nano beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beche, A; Rouviere, J-L [CEA, INAC, SP2M, LEMMA, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Clement, L, E-mail: armand.beche@cea.f, E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.f [ST Microelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, F-38920 Crolles (France)

    2010-02-01

    Nano beam electron diffraction (NBD or NBED) is applied on a well controlled sample in order to evaluate the limit of the technique to measure strain. Measurements are realised on a 27nm thick Si{sub 0.7}Ge{sub 0.3} layer embedded in a silicon matrix, with a TITAN microscope working at 300kV. Using a standard condenser aperture of 50{mu}m, a probe size diameter of 2.7 nm is obtained and a strain accuracy of 6x10{sup -4} (mean root square, rms) is achieved. NBED patterns are acquired along a [110] direction and the bidimensionnal strain in the (110) plane is measured. Finite element simulations are carried out to check experimental results and reveal that strain relaxation and probe averaging in a 170nm thick TEM lamella reduces strain by 15%.

  2. Single-shot 3D structure determination of nanocrystals with femtosecond X-ray free electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Rui; Song, Changyong; Rodriguez, Jose A; Huang, Zhifeng; Chen, Chien-Chun; Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Suzuki, Akihiro; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takahashi, Yukio; Fan, Jiadong; Zou, Yunfei; Hatsui, Takaki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Kameshima, Takashi; Yonekura, Koji; Tono, Kensuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Sato, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using synchrotron radiation, X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs), high harmonic generation, soft X-ray lasers, and optical lasers has found broad applications across several disciplines. An active research direction in CDI is to determine the structure of single particles with intense, femtosecond X-FEL pulses based on diffraction-before-destruction scheme. However, single-shot 3D structure determination has not been experimentally realized yet. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of single-shot 3D structure determination of individual nanocrystals using ~10 femtosecond X-FEL pulses. Coherent diffraction patterns are collected from high-index-faceted nanocrystals, each struck by a single X-FEL pulse. Taking advantage of the symmetry of the nanocrystal, we reconstruct the 3D structure of each nanocrystal from a single-shot diffraction pattern at ~5.5 nm resolution. As symmetry exists in many nanocrystals and virus particles, this method can be applied to 3D st...

  3. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  4. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Ito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.

  5. Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction: Inversion of Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of imaging molecular orbitals from photoelectron spectra obtained via Laser Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED) in linear molecules. This is an extension of our work published recently in Physical Review A \\textbf{94}, 023421 (2016) to the case of the HOMO-1 orbital of the carbon dioxide molecule. We show that such an imaging technique has the potential to image molecular orbitals at different internuclear distances in a sub-femtosecond time scale and with a resolution of a fraction of an Angstr\\"om.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1-3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  7. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, M G; Le, A -T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with {\\pi}g and {\\pi}u symmetries, respectively, and where their ionisation probabilities do not maximise along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpec...

  8. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  9. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  10. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Aaron S; Sawaya, Michael R; Rodriguez, Jose; Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; McFarlane, Heather T; Cascio, Duilio; Adams, Paul D; Eisenberg, David S; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2015-02-01

    Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  11. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  12. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  13. Effect of electron heating on femtosecond laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jincheng; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-05-01

    We employ a surface plasmon technique to resolve the dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced coherent acoustic phonons in noble metals. Clear acoustic oscillations are observed in our experiments. We further study the dependence of the initial phase of the oscillations on pump fluence, and we find that the initial phase decreases linearly with pump fluence. Our model calculations show that hot electrons instantaneously excited by femtosecond pulses contribute to the generation of coherent acoustic phonons in metals.

  14. Femtosecond spectroscopy of electron-electron and electron-phonon energy relaxation in Ag and Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Rogier H. M.; Sprik, Rudolf; Lagendijk, Ad

    1995-05-01

    We show experimentally that the electron distribution of a laser-heated metal is a nonthermal distribution on the time scale of the electron-phonon (e-ph) energy relaxation time τE. We measured τE in 45-nm Ag and 30-nm Au thin films as a function of lattice temperature (Ti=10-300 K) and laser-energy density (Ul=0.3-1.3 J cm-3), combining femtosecond optical transient-reflection techniques with the surface-plasmon polariton resonance. The experimental effective e-ph energy relaxation time decreased from 710-530 fs and 830-530 fs for Ag and Au, respectively, when temperature is lowered from 300 to 10 K. At various temperatures we varied Ul between 0.3-1.3 J cm-3 and observed that τE is independent from Ul within the given range. The results were first compared to theoretical predictions of the two-temperature model (TTM). The TTM is the generally accepted model for e-ph energy relaxation and is based on the assumption that electrons and lattice can be described by two different time-dependent temperatures Te and Ti, implying that the two subsystems each have a thermal distribution. The TTM predicts a quasiproportional relation between τE and Ti in the perturbative regime where τE is not affected by Ul. Hence, it is shown that the measured dependencies of τE on lattice temperature and energy density are incompatible with the TTM. It is proven that the TTM assumption of a thermal electron distribution does not hold especially under our experimental conditions of low laser power and lattice temperature. The electron distribution is a nonthermal distribution on the picosecond time scale of e-ph energy relaxation. We developed a new model, the nonthermal electron model (NEM), in which we account for the (finite) electron-electron (e-e) and electron-phonon dynamics simultaneously. It is demonstrated that incomplete electron thermalization yields a slower e-ph energy relaxation in comparison to the thermalized limit. With the NEM we are able to give a consistent

  15. Ultrafast electron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    Ultrafast electron diffraction has emerged since the end of last century, and has become an increasingly important tool for revealing great details of molecular dynamics. In comparison to spectroscopic techniques, ultrafast electron diffraction directly probes time-resolved structure of target molecules, and therefore can potentially provide "molecular movies" of the reactions being studied. These molecular movies are critical for understanding and ultimately controlling the energy conversion pathways and efficiencies of photochemical processes. In this dissertation, I have focused on ultrafast electron diffraction from gas-phase molecules, and have investigated several long-standing challenges that have been preventing researchers from being able to achieve 3-D molecular movies of photochemical reactions. The first challenge is to resolve the full 3-D structure for molecules in the gas phase. The random orientation of molecules in the gas phase smears out the diffraction signal, which results in only 1-D structural information being accessible. The second challenge lies in temporal resolution. In order to resolve coherent nuclear motions on their natural time scale, a temporal resolution of ˜200 femtosecond or better is required. However, due to experimental limitations the shortest temporal resolution that had been achieved was only a few picoseconds in early 2000, by Zewail group from Caltech. The first challenge is tackled by laser-alignment. In the first half of the dissertation, I approach this method both theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrate that by using a short laser pulse to transiently align target molecules in space, 3-D molecular structure can be reconstructed ab-initio from diffraction patterns. The second half of the dissertation presents two experiments, both of which are important steps toward imaging coherent nuclear motions in real time during photochemical reactions. The first experiment simultaneously resolves molecular alignment

  16. Few femtosecond level electron bunch diagnostic at quasi-cw electron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Bertram; Kuntzsch, Michael; Kovalev, Sergei; Hauser, Jens; Findeisen, Stefan; Schneider, Christian; Kaya, Caglar; Michel, Peter; Gensch, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Al-Shemmary, Alaa; Stojanovic, Nikola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    At the SRF based prototype cw accelerator ELBE a new electron beamline, providing for femtosecond electron bunches with nC bunch charges and repetition rates in the 1-200 KHz regime and with pC bunch charge and repetition rates of 13 MHz, is currently being constructed. The 40 MeV electrons will be used in photon-electron interaction experiments with TW and PW class lasers and the generation of broad and narrow bandwidth coherent THz pulses. Discussed here are ideas for novel online diagnostics of the electron bunch properties (e.g. arrival time and bunch form) based on the time and frequency domain analysis of the emitted coherent THz radiation, but also based on direct measurements by e.g. electro-optic sampling. The suitability of ELBE as a testbed for diagnostic of future cw X-ray photon sources (e.g. energy recovery linacs) will be discussed.

  17. Destruction-and-diffraction by X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-09-01

    It is common knowledge that macromolecular crystals are damaged by the X-rays they are exposed to during conventional data collection. One of the claims made about the crystallographic data collection now being collected using X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) is that they are unaffected by radiation damage. XFEL data sets are assembled by merging data obtained from a very large number of crystals, each of which is exposed to a single femtosecond pulse of radiation, the duration of which is so short that diffraction occurs before the damage done to the crystal has time to become manifest, i.e. "diffraction-before-destruction." However, recent theoretical studies have shown that many of the elemental electronic processes that ultimately result in the destruction of such crystals occur during a single pulse. It is predicted that the amplitudes of atomic scattering factor could be reduced by as much as 75% within the first 5 femtoseconds of such pulses, and that different atoms will respond in different ways. Experimental evidence is provided here that these predictions are correct. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  18. Quantum Theory of Electronic Double-Slit Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiang-Yao; GUO Yi-Qing; ZHANG Bai-Jun; LI Hai-Bo; LU Jing-Bin; LIU Xiao-Jing; WANG Li; ZHANG Chun-Li; LIU Bing; FAN Xi-Hui

    2007-01-01

    Phenomena of electron, neutron, atomic and molecular diffraction have been studied in many experiments, and these experiments have been explained by some theoretical works. We study electronic double-slit diffraction with a quantum mechanical approach and obtain the following results: (1) When the ratio of d + a/a = n (n = 1, 2, 3,...),orders n, 2n, 3n,...are missing in diffraction pattern. (2) When the ratio of d+a/a ≠ n (n = 1, 2, 3,...), there is not missing order in diffraction pattern. (3) The slit thickness c has a large affect on the electronic diffraction pattern, which is a new quantum effect. We believe that all the predictions in our work can be tested by the electronic double slit diffraction experiment.

  19. Time-resolved electron beam diagnostics with sub-femtosecond resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guanglei; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Haixiao; Yang, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    In modern high-gain free-electron lasers, ultra-fast photon pulses designed for studying chemical, atomic and biological systems are generated from a serial of behaviors of high-brightness electron beam at the time-scale ranging from several hundred femtoseconds to sub-femtosecond. Currently, radiofrequency transverse deflectors are widely used to provide reliable, single-shot electron beam phase space diagnostics, with a temporal resolution of femtosecond. Here, we show that the time resolution limitations caused by the intrinsic beam size in transverse deflectors, can be compensated with specific transverse-to-longitudinal coupling elements. For the purpose, an undulator with transverse gradient field is introduced before the transverse deflector. With this technique, a resolution of less than 1fs root mean square has been theoretically demonstrated for measuring the longitudinal profile and/or the micro-bunching of the electron bunch.

  20. A brief review: Ultrafast electron diffractive voltammetry: General formalism and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Kiseok; Tao, Zhensheng; Han, Tzong-Ru T; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    We present a general formalism of ultrafast diffractive voltammetry approach as a contact-free tool to investigate the ultrafast surface charge dynamics in nanostructured interfaces. As case studies, the photoinduced surface charging processes in oxidized silicon surface and the hot electron dynamics in nanoparticle-decorated interface are examined based on the diffractive voltammetry framework. We identify that the charge redistribution processes appear on the surface, sub-surface, and vacuum levels when driven by intense femtosecond laser pulses. To elucidate the voltammetry contribution from different sources, we perform controlled experiments using shadow imaging techniques and N-particle simulations to aid the investigation of the photovoltage dynamics in the presence of pho- toemission. We show that voltammetry contribution associated with photoemission has a long decay tail and plays a more visible role in the nanosecond timescale, whereas the ultrafast voltammetry are dominated by local charge transfe...

  1. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  2. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  3. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Wang, Hsiang-Ju; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Lawrence, Robert M; Kupitz, Christopher; Kirian, Richard; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Foucar, Lutz M; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Liang, Mengning; Menzel, Andreas; Wang, Fenglin; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Doak, R Bruce; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Huang, Michael H; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Hogue, Brenda G; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiled into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.

  4. Fabrication of internal diffraction gratings in planar fluoride glass using low-density plasma formation induced by a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung-Hak [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)], E-mail: shcho@kimm.re.kr; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Ryul [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong Wook [Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2008-12-30

    The fabrication of internal diffraction gratings with photo-induced refractive index modification in planar fluoride plates was demonstrated using low-density plasma formation excited by a high-intensity femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ({lambda}{sub p} = 790 nm). The refractive index modifications with diameters ranging from 350 nm to 5 {mu}m were photoinduced after plasma formation occurred upon irradiation with peak intensities of more than 1 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The graded refractive index profile was fabricated to be a symmetric around from the center of the point at which low-density plasma occurred. The maximum refractive index change ({delta}n) was estimated to be 1.3 x 10{sup -2}. The low-density plasma formation (n{sub c} < 1.79 x 10{sup 27} m{sup -3}]) causes the increase of the refractive index modification with fluoride glass.

  5. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  6. Electron gun for diffraction experiments on controlled molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Nele L M; Długołecki, Karol; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    A dc electron gun, generating picosecond pulses with up to $8\\times10^{6}$ electrons per pulse, was developed. Its applicability for future time-resolved-diffraction experiments on state- and conformer-selected laser-aligned or oriented gaseous samples was characterized. The focusing electrodes were arranged in a velocity-map imaging spectrometer configuration. This allowed to directly measure the spatial and velocity distributions of the electron pulses emitted from the cathode. In combination with electron trajectory simulations, this permitted the characterization of the electron beam in terms of coherence length and pulse duration. Electron diffraction data of a thin aluminum foil illustrated the diffraction capabilities of the electron-gun setup.

  7. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-02-10

    Understanding structure-function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure-function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  8. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  9. Pattern matching approach to pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolze, Gert; Winkelmann, Aimo; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to overcome Kikuchi pattern misindexing problems caused by crystallographic pseudosymmetry in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Based on the quantitative comparison of experimentally measured Kikuchi patterns with dynamical electron diffraction simulations, the algorithm identifies the best-fit orientation from a set of pseudosymmetric candidates. Using measurements on framboidal pyrite (FeS2) as an example, we also show the improvement of the orientation precision using this approach.

  10. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Femtosecond-pulse laser desorption is a process in which desorption is driven by a subpicosecond temperature pulse of order 5000 K in the substrate-adsorbate electron system, whose energy is transferred into the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom by a direct coupling mechanism. We presen...

  11. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-05-20

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  12. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Barlow Myers, C. W.; Bryan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM) in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs) combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics. PMID:27158637

  13. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  14. Imaging polyatomic molecules with ultrafast laser-induced electron diffraction (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, Chii-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Molecular structure determination of chemical reactions or processes has been one of the grand challenges in physics, chemistry, and biology. To image these processes, it typically requires sub-Angstrom spatial and femtosecond temporal resolutions. One of the standard imaging techniques, X-ray diffraction, however, currently suffers from temporal jitters and is available only at large facilities. Furthermore, it also suffers from very low elastic scattering cross sections, which make it difficult to apply to gas phase molecules. Another technique, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), overcomes this low cross section problem, but the temporal resolution is still limited to hundreds of femtoseconds, mainly due to Coulomb repulsion in electron beam and velocity mismatch between laser-pump pulse and electron probe pulse in a typical pump-probe scheme. The recently proposed laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) is based on two basic ideas. First, an electron wave packet can be generated from a target itself by an intense laser pulse and driven back within the subsequent half-cycle of the laser to rescatter from the parent ion, thus realizing a self-imaging process. Laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCS) can then be extracted from high-energy electron spectra, as demonstrated by the Quantitative Rescattering theory (QRS). Second, the target structure information can be retrieved from the DCS. This retrieval is further simplified by using back-scattered electrons with collision energy of about 100 eV, for which the independent-atom model (IAM) can be employed to quite accurately simulate the DCS. Demonstration of ultrafast imaging with the LIED has been reported so far on simple diatomic molecules. Here we discuss recent progress in LIED with polyatomic molecules in two examples. The first one is aligned acetylene (C2H2) and the second one is benzene (C6H6). In both cases, two bond lengths, C-C and C-H have been successfully retrieved. For even more

  15. Quenching Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Electron Gas by a Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Michael; Rudin, Sergey; Greg Rupper Collaboration; Andrey Muraviev Collaboration

    Plasmonic detectors of terahertz (THz) radiation using the plasma wave excitation in 2D electron gas are capable of detecting ultra short THz pulses. To study the plasma wave propagation and decay, we used femtosecond laser pulses to quench the plasma waves excited by a short THz pulse. The femtosecond laser pulse generates a large concentration of the electron-hole pairs effectively shorting the 2D electron gas channel and dramatically increasing the channel conductance. Immediately after the application of the femtosecond laser pulse, the equivalent circuit of the device reduces to the source and drain contact resistances connected by a short. The total response charge is equal to the integral of the current induced by the THz pulse from the moment of the THz pulse application to the moment of the femtosecond laser pulse application. This current is determined by the plasma wave rectification. Registering the charge as a function of the time delay between the THz and laser pulses allowed us to follow the plasmonic wave decay. We observed the decaying oscillations in a sample with a partially gated channel. The decay depends on the gate bias and reflects the interplay between the gated and ungated plasmons in the device channel. Army Research Office.

  16. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  17. Effect of electron emission on solids heating by femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirina, V. V.; Sergaeva, O. N.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2011-02-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse interaction with material involves a number of specialities as compared to longer irradiations. We study laser heating of metal by femtosecond pulse with taking into account electron photo- and thermionic emission leading to accumulation of a high positive charge on the target surface and, thus, to the generation of the electric field which causes Coulomb explosion (an electronic mechanism of ablation). Also emission slightly influences the thermal and optical properties of solids.

  18. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  19. Femtosecond laser micromachining with extended depth of focus by using diffractive lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Peiró, S.; González-Ausejo, J.; Mendoza-Yero, O., E-mail: omendoza@fca.uji.es; Mínguez-Vega, G.; Lancis, J.

    2014-06-01

    We show that a simple diffraction focusing element can alleviate mechanical tolerances in ultrafast laser microprocessing. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate that, in comparison with a conventional refractive lens (RL), focusing light pulses of 30 fs onto a stainless steel sample with a diffractive lens (DL) can increase twice the useful axial ablation region. This is thanks to the combination of the broadband spectrum of ultrashort pulses, and the huge longitudinal chromatic aberration associated with DLs. We believe that our results might be useful for reducing the complexity and cost of ultrafast microprocessing systems.

  20. Spot profile analysis and lifetime mapping in ultrafast electron diffraction: Lattice excitation of self-organized Ge nanostructures on Si(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frigge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast high energy electron diffraction in reflection geometry is employed to study the structural dynamics of self-organized Germanium hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters on Si(001 upon femtosecond laser excitation. Utilizing the difference in size and strain state the response of hut- and dome clusters can be distinguished by a transient spot profile analysis. Surface diffraction from {105}-type facets provide exclusive information on hut clusters. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of the dynamics of the entire diffraction pattern gives time constants of 40, 160, and 390 ps, which are assigned to the cooling time constants for hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters.

  1. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  2. Femtosecond single- to few-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bainbridge, A R; Bryan, W A

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter on micrometre to nanometre length scales in a series of ultrafast snapshots, tracking the dynamic evolution of charge distributions. Given that femtosecond pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, the ideal operation mode (without active compression) is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate for the first time femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM) in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electron pulses in the present work have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 120 fs, combined with a spatial resolution below a micrometre. We image the evolution of a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. The rapidity of the strong-field response of the metal nanotip facilitates the char...

  3. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, Aimo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: winkelm@mpi-halle.mpg.de; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Day, Austin P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Dixton Rd., Monmouth, Gwent, NP25 3PP (United Kingdom); Parbrook, Peter [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{l_brace}0001{r_brace} at 20 kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment.

  4. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Cornaggia, Christian; Saugout, Sébastien; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2010-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the Laser Induced Electron Diffraction, LIED, technique [T. Zuo \\textit{et al.}, Chem. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{259}, 313 (1996)]. We present numerical results obtained for the CO$_2$ molecule using a single active electron model. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  5. Energy-filtered electron-diffracted beam holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, R.A. [Center for Advanced Materials and Related Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, P.O. Box. 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8N 4T6 (Canada)]. E-mail: rherring@uvic.ca

    2005-10-15

    A method of energy-filtered electron holography is described where any two electron-diffracted beams can be interfered using an electron biprism. A Gatan image filter is used to select the energy loss of the electrons produced in the holograms. Gallium arsenide is used as the TEM specimen. This method of microscopy confirms that fringes extending beyond a limiting aperture were due to inelastically scattered electrons and specifically electrons scattered from the bulk plasmon. The degree of coherence of the zero-loss and energy-loss electrons were high and measured to be {approx}0.3, which was maintained even for the high energy-loss electrons up to 100 eV. Future systematic studies using this method should help understand the Stobbs factor and contribute to the development of quantitative high-resolution electron microscopy.

  6. Energy-filtered electron-diffracted beam holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, R A

    2005-10-01

    A method of energy-filtered electron holography is described where any two electron-diffracted beams can be interfered using an electron biprism. A Gatan image filter is used to select the energy loss of the electrons produced in the holograms. Gallium arsenide is used as the TEM specimen. This method of microscopy confirms that fringes extending beyond a limiting aperture were due to inelastically scattered electrons and specifically electrons scattered from the bulk plasmon. The degree of coherence of the zero-loss and energy-loss electrons were high and measured to be approximately 0.3, which was maintained even for the high energy-loss electrons up to 100 eV. Future systematic studies using this method should help understand the Stobbs factor and contribute to the development of quantitative high-resolution electron microscopy.

  7. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dong [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiang, Lan, E-mail: jianglan@bit.edu.cn [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Feng; Li, Xin [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Qu, Liangti [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2015-10-23

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons.

  8. Enhancement of ultrafast electron photoemission from metallic nano antennas excited by a femtosecond laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Gubko, M A; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V; Nathala, C S R; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Treshin, I V

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time that an array of nanoantennas (central nanotips inside sub-micron pits) on an aluminum surface, fabricated using a specific double-pulse femtosecond laser irradiation scheme, results in a 28-fold enhancement of the non-linear (three-photon) electron photoemission yield, driven by a third intense IR femtosecond laser pulse. The supporting numerical electrodynamic modeling indicates that the electron emission is increased not owing to a larger effective aluminum surface, but due to instant local electromagnetic field enhancement near the nanoantenna, contributed by both the tip's lightning rod effect and the focusing effect of the pit as a microreflector and annular edge as a plasmonic lens.

  9. Collimation and splitting of valley electron diffraction in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mou; Bai, Yan-Kui; Zhang, Wen-Lian; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    We reported the collimation and splitting effects of the diffraction of valley electrons in graphene. When the incident energy increases from the neutral point, the diffraction tends to be collimated for one valley and split for the other valley. The difference in the diffraction between valleys results in valley-dependent transport. We investigated the left-right conductance of a four-terminal graphene device. The conductance ratio between the two valleys was derived to be 1 -(8 /3 )E , where E is the incident energy in units of the atom-atom hopping. The ratio is independent of the device dimensions and reflects the intrinsic properties of the electronic structure of graphene.

  10. The Electron Trajectory in a Relativistic Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Feng; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Xu Han; Shen Baifei; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we start from Lagrange equation and analyze theoretically the electron dynamics in electromagnetic field. By solving the relativistic government equations of electron,the trajectories of an electron in plane laser pulse, focused laser pulse have been given for different initial conditions. The electron trajectory is determined by its initial momentum, the amplitude,spot size and polarization of the laser pulse. The optimum initial momentum of the electron for LSS (laser synchrotron source) is obtained. Linear polarized laser is more advantaged than circular polarized laser for generating harmonic radiation.

  11. Single-Shot Electron Diffraction using a Cold Atom Electron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Speirs, Rory W; Nugent, Keith A; Sparkes, Benjamin M; Scholten, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Cold atom electron sources are a promising alternative to traditional photocathode sources for use in ultrafast electron diffraction due to greatly reduced electron temperature at creation, and the potential for a corresponding increase in brightness. Here we demonstrate single-shot, nanosecond electron diffraction from monocrystalline gold using cold electron bunches generated in a cold atom electron source. The diffraction patterns have sufficient signal to allow registration of multiple single-shot images, generating an averaged image with significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio than obtained with unregistered averaging. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was also demonstrated, showing that cold atom electron sources may be useful in resolving nanosecond dynamics of nanometre scale near-surface structures.

  12. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  13. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  14. Observation of the Quantum-Classical Transition via Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierle, Peter; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    A collimated electron beam with an energy ranging from .5 keV- 5 keV is passed over a 1 cm long conducting surface. The electrons are diffracted from a 100 nm periodic SiN free-standing grating. The surface is place within the electron near-field diffraction distance. The loss of visibility of the far-field diffraction pattern is measured, which indicates the amount of decoherence that the electrons experienced as they passed over the surface. It has been determined through the visibility as a function of the height with respect to the surface that a) one can observe the transition of the electron's behavior between classical and quantum mechanics, b) that our experiment can be used to rule out a classical theoretical model of the surface decohering mechanism (consistent with Hasselbach's work), and c) this experimental setup is simpler than the use of an interferometer. Comparing a silicon to a gold surface, we are in the process of testing a wider array of theoretical models for the mechanism of decoherence. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under award number 1306565.

  15. Coherence Time Resolvable Diffraction and New Tunnelling Electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易林

    2002-01-01

    With the help of the perturbation method and the Feynman path integral technique, we analytically demonstrate that, when the electronic spectrum of a mesoscopic box is measured through two connecting leads, there exists a class of new diffraction phenomena in the coherence time domain, based on the new coherent tunnelling model.It is shown that the new diffraction effect determines the minimal resolvable coherence time to the Heisenberg limit. In particular, Fraunhofer optical phenomena, such as missing order and grating effects, can be reproduced in the meso-systems. The predicted periodic oscillations as a function of voltage are in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Macromolecular structures probed by combining single-shot free-electron laser diffraction with synchrotron coherent X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kim, Sunam; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Nam, Daewoong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Miyashita, Osamu; Tama, Florence; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Tono, Kensuke; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Hasnain, S Samar; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2014-05-02

    Nanostructures formed from biological macromolecular complexes utilizing the self-assembly properties of smaller building blocks such as DNA and RNA hold promise for many applications, including sensing and drug delivery. New tools are required for their structural characterization. Intense, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers enable single-shot imaging allowing for instantaneous views of nanostructures at ambient temperatures. When combined judiciously with synchrotron X-rays of a complimentary nature, suitable for observing steady-state features, it is possible to perform ab initio structural investigation. Here we demonstrate a successful combination of femtosecond X-ray single-shot diffraction with an X-ray free-electron laser and coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron X-rays to provide an insight into the nanostructure formation of a biological macromolecular complex: RNA interference microsponges. This newly introduced multimodal analysis with coherent X-rays can be applied to unveil nano-scale structural motifs from functional nanomaterials or biological nanocomplexes, without requiring a priori knowledge.

  17. Time evolution of electron structure in femtosecond heated warm dense molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recoules, V.; Dorchies, F.; Bouchet, J.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P. M.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Tshentscher, T.; Harmand, M.; Toleikis, S.; Stormer, M.; Galtier, E.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P. A.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-11-01

    The time evolution of the electron structure is investigated in a molybdenum foil heated up to the warm dense matter regime by a femtosecond laser pulse, through time-resolved XANES spectroscopy. Spectra are measured with independent control of temperature and density. They are successfully compared with ab initio quantum molecular dynamic calculations and an analytical model. We demonstrate that the observed white line in the L3-edge reveals the time evolution of the electron density of state from the solid to the hot (a few eV) and expanding liquid.

  18. Progress in sub-femtosecond control of electron localization in molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in controlled generation of intense, ultrashort laser pulses in the femtosecond and attosecond time-scales have pushed new avenues of research in the coherent control of ultrafast electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. We present a topical review on the phenomenon of control of electron localization in small dissociating molecules. By creating and controlling coherent superposition of the symmetric and antisymmetric electronic states, it becomes possible to confine the evolving electron cloud onto a preferred nucleus, thereby steering the molecule towards a desired dissociation route. We discuss the origin of the idea and various mechanisms to achieve electron localization in small molecules. To highlight recent experimental progress, we explain how one can employ few-cycle IR pulses and different attosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses in various ways to successfully demonstrate the control of electronic dynamics. Future research opportunities and challenges on this topic are envisioned.

  19. Electron emission from a double-layer metal under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuchang; Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin, E-mail: amchen@jlu.edu.cn; Ding, Dajun; Jin, Mingxing, E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate electron emission during femtosecond laser ablation of single-layer metal (copper) and double-layer structures. The double-layer structure is composed of a surface layer (copper) and a substrate layer (gold or chromium). The calculated results indicate that the double-layer structure brings a change to the electron emission from the copper surface. Compared with the ablation of a single-layer, a double-layer structure may be helpful to decrease the relaxation time of the electron temperature, and optimize the electron emission by diminishing the tailing phenomenon under the same absorbed laser fluence. With the increase of the absorbed laser fluence, the effect of optimization becomes significant. This study provides a way to optimize the electron emission which can be beneficial to generate laser induced ultrafast electron pulse sources.

  20. Femtosecond Spectroscopy of Electron-Lattice Coupling in LuMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shitao

    2005-03-01

    Hexagonal manganite LuMnO3 is a ferroelectric (Tc 900 K) and strongly frustrated antiferromagnetic (TN 90 K) crystal. Strong coupling between lattice, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom make it a promissing electronic material. We have used femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to observe the interaction of electron excitation and lattice vibration in real time. Optical excitation at a sharp absorption peak at 800 nm corresponding to a Mn d(x^2-y^2),(xy)->d(3z^2-r^2)transition served as the primary excitation step. Reflectivity changes as a function of delay time reveal electronic relaxation and coherent oscillations of several optical phonon modes. Electron and phonon excitation and relaxation dynamics were studied using different polarization geometries and symmetry analysis. The interaction mechanisms of photons, electrons, and coherent phonons are discussed.

  1. Simultaneous electronic and lattice characterization using coupled femtosecond spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2009-09-01

    High-power electronics are central in the development of radar, solid-state lighting, and laser systems. Large powers, however, necessitate improved heat dissipation as heightened temperatures deleteriously affect both performance and reliability. Heat dissipation, in turn, is determined by the cascade of energy from the electronic to lattice system. Full characterization of the transport then requires analysis of each. In response, this four-month late start effort has developed a transient thermoreflectance (TTR) capability that probes the thermal response of electronic carriers with 100 fs resolution. Simultaneous characterization of the lattice carriers with this electronic assessment was then investigated by equipping the optical arrangement to acquire a Raman signal from radiation discarded during the TTR experiment. Initial results show only tentative acquisition of a Raman response at these timescales. Using simulations of the response, challenges responsible for these difficulties are then examined and indicate that with outlined refinements simultaneous acquisition of TTR/Raman signals remains attainable in the near term.

  2. Simultaneous electronic and lattice characterization using coupled femtosecond spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2009-09-01

    High-power electronics are central in the development of radar, solid-state lighting, and laser systems. Large powers, however, necessitate improved heat dissipation as heightened temperatures deleteriously affect both performance and reliability. Heat dissipation, in turn, is determined by the cascade of energy from the electronic to lattice system. Full characterization of the transport then requires analysis of each. In response, this four-month late start effort has developed a transient thermoreflectance (TTR) capability that probes the thermal response of electronic carriers with 100 fs resolution. Simultaneous characterization of the lattice carriers with this electronic assessment was then investigated by equipping the optical arrangement to acquire a Raman signal from radiation discarded during the TTR experiment. Initial results show only tentative acquisition of a Raman response at these timescales. Using simulations of the response, challenges responsible for these difficulties are then examined and indicate that with outlined refinements simultaneous acquisition of TTR/Raman signals remains attainable in the near term.

  3. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-15

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  4. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  5. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  6. Atomistic modeling of electron relaxation effect on femtosecond laser-induced thermoelastic response of gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Q. L.; Tian, X. G.; Lu, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    The thermoelastic response of thin gold films induced by femtosecond laser irradiation is numerically simulated using a modified combined two-temperature model (TTM) and molecular dynamics (MD) method, with focus placed upon the influence of the electron relaxation effect. The validity of the numerical approach is checked against existing experimental results. While the electron relaxation effect is found negligible when the laser duration is much longer than the electron thermal relaxation time, it becomes significant if the laser duration matches the electron relaxation time, especially when the former is much shorter than the latter. The characteristics of thermo-mechanical interaction in the thin film are analyzed, and the influence of temperature-dependent material properties upon the thermoelastic response of the film quantified.

  7. A complete comparison of simulated electron diffraction patterns using different parameterizations of the electron scattering factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, I., E-mail: Ivan.Lobato@uantwerpen.be; Van Dyck, D.

    2015-08-15

    The steadily improving experimental possibilities in instrumental resolution as in sensitivity and quantization of the data recording put increasingly higher demands on the precision of the scattering factors, which are the key ingredients for electron diffraction or high-resolution imaging simulation. In the present study, we will systematically investigate the accuracy of fitting of the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor for the calculation of electron diffraction intensities. It is shown that the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor are consistent to calculate electron diffraction intensities for thin specimens and low angle scattering. Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior (Lobato and Dyck [5], Kirkland [4], and Weickenmeier and Kohl [2]) produce similar results for both the undisplaced lattice model and the frozen phonon model, except for certain thicknesses and reflections. - Highlights: • Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior produce similar electron diffraction intensities. • Peng et al. parameterization is not adequate for calculations that involves higher-order Laue zones reflections. • Electron diffraction calculations of Cu-crystal with and without inclusion of phonons.

  8. Femtosecond x-ray free electron laser pulse duration measurement from spectral correlation function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lutman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for measuring the duration of femtosecond x-ray pulses from self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron lasers by performing statistical analysis in the spectral domain. Analytical expressions of the spectral correlation function were derived in the linear regime to extract both the pulse duration and the spectrometer resolution. Numerical simulations confirmed that the method can be also used in the nonlinear regime. The method was demonstrated experimentally at the Linac Coherent Light Source by measuring pulse durations down to 13 fs FWHM.

  9. A complete comparison of simulated electron diffraction patterns using different parameterizations of the electron scattering factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I; Van Dyck, D

    2015-08-01

    The steadily improving experimental possibilities in instrumental resolution as in sensitivity and quantization of the data recording put increasingly higher demands on the precision of the scattering factors, which are the key ingredients for electron diffraction or high-resolution imaging simulation. In the present study, we will systematically investigate the accuracy of fitting of the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor for the calculation of electron diffraction intensities. It is shown that the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor are consistent to calculate electron diffraction intensities for thin specimens and low angle scattering. Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior (Lobato and Dyck [5], Kirkland [4], and Weickenmeier and Kohl [2]) produce similar results for both the undisplaced lattice model and the frozen phonon model, except for certain thicknesses and reflections.

  10. Cheetah: software for high-throughput reduction and analysis of serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Anton; Kirian, Richard A; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max; Yoon, Chun Hong; White, Thomas A; Chapman, Henry

    2014-06-01

    The emerging technique of serial X-ray diffraction, in which diffraction data are collected from samples flowing across a pulsed X-ray source at repetition rates of 100 Hz or higher, has necessitated the development of new software in order to handle the large data volumes produced. Sorting of data according to different criteria and rapid filtering of events to retain only diffraction patterns of interest results in significant reductions in data volume, thereby simplifying subsequent data analysis and management tasks. Meanwhile the generation of reduced data in the form of virtual powder patterns, radial stacks, histograms and other meta data creates data set summaries for analysis and overall experiment evaluation. Rapid data reduction early in the analysis pipeline is proving to be an essential first step in serial imaging experiments, prompting the authors to make the tool described in this article available to the general community. Originally developed for experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers, the software is based on a modular facility-independent library to promote portability between different experiments and is available under version 3 or later of the GNU General Public License.

  11. Electronic transport properties of silicon junctionless nanowire transistors fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Hong, Ma; Wei-Hua, Han; Hao, Wang; Qi-feng, Lyu; Wang, Zhang; Xiang, Yang; Fu-Hua, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Silicon junctionless nanowire transistor (JNT) is fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing on a heavily n-doped SOI substrate. The performances of the transistor, i.e., current drive, threshold voltage, subthreshold swing (SS), and electron mobility are evaluated. The device shows good gate control ability and low-temperature instability in a temperature range from 10 K to 300 K. The drain currents increasing by steps with the gate voltage are clearly observed from 10 K to 50 K, which is attributed to the electron transport through one-dimensional (1D) subbands formed in the nanowire. Besides, the device exhibits a better low-field electron mobility of 290 cm2·V-1·s-1, implying that the silicon nanowires fabricated by femtosecond laser have good electrical properties. This approach provides a potential application for nanoscale device patterning. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376096, 61327813, and 61404126) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB934104).

  12. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  13. Novel drift compensation for a femtosecond laser system at a quasi-cw electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Bertram; Kuntzsch, Michael; Kovalev, Sergei; Gensch, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A method for electron beam/THz to femtosecond (fs)-laser synchronization drift correction at the quasi-cw linear electron accelerator ELBE is presented, which is utilizing THz radiation generated by a CDR/CTR screen and an undulator respectively. Measurements of these pulses will allow for compensation of slow drifts in the arrival time on millisecond timescales between the THz and the fs-laser pulses. The method requires two electro-optic detection setups which allow for the sampling of a single THz pulse, at two different working points. Given a consistent pulse shape these two data points can provide information on the sign of the arrival time drift relative to the laser. This information can be used both for providing feedback on fs laser arrival time in a potential THz time domain experiment as well as the electron bunch arrival time in the accelerator.

  14. Selective triggering of phase change in dielectrics by femtosecond pulse trains based on electron dynamics control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chuan-Cai; Jiang Lan; Leng Ni; Liu Peng-Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this study we experimentally reveal that the phase change mechanism can be selectively triggered by shaping femtosecond pulse trains based on electron dynamics control (EDC),including manipulation of excitations,ionizations,densities,and temperatures of electrons.By designing the pulse energy distribution to adjust the absorptions,excitations,ionizations,and recombinations of electrons,the dominant phase change mechanism experiences transition from nonthermal to thermal process.This phenomenon is observed in quadruple,triple,and double pulses per train ablation of fused silica separately.This opens up possibilities for controlling phase change mechanisms by EDC,which is of great significance in laser processing of dielectrics and fabrication of integrated nano-and micro-optical devices.

  15. Femtosecond probing of light-speed plasma wakefields by using a relativistic electron bunch

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Wan, Y; Guo, B; Wu, Y P; Pai, C -H; Li, F; Chu, H -H; Gu, Y Q; Xu, X L; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Wang, J; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic wakes produced by intense laser or particle beams propagating through plasmas are being considered as accelerators for next generation of colliders and coherent light sources. Such wakes have been shown to accelerate electrons and positrons to several gigaelectronvolts (GeV), with a few percent energy spread and a high wake-to-beam energy transfer efficiency. However, complete mapping of electric field structure of the wakes has proven elusive. Here we show that a high-energy electron bunch can be used to probe the fields of such light-speed wakes with femtosecond resolution. The highly transient, microscopic wakefield is reconstructed from the density modulated ultra-short probe bunch after it has traversed the wake. This technique enables visualization of linear wakefields in low-density plasmas that can accelerate electrons and positrons beams. It also allows characterization of wakes in plasma density ramps critical for maintaining the beam emittance, improving the energy transfer efficiency ...

  16. Femtosecond spectroscopic studies of photoinduced electron transfer in MDMO-PPV:ZnO hybrid bulk heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchetto, E.; De Cola, L. [Institute of Physics, University of Muenster, Mendelstrasse 7, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Slooff, H. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zhang, H. [Van ' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, 1018 WS Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    The photophysics of charge carriers (polaron) in MDMO-PPV:ZnO hybrid bulk heterojunction is studied at 80 K by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A short-lived positive polaron is observed in the blend phase in MDMO-PPV:ZnO blend films with a weight ratio of 1:1 and 1:2. Further increase of ZnO weight ratio results in a significant quenching of the polaron absorption. The results are discussed in the concept that both pristine polymer and MDMO-PPV:ZnO blend phases coexist in the blend films. It is concluded that a polaron is photogenerated within the excitation laser pulse (<100 fs) and electron transfer efficiency is highest in blend films 1:1 and 1:2. Lack of the interfacial area and faster back electron transfer process are discussed to be responsible for the quenching of the electron transfer efficiency in blend film 1:3.

  17. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction Studies of Interface Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukite, Paul

    1988-12-01

    The epitaxial growth of semiconductors, such as GaAs, by the technique of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has led to many improvements in device performance and capabilities. One important system is the epitaxial growth of GaAs on Si. This holds great promise for integrating optical and electronic devices on the same chip. The key to achieving this is to grow high quality GaAs layers on Si substrates. In this investigation, single-crystal GaAs was grown on Si and Ge substrates by MBE. The growth of the epitaxial layers was investigated in situ with reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Important in this heteroepitaxial system is that two possible GaAs crystal orientations can be obtained. By using a theory of kinematic electron diffraction developed in the course of this work, the mechanisms and growth conditions which choose between the two GaAs orientations have been determined for the first time. A further result is that the epitaxial growth processes are anisotropic on the two orientations. This leads to different crystalline qualities dependent on the orientation. To understand this in more detail, the crystal growth process was formulated mathematically. By incorporating the concepts of anisotropic diffusion and adsorption into a nonlinear differential equation, the time-dependent growth and RHEED behavior has been calculated and compared to experiment. The experimental observations of RHEED intensity oscillations and two-dimensional clustering are in excellent agreement with the diffraction and growth theories. It is concluded that surface steps play a vital role in the crystal growth and interface formation processes reported in this study.

  18. Prepulse controlled electron acceleration from solids by a femtosecond laser pulse in the slightly relativistic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, K. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Krestovskikh, D. A.; Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Volkov, R. V.; Savel'ev, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present results from the experimental and numerical study of electron heating and acceleration under the action of a 50 fs high contrast laser pulse [intensities ˜(1-4) × 1018 W/cm2] with a controlled preplasma that was created by a 6 ns laser "prepulse" with intensity ˜1012 W/cm2. A substantial increase both in the gamma yield and "temperature" was obtained by the proper adjustment of the time delay between the two pulses (0-5 ns), while the gamma yield dropped to almost zero values if the nanosecond pulse came 10-20 ns in advance of the femtosecond one. Comprehensive optical diagnostics (shadowgraphy, interferometry, and angular resolved self-emission measurements) data allowed us to estimate the electron density profile. The latter profile was used for making numerical Particle-in-cell simulations which describe the gamma yield enhancement well. We also illustrate how the observed drop in the gamma yield within a certain range of delays was due to ionization defocusing of the femtosecond beam in an expanding long-scale (L/λ > 1) preplasma.

  19. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Chung, H.-K.; Gutt, C.; Huang, L. G.; Zacharias, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength, and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (resonant coherent X-ray diffraction). In this case, the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribution, charge state distribution, and plasma temperature with such high spatial and temporal resolution will make a vast number of processes in shortpulse laser-solid interaction accessible for direct experimental observation, e.g., hole-boring and shock propagation, filamentation and instability dynamics, electron transport, heating, and ultrafast ionization dynamics.

  20. Femtosecond laser fabrication of sub-diffraction nanoripples on wet Al surface in multi-filamentation regime: High optical harmonics effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionin, A.A.; Kudryashov, S.I., E-mail: sikudr@lebedev.ru; Makarov, S.V.; Rudenko, A.A.; Saltuganov, P.N.; Seleznev, L.V.; Sinitsyn, D.V.; Sunchugasheva, E.S.

    2014-02-15

    Relief ripples with sub-diffraction periods (≈λ{sub las}/3, λ{sub las}/4) were produced on a aluminum surface immersed in water and irradiated in a multi-filamentation regime by focused 744 nm femtosecond laser pulses with highly supercritical, multi-GW peak powers. For the VUV (8.5 eV) surface plasmon resonance on the wet aluminum surface, such small-scale surface nanogratings can be produced by high – second and third – optical harmonics, coming to the surface from the optical filaments in the water layer. Then, the sub-diffraction surface ripples may appear through interference of their transverse electric fields with the longitudinal electric fields of their counterparts, scattered on the surface roughness and appeared as the corresponding high-energy, high-wavenumber surface polaritons.

  1. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y., E-mail: ding@slac.stanford.edu; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Helml, W. [Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  2. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  3. Dynamical electron backscatter diffraction patterns. Part I: pattern simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; De Graef, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for the simulation of dynamic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns is introduced. The computational approach merges deterministic dynamic electron-scattering computations based on Bloch waves with a stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the energy, depth, and directional distributions of the backscattered electrons (BSEs). An efficient numerical scheme is introduced, based on a modified Lambert projection, for the computation of the scintillator electron count as a function of the position and orientation of the EBSD detector; the approach allows for the rapid computation of an individual EBSD pattern by bi-linear interpolation of a master EBSD pattern. The master pattern stores the BSE yield as a function of the electron exit direction and exit energy and is used along with weight factors extracted from the MC simulation to obtain energy-weighted simulated EBSD patterns. Example simulations for nickel yield realistic patterns and energy-dependent trends in pattern blurring versus filter window energies are in agreement with experimental energy-filtered EBSD observations reported in the literature.

  4. Acceleration of Electrons in a Diffraction Dominated IFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Musumeci, Pietro; Pellegrini, Claudio; Ralph, J; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Travish, Gil

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of energy gain in excess of 20 MeV at the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected ina 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered both in period and field amplitude. A CO2 10 μ m laser with power >300 GW is used as the IFEL driver. The Rayleigh range of the laser (1.8cm) is shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. Few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in stable accelerating buckets and electrons with energies up to 35 MeV are detected on the magnetic spectrometers. Experimental results on the scaling of the accelerator characteristics versus input parameters like injection energy, laser focus position and laser power are discussed. Three dimensional simulations are in good agreement with the electron energy spectrums observed in the experiment and indicate that substantial energy exchange between laser and electron beam only occurs in the firs...

  5. Reflection of femtosecond pulses from soft X-ray free-electron laser by periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany); Hendel, S.; Bienert, F.; Sacher, M.D.; Heinzmann, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Recent experiments on a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) source (FLASH in Hamburg) have shown that multilayers (MLs) can be used as optical elements for highly intense X-ray irradiation. An effort to find most appropriate MLs has to consider the femtosecond time structure and the particular photon energy of the FEL. In this paper we have analysed the time response of 'low absorbing' MLs (e.g. such as La/B{sub 4}C) as a function of the number of periods. Interaction of a pulse train of Gaussian shaped sub-pulses using a realistic ML grown by electron-beam evaporation technique has been analysed in the soft-X-ray range. The structural parameters of the MLs were obtained by reflectivity measurements at BESSY II and subsequent profile fittings. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. MeV femtosecond electron pulses from direct-field acceleration in low density atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Varin, Charles; Hogan-Lamarre, Pascal; Fennel, Thomas; Piché, Michel; Brabec, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we show that few-MeV electrons can be produced by focusing tightly few-cycle radially-polarized laser pulses in a low-density atomic gas. In particular, it is observed that for the few-TW laser power needed to reach relativistic electron energies, longitudinal attosecond microbunching occurs naturally, resulting in femtosecond structures with high-contrast attosecond density modulations. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that in the relativistic regime the leading pulse of these attosecond substructures survives to propagation over extended distances, suggesting that it could be delivered to a distant target, with the help of a properly designed transport beamline.

  7. Bunch compression efficiency of the femtosecond electron source at Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongbai, C. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Kusoljariyakul, K., E-mail: zartparz@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Saisut, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiangmai 50200 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2011-07-21

    A femtosecond electron source has been developed at the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility (PBP), Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand. Ultra-short electron bunches can be produced with a bunch compression system consisting of a thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha-magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. To obtain effective bunch compression, it is crucial to provide a proper longitudinal phase-space distribution at the gun exit matched to the subsequent beam transport system. Via beam dynamics calculations and experiments, we investigate the bunch compression efficiency for various RF-gun fields. The particle distribution at the RF-gun exit will be tracked numerically through the alpha-magnet and beam transport. Details of the study and results leading to an optimum condition for our system will be presented.

  8. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Takanori [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Suzuki, Mamoru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Masuda, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Inoue, Shigeyuki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakatsu, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shimamura, Tatsuro [Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nureki, Osamu [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Iwata, So [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sugahara, Michihiro, E-mail: msuga@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-11-27

    Sulfur SAD phasing facilitates the structure determination of diverse native proteins using femtosecond X-rays from free-electron lasers via serial femtosecond crystallography. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures.

  9. Laser-driven plasma wakefield electron acceleration and coherent femtosecond pulse generation in X-ray and gamma ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, V. I.; Lotov, K. V.; Gubin, K. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Bagayev, S. N.; Logachev, P. V.

    2017-01-01

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in capillaries and gas jets followed by inverse Compton scattering of high intensity femtosecond laser pulses is discussed. The drive and scattered pulses will be produced by the two-channel multi-terawatt laser system developed in ILP SB RAS.

  10. Low-Dose, Low-Temperature Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction and Multiwavelength Analysis of Hydrocarbon Films by Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinsong; Spence, John C. H.

    2003-10-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbon (perylene, coronene) and tetracontane films are shown to produce useful convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns under low-dose and low-temperature conditions. These were obtained using a Zeiss LEO-921 electron microscope with an omega energy filter at liquid helium and nitrogen temperatures. The usefulness of patterns showing CBED disks of constant intensity (“blank disks,” indicating kinematic scattering) for structure analysis is investigated, with the aim of avoiding film-bending artifacts. Using CBED patterns from thicker areas, sample thickness was experimentally determined using either two-beam or three-beam patterns. Koehler mode illumination (a new form of SAD pattern offering smaller areas) was also used, and the possibility of obtaining structure factor moduli using the kinematic and two-beam approximations was investigated by comparing measured diffraction intensities with experimental ones for these known structures. The commonly used approximation |F| [similar] Ig (intended to account for bending) was found to be a worse approximation than the two-beam approximation with well-defined excitation error for these microdiffraction experiments. A new multiwavelength method of retrieving structure factor moduli and thickness from microdiffraction patterns using two-beam theory is demonstrated for tetracontane.

  11. Transmission Electron Diffraction Studies of Xenon Adsorbed on Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, A. Q. D.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Adsorption studies of xenon on graphite were performed using the Hitachi HU-11B Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). It has been used as a Transmission High Energy Electron Diffraction (THEED) camera. This has been modified to include an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) environmental chamber. This chamber was isolated from the microscope vacuum by two 400 μm diameter differentially pumped apertures. Pressures of {~}10 ^{-6} torr and {~ }10^{-9} torr were achieved inside the microscope column and the environmental chamber respectively. The chamber was fitted with a new sample holder designed with double "O" rings. The sample was cooled with liquid helium. Previous THEED experiments by Venables et al and Schabes-Retchkiman and Venables revealed the presence of a 2D-solid incommensurate (I)-commensurate (C) phase transition as the temperature is lowered. These results were confirmed and extended in the present work. Hong et al have recently interpreted their X-ray diffraction experiments as showing an incommensurate-striped domain phase transition at {~}65rm K. No evidence was found for the existence of a striped domain structure on any part of the xenon phase diagram studied. Experiments of xenon adsorbed on the basal plane (0001) of graphite were carried out at pressures from {~}1.5 times 10^{-5} torr to {~}1.8 times 10^{-8} torr over a temperature range from 55K^.90K. A set of lattice parameter (misfit) measurements were made as a function of temperature at constant pressure with an accuracy of +/-0.1% rather than +/-0.3% previously obtained. The misfit data was fitted to a power law formula, i.e. misfit m = B_{rm o} (rm T - rm T_{rm o})^{rm A} , where A is a constant and equal to 0.8. It was found that B_{rm o} and T_{rm o} are functions of log(P). The data fell into two groups corresponding to two phase transitions. The same power law was used for both sets of data. Two transitions were found, one is I-C and

  12. Automated twin identification technique for use with electron backscatter diffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrie, B. L. (Benjamin Lyman); Mason, T. A. (Thomas A.); Bingert, J. F. (John F.)

    2004-01-01

    Historically, twinning information has been obtained by optical microscopy, TEM, and neutron diffraction. Recent research has shown that automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) can be used to extract reliable twinning statistics. An automated twin identification technique for use with EBSD has facilitated a greater understanding of deformation twinning in materials. The key features of this automated framework are the use of the crystallographic definition of twin relationships, the inclination of the common K, plane at a twin boundary, and the correct identification of the parent orientation in a parent/twin pair. The complex nature of the parent/twin interactions required the use of a voting scheme to correctly identify parent orientations. In those few cases were the voting scheme was unable to determine parent orientation (< 2 pct) the algorithm allows for manual selection. Twin area fractions are categorized by operative twin systems along with secondary and tertiary twinning. These statistics are reported for {alpha}-zirconium and 316L stainless steel. These improved twin statistics can help quantify deformation processes as well as provide validation of plasticity models for materials that exhibit deformation twinning.

  13. Relaxation of femtosecond photoexcited electrons in a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navinder Singh

    2005-01-01

    A model calculation is given for the energy relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution of hot electrons (holes) prepared in the conduction (valence) band of a polar indirect band-gap semiconductor, which has been subjected to homogeneous photoexcitation by a femtosecond laser pulse. The model assumes that the pulsed photoexcitation creates two distinct but spatially interpenetrating electron and hole non-equilibrium subsystems that initially relax non-radiatively through the electron (hole)–phonon processes towards the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum), and finally radiatively through the phonon-assisted electron–hole recombination across the band-gap, which is a relatively slow process. This leads to an accumulation of electrons (holes) at the conduction (valence) band minimum (maximum). The resulting peaking of the carrier density and the entire evolution of the hot electron (hole) distribution has been calculated. The latter may be time resolved by a pump-probe study. The model is particularly applicable to a divided (nanometric) polar indirect band-gap semiconductor with a low carrier concentration and strong electron–phonon coupling, where the usual two-temperature model [1–4] may not be appropriate.

  14. Mixture-Fraction Measurements with Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.; Danehy, Paul M.; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-01-01

    Tracer-free mixture-fraction measurements were demonstrated in a jet using femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging. Measurements were conducted across a turbulent jet at several downstream locations both in a pure-nitrogen jet exiting into an air-nitrogen mixture and in a jet containing an air-nitrogen mixture exiting into pure nitrogen. The signal was calibrated with known concentrations of oxygen in nitrogen. The spatial resolution of the measurement was approx.180 microns. The measurement uncertainty ranged from 5% to 15%, depending on the mixture fraction and location within the beam, under constant temperature and pressure conditions. The measurements agree with a mixture fraction of unity within the potential core of the jet and transition to the self-similar region.

  15. Femtosecond excitations in metallic nanostructures. From ultrafast light confinement to a local electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropers, C.

    2007-07-11

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of optical excitations in metallic nanostructures. In experiments on selected model structures, the dynamics of these excitations and their electromagnetic spatial modes are investigated with femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. Angle- and time-resolved transmission experiments on metallic thin film gratings demonstrate the dominant role resonant surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) play in the optical properties of such structures. The lifetimes of these excitations are determined, and it is shown that coherent couplings among SPP-resonances result in drastic lifetime modifications. Near the visible part of the spectrum, subradiant SPP lifetimes of up to 200 femtoseconds are observed, which is considerably longer than previously expected for these structures. The spatial SPP mode profiles are imaged using a custom-built near-field optical microscope. The experiments reveal a direct correlation between the spatial mode structure and the dynamics of different SPP resonances. Coupling-induced SPP band gaps are identified as splittings into symmetric and antisymmetric surface modes. These findings allow for an interpretation of the near-field optical image contrast in terms of the contributions of different vectorial components of the electromagnetic near-field. A selective imaging of different electric and magnetic field components is demonstrated for various types of near-field probes. Furthermore, the excitation of SPPs in periodic structures is employed in a novel type of near-field tip. The resonant excitation of SPPs in a nanofabricated grating on the shaft of a sharp metallic tip results in their concentration at the tip apex. The final part of the thesis highlights the importance of optical field enhancements for the local generation of nonlinear optical signals at the apex of sharp metallic tips. Specifically, the observation of intense multiphoton electron emission after femtosecond

  16. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  17. Charge rearrangement in magnetite: from magnetic field induced easy axis switching to femtoseconds electronic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kąkol, Z.; Kozłowski, A.; Kołodziej, T.; Przewoźnik, J.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetite is the oldest magnet and the first material where the concept of a strong correlations driven metal-insulator transition was suggested and found at TV = 124 K in the so-called Verwey phase transformation. Recently, the structure below TV was solved revealing subtle electronic structure in the form of trimeron lattice that, according to yet another recent communication, may be switched within femtosecond range. In this review article, we argue that the same change of trimeron lattice can be achieved by a magnetic field, in the phenomenon called the easy axis switching. The results of many of our experiments show that although this process is best viewed by magnetization studies, it is also reflected in magnetostriction, causes some changes in electronic transport and can be observed microscopically by NMR that proved electronic order alteration. All those facts suggest that the axis switching process observed and studied by us is intimately linked with the fast change of electronic trimeron order mentioned above.

  18. Fast character projection electron beam lithography for diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Banasch, Michael; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-05-01

    Electron beam lithography becomes attractive also for the fabrication of large scale diffractive optical elements by the use of the character projection (CP) technique. Even in the comparable fast variable shaped beam (VSB) exposure approach for conventional electron beam writers optical nanostructures may require very long writing times exceeding 24 hours per wafer because of the high density of features, as required by e.g. sub-wavelength nanostructures. Using character projection, the writing time can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude, due to the simultaneous exposure of multiple features. The benefit of character projection increases with increasing complexity of the features and decreasing period. In this contribution we demonstrate the CP technique for a grating of hexagonal symmetry at 350nm period. The pattern is designed to provide antireflective (AR) properties, which can be adapted in their spectral and angular domain for applications from VIS to NIR by changing the feature size and the etching depth of the nanostructure. This AR nanostructure can be used on the backside of optical elements e.g. gratings, when an AR coating stack could not be applied for the reason of climatic conditions or wave front accuracy.

  19. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  20. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  1. Test of theoretical models for ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer with femtosecond two-photon photoemission data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lars Gundlach; Tobias Letzig; Frank Willig

    2009-09-01

    The energy distribution of electrons injected into acceptor states on the surface of TiO2 was measured with femtosecond two-photon photoemission. Shape and relative energetic position of these distribution curves with respect to the corresponding donor states, i.e. of perylene chromophores in the first excited singlet state attached via different bridge-anchor groups to the TiO2 surface, were compared with the predictions of different theoretical models for light-induced ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer (HET). Gerischer’s early scenario for light-induced HET was considered and two recent explicit calculations, i.e. a fully quantum mechanical analytical model and a time-dependent density functional theory model based on molecular dynamics simulations for the vibrational modes were also considered. Based on the known vibrational structure in the photoionization spectrum of perylene in the gas phase and that measured in the linear absorption spectra of the perylene chromophores anchored on the TiO2 surface the energy distribution curves for the injected electrons were fitted assuming the excitation of the dominant 0.17 eV vibrational mode in the ionized perylene chromophore leading to a corresponding Franck-Condon dictated progression in the energy distribution curves. Each individual peak was fitted with a Voigt profile where the Lorentzian contribution was taken from the time-resolved HET data and the Gaussian contribution attributed to inhomogeneous broadening. The measured room temperature energy distribution curves for the injected electrons are explained with the fully quantum mechanical model for light-induced HET with the high energy, 0.17 eV, skeletal stretching mode excited in the ionized perylene chromophore. The corresponding energy distribution of the injected electrons is fully accommodated in acceptor states on the TiO2 surface fulfilling the wide band limit.

  2. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashchieva, E.P. [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented.

  3. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  4. Strain Analysis in Submicron Electron Devices by Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armigliato, A.; Balboni, R.; Frabboni, S.; Benedetti, A.; Cullis, A. G.

    The basic features of the convergent beam electron diffraction technique (CBED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the quantitative strain analysis of silicon nanoregions are described. Details on the procedure employed to obtain the components of the strain tensor from an experimental CBED pattern are given. The CBED methodology has been recently applied to the analysis of strain in the field of microelectronics; as an example, the investigation of 0.22 7m wide electr ically active silicon regions, underlying silicon nitride stripes in shallow trench isolation structures for non volatile memories, is reported. It is found that the strain field can be related to the different technological steps.

  5. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the "medium" energy regime (1-10

  6. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  7. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Serrao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM. Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5. In addition, five manual CCC (n=5 were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA. Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq, were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P<0.05 than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  8. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György;

    2015-01-01

    spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...... states is a key mechanistic feature. The present study demonstrates the extensive potential of femtosecond X-ray techniques as diagnostics of non-adiabatic electron transfer processes in synthetic and biological systems, and some directions for future studies, are outlined....

  9. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György;

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer preceding energy equilibration still poses many experimental and conceptual challenges to the optimization of photoconversion since an atomic-scale description has so far been beyond reach. Here we combine femtosecond transient optical absorption...... spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...

  10. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray-diffraction tests performed on aluminum conductors in commercial HI1-507A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit analog multiplexers, both before and after circuits exposed to ionizing radiation from Co(60) source, and after postirradiation annealing at ambient and elevated temperatures. Tests in addition to electrical tests performed to determine effects of irradiation and of postirradiation annealing on electrical operating characteristics of circuits. Investigators sought to determine whether relationship between effects of irradiation on devices and physical stresses within devices. X-ray diffraction potentially useful for nondestructive measurement of stresses.

  11. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badali, D S; Gengler, R Y N; Miller, R J D

    2016-05-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the "medium" energy regime (1-10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples.

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Badali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV. An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples.

  13. Coherent phonon excitation and linear thermal expansion in structural dynamics and ultrafast electron diffraction of laser-heated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jau

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we examine the ultrafast structural dynamics of metals induced by a femtosecond laser-heating pulse as probed by time-resolved electron diffraction. Using the two-temperature model and the Grüneisen relationship we calculate the electron temperature, phonon temperature, and impulsive force at each atomic site in the slab. Together with the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam anharmonic chain model we calculate changes of bond distance and the peak shift of Bragg spots or Laue rings. A laser-heated thin slab is shown to exhibit "breathing" standing-wave behavior, with a period equal to the round-trip time for sound wave and a wavelength twice the slab thickness. The peak delay time first increases linearly with the thickness (<70nm for aluminum and <200nm for gold), but becomes less dependent if further thickness increases. Coherent phonon excitation and propagation from the stressed bulk atoms due to impulsive forces as well as the linear thermal expansion due to lattice temperature jump are shown to contribute to the overall structural changes. Differences between these two mechanisms and their dependence on film thickness and other factors are discussed.

  14. Nonintercepting electron beam size monitor using optical diffraction radiation interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cianchi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of diffraction radiation (DR, emitted when a charged particle beam passes through a rectangular slit, has been proposed and successfully tested as a nonintercepting diagnostic of high brightness beams. However, some problems related to the control of the particle trajectory through the slit still remain. If an additional slit is placed in front of the first one, at a distance shorter than the radiation formation length, interference between the forward diffraction radiation from the upstream slit and the backward diffraction radiation from the downstream slit can be observed. In this paper we report the first experimental observation of this effect, which we call here optical diffraction radiation interference (ODRI. If the two slits have different dimensions and are not aligned on the same axis, the properties of the ODRI pattern can be effectively used for nonintercepting beam diagnostics, especially for the unambiguously determination of the beam size. Indeed, the advantage of ODRI compared with a single aperture DR screen is due to the reduction of synchrotron radiation background, the increase of sensitivity for transverse beam dimensions, and the possibility to separate effects caused by the beam size and by beam offset within the slit.

  15. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  16. Numerical Study of Injection Mechanisms for Generation of Mono-Energetic Femtosecond Electron Bunch from the Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Takeru; Zhidkov, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration gradients of up to the order of 100GV/m and mono-energetic electron bunch up to 200MeV have recently been observed in several plasma cathode experiments. However, mechanisms of self-injection in plasma are not sufficiently clarified, presently. In this study, we carried out 2D PIC simulation to reveal the mechanisms of mono-energetic femtosecond electron bunch generation. We found two remarkable conditions for the generation: electron density gradient at vacuum-plasma interface and channel formation in plasma. Steep electron density gradient (~ plasma wave length) causes rapid injection and produces an electron bunch with rather high charge and less than 100fs duration. The channel formation guides an injected laser pulse and decreases the threshold of laser self-focusing, which leads to high electric field necessary for wave-breaking injection.

  17. Coherent forward and backward diffraction radiation of relativistic electrons in a dielectric targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G. A.; Shevelev, M. V.; Popov, Yu A.

    2016-08-01

    During the interaction of the relativistic electrons field with a dielectric target various types of electromagnetic radiation, such as Cerenkov radiation, diffraction radiation, transition radiation can be generated. In this report we present the results of experimental studies of the diffraction radiation generated by relativistic electrons in a dielectric target at the interface vacuum-insulator and insulator-conductor in the millimeter wavelength range. The experimental results show that the component of the diffraction radiation of relativistic electrons at the interface insulator-conductor, for any significant refractive index of insulator, is suppressed. The analysis of the results from different points of view was done.

  18. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.fr; Martin, Yannick [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble UMR-E, SP2M, LEMMA, Minatec Grenoble F-38054 (France); Béché, Armand [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble UMR-E, SP2M, LEMMA, Minatec Grenoble F-38054 (France); FEI Electron Optics, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David [CEA, LETI, Minatec, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  19. Single-shot method for measuring femtosecond bunch length in linac-based free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Huang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the generation and characterization of femtosecond and subfemtosecond pulses from linac-based free-electron lasers (FELs. In this report, following the method of Ricci and Smith [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 032801 (2000PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.3.032801], we investigate the measurement of the longitudinal bunch profile of an ultrashort electron bunch produced by these FELs. We show that this method can be applied in a straightforward manner at x-ray FEL facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source by slightly adjusting the second bunch compressor followed by running the bunch on an rf zero-crossing phase of the final linac. We find that the linac wakefield strongly perturbs the measurement, and through analysis show that it can be compensated in a simple way. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and wakefield compensation through numerical simulations, including effects of coherent synchrotron radiation and longitudinal space charge. When used in conjunction with a high-resolution electron spectrometer, this method potentially reveals the temporal profile of the electron beam down to the femtosecond and subfemotsecond scale.

  20. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  1. Nano-modulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A; Moncton, David E

    2015-01-01

    A new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulations at nanometer scale and below is presented. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in perfect crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a device based on inverse Compton scattering with total length of a few meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.

  2. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  3. Laser induced electron diffraction: a tool for molecular orbital imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michel; Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman

    2012-01-01

    We explore the laser-induced ionization dynamics of N2 and CO2 molecules subjected to a few-cycle, linearly polarized, 800\\,nm laser pulse using effective two-dimensional single active electron time-dependent quantum simulations. We show that the electron recollision process taking place after an initial tunnel ionization stage results in quantum interference patterns in the energy resolved photo-electron signals. If the molecule is initially aligned perpendicular to the field polarization, the position and relative heights of the associated fringes can be related to the molecular geometrical and orbital structure, using a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital from which the ionized electron is produced. We show that it is possible to extract inter-atomic distances in the molecule from an averaged photon-electron signal with an accuracy of a few percents.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic structure adjustments based on electron dynamics control: from subwavelength ripples to double-grating structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Wang, Sumei; Yuan, Yanping; Lu, Yongfeng

    2013-10-01

    This study proposes a method for adjusting subwavelength ripple periods and the corresponding double-grating structures formed on fused silica by designing femtosecond laser pulse trains based on localized transient electron density control. Four near-constant period ranges of 190-490 nm of ripples perpendicular to the polarization are obtained by designing pulse trains to excite and modulate the surface plasmon waves. In the period range of 350-490 nm, the double-grating structure is fabricated in one step, which is probably attributable to the grating-assisted enhanced energy deposition and subsequent thermal effects.

  5. Molecular vibrations kof iron trifluoride and aluminum trifluoride from gas-phase electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargittai, Magdolna; Subbotina, Natalya Yu.; Gershikov, Alexander G.

    1991-04-01

    A vibrational analysis of the electron diffraction intensity data of iron trifluoride provides firm evidence for the planarity of this molecule. The optimized deformation frequencies of iron trifluoride, ν 2 110(17) and ν 4 158(17) cm -1, appear to be much lower than the available estimates. The optimized symmetric streching frequency for aluminium trifluoride is 683(54) cm -1 from the joint analysis of electron diffraction intensities and vibrational frequencies. Force constants are also obtained for both molecules.

  6. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2017-02-20

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local analysis. In this study, lattice constants of cubic STN and cubic YSZ in the pure materials and in co-sintered composites were measured from their EBSPs acquired at 10 kV using a silicon single crystal as a calibration reference. The EBSP distortion was corrected by spherical back projection and Kikuchi band analysis was made using in-house software. The error of the lattice constant measurement was determined to be in the range of 0.09-1.12% compared to values determined by XRD and from literature. The confidence level of the method is indicated by the standard deviation of the measurement, which is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting the measurement precision. Possible methods to improve measurement precision are suggested.

  7. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  8. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope.

  9. Coherent-radiation spectroscopy of few-femtosecond electron bunches using a middle-infrared prism spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T J; Behrens, C; Ding, Y; Fisher, A S; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Loos, H

    2013-11-01

    Modern, high-brightness electron beams such as those from plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron laser linacs continue the drive to ever-shorter bunch durations. In low-charge operation (~20 pC), bunches shorter than 10 fs are reported at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Though suffering from a loss of phase information, spectral diagnostics remain appealing as compact, low-cost bunch duration monitors suitable for deployment in beam dynamics studies and operations instrumentation. Progress in middle-infrared (MIR) imaging has led to the development of a single-shot, MIR prism spectrometer to characterize the corresponding LCLS coherent beam radiation power spectrum for few-femtosecond scale bunch length monitoring. In this Letter, we report on the spectrometer installation as well as the temporal reconstruction of 3 to 60 fs-long LCLS electron bunch profiles using single-shot coherent transition radiation spectra.

  10. Coherent-Radiation Spectroscopy of Few-Femtosecond Electron Bunches Using a Middle-Infrared Prism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T. J.; Behrens, C.; Ding, Y.; Fisher, A. S.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.

    2013-11-01

    Modern, high-brightness electron beams such as those from plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron laser linacs continue the drive to ever-shorter bunch durations. In low-charge operation (˜20pC), bunches shorter than 10 fs are reported at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Though suffering from a loss of phase information, spectral diagnostics remain appealing as compact, low-cost bunch duration monitors suitable for deployment in beam dynamics studies and operations instrumentation. Progress in middle-infrared (MIR) imaging has led to the development of a single-shot, MIR prism spectrometer to characterize the corresponding LCLS coherent beam radiation power spectrum for few-femtosecond scale bunch length monitoring. In this Letter, we report on the spectrometer installation as well as the temporal reconstruction of 3 to 60 fs-long LCLS electron bunch profiles using single-shot coherent transition radiation spectra.

  11. Anisotropic symmetry breaking in two-dimensional charge density waves of ErTe3 investigated by femtosecond electron crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Faran; Golubev, Timofey; Hwang, Bin; Ruan, Chong-Yu; Duxbury, Phil; Malliakas, Christos; Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2015-03-01

    Electron-phonon interactions can give rise to various charge-ordered states, especially at low dimensions, where Fermi surface is more prone to form nesting. Rare earth tritellurides compound ErTe3 develops charge density waves (CDW) along two perpendicular directions at different temperatures. By directly probing the order parameters of the two CDWs using femtosecond electron crystallography under different temperatures and driving photonic energy, we investigated the emergences of competing CDW orders in a dynamical phase diagram. The anisotropic symmetry breaking and the role of electron-phonon coupling, and photo-doping effect are discussed in reference to other CDW systems. Our work is supported by Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46309.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of micron electron beam size of high energy using diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G A

    2003-01-01

    Treatments of the usage of diffraction radiation from the relativistic electrons moving though a conductive slit for the transverse beam size measurement encounter hard limitation of the method sensitivity for the electron energy larger than 1 GeV. We consider in this article a possibility of application of the artificial phase shift, which can take place when transverse electron position varies. This allows us to realize the measurements of transverse size of supper-relativistic electron beams with the small emittance.

  13. Molecular Choreography of Isomerization and Electron Transfer Using One and Two Dimensional Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David Paul

    Chemical reactions are defined by the change in the relative positions and bonding of nuclei in molecules. I have used femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to probe these transformations with structural specificity and high time precision revealing the mechanisms of two important classes of reactions; isomerization about an N=N bond and interfacial/intermolecular electron transfer. Isomerization about a double bond is one of the simplest, yet most important, photochemical reactions. In contrast to carbon double bonds, nitrogen double bonds can react via two possible mechanisms; rotation or inversion. To determine which pathway is predominant, I studied an azobenzene derivative using both FSRS and impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (ISRS). The FSRS experiments demonstrated that the photochemical reaction occurs concomitantly with the 700 fs non-radiative decay of the excited state; because no major change in N=N stretching frequency was measured, I surmised that the reaction proceeds through an inversion pathway. My subsequent ISRS experiments confirmed this hypothesis; I observed a highly displaced, low frequency, inversion-like mode, indicating that initial movement out of the Franck-Condon region proceeds along an inversion coordinate. To probe which nuclear motions facilitate electron transfer and charge recombination, I used FSRS and the newly developed 2D-FSRS techniques to study two model systems, triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles and a molecular charge transfer (CT) dimer. In the dye-nanoparticle system I discovered that charge separation persists much longer (> 100 ps) than previously thought by using the juxtaposition of the FSRS and transient absorption data to separate the dynamics of the dye from that of the injected electron. Additionally, I discovered that dye constructs with an added vinyl group were susceptible to quenching via isomerization. The CT dimer offered an opportunity to study a system in which charge

  14. Strain mapping in TEM using precession electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Mitra Lenore; Leff, Asher Calvin

    2017-02-14

    A sample material is scanned with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) over multiple steps having a predetermined size at a predetermined angle. Each scan at a predetermined step and angle is compared to a template, wherein the template is generated from parameters of the material and the scanning. The data is then analyzed using local mis-orientation mapping and/or Nye's tensor analysis to provide information about local strain states.

  15. Feynman Path Integral Approach to Electron Diffraction for One and Two Slits: Analytical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an analytic solution of the famous problem of diffraction and interference of electrons through one and two slits (for simplicity, only the one-dimensional case is considered). In addition to exact formulae, various approximations of the electron distribution are shown which facilitate the interpretation of the results.…

  16. X-ray and Electron Diffraction Study of MgO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsirelson, V.G.; Asilov, A.S.; Abramov, Yu. A.; Belokoneva, E.L.; Kitaneh, R.; Feil, D.

    1998-01-01

    Precise X-ray and high-energy transmission electron diffraction methods were used for the study of electron density and electrostatic potential in MgO crystals. The structure amplitudes were determined and their accuracy estimated using ab initio Hartree-Fock structure amplitudes as criteria. The el

  17. Experimental Characterization of Sub-picosecond Electron Bunch Length with Coherent Diffraction Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Dao; YANG Xing-Fan; HUANG Wen-Hui; TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIN Yu-Zheng; LI Wei-Hua; PAN Qing; LI Ming

    2008-01-01

    Diffraction radiation is one of the most promising candidates for electron beam diagnostics for the International Linear Collider, x-ray free electron lasers and energy recovery linac due to its non-intercepting characteristics. We report the non-intercepting measurement of sub-ps electron bunch length with coherent diffraction radiation. The bunch length is measured with a Martin-Puplett interferometer and the detailed longitudinal bunch shape is reconstructed with the Kramers-Kronig relation. The rms bunch length is found to be about 0.73ps, which confirms a successful commissioning of the bunch compressor and the interferometer.

  18. Diffractive imaging of transient electronic core-shell structures in a nanoplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Krikunova, Maria; Müller, Jan-Phillipe; Müller, Maria; Oelze, Tim; Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Sauppe, Mario; Schorb, Sebastian; Wolter, David; Harmand, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have recorded the coherent diffraction images of individual xenon clusters using intense extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses tuned to atomic and ionic resonances in order to elucidate the influence of light induced electronic changes on the diffraction pattern. The data show the emergence of a transient core-shell structure within the otherwise homogeneous sample. Simulations indicate that ionization and nanoplasma formation result in a cluster shell with strongly altered refraction. The presented resonant scattering approach enables the imaging of ultrafast electron dynamics with unprecedented spatial resolution on their natural time scale.

  19. Digital in-line holography with femtosecond VUV radiation provided by the free-electron laser FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhahn, Axel; Staier, Florian; Nisius, Thomas; Schäfer, David; Barth, Ruth; Christophis, Christof; Stadler, Lorenz-M; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Gutt, Christian; Mancuso, Adrian; Schropp, Andreas; Gulden, Johannes; Reime, Bernd; Feldhaus, Josef; Weckert, Edgar; Pfau, Bastian; Günther, Christian M; Könnecke, René; Eisebitt, Stefan; Martins, Michael; Faatz, Bart; Guerassimova, Natalia; Honkavaara, Katja; Treusch, Rolf; Saldin, Evgueni; Schreiber, Siegfried; Schneidmiller, Evgeny A; Yurkov, Mikhail V; Vartanyants, Ivan; Grübel, Gerhard; Grunze, Michael; Wilhein, Thomas

    2009-05-11

    Femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation provided by the free-electron laser FLASH was used for digital in-line holographic microscopy and applied to image particles, diatoms and critical point dried fibroblast cells. To realize the classical in-line Gabor geometry, a 1 microm pinhole was used as spatial filter to generate a divergent light cone with excellent pointing stability. At a fundamental wavelength of 8 nm test objects such as particles and diatoms were imaged at a spatial resolution of 620 nm. In order to demonstrate the applicability to biologically relevant systems, critical point dried rat embryonic fibroblast cells were for the first time imaged with free-electron laser radiation.

  20. Direct detection of delayed high energy electrons from the 181Ta target irradiated by a moderate intensity femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel’ev, A.; Chefonov, O.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Agranat, M.; Spohr, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    We depict an experimental study of delayed fast, negatively charged particles from femtosecond laser-plasma interaction at an intensity of I ∼ 1017 W cm‑2. Plates of 2 mm thickness made of 181Ta (∼100% abundance) and natural W were used as targets. We distinguished certain delayed events due to detection of negative H‑, C‑ and O‑ ions. However, most events which were delayed by 0.5–5 μs with respect to the instantaneous plasma formation caused by the laser pulses, were identified as electrons with energies of 3–7 keV. A comparative analysis between the tantalum and tungsten spectra was undertaken. This revealed a close similarity between the measured spectrum for tantalum and the predicted spectrum for electrons arising from to the internal conversion decay of the 6.237 keV nuclear isomeric state in 181Ta.

  1. SUePDF: a program to obtain quantitative pair distribution functions from electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dung Trung; Svensson, Gunnar; Tai, Cheuk-Wai

    2017-01-01

    SUePDF is a graphical user interface program written in MATLAB to achieve quantitative pair distribution functions (PDFs) from electron diffraction data. The program facilitates structural studies of amorphous materials and small nanoparticles using electron diffraction data from transmission electron microscopes. It is based on the physics of electron scattering as well as the total scattering methodology. A method of background modeling is introduced to treat the intensity tail of the direct beam, inelastic scattering and incoherent multiple scattering. Kinematical electron scattering intensity is scaled using the electron scattering factors. The PDFs obtained after Fourier transforms are normalized with respect to number density, nanoparticle form factor and the non-negativity of probability density. SUePDF is distributed as free software for academic users. PMID:28190994

  2. Development of a Laser Driven Photocathode Injector and Femtosecond Scale Laser Electron Synchronization for Next Generation Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P; Ditmire, T R; Rosenzweig, J

    2000-01-01

    A high brightness photoinjector has been developed at LLNL. This injector combined with the 100 TW FALCON laser and the LLNL 100 MeV S-Band RF linac will enable development of a high brightness, femtosecond-scale, tunable, hard x-ray probe for time-resolved material measurements, based on Thomson scattering. Short pulse x-rays enable time-resolved characterization of shock dynamics, and examination of materials under extremes of pressure and temperature. Examples include Equation of State characterization on high-density materials, Crystal disorganization and re-growth in shocked and heated materials, and measurement of short time scale phase transition phenomena. Single shot evaluation, requiring high peak flux, is important for complex experiments such as probing of laser shocked actinides. A low emittance electron beam synchronized with femtosecond accuracy to an intense laser will revolutionize x-ray dynamics studies of materials. This project will lead development of ultrafast x-ray dynamics research on ...

  3. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. Electrons diffraction scattering on a traveling wave - "Inelastic Kapitza-Dirac effect"

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, H K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper conceptual points regarding electrons elastic (Kapitza-Dirac effect) and inelastic diffraction effect on the different type slowed electromagnetic wave structures/light gratings are considered. From the unified point of view it is analyzed the main works on this subject for last four decades in chronological order, pointing out the essential peculiarity inherent in induced Cherenkov, Compton, and undulator/wiggler processes too. This review article has also a goal to resolve confusion in scientific literature connected with the recently appeared paper [6] relating the electrons diffraction on a traveling wave in a dielectric medium.

  5. Determination of the chiral indices (n,m) of carbon nanotubes by electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    2007-01-07

    The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by the chiral indices, (n,m), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) offers a unique and powerful probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This article covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (i) to express the electron diffraction intensity distribution in the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (ii) to obtain the chiral indices (n,m) of carbon nanotubes from their electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of given chiral indices (n,m), the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube can be expressed analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory, from which its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e., assignment of the chiral indices (n,m) of a carbon nanotube from its electron diffraction pattern, is approached from the relationship between the electron diffraction intensity distribution and the chiral indices (n,m). The first method is to obtain indiscriminately the chiral indices (n,m) by reading directly the intensity distribution on the three principal layer lines, l(1), l(2), and l(3), which have intensities proportional to the square of the Bessel functions of orders m, n, and n + m: I(l1) proportional, variant |J(m) (pidR)|(2), I(l2) proportional, variant |J(n) (pidR)|(2), and I(l3) proportional, variant |J(n+m) (pidR)|(2). The second method is to obtain and use the ratio of the indices n/m = (2D(1)-D(2))/(2D(2)-D(1)) in which D(1) and D(2) are the spacings of principal layer lines l(1) and l(2), respectively. Examples of using these methods are also illustrated in the determination of chiral indices of isolated individual single-walled carbon nanotubes, a bundle

  6. Ultrafast electron diffraction technique and its applications%超快电子衍射技术及其应用∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴敏洁; 齐大龙; 齐迎朋; 贾天卿; 张诗按; 孙真荣

    2015-01-01

    The real-time observation of atomic motion in space and time is of great importance for natural science research. Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) technique, which is equipped with both the high temporal resolution of femtosecond laser pulses and the high spatial resolution of electron diffraction, can provide an effective approach to study the structural change of matter in atomic scale. In this review, we make an introduction of the development history, experimental methods, related applications and future prospects of UED technique.%时间和空间上实时观测原子运动对于自然科学研究有着非常重大的意义,而超快电子衍射(UED)技术同时具备飞秒激光脉冲的高时间分辨特性和电子衍射技术的高空间特性,可以为实时观测原子级分辨尺度物质的结构变化提供一种有效工具。本文综述了超快电子衍射技术的发展历史、实验方法以及相关应用,并且展望了超快电子衍射技术未来的发展。

  7. Theoretical study of precision and accuracy of strain analysis by nano-beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahr, Christoph, E-mail: mahr@ifp.uni-bremen.de; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Grieb, Tim; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Krause, Florian F.; Zillmann, Dennis; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2015-11-15

    Measurement of lattice strain is important to characterize semiconductor nanostructures. As strain has large influence on the electronic band structure, methods for the measurement of strain with high precision, accuracy and spatial resolution in a large field of view are mandatory. In this paper we present a theoretical study of precision and accuracy of measurement of strain by convergent nano-beam electron diffraction. It is found that the accuracy of the evaluation suffers from halos in the diffraction pattern caused by a variation of strain within the area covered by the focussed electron beam. This effect, which is expected to be strong at sharp interfaces between materials with different lattice plane distances, will be discussed for convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns using a conventional probe and for patterns formed by a precessing electron beam. Furthermore, we discuss approaches to optimize the accuracy of strain measured at interfaces. The study is based on the evaluation of diffraction patterns simulated for different realistic structures that have been investigated experimentally in former publications. These simulations account for thermal diffuse scattering using the frozen-lattice approach and the modulation-transfer function of the image-recording system. The influence of Poisson noise is also investigated. - Highlights: • Theoretical study of precision and accuracy of strain analysis by nano-beam electron diffraction. • Evaluation of simulations for exact knowledge of the actual strain. • Improvement of precision using electron beam precession. • Explanation of artefacts in the measurement close to interfaces. • Theoretical solution for the improvement of the accuracy at interfaces.

  8. Polarization-independent etching of fused silica based on electrons dynamics control by shaped femtosecond pulse trains for microchannel fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X; Jiang, L; Li, X; Zhang, K; Xia, B; Liu, P; Qu, L; Lu, Y

    2014-09-01

    We propose an approach to realize polarization-independent etching of fused silica by using temporally shaped femtosecond pulse trains to control the localized transient electrons dynamics. Instead of nanograting formation using traditional unshaped pulses, for the pulse delay of pulse trains larger than 1 ps, coherent field-vector-related coupling is not possible and field orientation is lost. The exponential growth of the periodic structures is interrupted. In this case, disordered and interconnected nanostructures are formed, which is probably the main reason of etching independence on the laser polarization. As an application example, square-wave-shaped and arc-shaped microchannels are fabricated by using pulse trains to demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method in fabricating high-aspect-ratio and three-dimensional microchannels.

  9. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai; Lasse H., Lillevang; Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian; Balling, Peter; Senftleben, Arne; Baumert, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  10. Femtosecond double-pulse fabrication of hierarchical nanostructures based on electron dynamics control for high surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xin; Jiang, Lan; Shi, Xuesong; Li, Cong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2013-09-15

    This Letter presents a simple, efficient approach for high surface-enhanced Raman scattering by one-step controllable fabrication of hierarchical structures (nanoparticles+subwavelength ripples) on silicon substrates in silver nitrate solutions using femtosecond double pulses based on nanoscale electron dynamics control. As the delays of the double pulses increase from 0 fs to 1 ps, the hierarchical structures can be controlled with (1) nanoparticles--the number of nanoparticles in the range of 40-100 nm reaches the maximum at 800 fs and (2) ripples--the subwavelength ripples become intermittent with decreased ablation depths. The redistributed nanoparticles and the modified ripple structures contribute to the maximum enhancement factor of 2.2×10(8) (measured by 10(-6)  M rhodamine 6G solution) at the pulse delay of 800 fs.

  11. Femtosecond Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Solvated Transition-Metal Complexes: Deciphering the Interplay of Electronic and Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Kim, Tae Kyu; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2011-04-21

    We present the first implementation of femtosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy as an ultrafast direct probe of the excited-state valence orbitals in solution-phase molecules. This method is applied to photoinduced spin crossover of [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+, where the ultrafast spinstate conversion of the metal ion, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation, is directly measured using the intrinsic spin-state selectivity of the soft X-ray L-edge transitions. Our results provide important experimental data concerning the mechanism of ultrafast spin-state conversion and subsequent electronic and structural dynamics, highlighting the potential of this technique to study ultrafast phenomena in the solution phase.

  12. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  13. Application of δ recycling to electron automated diffraction tomography data from inorganic crystalline nanovolumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Jordi; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Vallcorba, Oriol; Kolb, Ute

    2013-07-01

    δ Recycling is a simple procedure for directly extracting phase information from Patterson-type functions [Rius (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 399-400]. This new phasing method has a clear theoretical basis and was developed with ideal single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. On the other hand, introduction of the automated diffraction tomography (ADT) technique has represented a significant advance in electron diffraction data collection [Kolb et al. (2007). Ultramicroscopy, 107, 507-513]. When combined with precession electron diffraction, it delivers quasi-kinematical intensity data even for complex inorganic compounds, so that single-crystal diffraction data of nanometric volumes are now available for structure determination by direct methods. To check the tolerance of δ recycling to missing data-collection corrections and to deviations from kinematical behaviour of ADT intensities, δ recycling has been applied to differently shaped nanocrystals of various inorganic materials. The results confirm that it can phase ADT data very efficiently. In some cases even more complete structure models than those derived from conventional direct methods and least-squares refinement have been found. During this study it has been demonstrated that the Wilson-plot scaling procedure is largely insensitive to sample thickness variations and missing absorption corrections affecting electron ADT intensities.

  14. New electron source concept for single-shot sub-100 fs electron diffraction in the 100 keV range

    CERN Document Server

    van Oudheusden, T; Siwick, B J; Van der Geer, S B; Root, W P E M O; Luiten, O J

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for producing sub-100 fs electron bunches that are suitable for single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction experiments in the 100 keV energy range. A combination of analytical results and state-of-the-art numerical simulations show that it is possible to create 100 keV, 0.1 pC, 20 fs electron bunches with a spotsize smaller than 500 micron and a transverse coherence length of 3 nm, using established technologies in a table-top set-up. The system operates in the space-charge dominated regime to produce energy-correlated bunches that are recompressed by established radio-frequency techniques. With this approach we overcome the Coulomb expansion of the bunch, providing an entirely new ultrafast electron diffraction source concept.

  15. Use of Reciprocal Lattice Layer Spacing in Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eades, J.A.; Michael, J.R.

    1999-05-10

    In the scanning electron microscope (SEM), using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), it is possible to measure the spacing of the layers in the reciprocal lattice. These values are of great use in confirming the identification of phases. The technique derives the layer spacing from the HOLZ rings which appear in patterns from many materials. The method adapts results from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many materials the measured layer spacing compares well with the calculated layer spacing. A noted exception is for higher atomic number materials. In these cases an extrapolation procedure is described that requires layer spacing measurements at a range of accelerating voltages. This procedure is shown to improves the accuracy of the technique significantly. The application of layer spacing measurements in EBSD is shown to be of use for the analysis of two polytypes of SiC.

  16. Micromachining using femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toenshoff, Hans K.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Korte, Frank; Bauer, Thorsten

    2000-11-01

    Femtosecond laser systems have been proved to be effective tools for high precision micro-machining. Almost all solid materials can be processed with high precision. The dependence on material properties like thermal conductivity, transparency, heat- or shock sensitivity is strongly reduced and no significant influence on the remaining bulk material is observed after ablation using femtosecond laser pulses. In contrast to conventional laser processing, where the achievable precision is reduced due to a formed liquid phase causing burr formation, the achievable precision using femtosecond pulses is only limited by the diffraction of the used optics. Potential applications of this technique, aincluding the structuring of biodegradable polymers for cardiovascular implants, so-called stents, as well as high precision machining of transparent materials are presented.

  17. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Coffee, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helml, W. [Technische Univ. Munchen, Garching (Germany); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krejcik, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  18. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  19. Coherent diffraction and holographic imaging of individual biomolecules using low-energy electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2013-01-01

    Modern microscopy techniques are aimed at imaging an individual molecule at atomic resolution. Here we show that low-energy electrons with kinetic energies of 50-250 eV offer a possibility of overcome the problem of radiation damage, and obtaining images of individual biomolecules. Two experimental schemes for obtaining images of individual molecules, holography and coherent diffraction imaging, are discussed and compared. Images of individual molecules obtained by both techniques, using low-energy electrons, are shown.

  20. Growth studies of heteroepitaxial oxide thin films using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, G.; Huijben, M.; Janssen, A.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.; Koster, G.; Huijben, M.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) in combination with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is described. Both the use of RHEED as a real-time rate-monitoring technique and methods to study nucleation and growth during PLD are discussed. After a brief introduction of RHEED

  1. A pipeline for comprehensive and automated processing of electron diffraction data in IPLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Andreas D; Philippsen, Ansgar; Engel, Andreas; Walz, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals allows the structural study of membrane proteins in their native environment, the lipid bilayer. Determining the structure of a membrane protein at near-atomic resolution by electron crystallography remains, however, a very labor-intense and time-consuming task. To simplify and accelerate the data processing aspect of electron crystallography, we implemented a pipeline for the processing of electron diffraction data using the Image Processing Library and Toolbox (IPLT), which provides a modular, flexible, integrated, and extendable cross-platform, open-source framework for image processing. The diffraction data processing pipeline is organized as several independent modules implemented in Python. The modules can be accessed either from a graphical user interface or through a command line interface, thus meeting the needs of both novice and expert users. The low-level image processing algorithms are implemented in C++ to achieve optimal processing performance, and their interface is exported to Python using a wrapper. For enhanced performance, the Python processing modules are complemented with a central data managing facility that provides a caching infrastructure. The validity of our data processing algorithms was verified by processing a set of aquaporin-0 diffraction patterns with the IPLT pipeline and comparing the resulting merged data set with that obtained by processing the same diffraction patterns with the classical set of MRC programs.

  2. Solution of a multiple-scattering inverse problem: electron diffraction from surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D K; Seubert, A; Heinz, K

    2002-03-18

    We present a solution to the multiple-scattering inverse problem for low-energy electron diffraction that enables the determination of the three-dimensional atomic structure of an entire surface unit cell directly from measured data. The solution requires a knowledge of the structure of the underlying bulk crystal and is implemented by a maximum entropy algorithm.

  3. Optical diffraction studies of crystalline structures in electron micrographs. I. Theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J E

    1969-12-01

    Determination of the unit cell of crystalline particles by optical diffraction analysis of electron micrographs may establish the identity and help in approximating the molecular weight of the substances contained in the crystal. This technique may be particularly helpful when isolation and purification of the crystalline material cannot be accomplished.

  4. Structure analysis of large argon clusters from gas-phase electron diffraction data: some recent results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van de B.W.

    1999-01-01

    An up-to-date overview of recent developments in the structure elucidation of large ArN-clusters (103electron diffraction data, is given. Although a satisfactory model for N3000 had been found in 1996, the size range beyond N10,000 presents new and unexpected problems. T

  5. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet...

  6. RADIAL DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF cis-1,4-POLYBUTADIENE BY ELECTRON DIFFRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Enle; KAN Xianglan; ZHAO Xiaoguang

    1983-01-01

    The interatomic distance function of rareearth catalyzed cis-1,4-polybutadiene was studied by radial distribution function (RDF) derived from electron diffraction. Two intramolecular peaks and three intermolecular peaks have been found on the RDF. The appearance of such a number of intermolecular maxima on the RDF can be explained by the local parallel packing of long molecular chains of the amorphous polymers.

  7. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  8. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.

    2013-04-11

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to investigate the photoexcited dynamics of a series of triphenylamine-coumarin dye/TiO2 conjugates. The TA decay is multiexponential, spanning time scales from 100 fs to 100 ps, while the characteristic transient Raman spectrum of the radical cation decays biexponentially with a dominant ∼3 ps component. To explain these observations, we propose a model in which the decay of the TA is due to hot electrons migrating from surface trap states to the conduction band of TiO 2 while the decay of the Raman signature is due to internal conversion of the dye molecule. Furthermore, the S1 Raman spectrum of TPAC3, a dye wherein a vinyl group separates the triphenylamine and coumarin moieties, is similar to the S1 Raman spectrum of trans-stilbene; we conclude that their S1 potential energy surfaces and reactivity are also similar. This correlation suggests that dyes containing vinyl linkers undergo photoisomerization that competes with electron injection. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. ARTICLES: A Surface Femtosecond Two-Photon Photoemission Spectrometer for Excited Electron Dynamics and Time-Dependent Photochemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ze-feng; Zhou, Chuan-yao; Ma, Zhi-bo; Xiao, Chun-lei; Mao, Xin-chun; Dai, Dong-xu; LaRue, Jerry; Cooper, Russell; Wodtke, Alec M.; Yang, Xue-ming

    2010-06-01

    A surface femtosecond two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectrometer devoted to the study of ultrafast excited electron dynamics and photochemical kinetics on metal and metal oxide surfaces has been constructed. Low energy photoelectrons are measured using a hemispherical electron energy analyzer with an imaging detector that allows us to detect the energy and the angular distributions of the photoelectrons simultaneously. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was built for the time-resolved 2PPE (TR-2PPE) measurement to study ultrafast surface excited electron dynamics, which was demonstrated on the Cu(111) surface. A scheme for measuring time-dependent 2PPE (TD-2PPE) spectra has also been developed for studies of surface photochemistry. This technique has been applied to a preliminary study on the photochemical kinetics on ethanol/TiO2(110). We have also shown that the ultrafast dynamics of photoinduced surface excited resonances can be investigated in a reliable way by combining the TR-2PPE and TD-2PPE techniques.

  10. Odd electron diffraction patterns in silicon nanowires and silicon thin films explained by microtwins and nanotwins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayron, Cyril; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Celine; Secouard, Christopher; Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [CEA DRT, LITEN, Minatec, 38 - Grenoble (France); Den Hertog, Martien; Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, DSM, INAC, Minatec, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2009-04-15

    Odd electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) have been obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on silicon nanowires grown via the vapour-liquid- solid method and on silicon thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation. Many explanations have been given in the past, without consensus among the scientific community: size artifacts, twinning artifacts or, more widely accepted, the existence of new hexagonal Si phases. In order to resolve this issue, the microstructures of Si nanowires and Si thin films have been characterized by TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and highresolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Despite the differences in the geometries and elaboration processes, the EDPs of the materials show great similarities. The different hypotheses reported in the literature have been investigated. It was found that the positions of the diffraction spots in the EDPs could be reproduced by simulating a hexagonal structure with c/a=12(2/3){sup 1/2}, but the intensities in many EDPs remained unexplained. Finally, it was established that all the experimental data, i.e. EDPs and HRTEM images, agree with a classical cubic silicon structure containing two microstructural defects: (i) overlapping {sigma}3 microtwins which induce extra spots by double diffraction, and (ii) nanotwins which induce extra spots as a result of streaking effects. It is concluded that there is no hexagonal phase in the Si nanowires and the Si thin films presented in this work. (orig.)

  11. Odd electron diffraction patterns in silicon nanowires and silicon thin films explained by microtwins and nanotwins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayron, Cyril; Den Hertog, Martien; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Céline; Secouard, Christopher; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Odd electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) have been obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on silicon nanowires grown via the vapour–liquid–solid method and on silicon thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation. Many explanations have been given in the past, without consensus among the scientific community: size artifacts, twinning artifacts or, more widely accepted, the existence of new hexagonal Si phases. In order to resolve this issue, the microstructures of Si nanowires and Si thin films have been characterized by TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Despite the differences in the geometries and elaboration processes, the EDPs of the materials show great similarities. The different hypotheses reported in the literature have been investigated. It was found that the positions of the diffraction spots in the EDPs could be reproduced by simulating a hexagonal structure with c/a = 12(2/3)1/2, but the intensities in many EDPs remained unexplained. Finally, it was established that all the experimental data, i.e. EDPs and HRTEM images, agree with a classical cubic silicon structure containing two microstructural defects: (i) overlapping Σ3 microtwins which induce extra spots by double diffraction, and (ii) nanotwins which induce extra spots as a result of streaking effects. It is concluded that there is no hexagonal phase in the Si nanowires and the Si thin films presented in this work. PMID:22477767

  12. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  13. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3, in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields.

  14. Super-oscillating Electron Wave Functions with Sub-diffraction Spots

    CERN Document Server

    Remez, Roei; Lu, Peng-Han; Tavabi, Amir H; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Arie, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Almost one and a half centuries ago, Ernst Abbe [1] and shortly after Lord Rayleigh [2] derived the minimum, diffraction-limited spot radius of an optical lens to be 1.22{\\lambda}/(2sin{\\alpha}), where {\\lambda} is the wavelength and {\\alpha} is the semi-angle of the beam's convergence cone. Here, we show how to overcome this limit and realize the first super-oscillating massive-particle wave function, which has an arbitrarily small central spot that is much smaller than the Abbe-Rayleigh limit and theoretically even smaller than the de Broglie wavelength. We experimentally demonstrate an electron central spot of radius 106 pm, which is more than two times smaller than the diffraction limit of the experimental setup used. Such an electronic wave function can serve as a probe in scanning transmission electron microscopy, providing improved imaging of objects at the sub-{\\AA}ngstrom scale.

  15. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xianhai; Huang, Wenhui; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. Small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  16. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  17. Damped oscillations in reflection high energy electron diffraction during GaAs MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hove, J.M.; Lent, C.S.; Pukite, P.R.; Cohen, P.I.

    1983-07-01

    Oscillations in the time evolution of electron diffraction during MBE growth of GaAs are shown to be related to periodic variations in the step distributions on GaAs surfaces during epitaxial growth. Unintentionally doped GaAs surfaces were first prepared by MBE. Then the Ga flux is interrupted until an instrument limited diffraction pattern was obtained. During this process the angular width of the specular beam was measured versus time. When the Ga flux there are intensity oscillations that are weak near the Bragg angle. At the Bragg angle, where the diffraction is insensitive to surface steps, the length of the specular RHEED streak does not change. At angles between the Bragg angles, where steps lengthen the streaks, there are periodic variations in the streak length. We interpret the results in terms of a model in which a partially completed surface has a step distribution with smaller average terrace lengths than a completed surface.

  18. Investigation on Deformation Behavior of Nickel Aluminum Bronze by Neutron Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hong; Lv, Yuting; Lu, Weijie; Sun, Guangai

    2016-05-01

    The deformation behavior, deformation microstructures, and generated inter-phase stresses of nickel aluminum bronze were investigated by in situ neutron diffraction instrument and transmission electron microscopy in this paper. Lattice strains calculated by both peak shifting and broadening by Gaussian fitting of α and κ phase neutron diffraction peak profiles at both holding stress conditions and unloaded stress conditions were compared. Twining and stacking faults in α matrix were observed after deformed by different tensile stresses. Compressive internal/residual stress in α matrix and tensile internal stress in κ phase in elasto-plastic region were calculated based on neutron diffraction analysis. The piled-up dislocations around hard κ phases increase with increasing the deformation degree, which raise the stress concentration near α/ κ interface and increase the internal stresses.

  19. Effect of the Femtosecond Laser on an Intracorneal Inlay for Surgical Compensation of Presbyopia during Cataract Surgery: Scanning Electron Microscope Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarz, Marta; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose Luis; Hernández-Verdejo, Jose Luis; Tañá, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) on porcine eyes implanted with a Kamra corneal inlay and to describe how the inlay may change the effect of the femtosecond laser on the lens. FLACS was performed on six porcine eyes and a Kamra corneal inlay had been implanted, exploring the lens under the surgical microscope. Another Kamra corneal inlay was attached to the upper part of the transparent hemisphere used for calibration of the femtosecond laser. Capsulorhexis, arcuate incisions, and phacofragmentation were carried out. The Kamra corneal inlay was compared with a nontreated one using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the hemisphere was analyzed with a surgical microscope. Capsulorhexis and phacofragmentation were completed in all the porcine eyes, although accuracy to determine the exact effect on the lens was not possible to achieve. The effect of the femtosecond laser on the PMMA hemisphere through the Kamra corneal inlay showed the capsulorhexis was placed outside the outer margin of the inlay and a sharply sculpted fragmentation pattern with a three-dimensional (donut-shaped) annulus untreated beneath it. SEM images of the nontreated and the treated inlays were comparable. No ultrastructural changes were found in the treated Kamra corneal inlay. FLACS can be performed with a Kamra corneal inlay for surgical compensation of presbyopia without the risk of damaging the inlay. The Kamra corneal inlay acts as a screen that avoids the laser to reach the areas beneath its shadow, but not the exposed areas of the lens.

  20. Ab-initio crystal structure analysis and refinement approaches of oligo p-benzamides based on electron diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; van de Streek, Jacco; Kilbinger, Andreas F M

    2012-01-01

    Ab-initio crystal structure analysis of organic materials from electron diffraction data is presented. The data were collected using the automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) technique. The structure solution and refinement route is first validated on the basis of the known crystal stru...

  1. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction Determination of the Structure of the Zeta Phase of Oxygen Physisorbed on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toney, Michael; Fain, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Low-energy electron diffraction measurements on the ζ phase of diatomic oxygen physisorbed on the basal plane of graphite single crystals are reported for 12......Low-energy electron diffraction measurements on the ζ phase of diatomic oxygen physisorbed on the basal plane of graphite single crystals are reported for 12...

  2. Electron dynamics and optical properties modulation of monolayer MoS2 by femtosecond laser pulse: a simulation using time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Su, Gaoshi; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we adopted time-dependent density functional theory to investigate the optical properties of monolayer MoS2 and the effect of intense few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses on these properties. The electron dynamics of monolayer MoS2 under few-cycle and multi-cycle laser irradiation were described. The polarization direction of the laser had a marked effect on the energy absorption and electronic excitation of monolayer MoS2 because of anisotropy. Change in the polarization direction of few-cycle pulse changed the absorbed energy by a factor over 4000. Few-cycle pulse showed a higher sensitivity to the electronic property of material than multi-cycle pulse. The modulation of the dielectric properties of the material was observed on the femtosecond time scale. The negative divergence appeared in the real part of the function at low frequencies and photoinduced blue shift occurred due to Burstein-Moss effect. The irradiation of femtosecond laser caused the dielectric response within the infrared region and introduced anisotropy to the in-plane optical properties. Laser-based engineering of optical properties through controlling transient electron dynamics expands the functionality of MoS2 and has potential applications in direction-dependent optoelectronic devices.

  3. Two-color vibrational, femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) of gas-phase nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Wrzesinski, Paul J.; Gord, James R.

    2016-09-01

    A resonantly enhanced, two-color, femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) approach is demonstrated and used to explore the nature of the frequency- and time-dependent signals produced by gas-phase nitric oxide (NO). Through careful selection of the input pulse wavelengths, this fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) scheme allows rovibronic-state-resolved observation of time-dependent rovibrational wavepackets propagating on the vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surface of this diatomic species. Despite the use of broadband, ultrafast time-resolved input pulses, high spectral resolution of gas-phase rovibronic transitions is observed in the FREE-CARS signal, dictated by the electronic dephasing timescales of these states. Analysis and computational simulation of the time-dependent spectra observed as a function of pump-Stokes and Stokes-probe delays provide insight into the rotationally resolved wavepacket motion observed on the excited-state and vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surfaces of NO, respectively.

  4. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, Porwal, S.; Bhartiya, S.; Rao, B. T.; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Sharma, T. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ˜10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ˜7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ˜380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  5. QED v 1.0: a software package for quantitative electron diffraction data treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, D; Calestani, G; Gemmi, M; Migliori, A

    2000-03-01

    A new software package for quantitative electron diffraction data treatment of unknown structures is described. No "a priori" information is required by the package which is able to perform in successive steps the 2-D indexing of digitised diffraction patterns, the extraction of the intensity of the collected reflections and the 3-D indexing of all recorded patterns, giving as results the lattice parameters of the investigated structure and a series of data files (one for each diffraction pattern) containing the measured intensities and the relative e.s.d.s of the 3-D indexed reflections. The software package is mainly conceived for the treatment of diffraction patterns taken with a Gatan CCD Slow-Scan Camera, but it can also deal with generic digitised plates. The program is designed to extract intensity data suitable for structure solution techniques in electron crystallography. The integration routine is optimised for a correct background evaluation, a necessary condition to deal with weak spots of irregular shape and an intensity just above the background.

  6. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Porwal, S. [Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Rao, B. T. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Sharma, T. K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  7. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200 μ m , for two final bunch charges: 1 05 electrons (16 fC) and 1 06 electrons (160 fC). Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx=0.27 nm /μ m was obtained for a final bunch charge of 1 05 electrons and final bunch length of σt≈100 fs . For a final charge of 1 06 electrons the cryogun produces Lc ,x/σx≈0.1 nm /μ m for σt≈100 - 200 fs and σx≥50 μ m . These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  8. Ab Initio structure determination of vaterite by automated electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaioli, Enrico; Andrusenko, Iryna; Schüler, Timo; Loges, Niklas; Dinnebier, Robert E; Panthöfer, Martin; Tremel, Wolfgang; Kolb, Ute

    2012-07-09

    "This is a mineral about which there has been much discussion" is a typical statement about vaterite in older standard textbooks of inorganic chemistry. This polymorph of CaCO(3) was first mentioned by H. Vater in 1897, plays key roles in weathering and biomineralization processes, but occurs only in the form of nanosized crystals, unsuitable for structure determination. Its structure could now be solved by automated electron diffraction tomography from 50 nm sized nanocrystals.

  9. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F. [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 GRENOBLE Cedex 9 (France); Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M. [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Rouvière, J. L. [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 GRENOBLE Cedex 9 (France); Chenevier, B. [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); LMGP, CNRS, 3 parvis Louis Néel, 38016 GRENOBLE Cedex 1 (France)

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  10. A structural study of cyanotrichite from Dachang by conventional and automated electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Capitani, Giancarlo; Scordari, Fernando; Pinto, Daniela; Lausi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of cyanotrichite, having general formula Cu4Al2(SO4)(OH)12·2H2O, from the Dachang deposit (China) was studied by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy, automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). ADT revealed the presence of two different cyanotrichite-like phases. The same phases were also recognized in the XRPD pattern, allowing the perfect indexing of all peaks leading, after refinement to the following cell parameters: (1) a = 12.417(2) Å, b = 2.907(1) Å, c = 10.157(1) Å and β = 98.12(1); (2) a = 12.660(2) Å, b = 2.897(1) Å, c = 10.162(1) Å and β = 92.42(1)°. Only for the former phase, labeled cyanotrichite-98, a partial structure, corresponding to the [Cu4Al2(OH){12/2+}] cluster, was obtained ab initio by direct methods in space group C2/ m on the basis of electron diffraction data. Geometric and charge-balance considerations allowed to reach the whole structure model for the cyanotrichite-98 phase. The sulfate group and water molecule result to be statistically disordered over two possible positions, but keeping the average structure consistent with the C-centering symmetry, in agreement with ADT results.

  11. Interferometric two-photon photoemission correlation technique and femtosecond wet-electron dynamics at the TiO2 (110) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin LI; Jin ZHAO; Min FENG; Ken ONDA

    2008-01-01

    The femtosecond time-resolved two-photon pho-toemission (TR-2PP) and the ultra high vacuum (UHV) sur-face science techniques are integrated to investigate the elec-tronic structures and the interracial electron transfer dynamics at the atomically ordered adsorbate overlayers on TiO,2single-crystalline surfaces. Our research into the CH,3OH/TiO,2sys-tem exhibits complex dynamics, providing abundant informa-tion with regard to electron transport and solvation processes in the interfacial solvent structures. These represent the fundamentally physical, photochemical, and photocatalytic reactions of protic chemicals covered with metal-oxides.

  12. Primary events in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome: intraprotein electron and proton transfer revealed by femtosecond spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immeln, Dominik; Weigel, Alexander; Kottke, Tilman; Pérez Lustres, J Luis

    2012-08-01

    Photoreceptors are chromoproteins that undergo fast conversion from dark to signaling states upon light absorption by the chromophore. The signaling state starts signal transduction in vivo and elicits a biological response. Therefore, photoreceptors are ideally suited for analysis of protein activation by time-resolved spectroscopy. We focus on plant cryptochromes which are blue light sensors regulating the development and daily rhythm of plants. The signaling state of these flavoproteins is the neutral radical of the flavin chromophore. It forms on the microsecond time scale after light absorption by the oxidized state. We apply here femtosecond broad-band transient absorption to early stages of signaling-state formation in a plant cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transient spectra show (i) subpicosecond decay of flavin-stimulated emission and (ii) further decay of signal until 100 ps delay with nearly constant spectral shape. The first decay (i) monitors electron transfer from a nearby tryptophan to the flavin and occurs with a time constant of τ(ET) = 0.4 ps. The second decay (ii) is analyzed by spectral decomposition and occurs with a characteristic time constant τ(1) = 31 ps. We reason that hole transport through a tryptophan triad to the protein surface and partial deprotonation of tryptophan cation radical hide behind τ(1). These processes are probably governed by vibrational cooling. Spectral decomposition is used together with anisotropy to obtain the relative orientation of flavin and the final electron donor. This narrows the number of possible electron donors down to two tryptophans. Structural analysis suggests that a set of histidines surrounding the terminal tryptophan may act as proton acceptor and thereby stabilize the radical pair on a 100 ps time scale.

  13. High sensitivity electron diffraction analysis. A study of divalent cation binding to purple membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, A.K.; Stroud, R.M. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A sensitive high-resolution electron diffraction assay for change in structure is described and harnessed to analyze the binding of divalent cations to the purple membrane (PM) of Halobacterium halobium. Low-dose electron diffraction patterns are subject to a matched filter algorithm. to extract accurate values of reflection intensities. This, coupled with a scheme to account for twinning and specimen tilt in the microscope, yields results that are sensitive enough to rapidly quantitate any structure change in PM brought about by site-directed mutagenesis to the level of less than two carbon atoms. Removal of tightly bound divalent cations (mainly Ca2+ and Mg2+) from PM causes a color change to blue and is accompanied by a severely altered photocycle of the protein bacteriohodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump. We characterize the structural changes that occur upon association of 3:1 divalent cation to PM, versus membranes rendered purple by addition of excess Na+. High resolution, low dose electron diffraction data obtained from glucose-embedded samples of Pb2+ and Na+ reconstituted PM preparations at room temperature identify several sites with total occupancy of 2.01 +/- 0.05 Pb2+ equivalents. The color transition as a function of ion concentration for Ca2+ or Mg2+ and Pb2+ are strictly comparable. A (Pb2(+)-Na+) PM Fourier difference map in projection was synthesized at 5 A using the averaged data from several nominally untilted patches corrected for twinning and specimen tilt. We find six major sites located on helices 7, 5, 4, 3, 2 in close association with bR. These partially occupied sites (0.55-0.24 Pb2+ equivalents) represent preferential sites of binding for divalent cations and complements our earlier result by x-ray diffraction.

  14. Single-pulse femtosecond laser Bessel beams drilling of high-aspect-ratio microholes based on electron dynamics control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Yan, Xueliang; Han, Weina; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    Microholes drilling has attracted extensive research efforts for its broad applications in photonics, microfluidics, optical fibers and many other fields. A femtosecond (fs) laser is a promising tool for high-precision materials processing with reduced recast/microcracks and minimized heat affected zones. But there remain many challenges in hole drilling using conventional fs laser with Gaussian beams, such as low aspect ratio and taper effects. We report small-diameter and high-aspect-ratio microholes with taper free drilling in PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) using single-pulse fs laser Bessel beams. Axicon is used to transform Gaussian beams into Bessel beams, which then irradiate in the sample by a telescope consisting of plano-convex lens and microscope objective. Using this technique, we enhance the aspect ratio of microholes by 55 times as compared with Gaussian beams. We attribute this high aspect ratio and high quality microholes formation to the unique spatial intensity distribution and propagation stability of Bessel beams, which can effectively adjust the transient localized electron density distribution leading to a long and uniform localized-interacted zone. By using the optimized pulse energy and focal depth position, the microholes diameter ranges between 1.4-2.1 μm and the aspect ratio can exceed 460. This efficient technique is of great potentials for fabrication of microphotonics devices and microfluidics.

  15. Instantaneous nonvertical electronic transitions with shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Is it possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2003-01-01

    In molecular electronic transitions, a vertical transition can be induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. That is, a replica of the initial nuclear state-times the transition dipole moment of the electronic transition-can be created instantaneously (on the time scale of nuclear motion) in the excited...

  16. Quantum Chemistry on the time axis: electron correlations and rearrangements on femtosecond and attosecond scales

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments toward the production and laboratory use of pulses of high intensity, and/or of very high frequency, and/or of ultrashort duration, make possible experiments which can produce time-resolved data on ultrafast transformations involving motions of electrons. The formulation, quantitative understanding and prediction of related new phenomena entail the possibility of computing and applying solutions of the many-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation, for arbitrary electronic structures, including the dominant effects of Rydberg series, of multiply excited states and of the multi-channel continuous spectrum. To this purpose, we have proposed and applied to many prototypical cases the state-specific expansion approach (SSEA). (Mercouris, Komninos and Nicolaides, Adv. Quantum Chem. 60, 333 (2010)). The paper explains briefly the SSEA, and outlines four of its applications to recently formulated problems concerning time-resolved electronic processes, where electron correlations are crucial....

  17. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  18. Stacking disorder in silicon carbide supported cobalt crystallites: an X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H E; de Villiers, J P R; Tuling, A; Olivier, E J

    2016-11-21

    Supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are characteristically nanoparticulate and the reduced SiC supported catalyst was found to contain both HCP and FCC polymorphs. This is reflected in the powder XRD patterns and generally there is a poor fit between the experimental and calculated diffractograms. This was ascribed to small crystallite sizes and the occurrence of disorder, manifested as peak broadening and peak shifts. Selected area electron diffraction data of suitably oriented cobalt catalyst grains on silicon carbide supports show non-periodic disorder in the zone axis orientations that contain the common (001) (HCP) and (111) (FCC) reciprocal lattice planes. Both FCC and HCP polymorphs are present in the same grains and these show disorder mainly in the HCP component. The disorder is further examined using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution and the stacking sequences elucidated. Random sequences of mainly FCC are interrupted by HCP sequences and twin surfaces with reverse stacking sequences are also present. This study highlights the presence of significant disorder in cobalt catalyst grains confirmed by HAADF microscopy.

  19. Determining molecular structures and conformations directly from electron diffraction using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2006-02-13

    A global optimization strategy, based upon application of a genetic algorithm (GA), is demonstrated as an approach for determining the structures of molecules possessing significant conformational flexibility directly from gas-phase electron diffraction data. In contrast to the common approach to molecular structure determination, based on trial-and-error assessment of structures available from quantum chemical calculations, the GA approach described here does not require expensive quantum mechanical calculations or manual searching of the potential energy surface of the sample molecule, relying instead upon simple comparison between the experimental and calculated diffraction pattern derived from a proposed trial molecular structure. Structures as complex as all-trans retinal and p-coumaric acid, both important chromophores in photosensing processes, may be determined by this approach. In the examples presented here, we find that the GA approach can determine the correct conformation of a flexible molecule described by 11 independent torsion angles. We also demonstrate applications to samples comprising a mixture of two distinct molecular conformations. With these results we conclude that applications of this approach are very promising in elucidating the structures of large molecules directly from electron diffraction data.

  20. Metallographic preparation of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy for analysis by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, M G; Martínez-Flores, E E; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Escalera, M Dolores

    2014-08-01

    Samples of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy (Zinalco) that will be heavily deformed were prepared using five different manual mechanical metallographic methods. Samples were analyzed before tensile testing using the orientation imaging microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (OIM-EBSD) technique. The effect of type and particle size during the final polishing stages for this material were studied in order to identify a method that produces a flat, damage free surface with a roughness of about 50 nm and clean from oxide layers, thereby producing diffraction patterns with high image quality (IQ) and adequate confidence indexes (CI). Our results show that final polishing with alumina and silica, as was previously suggested by other research groups for alloys that are difficult to prepare or alloys with low melting point, are not suitable for manual metallographic preparation of this alloy. Indexes of IQ and CI can be used to evaluate methods of metallographic preparation of samples studied using the OIM-EBSD technique.

  1. Spectrometer for Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Based on Diffraction Focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, V G; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short, spatially coherent pulses of x-ray radiation. We propose the diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of $\\Delta E/E\\approx 2\\times 10^{-6}$. This is much better than for most modern x-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from the metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. We show that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  2. Convergent beam electron diffraction study on ge-based oxide spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S I; Umeyama, N [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, AIST, Tsukuba (Japan); Matsuhata, H [Energy Semiconductor Electronics Research Laboratory, AIST, Tsukuba (Japan); Tominaga, A; Sato, H [Department of Physics, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan); Hara, S [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Watanabe, T [Department of Physics, Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Tomiyasu, K [IMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Crawford, M K, E-mail: ikeda-shin@aist.go.j [DuPont Co., Wilmington, Delaware (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Transition metal oxides with spinel crystal structure exhibit intriguing and non trivial magnetic phenomena owing to magnetic frustration between spins having antiferromagnetic coupling interaction on triangle or kagome lattice. GeCo{sub 2}O{sub 4}(GCO) and GeNi{sub 2}O{sub 4}(GNO), which belong to above category, are very rare normal spinels containing Ge ion. Both reveal antiferromagnetic-like phase transitions at 20 K and 12 K, respectively. According to previous neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements, GNO keeps its cubic structural symmetry down to 2 K which is not natural because such a magnetic transition tends to associate with symmetry breaking structural transitions. In order to know whether the structural transition or symmetry change occur or not at the magnetic transition in detail, convergent beam electron diffraction measurements is employed for the compounds.

  3. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  4. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  5. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  6. Carrier-envelope phase mapping in laser-induced electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiseler, Henning; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Kaneshima, Keisuke; Geier, Florian; Kanai, Teruto; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Itatani, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    We present laser-induced electron diffraction measurements of elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCSs) of a photoelectron on the parent ion for argon, krypton, and xenon, using waveform-controlled few-cycle pulses. Considering only cutoff electrons and employing the adiabatic theory for the analysis enables us to eliminate ambiguities in extracting the DCSs from experimental spectra. Contrary to previous works, which mainly focused on the angular dependence of the DCS, our method allows us to extract also its dependence on the scattering momentum. In the case of xenon, we demonstrate how this method can be used to obtain the complete angular and momentum dependence of the DCS in a range of these variables determined by the pulse. The obtained results are compared to theoretical calculations based on the single-active-electron approximation, which shows a high level of agreement. Further investigations may provide opportunities to study multielectron effects when more advanced theoretical models become available.

  7. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  8. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED

  9. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this t

  10. Forward acceleration and generation of femtosecond, megaelectronvolt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofang wang(王晓方); Quandong Wang(汪权东); Baifei Shen(沈百飞)

    2003-01-01

    We present a new mechanism of energy gain of electrons accelerated by a laser pulse. It is shown that when the intensity of an ultrafast intense laser pulse decreases rapidly along the direction of propagation, electrons leaving the pulse experience an action of ponderomotive deceleration at the descending part of a lower-intensity laser field than acceleration at the ascending part of a high-intensity field, thus gain net energy from the pulse and move directly forward. By means of such a mechanism, a megaelectronvolt electron beam with a bunch length shorter than 100 fs could be realized with an ultrafast (≤30 fs),intense (>1019 W/cm2) laser pulse.

  11. Orbital angular momentum in electron diffraction and its use to determine chiral crystal symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present an alternative way to look at electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Instead of writing the scattering amplitude in Fourier space as a set of plane waves, we use the cylindrical Fourier transform to describe the scattering amplitude in a basis of orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. We show how working in this framework can be very convenient when investigating, e.g., rotation and screw-axis symmetries. For the latter we find selection rules on the OAM coefficients that unambiguously reveal the handedness of the screw axis. Detecting the OAM coefficients of the scattering amplitude thus offers the possibility to detect the handedness of crystals without the need for dynamical simulations, the thickness of the sample, nor the exact crystal structure. We propose an experimental setup to measure the OAM components where an image of the crystal is taken after inserting a spiral phase plate in the diffraction plane and perform multislice simulations on α quartz to demonstrate how the method indeed reveals the chirality. The experimental feasibility of the technique is discussed together with its main advantages with respect to chirality determination of screw axes. The method shows how the use of a spiral phase plate can be extended from a simple phase imaging technique to a tool to measure the local OAM decomposition of an electron wave, widening the field of interest well beyond chiral space group determination.

  12. Three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of deformation in MgO micropillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, S., E-mail: sandra.korte@cantab.net [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ritter, M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Jiao, C. [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midgley, P.A.; Clegg, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Small-scale testing is extensively used to study the effects of size on plasticity or characterise plastic deformation of brittle materials, where cracking is suppressed on the microscale. Geometrical and experimental constraints have been shown to affect small-scale deformation and efforts are underway to understand these better. However, current analytical techniques tend to possess high resolution in only one or two dimensions, impeding a detailed analysis of the entire deformed volume. Here electron backscattered diffraction in three dimensions is presented as a way of characterising three-dimensional (3-D) deformation at high spatial resolution. It is shown that, by reconstruction of compressed and then successively sliced and indexed MgO micropillars, this 3-D technique yields information complementary to {mu}-Laue diffraction or electron microscopy, allowing a correlation of experimental artefacts and the distribution of plasticity. In addition, deformation features which are difficult to visualise by standard scanning electron microscopy are easily detected, for example where only small surface traces are produced or minimal plastic strain can be introduced before failure in brittle materials.

  13. The effects of slippage and diffraction in long wavelength operation of a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulin, V. I.; Haselhoff, E. H.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5 110 μm. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably longer wavelengths. This would result in the production of extremely short, far-infrared pulses, with a duration of a single optical period or even less. In order to investigate the pulse propagation for free-electron lasers operating in the long wavelength limit, a three-dimensional simulation code was developed. Using the FELIX parameters, with the addition of a long-period undulator, the effects of slippage, diffraction losses, changes in the filling factor, as well as the effects of the optical cavity geometry were studied for wavelengths up to 300 μm, with electron pulses in the ps regime. It is shown that slippage effects are less restrictive for long wavelength operation than the increasing losses due to optical beam diffraction.

  14. Investigation of lithiated carbons by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T D; Song, X Y; Kinoshita, K

    2000-10-26

    The microstructures of lithiated synthetic graphite and carbon black were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Information about the crystal structure of carbon containing various Li compositions can provide useful insights to our understanding of the Li storage mechanism in carbonaceous materials. Samples with compositions of Li{sub 0.93}C{sub 6} or Li{sub 0.45}C{sub 6} were found to contain both stage-one and stage-two compounds. These observations are consistent with XRD data. The changes in sample microstructure as the results of lithiation and exposure to electron irradiation were observed by TEM and recorded over several minutes in the microscope environment. Selected area electron diffraction patterns indicated that the lithiated samples quickly changed composition to LiC{sub 24}, which appeared to dominate during the brief analysis period. The layer planes in the lattice image of a disordered carbon black after Li insertion are poorly defined, and changes in the microstructure of these lithiated carbons was not readily apparent. Observations on these lithium intercalation compounds as well as the limitation of the experimental procedure will be presented.

  15. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...... by a bismuth bilayer is ruled out. Surface relaxations obtained by both techniques are in good agreement with each other and found to be small. This includes the relaxation of the van der Waals gap between the first two quintuple layers....

  16. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  17. Dynamical scattering and electron diffraction from thin polymer lamellar crystals - poly(tert-butylethylene sulfide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset; Dumas; Cartier; Lotz

    1999-09-01

    Strong violations of Friedel symmetry are observed in hk0 electron diffraction patterns from lamellar crystals of poly(tert-butylethylene sulfide) obtained at 120 kV. These deviations are largely explained by a multislice dynamical scattering calculation based on the crystal structure model. Further improvement is found when a secondary scattering component is added, in keeping with a perfect crystallite thickness less than that of the lamellar thickness. Despite the multiple-scattering perturbations, the frustrated chain packing can still be determined by direct methods followed by Fourier refinement. However, the Friedel-related intensities must be averaged before calculation of normalized structure factors.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  19. Three-dimensional analysis by electron diffraction methods of nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammer, Christoph; Mangler, Clemens; Karnthaler, Hans-Peter; Rentenberger, Christian

    2011-12-01

    To analyze nanocrystalline structures quantitatively in 3D, a novel method is presented based on electron diffraction. It allows determination of the average size and morphology of the coherently scattering domains (CSD) in a straightforward way without the need to prepare multiple sections. The method is applicable to all kinds of bulk nanocrystalline materials. As an example, the average size of the CSD in nanocrystalline FeAl made by severe plastic deformation is determined in 3D. Assuming ellipsoidal CSD, it is deduced that the CSD have a width of 19 ± 2 nm, a length of 18 ± 1 nm, and a height of 10 ± 1 nm.

  20. Scattering of diffracting beams of electron cyclotron waves by random density fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hannes; Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    The physics and first results of the new WKBeam code for electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas are presented. This code is developed on the basis of a kinetic radiative transfer model which is general enough to account for the effects of diffraction and density fluctuations on the beam. Our preliminary numerical results show a significant broadening of the power deposition profile in ITER due to scattering from random density fluctuations at the plasma edge, while such scattering effects are found to be negligible in medium-size tokamaks like ASDEX upgrade.

  1. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  2. Femtosecond resolved diagnostics for electron beam and XUV seed temporal overlap at sFLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkeshian, Roxana

    2012-02-15

    sFLASH is a seeded experiment at the Free-Electron Laser FLASH in Hamburg. It uses a 38 nm High-Harmonic-Generation (HHG) scheme to seed the FEL-process in a 10m long variable-gap undulator. The temporal overlap between the electron and HHG pulses is critical to the seeding process. The use of a 3{sup rd} harmonic accelerating module provides a high current electron beam with {proportional_to} (400 fs){sub FWHM} bunch duration. The duration of the HHG laser pulse is {<=} (30 fs){sub FWHM}. The desired overlap is achieved in two steps. Firstly, the HHG drive laser is brought to temporal overlap with the incoherent spontaneous radiation from an upstream undulator with picosecond resolution. The temporal overlap is periodically monitored using a streak camera installed in the linear accelerator tunnel. Next, the coherent radiation from an undulator is used to determine the exact overlap of the electron beam in a modulator-radiator set-up with sub-picosecond resolution. The physical and technical principles of the setup providing the temporal overlap are described. Results of the system are analyzed. An analytical approach and simulation results for the performance of the seeding experiment are presented. First attempts at demonstration of seeding are discussed. Strategies for optimizing overlap conditions are presented. (orig.)

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  4. The SPARC_LAB femtosecond synchronization for electron and photon pulsed beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaveglia, M.; Gallo, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Gatti, G.; Anania, M. P.; Petrarca, M.; Villa, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Biagioni, A.; Mostacci, A.

    2015-05-01

    The SPARC LAB complex hosts a 150 MeV electron photo-injector equipped with an undulator for FEL production (SPARC) together with a high power TW laser (FLAME). Recently the synchronization system reached the performance of < 100 fsRMS relative jitter between lasers, electron beam and RF accelerating fields. This matches the requirements for next future experiments: (i) the production of X-rays by means of Thomson scattering (first collisions achieved in 2014) and (ii) the particle driven PWFA experiment by means of multiple electron bunches. We report about the measurements taken during the machine operation using BAMs (Bunch Arrival Monitors) and EOS (Electro-Optical Sampling) system. A new R and D activity concerning the LWFA using the external injection of electron bunches in a plasma generated by the FLAME laser pulse is under design. The upgrade of the synchronization system is under way to guarantee the < 30 fs RMS jitter required specification. It foresees the transition from electrical to optical architecture that mainly affects the reference signal distribution and the time of arrival detection performances. The new system architecture is presented together with the related experimental data.

  5. Towards a full retrieval of the deformation tensor F using convergent beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Y. [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Rouviere, J.L., E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.fr [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zuo, J.M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Favre-Nicolin, V. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-01-15

    A new method to retrieve the local lattice parameters and rotations in a crystal from off-axis convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented and validated using Bloch wave dynamical simulations. The originality of the method is to use both the diffracted and transmitted beams and to use kinematical approximations in the fitting algorithm. The study is based on the deformation gradient tensor F which includes rotation and strain. Working on simulated images it is shown that (i) from a single direction of observation, seven parameters out of the nine parameters of F can be determined with an accuracy of 3×10{sup −4} for the normal strain parameters ε{sub xx}, ε{sub yy}, and ε{sub zz}, (ii) the unit cell volume can only be retrieved if the diffracted and transmitted beams are both included in the fitting and (iii) all the nine parameters of F can be determined by combining two directions of observation separated by about 20°. - Highlights: • New CBED strain retrieval method using both deficient and excess HOLZ lines. • From a single CBED pattern, the unit cell volume can be measured without ambiguity. • From a single pattern, seven parameters of the deformation tensor F can be determined. • From two patterns from two directions separated by 20°, the nine parameters are retrieved. • Algorithm validated using dynamical simulations.

  6. Whole-pattern fitting technique in serial femtosecond nanocrystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben A. Dilanian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX has created new opportunities in the field of structural analysis of protein nanocrystals. The intensity and timescale characteristics of the X-ray free-electron laser sources used in SFX experiments necessitate the analysis of a large collection of individual crystals of variable shape and quality to ultimately solve a single, average crystal structure. Ensembles of crystals are commonly encountered in powder diffraction, but serial crystallography is different because each crystal is measured individually and can be oriented via indexing and merged into a three-dimensional data set, as is done for conventional crystallography data. In this way, serial femtosecond crystallography data lie in between conventional crystallography data and powder diffraction data, sharing features of both. The extremely small sizes of nanocrystals, as well as the possible imperfections of their crystallite structure, significantly affect the diffraction pattern and raise the question of how best to extract accurate structure-factor moduli from serial crystallography data. Here it is demonstrated that whole-pattern fitting techniques established for one-dimensional powder diffraction analysis can be feasibly extended to higher dimensions for the analysis of merged SFX diffraction data. It is shown that for very small crystals, whole-pattern fitting methods are more accurate than Monte Carlo integration methods that are currently used.

  7. Development and commissioning of a double-prism spectrometer for the diagnosis of femtosecond electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Steffen

    2016-12-15

    Free-electron lasers as accelerator-driven light sources and wakefield-based acceleration in plasmas require the knowledge of the longitudinal extension and the longitudinal current profile of the involved electron bunches. These bunches can yield lengths below 10 μm, or durations shorter than approx. 33 fs, as well as charges less than 30 pC. During this work, transition radiation from relativistic electron bunches was investigated in the mid-infrared wavelength regime. A spectrometer using an arrangement of two consecutive zinc selenide prisms was developed, built and commissioned. The instrument covers the spectral range from 2 μm to 18 μm in a single shot. Measurements with the double-prism spectrometer were conducted at the FEL facilities FLASH at DESY in Hamburg, Germany and FELIX at the Radboud Universiteit in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. The assessment of the spectrometer and comparative studies with established diagnostic devices at FLASH show high signal-to-noise ratios at bunch charges below 10 pC and confirm the obtained results.

  8. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  10. High sensitivity electron diffraction analysis. A study of divalent cation binding to purple membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A K; Stroud, R M

    1990-02-01

    A sensitive high-resolution electron diffraction assay for change in structure is described and harnessed to analyze the binding of divalent cations to the purple membrane (PM) of Halobacterium halobium. Low-dose electron diffraction patterns are subject to a matched filter algorithm (Spencer, S. A., and A. A. Kossiakoff. 1980. J. Appl. Crystallogr. 13:563-571). to extract accurate values of reflection intensities. This, coupled with a scheme to account for twinning and specimen tilt in the microscope, yields results that are sensitive enough to rapidly quantitate any structure change in PM brought about by site-directed mutagenesis to the level of less than two carbon atoms. Removal of tightly bound divalent cations (mainly Ca2+ and Mg2+) from PM causes a color change to blue and is accompanied by a severely altered photocycle of the protein bacteriohodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump. We characterize the structural changes that occur upon association of 3:1 divalent cation to PM, versus membranes rendered purple by addition of excess Na+. High resolution, low dose electron diffraction data obtained from glucose-embedded samples of Pb2+ and Na+ reconstituted PM preparations at room temperature identify several sites with total occupancy of 2.01 +/- 0.05 Pb2+ equivalents. The color transition as a function of ion concentration for Ca2+ or Mg2+ and Pb2+ are strictly comparable. A (Pb2(+)-Na+) PM Fourier difference map in projection was synthesized at 5 A using the averaged data from several nominally untilted patches corrected for twinning and specimen tilt. We find six major sites located on helices 7, 5, 4, 3, 2 (nomenclature of Engelman et al. 1980. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 77:2023-2027) in close association with bR. These partially occupied sites (0.55-0.24 Pb2+ equivalents) represent preferential sites of binding for divalent cations and complements our earlier result by x-ray diffraction (Katre et al. 1986. Biophys. J. 50:277-284).

  11. Estimation of dislocation density from precession electron diffraction data using the Nye tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, A C; Weinberger, C R; Taheri, M L

    2015-06-01

    The Nye tensor offers a means to estimate the geometrically necessary dislocation density of a crystalline sample based on measurements of the orientation changes within individual crystal grains. In this paper, the Nye tensor theory is applied to precession electron diffraction automated crystallographic orientation mapping (PED-ACOM) data acquired using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The resulting dislocation density values are mapped in order to visualize the dislocation structures present in a quantitative manner. These density maps are compared with other related methods of approximating local strain dependencies in dislocation-based microstructural transitions from orientation data. The effect of acquisition parameters on density measurements is examined. By decreasing the step size and spot size during data acquisition, an increasing fraction of the dislocation content becomes accessible. Finally, the method described herein is applied to the measurement of dislocation emission during in situ annealing of Cu in TEM in order to demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterizing microstructural dynamics.

  12. Atomic structure of "multilayer silicene" grown on Ag(111): Dynamical low energy electron diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuaki; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Lin, Chun-Liang; Nagao, Ryo; Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Toshio; Arafune, Ryuichi; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the atomic structure of the "multilayer silicene" grown on the Ag(111) single crystal surface by using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We measured the intensity of the LEED spot as a function of the incident electron energy (I-V curve) and analyzed the I-V curve using a dynamical LEED theory. We have found that the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag model well reproduces the I-V curve whereas the models consisting of the honeycomb structure of Si do not. The bias dependence of the STM image of multilayer silicene agrees with that of the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed surface. Consequently, we have concluded that the multilayer silicene grown on Ag(111) is identical to the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed structure.

  13. Neutron diffraction of titanium aluminides formed by continuous electron-beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkov, S.; Neov, D.; Luytov, D.; Petrov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ti-Al-based alloys were produced by hybrid electron-beam technologies. A composite Ti-Al film was deposited on a Ti substrate by electron-beam evaporation (EBE), followed by electron-beam treatment (EBT) by a continuously scanned electron beam. The speed of the specimens motion during the EBT were V 1 = 1 cm/sec and V 2 = 5 cm/sec, in order to realize two different alloying mechanisms -- by surface melting and by electron-beam irradiation without melting the surface. The samples prepared were characterized by XRD and neutron diffraction to study the crystal structure on the surface and in depth. SEM/EDX analysis was conducted to explore the surface structure and analyze the chemical composition. Nanoindentation measurements were also carried out. No intermetallic phases were registered in the sample treated at velocity V 1, while the sample treated at V 2 exhibited a Ti3Al/TiAl structure on the surface, transformed to Ti/TiAl in depth. The nanoindentation test demonstrated a significant negative hardness gradient from the surface to the depth of the sample.

  14. Reconstruction from a single diffraction pattern of azimuthally projected electron density of molecules aligned parallel to a single axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D K; Shneerson, V L; Starodub, D; Spence, J C H

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction from the individual molecules of a molecular beam, aligned parallel to a single axis by a strong electric field or other means, has been proposed as a means of structure determination of individual molecules. As in fiber diffraction, all the information extractable is contained in a diffraction pattern from incidence of the diffracting beam normal to the molecular alignment axis. The limited size of the object results in continuous diffraction patterns characterized by neither Bragg spots nor layer lines. Equations relating the scattered amplitudes to the molecular electron density may be conveniently formulated in terms of cylindrical harmonics. For simulated diffraction patterns from short C nanotubes aligned along their axes, iterative solution of the equation for the zeroth-order cylindrical harmonic and its inverse with appropriate constraints in real and reciprocal space enables the phasing of the measured amplitudes, and hence a reconstruction of the azimuthal projection of the molecule.

  15. Diffractive ρ production at small x in future electron-ion colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.; Spiering, D.

    2016-09-01

    The future electron-ion (eA) collider is expected to probe the high energy regime of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD), with the exclusive vector meson production cross section being one of the most promising observables. In this paper we complement previous studies of exclusive processes presenting a comprehensive analysis of diffractive ρ production at small x. We compute the coherent and incoherent cross sections taking into account non-linear QCD dynamical effects and considering different models for the dipole-proton scattering amplitude and vector meson wave function. The dependence of these cross sections on the energy, photon virtuality, nuclear mass number and squared momentum transfer is analysed in detail. Moreover, we compare the non-linear predictions with those obtained in the linear regime. Finally, we also estimate the exclusive photon, J/{{\\Psi }} and ϕ production and compare with the results obtained for ρ production. Our results demonstrate that the analysis of diffractive ρ production in future electron-ion colliders will be important in understanding the non-linear QCD dynamics.

  16. Orbital angular momentum in electron diffraction and its use to determine chiral crystal symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Juchtmans, Roeland

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present an alternative way to look at electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. In stead of writing the scattering amplitude in Fourier space as a set of plane waves, we use the cylindrical Fourier transform to describe the scattering amplitude in a basis of orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. We show how working in this framework can be very convenient when investigating e.g. rotation and screw axis symmetries. For the latter we find selection rules on the OAM-coefficients that unambiguously reveal the handedness of the screw axis. Detecting the OAM-coefficients of the scattering amplitude thus offers the possibility to detect the handedness of crystals without the need for dynamical simulations, the thickness of the sample nor the exact crystal structure. We propose an experimental setup to measure the OAM-components where an image of the crystal is taken after inserting a spiral phase plate in the diffraction plane and perform mulsti-slice simulations on $\\alpha$-q...

  17. Performance of Dynamically Simulated Reference Patterns for Cross-Correlation Electron Backscatter Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian E; Christensen, Jordan J; Singh, Saransh; De Graef, Marc; Fullwood, David T; Homer, Eric R; Wagoner, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution (or "cross-correlation") electron backscatter diffraction analysis (HR-EBSD) utilizes cross-correlation techniques to determine relative orientation and distortion of an experimental electron backscatter diffraction pattern with respect to a reference pattern. The integrity of absolute strain and tetragonality measurements of a standard Si/SiGe material have previously been analyzed using reference patterns produced by kinematical simulation. Although the results were promising, the noise levels were significantly higher for kinematically produced patterns, compared with real patterns taken from the Si region of the sample. This paper applies HR-EBSD techniques to analyze lattice distortion in an Si/SiGe sample, using recently developed dynamically simulated patterns. The results are compared with those from experimental and kinematically simulated patterns. Dynamical patterns provide significantly more precision than kinematical patterns. Dynamical patterns also provide better estimates of tetragonality at low levels of distortion relative to the reference pattern; kinematical patterns can perform better at large values of relative tetragonality due to the ability to rapidly generate patterns relating to a distorted lattice. A library of dynamically generated patterns with different lattice parameters might be used to achieve a similar advantage. The convergence of the cross-correlation approach is also assessed for the different reference pattern types.

  18. RF design of X-band RF deflector for femtosecond diagnostics of LCLS electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.; Wang, Juwen

    2012-12-01

    We designed a successful constant impedance traveling wave X-band rf deflector for electron beam diagnostics at the 14 GeV SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This is the first practical deflector built with a waveguide coupler. The 1-meter rf deflector produces 24 MeV peak transverse kick when powered with 20 MW of 11.424 GHz rf. The design is based on our experience with high gradient X-band accelerating structures. Several deflectors of this design have been built at SLAC and are currently in use. Here we describe the design and distinguishing features of this device.

  19. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material.

  20. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鑫; 江舟亚; 陈龙; 陈黎明; 辛建国; 陈洁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal.

  1. Coherent diffraction imaging analysis of shape-controlled nanoparticles with focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of the coherent diffraction imaging analysis of nanoparticles using focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses, allowing us to analyze the size distribution of particles as well as the electron density projection of individual particles. We measured 1000 single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction patterns of shape-controlled Ag nanocubes and Au/Ag nanoboxes and estimated the edge length from the speckle size of the coherent diffraction patterns. We then reconstructed the two-dimensional electron density projection with sub-10 nm resolution from selected coherent diffraction patterns. This method enables the simultaneous analysis of the size distribution of synthesized nanoparticles and the structures of particles at nanoscale resolution to address correlations between individual structures of components and the statistical properties in heterogeneous systems such as nanoparticles and cells.

  2. Experiments performed in order to reveal fundamental differences between the diffraction and interference of waves and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Demjanov, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction patterns of electrons are believed to resemble those of electromagnetic waves (EMW). I performed a series of experiments invoked to show that the periodicity of peaks in the diffraction diagram of electrons is concerned with the periodicity of the arrangement of scattering centers in the diffraction grating in combination with the supposed character of the spatial structure of the electron as a system of regularly spaced concentric shells of elasticity. I started from the experiment on the diffraction of electrons and EMWs at the sharp edge of the opaque half-plane. This simple scattering configuration enabled me to discriminate between the re-radiation mechanism of the wave diffraction and ricochet scattering of electrons on the edge of the half-plane. Then I made experiments with scattering on composite objects proceeding step by step from a single straight edge to a couple of edges (one slit) and then to four edges (two slits). Thus I succeeded in interpretation of the double-slit diffraction (...

  3. Structural analysis of organic films by electron diffraction at high and low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael Richard

    This dissertation concerns the importance of electron diffraction as a structural tool in the analysis of organic crystalline materials, focusing on those specimens for which X-ray analysis is insufficient. It extends the range of knowledge needed for solving common problems that occur in such analysis: sample preparation, damage processes, extraction of crystallographic phases, and specimen irregularities. This research reports the first direct measurement of electron beam damage in transmission for beam energies below the carbon-K edge and in part extends the research of Howie, Isaacson, Fryer, and others. Here, it is confirmed that a correlation exists between the carbon-K shell ionization and the damage cross section by direct measurement of spot fading in transmission at beam energies ranging from 200eV to 1000eV. The threshold in damage was directly measured confirming the hypothesis linking K shell ionization to damage in the aromatic specimens; however, for the aliphatic specimens, the threshold effects were not as significant, indicating the importance of other damage processes which are explained. Calculations based on the experimental data show a region of beam energy which may be utilized to image single molecules, in contradiction to previous theory. Utilizing energy filtering, Kohler mode, cryo-microscopy, and standard low-dose techniques, the structures of two organic specimens which could not be solved by X-ray are solved by electron diffraction. These specimens exhibited high sensitivity to the electron beam and were thought good candidates for the project. The first is a Diacetylene polymer 1,2 bis (10,12 tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3phosphocholine (DC89PC) with a large unit cell, here only a partial structure solution was possible by Direct Methods (DM) phasing and chemical modeling. The full solution will require new sample preparation techniques. Film bending was observed directly, and the resulting effects to the diffraction data are explained

  4. A Multi-Channel THz and Infrared Spectrometer for Femtosecond Electron Bunch Diagnostics by Single-Shot Spectroscopy of Coherent Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Wesch, S; Behrens, C; Delsim-Hashemi, H; Schmüser, P

    2011-01-01

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5 - 44 um) or in long wavelength mode (45 - 430 um). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching effects in magnetic chicanes. The d...

  5. Crystallographic Characteristic of Intermetallic Compounds in Al-Si-Mg Casting Alloys Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yongzhi; XU Zhengbing; HE Juan; ZENG Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The Al-Si-Mg alloy which can be strengthened by heat treatment is widely applied to the key components of aerospace and aeronautics. Iron-rich intermetallic compounds are well known to be strongly influential on mechanical properties in Al-Si-Mg alloys. But intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si-Mg alloy intermetallics are often misidentified in previous metallurgical studies. It was described as many different compounds, such as AlFeSi, Al8Fe2Si, Al5(Fe, Mn)3Si2 and so on. For the purpose of solving this problem, the intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si alloys containing 0.5% Mg were investigated in this study. The iron-rich compounds in Al-Si-Mg casting alloys were characterized by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS), electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD) and X-ray powder diffraction(XRD). The electron backscatter diffraction patterns were used to assess the crystallographic characteristics of intermetallic compounds. The compound which contains Fe/Mg-rich particles with coarse morphologies was Al8FeMg3Si6 in the alloy by using EBSD. The compound belongs to hexagonal system, space group P2m, with the lattice parameter a=0.662 nm, c=0.792 nm. The β-phase is indexed as tetragonal Al3FeSi2, space group I4/mcm, a=0.607 nm and c=0.950 nm. The XRD data indicate that Al8FeMg3Si6 and Al3FeSi2 are present in the microstructure of Al-7Si-Mg alloy, which confirms the identification result of EBSD. The present study identified the iron-rich compound in Al-Si-Mg alloy, which provides a reliable method to identify the intermetallic compounds in short time in Al-Si-Mg alloy. Study results are helpful for identification of complex compounds in alloys.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis of calcific deposits on intrauterine contraceptive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.R.; Wilkinson, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Deposits found on intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All seven devices, including five plastic and two copper IUDs, were coated with a crust containing cellular, acellular, and fibrillar material. The cellular material was composed of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cells of epithelial origin, sperm, and bacteria. Some of the bacteria were filamentous, with acute-angle branching. The fibrillar material appeared to be fibrin. Most of the acellular material was amorphous; calcite was identified by x-ray diffraction, and x-ray microanalysis showed only calcium. Some of the acellular material, particularly that on the IUD side of the crust, was organized in spherulitic crystals and was identified as calcium phosphate by x-ray microanalysis. The crust was joined to the IUD surface by a layer of fibrillar and amorphous material. It is suggested that the initial event in the formation of calcific deposits on IUD surfaces is the deposition of an amorphous and fibrillar layer. Various types of cells present in the endometrial environment adhere to this layer and then calcify. Thus, the deposition of calcific material on the IUDs is a calcification phenomenon, not unlike the formation of plaque on teeth.

  7. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... films. This sample preparation method is fast and usually results in little structural change in the nanowires [2]. However, it does not provide information about the interface between the nanowires and the substrate, who’s physical and electrical properties are important for many modern applications...... of nanowires. In particular, strain and crystallographic defects can have a major influence on the electronic structure of the material. In improved method for the characterization of such interfaces would be valuable for optimizing and understanding the transport properties of devices based on nanowires. Here...

  8. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation.

  9. Quantitative analysis of martensite and bainite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Hua, Jiajie; Kong, Mingguang; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Ziwei

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, ultra-high-strength steels with multiphase microstructures containing martensite and bainite were prepared by controlling the cooling rate. A new approach was proposed for quantitatively statistical phase analysis using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) based on the band contrast which correlates to the quality and intensity of the diffraction patterns. This approach takes advantage of the inherently greater lattice imperfections of martensite, such as dislocations and low-angle grain boundaries, relative to that of bainite. These can reduce the intensity and quality of the EBSD patterns of martensite, which decrease the band contrast. Thus, combined with morphological observations, Gaussian two-peak fitting was employed to analyze the band contrast profile and confirm the ranges of band contrast for the two phases. The volume fractions of bainite and martensite in different samples were determined successfully. In addition, the results show that increased cooling rates improve the proportion of martensite and the ratio of martensite to bainite. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:814-819, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L{sub 2,3}-edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 4} and charge and orbital order in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  11. Multi-objective Optimizations of a Normal Conducting RF Gun Based Ultra Fast Electron Diffraction Beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Gulliford, C; Maxson, J; Bazarov, I

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of multi-objective genetic algorithm optimizations of a potential single shot ultra fast electron diffraction beamline utilizing a 100 MV/m 1.6 cell normal conducting rf (NCRF) gun, as well as a 9 cell 2pi/3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for a charge of 1e6 electrons. Analysis of the solutions is discussed, as are the effects of disorder induced heating. In particular, for a charge of $10^6$ electrons and final beam size greater than or equal to 25 microns, we found a relative coherence length of 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 nm/micron for a final bunch length of approximately 5, 30, and 100 fs, respectively. These results demonstrate the viability of using geneti...

  12. Multiple defocused coherent diffraction imaging: method for simultaneously reconstructing objects and probe using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Makoto; Shimomura, Kei; Suzuki, Akihiro; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-05-30

    The sample size must be less than the diffraction-limited focal spot size of the incident beam in single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) based on a diffract-before-destruction scheme using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). This is currently a major limitation preventing its wider applications. We here propose multiple defocused CXDI, in which isolated objects are sequentially illuminated with a divergent beam larger than the objects and the coherent diffraction pattern of each object is recorded. This method can simultaneously reconstruct both objects and a probe from the coherent X-ray diffraction patterns without any a priori knowledge. We performed a computer simulation of the prposed method and then successfully demonstrated it in a proof-of-principle experiment at SPring-8. The prposed method allows us to not only observe broad samples but also characterize focused XFEL beams.

  13. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  14. Adaptive characterization of recrystallization kinetics in IF steel by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Won-Woong; Lee, Ho Won; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a rigorous methodology for quantifying recrystallization kinetics by electron backscatter diffraction is proposed in order to reduce errors associated with the operator's skill. An adaptive criterion to determine adjustable grain orientation spread depending on the recrystallization stage is proposed to better identify the recrystallized grains in the partially recrystallized microstructure. The proposed method was applied in characterizing the microstructure evolution during annealing of interstitial-free steel cold rolled to low and high true strain levels of 0.7 and 1.6, respectively. The recrystallization kinetics determined by the proposed method was found to be consistent with the standard method of Vickers microhardness. The application of the proposed method to the overall recrystallization stages showed that it can be used for the rigorous characterization of progressive microstructure evolution, especially for the severely deformed material.

  15. Analysis of Orange Peel Defect in St14 Steel Sheet by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengquan CAO; Jinxu ZHANG; Jiansheng WU; Jiaguang CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the orange peel defect in the surface range of the st14 steel sheet has been investigated using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It has been found that the orange peel defect in the st14steel sheet was resulted from the local coarse grains which were produced during hot-rolling due to the critical deformation in dual-phase zone. During deep drawing, the coarse grains with {100}<001> microtexture can slip on the {112}<111> slip system to form bulging and yields orange peel defects, while the coarse grains with {112}<110>orientation do not form the defect as the Schmid factor of {112}<111> slip system in it equals zero.

  16. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  17. Observation of Ferroelectricity in a Confined Crystallite Using Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Williams, D. B. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Shin, Junsoo [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    LaBGeO{sub 5} is a model transparent ferroelectric glass-ceramic (TFGC) material, developed as an inexpensive alternative to single-crystal nonlinear optical materials. The optical activity of the TFGC originates from the ferroelectric phase which remains under a hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding glass matrix. A combination of two techniques, electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), is employed to monitor the development of the ferroelectric phase. A method is proposed to theoretically construct PFM amplitude maps from EBSD orientation maps. The theoretical vertical piezoresponse map is compared with the experimental piezoresponse map from PFM. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental maps is observed.

  18. Improved angular resolution in electron backscatter diffraction analysis by use of image correlation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI HY; Andrew GODFREY; WANG W

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a method for improving the angular resolution of the electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD)technique based on a correlative matching of EBSD patterns.Standard image interpolation methods are used to detect shifts between selected regions of the EBSD patterns to an accuracy of one tenth of a pixel.Simulated data sets are used to show that such accuracy,combined with a small angle approximation in calculation of the rotation angle,allows determination of the misorientation between patterns to an accuracy of 0.01 degrees.The method is tested on samples of both single crystal aluminum and recrystallized nickel.The results demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the new method compared to the conventional method.

  19. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorset, Douglas L. [Electron Diffraction Department, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1999-06-07

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of 'bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene. (author)

  20. Large area stress distribution in crystalline materials calculated from lattice deformation identified by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongliang; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Dai, Yuanbin; Tian, Yuan; Huo, Qin

    2014-08-05

    We report a method to obtain the stress of crystalline materials directly from lattice deformation by Hooke's law. The lattice deformation was calculated using the crystallographic orientations obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology. The stress distribution over a large area was obtained efficiently and accurately using this method. Wurtzite structure gallium nitride (GaN) crystal was used as the example of a hexagonal crystal system. With this method, the stress distribution of a GaN crystal was obtained. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify the stress distribution. The cause of the stress distribution found in the GaN crystal was discussed from theoretical analysis and EBSD data. Other properties related to lattice deformation, such as piezoelectricity, can also be analyzed by this novel approach based on EBSD data.

  1. How the optical timing system,the longitudinal diagnostics and the associated feedback systems provide femtosecond stable operation at the FERMI free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Ferianis; Enrico Allaria; Eugenio Ferrari; Giulio Gaio; Giuseppe Penco; Fabio Rossi; Marco Veronese

    2016-01-01

    FERMI, the seeded free electron laser(FEL) in operation in Italy, is providing the User Community with unique fully coherent radiation, in the wavelength range 100–4 nm. FERMI is the first FEL fully synchronized by means of optical fibers. The optical timing system ensures an ultra-stable phase reference to its distributed clients. Several femtosecond longitudinal diagnostics verify the achieved performance; the bunch length monitor(BLM) and the bunch arrival monitor(BAM) will be presented in this paper. Feedback systems play a crucial role to guarantee the needed longterm electron beam stability. A real-time infrastructure allows shot-to-shot communication between front-end computers and the servers. Orbit feedbacks are useful in machine tuning, whereas longitudinal feedbacks control electron energy,compression and arrival time. A flexible software framework allows a rapid implementation of heterogeneous multiinput–multi-output(MIMO) longitudinal loops simply by selecting the appropriate sensors and actuators.

  2. Influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on electron-ion collision in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo [Department of Electronics Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Hayang 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the electron-ion collision process is investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The eikonal method and micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding are used to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, density parameter, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and the impact parameter. The result shows that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects suppress the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the differential eikonal collision cross section, especially, in small-impact parameter regions. It is also shown that the quantum shielding effect on the eikonal collision cross section is more important in low-collision energies. In addition, it is found that the eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase in the density parameter. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the quantum diffraction and shielding effects are also discussed.

  3. AnyStitch: a tool for combining electron backscatter diffraction data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilchak, A L; Shiveley, A R; Tiley, J S; Ballard, D L

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in electron backscatter diffraction equipment and software have permitted increased data acquisition rates on the order of hundreds of points per second with additional increases in the foreseeable future likely. This increase in speed allows users to collect data from statistically significant areas of samples by combining beam-control scans and automated stage movements. To facilitate data analysis, however, the individual tiles must be combined, or stitched, into a single data set. In this paper, we describe a matlab(®) (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA) program to facilitate stitching of electron backscatter diffraction data. The method offers users a wide range of controls for tile placement including independent overlaps for horizontal and vertical tiles and also includes a parameter to account for systematic stage positioning errors or improperly calibrated scan rotation. The code can stitch data collected on either square or hexagonal grids and contains a function to reduce the resolution of square grid data if the resulting file is too large (or has too many grains) to be opened by the analysis software. The software was primarily written to work with TSL(®) OIM™ data sets and includes a function to quickly read compressed *.osc files into a variable in the matlab(®) workspace as opposed to using slower, text-reading functions. The output file is in *.ang format and can be opened directly by TSL(®) OIM™ Analysis software. A set of functions to facilitate stitching of text-based *.ctf files produced by Oxford Instruments HKL systems are also included. Finally, the code can also be used to combine *.tif images to produce a montage. The source code, a graphical user interface and a compiled version of the software was made available in the online version of this paper.

  4. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms.

  5. Molecular structure and nicotinic activity of arecoline. A gas electron diffraction study combined with theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2005-01-01

    The molecular structure of arecoline (methyl 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylnicotinate, ? has been determined by gas electron diffraction. Diffraction patterns were taken at about 370 K. Structural constraints for the data analysis were obtained from MP2/6-31G** calculations. Vibrational mean amplitudes and shrinkage corrections were calculated from the force constants obtained from the gas-phase vibrational frequencies and the B3LYP/6-31G** calculations. The electron diffraction data were well reproduced by assuming the mixture of four conformers. The determined structural parameters ( rg (Å) and ∠ (°)) for the main conformer with 3 σ in parentheses are as follows: =1.456(4); rg(N-C methyl)=1.451 (d.p.); rg(C dbnd6 C)=1.339(9); =1.512(3); rg(O-C methyl)=1.434(5); rg(C(O)-O)=1.355 (d.p.); rg(C dbnd6 O)=1.209(4); the out-of-plane angle of the methyl group=50.3(23); ∠C ringN ringC ring=112.8(30); ∠N ringC ringC ring(H 2)=110.5(16); =118.4(5); ∠C dbnd6 CC(O)=116.8(7); ∠CC dbnd6 O=127.6(9); ∠CC-O=109.8(8), where the angle brackets denote averaged values and d.p. denotes dependent parameters. Fixing the abundances of the minor conformers, Ax-s- cis and Ax-s- trans, at the theoretical values (13% in total), those of the Eq-s- cis and Eq-s- trans conformers were determined to be 46(16) and 41(16)%, respectively. Here Ax and Eq denote the axial and equatorial directions of the N-CH 3 bond and s- cis and s- trans show the orientation of the methoxycarbonyl group expressed by the configuration of the C dbnd6 O and C dbnd6 C bonds. The N⋯O carbonyl distances of the Eq-s- cis and Ax-s- cis conformers are 4.832(13) and 4.874(16) Å, respectively. They are close to the N⋯N distance of the most abundant conformer of nicotine, 4.885(6) Å, suggesting that the Eq-s- cis and Ax-s- cis conformers have nicotinic activity.

  6. Multiobjective optimization design of an rf gun based electron diffraction beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Maxson, Jared

    2017-03-01

    Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line comprised of a 100 MV /m 1.6-cell normal conducting rf (NCRF) gun, as well as a nine-cell 2 π /3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids, have been performed. These include optimization of the normalized transverse emittance as a function of bunch charge, as well as optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of the rms bunch length of the beam at the sample location for a fixed charge of 1 06 electrons. Analysis of the resulting solutions is discussed in terms of the relevant scaling laws, and a detailed description of one of the resulting solutions from the coherence length optimizations is given. For a charge of 1 06 electrons and final beam sizes of σx≥25 μ m and σt≈5 fs , we found a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx≈0.07 using direct optimization of the coherence length. Additionally, based on optimizations of the emittance as a function of final bunch length, we estimate the relative coherence length for bunch lengths of 30 and 100 fs to be roughly 0.1 and 0.2 nm /μ m , respectively. Finally, using the scaling of the optimal emittance with bunch charge, for a charge of 1 05 electrons, we estimate relative coherence lengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.92 nm /μ m for final bunch lengths of 5, 30 and 100 fs, respectively.

  7. High-resolution protein structure determination by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J; Barends, Thomas R M; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Seibert, M Marvin; Montanez, Paul A; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M; Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y; Hunter, Mark S; Johansson, Linda C; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-07-20

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules.

  8. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  9. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron-Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    optoelectronic devices that rely on long charge carrier lifetimes, such as nanostructured solar cells . Further studies of the effects of strain on the carrier...resolution and submicron spatial resolution to characterize charge–carrier recombination and transport dynamics in silicon nanowires (NWs) locally strained...release; distribution is unlimited. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron–Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump–Probe

  10. Estimation of dislocation density from precession electron diffraction data using the Nye tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leff, A.C. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Weinberger, C.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Taheri, M.L., E-mail: mtaheri@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Nye tensor offers a means to estimate the geometrically necessary dislocation density of a crystalline sample based on measurements of the orientation changes within individual crystal grains. In this paper, the Nye tensor theory is applied to precession electron diffraction automated crystallographic orientation mapping (PED-ACOM) data acquired using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The resulting dislocation density values are mapped in order to visualize the dislocation structures present in a quantitative manner. These density maps are compared with other related methods of approximating local strain dependencies in dislocation-based microstructural transitions from orientation data. The effect of acquisition parameters on density measurements is examined. By decreasing the step size and spot size during data acquisition, an increasing fraction of the dislocation content becomes accessible. Finally, the method described herein is applied to the measurement of dislocation emission during in situ annealing of Cu in TEM in order to demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterizing microstructural dynamics. - Highlights: • Developed a method of mapping GND density using orientation mapping data from TEM. • As acquisition length-scale is decreased, all dislocations are considered GNDs. • Dislocation emission and corresponding grain rotation quantified.

  11. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of a CZT growth tip from a vertical gradient freeze furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Henager, C. H.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Bliss, M.; Riley, B. R.

    2011-08-15

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize the growth-tip region of a 4.2-cm diameter CdZnTe (CZT) boule grown using low-pressure Bridgman method in a vertical gradient freeze furnace. The boule was sectioned and polished and a section taken along the boule longitudinal centerline with an approximate surface area of 1-cm2 was used for optical and scanning electron microscopy. A collage was assembled using EBSD/SEM images to show morphological features, e.g., twin structure, grain structure, and overall crystal growth direction. Severely twinned regions originating from the tip and side walls were observed. The overall growth orientation was close to (1 1 0) and (1 1 2) directions. In some regions, the (0 0 1) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction, while twins aligned such that (1 1 1) and (1 1 2) poles aligned with the growth direction. Finally, in some other areas, (1 1 2) or (0 1 1) poles of the CZT matrix aligned with the growth direction. New relationships between the CZT matrix and large Te polycrystalline particles were revealed: {1 1 2-}CZTΙΙ{1 1- 0 0}Te and {0 0 1}CZTII{0 1-1-1}Te.

  12. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bremen, R; Ribas Gomes, D; de Jeer, L T H; Ocelík, V; De Hosson, J Th M

    2016-01-01

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles.

  13. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B. -G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Biophysics

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  14. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  15. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  16. Eucentric four-axis ultrahigh vacuum goniometer for reflection high-energy electron diffraction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmehl, A.; Schulz, R. R.; Mannhart, J.

    2005-12-01

    The design and performance of a four-axis low-profile eucentric UHV goniometer for in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) studies during film deposition is reported. The design provides one translational and three rotational degrees of freedom that are fully independent. Although developed to facilitate high-pressure RHEED during the growth of oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition, this goniometer design is applicable to other UHV techniques including molecular beam epitaxy. The goniometer requires only a single DN 100 CF flange (6in. o.d., 100mm i.d.), making it suitable for small deposition systems, too. Samples, attached to a resistively heated holder, can be easily transferred on and off of the goniometer without breaking vacuum. The holder accommodates samples up to 10mm×10mm in size and allows them to be heated to 900°C in pure oxygen while being attached to the goniometer. Full eucentric motion of the hot sample is possible with a typical axis precision of mechanism is located in air, allowing the use of standard materials and lubricants, substantially reducing the in-vacuum mechanics, and increasing the precision, reliability, and robustness of the system.

  17. The Possibility of Noninvasive Micron High Energy Electron Beam Size Measurement Using Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Gennady; Aryshev, Alexander; Cline, David B; Fukui, Yasuo; Hamatsu, Ryosuke; Hayano, Hitoshi; Karataev, Pavel; Muto, Toshiya; Potylitsyn, Alexander; Ross, Marc; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    During the last years a noninvasive method for beam size measurement based on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been in progress (P. Karataev, et al., Physical Review Letters 93, 244802 (2004). However this technique encounters with hard sensitivity limitation for electron energies larger than several GeV. For example, for SLAC conditions the sensitivity of this method is 4 orders smaller than an appropriate one. We suggest to use a "dis-phased" slit target, where two semi-planes are turned with respect to each other at a small "dis-phased" angle. In order to ensure the interference between the diverged radiation beams we use a cylindrical lens. This method has much better sensitivity and resolution. A "dis-phased" angle 10 milliradians gives the optimal sensitivity to 5 microns transversal beam size. The theoretical model for calculating the ODR radiation from such targets (including focusing by cylindrical lens) is presented. It is shown that the sensitivity of this method does not depend on the L...

  18. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  19. In situ electron backscatter diffraction investigation of recrystallization in a copper wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure; Baudin, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of a cold drawn copper wire (reduction area of 38%) during primary recrystallization and grain growth was observed in situ by electron backscatter diffraction. Two thermal treatments were performed, and successive scans were acquired on samples undergoing heating from ambient temperature to a steady state of 200°C or 215°C. During a third in situ annealing, the temperature was continuously increased up to 600°C. Nuclei were observed to grow at the expense of the deformed microstructure. This growth was enhanced by the high stored energy difference between the nuclei and their neighbors (driving energy in recrystallization) and by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries of high mobility. In the early stages of growth, the nuclei twin and the newly created orientations continue to grow to the detriment of the strained copper. At high temperatures, the disappearance of some twins was evidenced by the migration of the incoherent twin boundaries. Thermal grooving of grain boundaries is observed at these high temperatures and affects the high mobile boundaries but tends to preserve the twin boundaries of lower energy. Thus, grooving may contribute to the twin vanishing.

  20. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  1. Low-energy electron diffraction investigation of epitaxial growth: Pt and Pd on Pd(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn-Sanders, D.

    1990-09-21

    We investigate the epitaxial growth of Pt and Pd and Pd(100) via spot profile analysis using conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). We resolve a central-spike and diffuse component in the spot profiles, reflecting the layer-occupations and pair-correlations, respectively. Kinetic limitations inhibit layer-by-layer growth at low temperatures. Our data suggest diffusion switches on at ca. 150 K for Pt and ca. 170 K for Pd indicating activation barriers to surface diffusion of ca. 10 and ca. 13 kcal/mol, respectively. To clarify the role of diffusion in determining the resulting film morphology, we develop a growth model that incorporates the adsorption-site requirement and predicts intensity oscillations. We present a new procedure to experimentally determine out-of-phase scattering conditions. At these energies, ring-structure is evident in the profiles during Pd growth between ca. 200 and 400 K. We report ring intensity oscillations as a function of coverage, which demonstrate the filling of individual layers.

  2. Low-energy electron diffraction study of rare gas adsorption on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caragiu, Mellita

    2000-10-01

    The method of Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is applied to the study of rare gas - metal systems. The emphasis is on the adsorption site of the adatoms on the substrate, as a result of controversial opinions on this matter arising both from theoretical approaches and previous experimental data. Contrary to the expectations, it is found that rare gases prefer low coordination sites when adsorbed in commensurate phases for practically all studied structures: Cu111 -3x3 R30°-Xe, Pt111- 3x3 R30°-Xe, Pd111 -3x3 R30° -Xe, Ag111 -7x 7R19.1° -4Ar, Cu110 - 41 02 -5Kran dCu110 - 61 02 -7Xe. Possible explanations for the rare gas behavior on metal substrates are reviewed. Besides the crucial information of the rare gas adsorption site, the LEED analysis provides structural (geometrical) parameters for the systems under study and several non-structural ones (e.g. vibrations of the atoms and inner potential of the crystal).

  3. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  4. Homoepitaxial Growth of Metal Halide Crystals Investigated by Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei; Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S.; Wang, Lili; Lunt, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the homoepitaxial growth of a metal halide on single crystals investigated with in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial growth of NaCl on NaCl (001) is explored as a function of temperature and growth rate which provides the first detailed report of RHEED oscillations for metal halide growth. Layer-by-layer growth is observed at room temperature accompanied by clear RHEED oscillations while the growth mode transitions to an island (3D) mode at low temperature. At higher temperatures (>100 °C), RHEED oscillations and AFM data indicate a transition to a step-flow growth mode. To show the importance of such metal halide growth, green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using a doped NaCl film with a phosphorescent emitter as the emissive layer. This study demonstrates the ability to perform in situ and non-destructive RHEED monitoring even on insulating substrates and could enable doped single crystals and crystalline substrates for a range of optoelectronic applications.

  5. Homoepitaxial Growth of Metal Halide Crystals Investigated by Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei; Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S.; Wang, Lili; Lunt, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the homoepitaxial growth of a metal halide on single crystals investigated with in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial growth of NaCl on NaCl (001) is explored as a function of temperature and growth rate which provides the first detailed report of RHEED oscillations for metal halide growth. Layer-by-layer growth is observed at room temperature accompanied by clear RHEED oscillations while the growth mode transitions to an island (3D) mode at low temperature. At higher temperatures (>100 °C), RHEED oscillations and AFM data indicate a transition to a step-flow growth mode. To show the importance of such metal halide growth, green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using a doped NaCl film with a phosphorescent emitter as the emissive layer. This study demonstrates the ability to perform in situ and non-destructive RHEED monitoring even on insulating substrates and could enable doped single crystals and crystalline substrates for a range of optoelectronic applications. PMID:28071732

  6. Electronics and Trigger developments for the Diffractive Physics Proposal at 220 m from LHC-ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Le Dû, P; Kepka, O; Kupco, A; Royon, Christophe; Tic, T; Vrba, Vaclav

    2007-01-01

    The instrumentation consists of two sets of Roman Pots installed respectively at 216 and 224m on both sides from the ATLAS IP to measure with precision the position (< 10 micrometers) and the timing (< 5ps) of the two back to back diffracted protons tracks. Each Roman Pot is equipped with several planes of Silicon strips detectors read out by a new version of the ATLAS Silicon tracker ABCD readout chip with a longer latency (6.4 microseconds) and fast OR outputs defining a track segment. Theses inputs are to be combined in time with the ATLAS level 1 trigger accept signal. In addition, these tracks are time filtered with a very fast timing detector (MCP-PMT) allowing to constraint further at the level 2 the position of the IP within a one millimetre precision., The description of the electronics and trigger system as well as the various technical issues associated with such challenging experiments (clocks, cabling,, time monitoring) will be presented.

  7. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  8. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  9. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C;

    2015-01-01

    of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure...

  10. Quantitative investigation of precipitate growth during ageing of Al-(Mg,Si) alloys by energy-filtered electron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollgarten, M.; Chang, C. S. T.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    LIBRA 200 operated at 200 kV using the in-column omega filter for zero-loss filtered electron diffraction. Recording was on imaging plates (made by Fuji company) which were read out in a scanner of type Ditabis Micron. Scanning resolution was about 7·10-3 nm-1/pixel. Suitable parts of the recorded...

  11. On the bulk degradation of yttria-stabilized nanocrystalline zirconia dental implant abutments : an electron backscatter diffraction study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Schepke, U.; Rasoul, H. Haji; Cune, M. S.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of yttria-stabilized zirconia dental implants abutments due to the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was studied in detail by microstructural characterization using Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). The amount and distribution of the monoclinic phase, the grain-size d

  12. Calculations of the dynamical Debye-Scherrer electron diffraction pattern from small particles of gold and silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B.D. (Inst. de Micro- et Optoelectronique, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)); Reinhard, D. (Inst. de Physique Experimentale, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)); Ugarte, D. (Inst. de Physique Experimentale, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1993-05-01

    Calculations of the dynamical Debye-Scherrer electron diffraction pattern for ultrafine gold and silver particles have been performed using the multislice method. Two cluster sizes, 31 and 55 A in diameter (923 and 5083 atoms, respectively), of both f.c.c. and icosahedral structures were used, at incident voltages of 40 kV and 100 kV. (orig.)

  13. Optical and Electronic Properties of Femtosecond Laser-Induced Sulfur-Hyperdoped Silicon N+/P Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Bohan; Ahmad, Waseem; Xuan, Yaoyu; Ying, Xiangxiao; Liu, Zhijun; Chen, Zhi; Li, Shibin

    2017-09-01

    Impurity-mediated near-infrared (NIR) photoresponse in silicon is of great interest for photovoltaics and photodetectors. In this paper, we have fabricated a series of n+/p photodetectors with hyperdoped silicon prepared by ion-implantation and femtosecond pulsed laser. These devices showed a remarkable enhancement on absorption and photoresponse at NIR wavelengths. The device fabricated with implantation dose of 1014 ions/cm2 has exhibited the best performance. The proposed method offers an approach to fabricate low-cost broadband silicon-based photodetectors.

  14. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  15. Serial femtosecond crystallography: the first five years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilme Schlichting

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein crystallography using synchrotron radiation sources has had a tremendous impact on biology, having yielded the structures of thousands of proteins and given detailed insight into their mechanisms. However, the technique is limited by the requirement for macroscopic crystals, which can be difficult to obtain, as well as by the often severe radiation damage caused in diffraction experiments, in particular when using tiny crystals. To slow radiation damage, data collection is typically performed at cryogenic temperatures. With the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs capable of delivering extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulses, this situation appears to be remedied, allowing the structure determination of undamaged macromolecules using either macroscopic or microscopic crystals. The latter are exposed to the FEL beam in random orientations and their diffraction data are collected at cryogenic or room temperature in a serial fashion, since each crystal is destroyed upon a single exposure. The new approaches required for crystal growth and delivery, and for diffraction data analysis, including de novo phasing, are reviewed. The opportunities and challenges of SFX are described, including applications such as time-resolved measurements and the analysis of radiation damage-prone systems.

  16. Two mirror X-ray pulse split and delay instrument for femtosecond time resolved investigations at the LCLS free electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan F; Kukk, Edwin; Osipov, Timur Y; Coffee, Ryan; Ferguson, Ken R; Xiong, Hui; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Petrovic, Vlad S; Montero, Sebastian Carron; Bozek, John D

    2016-05-30

    We built a two-mirror based X-ray split and delay (XRSD) device for soft X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser facility. The instrument is based on an edge-polished mirror design covering an energy range of 250 eV-1800 eV and producing a delay between the two split pulses variable up to 400 femtoseconds with a sub-100 attosecond resolution. We present experimental and simulation results regarding molecular dissociation dynamics in CH3I and CO probed by the XRSD device. We observed ion kinetic energy and branching ratio dependence on the delay times which were reliably produced by the XRSD instrument.

  17. Ultrafast forward and backward electron transfer dynamics of coumarin 337 in hydrogen-bonded anilines as studied with femtosecond UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Hirendra N; Verma, Sandeep; Nibbering, Erik T J

    2011-02-10

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy is used to study both forward and backward electron transfer (ET) dynamics between coumarin 337 (C337) and the aromatic amine solvents aniline (AN), N-methylaniline (MAN), and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMAN), where all the aniline solvents can donate an electron but only AN and MAN can form hydrogen bonds with C337. The formation of a hydrogen bond with AN and MAN is confirmed with steady state FT-IR spectroscopy, where the C═O stretching vibration is a direct marker mode for hydrogen bond formation. Transient IR absorption measurements in all solvents show an absorption band at 2166 cm(-1), which has been attributed to the C≡N stretching vibration of the C337 radical anion formed after ET. Forward electron transfer dynamics is found to be biexponential with time constants τ(ET)(1) = 500 fs, τ(ET)(2) = 7 ps in all solvents. Despite the presence of hydrogen bonds of C337 with the solvents AN and MAN, no effect has been found on the forward electron transfer step. Because of the absence of an H/D isotope effect on the forward electron transfer reaction of C337 in AN, hydrogen bonds are understood to play a minor role in mediating electron transfer. In contrast, direct π-orbital overlap between C337 and the aromatic amine solvents causes ultrafast forward electron transfer dynamics. Backward electron transfer dynamics, in contrast, is dependent on the solvent used. Standard Marcus theory explains the observed backward electron transfer rates.

  18. Classification and assessment of retrieved electron density maps in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is one of the techniques used to visualize structures of non-crystalline particles of micrometer to submicrometer size from materials and biological science. In the structural analysis of CXDI, the electron density map of a sample particle can theoretically be reconstructed from a diffraction pattern by using phase-retrieval (PR) algorithms. However, in practice, the reconstruction is difficult because diffraction patterns are affected by Poisson noise and miss data in small-angle regions due to the beam stop and the saturation of detector pixels. In contrast to X-ray protein crystallography, in which the phases of diffracted waves are experimentally estimated, phase retrieval in CXDI relies entirely on the computational procedure driven by the PR algorithms. Thus, objective criteria and methods to assess the accuracy of retrieved electron density maps are necessary in addition to conventional parameters monitoring the convergence of PR calculations. Here, a data analysis scheme, named ASURA, is proposed which selects the most probable electron density maps from a set of maps retrieved from 1000 different random seeds for a diffraction pattern. Each electron density map composed of J pixels is expressed as a point in a J-dimensional space. Principal component analysis is applied to describe characteristics in the distribution of the maps in the J-dimensional space. When the distribution is characterized by a small number of principal components, the distribution is classified using the k-means clustering method. The classified maps are evaluated by several parameters to assess the quality of the maps. Using the proposed scheme, structure analysis of a diffraction pattern from a non-crystalline particle is conducted in two stages: estimation of the overall shape and determination of the fine structure inside the support shape. In each stage, the most accurate and probable density maps are objectively selected. The validity

  19. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Zhang, Hongliang; Varga, Tamas; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-08

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  20. The Origin of Graphic Granite: New Insights from Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Wu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Graphic granite, found predominantly in granitic pegmatite, is a leucocratic granitic rock consisting of an intimate intergrowth of alkali feldspar and quartz with a distinctive texture as ancient cuneiform writing when viewed in certain cross sections. Deciphering the graphic texture is important for understanding its origin and the crystallization process of granitic rocks. In this study, we present investigations on petrology, mineral composition, crystallographic relationship and topotaxy of quartz and alkali feldspar in graphic granites from the Fangshan adakitic pluton, Beijing, north China and the Luotian dome in the Northern Dabie Mountains, central China. The euhedral to subhedral coarse-grained feldspar host in graphic granite can be alkali feldspar or plagioclase. Microscopically, the feldspar host is usually a perthite, which is decomposed into irregular intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar. The volume content of quartz usually ranges from 20% to 45%, and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite depends greatly on the formation conditions. However, the quartz-feldspar ratio and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite are relatively stable in coeval graphic granites in the same area. The majority of the quartz grains undergrown with host feldspar are in the form of sub-parallel tabular, long rods and unconnected dendritic crystals, which only shows a distinctive graphic texture in certain cross sections. Under cross polarized light microscopy, multiple domains of quartz grains exhibit a nearly simultaneous extinction within a single crystal of feldspar. The crystallographic orientations of the quartz grains and the host feldspar were measured using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Statistical analyses indicate a definite crystallographic orientation relationship between the majority of graphic quartz grains and the host feldspar in that [11-23]Quartz parallel to [001]Feldspar. Moreover, Dauphiné twin of quartz

  1. Distinguishing between biologically induced and biologically controlled mineralization in fossil organisms using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Jan-Filip; Jarochowska, Emilia; Bestmann, Michel; Munnecke, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and metazoans, i.e. biologically induced calcification (BIM) vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM) might be possible to discern through different crystallographic structures in which they result. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Paleozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella Wood 1945, considered to be a cyanobacterium, and Allonema Ulrich & Bassler 1904. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a reference. The shell of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. The pole figures and misorientation axis distribution reveal a fiber texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°), indicating a well-organized structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show a random distribution. However, Rothpletzella also shares other morphological similarities with fossil and extant cyanobacteria. We propose that the strict limitation of rotations (misorientations) between adjacent crystals around a specific axis of the crystal system can be used as a criterion to distinguish shells formed through biologically controlled biomineralization.

  2. Molecular structure of gaseous isatin as studied by electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Alexander V.; Nikolaenko, Kirill O.; Davidovich, Pavel B.; Ivanov, Anatolii D.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structure of isatin, indole-2,3-dione, was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum chemical calculations (M062X and MP2 methods with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set). The best fit of the experimental scattering intensities (R-factor = 4.4%) was obtained for a molecular model of Cs symmetry. The structure of the benzene ring deviates from a regular hexagon due to the adjacent pyrrole heterocycle. The small differences between similar geometric parameters were constrained at the values calculated at the M062X level. The experimental structural parameters agree well with the results of theoretical calculations. The bonds in the benzene moiety are in agreement with their standard values. The (Odbnd)Csbnd C(dbnd O) carbon-carbon bond of the pyrrole moiety (1.573(7) Å) is remarkably lengthened in comparison with standard C(sp2)sbnd C(sp2) value, 1.425(11) Å for N-methylpyrrole. According to NBO analysis of isatin, glyoxal and pyrrole-2,3-dione molecules this lengthening cannot be attributed to the steric interactions of Cdbnd O bonds alone and is, mainly, due to the electrostatic repulsion and hyperconjugation that is delocalization of oxygen lone pairs of π-type into the corresponding carbon-carbon antibonding orbital, nπ(O) → σ∗(Csbnd C). Deletion of σ∗(Csbnd C) orbital followed by subsequent geometry optimization led to shortening of the corresponding Csbnd C bond by 0.06 Å. According to different aromaticity descriptors, aromaticity of benzene moiety of isatin is smaller in comparison with benzene molecule. External magnetic field induces diatropic ring current in benzene moiety of isatin.

  3. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  4. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  5. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-15

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 {mu}m) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 {mu}m). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  6. Nanoscale strain distributions in embedded SiGe semiconductor devices revealed by precession electron diffraction and dual lens dark field electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. Y. [IBM Micro-Electronics Division, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12570 (United States); Cooper, D.; Bernier, N. [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, J. [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Murray, C. E.; Bruley, J. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Route 134, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    The detailed strain distributions produced by embedded SiGe stressor structures are measured at high spatial resolution with high precision, with dual lens dark field electron holography and precession electron diffraction. Shear strain and lattice rotation within the crystalline lattice are observed at the boundaries between the SiGe and Si regions. The experimental results are compared to micromechanical modeling simulations to understand the mechanisms of elastic relaxation on all the modes of deformation at a sub-micron length scale.

  7. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  8. Atomic structure solution of the complex quasicrystal approximant Al77Rh15Ru8 from electron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuha, Shmuel; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Grushko, Benjamin; Kolb, Ute; Meshi, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the novel Al77Rh15Ru8 phase (which is an approximant of decagonal quasicrystals) was determined using modern direct methods (MDM) applied to automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) data. The Al77Rh15Ru8 E-phase is orthorhombic [Pbma, a = 23.40 (5), b = 16.20 (4) and c = 20.00 (5) Å] and has one of the most complicated intermetallic structures solved solely by electron diffraction methods. Its structural model consists of 78 unique atomic positions in the unit cell (19 Rh/Ru and 59 Al). Precession electron diffraction (PED) patterns and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) images were used for the validation of the proposed atomic model. The structure of the E-phase is described using hierarchical packing of polyhedra and a single type of tiling in the form of a parallelogram. Based on this description, the structure of the E-phase is compared with that of the ε6-phase formed in Al-Rh-Ru at close compositions.

  9. Femtosecond-laser induced dynamics of CO on Ru(0001): Deep insights from a hot-electron friction model including surface motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Robert; Floß, Gereon; Saalfrank, Peter; Füchsel, Gernot; Lončarić, Ivor; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin model accounting for all six molecular degrees of freedom is applied to femtosecond-laser induced, hot-electron driven dynamics of Ru(0001)(2 ×2 ):CO. In our molecular dynamics with electronic friction approach, a recently developed potential energy surface based on gradient-corrected density functional theory accounting for van der Waals interactions is adopted. Electronic friction due to the coupling of molecular degrees of freedom to electron-hole pairs in the metal are included via a local density friction approximation, and surface phonons by a generalized Langevin oscillator model. The action of ultrashort laser pulses enters through a substrate-mediated, hot-electron mechanism via a time-dependent electronic temperature (derived from a two-temperature model), causing random forces acting on the molecule. The model is applied to laser induced lateral diffusion of CO on the surface, "hot adsorbate" formation, and laser induced desorption. Reaction probabilities are strongly enhanced compared to purely thermal processes, both for diffusion and desorption. Reaction yields depend in a characteristic (nonlinear) fashion on the applied laser fluence, as well as branching ratios for various reaction channels. Computed two-pulse correlation traces for desorption and other indicators suggest that aside from electron-hole pairs, phonons play a non-negligible role for laser induced dynamics in this system, acting on a surprisingly short time scale. Our simulations on precomputed potentials allow for good statistics and the treatment of long-time dynamics (300 ps), giving insight into this system which hitherto has not been reached. We find generally good agreement with experimental data where available and make predictions in addition. A recently proposed laser induced population of physisorbed precursor states could not be observed with the present low-coverage model.

  10. Molecular structure of cotinine studied by gas electron diffraction combined with theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2007-09-01

    The molecular structure of cotinine (( S)-1-methyl-5-(3-pyridinyl)-2-pyrrolidinone), the major metabolite of nicotine, has been determined at about 182 °C by gas electron diffraction combined with MP2 and DFT calculations. The diffraction data are consistent with the existence of the (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers, where ax and eq indicate the configuration of the pyrrolidinone ring by means of the position (axial and equatorial) of the pyridine ring, and sc, sp and ap distinguish the isomers arising from the internal rotation around the bond connecting the two rings. The (CH 3)NCCC(N) dihedral angles, ϕ, of the (ax, sc) and (eq, sp) conformers were determined independently to be 158(12)° and 129(13)°, respectively, where the numbers in parentheses are three times the standard errors, 3 σ. According to the MP2 calculations, the corresponding dihedral angles for the (ax, ap) and (eq, ap) conformers were assumed to differ by 180° from their syn counterparts. The ratios x(ax, sc)/ x(ax, ap) and x(eq, sp)/ x(eq, ap) were taken from the theoretically estimated free energy differences, Δ G, where x is the abundance of the conformer. The resultant abundances of (ax, sc), (ax, ap), (eq, sp) and (eq, ap) conformers are 34(6)%, 21% (d.p.), 28% (d.p.), and 17% (d.p.), respectively, where d.p. represents dependent parameters. The determined structural parameters ( rg (Å) and ∠ α (°)) of the most abundant conformer, (ax, sc), are as follows: r(N sbnd C) pyrrol = 1.463(5); r(N sbnd C methyl) = 1.457(←); r(N sbnd C( dbnd O)) = 1.384(12); r(C dbnd O) = 1.219(5); = 1.541(3); r(C pyrrolsbnd C pyrid) = 1.521(←); = 1.396(2); = 1.343(←); ∠(CNC) pyrrol = 113.9(11); ∠CCC pyrrol(-C pyrid) = 103.6(←); ∠NCO = 124.1(13); ∠NC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.1(12); ∠C pyrrolC pyrrolC pyrid = 113.3(←); ∠(CNC) pyrid = 117.1(2); = 124.4(←); ∠C methylNC( dbnd O) = ∠C methylNC(-C pyrid) = 122.8(d.p.); ∠NC( dbnd O)C = 107.1(d.p.); ∠NC pyrrol

  11. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  12. Electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy in the characterization of calcium phosphate precipitation from aqueous solutions under biomineralization conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvorova E. I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate precipitation obtained from aqueous solutions at room and body temperature and pH 5.5-7.5 were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, transmission electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphates were prepared by different methods of mixing of the stock solutions: diffusion-controlled mixing in space, convection-controlled mixing on earth and forced mixing on earth and with typical physiological parameters (pH and temperature. Concentrations of the stock solutions, rate of solution mixing and duration of precipitation influence very strongly the chemical composition of the precipitation, the phase composition of individual crystals, their sizes, morphology and structure. Microdiffraction and HRTEM techniques showed an incontestable advantage on other techniques like SEM and XRD in the investigation of small particles and mixtures of calcium phosphates (hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate with different proportions.

  13. Characterization of the Absolute Crystal Polarity across Twin Boundaries in Gallium Phosphide Using Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen; McKernan; Carter

    1999-05-01

    : The measurement of absolute crystal polarity is crucial to understanding the structural properties of many planar defects in compound semiconductors. Grain boundaries, including twin boundaries, in the sphalerite lattice are uniquely characterized by the crystallographic misorientation of individual grains and the direction of the crystal polarity in domains adjoining the grain boundary. To evaluate crystal polarity in gallium phosphide (GaP), asymmetrical interference contrast in convergent-beam electron-diffraction (CBED) patterns was used to ascertain the nature and direction of polar bonds. The direction of the asymmetry in the electron diffraction reflections was correlated with the crystal polarity of a sample with known polarity. The CBED technique was applied to determine the polar orientation of grains adjoining Sigma = 3 coherent and lateral twin boundaries in polycrystalline GaP.

  14. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Gallé, G.; Scott, S. A.; Pérez, J. R. Sánchez; Lagally, M. G.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Faure, J.

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  15. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  16. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  17. Multi-objective Optimizations of a Novel Cryo-cooled DC Gun Based Ultra Fast Electron Diffraction Beamline

    OpenAIRE

    Gulliford, C.; Bartnik, A.; Bazarov, I.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of multi-objective genetic algorithm optimizations of a potential single shot ultra fast electron diffraction beamline utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final r...

  18. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  19. High-angle triple-axis specimen holder for three-dimensional diffraction contrast imaging in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S., E-mail: hata.satoshi.207@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Miyazaki, H. [Mel-Build, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0052 (Japan); Miyazaki, S. [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan); Mitsuhara, M. [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Kaneko, K.; Higashida, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ikeda, K.; Nakashima, H. [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsumura, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Barnard, J.S. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Sharp, J.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Electron tomography requires a wide angular range of specimen-tilt for a reliable three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Although specimen holders are commercially available for tomography, they have several limitations, including tilting capability in only one or two axes at most, e.g. tilt-rotate. For amorphous specimens, the image contrast depends on mass and thickness only and the single-tilt holder is adequate for most tomographic image acquisitions. On the other hand, for crystalline materials where image contrast is strongly dependent on diffraction conditions, current commercially available tomography holders are inadequate, because they lack tilt capability in all three orthogonal axes needed to maintain a constant diffraction condition over the whole tilt range. We have developed a high-angle triple-axis (HATA) tomography specimen holder capable of high-angle tilting for the primary horizontal axis with tilting capability in the other (orthogonal) horizontal and vertical axes. This allows the user to trim the specimen tilt to obtain the desired diffraction condition over the whole tilt range of the tomography series. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have used this triple-axis tomography holder with a dual-axis tilt series (the specimen was rotated by 90{sup o} ex-situ between series) to obtain tomographic reconstructions of dislocation arrangements in plastically deformed austenitic steel foils. -- Highlights: {yields} A double tilt-rotate specimen holder for diffraction contrast imaging in electron tomography. {yields} Precise alignment of a diffraction condition for tilt-series acquisition of TEM/STEM images. {yields} Complete visualization of 3D dislocation arrangements by dual-axis STEM tomography.

  20. Time-resolved measurement of the three-dimensional motion of gold nanocrystals in water using diffracted electron tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Naoki, E-mail: n-ogawa@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Integrated Science in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Graduate School for Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirohata, Yasuhisa [Department of Integrated Science in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Ishikawa, Akira, E-mail: ishikawa@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajosui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    We introduce diffracted electron tracking (DET), which combines two electron microscopy techniques, electron backscatter diffraction and the use of an environmental cell in a scanning electron microscope to measure changes in nanocrystal-orientation. The accuracy of DET was verified by measuring the motion of a flat gold crystal caused by the rotation or tilting of the specimen stage. DET was applied to measure the motion of semi-fixed gold nanocrystals in various environments. In addition to large motions induced in water environment, DET could detect small differences in the three-dimensional (3D) motion amplitude between vacuum environment and an Ar gas environment. DET promises to be a useful method for measuring the motion of single nanocrystals in various environments. This measuring technique may be used in a wide range of scientific fields; for example, DET may be a prospective method to track the single molecule dynamics of molecules labeled with gold nanocrystals. - Highlights: • We developed DET for measuring single molecular dynamics. • DET can be run by a scanning electron microscope only attached with EBSD system. • DET was assured using a flat gold crystal corresponding to sample stage movements. • DET can measure the Brownian motion of gold nanocrystals in water environment.

  1. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  3. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  4. Single-pulse enhanced coherent diffraction imaging of bacteria with an X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Yaling; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sunam; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Yao, Shengkun; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jianhua; Duan, Xiulan; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun; Earnest, Thomas; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution imaging offers one of the most promising approaches for exploring and understanding the structure and function of biomaterials and biological systems. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) combined with coherent diffraction imaging can theoretically provide high-resolution spatial information regarding biological materials using a single XFEL pulse. Currently, the application of this method suffers from the low scattering cross-section of biomaterials and X-ray damage to the sample. However, XFELs can provide pulses of such short duration that the data can be collected using the “diffract and destroy” approach before the effects of radiation damage on the data become significant. These experiments combine the use of enhanced coherent diffraction imaging with single-shot XFEL radiation to investigate the cellular architecture of Staphylococcus aureus with and without labeling by gold (Au) nanoclusters. The resolution of the images reconstructed from these diffraction patterns were twice as high or more for gold-labeled samples, demonstrating that this enhancement method provides a promising approach for the high-resolution imaging of biomaterials and biological systems.

  5. Single-pulse enhanced coherent diffraction imaging of bacteria with an X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Yaling; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sunam; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Yao, Shengkun; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jianhua; Duan, Xiulan; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Gao, Xueyun; Earnest, Thomas; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging offers one of the most promising approaches for exploring and understanding the structure and function of biomaterials and biological systems. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) combined with coherent diffraction imaging can theoretically provide high-resolution spatial information regarding biological materials using a single XFEL pulse. Currently, the application of this method suffers from the low scattering cross-section of biomaterials and X-ray damage to the sample. However, XFELs can provide pulses of such short duration that the data can be collected using the “diffract and destroy” approach before the effects of radiation damage on the data become significant. These experiments combine the use of enhanced coherent diffraction imaging with single-shot XFEL radiation to investigate the cellular architecture of Staphylococcus aureus with and without labeling by gold (Au) nanoclusters. The resolution of the images reconstructed from these diffraction patterns were twice as high or more for gold-labeled samples, demonstrating that this enhancement method provides a promising approach for the high-resolution imaging of biomaterials and biological systems. PMID:27659203

  6. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Donghui [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Huang, Mei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Wang, Zhijiang, E-mail: wangzj@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Feng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  8. Studies of electron diffusion in photo-excited Ni using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, A. I. H.; Jarnac, A.; Wang, Xiaocui; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the heat deposition profile in a laser-excited metal can be determined by time-resolved X-ray diffraction. In this study, we investigated the electron diffusion in a 150 nm thick nickel film deposited on an indium antimonide substrate. A strain wave that mimics the heat deposition profile is generated in the metal and propagates into the InSb, where it influences the temporal profile of X-rays diffracted from InSb. We found that the strain pulse significantly deviated from a simple exponential profile, and that the two-temperature model was needed to reproduce the measured heat deposition profile. Experimental results were compared to simulations based on the two-temperature model carried out using commercial finite-element software packages and on-line dynamical diffraction tools. To reproduce the experimental data, the electron-phonon coupling factor was lowered compared to previously measured values. The experiment was carried out at a third-generation synchrotron radiation source using a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera with a temporal resolution of 3 ps.

  9. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner, E-mail: hwfink@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-15

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. - Highlights: • Structural biology of single proteins. • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Holography. • Low-energy electrons. • Coherent diffraction and phase retrieval.

  10. Measurement of chromatic aberration in STEM and SCEM by coherent convergent beam electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C L; Etheridge, J

    2013-02-01

    A simple method is described for the accurate and precise measurement of chromatic aberration under electron-optical conditions pertinent to scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). The method requires only the measurement of distances in a coherent CBED pattern and knowledge of the electron wavelength and the lattice spacing of a calibration specimen. The chromatic aberration of a spherical-aberration corrected 300 kV thermal field emission TEM is measured in STEM and SCEM operating modes and under different condenser lens settings. The effect of the measured chromatic aberrations on the 3 dimensional intensity distribution of the electron probe is also considered.

  11. Convergent-beam low energy electron diffraction (CBLEED) and the measurement of surface dipole layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J C H; Poon, H C; Saldin, D K

    2004-02-01

    We propose the formation of LEED patterns using a highly convergent beam forming a probe of nanometer dimensions. A reflection rocking curve may then be recorded in many diffraction orders simultaneously. Multiple scattering calculations show that the intensity variations within these rocking curves is as sensitive to the parameters describing the surface dipole layer as conventional I/V scans. However the data may be collected from areas sufficiently small to avoid defects and surface steps, radiation damage controlled by use of low voltages, and the information depth selected by choice of the (constant) voltage. We briefly discuss also the application of this method to oxides and the formation of atomic-resolution scanning images in an idealized instrument in which coherent diffracted LEED orders overlap.

  12. Spatiotemporal stability of a femtosecond hard-x-ray undulator source studied by control of coherent optical phonons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, P; Johnson, S L; Streun, A; Abela, R; Abramsohn, D; Grolimund, D; Krasniqi, F; Schmidt, T; Schlott, V; Ingold, G

    2007-10-26

    We report on the temporal and spatial stability of the first tunable femtosecond undulator hard-x-ray source for ultrafast diffraction and absorption experiments. The 2.5-1 Angstrom output radiation is driven by an initial 50 fs laser pulse employing the laser-electron slicing technique. By using x-ray diffraction to probe laser-induced coherent optical phonons in bulk bismuth, we estimate an x-ray pulse duration of 140+/-30 fs FWHM with timing drifts below 30 fs rms measured over 5 days. Optical control of coherent lattice motion is demonstrated.

  13. Simulation of Coherent Diffraction Radiation Generation by Pico-Second Electron Bunches in an Open Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhikh, L. G.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Verigin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this report we present new approach for calculation of processes of diffraction radiation generation, storage and decay in an open resonator based on generalized surface current method. The radiation characteristics calculated using the developed approach were compared with those calculated using Gaussian-Laguerre modes method. The comparison shows reasonable coincidence of the results that allows to use developed method for investigation of more complicated resonators.

  14. Damage investigation on tungsten and diamond diffractive optics at a hard x-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Daniel; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Schroer, Christian G; Seiboth, Frank; Patommel, Jens; Meier, Vivienne; Hoppe, Robert; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sinn, Harald; Vogt, Ulrich

    2013-04-08

    Focusing hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation with extremely high fluence sets stringent demands on the x-ray optics. Any material placed in an intense x-ray beam is at risk of being damaged. Therefore, it is crucial to find the damage thresholds for focusing optics. In this paper we report experimental results of exposing tungsten and diamond diffractive optics to a prefocused 8.2 keV free-electron laser beam in order to find damage threshold fluence levels. Tungsten nanostructures were damaged at fluence levels above 500 mJ/cm(2). The damage was of mechanical character, caused by thermal stress variations. Diamond nanostructures were affected at a fluence of 59 000 mJ/cm(2). For fluence levels above this, a significant graphitization process was initiated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and µ-Raman analysis were used to analyze exposed nanostructures.

  15. Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metal photocathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yun-Quan; Zhang Jie; Liang Wen-Xi

    2005-01-01

    The features of interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with photocathode are studied theoretically in this paper.The surface temperature of the metal cathode film while femtosecond laser pulses irradiation is studied with twotemperature model. With a simple photoelectric model we obtain the optimum metal film thickness for the backilluminated photocathode. The generated ultrashort photocurrent pulses are strongly dependent on the temperature of the electron gas and the lattice during the femtosecond laser pulse irradiation on the photocathode.

  16. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles. PMID:24763651

  17. Multiscale modeling of femtosecond laser irradiation on copper film with electron thermal conductivity from ab initio calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    By combining ab initio quantum mechanics calculation and Drude model, electron temperature and lattice temperature dependent electron thermal conductivity is calculated and implemented into a multiscale model of laser material interaction, which couples the classical molecular dynamics and two-temperature model. The results indicated that the electron thermal conductivity obtained from ab initio calculation leads to faster thermal diffusion than that using the electron thermal conductivity from empirical determination, which further induces deeper melting region, larger number of density waves travelling inside the copper film and more various speeds of atomic clusters ablated from the irradiated film surface.

  18. Preliminary results of a femto-second electron bunch facility%飞秒电子束装置的初步实验结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾强; 陈永中; 戴志敏; 李德明; 赵振堂

    2008-01-01

    上海应用物理研究所建造并调试了一台飞秒电子束装置.这台装置主要由一把S波段热阴极微波电子枪、一台alpha磁铁和一根SLAC型加速管组成.这台装置可以产生能量为 20~30 MeV,峰值电流为100 A,微束团长度为250 fs的电子束.这篇文章报道了这台装置的调试和电子束团参数的测量.%A femto-second electron bunch facility has been constructed and commissioned at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics(SINAP).The linac of this facility consists of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun,an alpha magnet and a SLAC-type accelerating tube to generate a beam,then compress the micro-bunches,and finally accelerate the beam to 20~30 MeV.Preliminary experimental result shows that the length of the micro-bunches is about 250 fs.The measured beam parameters of this facility are presented in this paper.

  19. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid using a hard X-ray free electron laser in a dual-beam dispersive detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Chiba, Yuhei; Isokawa, Yusuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Suzuki, Toshinori; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-13

    We present femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solution using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronized Ti:sapphire laser. The instrumental response time is 200 fs, and the repetition rate of measurement is 10 Hz. A cylindrical liquid beam 100 μm in diameter of aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate solution is photoexcited at 400 nm, and the transient X-ray absorption spectra are measured in the K-edge region of iron, 7.10 - 7.26 keV, using a dual X-ray beam dispersive detection method. Each of the dual beams has the pulse energy of 1.4 μJ, and pump-induced absorbance change on the order of 10(-3) is successfully detected. The photoexcited iron complex exhibits a red shifted iron K-edge with the appearance time constant of 260 fs. The X-ray absorption difference spectra, with and without the pump pulses, are independent of time delay after 1.5 ps up to 100 ps, indicating that the photoexcited species is long-lived.

  20. Three-dimensional structure determination protocol for noncrystalline biomolecules using x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    Coherent and intense x-ray pulses generated by x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources are paving the way for structural determination of noncrystalline biomolecules. However, due to the small scattering cross section of electrons for x rays, the available incident x-ray intensity of XFEL sources, which is currently in the range of 10(12)-10(13) photons/μm(2)/pulse, is lower than that necessary to perform single-molecule diffraction experiments for noncrystalline biomolecules even with the molecular masses of megadalton and submicrometer dimensions. Here, we propose an experimental protocol and analysis method for visualizing the structure of those biomolecules by the combined application of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction methods. To compensate the small scattering cross section of biomolecules, in our protocol, a thin vitreous ice plate containing several hundred biomolecules/μm(2) is used as sample, a setup similar to that utilized by single-molecule cryoelectron microscopy. The scattering cross section of such an ice plate is far larger than that of a single particle. The images of biomolecules contained within irradiated areas are then retrieved from each diffraction pattern, and finally provide the three-dimensional electron density model. A realistic atomic simulation using large-scale computations proposed that the three-dimensional structure determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit embedded in a vitreous ice plate is possible at a resolution of 0.8 nm when an x-ray beam of 10(16) photons/500×500 nm(2)/pulse is available.

  1. Phase retrieval from single biomolecule diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shiro; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2012-02-13

    In this paper, we propose the SPR (sparse phase retrieval) method, which is a new phase retrieval method for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI). Conventional phase retrieval methods effectively solve the problem for high signal-to-noise ratio measurements, but would not be sufficient for single biomolecular imaging which is expected to be realized with femto-second x-ray free electron laser pulses. The SPR method is based on the Bayesian statistics. It does not need to set the object boundary constraint that is required by the commonly used hybrid input-output (HIO) method, instead a prior distribution is defined with an exponential distribution and used for the estimation. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method reconstructs the electron density under a noisy condition even some central pixels are masked.

  2. Third-dimension information retrieval from a single convergent-beam transmission electron diffraction pattern using an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Van den Broek, Wouter; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-05-01

    We have reconstructed third-dimension specimen information from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns simulated using the stacked-Bloch-wave method. By reformulating the stacked-Bloch-wave formalism as an artificial neural network and optimizing with resilient back propagation, we demonstrate specimen orientation reconstructions with depth resolutions down to 5 nm. To show our algorithm's ability to analyze realistic data, we also discuss and demonstrate our algorithm reconstructing from noisy data and using a limited number of CBED disks. Applicability of this reconstruction algorithm to other specimen parameters is discussed.

  3. Structural Features of Nanocrystalline Magnetite Obtained by Different Syntheses According to X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Kalinkevich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural features of nanosized magnetite Fe3O4 synthesized in the presence of polymeric matrices (polysaccharide chitosan, etc. were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. The data obtained strongly suggest the influence of the polysaccharide matrix on the magnetite nanoparticles growth inhibition and size stabilization. The controlled size decrease of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is accompanied with the increase of crystal lattice imperfection and the decrease of the unit cell size. The utility of TEM and XRD complementary use for the determination of nanosized magnetite particles structure and substructure parameters is shown in the present paper.

  4. Electron tomography and nano-diffraction enabling the investigation of individual magnetic nanoparticles inside fibers of MR visible implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabu, I.; Wirch, N.; Caumanns, T.; Theissmann, R.; Krüger, M.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Weirich, T. E.

    2017-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONPs) incorporated into the base material of implants are used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging for the delineation of the implants from the surrounding tissue. However, the delineation quality is strongly related to the structural characteristics of the incorporated SPIONPs and their interparticle interaction as well as their interaction with the polymer matrix of the implant. Consequently, a profound knowledge of the formation of aggregates inside the polymer matrix, which are responsible for strong interparticle interactions, and of their structural characteristics, is required for controlling the magnetic resonance image quality of the implants. In this work, transmission electron microscopy methods such as electron tomography and nano-electron diffraction were used to depict SPIONP aggregates inside the melt-spin polyvinylidene fluoride fibers used for the assembly of implants and to determine the crystal structure of individual nanocrystals inside these aggregates, respectively. Using these techniques it was possible for the first time to characterize the aggregates inside the fibers of implants and to validate the magnetization measurements that have been previously used to assess the interaction phenomena inside the fibers of implants. With electron tomography, inhomogeneously sized distributed aggregates were delineated and 3D models of these aggregates were constructed. Furthermore, the distribution of the aggregates inside the fibers was verified by means of magnetic force microscopy. With nano-diffraction measurements, the SPIONP crystal structure inside the fibers of the implant could not be clearly assigned to that of magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). Therefore, additional electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements were performed, which revealed the presence of both phases of Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3, probably caused by oxidation processes during the manufacture of the fibers by

  5. Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chufeng; Schmidt, Kevin; Spence, John C

    2015-07-01

    We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold.

  6. Towards sub-femtosecond emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Roger; Hansen, Peter; Batelaan, Herman; Hilbert, Shawn

    2010-03-01

    To manipulate femtosecond pulses of electrons new electron optical elements are needed. For example, if a source has a lower limit in the duration of the electron pulses that it generates, then aan electron optical element that can reduce the pulse duration could be useful. An example of this is the proposed ``temporal lens '' [1]. To detect the short electron pulses one also needs new elements. Attempts to use the ponderomotive interaction between the electron pulse and a second laser pulse will be presented [2]. Alternatively, we have started to explore a plasmonics structure provided by the Capasso group to make a fast electron switch. This has the potential to be useful both for switching, shaping and detecting the electron pulse. Finally, the experimental parameters and detection ideas for quantum degeneracy will be discussed. [1] S. Hilbert, B. Barwick, K. Uiterwaal, H. Batelaan, A. Zewail, ``Temporal lenses for attosecond and femtosecond electron pulses'', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, p. 10558, vol. 106, (2009). [2] L. Kreminskaya, C. Corder, V. Engquist, O. Golovin, P. Hansen, H. Batelaan, A. I. Khizhnyak, G. A. Swartzlander, Jr., ``Laser Beam Shaping: Donut Mode Formation by Interference.'' Laser Beam Shaping X (Proceedings Volume) Proceedings of SPIE Volume: 7430.

  7. Design of an MeV ultra-fast electron diffraction experiment at Tsinghua university

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ren-Kai; TANG Chuan-Xiang; HUANG Wen-Hui; DU Ying-Chao; SHI Jia-Ru; YAN Li-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved MeV ultra-fast electron difiraction(UED)is a powerful tool for structure dynamics studies.In this paper.we present a design of a MeV UED facility based on a photocathode RF gun at Tsinghua University.Electron beam qualities are optimized with numerical simulations,indicating that resolutions of 250 fs and 0.01 A.and bunch charge exceeding 105 electrons are expected with technically achievable machine parameters.Status of experiment preparation is also presented.

  8. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  9. Above-Threshold Ionization and Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction in Diatomic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, N; Ciappina, M F; Wolter, B; Biegert, J; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and a...

  10. Ultrafast Electron Transfer in Complexes of Doxorubicin with Human Telomeric G-Quadruplexes and GC Duplexes Probed by Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Manet, Ilse

    2016-05-04

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a natural anthracycline widely used in chemotherapy; its combined application as a chemotherapeutic and photodynamic agent has been recently proposed. In this context, understanding the photoinduced properties of DOX complexes with nucleic acids is crucial. Herein, the study of photoinduced electron transfer in DOX-DNA complexes by femtosecond fluorescence spectroscopy is reported. The behaviour of complexes with two model DNA structures, a G-quadruplex (G4) formed by the human telomeric sequence (Tel21) and a d(GC) duplex, is compared. The DOX affinity for these two sequences is similar. Although both 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries have been reported for DOX-G4 complexes, only 1:1 complexes form with the duplex. The steady-state absorption indicates a strong binding interaction with the duplex due to drug intercalation between the GC base pairs. In contrast, the interaction of DOX with Tel21 is much weaker and arises from drug binding on the G4 external faces at two independent binding sites. As observed for DOX-d(GC) complexes, fluorescence of the drug in the first binding site of Tel21 exhibits decays within a few picoseconds following a biphasic pattern; this is attributed to the existence of two drug conformations. The fluorescence of the drug in the second binding site of Tel21 shows slower decays within 150 ps. These timescales are consistent with electron transfer from the guanines to the excited drug, as favoured by the lower oxidation potential of the stacked guanines of G4 with respect to those in the duplex.

  11. Advances in X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction data processing applied to the crystal structure of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhao, Minglei; Brewster, Aaron S; Michels-Clark, Tara; Holton, James M; Sauter, Nicholas K; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-10-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) reduce the effects of radiation damage on macromolecular diffraction data and thereby extend the limiting resolution. Previously, we adapted classical post-refinement techniques to XFEL diffraction data to produce accurate diffraction data sets from a limited number of diffraction images (Uervirojnangkoorn et al., 2015), and went on to use these techniques to obtain a complete data set from crystals of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex and to determine the structure at 3.5 Å resolution (Zhou et al., 2015). Here, we describe new advances in our methods and present a reprocessed XFEL data set of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex. The reprocessing produced small improvements in electron density maps and the refined atomic model. The maps also contained more information than those of a lower resolution (4.1 Å) synchrotron data set. Processing a set of simulated XFEL diffraction images revealed that our methods yield accurate data and atomic models.

  12. Modeling electron density distributions from X-ray diffraction to derive optical properties: Constrained wavefunction versus multipole refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickstein, Daniel D.; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Turner, Michael J.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-01

    The rational design of next-generation optical materials requires an understanding of the connection between molecular structure and the solid-state optical properties of a material. A fundamental challenge is to utilize the accurate structural information provided by X-ray diffraction to explain the properties of a crystal. For years, the multipole refinement has been the workhorse technique for transforming high-resolution X-ray diffraction datasets into the detailed electron density distribution of crystalline material. However, the electron density alone is not sufficient for a reliable calculation of the nonlinear optical properties of a material. Recently, the X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement has emerged as a viable alternative to the multipole refinement, offering several potential advantages, including the calculation of a wide range of physical properties and seeding the refinement process with a physically reasonable starting point. In this study, we apply both the multipole refinement and the X-ray constrained wavefunction technique to four molecules with promising nonlinear optical properties and diverse structural motifs. In general, both techniques obtain comparable figures of merit and generate largely similar electron densities, demonstrating the wide applicability of the X-ray constrained wavefunction method. However, there are some systematic differences between the electron densities generated by each technique. Importantly, we find that the electron density generated using the X-ray constrained wavefunction method is dependent on the exact location of the nuclei. The X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement makes smaller changes to the wavefunction when coordinates from the Hartree-Fock-based Hirshfeld atom refinement are employed rather than coordinates from the multipole refinement, suggesting that coordinates from the Hirshfeld atom refinement allow the X-ray constrained wavefunction method to produce more accurate wavefunctions. We

  13. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z., E-mail: mmo09@slac.stanford.edu; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [Faculty of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  14. Accurate determination of lattice parameters based on Niggli reduced cell theory by using digitized electron diffraction micrograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Cai, Canying; Lin, Jianguo; Gong, Lunjun; Yang, Qibin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we used Niggli reduced cell theory to determine lattice constants of a micro/nano crystal by using electron diffraction patterns. The Niggli reduced cell method enhanced the accuracy of lattice constant measurement obviously, because the lengths and the angles of lattice vectors of a primitive cell can be measured directly on the electron micrographs instead of a double tilt holder. With the aid of digitized algorithm and least square optimization by using three digitized micrographs, a valid reciprocal Niggli reduced cell number can be obtained. Thus a reciprocal and real Bravais lattices are acquired. The results of three examples, i.e., Mg4Zn7, an unknown phase (Precipitate phase in nickel-base superalloy) and Ba4Ti13O30 showed that the maximum errors are 1.6% for lengths and are 0.3% for angles.

  15. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  16. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  17. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sanchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-di...

  18. 高能飞秒激光烧蚀金靶材的动态热导率影响研究%Effect of Electronic Thermal Conductivity on Properties of Gold Target Material of Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭新玉; 魏慧丽; 毛峰; 徐辉进; 黄祥平; 易佳

    2011-01-01

    The influence of electronic thermal conductivity on properties of the femtosecond laser ablation of gold was studied. Because the electron heat capacity, electron-phonon coupling coefficient and electronic thermal conductivity and other thermal physical parameters had influence on the maximum temperature, electron-phonon coupling time and electron-phonon coupling temperature, which characterized the properties of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation. In addition, the physical parameters were expressions of electron temperature or electron temperature and lattice temperature. In order to better understand the influence of electronic thermal conductivity on properties in femtosecond laser ablation, electronic heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling coefficient were taken a reasonable constant value, respectively, while the electronic thermal conductivity was taken three constant values within reasonable limits by arithmetic law, by simulating the heat transfer evolution on target surface based on the one-dimensional two-temperature model, the influence of electron thermal conductivity on maximum electron temperature, on electron-phonon coupling time and electron-phonon coupling temperature was mainly discussed in the femtosecond laser ablation. Hie results showed that electronic thermal conductivity had different effects on electronic maximum temperature, electron-phonon coupling time and electron-phonon coupling temperature. As the electronic thermal conductivity was a reflection of the energy release rate in electronic sub-system when the surface electrons reached to the highest temperature, this led to the electronic thermal conductivity had the most significant influence on the electro-lattice coupling temperature.%讨论了高能飞秒激光烧蚀金属金靶材过程中电子热导率对激光烧蚀性质的影响.由于电子热容量,电声耦合系数及电子热导率等热物理参数对能够表征飞秒激光烧蚀性质的电子最高温度,电声耦

  19. Surface Morphology and Microstructural Characterization of KCl Crystals Grown in Halite-Sylvite Brine Solutions by Electron Backscattered Diffraction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Jiban; Basu, Ritwik; Evitts, Richard William; Besant, Robert William

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a study on the ternary NaCl-KCl-H2O system was carried out by an extractive metallurgy technique from mixed brine solutions of different compositions at room temperature (23°C). The surface morphology and microstructure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The presence of Na{ }+ was found to reduce the stability of the solutions and increase the crystallization induction period, interfacial energy, energy of formation of the nucleus and greatly reduce the nucleation rate of KCl crystal. The surface morphology of KCl crystals is significantly changed due to presence of 5 to 10% (w/w) of NaCl as impurities in the binary solutions and shows the formation of co-crystals of different crystallographic orientation of NaCl on the KCl surface. In addition X-ray diffraction studies performed on KCl crystals grown in halite-sylvite binary solutions reveals that these crystals are cubic in nature and its lattice constant is 6.2952 Å when the NaCl concentration is small.

  20. Measurement of chromatic aberration in STEM and SCEM by coherent convergent beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, C.L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-02-15

    A simple method is described for the accurate and precise measurement of chromatic aberration under electron-optical conditions pertinent to scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). The method requires only the measurement of distances in a coherent CBED pattern and knowledge of the electron wavelength and the lattice spacing of a calibration specimen. The chromatic aberration of a spherical-aberration corrected 300 kV thermal field emission TEM is measured in STEM and SCEM operating modes and under different condenser lens settings. The effect of the measured chromatic aberrations on the 3 dimensional intensity distribution of the electron probe is also considered. - Highlights: ► A method is presented to measure chromatic aberration (C{sub c}) using coherent CBED. ► The C{sub c} of the probe and imaging lens systems in STEM and SCEM modes is measured in a C{sub 3}-corrected S/TEM. ► The effect of the measured C{sub c} on the depth resolution in STEM is simulated for different energy spreads.

  1. Structural studies on the ZrO/sub 2/-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system by electron diffraction and electron microscopy. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Susumu; Tanaka, Michiyoshi; Ishigame, Mareo

    1987-07-20

    Oxygen-ion arrangements of 20-30 mol% Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-ZrO/sub 2/ and 20-40 mol% Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-HfO/sub 2/ in the high-temperature cubic phases have been investigated by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy. An analysis of the diffuse scattering appearing in electron-diffraction patterns provides a modulated structure model for each system, which consists of a positional modulation of oxygen ions and anti-phase boundaries. The oxygen-ion modulation is expressed by a square transverse wave whose wavenumber vector is q (..pi../a/sub 0/)<110>. Anti-phase boundaries lie parallel to the brace112brace planes at intervals of five and seven times the (112) spacing of the ZrO/sub 2/-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and the HfO/sub 2/-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crystals, respectively. These modulated structures have been found to form micro-domains of several nm in diameter. Heat treatment indicates that ordered phases can exist below about 950/sup 0/C in both systems.

  2. High Repetition-Rate Wakefield Electron Source Generated by Few-millijoule, 30 femtosecond Laser Pulses on a Density Downramp

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Easter, J H; Krushelnick, K; Nees, J A; Thomas, A G R

    2012-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of laser wakefield electron acceleration using a sub-TW power laser by tightly focusing 30-fs laser pulses with only 8 mJ pulse energy on a 100 \\mu m scale gas target. The experiments are carried out at an unprecedented 0.5 kHz repetition rate, allowing "real time" optimization of accelerator parameters. Well-collimated and stable electron beams with a quasi-monoenergetic peak in excess of 100 keV are measured. Particle-in-cell simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental results and suggest an acceleration mechanism based on electron trapping on the density downramp, due to the time varying phase velocity of the plasma waves.

  3. Investigation of ultrafast lattice heating in thin (semi-)metal films using time-resolved electron diffraction; Untersuchung der schnellen Gitteraufheizung in duennen (Halb-)Metallfilmen mit Hilfe zeitaufgeloester Elektronenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligges, Manuel

    2009-07-21

    In the framework of the present thesis the fast lattice heating in thin metal and bismuth layers after optical short-pulse excitation was studied. By irradiation of ultrathin solid films with ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses for sort times an extreme nonequilibrium state occurs: The electronic system is strongly excited, while the lattice system remains cold. An energetic exchange between both systems follows, which is based on the electron-phonon interaction and leads to heating of the lattice system. This lattice heating can be observed by means of the Debye-Waller effect in the electron diffraction image. By means of the excitation-interrogation scheme by a series of moment records this lattice heating can be observed time-resolvedly. The experimentally determind time scales for this process permit conclusions on the electron-phonon coupling in the studied materials. In this thesis a time-resolving transmissi9on-electron diffraction experiment with sub-picosecond time resolution was constructed and optimized. By means of this experiment the fast lattice heating in thin gold, silver, copper, and bismuth films was studied. The observed heating behaviour of the metal films shows agreement with theoretical predictions of different model calculations. The results of the measurements on bismuth films show a hitherto not observed coupling behaviour. [German] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die schnelle Gitteraufheizung in duennen Metall- und Wismutschichten nach optischer Kurzimpulsanregung untersucht. Durch Bestrahlung duenner Festkoerperfilme mit ultrakurzen (Femtosekunden-) Laserimpulsen entsteht fuer kurze Zeiten ein extremer Nichtgleichgewichtszustand: Das elektronische System wird stark angeregt, waehrend das Gittersystem kalt bleibt. Es folgt ein energetischer Austausch zwischen beiden Systemen, der auf der Elektron-Phonon-Wechselwirkung beruht und zur Aufheizung des Gittersystems fuehrt. Diese Gitteraufheizung kann anhand des Debye

  4. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  5. Characterizing THz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at Femtosecond Linear Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xu-Ling; ZHANG Jian-Bing; LU YU; LUO Feng; LU Shan-Liang; YU Tie-Min; DAI Zhi-Min

    2009-01-01

    The generation and observation of coherent THz synchrotron radiation from femtosecond electron bunches in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics femtosecond accelerator device is reported.We describe the experiment setup and present the first result of THz radiation properties such as power and spectrum.

  6. PbTe thin films grown by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Silva, D.; Moya, L.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.; Schrank, A.; Souza Filho, C. R.; de Oliveira, E. P.

    2007-09-01

    PbTe thin films were grown on BK7 glass and Si(100) substrates using femtosecond pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The influence of the background pressure and the laser fluence on the structural and optical characteristics of the PbTe films was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface and structural properties of the deposited PbTe thin films, respectively. Transmission spectroscopy measurements in the visible and infrared region (VIS-IR) were used to investigate the optical properties of the PbTe thin films.

  7. Dynamical studies on the generation of periodic surface structures by femtosecond laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenfeld A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength is studied experimentally using a double pulse experiment with cross polarized pulse sequences and a trans illumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps – 1 ns pump-probe diffraction approach. The results in both experiments confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition and the laser-induced free-electron plasma in the conduction band of the solids for the formation of LIPSS.

  8. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  9. Multi-objective Optimizations of a Novel Cryo-cooled DC Gun Based Ultra Fast Electron Diffraction Beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Gulliford, C; Bazarov, I

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of multi-objective genetic algorithm optimizations of a potential single shot ultra fast electron diffraction beamline utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, 200 microns, for two final bunch charges: 100k and 1000k electrons. Analysis of the solutions is discussed, as are the effects of disorder induced heating. In particular, a coherence length per rms spot size of 0.27 nm/micron was obtained for a final bunch charge of 100k electrons and final rms bunch length of approximately 100 fs. For a final charge of 1000k electrons the cryogun produces a coherence length per rms spot size...

  10. A femtosecond study of the anomaly in electron injection for dye-sensitized solar cells: the influence of isomerization employing Ru(II) sensitizers with anthracene and phenanthrene ancillary ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Hammad; Younts, Robert; Ogbose, Louis; Gautam, Bhoj; Gundogdu, Kenan; El-Shafei, Ahmed

    2015-01-28

    In this study, an intriguing difference caused by structural isomerization based on anthracene and phenanthrene stilbazole type ancillary ligands in Ru(ii) sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) has been investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Both anthracene and phenanthrene based sensitizers HD-7 and HD-8, respectively, resulted in a similar extinction coefficient, photophysical and thermodynamic free energy of electron injection and dye regeneration as measured by UV-Vis, excited state lifetime and cyclic voltammetry measurements, respectively. However, TiO2 adsorbed HD-7 resulted in up to 45% less photocurrent density than HD-8 although photovoltage was similar owing to comparable thermodynamic characteristics. It was obvious from the measurement of incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) that excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to internal energy loss before injection into the TiO2 conduction band. Analysis of photo-induced spectral features measured by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy showed that excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to ISC (intersystem crossing) much more than HD-8 and those triplet electrons are not injected into TiO2 efficiently. Interestingly, from impedance measurements, HD-7 showed higher recombination resistance than HD-8 and N719, but a shorter lifetime for electrons injected into the TiO2 conduction band.

  11. Gamma-ray and neutron diffraction studies of CoF2: magnetostriction, electron density and magnetic moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, W; Reehuis, M; Schultz, A J

    2004-01-01

    Accurate structure factors up to sin theta/lambda = 1.6 A(-1) have been measured with 316.5 keV gamma-rays from CoF(2), both at room temperature and in the antiferromagnetic state at 10 K. The same crystal was used to collect extended time-of-flight neutron diffraction data in the two magnetic states, which allowed an accurate determination of the fluorine positional parameter. For room temperature, the standard structural parameters are reported. At 10 K, a complete charge-density study has been carried out. The total number of 3d electrons on Co is found to be 6.95 (3). The experimental populations of the d orbitals agree with expectation from crystal field theory. The fluorine valence region exhibits a strong dipolar deformation. Electronic properties at the bond critical points and integrated atomic properties are derived from the static model electron density, revealing the Co-F interactions as purely ionic. On magnetic ordering, a shift of the fluorine ions of 1.5 (4) x 10(-3) A is found which confirms a prediction from theory of optical birefringence. The effect of magnetostriction on the distortion of the ligand coordination octahedra is compared for the late members of the 3d transition-metal difluorides. From neutron powder diffraction, an ordered magnetic moment of 2.60 (4) mu(B) per cobalt ion is found. Despite the strong deviation from the ideal spin value of 3 mu(B), there is still an appreciable orbital contribution to the local magnetic moment.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of heat-affected zone of copper metal ablated with femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials with high thermal conductivity is of paramount importance, because the chemical composition and properties of the area ablated with femtosecond laser are kept unchanged. The material processing by femtosecond laser can well control the heat-affected zone, compared to nanosecond laser ablation. We report on the heat-affected zone of crystalline copper (Cu) by use of femtosecond laser experimentally and theoretically. Laser ablation of Cu is investigated theoretically by two temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation takes into account of electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by two temperature model. The dependence of lattice temperature on time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation and two temperature model. The heat-affected zone estimated from the temperature is mainly studied and calculated to be 3 nm at 0.02 J/cm2 which is below the threshold fluence of 0.137 J/cm2. In addition, the thickness of heat-affected zone of copper crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the ablated surface, the surface crystallinity is partially changed into disordered structure from crystal form. The residual energy left in the metal, which is not used for ablation, will induce liquid phase, leading to the amorphous phase of the metal during resolidification. The thickness of heat-affected zone depends on laser fluence and is experimentally measured to be less than 1 μm at higher laser fluences than the ablation threshold.

  13. Excited Electronic and Vibrational State Decomposition of Energetic Materials and Model Systems on Both Nanosecond and Femtosecond Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-22

    behavior of these species is then compared with that of very similar model systems in order to enable the synthesis of new materials that will be...systems in order to enable the synthesis of new materials that will be energetic by design. This must be the first step in the determination of the unique...1,2,4- triazole -1,1’-diol, respectively), following electronic state excitation, is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Different from

  14. From virus structure to chromatin: X-ray diffraction to three-dimensional electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Early influences led me first to medical school with a view to microbiology, but I felt the lack of a deeper foundation and changed to chemistry, which in turn led me to physics and mathematics. I moved to the University of Cape Town to work on the X-ray crystallography of some small organic compounds. I developed a new method of using molecular structure factors to solve the crystal structure, which won me a research studentship to Trinity College Cambridge and the Cavendish Laboratory. There I worked on the austenite-pearlite transition in steel. This is governed by the dissipation of latent heat, and I ended up numerically solving partial differential equations. I used the idea of nucleation and growth during the phase change, which had its echo when I later tackled the assembly of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) from its constituent RNA and protein subunits. I wanted to move on to X-ray structure analysis of large biological molecules and obtained a Nuffield Fellowship to work in J.D. Bernal's department at Birkbeck College, London. There, I met Rosalind Franklin, who had taken up the study of TMV. I was able to interpret some of Franklin's beautiful X-ray diffraction patterns of the virus particle. From then on, my fate was sealed. After Franklin's untimely death in 1958, I moved in 1962 to the newly built MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, which, under Max Perutz, housed the original MRC unit from the Cavendish Laboratory. I was thus privileged to join the Laboratory at an early stage in its expansion and consequently able to take advantage of, and to help build up, its then unique environment of intellectual and technological sophistication. There I have remained ever since.

  15. Charge localization in oxidized Pb2Sr2Y0.5Cu308+8 studies by electron and neutron powder diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, M.H.; Jørgensen, J.E.; Andersen, N.H.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidized Pb2Sr2Y0.5Ca0.5Cu3O8+delta was studied by electron diffraction and neutron powder diffraction. The electron diffraction diagrams showed a doubling along the b-axis and a quadruplication along the a-axis indicating that the excess oxygen is incorporated into the structure in an ordered wa...... of superconductivity in the oxidized compound. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.......Oxidized Pb2Sr2Y0.5Ca0.5Cu3O8+delta was studied by electron diffraction and neutron powder diffraction. The electron diffraction diagrams showed a doubling along the b-axis and a quadruplication along the a-axis indicating that the excess oxygen is incorporated into the structure in an ordered way....... The oxygen content was determined from refinement of the neutron data and delta = 1.2(1) was obtained. Calculation of bond valency sums for the cations shows that the bond valency sum for Cu in the CuO2 layers in Pb2Sr2Y0.5Ca0.5Cu3O8 decreases when the compound is oxidized, thereby explaining the lack...

  16. Structural analysis of multilayer metal nitride films CrN/MoN using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolnyi, Bogdan; Bondar, Oleksandr; Opielak, Marek; Rogalski, Przemysław; Araújo, João. Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis method was used for studying structure and properties of multilayer nitride CrN/MoN coatings fabricated by cathode arc physical vapour deposition (Arc-PVD). Samples were deposited on steel substrate with different single layer thickness from tens nanometers to 1 micron and with total thickness of coatings up to 8-13 μm. Colour grains mapping, grain size distribution profiles, pole figures and texture analyses were the main research instruments. Studying of obtained coatings was performed on specially prepared polished cross-section samples. The dependence between single layer thickness and grain size of materials, which is also changing through depth profile of the coating, was observed. In addition, it was possible to study phase composition, prevailing crystals orientation, dominant texture and grains growth. Studying of grains size, as well as other indicated parameters, is a very important task because it gives an information about grains interfaces volume, which causes changes in mechanical properties of material. Obtained results were cross-checked by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) where it was possible.

  17. Selenium single-wavelength anomalous diffraction de novo phasing using an X-ray-free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Mark S; Yoon, Chun Hong; DeMirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G; Dao, E Han; Ahmadi, Radman; Aksit, Fulya; Aquila, Andrew L; Ciftci, Halilibrahim; Guillet, Serge; Hayes, Matt J; Lane, Thomas J; Liang, Meng; Lundström, Ulf; Koglin, Jason E; Mgbam, Paul; Rao, Yashas; Zhang, Lindsey; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Holton, James M; Boutet, Sébastien

    2016-11-04

    Structural information about biological macromolecules near the atomic scale provides important insight into the functions of these molecules. To date, X-ray crystallography has been the predominant method used for macromolecular structure determination. However, challenges exist when solving structures with X-rays, including the phase problem and radiation damage. X-ray-free electron lasers (X-ray FELs) have enabled collection of diffraction information before the onset of radiation damage, yet the majority of structures solved at X-ray FELs have been phased using external information via molecular replacement. De novo phasing at X-ray FELs has proven challenging due in part to per-pulse variations in intensity and wavelength. Here we report the solution of a selenobiotinyl-streptavidin structure using phases obtained by the anomalous diffraction of selenium measured at a single wavelength (Se-SAD) at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our results demonstrate Se-SAD, routinely employed at synchrotrons for novel structure determination, is now possible at X-ray FELs.

  18. Micrograting Polymerization Fabrication with a Single Femtosecond Laser Pulse at 400 nm Wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红沧; 郭亨长; 蒋红兵; 杨宏; 龚旗煌; 王涛; 施盟泉; 吴飞鹏

    2003-01-01

    High diffraction efficiency refractive index-modulated holographic micrograting on a polymer thin film was obtained with a single femtosecond laser pulse interference and photo-polymerization. The diffractive efficiency of the micrograting with an He-Ne laser is up to 78% when the thickness of the film is 90 μm, which corresponds to the refractive index-modulation as large as 2.4 × 10-3. The compared experiment with a femtosecond oscillator laser indicated that a single femtosecond Iaser pulse has the advantages in laser machining over the cw holography method such as high fabrication speed, good surface structure and high diffractive efficiency.

  19. Semianalytical study of the propagation of an ultrastrong femtosecond laser pulse in a plasma with ultrarelativistic electron jitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanović, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.jovanovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Zemun (Serbia); Fedele, Renato, E-mail: renato.fedele@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); Belić, Milivoj, E-mail: milivoj.belic@qatar.tamu.edu [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); De Nicola, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.denicola@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    The interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma is studied analytically and numerically in a regime with ultrarelativistic electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The study is applied to a laser wakefield acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse. These have fundamentally different dispersive properties since in the core the electrons are almost completely expelled by a very strong ponderomotive force, and the electromagnetic wave packet is imbedded in a vacuum channel, thus having (almost) linear properties. Conversely, at the pulse edges, the laser amplitude is smaller, and the wave is weakly nonlinear and dispersive. New nonlinear terms in the wave equation, introduced by the nonlinear phase, describe without the violation of imposed scaling laws a smooth transition to a nondispersive electromagnetic wave at very large intensities and a simultaneous saturation of the (initially cubic) nonlocal nonlinearity. The temporal evolution of the laser pulse is studied both analytically and by numerically solving the model equations in a two-dimensional geometry, with the spot diameter presently used in some laser acceleration experiments. The most stable initial pulse length is estimated to exceed ≳1.5–2 μm. Moderate stretching of the pulse in the direction of propagation is observed, followed by the development of a vacuum channel and of a very large

  20. Generation of GW radiation pulses from a VUV free-electron laser operating in the femtosecond regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvazyan, V; Baboi, N; Bohnet, I; Brinkmann, R; Castellano, M; Castro, P; Catani, L; Choroba, S; Cianchi, A; Dohlus, M; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Fateev, A A; Feldhaus, J; Flöttmann, K; Gamp, A; Garvey, T; Genz, H; Gerth, Ch; Gretchko, V; Grigoryan, B; Hahn, U; Hessler, C; Honkavaara, K; Hüning, M; Ischebeck, R; Jablonka, M; Kamps, T; Körfer, M; Krassilnikov, M; Krzywinski, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Loos, H; Luong, M; Magne, C; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Minty, M; Müller, U-C; Nölle, D; Novokhatski, A; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Plucinski, L; Rehlich, K; Reyzl, I; Richter, A; Rossbach, J; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H-J; Schreiber, S; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sobierajski, R; Sonntag, B; Steeg, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, K P; Tiedtke, K; Tonutti, M; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Türke, D; Verzilov, V; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Wendt, M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Wittenburg, K; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K

    2002-03-11

    Experimental results are presented from vacuum-ultraviolet free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode. The generation of ultrashort radiation pulses became possible due to specific tailoring of the bunch charge distribution. A complete characterization of the linear and nonlinear modes of the SASE FEL operation was performed. At saturation the FEL produces ultrashort pulses (30-100 fs FWHM) with a peak radiation power in the GW level and with full transverse coherence. The wavelength was tuned in the range of 95-105 nm.

  1. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  2. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution.

  3. Holography and Coherent Diffraction with Low-Energy Electrons: A Route towards Structural Biology at the Single Molecule Level

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-01-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Angstrom has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from one data set at once. Applied to individual biomolecules the method allows for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between di...

  4. Electron diffraction study of the plastic relaxation of MgO epitaxially grown on BCC FeV(001) alloys by varying the lattice mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Frédéric; Andrieu, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    The epitaxial growth of MgO on Fe1 - xVx buffer layers with adjustable lattice parameter is studied by electron diffraction (RHEED) in real time. At the onset of plastic relaxation in the MgO layer, a clear splitting of the diffraction rods is observed in directions, as well as an increase in their length in the directions. Splitting along is also made visible through image background subtraction. These features originate from the surface strain above misfit dislocations, as previously proposed to account for satellite spots in LEED measurements. This explanation is supported by simulations of the diffraction patterns using kinematic diffraction theory. Observation of the diffraction rods splitting is shown to be a powerful way to check the presence of dislocations in MgO tunnel barriers and to accurately determine the critical thickness of plastic relaxation.

  5. Diverse application platform for hard X-ray diffraction in SACLA (DAPHNIS): application to serial protein crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono, Kensuke; Nango, Eriko; Sugahara, Michihiro; Song, Changyong; Park, Jaehyun; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Hatsui, Takaki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwata, So; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-05-01

    An experimental system for serial femtosecond crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has been developed. It basically consists of a sample chamber, fluid injectors and a two-dimensional detector. The chamber and the injectors are operated under helium atmosphere at 1 atm. The ambient pressure operation facilitates applications to fluid samples. Three kinds of injectors are employed to feed randomly oriented crystals in aqueous solution or highly viscous fluid. Experiments on lysozyme crystals were performed by using the 10 keV XFEL of the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA). The structure of model protein lysozyme from 1 µm crystals at a resolution of 2.4 Å was obtained.

  6. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricolleau, C., E-mail: Christian.Ricolleau@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Alloyeau, D. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Phénomènes Quantiques, CNRS-UMR 7162, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, Case 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, UMR CNRS/Onera, 29, avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Châtillon (France)

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  7. Atomic scattering in the diffraction limit: electron transfer in keV Li+-Na(3s, 3p) collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Nielsen, C.V.; Rybaltover, M.;

    2002-01-01

    . This setup yields a momentum resolution of 0.12 an, an order of magnitude better angular resolution than previous measurements on this system. This enables us to clearly resolve Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns in the angle DCS. In particular, the angular width of the ring structure is given by the ratio...... of the de Broglie wavelength lambda(dB) = 150 fm at a velocity v = 0.20 au and the effective atomic diameter for electron capture 2R = 20 au. Parallel AO and MO semiclassical coupled-channel calculations of the Na(3s, 3p) --> Li(2s, 2p) state-to-state collision amplitudes have been performed, and quantum...

  8. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  9. Multipurpose end-station for coherent diffraction imaging and scattering at FERMI@Elettra free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Bencivenga, Filippo; Manfredda, Michele; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Svetina, Cristian; Zangrando, Marco; Demidovich, Alexander; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Danailov, Miltcho; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Kiskinova, Maya

    2015-05-01

    The Diffraction and Projection Imaging (DiProI) beamline at FERMI, the Elettra free-electron laser (FEL), hosts a multi-purpose station that has been opened to users since the end of 2012. This paper describes the core capabilities of the station, designed to make use of the unique features of the FERMI-FEL for performing a wide range of static and dynamic scattering experiments. The various schemes for time-resolved experiments, employing both soft X-ray FEL and seed laser IR radiation are presented by using selected recent results. The ongoing upgrade is adding a reflection geometry setup for scattering experiments, expanding the application fields by providing both high lateral and depth resolution.

  10. Comparison between magnetic force microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction for ferrite quantification in type 321 stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, A D; Harniman, R L; Collins, A M; Davis, S A; Younes, C M; Flewitt, P E J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Several analytical techniques that are currently available can be used to determine the spatial distribution and amount of austenite, ferrite and precipitate phases in steels. The application of magnetic force microscopy, in particular, to study the local microstructure of stainless steels is beneficial due to the selectivity of this technique for detection of ferromagnetic phases. In the comparison of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction for the morphological mapping and quantification of ferrite, the degree of sub-surface measurement has been found to be critical. Through the use of surface shielding, it has been possible to show that Magnetic Force Microscopy has a measurement depth of 105-140 nm. A comparison of the two techniques together with the depth of measurement capabilities are discussed.

  11. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril...... of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure...... hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from...

  12. Silicidation in Ni/Si thin film system investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: amar@igcar.gov.in; Kalavathi, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Gopalan, Padma [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kamruddin, M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Silicide formation induced by thermal annealing in Ni/Si thin film system has been investigated using glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Silicide formation takes place at 870 K with Ni{sub 2}Si, NiSi and NiSi{sub 2} phases co-existing with Ni. Complete conversion of intermediate silicide phases to the final NiSi{sub 2} phase takes place at 1170 K. Atomic force microscopy measurements have revealed the coalescence of pillar-like structures to ridge-like structures upon silicidation. A comparison of the experimental results in terms of the evolution of various silicide phases is presented.

  13. Pressure effect and electron diffraction on the anomalous transition in ternary superconductor Bi2Rh3Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; Chan, C. L.; Mukherjee, S.; Chou, C. C.; Tseng, C. M.; Hsu, S. L.; Chu, M.-W.; Lin, J.-Y.; Yang, H. D.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of external hydrostatic pressure up to 22.23 kbar on the temperature-dependent transport properties of the ternary compound Bi2Rh3Se2 is investigated. Interestingly, the resistive anomaly at Ts~250 K, previously proposed as a charge-density-wave (CDW) transition, is shifted to higher temperature with increasing pressure, in distinct contrast to an established knowledge for CDW. Using temperature-dependent electron-diffraction characterizations, we have unraveled that this transition is, in effect, of a structural phase-transformation nature, experiencing the symmetry reduction from a high-symmetry C-centered monoclinic lattice to a low-symmetry primitive one below Ts. A more elaborately determined room-temperature C-centered lattice was also proposed.

  14. Development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber for serial optical and diffraction experiments with free electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, I.; Hallmann, J.; Gruebel, S.; More, R.; Quevedo, W.; Petri, M.; Techert, S. [Department of Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37070 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    In this paper we present a development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber which primal function is to be used in pump/probe experiments with free electron laser (FEL) radiation. The chamber is constructed for serial diffraction and serial spectroscopy allowing a fast exchange of samples during the measurement process. For the fast exchange of samples, liquid jet systems are used. Both applications, utilizing soft x-ray FEL pulses as pump and optical laser pulses as probe and vice versa are documented. Experiments with solid samples as well as the liquid jet samples are presented. When working with liquid jets, a system of automatically refilled liquid traps for capturing liquids has been developed in order to ensure stable vacuum conditions. Differential pumping stages are placed in between the FEL beamline and the experimental chamber so that working pressure in the chamber can be up to four orders of magnitude higher than the pressure in the FEL beamline.

  15. Semi-experimental equilibrium structure of pyrazinamide from gas-phase electron diffraction. How much experimental is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis S.; Vishnevskiy, Yury V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Grikina, Olga E.; Khaikin, Leonid S.

    2017-03-01

    A semi-experimental equilibrium structure of free molecules of pyrazinamide has been determined for the first time using gas electron diffraction method. The refinement was carried using regularization of geometry by calculated quantum chemical parameters. It is discussed to which extent is the final structure experimental. A numerical approach for estimation of the amount of experimental information in the refined parameters is suggested. The following values of selected internuclear distances were determined (values are in Å with 1σ in the parentheses): re(Cpyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.397(2), re(Npyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.332(3), re(Cpyrazine-Camide) = 1.493(1), re(Namide-Camide) = 1.335(2), re(Oamide-Camide) = 1.219(1). The given standard deviations represent pure experimental uncertainties without the influence of regularization.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Selected Area Electron Diffraction Pattern of Fe Oxide/Au Core-shell Structured Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianghua LU; Kailun YAO; Dong XI; Zuli LIU; Xiaoping LUO; Qin NING

    2007-01-01

    The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern of magnetic iron oxide core/gold shell nanoparticles has been studied. For the composite particles with mean size less than 10 nm, their SAED pattern is found to be different from either the pattern of pure Fe oxide nanoparticles or that of pure Au particles. Based on the fact that the ring diameters of these composite particles fit the characteristic relation for the fcc structure, the Au atoms on surfaces of the concerned particles are supposed to pack in a way more tightly than they usually do in pure Au nanoparticles. The driving force for this is the coherency strain which enables the shell material at the heterostructured interface to adapt the lattice parameters of the core.

  17. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data for amyloid formation of Aβ40 and Aβ42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Selivanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “One of the possible mechanisms of amyloid fibrils formation based on the sizes of primary and secondary folding nuclei of Aβ40 and Aβ42” (Dovidchenko et al., 2016 [1]. Aβ peptide is one of the most intensively studied amyloidogenic peptides. Despite the huge number of articles devoted to studying different fragments of Aβ peptide there are only several papers with correct kinetics data, also there are a few papers with X-ray data, especially for Aβ42. Our data present X-ray diffraction patterns both for Aβ40 and Aβ42 as well for Tris–HCl and wax. Moreover, our data provide kinetics of amyloid formation by recombinant Аβ40 and synthetic Аβ42 peptides by using electron microscopy.

  18. Electron diffraction study of the equilibrium structure of hexamethylenetetramine involving data from quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Karasev, N. M.; Kovtun, D. M.; Kochikov, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium structure of the urotropine molecule is characterized by means of gas electron diffraction (GED) with the involvement of quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy. A structural analysis of the GED data is performed based on the parameters of the intramolecular potential function using of the program complex SYMM/DISP/ELDIFF/LARGE. The quadratic and cubic force constants of the urotropine molecule were obtained earlier on the basis of calculations at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level and assuming molecular symmetry T d . The values of the equilibrium geometric parameters r e of the urotropine molecule are found. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those calculated at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level.

  19. Diffractive optical elements and quasioptical schemes for experiments on a high-power terahertz free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Zhigach, S. A.; Knyazev, B. A.; Konysheva, A. V.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Merzhievsky, L. A.; Polskikh, I. A.; Cherkassky, V. S.

    2007-10-01

    We have developed reflective diffraction optical elements (DOE) for focusing monochromatic coherent radiation of 400 W terahertz Novosibirsk free-electron laser (FEL). Operational characteristics of two modifications of the refractive kinoform lenses were studied. Quasioptical Toepler system with terahertz radiation recording by a thermosensitive luminescent screen was fabricated for the examination of film and solid deformation. A system for real-time terahertz radioscopy of objects with image recording with a microbolometer matrix (MBM) was fabricated. Images of objects illuminated with a plane wave or diffuse radiation were studied with the MBM. It was shown that the speckle pattern, which appears in the second case, can be averaged by means of the scatterer rotation.

  20. A novel inert crystal delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsie E. Conrad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX has opened a new era in crystallography by permitting nearly damage-free, room-temperature structure determination of challenging proteins such as membrane proteins. In SFX, femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser pulses produce diffraction snapshots from nanocrystals and microcrystals delivered in a liquid jet, which leads to high protein consumption. A slow-moving stream of agarose has been developed as a new crystal delivery medium for SFX. It has low background scattering, is compatible with both soluble and membrane proteins, and can deliver the protein crystals at a wide range of temperatures down to 4°C. Using this crystal-laden agarose stream, the structure of a multi-subunit complex, phycocyanin, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution using 300 µg of microcrystals embedded into the agarose medium post-crystallization. The agarose delivery method reduces protein consumption by at least 100-fold and has the potential to be used for a diverse population of proteins, including membrane protein complexes.

  1. A novel inert crystal delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Chelsie E.; Basu, Shibom; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Schaffer, Alexander; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Aquila, Andrew; Coe, Jesse; Gati, Cornelius; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Kupitz, Christopher; Nelson, Garrett; Subramanian, Ganesh; White, Thomas A.; Zhao, Yun; Zook, James; Boutet, Sébastien; Cherezov, Vadim; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Raimund; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-30

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has opened a new era in crystallography by permitting nearly damage-free, room-temperature structure determination of challenging proteins such as membrane proteins. In SFX, femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser pulses produce diffraction snapshots from nanocrystals and microcrystals delivered in a liquid jet, which leads to high protein consumption. A slow-moving stream of agarose has been developed as a new crystal delivery medium for SFX. It has low background scattering, is compatible with both soluble and membrane proteins, and can deliver the protein crystals at a wide range of temperatures down to 4°C. Using this crystal-laden agarose stream, the structure of a multi-subunit complex, phycocyanin, was solved to 2.5Å resolution using 300µg of microcrystals embedded into the agarose medium post-crystallization. The agarose delivery method reduces protein consumption by at least 100-fold and has the potential to be used for a diverse population of proteins, including membrane protein complexes.

  2. All fiber-coupled, long-term stable timing distribution for free-electron lasers with few-femtosecond jitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Şafak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report recent progress made in a complete fiber-optic, high-precision, long-term stable timing distribution system for synchronization of next generation X-ray free-electron lasers. Timing jitter characterization of the master laser shows less than 170-as RMS integrated jitter for frequencies above 10 kHz, limited by the detection noise floor. Timing stabilization of a 3.5-km polarization-maintaining fiber link is successfully achieved with an RMS drift of 3.3 fs over 200 h of operation using all fiber-coupled elements. This all fiber-optic implementation will greatly reduce the complexity of optical alignment in timing distribution systems and improve the overall mechanical and timing stability of the system.

  3. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Castorina, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Giorgianni, F.; Giribono, A.; Li, W.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Romeo, S.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  4. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pompili, Riccardo; Bellaveglia, M; Biagioni, A; Castorina, G; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Croia, M; Di Giovenale, D; Ferrario, M; Filippi, F; Gallo, A; Gatti, G; Giorgianni, F; Giribono, A; Li, W; Lupi, S; Mostacci, A; Petrarca, M; Piersanti, L; Di Pirro, G; Romeo, S; Scifo, J; Shpakov, V; Vaccarezza, C; Villa, F

    2017-01-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  5. All fiber-coupled, long-term stable timing distribution for free-electron lasers with few-femtosecond jitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şafak, K; Xin, M; Callahan, P T; Peng, M Y; Kärtner, F X

    2015-07-01

    We report recent progress made in a complete fiber-optic, high-precision, long-term stable timing distribution system for synchronization of next generation X-ray free-electron lasers. Timing jitter characterization of the master laser shows less than 170-as RMS integrated jitter for frequencies above 10 kHz, limited by the detection noise floor. Timing stabilization of a 3.5-km polarization-maintaining fiber link is successfully achieved with an RMS drift of 3.3 fs over 200 h of operation using all fiber-coupled elements. This all fiber-optic implementation will greatly reduce the complexity of optical alignment in timing distribution systems and improve the overall mechanical and timing stability of the system.

  6. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2017-07-24

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  7. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  8. Angular correlations of photons from solution diffraction at a free-electron laser encode molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Mendez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During X-ray exposure of a molecular solution, photons scattered from the same molecule are correlated. If molecular motion is insignificant during exposure, then differences in momentum transfer between correlated photons are direct measurements of the molecular structure. In conventional small- and wide-angle solution scattering, photon correlations are ignored. This report presents advances in a new biomolecular structural analysis technique, correlated X-ray scattering (CXS, which uses angular intensity correlations to recover hidden structural details from molecules in solution. Due to its intense rapid pulses, an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL is an excellent tool for CXS experiments. A protocol is outlined for analysis of a CXS data set comprising a total of half a million X-ray exposures of solutions of small gold nanoparticles recorded at the Spring-8 Ångström Compact XFEL facility (SACLA. From the scattered intensities and their correlations, two populations of nanoparticle domains within the solution are distinguished: small twinned, and large probably non-twinned domains. It is shown analytically how, in a solution measurement, twinning information is only accessible via intensity correlations, demonstrating how CXS reveals atomic-level information from a disordered solution of like molecules.

  9. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Remazeilles, Celine [FRE 3474 CNRS - Universite de La Rochelle, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Ingenieur pour l' Environnement, La Rochelle cedex 01 (France)

    2013-02-15

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride {beta}-Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl, chukanovite Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3} or siderite FeCO{sub 3}. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O{sub 2}, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride {beta}-Fe{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Rémazeilles, Céline

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl, chukanovite Fe2(OH)2CO3 or siderite FeCO3. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O2, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed.

  11. Determination of the Projected Atomic Potential by Deconvolution of the Auto-Correlation Function of TEM Electron Nano-Diffraction Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberato De Caro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to determine the projected atomic potential of a specimen directly from transmission electron microscopy coherent electron nano-diffraction patterns, overcoming common limitations encountered so far due to the dynamical nature of electron-matter interaction. The projected potential is obtained by deconvolution of the inverse Fourier transform of experimental diffraction patterns rescaled in intensity by using theoretical values of the kinematical atomic scattering factors. This novelty enables the compensation of dynamical effects typical of transmission electron microscopy (TEM experiments on standard specimens with thicknesses up to a few tens of nm. The projected atomic potentials so obtained are averaged on sample regions illuminated by nano-sized electron probes and are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical expectations. Contrary to lens-based microscopy, here the spatial resolution in the retrieved projected atomic potential profiles is related to the finer lattice spacing measured in the electron diffraction pattern. The method has been successfully applied to experimental nano-diffraction data of crystalline centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric specimens achieving a resolution of 65 pm.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and femtosecond nonlinear saturable absorption behavior of copper phthalocyanine nanocrystals doped-PMMA polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongo, S.; Dhlamini, M. S.; Neethling, P. H.; Yao, A.; Maaza, M.; Sahraoui, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we report the femtosecond nonlinear saturable absorption response of synthesized copper phthalocyanine nanocrystals (CPc-NCs)-doped PMMA polymer thin films. The samples were initially characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-Vis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The crystalline phase and morphological analysis revealed nanocrystals of monoclinic structure with an average crystallite size between 31.38 nm and 42.5 nm. The femtosecond Z-scan study at 800 nm central wavelength indicated a saturable absorption behavior of which the mechanism is closely related to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the particles. This nonlinear effect could potentially make the CPc-NCs useful in nonlinear optical devices.

  13. Surface Reconstruction of Hexagonal Y-doped HoMnO3 and LuMnO3 Studied Using Low-energy Electron Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasic, R.; Sadowski, J.

    2010-04-15

    We have investigated the (0001) surfaces of several hexagonal manganite perovskites by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) in order to determine if the surface periodicity is different from that of the bulk materials. These LEED studies were conducted using near-normal incidence geometry with a low energyelectron microscope (LEEM)/LEED apparatus from room temperature to 1200 degrees C and with an electron energy in the range of 15-50 eV. Diffraction patterns showed features of bulk-terminated periodicity as well as a 2 2 surface reconstruction. Possible origins for this surface reconstruction structure are discussed and comparisons are made with surface studies of other complex oxides.

  14. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce4Li3P18N35, with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce4Li3P18N35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P63(α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce4-0.5xLi3P18N35-1.5xO1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  15. Coherent diffractive imaging of single helium nanodroplets with a high harmonic generation source

    CERN Document Server

    Rupp, Daniela; Langbehn, Bruno; Sauppe, Mario; Zimmermann, Julian; Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Möller, Thomas; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Trabattoni, Andrea; Calegari, Francesca; Nisoli, Mauro; Sander, Katharina; Peltz, Christian; Vrakking, Marc J J; Fennel, Thomas; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging of individual free nanoparticles has opened novel routes for the in-situ analysis of their transient structural, optical, and electronic properties. So far, single-particle diffraction was assumed to be feasible only at extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and X-ray free-electron lasers, restricting this research field to large-scale facilities. Here we demonstrate single-shot imaging of isolated helium nanodroplets using XUV pulses from a femtosecond-laser driven high harmonic source. We obtain bright scattering patterns that provide access to the nanostructure's optical parameters. Moreover, the wide-angle scattering data enable us to uniquely identify hitherto unresolved prolate shapes of superfluid helium droplets. Our results mark the advent of single-shot gas-phase nanoscopy with lab-based short-wavelength pulses and pave the way to ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging with phase-controlled multicolor fields and attosecond pulses.

  16. Specimen preparation for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells and cellular organelles by using the X-ray free-electron laser at SACLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Okajima, Koji; Fukuda, Asahi; Oide, Mao; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) allows internal structures of biological cells and cellular organelles to be analyzed. CXDI experiments have been conducted at 66 K for frozen-hydrated biological specimens at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser facility (SACLA). In these cryogenic CXDI experiments using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses, specimen particles dispersed on thin membranes of specimen disks are transferred into the vacuum chamber of a diffraction apparatus. Because focused single XFEL pulses destroy specimen particles at the atomic level, diffraction patterns are collected through raster scanning the specimen disks to provide fresh specimen particles in the irradiation area. The efficiency of diffraction data collection in cryogenic experiments depends on the quality of the prepared specimens. Here, detailed procedures for preparing frozen-hydrated biological specimens, particularly thin membranes and devices developed in our laboratory, are reported. In addition, the quality of the frozen-hydrated specimens are evaluated by analyzing the characteristics of the collected diffraction patterns. Based on the experimental results, the internal structures of the frozen-hydrated specimens and the future development for efficient diffraction data collection are discussed.

  17. Specimen preparation for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells and cellular organelles by using the X-ray free-electron laser at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Okajima, Koji; Fukuda, Asahi; Oide, Mao; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) allows internal structures of biological cells and cellular organelles to be analyzed. CXDI experiments have been conducted at 66 K for frozen-hydrated biological specimens at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser facility (SACLA). In these cryogenic CXDI experiments using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses, specimen particles dispersed on thin membranes of specimen disks are transferred into the vacuum chamber of a diffraction apparatus. Because focused single XFEL pulses destroy specimen particles at the atomic level, diffraction patterns are collected through raster scanning the specimen disks to provide fresh specimen particles in the irradiation area. The efficiency of diffraction data collection in cryogenic experiments depends on the quality of the prepared specimens. Here, detailed procedures for preparing frozen-hydrated biological specimens, particularly thin membranes and devices developed in our laboratory, are reported. In addition, the quality of the frozen-hydrated specimens are evaluated by analyzing the characteristics of the collected diffraction patterns. Based on the experimental results, the internal structures of the frozen-hydrated specimens and the future development for efficient diffraction data collection are discussed. PMID:27359147

  18. Compton Scattering and Its Applications: The PLEIADES Femtosecond X-ray Source at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Kuba, J; Rupp, B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-05-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small ({micro}m{sup 3}) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the {gamma}-{gamma} collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  19. Compton Scattering and its Applications:. the Pleiades Femtosecond X-Ray Source at LLNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Brown, W. J.; Anderson, S. G.; Barty, C. P. J.; Betts, S. M.; Booth, R.; Crane, J. K.; Cross, R. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gibson, D. J.; Kuba, J.; Rupp, B.; Tremaine, A. M.; Springer, P. T.

    2004-10-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small (μm3) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the γ-γ collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  20. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.