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Sample records for femtosecond electron diffraction

  1. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  2. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  3. Femtosecond Electron Wave Packet Propagation and Diffraction: Towards Making the ``Molecular Movie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction harbors great promise for achieving atomic resolution of the fastest chemical processes. The generation of sufficiently short electron pulses to achieve this real time view of a chemical reaction has been limited by problems in maintaining short electron pulses with realistic electron densities to the sample. The propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets in the drift region of a photoelectron gun are investigated with an N-body numerical simulation and mean-field model. This analyis shows that the redistribution of electrons inside the packet, arising from space-charge and dispersion contributions, changes the pulse envelope and leads to the development of a spatially linear axial velocity distribution. These results have been used in the design of femtosecond photoelectron guns with higher time resolution and novel electron-optical methods of pulse characterization that are approaching 100 fs timescales. Time-resolved diffraction studies with electron pulses of approximately 500 femtoseconds have focused on solid-liquid phase transitions under far from equilibrium conditions. This work gives a microscopic description of the melting process and illustrates the promise of atomically resolving transition state processes.

  4. High current table-top setup for femtosecond gas electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zandi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed an experimental setup for gas phase electron diffraction with femtosecond resolution and a high average beam current. While gas electron diffraction has been successful at determining molecular structures, it has been a challenge to reach femtosecond resolution while maintaining sufficient beam current to retrieve structures with high spatial resolution. The main challenges are the Coulomb force that leads to broadening of the electron pulses and the temporal blurring that results from the velocity mismatch between the laser and electron pulses as they traverse the sample. We present here a device that uses pulse compression to overcome the Coulomb broadening and deliver femtosecond electron pulses on a gas target. The velocity mismatch can be compensated using laser pulses with a tilted intensity front to excite the sample. The temporal resolution of the setup was determined with a streak camera to be better than 400 fs for pulses with up to half a million electrons and a kinetic energy of 90 keV. The high charge per pulse, combined with a repetition rate of 5 kHz, results in an average beam current that is between one and two orders of magnitude higher than previously demonstrated.

  5. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  6. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  7. CL 19: Anisotropy of the electron diffraction from femtosecond Laser excited Bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; Streubuehr, C.; Brazda, Th.; Payer, Th.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Von der Linde, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report an electron diffraction experiment in Bi in which a linearly polarized E g optical phonon mode is detected after excitation of the material by a femtosecond laser pulse. Bismuth is a semimetal with rhombohedral crystal structure with two atoms in the unit cell. There are two types of optical phonon modes: (i) The totally symmetric A 1g mode which corresponds to a displacement of the atoms along the trigonal (111) direction, and (ii) the doubly degenerate E g mode which represents a motion in the plane perpendicular to (111). The A 1g mode can be coherently excited both by displacive excitation (DE) and by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS). Symmetry properties prevent DE of E g modes leaving ISRS as a likely excitation mechanism. We performed time resolved electron diffraction experiments on femtosecond laser excited Bi membranes of 15 nm thickness which were grown on a NaCl crystal and detached by floating in water. The experimental setup is described elsewhere. The fundamental laser beam (800 nm) was used for the excitation of the Bi films. The films had a crystalline structure with the (111) axis perpendicular to the surface. The electron beam passed perpendicular to the surface through the film. In this geometry the diffraction pattern is insensitive to atomic displacements along the (111) direction, i.e. insensitive to A 1g phonon modes. On the other hand, the excitation of E g modes corresponding to atomic displacements in the plane normal to (111) decreases the intensity of particular diffraction orders. The individual cycles of the E g vibrations (duration 475 fs) could not be resolved because our time resolution about 700 fs was not sufficient. In our experiment excitation beam with a fluence of 1 mJ/cm 2 and variable linear polarization was incident from the backside at an angle of 40 degrees (counter propagating electron and laser beam). The diffraction patterns were recorded as a function of the delay time between laser pump and

  8. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  9. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  10. Diffraction contrast as a sensitive indicator of femtosecond sub-nanoscale motion in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Schliep, Karl B.; Flannigan, David J.

    2013-09-01

    With ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM), access can be gained to the spatiotemporal scales required to directly visualize rapid, non-equilibrium structural dynamics of materials. This is achieved by operating a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion by photoelectrically generating coherent, well-timed electron packets in the gun region of the TEM. These probe photoelectrons are accelerated down the TEM column where they travel through the specimen before reaching a standard, commercially-available CCD detector. A second laser pulse is used to excite (pump) the specimen in situ. Structural changes are visualized by varying the arrival time of the pump laser pulse relative to the probe electron packet at the specimen. Here, we discuss how ultrafast nanoscale motions of crystalline materials can be visualized and precisely quantified using diffraction contrast in UTEM. Because diffraction contrast sensitively depends upon both crystal lattice orientation as well as incoming electron wavevector, minor spatial/directional variations in either will produce dynamic and often complex patterns in real-space images. This is because sections of the crystalline material that satisfy the Laue conditions may be heterogeneously distributed such that electron scattering vectors vary over nanoscale regions. Thus, minor changes in either crystal grain orientation, as occurs during specimen tilting, warping, or anisotropic expansion, or in the electron wavevector result in dramatic changes in the observed diffraction contrast. In this way, dynamic contrast patterns observed in UTEM images can be used as sensitive indicators of ultrafast specimen motion. Further, these motions can be spatiotemporally mapped such that direction and amplitude can be determined.

  11. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R., E-mail: g.chabrol@ecam-strasbourg.eu [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Ciceron, Adline [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Télécom Physique Strasbourg – Pôle API – 300 Bd Sébastien Brant – CS 10413, Illkirch Graffenstaden F 67400 (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • A method for rapid manufacturing of optical diffractive element in BK7 is proposed. • A binary grating in BK7 was successfully machined by femtosecond laser pulses. • Process relying on nonlinear absorption in the dielectric due to photoionization. • The binary grating was analysed by SEM and interferometric microscopy. • Simulations by Fourier modal method supported the measured diffractive efficiency. - Abstract: This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  12. Pico-femtosecond image-tube photography in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelev, M Ya

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of experimental achievement of the time resolution of image-converter tubes (ICTs) corresponding to the theoretical limit of 10 fs is considered as applied to quantum electronics problems. A new generation of ICTs with a temporal resolution of 200 - 500 fs has been developed for recording femtosecond laser radiation. The entirely new devices based on time-analysing ICTs such as femtosecond photoelectronic diffractometers, have been created for studying the dynamics of phase transitions in substances using diffrac-tion of electrons with energies ranging from 20 to 40 keV. (femtosecond technologies)

  13. IL 12: Femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, M.; Zamponi, F.; Rothhardt, P.; Ansari, Z.; Dreyer, J.; Freyer, B.; Premont-Schwarz, M.; Elsaesser, T.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical reaction generates new compounds out of one or more initial species. On a molecular level, the spatial arrangement of electrons and nuclei changes. While the structure of the initial and the product molecules can be measured routinely, the transient structures and molecular motions during a reaction have remained unknown in most cases. This knowledge, however, is a key element for the exact understanding of the reaction. The ultimate dream is a 'reaction microscope' which allows for an in situ imaging of the molecules during a reaction. We report on the first femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction experiment in which we directly map the transient electronic charge density in the unit cell of a crystalline solid with 30 pico-meter spatial and 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline powder samples, the Debye Scherrer diffraction technique, is a standard method for determining equilibrium structures. The intensity of the Debye Scherrer rings is determined by the respective x-ray structure factor which represents the Fourier transform of the spatial electron density. In our experiments, the transient intensity and angular positions of up to 20 Debye Scherrer reactions from a polycrystalline powder are measured and unravel for the first time a concerted electron and proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded ionic (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 crystals. Photoexcitation of ammonium sulfate induces a sub-100 fs electron transfer from the sulfate groups into a highly conned electron channel along the z-axis of the unit cell. The latter geometry is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps derived from the diffraction data display a periodic modulation of the channels charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A deeper insight into the underlying microscopic

  14. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  15. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  16. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  17. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO 2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO 2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO 2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  18. Generation of Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Thongbai, Chitrlada; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Saisut, Jatuporn; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses become a tool of interesting important to study dynamics at molecular or atomic levels. Such short pulses can be generated from a system consisting of an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as sources to produce electromagnetic radiation of equally short pulses by choosing certain kind of radiation pruduction processes. At the Fast Neutron Research Facility (Thailand), we are especially interested in production of radiation in Far-infrared and X-ray regime. In the far-infrared wavelengths which are longer than the femtosecond pulse length, the radiation is emitted coherently producing intense radiation. In the X-ray regime, development of femtosecond X-ray source is crucial for application in ultrafast science.

  19. Study of the ultrafast polarization dynamics in lithium borohydride by means of femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stingl, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the ultrafast electronic polarisation in the crystalline material lithium borohydride (LiBH 4 ) is examined. The material is excited by a femtosecond long optical pulse and scanned by a likewise short X-ray pulse. Using X-ray scattering the optically induced spatial rearrangement of electronic charge can be directly mapped with atomic spatial resolution. Copper K-alpha X-rays for the experiment are produced in a laboratory table-top laserplasma source with 1 kHz repetition rate. This radiation is then focused on a powdered sample. Debye-Scherrer rings produced from powder diffraction are collected on a large area detector and processed to yield intensity profiles. Using pump-probe technique the change in diffracted intensity, triggered by excitation with a femtosecond optical pulse is examined. The temporal resolution is given by the delay between pump and probe pulse. This way insight is gained into the dynamic electronic evolution of the system. Intensity changes can be correlated to changes in charge density in the relevant material to elucidate structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale. Lithium borohydride was chosen since it displays necessary characteristics for the exploration of ultrafast electronic polarisation. Up to date there has been no spatially resolved research in the femtosecond regime elucidating this electronic phenomenon. This work presents the ultrafast resonse in Lithiumborhydrid (LiBH 4 ) to strong electronic fields with optical frequencies, which leads to charge relocation accompanied by electronic polarisation.

  20. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  1. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Saisut, Jatuporn; Thongbai, Chitrlada; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond electron pulses. Theses short pulses are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  2. Femtosecond electron bunches, source and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongbai, C.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Rimjaem, S.; Rhodes, M.W.; Saisut, J.; Thamboon, P.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Vilaithong, T.

    2008-01-01

    A femtosecond electron source has been developed at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF), Chiang Mai University, Thailand. So far, it has produced electron bunches as short as σ z ∼180 fs with (1-6)x10 8 electrons per microbunch. The system consists of an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha-magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. Coherent transition radiation emitted at wavelengths equal to and longer than the bunch length is used in a Michelson interferometer to determine the bunch length by autocorrelation technique. The experimental setup and results of the bunch length measurement are described

  3. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  4. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  5. Femtosecond x-ray photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase dibromobenzene molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Boll, R; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hömke, A; Adolph, M; Gorkhover, T; Aquila, A; Chapman, H N; Coppola, N; Delmas, T; Gumprecht, L; Holmegaard, L; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coffee, R; Decleva, P; Filsinger, F; Johnsson, P

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved femtosecond photoelectron momentum images and angular distributions of dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C 6 H 4 Br 2 ) molecules measured in a near-infrared pump, soft-x-ray probe experiment performed at an x-ray free-electron laser. The observed alignment dependence of the bromine 2p photoelectron angular distributions is compared to density functional theory calculations and interpreted in terms of photoelectron diffraction. While no clear time-dependent effects are observed in the angular distribution of the Br(2p) photoelectrons, other, low-energy electrons show a pronounced dependence on the time delay between the near-infrared laser and the x-ray pulse. (paper)

  6. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  7. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO{sub 2} laser polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hun-Kook [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Tae [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahsan, Shamim [Khulna University, Khulna (Bangladesh)

    2014-11-15

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO{sub 2} laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO{sub 2} laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO{sub 2} laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  8. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  9. Ultrafast lattice dynamics in photoexcited nanostructures. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction with optimized evaluation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Within the course of this thesis, I have investigated the complex interplay between electron and lattice dynamics in nanostructures of perovskite oxides. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses were utilized to probe the evolution of atomic rearrangement directly, which is driven by ultrafast optical excitation of electrons. The physics of complex materials with a large number of degrees of freedom can be interpreted once the exact fingerprint of ultrafast lattice dynamics in time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments for a simple model system is well known. The motion of atoms in a crystal can be probed directly and in real-time by femtosecond pulses of hard X-ray radiation in a pump-probe scheme. In order to provide such ultrashort X-ray pulses, I have built up a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. The setup was extended by a stable goniometer, a two-dimensional X-ray detector and a cryogen-free cryostat. The data acquisition routines of the diffractometer for these ultrafast X-ray diffraction experiments were further improved in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and angular resolution. The implementation of a high-speed reciprocal-space mapping technique allowed for a two-dimensional structural analysis with femtosecond temporal resolution. I have studied the ultrafast lattice dynamics, namely the excitation and propagation of coherent phonons, in photoexcited thin films and superlattice structures of the metallic perovskite SrRuO 3 . Due to the quasi-instantaneous coupling of the lattice to the optically excited electrons in this material a spatially and temporally well-defined thermal stress profile is generated in SrRuO 3 . This enables understanding the effect of the resulting coherent lattice dynamics in time-resolved X-ray diffraction data in great detail, e.g. the appearance of a transient Bragg peak splitting in both thin films and superlattice structures of SrRuO 3 . In addition, a comprehensive simulation toolbox to calculate the ultrafast lattice dynamics and the

  10. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  11. Two-dimensional electronic femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie J.P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with a femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering probe. The method reveals correlations between excitation energy and excited state vibrational structure following photoexcitation. We demonstrate the method in rhodamine 6G.

  12. Extended ABCD matrix formalism for the description of femtosecond diffraction patterns; application to femtosecond digital in-line holography with anamorphic optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Marc; Shen, Huanhuan; Coetmellec, Sebastien; Lebrun, Denis

    2012-03-10

    We present a new model to predict diffraction patterns of femtosecond pulses through complex optical systems. The model is based on the extension of an ABCD matrix formalism combined with generalized Huygens-Fresnel transforms (already used in the CW regime) to the femtosecond regime. The model is tested to describe femtosecond digital in-line holography experiments realized in situ through a cylindrical Plexiglas pipe. The model allows us to establish analytical relations that link the holographic reconstruction process to the experimental parameters of the pipe and of the incident beam itself. Simulations and experimental results are in good concordance. Femtosecond digital in-line holography is shown to allow significant coherent noise reduction, and this model will be particularly efficient to describe a wide range of optical geometries. More generally, the model developed can be easily used in any experiment where the knowledge of the precise evolution of femtosecond transverse patterns is required.

  13. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  14. Fast parallel diffractive multi-beam femtosecond laser surface micro-structuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Kuang, E-mail: z.kuang@liv.ac.uk [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brodie Building, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom); Dun Liu; Perrie, Walter; Edwardson, Stuart; Sharp, Martin; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff; Watkins, Ken [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brodie Building, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Fast parallel femtosecond laser surface micro-structuring is demonstrated using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The Gratings and Lenses algorithm, which is simple and computationally fast, is used to calculate computer generated holograms (CGHs) producing diffractive multiple beams for the parallel processing. The results show that the finite laser bandwidth can significantly alter the intensity distribution of diffracted beams at higher angles resulting in elongated hole shapes. In addition, by synchronisation of applied CGHs and the scanning system, true 3D micro-structures are created on Ti6Al4V.

  15. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  16. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  17. High throughput diffractive multi-beam femtosecond laser processing using a spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Zheng [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: z.kuang@liv.ac.uk; Perrie, Walter [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom); Leach, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Sharp, Martin; Edwardson, Stuart P. [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom); Padgett, Miles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Dearden, Geoff; Watkins, Ken G. [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-30

    High throughput femtosecond laser processing is demonstrated by creating multiple beams using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The diffractive multi-beam patterns are modulated in real time by computer generated holograms (CGHs), which can be calculated by appropriate algorithms. An interactive LabVIEW program is adopted to generate the relevant CGHs. Optical efficiency at this stage is shown to be {approx}50% into first order beams and real time processing has been carried out at 50 Hz refresh rate. Results obtained demonstrate high precision surface micro-structuring on silicon and Ti6Al4V with throughput gain >1 order of magnitude.

  18. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  19. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-01-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis

  20. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K., E-mail: lrk@slac.stanford.edu; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  1. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  2. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei, E-mail: lixiaowei@bit.edu.cn; Liu, Yang [Laser Micro/Nano-Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  3. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  4. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-15

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  5. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  6. Femtosecond and Subfemtosecond X-Ray Pulses from a SASE Based Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, P

    2004-03-10

    We propose a novel method to generate femtosecond and sub-femtosecond photon pulses in a free electron laser by selectively spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Its merits are simplicity and ease of implementation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, it can provide x-ray pulses the order of 1 femtosecond in duration containing about 1010 transversely coherent photons.

  7. Femtosecond pulse radiolysis based on photocathode electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Yang, Jinfeng; Kondoh, T.; Kozawa, T.; Tagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis is a powerful tool for studying chemical kinetics and primary processes or reactions of radiation chemistry. In the pulse radiolysis, a short electron beam, which is almost produced by radio-frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator with energy from a few MeV to a few tens MeV, is used as an irradiative source. The electron-induced reactions or phenomena in matter are analyzed by a short-pulse analyzing light (e.g. synchronized lasers) with the time-resolved stroboscopic technique. The time resolution of pulse radiolysis is not only dependent on the electron bunch length, the analyzing light pulse width, the time jitter between the electron bunch and the analyzing light, but also determined by degradation due to the velocity difference between light and the electron in the sample because of the refractive index. In order to improve the time resolution into femtosecond time region, we have develop a new pulse radiolysis based on a concept of 'Equivalent Velocity Spectroscopy (EVS)' to avoid the degradation of the time resolution caused by the velocity difference between the light and the electron beam in sample. In EVS as shown in Fig.1, a femtosecond electron beam produced by a photocathode electron linear accelerator was used, and a synchronized femtosecond laser was used as the analyzing light source. The electron beam and the laser light were injected into sample with an angle (θ), which is determined by the refractive index (n) of the sample. The electron bunch was also rotated with a same angle to make an overlap of the electron bunch with the laser pulse. The degradation of the time resolution caused by the velocity difference between the light and the electron beam can be calculated as g(L)=L[n/c-1/(vcos θ)], where L is the optical path length and v is the velocity of the electron in sample (we can assume v=c for a few tens MeV electron beam).We can thus obtained g(L)=0 by adjusting the incident angle to cos θ=1/n. However, the rotation

  8. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  9. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  10. Trapped electronic states in YAG crystal excited by femtosecond radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavedeev, E.V.; Kononenko, V.V.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The excitation of an electronic subsystem of an yttrium aluminum garnet by 800 nm femtosecond radiation was studied theoretically and experimentally. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the refractive index (n) inside the beam waist was explored by means of the pump-probe interferometric technique with a submicron resolution. The observed increase in n indicated the formation of bound electronic states relaxed for ∝ 150 ps. We showed that the experimental data agreed with the computational simulation based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation only if these transient states were considered to arise from a direct light-induced process but not from the decay of radiatively generated free-electron-hole pairs. (orig.)

  11. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  12. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  14. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  15. Instrumental development of a quasi-relativistic ultrashort electron beam source for electron diffractions and spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Min; Figora, Michael

    2017-10-01

    A stable femtosecond electron beam system has been configured for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) system is designed with a sub-MeV photoelectron beam source pulsed by a femtosecond UV laser and nondispersive beamline components, including a bunch compressor-a pulsed S-band klystron is installed and fully commissioned with 5.5 MW peak power in a 2.5 μs pulse length. A single-cell RF photo-gun is designed to produce 1.6-16 pC electron bunches in a photoemission mode with 150 fs pulse duration at 0.5-1 MeV. The measured RF system jitters are within 1% in magnitude and 0.2° in phase, which would induce 3.4 keV and 0.25 keV of ΔE, corresponding to 80 fs and 5 fs of Δt, respectively. Our particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the designed bunch compressor reduces the time-of-arrival jitter by about an order of magnitude. The transport and focusing optics of the designed beamline with the bunch compressor enables an energy spread within 10 -4 and a bunch length (electron probe) within quasi-relativistic UED system.

  16. Femtosecond electron bunches from an RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Farias, Ruy; Thongbai, Chitrlada; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Sub-picosecond electron pulses become a tool of increasing importance to study dynamics at an atomic level. Such electron pulses can be used directly or be converted into intense coherent far infrared radiation or equally short X-ray pulses. In principle, sub-picosecond electron pulses can be obtained in large, high-energy electron linear accelerator systems by repeatedly applying an energy slew and magnetic compression. Another process is the production of short electron pulses at low energies from an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode together with a bunch compressing α-magnet. In this paper, we present a systematic analysis of capabilities and limits of sub-picosecond electron pulses from such a source. We discuss particular parameter choices as well as the impact of geometric and electric specifications on the 6-dimensional phase space electron distribution. Numerical beam simulations with the computer code PARMELA are performed including effects and limitations due to space charge forces. While the production of femtosecond electron bunches is of primary concern, we also consider the preservation of such short bunches along a beam transport line

  17. Multiple nonlinear Bragg diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a {\\chi^{(2)}} photonic lattice with hexagonal domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyunishev, A. M.; Arkhipkin, V. G.; Baturin, I. S.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Shur, V. Ya; Chirkin, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    The frequency doubling of femtosecond laser pulses in a two-dimensional (2D) rectangular nonlinear photonic lattice with hexagonal domains is studied experimentally and theoretically. The broad fundamental spectrum enables frequency conversion under nonlinear Bragg diffraction for a series of transverse orders at a fixed longitudinal quasi-phase-matching order. The consistent nonstationary theory of the frequency doubling of femtosecond laser pulses is developed using the representation based on the reciprocal lattice of the structure. The calculated spatial distribution of the second-harmonic spectral intensity agrees well with the experimental data. The condition for multiple nonlinear Bragg diffraction in a 2D nonlinear photonic lattice is offered. The hexagonal shape of the domains contributes to multibeam second harmonic excitation. The maximum conversion efficiency for a series of transverse orders in the range 0.01%-0.03% is obtained.

  18. Deep-inelastic electron-proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    Recent measurements by the H1 collaboration at HERA of the cross section for deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering in which the proton interacts with minimal energy transfer and limited 4-momentum transfer squared are presented in the form of the contribution F 2 D(3) to the proton structure function F 2 . By parametrising the cross section phenomenologically in terms of a leading effective Regge pole exchange and comparing the result with a similar parametrisation of hadronic pp physics, the proton interaction is demonstrated to be dominantly of a diffractive nature. The quantitative interpretation of the parametrisation in terms of the properties of an effective leading Regge pole exchange, the pomeron (IP), shows that there is no evidence for a 'harder' BFKL-motivated IP in such deep-inelastic proton diffraction. The total contribution of proton diffraction to deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering is measured to be ∝10% and to be rather insensitive to Bjorken-x and Q 2 . A first measurement of the partonic structure of diffractive exchange is presented. It is shown to be readily interpreted in terms of the exchange of gluons, and to suggest that the bulk of diffractive momentum transfer is carried by a leading gluon. (orig.)

  19. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from an aerosolized beam of protein nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awel, Salah; Kirian, Richard A; Wiedorn, Max O; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Roth, Nils; Horke, Daniel A; Oberthür, Dominik; Knoska, Juraj; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Adriano, Luigi; Tolstikova, Alexandra; Xavier, P Lourdu; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Hunter, Mark S; James, Daniel; Robinson, Joseph S; Weierstall, Uwe; Rode, Andrei V; Bajt, Saša; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution Bragg diffraction from aerosolized single granulovirus nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser is demonstrated. The outer dimensions of the in-vacuum aerosol injector components are identical to conventional liquid-microjet nozzles used in serial diffraction experiments, which allows the injector to be utilized with standard mountings. As compared with liquid-jet injection, the X-ray scattering background is reduced by several orders of magnitude by the use of helium carrier gas rather than liquid. Such reduction is required for diffraction measurements of small macromolecular nanocrystals and single particles. High particle speeds are achieved, making the approach suitable for use at upcoming high-repetition-rate facilities.

  20. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of ∼0.04 o and an elastic strain resolution of ∼7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  1. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sawaya, Michael R. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McFarlane, Heather T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenberg, David S. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Sauter, Nicholas K., E-mail: nksauter@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  2. Precession electron diffraction – a topical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Midgley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 20 years since precession electron diffraction (PED was introduced, it has grown from a little-known niche technique to one that is seen as a cornerstone of electron crystallography. It is now used primarily in two ways. The first is to determine crystal structures, to identify lattice parameters and symmetry, and ultimately to solve the atomic structure ab initio. The second is, through connection with the microscope scanning system, to map the local orientation of the specimen to investigate crystal texture, rotation and strain at the nanometre scale. This topical review brings the reader up to date, highlighting recent successes using PED and providing some pointers to the future in terms of method development and how the technique can meet some of the needs of the X-ray crystallography community. Complementary electron techniques are also discussed, together with how a synergy of methods may provide the best approach to electron-based structure analysis.

  3. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  4. Compact femtosecond electron diffractometer with 100 keV electron bunches approaching the single-electron pulse duration limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldecker, Lutz; Bertoni, Roman; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and implementation of a highly compact femtosecond electron diffractometer working at electron energies up to 100 keV. We use a multi-body particle tracing code to simulate electron bunch propagation through the setup and to calculate pulse durations at the sample position. Our simulations show that electron bunches containing few thousands of electrons per bunch are only weakly broadened by space-charge effects and their pulse duration is thus close to the one of a single-electron wavepacket. With our compact setup, we can create electron bunches containing up to 5000 electrons with a pulse duration below 100 fs on the sample. We use the diffractometer to track the energy transfer from photoexcited electrons to the lattice in a thin film of titanium. This process takes place on the timescale of few-hundred femtoseconds and a fully equilibrated state is reached within 1 ps

  5. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Ångstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glownia, J. M.; Natan, A.; Cryan, J. P.; Hartsock, R.; Kozina, M.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with a temporal and spatial resolution of 30 fs and 0.3 Å. This high fidelity is due to interference between the nonstationary excitation and the stationary initial charge distribution. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on ångstrom and femtosecond scales. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. In conclusion, coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  6. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  7. Diffraction of white-light supercontinuum by femtosecond laser-induced transient grating in carbon bisulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huang; Yan-Qiang, Yang; Ying-Hui, Wang; Zhi-Ren, Zheng; Wen-Hui, Su

    2010-01-01

    Experiments on fs laser-induced transient grating (LITG) in carbon bisulfide (CS 2 ) are carried out to explore the chirp characteristics of a white-light supercontinuum (SC) generated by a 800-nm, 160-fs laser pulse in a 4-mm thick Al 2 O 3 crystal. Two orders of diffraction signals of SC by fs LITG in CS 2 are observed, demonstrating that both the third-order process and the fifth-order process are present simultaneously. The experimental results also imply that the formation of an fs transient refractive-index grating in CS 2 is mainly due to the electronic polarization process. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  8. Ultrashort and coherent single-electron pulses for diffraction at ultimate resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Friedrich Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful tool for studying structural dynamics with femtosecond temporal and sub-aangstroem spatial resolutions. It benefits from the high scattering cross-sections of electrons compared X-rays and allows the examination of thin samples, surfaces and gases. One of the main challenges in ultrafast electron diffraction is the generation of electron pulses with a short duration and a large transverse coherence. The former limits the temporal resolution of the experiment while the latter determines the maximum size of the scattering structures that can be studied. In this work, we strive to push the limits of electron diffraction towards higher temporal and spatial resolutions. The decisive step in our approach is to eliminate all detrimental effects caused by Coulomb repulsion between the electrons by reducing the number of electrons per pulse to one. In this situation, the electrons' longitudinal and transverse velocity distributions are determined solely by the photoemission process. By reducing the electron source size on the photocathode, we make use of the small transverse velocity spread to produce electron pulses with a transverse coherence length of 20 nm, which is about an order of magnitude larger than the reported values for comparable experiments. The energy distribution of an ensemble of single-electron pulses from a photoemission source is directly linked to the mismatch between the photon energy and the cathode's work function. This excess energy can be reduced by using a photon energy close to the material's work function. Using a tunable source of ultraviolet pulses, we demonstrate the reduction of the velocity spread of the electrons, resulting in a shorter duration of the electron pulses. The reduced electron pulse durations achieved by a tunable excitation or by other approaches require new characterization techniques for electron pulses. We developed a novel method for the characterization of electron pulses at

  9. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  10. Mineralogical applications of electron diffraction. 1. Theory and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; Christ, C.L.

    1958-01-01

    The small wavelengths used in electron-diffraction experiments and the thinness of the crystals necessary for the transmission of the electron beam combine to require a somewhat different diffraction geometry for the interpretation of electron-diffraction patterns than is used in the interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns. This geometry, based on the reciprocal lattice concept and geometrical construction of Ewald, needed for the interpretation.

  11. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  12. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  13. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szlachetko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s to femtoseconds (10−15 s and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS, we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments.

  14. NIST/Sandia/ICDD Electron Diffraction Database: A Database for Phase Identification by Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M J; Chambers, W F; Melgaard, D; Himes, V L; Stalick, J K; Mighell, A D

    1989-01-01

    A new database containing crystallographic and chemical information designed especially for application to electron diffraction search/match and related problems has been developed. The new database was derived from two well-established x-ray diffraction databases, the JCPDS Powder Diffraction File and NBS CRYSTAL DATA, and incorporates 2 years of experience with an earlier version. It contains 71,142 entries, with space group and unit cell data for 59,612 of those. Unit cell and space group information were used, where available, to calculate patterns consisting of all allowed reflections with d -spacings greater than 0.8 A for ~ 59,000 of the entries. Calculated patterns are used in the database in preference to experimental x-ray data when both are available, since experimental x-ray data sometimes omits high d -spacing data which falls at low diffraction angles. Intensity data are not given when calculated spacings are used. A search scheme using chemistry and r -spacing (reciprocal d -spacing) has been developed. Other potentially searchable data in this new database include space group, Pearson symbol, unit cell edge lengths, reduced cell edge length, and reduced cell volume. Compound and/or mineral names, formulas, and journal references are included in the output, as well as pointers to corresponding entries in NBS CRYSTAL DATA and the Powder Diffraction File where more complete information may be obtained. Atom positions are not given. Rudimentary search software has been written to implement a chemistry and r -spacing bit map search. With typical data, a full search through ~ 71,000 compounds takes 10~20 seconds on a PDP 11/23-RL02 system.

  15. Overall comparison of subpicosecond electron beam diagnostics by the polychromator, the interferometer and the femtosecond streak camera

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T; Yoshimatsu, T; Sasaki, S; Sugiyama, Y; Ishi, K; Shibata, Y; Kondo, Y; Yoshii, K; Ueda, T; Uesaka, M

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of longitudinal bunch length of subpicosecond and picosecond electron beams have been performed by three methods with three radiation sources at the 35 MeV S-band twin liner accelerators at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. The methods we adopt are the femtosecond streak camera with a nondispersive reflective optics, the coherent transition radiation (CTR) Michelson interferometer and the 10 ch polychromator that detects the spectrum of CTR and coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). The measurements by the two CTR methods were independently done with the streak camera and their results were consistent with one another. As a result, the reliability of the polychromator for the diagnostics of less than picosecond electron bunch and the usefulness of the diagnostics for the single shot measurement were verified. Furthermore, perfect nondestructive diagnostics for subpicosecond bunches was performed utilizing CDR interferometry. Then the good agreement between CDR interfero...

  16. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  17. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-02-10

    Understanding structure-function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure-function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  18. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  19. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  20. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Wang Feng; Li Xin; Yuan Yanping; Xiao Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train. (paper)

  1. Achieving few-femtosecond time-sorting at hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Coffee, R.; Bionta, M. R.; Chollet, M.; French, D.; Zhu, D.; Fritz, D. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Toleikis, S.; Cammarata, M.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, few-femtosecond pulses have become available at hard X-ray free-electron lasers. Coupled with the available sub-10 fs optical pulses, investigations into few-femtosecond dynamics are not far off. However, achieving sufficient synchronization between optical lasers and X-ray pulses continues to be challenging. We report a `measure-and-sort' approach, which achieves sub-10 fs root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) error measurement at hard X-ray FELs, far beyond the 100-200 fs r.m.s. jitter limitations. This timing diagnostic, now routinely available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is based on ultrafast free-carrier generation in optically transparent materials. Correlation between two independent measurements enables unambiguous demonstration of ~6 fs r.m.s. error in reporting the optical/X-ray delay, with single shot error suggesting the possibility of reaching few-femtosecond resolution.

  2. Femtosecond single electron bunch generation by rotating longitudinal bunch phase space in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Kondoh, T.; Kan, K.; Kozawa, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Tagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond (fs) electron bunching was observed in a photoinjector with a magnetic compressor by rotating the bunch in longitudinal phase space. The bunch length was obtained by measuring Cherenkov radiation of the electron beam with a femtosecond streak camera technique. A single electron bunch with rms bunch length of 98 fs was observed for a 32 MeV electron beam at a charge of 0.17 nC. The relative energy spread and the normalized transverse emittance of the electron beam were 0.2% and 3.8 mm-mrad, respectively. The effect of space charge on the bunch compression was investigated experimentally for charges from 0.17 to 1.25 nC. The dependences of the relative energy spread and the normalized beam transverse emittance on the bunch charge were measured

  3. Generation of a femtosecond electron microbunch train from a photocathode using twofold Michelson interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shevelev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The interest in producing ultrashort electron bunches has risen sharply among scientists working on the design of high-gradient wakefield accelerators. One attractive approach generating electron bunches is to illuminate a photocathode with a train of femtosecond laser pulses. In this paper we describe the design and testing of a laser system for an rf gun based on a commercial titanium-sapphire laser technology. The technology allows the production of four femtosecond laser pulses with a continuously variable pulse delay. We also use the designed system to demonstrate the experimental generation of an electron microbunch train obtained by illuminating a cesium-telluride semiconductor photocathode. We use conventional diagnostics to characterize the electron microbunches produced and confirm that it may be possible to control the main parameter of an electron microbunch train.

  4. Generation of a femtosecond electron microbunch train from a photocathode using twofold Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, M.; Aryshev, A.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.

    2017-10-01

    The interest in producing ultrashort electron bunches has risen sharply among scientists working on the design of high-gradient wakefield accelerators. One attractive approach generating electron bunches is to illuminate a photocathode with a train of femtosecond laser pulses. In this paper we describe the design and testing of a laser system for an rf gun based on a commercial titanium-sapphire laser technology. The technology allows the production of four femtosecond laser pulses with a continuously variable pulse delay. We also use the designed system to demonstrate the experimental generation of an electron microbunch train obtained by illuminating a cesium-telluride semiconductor photocathode. We use conventional diagnostics to characterize the electron microbunches produced and confirm that it may be possible to control the main parameter of an electron microbunch train.

  5. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  6. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  7. Calculation and construction of electron-diffraction photographs using computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayurov, S.S.; Notkin, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A method of computer construction and indexing of theoretical electronograms for monophase structures with arbitrary type of crystal lattice and for polyphase ones with known orientational coorrelations between phases is presented. Electron-diffraction photograph is presented, obtained from the foil area of two-phase VT22 alloy at β phase orientation in comparison with theoretical electron-diffraction photographs, built ap by computer, with the [100] β phase zone axis and with three variants of α phase orientation relatively to β phase. It is shown that on the experimental electron-diffraction photograph simultaneously presents α-phase three orientations, which reflexes can be indexing correctly [ru

  8. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)], E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} electrons packed in bunches of {approx}100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  9. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10 7 -10 8 electrons packed in bunches of ∼100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics

  10. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M

    2008-10-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10(7)-10(8) electrons packed in bunches of approximately 100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  11. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  12. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  13. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  14. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.; Lee, Olivia P.; Millstone, Jill E.; Chen, Mark S.; Su, Timothy A.; Creelman, Mark; Frechet, Jean; Mathies, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS

  15. Athermal electron distribution probed by femtosecond multiphoton photoemission from image potential states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrini, Gabriele; Giannetti, Claudio; Pagliara, Stefania; Banfi, Francesco; Galimberti, Gianluca; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    Image potential states are populated through indirect, scattering-mediated multiphoton absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses and revealed by single-photon photoemission. The measured effective mass is significantly different from that obtained with direct, resonant population. These features reveal a strong coupling of the electrons residing in the image potential state, outside the solid, with the underlying hot electron population created by the laser pulse. The coupling is mediated by a many-body scattering interaction between the image potential state electrons and bulk electrons in highly excited states

  16. Spot profile analysis and lifetime mapping in ultrafast electron diffraction: Lattice excitation of self-organized Ge nanostructures on Si(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frigge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast high energy electron diffraction in reflection geometry is employed to study the structural dynamics of self-organized Germanium hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters on Si(001 upon femtosecond laser excitation. Utilizing the difference in size and strain state the response of hut- and dome clusters can be distinguished by a transient spot profile analysis. Surface diffraction from {105}-type facets provide exclusive information on hut clusters. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of the dynamics of the entire diffraction pattern gives time constants of 40, 160, and 390 ps, which are assigned to the cooling time constants for hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters.

  17. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons

  18. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  19. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  20. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  2. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  3. Comparative study of macrotexture analysis using X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, Marilene Morelli

    2002-01-01

    The macrotexture is one of the main characteristics in metallic materials, which the physical properties depend on the crystallographic direction. The analysis of the macrotexture to middles of the decade of 80 was just accomplished by the techniques of Xray diffraction and neutrons diffraction. The possibility of the analysis of the macrotexture using, the technique of electron backscattering diffraction in the scanning electronic microscope, that allowed to correlate the measure of the orientation with its location in the micro structure, was a very welcome tool in the area of engineering of materials. In this work it was studied the theoretical aspects of the two techniques and it was used of both techniques for the analysis of the macrotexture of aluminum sheets 1050 and 3003 with intensity, measured through the texture index 'J', from 2.00 to 5.00. The results obtained by the two techniques were shown reasonably similar, being considered that the statistics of the data obtained by the technique of electron backscatter diffraction is much inferior to the obtained by the X-ray diffraction. (author)

  4. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  5. Response to 'Comment on 'Ultrafast electron optics: Propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets'' [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 803 (2003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwick, Bradley J.; Dwyer, Jason R.; Jordan, Robert E.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-01-01

    In this reply, we address the main issues raised by Qian et al. regarding our recent article [J. Appl. Phys. 92, 1643 (2002)]. In particular, we reiterate the approximations used in the development of the mean-field model and demonstrate how the form used for the on-axis potential is applicable to the study of femtosecond electron packet propagation and is not in need of correction. We also repeat our assertion that the one-dimensional (1-D) fluid model developed by Qian et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 91, 462 (2002)] overestimates space-charge-induced pulse broadening and is in qualitative disagreement with femtosecond electron packet propagation dynamics. The key differences between the mean-field and 1-D fluid model are discussed and their range of applicability is clarified

  6. Coherent infrared radiation from the ALS generated via femtosecond laser modulation of the electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS produces large modulation of the electron energies within a short ∼100 fs slice of the electron bunch. Propagating around the storage ring, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories. The length of the perturbation evolves with a distance from the wiggler but is much shorter than the electron bunch length. This perturbation causes the electron bunch to emit short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent infrared light which are automatically synchronized to the modulating laser. The intensity and spectra of the infrared light were measured in two storage ring locations for a nominal ALS lattice and for an experimental lattice with the higher momentum compaction factor. The onset of instability stimulated by laser e-beam interaction had been discovered. The infrared signal is now routinely used as a sensitive monitor for a fine tuning of the laser beam alignment during data accumulation in the experiments with femtosecond x-ray pulses

  7. Electron emission from a double-layer metal under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuchang; Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin, E-mail: amchen@jlu.edu.cn; Ding, Dajun; Jin, Mingxing, E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically investigate electron emission during femtosecond laser ablation of single-layer metal (copper) and double-layer structures. The double-layer structure is composed of a surface layer (copper) and a substrate layer (gold or chromium). The calculated results indicate that the double-layer structure brings a change to the electron emission from the copper surface. Compared with the ablation of a single-layer, a double-layer structure may be helpful to decrease the relaxation time of the electron temperature, and optimize the electron emission by diminishing the tailing phenomenon under the same absorbed laser fluence. With the increase of the absorbed laser fluence, the effect of optimization becomes significant. This study provides a way to optimize the electron emission which can be beneficial to generate laser induced ultrafast electron pulse sources.

  8. Optimizing disk registration algorithms for nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekin, Thomas C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Gammer, Christoph [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Jahnstrasse 12, Leoben, Austria 8700 (Austria); Ciston, Jim [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: cophus@gmail.com [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Scanning nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping is a technique by which the positions of diffracted disks sampled at the nanoscale over a crystalline sample can be used to reconstruct a strain map over a large area. However, it is important that the disk positions are measured accurately, as their positions relative to a reference are directly used to calculate strain. In this study, we compare several correlation methods using both simulated and experimental data in order to directly probe susceptibility to measurement error due to non-uniform diffracted disk illumination structure. We found that prefiltering the diffraction patterns with a Sobel filter before performing cross correlation or performing a square-root magnitude weighted phase correlation returned the best results when inner disk structure was present. We have tested these methods both on simulated datasets, and experimental data from unstrained silicon as well as a twin grain boundary in 304 stainless steel.

  9. Electronic diffraction tomography by Green's functions and singular values decompositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inverse scattering technique is developed to enable a three-dimensional sample reconstruction from the diffraction figures obtained for different sample orientations by electronic projection microscopy, thus performing a diffraction tomography. In its Green's-functions formulation, this technique takes account of all orders of diffraction by performing an iterative reconstruction of the wave function on the observation screen and in the sample. In a final step, these quantities enable a reconstruction of the potential-energy distribution, which is assumed real valued. The method relies on the use of singular values decomposition techniques, thus providing the best least-squares solutions and enabling a reduction of noise. The technique is applied to the analysis of a three-dimensional nanometric sample that is observed in Fresnel conditions with an electron energy of 40 eV. The algorithm turns out to provide results with a mean relative error around 3% and to be stable against random noise

  10. Relativistic electron drift in overdense plasma produced by a superintense femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastunkov, V.S.; Krainov, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The general peculiarities of electron motion in the skin layer at the irradiation of overdense plasma by a superintense linearly polarized laser pulse of femtosecond duration are considered. The quiver electron energy is assumed to be a relativistic quantity. Relativistic electron drift along the propagation of laser radiation produced by a magnetic part of a laser field remains after the end of the laser pulse, unlike the relativistic drift of a free electron in underdense plasma. As a result, the penetration depth is much larger than the classical skin depth. The conclusion has been made that the drift velocity is a nonrelativistic quantity even at the peak laser intensity of 10 21 W/cm 2 . The time at which an electron penetrates into field-free matter from the skin layer is much less than the pulse duration

  11. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-01

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  13. Measuring the electron bunch timing with femtosecond resolution at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Marie Kristin

    2013-03-15

    Bunch arrival time monitors (BAMs) are an integral part of the laser-based synchronisation system which is being developed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH).The operation principle comprises the measurement of the electron bunch arrival time relative to the optical timing reference, which is provided by actively length-stabilised fibre-links of the synchronisation system. The monitors are foreseen to be used as a standard diagnostic tool, not only for FLASH but also for the future European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL). The present bunch arrival time monitors have evolved from proof-of-principle experiments to beneficial diagnostic devices, which are almost permanently available during standard machine operation. This achievement has been a major objective of this thesis. The developments went in parallel to improvements in the reliable and low-maintenance operation of the optical synchronisation system. The key topics of this thesis comprised the characterisation and optimisation of the opto-mechanical front-ends of both, the fibre-links and the BAMs. The extent of applications involving the bunch arrival time information has been enlarged, providing automated measurements for properties of the RF acceleration modules, for instance, the RF on-crest phase determination and the measurement of energy fluctuations. Furthermore, two of the currently installed BAMs are implemented in an active phase and gradient stabilisation of specific modules in order to minimise the arrival time jitter of the electron bunches at the location of the FEL undulators, which is crucial for a high timing resolution of pump-probe experiments.

  14. Photoemission studies using femtosecond pulses for high brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1990-06-01

    We present the results of a series of experiments where various metal photocathodes are irradiated with ultrashort laser pulses, whose characteristics are: λ = 625 nm, τ = 100 fs, PRR = 89.5 MHz, Hν = 2 eV and average power 25 mW in each of the two beams. The quantum efficiency of the metals range from ∼10 -12 to 10 -8 at a power density of 100 MW/cm 2 at normal incidence. Since all the electrons are emitted due to multiphoton processes, these efficiencies are expected to increase substantially at large intensities. The efficiency at 100 MW/cm 2 has been increased by using p-polarized light at oblique incidence by ∼20x and by mediating the electron emission through surface plasmon excitation by ∼10 3 x. For the low intensities used in these experiments, the electron pulse duration is almost the same as the laser pulse duration for both the bulk and the surface plasmon mediated photoemission. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Rao, B. Jayachander [Departamento de Química and Centro de Química, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  16. Femtosecond X-ray Pulses from a Spatially Chirped Electron Bunch in a SASE FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, P.

    2003-01-14

    We propose a simple method to produce short x-ray pulses using a spatially chirped electron bunch in a SASE FEL. The spatial chirp is generated using an rf deflector which produces a transverse offset (in y and/or y') correlated with the longitudinal bunch position. Since the FEL gain is very sensitive to an initial offset in the transverse phase space at the entrance of the undulator, only a small portion of the electron bunch with relatively small transverse offset will interact significantly with the radiation, resulting in an x-ray pulse length much shorter than the electron bunch length. The x-ray pulse is also naturally phase locked to the rf deflector and so allows high precision timing synchronization. We discuss the generation and transport of such a spatially chirped electron beam and show that tens of femtosecond long pulse can be generated for the linac coherent light source (LCLS).

  17. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  18. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  19. Electron back scattered diffraction study of SmCo magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Machado, R.; Missell, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    The remanence and energy product of permanent magnets is a strong function of their crystallographic texture. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is a tool for texture analysis providing information about the atomic layers up to 50 nm below the surface of the material. This paper discusses experimental requirements for performing EBSD measurements on rare-earth permanent magnets and presents results on commercial SmCo magnet material. EBSD measurements proved to be very sensitive to misaligned grains and were sensitive to texture in good agreement with information provided by X-ray diffraction scans. Results for nanostructured Sm(CoFeCuZr) z magnets are also discussed

  20. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  1. Lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud Hanafy [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Bugayev, Aleksey [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is used to probe the lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony thin film. The temporal hierarchies of the intensity and position of diffraction orders are monitored. The femtosecond laser excitation of antimony film was found to lead to initial compression after the laser pulse, which gives way to tension vibrating at new equilibrium displacement. A damped harmonic oscillator model, in which the hot electron-blast force contributes to the driving force of oscillations in lattice spacing, is used to interpret the data. The electron–phonon energy-exchange rate and the electronic Grüneisen parameter were obtained.

  2. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  3. Switching waves dynamics in optical bistable cavity-free system at femtosecond laser pulse propagation in semiconductor under light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Egorenkov, Vladimir A.; Loginova, Maria M.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a propagation of laser pulse in a semiconductor under the conditions of an occurrence of optical bistability, which appears due to a nonlinear absorption of the semiconductor. As a result, the domains of high concentration of free charged particles (electrons and ionized donors) occur if an intensity of the incident optical pulse is greater than certain intensity. As it is well-known, that an optical beam must undergo a diffraction on (or reflection from) the domains boundaries. Usually, the beam diffraction along a coordinate of the optical pulse propagation does not take into account by using the slowly varying envelope approximation for the laser pulse interaction with optical bistable element. Therefore, a reflection of the beam from the domains with abrupt boundary does not take into account under computer simulation of the laser pulse propagation. However, the optical beams, reflected from nonhomogeneities caused by the domains of high concentration of free-charged particles, can essentially influence on a formation of switching waves in a semiconductor. We illustrate this statement by computer simulation results provided on the base of nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a set of PDEs, which describe an evolution of the semiconductor characteristics (concentrations of free-charged particles and potential of an electric field strength), and taking into account the longitudinal and transverse diffraction effects.

  4. Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, M.; Ueda, T.; Kozawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera is presented. The subpicosecond electron single bunch of energy 35 MeV was generated by the achromatic magnetic pulse compressor at the S-band linear accelerator of nuclear engineering research laboratory (NERL), University of Tokyo. The electric charge per bunch and beam size are 0.5 nC and the horizontal and vertical beam sizes are 3.3 and 5.5 mm (full width at half maximum; FWHM), respectively. Pulse shape of the electron single bunch is measured via Cherenkov radiation emitted in air by the femtosecond streak camera. Optical parameters of the optical measurement system were optimized based on much experiment and numerical analysis in order to achieve a subpicosecond time resolution. By using the optimized optical measurement system, the subpicosecond pulse shape, its variation for the differents rf phases in the accelerating tube, the jitter of the total system and the correlation between measured streak images and calculated longitudinal phase space distributions were precisely evaluated. This measurement system is going to be utilized in several subpicosecond analyses for radiation physics and chemistry. (orig.)

  5. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  6. Development of splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdellier, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Röder, Falk [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Triebenberg Lab, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Snoeck, Etienne [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using a combination of condenser electrostatic biprism with dedicated electron optic conditions for sample illumination, we were able to split a convergent beam electron probe focused on the sample in two half focused probes without introducing any tilt between them. As a consequence, a combined convergent beam electron diffraction pattern is obtained in the back focal plane of the objective lens arising from two different sample areas, which could be analyzed in a single pattern. This splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED) pattern has been tested first on a well-characterized test sample of Si/SiGe multilayers epitaxially grown on a Si substrate. The SCBED pattern contains information from the strained area, which exhibits HOLZ lines broadening induced by surface relaxation, with fine HOLZ lines observed in the unstrained reference part of the sample. These patterns have been analyzed quantitatively using both parts of the SCBED transmitted disk. The fine HOLZ line positions are used to determine the precise acceleration voltage of the microscope while the perturbed HOLZ rocking curves in the stained area are compared to dynamical simulated ones. The combination of these two information leads to a precise evaluation of the sample strain state. Finally, several SCBED setups are proposed to tackle fundamental physics questions as well as applied materials science ones and demonstrate how SCBED has the potential to greatly expand the range of applications of electron diffraction and electron holography. - Highlights: • Using a condenser biprism, we split the CBED pattern in two half-CBED disks. • We have determined the electron optical conditions used to perform various SCBED. • We propose new applications possible for this new SCBED configuration.

  7. Relativistic electron planar channeling and diffraction in thin monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, S.A.; Nurmagambetov, S.B.; Kaplin, V.V.; Rozum, E.I.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of relativistic electrons with thin monocrystals was investigated in approximation of continuous potential of crystal plane system. Numerical technique for solution of one-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a periodic potential was developed. Numerical solutions conducted according to the technique were used to determine the forms of ngular distributions of electrons located in various zones of lteral motion. Calculation results were applied for analyzing experimentally obtained data on agular distribution of 5.1 MeV electrons projected at small angles onto the (110) planar system of a Si monocrystal. The conducted complex experimental and theoretical: investigations demonstrated the possibility of prevalen occupation of certain states of lateral motion and enabled to determine angular reg in directions of the electron beam projection on a crystal where either channeling effects or those of electron diffraction are important

  8. Diffraction and microscopy with attosecond electron pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy1-7 can resolve electronic processes directly in time, but a movie-like space-time recording is impeded by the too long wavelength ( 100 times larger than atomic distances) or the source-sample entanglement in re-collision techniques8-11. Here we advance attosecond metrology to picometre wavelength and sub-atomic resolution by using free-space electrons instead of higher-harmonic photons1-7 or re-colliding wavepackets8-11. A beam of 70-keV electrons at 4.5-pm de Broglie wavelength is modulated by the electric field of laser cycles into a sequence of electron pulses with sub-optical-cycle duration. Time-resolved diffraction from crystalline silicon reveals a propagates in space and time. This unification of attosecond science with electron microscopy and diffraction enables space-time imaging of light-driven processes in the entire range of sample morphologies that electron microscopy can access.

  9. Extreme regimes of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode in a dc electron gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. E. M. Pasmans

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The femtosecond photoemission yield from a copper cathode and the emittance of the created electron beams has been studied in a 12  MeV/m, 100 keV dc electron gun over a wide range of laser fluence, from the linear photoemission regime until the onset of image charge limitations and cathode damaging. The measured photoemission curves can be described well with available theory which includes the Schottky effect, second-order photoemission, and image charge limitation. The second-order photoemission can be explained by thermally assisted one-photon photoemission (1PPE and by above-threshold two-photon photoemission (2PPE. Measurements with a fresh cathode suggest that the 2PPE process is dominant. The beam emittance has been measured for the entire range of initial surface charge densities as well. The emittance measurements of space-charge dominated beams can be described well by an envelope equation with generalized perveance. The dc gun produces 0.1 pC bunches with 25 nm rms normalized emittance, corresponding to a normalized brightness usually associated with rf photoguns. In this experimental study the limits of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode have been explored and analyzed in great detail, resulting in improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  10. Electron diffraction, elemental and image analysis of nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Pavlova, Ewa; Hromádková, Jiřina; Králová, Daniela; Tyrpekl, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, 2a (2009), s. 33-34 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura - Colloquium of Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association. Hluboká nad Vltavou, 22.06.2009-25.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA ČR GA203/07/0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : TEM * electron diffraction * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Lateral propagation of MeV electrons generated by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Tabakhoff, E.; Hudson, L. T.

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of MeV electrons generated by intense (≅10 20 W/cm 2 ) femtosecond laser irradiation, in the lateral direction perpendicular to the incident laser beam, was studied using targets consisting of irradiated metal wires and neighboring spectator wires embedded in electrically conductive (aluminum) or resistive (Teflon) substrates. The K shell spectra in the energy range 40-60 keV from wires of Gd, Dy, Hf, and W were recorded by a transmission crystal spectrometer. The spectra were produced by 1s electron ionization in the irradiated wire and by energetic electron propagation through the substrate material to the spectator wire of a different metal. The electron range and energy were determined from the relative K shell emissions from the irradiated and spectator wires separated by varying substrate lateral distances of up to 1 mm. It was found that electron propagation through Teflon was inhibited, compared to aluminum, implying a relatively weak return current and incomplete space-charge neutralization. The energetic electron propagation in the direction parallel to the electric field of the laser beam was larger than perpendicular to the electric field. Energetic electron production was lower when directly irradiating aluminum or Teflon compared to irradiating the heavy metal wires. These experiments are important for the determination of the energetic electron production mechanism and for understanding lateral electron propagation that can be detrimental to fast-ignition fusion and hard x-ray backlighter radiography.

  12. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y., E-mail: ding@slac.stanford.edu; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Helml, W. [Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  13. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  14. Solving complex and disordered surface structures with electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hove, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The past of surface structure determination with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) will be briefly reviewed, setting the stage for a discussion of recent and future developments. The aim of these developments is to solve complex and disordered surface structures. Some efficient solutions to the theoretical and experimental problems will be presented. Since the theoretical problems dominate, the emphasis will be on theoretical approaches to the calculation of the multiple scattering of electrons through complex and disordered surfaces. 49 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  15. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Takanori; Song, Changyong; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nakatsu, Toru; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur SAD phasing facilitates the structure determination of diverse native proteins using femtosecond X-rays from free-electron lasers via serial femtosecond crystallography. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures

  16. Coherent phonon excitation and linear thermal expansion in structural dynamics and ultrafast electron diffraction of laser-heated metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jau

    2008-04-28

    In this study, we examine the ultrafast structural dynamics of metals induced by a femtosecond laser-heating pulse as probed by time-resolved electron diffraction. Using the two-temperature model and the Grüneisen relationship we calculate the electron temperature, phonon temperature, and impulsive force at each atomic site in the slab. Together with the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam anharmonic chain model we calculate changes of bond distance and the peak shift of Bragg spots or Laue rings. A laser-heated thin slab is shown to exhibit "breathing" standing-wave behavior, with a period equal to the round-trip time for sound wave and a wavelength twice the slab thickness. The peak delay time first increases linearly with the thickness (linear thermal expansion due to lattice temperature jump are shown to contribute to the overall structural changes. Differences between these two mechanisms and their dependence on film thickness and other factors are discussed.

  17. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, G.; Jacob, D.; Roussel, P.; Boullay, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, M.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, C.; Cámara, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), 740-751 ISSN 2052-5206 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Keywords : XRD * structure refinement * precession electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2015

  18. Reflection of femtosecond pulses from soft X-ray free-electron laser by periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany); Hendel, S.; Bienert, F.; Sacher, M.D.; Heinzmann, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Recent experiments on a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) source (FLASH in Hamburg) have shown that multilayers (MLs) can be used as optical elements for highly intense X-ray irradiation. An effort to find most appropriate MLs has to consider the femtosecond time structure and the particular photon energy of the FEL. In this paper we have analysed the time response of 'low absorbing' MLs (e.g. such as La/B{sub 4}C) as a function of the number of periods. Interaction of a pulse train of Gaussian shaped sub-pulses using a realistic ML grown by electron-beam evaporation technique has been analysed in the soft-X-ray range. The structural parameters of the MLs were obtained by reflectivity measurements at BESSY II and subsequent profile fittings. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Bunch compression efficiency of the femtosecond electron source at Chiang Mai University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongbai, C.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.

    2011-01-01

    A femtosecond electron source has been developed at the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility (PBP), Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand. Ultra-short electron bunches can be produced with a bunch compression system consisting of a thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha-magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. To obtain effective bunch compression, it is crucial to provide a proper longitudinal phase-space distribution at the gun exit matched to the subsequent beam transport system. Via beam dynamics calculations and experiments, we investigate the bunch compression efficiency for various RF-gun fields. The particle distribution at the RF-gun exit will be tracked numerically through the alpha-magnet and beam transport. Details of the study and results leading to an optimum condition for our system will be presented.

  20. Bunch compression efficiency of the femtosecond electron source at Chiang Mai University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongbai, C.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.

    2011-07-01

    A femtosecond electron source has been developed at the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility (PBP), Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand. Ultra-short electron bunches can be produced with a bunch compression system consisting of a thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha-magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. To obtain effective bunch compression, it is crucial to provide a proper longitudinal phase-space distribution at the gun exit matched to the subsequent beam transport system. Via beam dynamics calculations and experiments, we investigate the bunch compression efficiency for various RF-gun fields. The particle distribution at the RF-gun exit will be tracked numerically through the alpha-magnet and beam transport. Details of the study and results leading to an optimum condition for our system will be presented.

  1. Coherent electron - hole state and femtosecond cooperative emission in bulk GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, Petr P; Kan, H; Ohta, H; Hiruma, T

    2002-01-01

    The conditions for obtaining a collective coherent electron - hole state in semiconductors are discussed. The results of the experimental study of the regime of cooperative recombination of high-density electrons and holes (more than 3 x 10 18 cm -3 ) in bulk GaAs at room temperature are presented. It is shown that the collective pairing of electrons and holes and their condensation cause the formation of a short-living coherent electron - hole BCS-like state, which exhibits radiative recombination in the form of high-power femtosecond optical pulses. It is experimentally demonstrated that almost all of the electrons and holes available are condensed at the very bottoms of the bands and are at the cooperative state. The average lifetime of this state is measured to be of about 300 fs. The dependences of the order parameter (the energy gap of the spectrum of electrons and holes) and the Fermi energy of the coherent BCS state on the electron - hole concentration are obtained. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  2. Quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction measurements of bonding in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The QCBED technique of measuring accurate structure factors has been made practical by advances in energy filtering, computing and in the accurate measurement of intensity. Originally attempted in 1965 by the late Peter Goodman (CSIRO, Melbourne) while working with Gunter Lehmpfuhl (Fritz Haber Institut, Berlin), QCBED has been successfully developed and tested in the last decade on simple structures such as Si and MgO. Our work on Alumina is a step up in complexity and has shown that extinction in X-ray diffraction is not correctable to the precision required. In combination with accurate X-ray diffraction, QCBED promises to revolutionize the accuracy of bonding charge density measurements, experimental results which are of significance in the development of Density Functional Theory used in predictive chemistry. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  3. Reconstruction of Laser-Induced Surface Topography from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; De Graef, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the surface topography of a sample can be reconstructed from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns collected with a commercial EBSD system. This technique combines the location of the maximum background intensity with a correction from Monte Carlo simulations to determine the local surface normals at each point in an EBSD scan. A surface height map is then reconstructed from the local surface normals. In this study, a Ni sample was machined with a femtosecond laser, which causes the formation of a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS). The topography of the LIPSS was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reconstructions from EBSD patterns collected at 5 and 20 kV. The LIPSS consisted of a combination of low frequency waviness due to curtaining and high frequency ridges. The morphology of the reconstructed low frequency waviness and high frequency ridges matched the AFM data. The reconstruction technique does not require any modification to existing EBSD systems and so can be particularly useful for measuring topography and its evolution during in situ experiments.

  4. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of electron back-scatter diffraction to texture research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, V.

    1996-01-01

    The application of electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) to materials research is reviewed. A brief history of the technique is given, followed by a description of present-day operation. The methodology of 'microtexture', i.e. spatially specific orientations, is described and recent examples of its application using EBSD are given, in particular to interstitial-free steel processing, growth of phases in a white iron and grain boundary phenomena in a superplastic alloy. The advantages and disadvantages of EBSD compared to use of X-rays for texture determination are discussed in detail

  6. Interpretation of diffuse low-energy electron diffraction intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, D.K.; Pendry, J.B.; Van Hove, M.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the diffuse low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) that occurs between sharp LEED beams can be used to determine the local bonding configuration near disordered surface atoms. Two approaches to the calculation of diffuse LEED intensities are presented for the case of lattice-gas disorder of an adsorbate on a crystalline substrate. The capabilities of this technique are most similar to those of near-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure, but avoid the restrictions due to the use of photons

  7. Hydrogen positions in single nanocrystals revealed by electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Brázda, Petr; Boullay, P.; Pérez, O.; Klementová, Mariana; Petit, S.; Eigner, Václav; Zaarour, M.; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 355, č. 6321 (2017), s. 166-169 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-10035S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen atoms * crystal structure * electron diffraction tomography * nanocrystalline materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 37.205, year: 2016

  8. Femtosecond excitations in metallic nanostructures. From ultrafast light confinement to a local electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropers, C.

    2007-07-11

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of optical excitations in metallic nanostructures. In experiments on selected model structures, the dynamics of these excitations and their electromagnetic spatial modes are investigated with femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. Angle- and time-resolved transmission experiments on metallic thin film gratings demonstrate the dominant role resonant surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) play in the optical properties of such structures. The lifetimes of these excitations are determined, and it is shown that coherent couplings among SPP-resonances result in drastic lifetime modifications. Near the visible part of the spectrum, subradiant SPP lifetimes of up to 200 femtoseconds are observed, which is considerably longer than previously expected for these structures. The spatial SPP mode profiles are imaged using a custom-built near-field optical microscope. The experiments reveal a direct correlation between the spatial mode structure and the dynamics of different SPP resonances. Coupling-induced SPP band gaps are identified as splittings into symmetric and antisymmetric surface modes. These findings allow for an interpretation of the near-field optical image contrast in terms of the contributions of different vectorial components of the electromagnetic near-field. A selective imaging of different electric and magnetic field components is demonstrated for various types of near-field probes. Furthermore, the excitation of SPPs in periodic structures is employed in a novel type of near-field tip. The resonant excitation of SPPs in a nanofabricated grating on the shaft of a sharp metallic tip results in their concentration at the tip apex. The final part of the thesis highlights the importance of optical field enhancements for the local generation of nonlinear optical signals at the apex of sharp metallic tips. Specifically, the observation of intense multiphoton electron emission after femtosecond

  9. Few femtosecond, few kilo-ampere electron bunch produced by a laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundh, O.; Lim, J.; Rechatin, C.; Ammoura, L.; Goddet, J.P.; Malka, V.; Faure, J.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Davoine, X.; Lefebvre, E.; Gallot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators driven by the interaction of ultra-intense and ultrashort laser pulses with a plasma can generate accelerating electric fields of several hundred giga-volts per meter and deliver high-quality electron beams with low energy spread, low emittance and up to 1 GeV peak energy. Moreover, it is expected they may soon be able to produce bursts of electrons shorter than those produced by conventional particle accelerators, down to femtosecond durations and less. Here we present wide-band spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation which we use for temporal characterization. Our analysis shows that the electron beam, produced using controlled optical injection, contains a temporal feature that can be identified as a 15 pC, 1.4-1.8 fs electron bunch (root mean square) leading to a peak current of 3-4 kA depending on the bunch shape. We anticipate that these results will have a strong impact on emerging applications such as short-pulse and short-wavelength radiation sources, and will benefit the realization of laboratory-scale free-electron lasers. (authors)

  10. Ultrashort electron bunch length measurement with diffraction radiation deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Wen-Hui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure electron bunch length with a diffraction radiation (DR) deflector which is composed of a DR radiator and three beam position monitors (BPMs). When an electron beam passes through a metallic aperture which is tilted by 45 degrees with respect to its trajectory, backward DR that propagates perpendicular to the beam’s trajectory is generated which adds a transverse deflection to the beam as a result of momentum conservation. The deflection is found to be largely dependent on the bunch length and could be easily observed with a downstream BPM. Detailed investigations show that this method has wide applicability, high temporal resolution, and great simplicity.

  11. Ultrashort electron bunch length measurement with diffraction radiation deflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure electron bunch length with a diffraction radiation (DR deflector which is composed of a DR radiator and three beam position monitors (BPMs. When an electron beam passes through a metallic aperture which is tilted by 45 degrees with respect to its trajectory, backward DR that propagates perpendicular to the beam’s trajectory is generated which adds a transverse deflection to the beam as a result of momentum conservation. The deflection is found to be largely dependent on the bunch length and could be easily observed with a downstream BPM. Detailed investigations show that this method has wide applicability, high temporal resolution, and great simplicity.

  12. Acceleration of Electrons in a Diffraction Dominated IFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Musumeci, Pietro; Pellegrini, Claudio; Ralph, J; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Travish, Gil

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of energy gain in excess of 20 MeV at the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected ina 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered both in period and field amplitude. A CO2 10 μ m laser with power >300 GW is used as the IFEL driver. The Rayleigh range of the laser (1.8cm) is shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. Few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in stable accelerating buckets and electrons with energies up to 35 MeV are detected on the magnetic spectrometers. Experimental results on the scaling of the accelerator characteristics versus input parameters like injection energy, laser focus position and laser power are discussed. Three dimensional simulations are in good agreement with the electron energy spectrums observed in the experiment and indicate that substantial energy exchange between laser and electron beam only occurs in the firs...

  13. High-precision cutting of polyimide film using femtosecond laser for the application in flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganin, D. V.; Lapshin, K. E.; Obidin, A. Z.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    The experimental results of cutting a polyimide film on the optical glass substrate by means of femtosecond lasers are given. Two modes of laser cutting of this film without damages to a glass base are determined. The first is the photo graphitization using a high repetition rate femtosecond laser. The second is ablative, under the effect of femtosecond laser pulses with high energy and low repetition rate. Cutting of semiconductor chips formed on the polyimide film surface is successfully demonstrated.

  14. Femtosecond dynamics of electron transfer in a neutral organic mixed-valence compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimenka, Raman; Margraf, Markus; Koehler, Juliane; Heckmann, Alexander; Lambert, Christoph; Fischer, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    In this article we report a femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption study of a neutral organic mixed-valence (MV) compound with the aim to gain insight into its charge-transfer dynamics upon optical excitation. The back-electron transfer was investigated in five different solvents, toluene, dibutyl ether, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzonitrile and n-hexane. In the pump step, the molecule was excited at 760 nm and 850 nm into the intervalence charge-transfer band. The resulting transients can be described by two time constant. We assign one time constant to the rearrangement of solvent molecules in the charge-transfer state and the second time constant to back-electron transfer to the electronic ground state. Back-electron transfer rates range from 1.5 x 10 12 s -1 in benzonitrile through 8.3 x 10 11 s -1 in MTBE, around 1.6 x 10 11 s -1 in dibutylether and toluene and to 3.8 x 10 9 s -1 in n-hexane

  15. Electron backscatter diffraction: Strategies for reliable data acquisition and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    In electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) software packages there are many user choices both in data acquisition and in data processing and display. In order to extract maximum scientific value from an inquiry, it is helpful to have some guidelines for best practice in conducting an EBSD investigation. The purpose of this article therefore is to address selected topics of EBSD practice, in a tutorial manner. The topics covered are a brief summary on the principles of EBSD, specimen preparation, calibration of an EBSD system, experiment design, speed of data acquisition, data clean-up, microstructure characterisation (including grain size) and grain boundary characterisation. This list is not meant to cover exhaustively all areas where EBSD is used, but rather to provide a resource consisting of some useful strategies for novice EBSD users.

  16. Absorptive form factors for high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; King, Q.A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal diffuse scattering contribution to the absorptive potential in high-energy electron diffraction is calculated in the form of an absorptive contribution to the atomic form factor. To do this, the Einstein model of lattice vibrations is used, with isotropic Debye-Waller factors. The absorptive form factors are calculated as a function of scattering vector s and temperature factor M on a grid which enables polynomial interpolation of the results to be accurate to better than 2% for much of the ranges 0≤Ms 2 ≤6 and 0≤M≤2 A 2 . The computed values, together with an interpolation routine, have been incorporated into a Fortran subroutine which calculates both the real and absorptive form factors for 54 atomic species. (orig.)

  17. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120 0 C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120 0 C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane

  18. Generation of femtosecond electron single pulse using laser photocathode RF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, M.; Kinoshita, K.; Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, Tokai, Ibaraki (JP)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    A new laser photocathode RF electron gun was installed in the second linac of the S-band twin linac system of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory(NERL) of University of Tokyo in August in 1997. Since then, the behavior of the new gun has been tested and the characteristic parameters have been evaluated. At the exit of the gun, the energy is 4.7 MeV, the charge per bunch 1 nC, the pulse width is 10 ps(FWHM), respectively, for 6 MW RF power supply from a klystron. The electron bunch is accelerated up to 17 MeV. The horizontal normalized emittance is 1 {pi} mm.mrad. Then, the bunch is compressed to be 440 fs(FWHM) with 0.35 nC by the chicane-type magnetic pulse compressor. The gun is planned to be used for femtosecond X-ray generation via the head-on Thomson scattering and laser wakefield acceleration in 1998. (author)

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  20. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacher, Josh, E-mail: jkacherbyu@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of {approx}0.04{sup o} and an elastic strain resolution of {approx}7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  1. Analytic model of electron pulse propagation in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, A.M.; Sipe, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mean-field analytic model to study the propagation of electron pulses used in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments (UED). We assume a Gaussian form to characterize the electron pulse, and derive a system of ordinary differential equations that are solved quickly and easily to give the pulse dynamics. We compare our model to an N-body numerical simulation and are able to show excellent agreement between the two result sets. This model is a convenient alternative to time consuming and computationally intense N-body simulations in exploring the dynamics of UED electron pulses, and as a tool for refining UED experimental designs

  2. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa 2 Cu 3 O(7-x). In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering. 7 references

  3. Electronically tunable femtosecond all-fiber optical parametric oscillator for multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Tim; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Fallnich, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    We present a femtosecond fiber-based optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) for multiphoton microscopy with wavelength tuning by electronic repetition rate tuning in combination with a dispersive filter in the FOPO cavity. The all-spliced, all-fiber FOPO cavity is based on polarization-maintaining fibers and a broadband output coupler, allowing to get access to the resonant signal pulses as well as the idler pulses simultaneously. The system was pumped by a gain-switched fiber-coupled laser diode emitting pulses at a central wavelength of 1030 nm and an electronically tunable repetition frequency of about 2 MHz. The pump pulses were amplified in an Ytterbium fiber amplifier system with a pulse duration after amplification of 13 ps. Tuning of the idler (1140 nm - 1300 nm) and signal wavelengths (850 nm - 940 nm) was achieved by changing the repetition frequency of the pump laser by about 4 kHz. The generated signal pulses reached a pulse energy of up to 9.2 nJ at 920 nm and were spectrally broadened to about 6 nm in the FOPO by a combination of self-phase and cross-phase modulation. We showed external compression of the idler pulses at 920 nm to about 430 fs and appleid them to two-photon excitation microscopy with green fluorescent dyes. The presented system constitutes an important step towards a fully fiber-integrated all-electronically tunable and, thereby, programmable light source and already embodies a versatile and flexible light source for applications, e.g., for smart microscopy.

  4. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P < 0.05) than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  5. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Serrao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM. Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5. In addition, five manual CCC (n=5 were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA. Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq, were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P<0.05 than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  6. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  7. Steering wave packet dynamics and population transfer between electronic states of the Na2 molecule by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Kaijun; Sun Zhigang; Cong Shulin; Wang Senming; Yu Jie; Lou Nanquan

    2005-01-01

    An approach used for steering the wave packet dynamics and the population transfer between electronic states of the Na 2 molecule by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated. Four controlling schemes, i.e., four different combinations of time delays (intuitive and counterintuitive sequences) and frequency detunings (positive and negative detunings), are discussed in detail. The light-induced potentials are used to describe the wave packet dynamics and population transfer. The numerical results show that the wave packet excited by femtosecond laser pulses oscillates drastically on 2 1 Π g state with time. The efficiency of controlling population transfer from the X 1 Σ g + to2 1 Π g states of Na 2 is nearly 100% for the schemes of the counterintuitive sequence pulses with positive and negative detunings

  8. Electron slicing for the generation of tunable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free electron laser and slice diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Mitri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the experimental results of femtosecond slicing an ultrarelativistic, high brightness electron beam with a collimator. In contrast to some qualitative considerations reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.074801, we first demonstrate that the collimation process preserves the slice beam quality, in agreement with our theoretical expectations, and that the collimation is compatible with the operation of a linear accelerator in terms of beam transport, radiation dose, and collimator heating. Accordingly, the collimated beam can be used for the generation of stable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses of tunable duration, from either a self-amplified spontaneous emission or an externally seeded free electron laser. The proposed method also turns out to be a more compact and cheaper solution for electron slice diagnostics than the commonly used radio frequency deflecting cavities and has minimal impact on the machine design.

  9. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  10. Orientation effects on indexing of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, Matthew M.; Wright, Stuart I.

    2005-01-01

    Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has become a well-accepted technique for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of polycrystalline microstructures. At the advent of this technique, it was observed that patterns obtained from grains in certain crystallographic orientations were more difficult for the automated indexing algorithms to accurately identify than patterns from other orientations. The origin of this problem is often similarities between the EBSD pattern of the correct orientation and patterns from other orientations or phases. While practical solutions have been found and implemented, the identification of these problem orientations generally occurs only after running an automated scan, as problem orientations are often readily apparent in the resulting orientation maps. However, such an approach only finds those problem orientations that are present in the scan area. It would be advantageous to identify all regions of orientation space that may present problems for automated indexing prior to initiating an automated scan, and to minimize this space through the optimization of acquisition and indexing parameters. This work presents new methods for identifying regions in orientation space where the reliability of the automated indexing is suspect prior to performing a scan. This methodology is used to characterize the impact of various parameters on the indexing algorithm

  11. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  12. Numerical studies on the electro-optic detection of femtosecond electron bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The electro-optic (EO effect is a powerful diagnostic tool for determining the time profile of ultrashort relativistic electron bunches. When a relativistic bunch passes within a few mm of an electro-optic crystal, its transient electric field is equivalent to a half-cycle THz pulse passing through the crystal. The induced birefringence can be detected with polarized femtosecond laser pulses. A simulation code has been written in order to understand the faithfulness and the limitations of electron bunch shape reconstruction by EO sampling. The THz pulse and the laser pulse are propagated as wave packets through the EO crystal. Alternatively, the response function method is applied. Using experimental data on the material properties of zinc telluride (ZnTe and gallium phosphide (GaP, the effects of velocity mismatch, pulse shape distortion, and signal broadening are explicitly taken into account. The simulations show that the most severe limitation on the time resolution is given by the transverse-optical (TO lattice oscillation in the EO crystal. The lowest TO frequency is 5.3 THz in ZnTe and 11 THz in GaP. Only the Fourier components below the TO resonance are usable for the bunch shape reconstruction. This implies that the shortest rms bunch length which can be resolved with moderate distortion amounts to σ≈90  fs in ZnTe and σ≈50  fs in GaP. The influence of the crystal thickness on the amplitude and width of the EO signal is studied. The optimum thickness is in the range from 100 to 300  μm for ZnTe and from 50 to 100  μm for GaP.

  13. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  14. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashchieva, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented

  15. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  16. Experimental study on energy distribution of the hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interacting with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yuqiu; Zheng Zhijian; Zhou Weimin; Wen Tianshu; Chunyu Shutai; Cai Dafeng; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu; Neijiang Teachers College, Neijiang; Jiao Chunye; Chen Hao; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu; Yang Xiangdong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the experiment of hot electron energy distribution during the femtosecond laser-solid target interaction. The hot electrons formed an anisotropic energy distribution. In the direction of the target normal, the energy spectrum of the hot electron was a Maxwellian-like distribution with an effective temperature of 206 keV, which was due to the resonance absorption. In the direction of the specular reflection of laser, there appeared a local plateau of hot electron energy spectrum at the beginning and then it was decreased gradually, which maybe produced by several acceleration mechanisms. The effective temperature and the yield of hot electrons in the direction of the target normal is larger than those in the direction of the specular reflection of laser, which proves that the resonance absorption mechanism is more effective than others. (authors)

  17. Wavelength dependent photoelectron circular dichroism of limonene studied by femtosecond multiphoton laser ionization and electron-ion coincidence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Fanood, Mohammad M.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomers of the monoterpene limonene have been investigated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron circular dichroism employing tuneable, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Electron imaging detection provides 3D momentum measurement while electron-ion coincidence detection can be used to mass-tag individual electrons. Additional filtering, by accepting only parent ion tagged electrons, can be then used to provide discrimination against higher energy dissociative ionization mechanisms where more than three photons are absorbed to better delineate the two photon resonant, one photon ionization pathway. The promotion of different vibrational levels and, tentatively, different electronic ion core configurations in the intermediate Rydberg states can be achieved with different laser excitation wavelengths (420 nm, 412 nm, and 392 nm), in turn producing different state distributions in the resulting cations. Strong chiral asymmetries in the lab frame photoelectron angular distributions are quantified, and a comparison made with a single photon (synchrotron radiation) measurement at an equivalent photon energy.

  18. Electron diffraction patterns with thermal diffuse scattering maxima around Kikuchi lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakhanyan, R. K.; Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction patterns of silicon with thermal diffuse maxima around Kikuchi lines, which are analogs of the maxima of thermal diffuse electron scattering around point reflections, have been recorded. Diffuse maxima are observed only around Kikuchi lines with indices that are forbidden for the silicon structure. The diffraction conditions for forming these maxima are discussed.

  19. Secondary mineralization in carious lesions of human dentin. Electron-probe, electron microscope, and electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H [Tokyo Dental Coll. (Japan)

    1975-02-01

    Dentinal carious lesions having a remineralized surface layer were studied by means electron-probe microanalysis, electron microscopy, electron diffraction. As the results of electron-probe study, F, Mg, and Na were found to be distributed mainly in the remineralized surface layer and S in the decalcified region where decreases in Ca, P, and Mg concentration were usually observed. The decrease in Mg concentration always started earlier than that of Ca and P concentration. Electron microscope and electron diffraction studies revealed that apatic crystals in the remineralized surface layer were much larger than those in the intact dentin. Although they were less conspicuous, crystals in the decalcified region also were larger than those in the intact region. Dentinal tubules, occluded by many crystals, were frequently seen during the observations. Crystals in the tubules varied in morphology, showing granular, needle, rhomboid, and tabular shapes. By means of electron diffraction, the granular- or needle-shaped crystals were identified as apatite and the rhomboid-shaped crystals as whitlockite. Some of the tabular-shaped crystals appeared to be cotacalcium phosphate.

  20. A measurement of electron-wall interactions using transmission diffraction from nanofabricated gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwick, Brett; Gronniger, Glen; Yuan, Lu; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Electron diffraction from metal coated freestanding nanofabricated gratings is presented, with a quantitative path integral analysis of the electron-grating interactions. Electron diffraction out to the 20th order was observed indicating the high quality of our nanofabricated gratings. The electron beam is collimated to its diffraction limit with ion-milled material slits. Our path integral analysis is first tested against single slit electron diffraction, and then further expanded with the same theoretical approach to describe grating diffraction. Rotation of the grating with respect to the incident electron beam varies the effective distance between the electron and grating bars. This allows the measurement of the image charge potential between the electron and the grating bars. Image charge potentials that were about 15% of the value for that of a pure electron-metal wall interaction were found. We varied the electron energy from 50 to 900 eV. The interaction time is of the order of typical metal image charge response times and in principle allows the investigation of image charge formation. In addition to the image charge interaction there is a dephasing process reducing the transverse coherence length of the electron wave. The dephasing process causes broadening of the diffraction peaks and is consistent with a model that ascribes the dephasing process to microscopic contact potentials. Surface structures with length scales of about 200 nm observed with a scanning tunneling microscope, and dephasing interaction strength typical of contact potentials of 0.35 eV support this claim. Such a dephasing model motivated the investigation of different metallic coatings, in particular Ni, Ti, Al, and different thickness Au-Pd coatings. Improved quality of diffraction patterns was found for Ni. This coating made electron diffraction possible at energies as low as 50 eV. This energy was limited by our electron gun design. These results are particularly relevant for the

  1. Automated grain mapping using wide angle convergent beam electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet

    2011-12-01

    The grain size statistics, commonly derived from the grain map of a material sample, are important microstructure characteristics that greatly influence its properties. The grain map for nanomaterials is usually obtained manually by visual inspection of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs because automated methods do not perform satisfactorily. While the visual inspection method provides reliable results, it is a labor intensive process and is often prone to human errors. In this article, an automated grain mapping method is developed using TEM diffraction patterns. The presented method uses wide angle convergent beam diffraction in the TEM. The automated technique was applied on a platinum thin film sample to obtain the grain map and subsequently derive grain size statistics from it. The grain size statistics obtained with the automated method were found in good agreement with the visual inspection method.

  2. Electron diffraction of CBr{sub 4} in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr{sub 4} as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr{sub 4} similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr{sub 4} doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  3. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  4. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  5. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  6. Retabulation of space group extinctions for electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Tanaka, M.

    1989-01-01

    The space group tables previously published by one of the authors and others are here presented in a revised and compacted form designed to make for compatability with existing tables for X-ray diffraction. 136 of the 230 space groups are subject to dynamic extinctions due to glide planes and screw axes, and the observables from these space groups in specific settings are tabulated. Tabs

  7. X-ray diffraction analysis device with electronic photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillit, R.Y.; Bruyas, H.; Patay, F.

    1985-01-01

    The means provided to control the movements around the three axes are composed of step-by-step motors related to exits control logic which is connected to the calculation and monitored by a clock. The clock monitors also the calculator so as that the calculator controls, together with the programmable clock and control logic, the coordination of the whole rotation movements, along the three rotation axes, their velocity, their duration and the acquisition of the measured intensities of the diffracted X-ray beam [fr

  8. Current status of femtosecond triplet Linacs 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Femtosecond Ultrafast Quantum Phenomenon Research Facility has been commissioned in 2000. It consists the femtosecond linac-laser synchronization system, the 12 TW 50 fs laser system and the analyzing system. Laser photocathode RF gun produced l kA = 7 nC / 7 ps for 250 μJ 267 nm laser irradiation, synchronization of 300 fs (rms) for minutes and l.9 ps (rms) for hours was established. Efforts to avoid such long-term drift are under way. This system is applied to subpico- and picosecond pulseradiolysis for radiation chemistry of water and supercritical water. Laser plasma linac works are under way to generate 20 MeV 10 fs electron bunch and ps ion beam using the 12 TW 50 fs laser. Further, the time-resolved X-ray diffraction is close to dynamic visualization of atomic motions. (author)

  9. Development of a Laser Driven Photocathode Injector and Femtosecond Scale Laser Electron Synchronization for Next Generation Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P; Ditmire, T R; Rosenzweig, J

    2000-01-01

    A high brightness photoinjector has been developed at LLNL. This injector combined with the 100 TW FALCON laser and the LLNL 100 MeV S-Band RF linac will enable development of a high brightness, femtosecond-scale, tunable, hard x-ray probe for time-resolved material measurements, based on Thomson scattering. Short pulse x-rays enable time-resolved characterization of shock dynamics, and examination of materials under extremes of pressure and temperature. Examples include Equation of State characterization on high-density materials, Crystal disorganization and re-growth in shocked and heated materials, and measurement of short time scale phase transition phenomena. Single shot evaluation, requiring high peak flux, is important for complex experiments such as probing of laser shocked actinides. A low emittance electron beam synchronized with femtosecond accuracy to an intense laser will revolutionize x-ray dynamics studies of materials. This project will lead development of ultrafast x-ray dynamics research on ...

  10. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Lillevang, Lasse H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Balling, Peter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Senftleben, Arne [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Baumert, Thomas, E-mail: baumert@physik.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses lead to excitation over smaller area and larger depth in water. • Transient optical properties are measured radially resolved by spectral interference in an imaging geometry. • Radially resolved spectral interference shows indications of nonlinear propagation effects at high fluences. - Abstract: In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  11. Size effect in X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from hydroxyapatite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Buffat, P.-A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron microdiffraction, and X-ray diffraction were used to study hydroxyapatite specimens with particle sizes from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Diffuse scattering (without clear reflections in transmission diffraction patterns) or strongly broadened peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns are characteristic for agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. However, HRTEM and microdiffraction showed that this cannot be considered as an indication of the amorphous state of the matter but rather as the demonstration of size effect and the morphological and structural features of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  12. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengguang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ∼MeV energy, ∼ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ∼MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ∼1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  13. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  14. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  15. Inversion of convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; Saunders, M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of recovering the structure factors that contribute to a zone-axis convergent-beam diffraction pattern is discussed. It is shown that an automated matching procedure that minimizes the sum-of-squares difference between experimental and simulated patterns is effective whether one is refining accurate structure factors in a known crystal or attempting ab initio structure determination. The details of the minimization method are analysed and it is shown that a quasi-Newton method that uses analytically derived gradients is particulary effective when several structure factors are varied. The inversion method for ab initio structure determination is tested on the [110] axis of GaP, using simulated patterns as ideal 'experimental' data. (orig.)

  16. Absorption distances in the dynamical theory of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Yoshihiko; Goto, Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The contrast effect of the electron microscopic image at crystal defects is characterized by two parameters; extincion distance and absorption distance. Both quantities are orginally defined for the elastic scattering. Since the inelastic scattering contributes to the electron microscopic image, parameters used for the interpretation of the images are not the same as those for the elastic scattering. It is shown that the difference of absorption distance beteen the theoretical estimation and that used for interpretation is due to the contrst effect of the small angle inelastic scattering. (author)

  17. Femtosecond planar electron beam source for micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Marshall

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A new accelerator, LACARA (laser-driven cyclotron autoresonance accelerator, under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is to be powered by a 1 TW CO_{2} laser beam and a 50 MeV injected electron pulse. LACARA will produce inside a 2 m, 6 T solenoid a 100 MeV gyrating electron bunch, with ∼3% energy spread, approximately 1 psec in length with particles advancing in phase at the laser frequency, executing one cycle each 35 fsec. A beamstop with a small off axis channel will transmit a short beam pulse every optical cycle, thereby producing a train of about 30, 3.5 fsec long, 1–3 pC microbunches for each laser pulse. We describe here a novel accelerator, a micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator driven by a 500 MeV LACARA-type injector that takes the output train of microbunches and transforms them into a near-rectangular cross section having a narrow dimension of ∼10 μm and height of ∼150 μm using a magnetic quadrupole; these bunches may be injected into a planar dielectric-lined waveguide (slightly larger than the bunch where cumulative buildup of wake fields can lead to an accelerating gradient >1 GV/m. This proposed vacuum-based wake field structure is physically rigid and capable of microfabrication accuracy, factors important in staging a large number of accelerator modules. Furthermore, the accelerating gradients it promises are comparable with those for plasma accelerators. A LACARA unit for preparing suitable bunches at 500 MeV is described. Physics issues are discussed, including bunch spreading and transport, bunch shaping, coherent diffraction radiation from the aperture, dielectric breakdown, and bunch stability in the rectangular wake field structure.

  18. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  19. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, John; Martin, Michael C; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Schönlein, Robert W; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the "femtoslicing" beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. This CSR, whose measured intensity is routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing experiments, represents a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for its characterization and in this paper an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation is presented.

  20. Femtosecond Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Solvated Transition-Metal Complexes: Deciphering the Interplay of Electronic and Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Kim, Tae Kyu; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2011-04-21

    We present the first implementation of femtosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy as an ultrafast direct probe of the excited-state valence orbitals in solution-phase molecules. This method is applied to photoinduced spin crossover of [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+, where the ultrafast spinstate conversion of the metal ion, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation, is directly measured using the intrinsic spin-state selectivity of the soft X-ray L-edge transitions. Our results provide important experimental data concerning the mechanism of ultrafast spin-state conversion and subsequent electronic and structural dynamics, highlighting the potential of this technique to study ultrafast phenomena in the solution phase.

  1. Phase analysis of nano-phase materials using selected area electron diffraction in the TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labar, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    In analogy to X-ray power diffraction (XRD), we are developing a method to help phase identification when examining a large number of grains simultaneously by electron diffraction. Although XRD is well established, it can not be used for small quantities of materials (volumes below 1 mm 3 ). Examining a usual TEM sample with thickness of 100 nm and using a selected area of 1 mm in diameter, the selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED) carries information about several thousands of grains from a material with an average grain size of about 10 nm. The accuracy of XRD can not be attained by electron diffraction (ED). However, simultaneous visual observation of the nanostructure is an additional benefit of TEM (beside the small amount of needed material). The first step of the development project was the development of a computer program ('ProcessDiffraction') that processes digital versions of SAED patterns and presents them in an XRD-like form (intensity vs. scattering vector). In the present version (V2.0.3) phase identification is carried out by comparing the measured distribution to 'Markers', i.e. data of known phases. XRD data cards are used if the detailed structure of a phase is not known. Kinematic electron diffraction intensities are calculated for phases with known atomic positions (Author)

  2. A FORTRAN program for an IBM PC compatible computer for calculating kinematical electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in transmission electron microscopy. The program is written in FORTRAN and calculates kinematical electron diffraction patterns in any zone axis from a given crystal structure. Quite large unit cells, containing up to 2250 atoms, can be handled by the program. The program runs on both the Helcules graphic card and the standard IBM CGA card

  3. Ultrafast electron diffraction and electron microscopy: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishchenko, A A; Aseyev, S A; Ryabov, E A; Bagratashvili, V N; Panchenko, V Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acting as complementary research tools, high time-resolved spectroscopy and diffractometry techniques proceeding from various physical principles open up new possibilities for studying matter with necessary integration of the 'structure–dynamics–function' triad in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. Since the 1980s, a new field of research has started at the leading research laboratories, aimed at developing means of filming the coherent dynamics of nuclei in molecules and fast processes in biological objects ('atomic and molecular movies'). The utilization of ultrashort laser pulse sources has significantly modified traditional electron beam approaches to and provided high space–time resolution for the study of materials. Diffraction methods using frame-by-frame filming and the development of the main principles of the study of coherent dynamics of atoms have paved the way to observing wave packet dynamics, the intermediate states of reaction centers, and the dynamics of electrons in molecules, thus allowing a transition from the kinetics to the dynamics of the phase trajectories of molecules in the investigation of chemical reactions. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Electronic diffraction study of the chlorination of nickel; Etude par diffraction electronique de la chloruration du nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigner, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A study has been made of the chlorination of the (100), (110) and (111) crystal faces of nickel using high energy electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Two methods have been used: bombardment with chlorine ions having an energy of between 10 and 30 keV, and direct chlorination in a diffractor at pressures of about 10{sup -4} torr. It has thus been possible to show the very special properties of nickel chloride (CdBr{sub 2} type, space group R 3-bar m) which is always formed along the (0001) plane, whatever the orientation of the substrate. It has also been possible to attain the metal-halide interface and to show the existence of two-dimensional chemisorbed films which are ordered or disordered according to the crystal orientation. (author) [French] La chloruration des faces (100) (110) et (111) du nickel a ete etudiee par diffraction des electrons de haute energie et par microscopie electronique. Deux methodes ont ete utilisees: le bombardement avec des ions chlore ayant une energie comprise entre 10 et 30 keV, et la chloruration directe dans un diffracteur pour des pressions de l'ordre de 10{sup -4} torr. Ainsi ont ete mises en evidence les proprietes tres particulieres du chlorure de nickel (type CdBr{sub 2}, groupe spatial R 3-bar m) qui s'accole toujours suivant le plan (0001), quelle que soit l'orientation du substrat. Il a ete egalement possible d'atteindre l'interface metal-halogenure et de montrer l'existence de couches chimisorbees bidimensionnelles, ordonnees ou desordonnees suivant l'orientation cristalline etudiee. (auteur)

  5. Online diagnostics of time-resolved electron beam properties with femtosecond resolution for X-ray FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Minjie

    2016-07-01

    The European X-ray Free-electron Laser (XFEL) puts high demands on the quality of the highbrightness driving electron beam with bunch lengths in the femtosecond regime. Longitudinal diagnostics is requested to optimize and control the longitudinal profile, the longitudinal phase space, the slice energy spread and the slice emittance of the electron bunch, all of which are crucial to the generation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The high bunch repetition rate of the super-conducting accelerator renders diagnostic method that is (quasi) non-destructive to the generation of SASE possible. In this thesis, three online diagnostic sections utilizing transverse deflecting structures (TDS) have been designed for the European XFEL, providing access to all parameters of interest with a longitudinal resolution down to below 10 fs.The requirement on the non-destructive capability has been realized by the implementation of fast kickermagnets and off-axis screens, which has been validated experimentally using an installation of the same concept at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg. A special slicing procedure has been developed to significantly enhance the accuracy of slice energy spread measurements. Suppression of coherence effects, which impede the beam imaging in the TDS diagnostics, has been first demonstrated experimentally using the spatial separation method with scintillator screens. Comparison of the results of emittance measurements using the quadrupole scan method with those using the multi-screen method has proved the reliability of the latter method, which has been modelled intensively for the European XFEL.

  6. High resolution electron exit wave reconstruction from a diffraction pattern using Gaussian basis decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Kirkland, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    We describe an algorithm to reconstruct the electron exit wave of a weak-phase object from single diffraction pattern. The algorithm uses analytic formulations describing the diffraction intensities through a representation of the object exit wave in a Gaussian basis. The reconstruction is achieved by solving an overdetermined system of non-linear equations using an easily parallelisable global multi-start search with Levenberg-Marquard optimisation and analytic derivatives

  7. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  8. Laser control of electron matter waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, E.; Becker, M.; Luiten, O.J.; Batelaan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years laser light has been used to control the motion of electron waves. Electrons can now be diffracted by standing waves of light. Laser light in the vicinity of nanostructures is used to affect free electrons, for example, femto-second and atto-second laser-induced electrons are emitted

  9. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  10. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.

    2013-04-11

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to investigate the photoexcited dynamics of a series of triphenylamine-coumarin dye/TiO2 conjugates. The TA decay is multiexponential, spanning time scales from 100 fs to 100 ps, while the characteristic transient Raman spectrum of the radical cation decays biexponentially with a dominant ∼3 ps component. To explain these observations, we propose a model in which the decay of the TA is due to hot electrons migrating from surface trap states to the conduction band of TiO 2 while the decay of the Raman signature is due to internal conversion of the dye molecule. Furthermore, the S1 Raman spectrum of TPAC3, a dye wherein a vinyl group separates the triphenylamine and coumarin moieties, is similar to the S1 Raman spectrum of trans-stilbene; we conclude that their S1 potential energy surfaces and reactivity are also similar. This correlation suggests that dyes containing vinyl linkers undergo photoisomerization that competes with electron injection. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Thermal expansion coefficient measurement from electron diffraction of amorphous films in a TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Misa; Cui, Kai; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray

    2018-05-01

    We measured the linear thermal expansion coefficients of amorphous 5-30 nm thick SiN and 17 nm thick Formvar/Carbon (F/C) films using electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Positive thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was observed in SiN but negative coefficients in the F/C films. In case of amorphous carbon (aC) films, we could not measure TEC because the diffraction radii required several hours to stabilize at a fixed temperature. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of diffraction and electron analysis in the fast reactor programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, I. F. [ed.

    1975-09-15

    After first discussing irradiation damage, the whole range of new methods of probe analysis were reviewed with a special reference to the study of surfaces. Further papers discussed scanning auger microscopy and the nuclear microprobe. Current diffraction studies were then described on uranium dioxide and the neutron poisons: boron carbide and europia. Finally, new techniques were covered with special reference to the scanning electron microscope and the application of the Harwell 6000 series electronics to x-ray diffraction. Separate records were prepared for each paper covered.

  13. Effect of the Femtosecond Laser on an Intracorneal Inlay for Surgical Compensation of Presbyopia during Cataract Surgery: Scanning Electron Microscope Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarz, Marta; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose Luis; Hernández-Verdejo, Jose Luis; Tañá, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) on porcine eyes implanted with a Kamra corneal inlay and to describe how the inlay may change the effect of the femtosecond laser on the lens. FLACS was performed on six porcine eyes and a Kamra corneal inlay had been implanted, exploring the lens under the surgical microscope. Another Kamra corneal inlay was attached to the upper part of the transparent hemisphere used for calibration of the femtosecond laser. Capsulorhexis, arcuate incisions, and phacofragmentation were carried out. The Kamra corneal inlay was compared with a nontreated one using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the hemisphere was analyzed with a surgical microscope. Capsulorhexis and phacofragmentation were completed in all the porcine eyes, although accuracy to determine the exact effect on the lens was not possible to achieve. The effect of the femtosecond laser on the PMMA hemisphere through the Kamra corneal inlay showed the capsulorhexis was placed outside the outer margin of the inlay and a sharply sculpted fragmentation pattern with a three-dimensional (donut-shaped) annulus untreated beneath it. SEM images of the nontreated and the treated inlays were comparable. No ultrastructural changes were found in the treated Kamra corneal inlay. FLACS can be performed with a Kamra corneal inlay for surgical compensation of presbyopia without the risk of damaging the inlay. The Kamra corneal inlay acts as a screen that avoids the laser to reach the areas beneath its shadow, but not the exposed areas of the lens.

  14. Electron dynamics and optical properties modulation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by femtosecond laser pulse: a simulation using time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Lan [Beijing Institute of Technology, Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing (China); Wang, Feng [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Su, Gaoshi [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing (China); Qu, Liangti [Beijing Institute of Technology, Key Laboratory of Cluster Science, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Beijing (China); Lu, Yongfeng [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Department of Electrical Engineering, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we adopted time-dependent density functional theory to investigate the optical properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the effect of intense few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses on these properties. The electron dynamics of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under few-cycle and multi-cycle laser irradiation were described. The polarization direction of the laser had a marked effect on the energy absorption and electronic excitation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} because of anisotropy. Change in the polarization direction of few-cycle pulse changed the absorbed energy by a factor over 4000. Few-cycle pulse showed a higher sensitivity to the electronic property of material than multi-cycle pulse. The modulation of the dielectric properties of the material was observed on the femtosecond time scale. The negative divergence appeared in the real part of the function at low frequencies and photoinduced blue shift occurred due to Burstein-Moss effect. The irradiation of femtosecond laser caused the dielectric response within the infrared region and introduced anisotropy to the in-plane optical properties. Laser-based engineering of optical properties through controlling transient electron dynamics expands the functionality of MoS{sub 2} and has potential applications in direction-dependent optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  15. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dongsheng [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Rusz, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Cai, Jianwang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-15

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. - Highlights: • The zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry is presented for EMCD technique. • The detailed calculations for EMCD signals under ZA case are conducted. • The EMCD signals are obtained under the ZA case in the experiments. • The effect of dynamical effect on EMCD signals under ZA case is discussed. • Site-specific EMCD signals of Fe in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} are obtained by specific ZA conditions.

  16. Low-energy electron diffraction and induced damage in hydrated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas M.; Oh, Doogie; Chen Yanfeng; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic scattering of 5-30 eV electrons within the B-DNA 5 ' -CCGGCGCCGG-3 ' and A-DNA 5 ' -CGCGAATTCGCG-3 ' DNA sequences is calculated using the separable representation of a free-space electron propagator and a curved wave multiple scattering formalism. The disorder brought about by the surrounding water and helical base stacking leads to a featureless amplitude buildup of elastically scattered electrons on the sugar and phosphate groups for all energies between 5 and 30 eV. However, some constructive interference features arising from diffraction are revealed when examining the structural waters within the major groove. These appear at 5-10, 12-18, and 22-28 eV for the B-DNA target and at 7-11, 12-18, and 18-25 eV for the A-DNA target. Although the diffraction depends on the base-pair sequence, the energy dependent elastic scattering features are primarily associated with the structural water molecules localized within 8-10 A spheres surrounding the bases and/or the sugar-phosphate backbone. The electron density buildup occurs in energy regimes associated with dissociative electron attachment resonances, direct electronic excitation, and dissociative ionization. Since diffraction intensity can be localized on structural water, compound H 2 O:DNA states may contribute to energy dependent low-energy electron induced single and double strand breaks

  17. Visible/IR light and x-rays in femtosecond synchronism from an x-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B. A.; Experimental Facilities Division

    2005-01-01

    A way is proposed to obtain pulses of visible/infrared light in femtosecond synchronism with x-rays from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), using the recently proposed emittance-slicing technique. In an XFEL undulator, only the short section of an electron bunch whose emittance is left unchanged by the slicing will emit intense coherent x-rays in the XFEL undulator. At the same time, the bunch emits highly collimated transition undulator radiation (TUR) into a cone whose opening angle is the reciprocal relativisticity parameter gamma. Due to the variation of the transverse momentum induced by the emittance slicing, the effective number of charges contributing to the TUR varies along the bunch, and is higher in the sliced-out part that emits the coherent x-rays. As with coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), the TUR is thus coherently enhanced (CTUR) at near-infrared wavelengths. Coming from the same part of the bunch the CTUR and the coherent x-rays are perfectly synchronized to each other. Because both types of radiation are generated in the long straight XFEL undulator, there are no dispersion effects that might induce a timing jitter. With typical XFEL parameters, the energy content of the single optical cycle of near-IR CTUR light is about 100 Nano-Joule, which is quite sufficient for most pump-probe experiments

  18. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas

  19. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S.; Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  20. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P., E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  1. In situ electron backscattered diffraction of individual GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikhodko, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: sergey@seas.ucla.edu; Sitzman, S. [Oxford Instruments America, Concord, MA 01742 (United States); Gambin, V. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kodambaka, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We suggest and demonstrate that electron backscattered diffraction, a scanning electron microscope-based technique, can be used for non-destructive structural and morphological characterization of statistically significant number of nanowires in situ on their growth substrate. We obtain morphological, crystal phase, and crystal orientation information of individual GaAs nanowires in situ on the growth substrate GaAs(1 1 1) B. Our results, verified using transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses of the same set of wires, indicate that most wires possess a wurtzite structure with a high density of thin structural defects aligned normal to the wire growth axis, while others grow defect-free with a zincblende structure. The demonstrated approach is general, applicable to other material systems, and is expected to provide important insights into the role of substrate structure on nanowire structure on nanowire crystallinity and growth orientation.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  3. Measuring the Shock Stage of Asteroid Regolith Grains by Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Martinez, James; Sitzman, Scott; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Ozawa, Hikaru; hide

    2018-01-01

    We have been analyzing Itokawa samples in order to definitively establish the degree of shock experienced by the regolith of asteroid Itokawa, and to devise a bridge between shock determinations by standard light optical petrography, crystal structures as determined by electron and X-ray diffraction. These techniques would then be available for samples returned from other asteroid regoliths.

  4. On a semiclassical analysis of high energy electron diffraction by imperfect crystals: the stacking fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.

    1978-01-01

    Electron diffraction amplitudes at the lower surface of a displaced sandwich crystal are obtained for the high energy limit in the real space formulation. Using semiclassical methods analytical approximations to a resulting overlap integral - central to the problem - are derived. (Auth.)

  5. A pipeline for comprehensive and automated processing of electron diffraction data in IPLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Andreas D; Philippsen, Ansgar; Engel, Andreas; Walz, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals allows the structural study of membrane proteins in their native environment, the lipid bilayer. Determining the structure of a membrane protein at near-atomic resolution by electron crystallography remains, however, a very labor-intense and time-consuming task. To simplify and accelerate the data processing aspect of electron crystallography, we implemented a pipeline for the processing of electron diffraction data using the Image Processing Library and Toolbox (IPLT), which provides a modular, flexible, integrated, and extendable cross-platform, open-source framework for image processing. The diffraction data processing pipeline is organized as several independent modules implemented in Python. The modules can be accessed either from a graphical user interface or through a command line interface, thus meeting the needs of both novice and expert users. The low-level image processing algorithms are implemented in C++ to achieve optimal processing performance, and their interface is exported to Python using a wrapper. For enhanced performance, the Python processing modules are complemented with a central data managing facility that provides a caching infrastructure. The validity of our data processing algorithms was verified by processing a set of aquaporin-0 diffraction patterns with the IPLT pipeline and comparing the resulting merged data set with that obtained by processing the same diffraction patterns with the classical set of MRC programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  7. Study of thermal stability of ultrafine-grained copper by means of electron back scattering diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, O.; Pantělejev, L.; Kunz, Ludvík

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 209-213 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ultra-fine grained copper * thermal stability of microstructure * electron back scattering diffraction * grain size * texture Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010

  8. Time-lapse misorientation maps for the analysis of electron backscatter diffraction data from evolving microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, J.; Cross, A.; Drury, M.; Hough, R.M.; Mariani, E.; Piazolo, S.; Prior, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    A “time-lapse misorientation map” is defined here as a map which shows the orientation change at each point in an evolving crystalline microstructure between two different times. Electron backscatter diffraction data from in situ heating experiments can be used to produce such maps, which then

  9. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  11. Structural study of disordered SiC nanowires by three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Duan; Guo, Peng; Wan, Wei; Zou, Ji; Shen, Zhijian; Guzi de Moraes, Elisângela; Colombo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The structure of disordered SiC nanowires was studied by using the three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction (RED) technique. The streaks shown in the RED images indicated the stacking faults of the nanowire. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging was employed to support the results from the RED data. It suggested that a 2H polytype is most possible for the nanowires. (paper)

  12. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  13. Femtosecond pulse shaping using plasmonic snowflake nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tok, Ruestue Umut; Sendur, Kuersat [Sabanci University, Orhanli-Tuzla, 34956, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-09-15

    We have theoretically demonstrated femtosecond pulse manipulation at the nanoscale using the plasmonic snowflake antenna's ability to localize light over a broad spectrum. To analyze the interaction of the incident femtosecond pulse with the plasmonic nanoantenna, we first decompose the diffraction limited incident femtosecond pulse into its spectral components. The interaction of each spectral component with the nanoantenna is analyzed using finite element technique. The time domain response of the plasmonic antenna is obtained using inverse Fourier transformation. It is shown that the rich spectral characteristics of the plasmonic snowflake nanoantenna allow manipulation of the femtosecond pulses over a wide spectrum. Light localization around the gap region of the nanoantenna is shown for femtosecond pulses. As the alignment of incident light polarization is varied, different antenna elements oscillate, which in turn creates a different spectrum and a distinct femtosecond response.

  14. Primary processes of the electron-protic species coupling in pure aqueous phases: - femtosecond laser spectroscopy study; - quantum approach of the electron-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas

    1991-01-01

    This thesis work deals with the coupling mechanisms between an electron, water molecules or protic species (hydronium ion, hydroxyl radical). Two complementary studies have been carry out in pure aqueous phases. The first one is concerned with the structural aspect of the hydrated electron which is studied via a semi-quantum approach Splitting Operator Method. The results indicates the importance of the second hydration shell in the localisation of an electron at 77 and 300 Kelvin. The second part of this work relates to the dynamic of the primary processes in light or heavy water at room temperature: the ion-molecule reaction, radical pair formation, geminate recombination of the hydrated electron with the hydronium ion and the hydroxyl radical. The dynamic of these reactions is studied by time resolved absorption spectroscopy from the near infrared to the near ultraviolet with a few tens femto-seconds temporal precision. The analysis of the primary processes takes into account the protic properties of water molecules. (author) [fr

  15. Quantitative microstructure characterization of self-annealed copper films with electron backscatter diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Gholinia, A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to analyze cross sections of self-annealed copper electrodeposits, for which earlier the kinetics of self-annealing had been investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The EBSD investigations on the grain size, grain boundary character...... and crystallographic texture of copper films with different thicknesses essentially supplement results from in-situ XRD. Twin relations between neighboring grains were identified from the orientation maps and the observed twin chains confirm multiple twinning in copper electrodeposits as the mechanism...

  16. A study on displacement of crystalline diffraction peaks in electron-beam irradiated filter paper cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ruimin; Xiang Qun; Song Jing

    1997-01-01

    It is found that the crystalline diffraction angles of the electron-beam irradiated filter paper cellulose shift regularly when the irradiation dose is increased. The experiments indicate that the molecules between crystalline area and amorphous area in the filter paper cellulose will be degraded by the irradiation and the cellulose molecules in the surface of crystal will come off, thus the microcrystalline dimension will be reduced and the diffraction angle will become smaller. The fact that intensity of the 002 peak for filter paper samples decreases gradually with the increasing storage time can be attributed to the post-irradiation effect

  17. Crystallographic orientation study of silicon steels using X-ray diffraction, electrons diffraction and the Etch Pit method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Hamilta de Oliveira

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the microstructural and crystallographic orientation of Fe-3%Si steel. The silicon steel shows good electrical properties and it is used in the nuclear and electrical power fields. The studied steel was supplied by Cia. Acos Especiais Itabira S/A - ACESITA. The material was received in the hot compressed condition, in one or two passes. The hot compressing temperatures used were 900, 1000 and 1100 deg C with soaking times ranging from 32 to 470 s. The material preferential crystallographic orientation was evaluated in every grain of the samples. The characterization techniques used were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the etch pit method; X ray diffraction using the Laue back-reflection method; orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). Microstructural characterization in terms of grain size measurement and mean number of grains in the sample were also undertaken. The Laue method was found an easy technique to access crystallographic orientation of this work polycrystalline samples 2.5 mm average grain size. This was due to the inability to focus the X-rays on a single grain of the material. The scanning electron microscopy showed microcavities left by the etch pit method, which allowed the observation of the crystallographic orientation of each grain from the samples. No conclusive grain crystallographic orientation was possible to obtain by the OIM technique due to the non-existing rolling direction. A more extensive work with the OIM technique must be undertaken on the Fe-3%Si with oriented grains and non oriented grains. (author)

  18. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  19. Femtosecond investigation of electronic and vibrational dynamics of metal nano-objects and local order in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgin, Julien

    2007-01-01

    In this Ph.D. work we have investigated the electronic and vibrational properties of metallic nano objects as a function of their size, shape and composition, and studied the vibrational modes in glasses, using femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. In mono-metallic copper clusters, acceleration of the electron-lattice energy exchanges for sizes smaller than 10 nm has been demonstrated, confirming previous results in gold and silver clusters. The small size regime, i.e., nanoparticles smaller than 2 nm, has been addressed. The results show the limit of the classical confined material approach. In bi-metallic clusters, electron-lattice interaction has been shown to reflect their composition for gold-silver materials, but exhibits a more complex behavior in the case of segregated nickel-silver particles. The impact of shape, structure and environment on the acoustic vibrations of metallic nano-objects has also been studied. Measurements performed in ensemble or pairs of prisms yielded evidence for local fluctuations of their coupling with the substrate. Nano-structuration effects have been demonstrated in nano-columns and segregated components. The vibrational modes associated to local order in glasses have been investigated using a high sensitivity impulsive stimulated Raman scattering technique. The 'defect modes' of normal and densified silica, associated to vibrations of ring structures, have been observed and characterized, yielding information on the evolution of the ring density. Performing similar measurements in germania, we have demonstrated the existence of a vibrational mode due to a similar ring structure and determined its characteristics [fr

  20. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John M.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Zholents, Alexander A.; Zolotorev, Max S.

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ''femtoslicing'' beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. These CSR pulses were first observed at the ALS, and the measurement of their intensity is now routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing x-ray experiments. At the same time, these CSR pulses synchronous with the modulating laser, represent a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for their characterization and in this paper we present an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation. In particular, we include more data on the interesting interaction, previously observed at the ALS, between the slicing and the microbunching instability (MBI), where under particular circumstances, the slicing seems to trigger the onset of the instability

  1. Dynamical electron diffraction simulation for non-orthogonal crystal system by a revised real space method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, C L; Liu, Q B; Cai, C Y; Huang, J; Zhou, G W; Wang, Y G

    2015-01-01

    In the transmission electron microscopy, a revised real space (RRS) method has been confirmed to be a more accurate dynamical electron diffraction simulation method for low-energy electron diffraction than the conventional multislice method (CMS). However, the RRS method can be only used to calculate the dynamical electron diffraction of orthogonal crystal system. In this work, the expression of the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is derived. By taking Na2 Ti3 O7 and Si as examples, the correctness of the derived RRS formula for non-orthogonal crystal system is confirmed by testing the coincidence of numerical results of both sides of Schrödinger equation; moreover, the difference between the RRS method and the CMS for non-orthogonal crystal system is compared at the accelerating voltage range from 40 to 10 kV. Our results show that the CMS method is almost the same as the RRS method for the accelerating voltage above 40 kV. However, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the CMS method introduces significant errors, not only for the higher-order Laue zone diffractions, but also for zero-order Laue zone. These indicate that the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is necessary to be used for more accurate dynamical simulation when the accelerating voltage is low. Furthermore, the reason for the increase of differences between those diffraction patterns calculated by the RRS method and the CMS method with the decrease of the accelerating voltage is discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Diffraction and absorption of inelastically scattered electrons for K-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, T.W.; Allen, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    An expression for the nonlocal inelastic scattering cross section for fast electrons in a crystalline environment, which explicitly includes diffraction as well as absorption for the inelastically scattered electrons, is used to carry out realistic calculations of K-shell electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis cross sections. The calculations demonstrate quantitatively why, in EDX spectroscopy, integration over the dynamical states of the inelastically scattered electron averages in such a way that an effective plane wave representation of the scattered electrons is a good approximation. This is only the case for large enough acceptance angles of the detector in an EELS experiment. For EELS with smaller detector apertures, explicit integration over the dynamical final states is necessary and inclusion of absorption for the scattered electrons is important, particularly for thicker crystals. 50 refs., 7 figs

  3. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  4. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Dickey, Elizabeth C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2017-02-15

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. Further, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system. - Highlights: • A novel technique to directly polar domains utilizing EBSD is demonstrated. • The technique relies on dynamical diffraction simulations of EBSD patterns. • The technique is demonstrated by mapping 180° domains in LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. • Further application of this technique to other materials classes is discussed.

  5. Development of an ellipse fitting method with which to analyse selected area electron diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G., E-mail: dmitchel@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Van den Berg, J.A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Catalyst Fundamentals, Fischer-Tropsch and Syngas Conversion Research, Sasol Technology R & D, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    A software method has been developed which uses ellipse fitting to analyse electron diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials. The method, which requires minimal user input, can determine the pattern centre and the diameter of diffraction rings with sub-pixel precision. This enables accurate crystallographic information to be obtained in a rapid and consistent manner. Since the method fits ellipses, it can detect, quantify and correct any elliptical distortion introduced by the imaging system. Distortion information derived from polycrystalline patterns as a function of camera length can be subsequently recalled and applied to single crystal patterns, resulting in improved precision and accuracy. The method has been implemented as a plugin for the DigitalMicrograph software by Gatan, and is a freely available via the internet. - Highlights: • A robust ellipse fitting method is developed. • Freely available software for automated diffraction pattern analysis is demonstrated. • Measurement and correction of elliptical distortion is routinely achieved.

  6. Three-dimensional nanostructure determination from a large diffraction data set recorded using scanning electron nanodiffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Meng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A diffraction-based technique is developed for the determination of three-dimensional nanostructures. The technique employs high-resolution and low-dose scanning electron nanodiffraction (SEND to acquire three-dimensional diffraction patterns, with the help of a special sample holder for large-angle rotation. Grains are identified in three-dimensional space based on crystal orientation and on reconstructed dark-field images from the recorded diffraction patterns. Application to a nanocrystalline TiN thin film shows that the three-dimensional morphology of columnar TiN grains of tens of nanometres in diameter can be reconstructed using an algebraic iterative algorithm under specified prior conditions, together with their crystallographic orientations. The principles can be extended to multiphase nanocrystalline materials as well. Thus, the tomographic SEND technique provides an effective and adaptive way of determining three-dimensional nanostructures.

  7. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    a systematic theoretical treatment of this coupling process in the language of an electronic friction, which generates Langevin noise in the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom, while the electronic degrees of freedom are at a high temperature. Starting from an influence-functional path...

  8. Instantaneous nonvertical electronic transitions with shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Is it possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2003-01-01

    In molecular electronic transitions, a vertical transition can be induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. That is, a replica of the initial nuclear state-times the transition dipole moment of the electronic transition-can be created instantaneously (on the time scale of nuclear motion) in the excited...

  9. Ab-initio crystal structure analysis and refinement approaches of oligo p-benzamides based on electron diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; van de Streek, Jacco; Kilbinger, Andreas F M

    2012-01-01

    Ab-initio crystal structure analysis of organic materials from electron diffraction data is presented. The data were collected using the automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) technique. The structure solution and refinement route is first validated on the basis of the known crystal stru...

  10. Three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction: software RED for automated data collection and data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Sun, Junliang; Su, Jie; Hovmöller, Sven; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Implementation of a computer program package for automated collection and processing of rotation electron diffraction (RED) data is described. The software package contains two computer programs: RED data collection and RED data processing. The RED data collection program controls the transmission electron microscope and the camera. Electron beam tilts at a fine step (0.05-0.20°) are combined with goniometer tilts at a coarse step (2.0-3.0°) around a common tilt axis, which allows a fine relative tilt to be achieved between the electron beam and the crystal in a large tilt range. An electron diffraction (ED) frame is collected at each combination of beam tilt and goniometer tilt. The RED data processing program processes three-dimensional ED data generated by the RED data collection program or by other approaches. It includes shift correction of the ED frames, peak hunting for diffraction spots in individual ED frames and identification of these diffraction spots as reflections in three dimensions. Unit-cell parameters are determined from the positions of reflections in three-dimensional reciprocal space. All reflections are indexed, and finally a list with hkl indices and intensities is output. The data processing program also includes a visualizer to view and analyse three-dimensional reciprocal lattices reconstructed from the ED frames. Details of the implementation are described. Data collection and data processing with the software RED are demonstrated using a calcined zeolite sample, silicalite-1. The structure of the calcined silicalite-1, with 72 unique atoms, could be solved from the RED data by routine direct methods.

  11. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Porwal, S. [Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Rao, B. T. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Sharma, T. K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  12. Red Shift and Broadening of Backward Harmonic Radiation from Electron Oscillations Driven by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Senecha, Vinod K; Han, Xu; Deng Degang; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of backward harmonic radiation due to electron oscillations driven by a linearly polarized fs laser pulse are analysed considering a single electron model. The spectral distributions of the electron's backward harmonic radiation are investigated in detail for different parameters of the driver laser pulse. Higher order harmonic radiations are possible for a sufficiently intense driving laser pulse. We have shown that for a realistic pulsed photon beam, the spectrum of the radiation is red shifted as well as broadened because of changes in the longitudinal velocity of the electrons during the laser pulse. These effects are more pronounced at higher laser intensities giving rise to higher order harmonics that eventually leads to a continuous spectrum. Numerical simulations have further shown that by increasing the laser pulse width the broadening of the high harmonic radiations can be controlled

  13. Reciprocal space mapping by spot profile analyzing low energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank-J.; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental approach for the recording of two-dimensional reciprocal space maps using spot profile analyzing low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). A specialized alignment procedure eliminates the shifting of LEED patterns on the screen which is commonly observed upon variation of the electron energy. After the alignment, a set of one-dimensional sections through the diffraction pattern is recorded at different energies. A freely available software tool is used to assemble the sections into a reciprocal space map. The necessary modifications of the Burr-Brown computer interface of the two Leybold and Omicron type SPA-LEED instruments are discussed and step-by-step instructions are given to adapt the SPA 4.1d software to the changed hardware. Au induced faceting of 4 deg. vicinal Si(001) is used as an example to demonstrate the technique

  14. Molecular structure determination of cyclooctane by Ab Initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Wagner B. de

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can make a significant contribution for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination of the molecular structure of the cyclooctane molecule by electron diffraction in the gas phase an initio calculations will be addressed, providing an example of a comparative analysis of theoretical and experimental predictions. (author)

  15. Correlated microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis of calcifications in an odontoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoba, T.; Yoshioka, C.; Yagi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Using microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis, a correlated morphologic and crystallographic study was performed on dysplastic enamel in a compound odontoma. The tumor was found in the lateral incisor-canine region of the left mandible of a 36-year-old woman. A conspicuous feature was the presence of hypomineralized areas, which were situated in the proximity of enamel surface and distinctly demarcated from the adjacent enamel. X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron microanalysis showed that these lesions have a lower crystallinity and a higher concentration of magnesium as compared with the adjacent enamel. In addition, the present study revealed the presence of two other types of calcifications: 1) calcified structures within the fissure or on the enamel surface, which include lacunae of varying size and which resemble a form of coronal cementum, and 2) spherical calcifications which may be an epithelial product. (author)

  16. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100–300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: ► The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. ► Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. ► Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. ► A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  17. Molecular structure determination of cyclootane by ab initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can ma...

  18. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.; Sabochik, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs

  19. Time-lapse misorientation maps for the analysis of electron backscatter diffraction data from evolving microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.; Cross, A.; Drury, M.; Hough, R.M.; Mariani, E.; Piazolo, S.; Prior, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    A 'time-lapse misorientation map' is defined here as a map which shows the orientation change at each point in an evolving crystalline microstructure between two different times. Electron backscatter diffraction data from in situ heating experiments can be used to produce such maps, which then highlight areas of microstructural change and also yield statistics indicative of how far different types of boundary (with different misorientations) have moved.

  20. Diffraction structures in delta electron spectra emitted in heavy-ion atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.; Bhalla, C.; Shingal, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Shinpaugh, J.; Wolf, W.; Wolf, H.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured doubly differential cross sections DDCS for projectiles between F and Au and find evidence for strong diffraction structure in the Binary Encounter region of the emitted electron spectra for Au(Z=79), I(Z=53) and Cu(Z=29) projectiles, however not for F projectiles in the collision energy range between 0.2 and 0.5 MeV/u. (orig.)

  1. Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction Study of 2xxx Series Aluminium Alloys Exhibiting Several Coexisting Strengthening Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sunde, Jonas Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, scanning precession electron diffraction is applied to heat-treated Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Cu-Ag alloys, shedding light on the distribution of phases present and the complex interplay between these microstructural features. The employed technique yielded high quality data sets, which through subsequent data processing enabled a detailed phase mapping of these multi-component Al alloys. Among the main results presented, are virtual dark field images highlighting all separat...

  2. Whole-pattern fitting technique in serial femtosecond nanocrystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben A. Dilanian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX has created new opportunities in the field of structural analysis of protein nanocrystals. The intensity and timescale characteristics of the X-ray free-electron laser sources used in SFX experiments necessitate the analysis of a large collection of individual crystals of variable shape and quality to ultimately solve a single, average crystal structure. Ensembles of crystals are commonly encountered in powder diffraction, but serial crystallography is different because each crystal is measured individually and can be oriented via indexing and merged into a three-dimensional data set, as is done for conventional crystallography data. In this way, serial femtosecond crystallography data lie in between conventional crystallography data and powder diffraction data, sharing features of both. The extremely small sizes of nanocrystals, as well as the possible imperfections of their crystallite structure, significantly affect the diffraction pattern and raise the question of how best to extract accurate structure-factor moduli from serial crystallography data. Here it is demonstrated that whole-pattern fitting techniques established for one-dimensional powder diffraction analysis can be feasibly extended to higher dimensions for the analysis of merged SFX diffraction data. It is shown that for very small crystals, whole-pattern fitting methods are more accurate than Monte Carlo integration methods that are currently used.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  4. Ab initio structure determination and quantitative disorder analysis on nanoparticles by electron diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Yaşar; Barton, Bastian; Marler, Bernd; Neder, Reinhard B; Kolb, Ute

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscaled porous materials such as zeolites have attracted substantial attention in industry due to their catalytic activity, and their performance in sorption and separation processes. In order to understand the properties of such materials, current research focuses increasingly on the determination of structural features beyond the averaged crystal structure. Small particle sizes, various types of disorder and intergrown structures render the description of structures at atomic level by standard crystallographic methods difficult. This paper reports the characterization of a strongly disordered zeolite structure, using a combination of electron exit-wave reconstruction, automated diffraction tomography (ADT), crystal disorder modelling and electron diffraction simulations. Zeolite beta was chosen for a proof-of-principle study of the techniques, because it consists of two different intergrown polymorphs that are built from identical layer types but with different stacking sequences. Imaging of the projected inner Coulomb potential of zeolite beta crystals shows the intergrowth of the polymorphs BEA and BEB. The structures of BEA as well as BEB could be extracted from one single ADT data set using direct methods. A ratio for BEA/BEB = 48:52 was determined by comparison of the reconstructed reciprocal space based on ADT data with simulated electron diffraction data for virtual nanocrystals, built with different ratios of BEA/BEB. In this way, it is demonstrated that this smart interplay of the above-mentioned techniques allows the elaboration of the real structures of functional materials in detail - even if they possess a severely disordered structure.

  5. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    efficient delivery of this power to the screen. We describe a method based on optical rectification to create an electron acceleration process which can act simultaneously on a femtosecond photo-electron pulse as well as cancel space-charge effects. This method can be used to produce attosecond electron and photon pulses. Narrow linewidth high intensity tunable light pulses are very useful for applications such as spectroscopic studies and remote sensing. Tunable lasers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) process are commonly used for this purpose. SRS process has high threshold because of small spontaneous Raman scattering cross-sections. We combined amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from dye molecules with SRS process in solvent molecules in which dye molecules are dissolved. ASE seeds SRS process and SRS peak is further amplified by stimulated emission gain. We got amplifications ~100 over SRS from pure solvent. This peak can be tuned over gain bandwidth of dye molecules.

  6. Femtosecond resolved diagnostics for electron beam and XUV seed temporal overlap at sFLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkeshian, Roxana

    2012-02-01

    sFLASH is a seeded experiment at the Free-Electron Laser FLASH in Hamburg. It uses a 38 nm High-Harmonic-Generation (HHG) scheme to seed the FEL-process in a 10m long variable-gap undulator. The temporal overlap between the electron and HHG pulses is critical to the seeding process. The use of a 3 rd harmonic accelerating module provides a high current electron beam with ∝ (400 fs) FWHM bunch duration. The duration of the HHG laser pulse is ≤ (30 fs) FWHM . The desired overlap is achieved in two steps. Firstly, the HHG drive laser is brought to temporal overlap with the incoherent spontaneous radiation from an upstream undulator with picosecond resolution. The temporal overlap is periodically monitored using a streak camera installed in the linear accelerator tunnel. Next, the coherent radiation from an undulator is used to determine the exact overlap of the electron beam in a modulator-radiator set-up with sub-picosecond resolution. The physical and technical principles of the setup providing the temporal overlap are described. Results of the system are analyzed. An analytical approach and simulation results for the performance of the seeding experiment are presented. First attempts at demonstration of seeding are discussed. Strategies for optimizing overlap conditions are presented. (orig.)

  7. The SPARC_LAB femtosecond synchronization for electron and photon pulsed beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaveglia, M.; Gallo, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Gatti, G.; Anania, M. P.; Petrarca, M.; Villa, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Biagioni, A.; Mostacci, A.

    2015-05-01

    The SPARC LAB complex hosts a 150 MeV electron photo-injector equipped with an undulator for FEL production (SPARC) together with a high power TW laser (FLAME). Recently the synchronization system reached the performance of < 100 fsRMS relative jitter between lasers, electron beam and RF accelerating fields. This matches the requirements for next future experiments: (i) the production of X-rays by means of Thomson scattering (first collisions achieved in 2014) and (ii) the particle driven PWFA experiment by means of multiple electron bunches. We report about the measurements taken during the machine operation using BAMs (Bunch Arrival Monitors) and EOS (Electro-Optical Sampling) system. A new R and D activity concerning the LWFA using the external injection of electron bunches in a plasma generated by the FLAME laser pulse is under design. The upgrade of the synchronization system is under way to guarantee the < 30 fs RMS jitter required specification. It foresees the transition from electrical to optical architecture that mainly affects the reference signal distribution and the time of arrival detection performances. The new system architecture is presented together with the related experimental data.

  8. Femtosecond resolved diagnostics for electron beam and XUV seed temporal overlap at sFLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkeshian, Roxana

    2012-02-15

    sFLASH is a seeded experiment at the Free-Electron Laser FLASH in Hamburg. It uses a 38 nm High-Harmonic-Generation (HHG) scheme to seed the FEL-process in a 10m long variable-gap undulator. The temporal overlap between the electron and HHG pulses is critical to the seeding process. The use of a 3{sup rd} harmonic accelerating module provides a high current electron beam with {proportional_to} (400 fs){sub FWHM} bunch duration. The duration of the HHG laser pulse is {<=} (30 fs){sub FWHM}. The desired overlap is achieved in two steps. Firstly, the HHG drive laser is brought to temporal overlap with the incoherent spontaneous radiation from an upstream undulator with picosecond resolution. The temporal overlap is periodically monitored using a streak camera installed in the linear accelerator tunnel. Next, the coherent radiation from an undulator is used to determine the exact overlap of the electron beam in a modulator-radiator set-up with sub-picosecond resolution. The physical and technical principles of the setup providing the temporal overlap are described. Results of the system are analyzed. An analytical approach and simulation results for the performance of the seeding experiment are presented. First attempts at demonstration of seeding are discussed. Strategies for optimizing overlap conditions are presented. (orig.)

  9. Desorption of hydrogen from magnesium hydride: in-situ electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I.P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change has been studied where electron beam in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) has been used to transform MgH 2 into magnesium. A combination of in-situ Electron Diffraction (ED) and an in-situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) study under ED mode describes the phase transformation in terms of, respectively, change in the crystal structure and Plasmon energy shift. The orientation relation [001] MgH2 //[-2110] Mg and (-110) MgH2 //(0001) Mg , obtained from the ED study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms in the structural change to describe the dynamics of the process. The in-situ EELS study has been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH 2 which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems. (author)

  10. Development and commissioning of a double-prism spectrometer for the diagnosis of femtosecond electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Steffen

    2016-12-15

    Free-electron lasers as accelerator-driven light sources and wakefield-based acceleration in plasmas require the knowledge of the longitudinal extension and the longitudinal current profile of the involved electron bunches. These bunches can yield lengths below 10 μm, or durations shorter than approx. 33 fs, as well as charges less than 30 pC. During this work, transition radiation from relativistic electron bunches was investigated in the mid-infrared wavelength regime. A spectrometer using an arrangement of two consecutive zinc selenide prisms was developed, built and commissioned. The instrument covers the spectral range from 2 μm to 18 μm in a single shot. Measurements with the double-prism spectrometer were conducted at the FEL facilities FLASH at DESY in Hamburg, Germany and FELIX at the Radboud Universiteit in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. The assessment of the spectrometer and comparative studies with established diagnostic devices at FLASH show high signal-to-noise ratios at bunch charges below 10 pC and confirm the obtained results.

  11. Femtosecond laser control of the angular distribution of electrons due to autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajema, M.L.; Jones, R.R.; Gallagher, T.F.

    2004-01-01

    Using two 500-fs laser pulses and a controlled time delay between them we are able to manipulate the angular distributions of the electrons ejected by autoionization of Ca atoms in the 4p 3/2 21s and 4p 3/2 19d states. Subsequent to their isolated core excitation by a 500-fs 393-nm laser pulse, Ca 4p 3/2 21s(19d) Rydberg atoms coherently evolve, via configuration interaction, into the degenerate 4p 1/2 ns(nd) states. While in the 4p 1/2 ns(nd) states atoms can be de-excited to bound 4sns(nd) levels using a 500-fs 397-nm pulse. Removing these atoms from the autoionizing states leads to a greater fraction of electrons leaving the atom along the direction of the laser polarization than is possible through direct excitation of 4 3/2 ns(nd) or 4p 1/2 ns(nd) using either the 393- or 397-nm pulse alone

  12. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.

    2005-01-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs

  13. A three-dimensional polarization domain retrieval method from electron diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Koch, Christoph T.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving three-dimensional domains of picometer-scale shifts in atomic positions from electron diffraction data, and apply it to simulations of ferroelectric polarization in BaTiO 3 . Our algorithm successfully and correctly retrieves polarization domains in which the Ti atom positions differ by less than 3 pm (0.4% of the unit cell diagonal distance) with 5 and 10 nm depth resolution along the beam direction, and we also retrieve unit cell strain, corresponding to tetragonal-to-cubic unit cell distortions, for 10 nm domains. Experimental applicability is also discussed. - Highlights: • We show a retrieval method for ferroelectric polarization from TEM diffraction data. • Simulated strain and polarization variations along the beam direction are retrieved. • This method can be used for 3D strain and polarization mapping without specimen tilt

  14. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  15. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In-situ Indentation and Correlated Precession Electron Diffraction Analysis of a Polycrystalline Cu Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianying; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2018-04-01

    In-situ TEM nanoindentation of a polycrystalline Cu film was cross-correlated with precession electron diffraction (PED) to quantify the microstructural evolution. The use of PED is shown to clearly reveal features, such as grain size, that are easily masked by diffraction contrast created by the deformation. Using PED, the accompanying grain refinement and change in texture as well as the preservation of specific grain boundary structures, including a ∑3 boundary, under the indent impression were quantified. The nucleation of dislocations, evident in low-angle grain boundary formations, was also observed under the indent. PED quantification of texture gradients created by the indentation process linked well to bend contours observed in the bright-field images. Finally, PED enabled generating a local orientation spread map that gave an approximate estimation of the spatial distribution of strain created by the indentation impression.

  17. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  18. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xianhai; Du Yingchao; Huang Wenhui; Tang Chuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    transverse ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled. (authors)

  19. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  20. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  1. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e{sup −} Å{sup −2}), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins.

  2. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e − Å −2 ), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins

  3. Recent results on solvation dynamics of electron and spur reactions of solvated electron in polar solvents studied by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report several studies done recently at ELYSE laboratory on the solvation dynamics of electron and on the kinetics of solvated electron in the spur reactions, performed by femtosecond laser spectroscopy and picosecond pulse radiolysis, respectively. Solvated electrons have been produced in polyol (1,2-Etanediol, 1,2-Propanediol and 1,3-Propanediol) by two-photon ionization of the solvent with 263 nm femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature. The two-photon absorption coefficient of these solvents at 263 nm has been determined. The dynamics of electron solvation in polyols has been studied by pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy. So, time resolved absorption spectra ranging from 430 to 720 nm have been measured (Figure 1). A blue shift of the spectra is observed for the first tens of picoseconds. Using Bayesian data analysis method, the observed solvation dynamics are reconstructed with different models: stepwise mechanisms, continuous relaxation models or combinations of stepwise and continuous relaxation. That analysis clearly indicates that it is not obvious to select a unique model to describe the solvation dynamics of electron in diols. We showed that several models are able to reproduce correctly the data: a two-step model, a heterogeneous or bi-exponential continuous relaxation model and even a hybrid model with a stepwise transition and homogeneous continuous relaxation. Nevertheless, the best fits are given by the continuous spectral relaxation models. The fact that the time-evolution of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron in diols can be accurately described by the temperature dependent absorption spectrum of the ground state solvated electron suggests that the spectral blue shift is mostly caused by the continuous relaxation of the electron trapped in a large distribution of solvent cages. Similar trends on electron solvation dynamics are observed in the cases of 1,2-ethanediol, 1,3-propanediol and 1,2 propanediol

  4. Perpendicular State of an Electronically Excited Stilbene: Observation by Femtosecond-Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Martin; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Ioffe, Ilya N; Granovsky, Alex A; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2016-10-20

    In the photoisomerization path of stilbene, a perpendicular state P on the S 1 potential energy surface is expected just before internal conversion through a conical intersection S 1 /S 0 . For decades the observation of P was thwarted by a short lifetime τ P in combination with slow population flow over a barrier. But these limitations can be overcome by ethylenic substitution. Following optical excitation of trans-1,1'-dicyanostilbene, P is populated significantly (τ P = 27 ps in n-hexane) and monitored by an exited-state absorption band at 370 nm. Here we report stimulated Raman lines of P. The strongest, at 1558 cm -1 , is attributed to stretching vibrations of the phenyl rings. Transient electronic states, resonance conditions, and corresponding Raman signals are discussed.

  5. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this

  6. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, C; Morniroli, J P; Jäger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess left brace 110 right brace-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages o...

  7. Extra spots in the electron diffraction patterns of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    Specimens of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys were examined in the transmission electron microscope. Groups of extra spots, often exhibiting four-fold symmetry, were observed in thin foil electron diffraction patterns of these specimens. The 'extra-spot' structure, like the expected black-dot/small scale dislocation loop neutron irradiated damage, is approximately 100 A in size. Its nature is uncertain. It may be related to irradiation damage or to some artefact introduced during specimen preparation. If it is the latter, then published irradiation damage defect size distributions and determined irradiation growth strains of other investigators, may require modification. The present inconclusive results indicate that extra-spot structure is likely to consist of oxide particles, but may correspond to hydride precipitation or decoration effects, or even, to electron beam effects. (author)

  8. Reassessment of the electron density in Cu2O using γ-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Wolfgang; Reehuis, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    The electron-density distribution in Cu2O has been critically reexamined to test controversial conclusions from earlier experimental and theoretical studies. The electron density is derived via multipole refinement of high-quality single-crystal diffraction data, collected at room temperature with 316.5 keV gamma radiation. Four γ-lines in the energy range 200-600 keV have been used to extrapolate extinction-free low-order structure factors. The remaining extinction corrections refine to a crystal mosaicity identical to the observed one. There is no support for anharmonic contributions to the thermal parameters. Important features of the derived electron density are (i) a partially filled d_{z^2} orbital, (ii) an incomplete ionization of Cu and O, and (iii) no interstitial Cu-Cu charge pileup, thereby refuting the covalent bonding hypothesis.

  9. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  10. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  11. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  12. Photoinduced electron-transfer in perylenediimide triphenylamine-based dendrimers : single photon timing and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fron, Eduard; Pilot, Roberto; Schweitzer, Gerd; Qu, Jianqiang; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Hofkens, Johan; Auweraer, Mark Van der; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2008-01-01

    The excited state dynamics of two generations perylenediimide chromophores substituted in the bay area with dendritic branches bearing triphenylamine units as well as those of the respective reference compounds are investigated. Using single photon timing and multi-pulse femtosecond transient

  13. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond UV laser and a VUV free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S. Y.; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takao; Nishizawa, Kiyoshi; Horio, Takuya; Mizuno, Tomoya; Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    A time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond ultraviolet (UV) laser and a vacuum UV freeelectron laser is presented. Ultrafast internal conversion and intersystem crossing in pyrazine in a supersonic molecular beam were clearly observed in the time profiles of photoioinzation intensity and time-dependent photoelectron images.

  14. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...... by a bismuth bilayer is ruled out. Surface relaxations obtained by both techniques are in good agreement with each other and found to be small. This includes the relaxation of the van der Waals gap between the first two quintuple layers....

  15. A comparison of texture results obtained using precession electron diffraction and neutron diffraction methods at diminishing length scales in ordered bimetallic nanolamellar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.S.; Liu, X.; Darbal, A.; Nuhfer, N.T.; McCabe, R.J.; Vogel, S.C.; LeDonne, J.E.; Rollett, A.D.; Barmak, K.; Beyerlein, I.J.; Mara, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) is used to acquire orientation information in Cu–Nb nanolamellar composites fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). The resulting maps quantify the grain size, shape, orientation distributions and interface planes in the vicinity of nanometer-thick deformation twins. The PED-based texture results compare favorably with bulk textures provided by neutron diffraction measurements, indicating uniformity in the ARB Cu–Nb texture. Additionally, {1 1 2} Cu ||{1 1 2} Nb interfaces are present, suggesting that ARB techniques can lead to stable interfaces with a special crystallography.

  16. Femtosecond Planar Electron Beam Source for Micron-Scale Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2006-01-01

    A new accelerator LACARA is under construction at ATF, Brookhaven National Laboratory. LACARA is to be powered by a 1 TW CO2 laser, and will utilize a 6-T 2-m long solenoidal magnetic field. For a 50 MeV injected electron bunch, LACARA is expected to produce a 100 MeV 1 ps gyrating beam with ∼ 3% energy spread. Beam electrons advance in phase at the laser frequency, executing one cycle each 35 fs. A beam stop with a small off-axis channel will transmit a short beam pulse every optical cycle, thereby producing a train of about 30, 3.5 fs, 1-3 pC microbunches for each laser pulse. One application for this train of microbunches obtained from a LACARA-type device involves focusing a portion of the beam using a magnetic quadrupole into a rectangular cross-section having a narrow dimension of a few microns and a height of a few hundred microns. These microbunches may be injected into a planar dielectric-lined waveguide where cumulative buildup of wake fields can lead to an accelerating gradient > 1 GV/m. This proposed vacuum-based wake field structure is mechanically rigid and capable of accurate microfabrication, factors important in staging a large number of accelerator modules. Furthermore, the accelerating gradients it promises are comparable with those for plasma accelerators. A LACARA unit for preparing suitable bunches at 500 MeV is described. Physics issues are discussed including bunch spreading and transport, bunch shaping, aperture radiation, dielectric breakdown, and bunch stability in the rectangular wake field structure. In appendices to this report, three supporting documents are attached. These include a set of drawings that show the layout of the beam line and optical line for LACARA at ATF-BNL; and two reprints of recent articles published in PRST-AB. The first article describes measurements of the coherent superposition of wake fields that arise from a periodic train of bunches, with supporting analysis. The second article presents theory that

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  18. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10"−"4 in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  20. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  1. Formation of array microstructures on silicon by multibeam interfered femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Quanzhong; Qiu Jianrong; Zhao Chongjun; Jiang Xiongwei; Zhu Congshan

    2005-01-01

    We report on an optical interference method to fabricate array microstructures on the surface of silicon wafers by means of five-beam interference of femtosecond laser pulses. Optical microscope and scanning electron microscope observations revealed microstructures with micrometer-order were fabricated. The diffraction characteristics of the fabricated structures were evaluated. The present technique allows one-step realization of functional optoelectronic devices on silicon surface

  2. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  3. Electron diffraction determination of 11.5 Å and HySo structures: candidate water carriers to the Upper Mantle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemmi, M.; Merlini, M.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Fumagalli, P.; Hanfland, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 12 (2016), s. 2645-2654 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : subduction * MASH system * electron diffraction tomography Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016

  4. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 3 6 3 6 or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis

  5. Accurate measurement of the orientation relationship of lath martensite and bainite by electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, G.; Takayama, N.; Furuhara, T.

    2009-01-01

    A new method to determine the orientation relationship between martensite and bainite with the parent austenite is developed based on electron backscatter diffraction analysis. This method can determine the orientation relationship accurately without the presence of retained austenite, and is applicable to lath martensite and bainite in low-alloyed carbon steels. The angles between close-packed directions are about 3 o for lath martensite regardless of the carbon content, while the angles between close-packed planes become smaller with increasing carbon content.

  6. Novel radio-frequency gun structures for ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Faillace, L; Fukasawa, A; Moody, J T; O'Shea, B; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M

    2009-08-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) photoinjector-based relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising new technique that has the potential to probe structural changes at the atomic scale with sub-100 fs temporal resolution in a single shot. We analyze the limitations on the temporal and spatial resolution of this technique considering the operating parameters of a standard 1.6 cell RF gun (which is the RF photoinjector used for the first experimental tests of relativistic UED at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; University of California, Los Angeles; Brookhaven National Laboratory), and study the possibility of employing novel RF structures to circumvent some of these limits.

  7. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, T.M.; Rooyen, I.J. van; Wu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC grain orientation determined by TEM-based precession electron diffraction. • Orientation data improved with increasing TEM sample thickness. • Fraction of low angle grain boundaries lower from PED data than EBSD data. • Fractions of high angle and CSL-related boundaries similar to EBSD data. - Abstract: Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. This work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on the quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison to SiC grain boundary characteristics, in an unirradiated TRISO particle, determined previously using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication process (∼80 nm), is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements, although thicker lamellae (∼120 nm) were found to produce higher quality orientation data. Also, analysis of SiC grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low-angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of a TRISO-coated particle made using the same fabrication parameters and a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature from a surrogate TRISO particle. However, the fractions of high-angle and coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm (Kirchhofer et al., 2013), depending on the fabrication parameters, and since grain boundary fission product precipitates in irradiated TRISO fuel can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data

  8. Understanding deformation with high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, T. B.; Hickey, J. L. R.

    2018-01-01

    High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) affords an increase in angular resolution, as compared to ‘conventional’ Hough transform based EBSD, of two orders of magnitude, enabling measurements of relative misorientations of 1 x 10-4 rads (~ 0.006°) and changes in (deviatoric) lattice strain with a precision of 1 x 10-4. This is achieved through direct comparison of two or more diffraction patterns using sophisticated cross-correlation based image analysis routines. Image shifts between zone axes in the two-correlated diffraction pattern are measured with sub-pixel precision and this realises the ability to measure changes in interplanar angles and lattice orientation with a high degree of sensitivity. These shifts are linked to strains and lattice rotations through simple geometry. In this manuscript, we outline the basis of the technique and two case studies that highlight its potential to tackle real materials science challenges, such as deformation patterning in polycrystalline alloys.

  9. Towards a full retrieval of the deformation tensor F using convergent beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Y. [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Rouviere, J.L., E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.fr [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zuo, J.M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Favre-Nicolin, V. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-01-15

    A new method to retrieve the local lattice parameters and rotations in a crystal from off-axis convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented and validated using Bloch wave dynamical simulations. The originality of the method is to use both the diffracted and transmitted beams and to use kinematical approximations in the fitting algorithm. The study is based on the deformation gradient tensor F which includes rotation and strain. Working on simulated images it is shown that (i) from a single direction of observation, seven parameters out of the nine parameters of F can be determined with an accuracy of 3×10{sup −4} for the normal strain parameters ε{sub xx}, ε{sub yy}, and ε{sub zz}, (ii) the unit cell volume can only be retrieved if the diffracted and transmitted beams are both included in the fitting and (iii) all the nine parameters of F can be determined by combining two directions of observation separated by about 20°. - Highlights: • New CBED strain retrieval method using both deficient and excess HOLZ lines. • From a single CBED pattern, the unit cell volume can be measured without ambiguity. • From a single pattern, seven parameters of the deformation tensor F can be determined. • From two patterns from two directions separated by 20°, the nine parameters are retrieved. • Algorithm validated using dynamical simulations.

  10. Spatially resolved determination of lattice distortions in silicon nanostructures by means of electron-backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the submitted thesis, a novel combined approach of both focused ion beam (FIB) based target preparation and strain determination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in semiconductor nanostructures is presented. In the first part, a powerful cross-correlation algorithm for detecting small feature shifts within EBSD patterns and, consequently, determining the strain, is presented. The corresponding strain sensitivity is demonstrated using dynamically simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, novel procedures for automated pattern analysis are introduced. Results of systematic studies concerning the influence of ion species, ion energy and dose density on the surface quality of silicon surfaces are presented in the second part. For that matter, the assessment of surface amorphization and rippling is based on high resolution microstructural diagnostics (TEM, AFM, Raman) and molecular dynamics simulation. The high application potential of combined FIB preparation and strain analysis using EBSD is exemplarily demonstrated for a 60 nm thick sSOI-sample. The good agreement with established techniques like Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction is also shown.

  11. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  12. Electron backscatter diffraction as a useful method for alloys microstructure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimek, Leszek; Pietrzyk, Bozena

    2004-11-17

    Microstructure examination of cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy is presented in this paper. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the alloy were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). An identification of alloy phases was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Two different kinds of precipitates in metallic matrix were found. They were identified as MC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type of carbides in Co-lattice solid solution. The advantages and limits of the EBSD method are described. It is presented that EBSD, as excellent tool for phase identification, is a valuable supplementary method for materials research.

  13. First measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure by autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Rule, D W

    2001-01-01

    We report the initial measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure using a nonintercepting technique based on the autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). A far infrared (FIR) Michelson interferometer with a Golay detector was used to obtain the autocorrelation. The radiation was generated by a thermionic rf gun beam at 40 MeV as it passed through a 5-mm-tall slit/aperture in a metal screen whose surface was at 45 deg. to the beam direction. For the observed bunch lengths of about 450 fs (FWHM) with a shorter time spike on the leading edge, peak currents of about 100 A are indicated. Also a model was developed and used to calculate the CDR from the back of two metal strips separated by a 5-mm vertical gap. The demonstrated nonintercepting aspect of this method could allow on-line bunch length characterizations to be done during free-electron laser experiments.

  14. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  15. Surface structure of VN0.89(100) determined by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Y.; Joly, Y.; Rundgren, J.; Johansson, L.I.; Wincott, P.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the (100) surface of substoichiometric vanadium nitride was studied by low-energy electron diffraction on a VN 0.89 (100) sample. A simple 1x1 (100) diffractogram was observed. To describe the electron scattering in substoichiometric VN we apply the averaged t-matrix approximation to the nitrogen atoms. We find that the best structural model is one having no nitrogen vacancies in the surface region. It turns out that the first layer is rippled with the N atoms displaced 0.17 A above the subplane of V atoms, that the spacing between this subplane and the second layer is 1.92 A, and that the spacing between the second and the third layer is 2.08 A. In relation to the (100) spacing of the bulk, 2.06 A, these spacings are 6.8% contracted and 1% expanded, respectively. The Debye temperature of VN is found to be 660 K in good agreement with a prediction from entropy data and from neutron diffraction and helium-ion channeling experiments

  16. ESCA and electron diffraction studies of InP surface heated under As molecular beam exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Shibukawa, Atsushi

    1983-01-01

    Chemical composition of InP substrate surface heattreated under As molecular beam exposure in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber was studied with ESCA, and surface reconstruction of the substrate was examined by in-situ electron diffraction. The InP substrate heated under the exposure of As molecular beam has mirror surface up to 590 0 C while the surface of InP heated above 400 0 C in vacuum is roughened. The ESCA study shows that thin InAs layer (thickness 0 C under the exposure of As. The electron diffraction study indicates that the InP is cleaned at about 500 0 C in As pressures of 10 -7 - 10 -5 Torr. The InP surface is prevented from thermally decomposing by the coverage of the InAs layer, which may be formed through the following process: 2InPO 4 + As 4 → 2InAs + P 2 O 5 + As 2 O 3 . (author)

  17. First indication of the coherent unipolar diffraction radiation generated by relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Shevelev, M.

    2018-05-01

    As is generally known, the integral of the electric field strength over all time for usual (bipolar) radiation is zero. The first demonstration of the possibility of unipolar radiation generation has been considered theoretically by Bessonov in 1981 [E.G. Bessonov, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 80 (1981) 852]. According to this work, the unipolar radiation (or strange electromagnetic waves) is radiation for which the integral of the electric field strength over the entire duration of a pulse differs significantly from zero. Later, several theoretical papers devoted to this phenomenon have appeared in the literature, where authors investigated mainly synchrotron radiation. However, despite the critical interest, the experimental investigations ignored this effect. In this paper we present results of the first experimental investigation of the unipolar radiation generated by a relativistic electron beam. To detect the unipolar radiation the detector that is sensitive to the selected direction of the electric field strength has been elaborated and tested. We used a designed detector to observe the coherent backward diffraction radiation appearing when a bunched electron beam travels in the vicinity of a flat conductive target. The asymmetry of the electric field strength of the coherent backward diffraction radiation has been demonstrated.

  18. 'Diffraction-free' optical beams in inverse free electron laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Marshall, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    'Diffraction-free' optical beams correspond to exact solutions of the wave equation in free space with the remarkable property that they propagate with negligible transverse spreading for distances much larger than the Rayleigh range. The requirement for this to occur is a large aperture. Using a 2D computer code, we find that these optical beams will also propagate with negligible diffraction even when perturbed by the electron beam in an IFEL; indeed they match well the FEL requirement for the accelerator. The numerical simulations are performed for the proposed facility at Brookhaven in which λ s =10 μm, B=1.5 T (linearly tapered l w =1.31-6.28 cm) and the optical beam power is either 8x10 11 W or 2.3x10 10 W. Approximately 70% of the electrons constituting a beam of current 5 mA or 15 A, radius 0.14 mm and initial energy of 50 MeV is accelerated at 50 MeV/m. (orig.)

  19. Direct observation of the formation of silver precipitations by means of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, V.; Ostwald, R.; Weil, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    Thin films (20-1,000 A) of copper (I)-, silver, and lead(II)-halides were prepared by evaporation onto silver (III), gold (III), and PbTe (III)-surfaces. These films were irradiated in vacuo with 40 kV-electrons, in some cases also with the light of a Xenon-lamp. At the same time the diffraction pattern, produced by the electron beam at glancing incidence, was observed and registered photographically. Silver precipitates could be detected by their diffraction pattern, when the crystallites had grown to a size of about 50 A. From all materials investigated silveriodide showed maximum sensitivity. The precipitates formed show no orientation with respect to the host crystal. From the temperature dependence of the sensitivity an activation energy of 0.12 eV can be deduced leading to interstitial ion migration as rate determining step. Pure silverchloride can not been radiolyzed by 40 kV-electrons. After doping it with 0.3 mol% CaCl 2 or MgCl 2 it becomes very sensitive. The precipitate showes orientation with respect to the host lattice. Also pure CuJ is resistant against the electron beam. Mixed crystals (Ag, Cu)J with xsub(AgJ) > 0.5 behave similar as pure AgJ. Pb(II)-halides show no sensitivity, but the compounds AgBr x 2 PbBr 2 and 5 AgJ x PbJ 2 are readily radiolyzed, forming polycrystalline silver precipitates. The mechanism of radiolysis, its dependency on temperature and film thickness is discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Real-time visualization of the vibrational wavepacket dynamics in electronically excited pyrimidine via femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Long, Jinyou; Ling, Fengzi; Wang, Yanmei; Song, Xinli; Zhang, Song; Zhang, Bing

    2017-07-01

    The vibrational wavepacket dynamics at the very early stages of the S1-T1 intersystem crossing in photoexcited pyrimidine is visualized in real time by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging and time-resolved mass spectroscopy. A coherent superposition of the vibrational states is prepared by the femtosecond pump pulse at 315.3 nm, resulting in a vibrational wavepacket. The composition of the prepared wavepacket is directly identified by a sustained quantum beat superimposed on the parent-ion transient, possessing a frequency in accord with the energy separation between the 6a1 and 6b2 states. The dephasing time of the vibrational wavepacket is determined to be 82 ps. More importantly, the variable Franck-Condon factors between the wavepacket components and the dispersed cation vibrational levels are experimentally illustrated to identify the dark state and follow the energy-flow dynamics on the femtosecond time scale. The time-dependent intensities of the photoelectron peaks originated from the 6a1 vibrational state exhibit a clear quantum beating pattern with similar periodicity but a phase shift of π rad with respect to those from the 6b2 state, offering an unambiguous picture of the restricted intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution dynamics in the 6a1/6b2 Fermi resonance.

  1. Nanoflow electrospinning serial femtosecond crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alonso-Mori, Roberto [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia [Technische Universität Berlin, Strasse des 17 Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Schafer, Donald W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Echols, Nathaniel; Gildea, Richard J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sellberg, Jonas [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); McQueen, Trevor A. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025 (United States); Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Hampton, Christina Y.; Starodub, Dmitri; Loh, N. Duane; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Zwart, Petrus H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Glatzel, Pieter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Milathianaki, Despina; White, William E. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Zouni, Athina [Technische Universität Berlin, Strasse des 17 Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Messinger, Johannes [Umeå Universitet, Umeå (Sweden); Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bergmann, Uwe [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bogan, Michael J., E-mail: mbogan@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    A low flow rate liquid microjet method for delivery of hydrated protein crystals to X-ray lasers is presented. Linac Coherent Light Source data demonstrates serial femtosecond protein crystallography with micrograms, a reduction of sample consumption by orders of magnitude. An electrospun liquid microjet has been developed that delivers protein microcrystal suspensions at flow rates of 0.14–3.1 µl min{sup −1} to perform serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies with X-ray lasers. Thermolysin microcrystals flowed at 0.17 µl min{sup −1} and diffracted to beyond 4 Å resolution, producing 14 000 indexable diffraction patterns, or four per second, from 140 µg of protein. Nanoflow electrospinning extends SFX to biological samples that necessitate minimal sample consumption.

  2. Nanoflow electrospinning serial femtosecond crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Kern, Jan; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Schafer, Donald W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Gildea, Richard J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Sellberg, Jonas; McQueen, Trevor A.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Hampton, Christina Y.; Starodub, Dmitri; Loh, N. Duane; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Glatzel, Pieter; Milathianaki, Despina; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A low flow rate liquid microjet method for delivery of hydrated protein crystals to X-ray lasers is presented. Linac Coherent Light Source data demonstrates serial femtosecond protein crystallography with micrograms, a reduction of sample consumption by orders of magnitude. An electrospun liquid microjet has been developed that delivers protein microcrystal suspensions at flow rates of 0.14–3.1 µl min −1 to perform serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies with X-ray lasers. Thermolysin microcrystals flowed at 0.17 µl min −1 and diffracted to beyond 4 Å resolution, producing 14 000 indexable diffraction patterns, or four per second, from 140 µg of protein. Nanoflow electrospinning extends SFX to biological samples that necessitate minimal sample consumption

  3. Analytical Electron Diffraction from Iii-V and II-Vi Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellward, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a number of new TEM-based techniques for the measurement of composition in ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. New methods of polarity determination in binary and ternary compounds are also presented. The theory of high energy electron diffraction is outlined, with particular emphasis on zone axis diffraction from well-defined strings. An account of TEM microstructural studies of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te and CdTe epitaxial layers, which provided the impetus for developing the diffraction-based analytical techniques, is given. The wide range of TEM-based compositional determination techniques is described. The use of HOLZ deficiency lines to infer composition from a lattice parameter measurement is evaluated. In the case of Cd_{ rm x}Hg_{rm 1-x}Te, it is found to be inferior to other techniques developed. Studies of dynamical aspects of HOLZ diffraction can yield information about the dispersion surface from which a measure of composition may be obtained. This technique is evaluated for Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As, in which it is found to be of some use, and for Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te, in which the large Debye-Waller factor associated with mercury in discovered to render the method of little value. A number of critical voltages may be measured in medium voltage TEMs. The (111) zone axis critical voltage of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te is found to vary significantly with x and forms the basis of an accurate technique for composition measurement in that ternary compound. Other critical voltage phenomena are investigated. In Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As and other light ternaries, a non-systematic critical voltage is found to vary with x, providing a good indicator of composition. Critical voltage measurements may be made by conventional CBED or by various other techniques, which may also simultaneously yield information on the spatial variation of composition. The

  4. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital MicrographTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.

    2008-01-01

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph TM has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet

  5. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital Micrograph{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au

    2008-03-15

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph{sup TM} has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet.

  6. Comparison of a simulated velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer with measurements obtained by Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    New-Tolley, Matthew; Zhang, Yibin; Shneider, Mikhail; Miles, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Accurate velocimetry measurements of turbulent flows are essential for improving our understanding of turbulent phenomena and validating numerical approaches. Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) is an unseeded molecular tagging method for velocimetry measurements in flows which contain nitrogen. A femtosecond laser pulse is used to ionize and dissociate nitrogen molecules within its focal zone. The decaying plasma fluoresces in the visible and infrared spectrum over a period of microseconds which allows the displacement of the tagged region to be photographed to determine velocity. This study compares the experimental and numerical advection of the tagged region in a turbulent boundary layer generated by a supersonic flow over a flat plate. The tagged region in the simulation is approximated as an infinitely thin cylinder while the flow field is generated using the steady state boundary layer equations with an algebraic turbulence model. This approximation is justified by previous computational analyses, using an unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver, which indicate that the radial perturbations of the tagged region are negligible compared to its translation. This research was conducted with government support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Dr. Ivett Leyva and the Army Research Office under Dr. Matthew Munson.

  7. Electron microscopy and diffraction of ordering in Ni-W alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopy and diffraction studies of ordering in stoichiometric Ni-20%W and off-stoichiometric Ni-15%W alloys have been carried out. The specimens of Ni-20%W were first 1,398 K for 4 h and then quenched rapidly into water. Short range order (SRO) spots were observed at {1 1/2 0}* positions. Two hitherto unknown metastable phases: D 2h 25 -Ni 2 W and D0 22 -Ni 3 W were observed in the diffraction patterns. Long range order (LRO) transformations were studied at 1,103 and 1,213 K. Kinetics and mechanism of transformations have been identified. Ni-15%W specimens were solution treated at 1,523 K for 1 h followed by quenching in water. SRO spots similar to those found in Ni-20%W were observed in this alloy as well. The transition to LRO was studied at 1,093 K. Distinct Ni 4 W precipitates could be observed after 5 h of annealing at this temperature. After 100 h of annealing precipitates were found to grow into faceted shape coherent with the disordered matrix. After prolonged annealing for over 150 h the Ni 4 W precipitates began to lose coherency by the generation of misfit dislocations. The microstructural observations have been compared for the stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric alloys

  8. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L{sub 2,3}-edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 4} and charge and orbital order in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  9. A deep convolutional neural network to analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; LeBeau, J M

    2018-05-01

    We establish a series of deep convolutional neural networks to automatically analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns. The networks first calibrate the zero-order disk size, center position, and rotation without the need for pretreating the data. With the aligned data, additional networks then measure the sample thickness and tilt. The performance of the network is explored as a function of a variety of variables including thickness, tilt, and dose. A methodology to explore the response of the neural network to various pattern features is also presented. Processing patterns at a rate of  ∼ 0.1 s/pattern, the network is shown to be orders of magnitude faster than a brute force method while maintaining accuracy. The approach is thus suitable for automatically processing big, 4D STEM data. We also discuss the generality of the method to other materials/orientations as well as a hybrid approach that combines the features of the neural network with least squares fitting for even more robust analysis. The source code is available at https://github.com/subangstrom/DeepDiffraction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L 2,3 -edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La 1.8 Sr 0.2 NiO 4 and charge and orbital order in Fe 3 O 4 . The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  11. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... with CBED and NBED [4,5] have shown a high degree of consistency. Strain has previously only been measured in nanowires removed from their substrate [6], or only using GPA [7]. The sample used for the present investigation was an InP nanowire grown on a Si substrate using metal organic vapor phase...

  12. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremen, R. van; Ribas Gomes, D.; Jeer, L.T.H. de; Ocelík, V., E-mail: v.ocelik@rug.nl; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-15

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles. - Highlights: • Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting resolution of t-EBSD are determined and characterized. • Distinction between resolutions of transmitted and detected electrons is determined. • The simulated results are confirmed experimentally on 140 nm thick AuAg foil.

  13. Some possibilities of the slow electron diffraction method when studying film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanova, T.S.; Tumareva, T.A.; Kiseleva, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A film structure of an initial thickness was studied with film probing in depth by an electron beam; for this purpose energy of incident electrons changed in sufficient wide ranges. Barium oxide films of 6-10 monolayer thickness deposited on a monocrystal (110) W have been chosen for the investigation. The structure was detected in a certain temperature range (850-1250 K) and the maximum development, the largest energy range fit approximatly 1000-1100 K temperature. Optimal temperature increases slightly with increasing an initial film thickness. The investigations carried on have shown that the structure of barium oxide films is heterogeneous in the layer thickness. This is concerned espicially the films of 6-10 monolayers. Notwithstanding the thickness trifle, the ''surface'' which structure was different from a region immediately adjacent to a substrate may be separated in films of this area. The method of the investigation in layers, i. e. the method for observing the film structure when varying incident electron energy permitted to establish that an absolute by certain structure of the layer adjacent to a substrate corresponds to each structure of the surface layer. In turn the structures of the layer adjacent to a substrate for the total film thickness of 6-10 monolayers turn out to be similar to the structures of 2-5 monolayer film, anyhow these structures are described with similar diffraction pictures

  14. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Ch; Spiecker, E; Morniroli, J P; Jaeger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess {110}-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages of the LACBED method consist in the possibility of determining the complete Burgers vector of the dislocation loops and of an unambiguous and fast loop type analysis

  15. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Laszlo S.; Biswas, Somjeet; Gu, Chengfan; Beausir, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined

  16. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorset, Douglas L. [Electron Diffraction Department, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1999-06-07

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of 'bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene. (author)

  17. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1999-06-01

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of `bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene.

  18. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  19. Phase mapping of iron-based rapidly quenched alloys using precession electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, P.; Janotova, I.; Hosko, J.; Matko, I.; Janickovic, D.; Svec, P. Sr.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on application of PED and phase/orientation mapping of nanocrystals of bcc-Fe formed during the first crystallization stage of amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B ribbon. Using precession electron diffraction and phase/orientation mapping the formation of primary crystalline phase, bcc-Fe, from amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B has been analyzed. Important information about mutual orientation of the phase in individual submicron grains as well as against the sample surface has been obtained. This information contributes to the understanding of micromechanisms controlling crystallization from amorphous rapidly quenched structure and of the structure of the original amorphous state. The presented technique due to its high spatial resolution, speed and information content provided complements well classical techniques, especially in nanocrystalline materials. (authors)

  20. Precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy from scanning precession electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, J. K.; Paulsen, Ø.; Wenner, S.; Holmestad, R.

    2017-09-01

    The key microstructural feature providing strength to age-hardenable Al alloys is nanoscale precipitates. Alloy development requires a reliable statistical assessment of these precipitates, in order to link the microstructure with material properties. Here, it is demonstrated that scanning precession electron diffraction combined with computational analysis enable the semi-automated extraction of precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy. Among the main findings is the precipitate number density, which agrees well with a conventional method based on manual counting and measurements. By virtue of its data analysis objectivity, our methodology is therefore seen as an advantageous alternative to existing routines, offering reproducibility and efficiency in alloy statistics. Additional results include improved qualitative information on phase distributions. The developed procedure is generic and applicable to any material containing nanoscale precipitates.

  1. Study of electron-beam-evaporated MgO films using electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelfotoh, M.O.; Ramsey, J.N.

    1982-05-21

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence were used to study MgO films deposited onto fused silica, single-crystal silicon and LiF substrates at various temperatures. Results showed that some of the same optical absorption and emission bands observed in X- or UV-irradiated, additively colored or mechanically deformed MgO crystals were observed in evaporated MgO films. The peak positions and the relative peak intensities of the optical absorption and emission bands depended on the substrate temperature during film deposition as well as on the structure of the film. The effect of heating the films in air and vacuum on the optical absorption and emission bands is also discussed.

  2. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-01-01

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse

  3. Initial microstructural study of a Ce-La alloy using electron backscattered diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Thomas B.; Younes, Charles M.; Ling, Michael; Jones, Christopher P.; Nicholson, John A.; Heard, Peter J.; Jenkins, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → First ever successful EBSD microstructural analysis of Ce-La alloy. → Successful preparation using electro-polishing in the open laboratory. → Equiaxed grains 20-40 μm in size dominate the microstructure, with random orientations, relatively straight grain boundary contacts and no evidence for crystal twinning. → All grains matched to a fcc γ-phase. → Problematic presence of entrapped oxide particles. - Abstract: To better understand and exploit the unique electronic and structural properties of f-block metals and their alloys it is perceived that an improved knowledge of the microstructural characteristics and phase changes as a function of temperature and pressure, is necessary. For other different types of metallic systems, the use of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) is becoming a common practice in order to obtain detailed microstructural information, but this has, as yet, been very limited in case of f-block metals. Because of their extreme affinity to oxygen and rapid surface reaction, EBSD studies of this metal-category are very sparse with only one work published on cerium metal providing an example of technical hurdles for a prerequisite oxide-free metal surface. Specifically the need to remove the oxide by ion etching was considered essential to enable a successful EBSD analysis. The current work presents the results of a first attempt to characterise the microstructure of a Ce-La alloy using EBSD. It demonstrates that high quality diffraction patterns and crystal orientation maps can be successfully obtained following a carefully controlled preparation of the alloy surface in the open laboratory by applying a simple and reproducible electro-polishing procedure without a further need for ion etching in vaccuo.

  4. Contrast of HOLZ lines in energy-filtered convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmpfuhl, G.; Krahl, D.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Higher-order Laue-zone (HOLZ) lines were investigated in convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon near the low-indexed zone axes [100], [110] and [111]. The visibility of these lines depends on the effective structure potentials of the reflections from the first Laue zone depending on their Debye-Waller factor. The contrast of the HOLZ lines is strongly reduced by inelastically scattered electrons. They can be excluded by an imaging Ω filter for energy losses above 2 eV. The diffraction patterns were compared with many-beam calculations. Without absorption, an excellent agreement could be achieved for the [111] and [100] zone axes, while the simulation of the [110] zone-axis pattern needed a calculation with absorption. The reason for this observation is explained in the Bloch-wave picture. Calculations with absorption, however, lead to artefacts in the intensity distribution of the [100] HOLZ pattern. In order to obtain agreement with the experiment, the Debye-Waller factor had to be modified in different ways for the different zone axes. This corresponds to a strong anisotropy of the Debye-Waller factor. To confirm this observation, the temperature dependence of the itensity distributions of the HOLZ patterns was investigated between 50 and 680 K. At room temperature, the parameter D in the Debye-Waller factor exp(-Ds 2 ) was determined as 0.13, 0.26 and 0.55 A 2 for the zone axes [100], [111] and [110], respectively. The reliability of the conclusions is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Nanoflow electrospinning serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Kern, Jan; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Schafer, Donald W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Gildea, Richard J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Sellberg, Jonas; McQueen, Trevor A.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Hampton, Christina Y.; Starodub, Dmitri; Loh, N. Duane; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Glatzel, Pieter; Milathianaki, Despina; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    An electrospun liquid microjet has been developed that delivers protein microcrystal suspensions at flow rates of 0.14–3.1 µl min−1 to perform serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies with X-ray lasers. Thermolysin microcrystals flowed at 0.17 µl min−1 and diffracted to beyond 4 Å resolution, producing 14 000 indexable diffraction patterns, or four per second, from 140 µg of protein. Nanoflow electrospinning extends SFX to biological samples that necessitate minimal sample consumption. PMID:23090408

  6. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  8. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  9. Multiobjective optimization design of an rf gun based electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line comprised of a 100  MV/m 1.6-cell normal conducting rf (NCRF gun, as well as a nine-cell 2π/3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids, have been performed. These include optimization of the normalized transverse emittance as a function of bunch charge, as well as optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of the rms bunch length of the beam at the sample location for a fixed charge of 10^{6} electrons. Analysis of the resulting solutions is discussed in terms of the relevant scaling laws, and a detailed description of one of the resulting solutions from the coherence length optimizations is given. For a charge of 10^{6} electrons and final beam sizes of σ_{x}≥25  μm and σ_{t}≈5  fs, we found a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.07 using direct optimization of the coherence length. Additionally, based on optimizations of the emittance as a function of final bunch length, we estimate the relative coherence length for bunch lengths of 30 and 100 fs to be roughly 0.1 and 0.2  nm/μm, respectively. Finally, using the scaling of the optimal emittance with bunch charge, for a charge of 10^{5} electrons, we estimate relative coherence lengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.92  nm/μm for final bunch lengths of 5, 30 and 100 fs, respectively.

  10. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  11. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Bender, H A; Wilcox, N S

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  12. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S.; Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  13. Electron diffraction analysis of an AB{sub 2}-type Laves phase for hydrogen battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Chumbley, S.; Laabs, F.C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.

    2000-11-16

    A multicomponent AB{sub 2} type nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery alloy prepared by high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in both the as-atomized and heat treated condition. TEM examination showed a heavily faulted dendritic growth structure in as-atomized powder. Selected area diffraction (SAD) showed that this region consisted of both a cubic C15 structure with lattice constant a=7.03 A and an hexagonal C14 structure with lattice parameter a=4.97 A, c=8.11 A. The orientation relationship (OR) between the C14 and C15 structures was determined to be (111)[1 anti 10]{sub C15}//(0001)[11 anti 20]C{sub 14}. An interdendritic phase possessing the C14 structure was also seen. There was also a very fine grain region consisting of the C14 structure. Upon heat treatment, the faulted structure became more defined and appeared as intercalation layers within the grains. Spherical particles rich in Zr and Ni appeared scattered at the grain boundries instead of the C14 interdendritic phase. The polycrystalline region also changed to a mixture of C14 and C15 structures. The phase stability of the C15 and C14 structures based on a consideration of atomic size factor and the average electron concentration is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Identification of phases in zinc alloy powders using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Martin G. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kenik, Edward A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 100 Bethel Valley Rd., Bldg. 4515, MS-6064, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)]. E-mail: mjokeefe@umr.edu; Miller, F. Scott [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Johnson, Benedict [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used for the structural characterization of phases in Zn alloy powders. Commercial Zn alloy powders contained additions of <1000 ppm of Bi, In, Al or Mg. Bismuth and In have extremely low solubility in Zn and form intermetallic Bi-In compounds which segregate to the Zn grain boundaries. The Bi-In phases were <0.3 {mu}m in size, had low melting points, and were not abundant enough for EBSD analysis. Increasing the alloying additions 20-40-fold resulted in Bi-In phases >1 {mu}m that could be used for EBSD analysis for phase characterization. Deformation-free microstructures were obtained by mechanical polishing and ion milling. The Zn matrix was characterized as Zn via EBSD. A BiIn{sub 2} phase was identified in the powder microstructures via EBSD. An In phase with 8-9 wt.% Bi was identified using low voltage energy dispersive spectroscopy and closely matched the composition predicted by the Bi-In phase diagram.

  15. A preliminary electron backscattered diffraction study of sintered NdFeB-type magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, S J; Williams, A J; Davies, B E; Harris, I R

    2002-03-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study orientation in sintered NdFeB type magnets. The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are greatly improved if a strong crystallographic texture is firstly achieved, namely, the direction of the c-axis is along the direction of magnetization. A systematic survey of sample preparation techniques showed that samples that were mechanically polished and then etched gave the most reliable EBSD data. Analyses were made using both fully automated EBSD scans and by EBSD measurements taken after manual movement of the beam. The EBSD results are presented as secondary electron SEM micrographs, orientation images and 001 pole figures. For the selection of grains investigated, the deviation of the c-axis was shown to be between 10 degrees and 30 degrees from the ideal [001]//magnetization direction. It is demonstrated that EBSD is a valuable tool for characterizing the microstructure and texture relationships and for assessing the performance of the processing routes of NdFeB magnets.

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction applied to lithium sheets prepared by broad ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Zaghib, Karim; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Due to its very low hardness and atomic number, pure lithium cannot be prepared by conventional methods prior to scanning electron microscopy analysis. Here, we report on the characterization of pure lithium metallic sheets used as base electrodes in the lithium-ion battery technology using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray microanalysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after the sheet surface was polished by broad argon ion milling (IM). No grinding and polishing were necessary to achieve the sufficiently damage free necessary for surface analysis. Based on EDS results the impurities could be characterized and EBSD revealed the microsctructure and microtexture of this material with accuracy. The beam damage and oxidation/hydration resulting from the intensive use of IM and the transfer of the sample into the microscope chamber was estimated to be effect on the surface temperature. However, a cryo-stage should be used if available during milling to guaranty a heating artefact free surface after the milling process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain); Castro, L.; Diego, G. de [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  18. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; Diego, G. de

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  19. Protein structure determination by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing of X-ray free-electron laser data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Nass

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs offers unprecedented possibilities for macromolecular structure determination of systems that are prone to radiation damage. However, phasing XFEL data de novo is complicated by the inherent inaccuracy of SFX data, and only a few successful examples, mostly based on exceedingly strong anomalous or isomorphous difference signals, have been reported. Here, it is shown that SFX data from thaumatin microcrystals can be successfully phased using only the weak anomalous scattering from the endogenous S atoms. Moreover, a step-by-step investigation is presented of the particular problems of SAD phasing of SFX data, analysing data from a derivative with a strong anomalous signal as well as the weak signal from endogenous S atoms.

  20. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  1. Double and triple crystal diffraction investigation on ion implanted and electron beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servidori, M.; Cembali, F.; Winter, U.; Zaumseil, P.; Richter, H.

    1985-01-01

    Double (DCD) and triple crystal (TCD) diffractometry was used to investigate radiation damage produced in silicon by silicon bombardment and its evolution after electron beam annealing. The implantation processes were carried out at 60 keV energy and at doses of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 200 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . As to the annealing treatments, an electron gun was used, operating in the ranges 7.5 to 24 W/cm 2 and 2 to 20 seconds. DCD rocking curves were analyzed by means of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The formalism introduced by Taupin was used to simulate the experimental intensity profiles. From the resulting best fits, the lattice strain vs. depth profiles were obtained, indicating an increase of the damage with dose for the as-implanted samples up to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 dose, whereas amorphous layers are produced for the higher doses. After annealing, lowering of the residual strain was observed to be directly proportional to the implanted dose. In particular, a complete recovery of the damage occurred for the 0.5 and 1 x 10 13 cm -2 samples. The results obtained by the fitting procedure were substantially independent from the power densities and times used during electron beam irradiation. TCD as a very sensitive method to investigate lattice defects after implantation was used to obtain information about the crystallographic perfection of the surface layer. The absence of diffuse scattering indicates that the annealed layers do not contain microdefects within the detection limits. (author)

  2. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-15

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 {mu}m) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 {mu}m). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  3. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 μm) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 μm). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  4. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  5. Characterizing deformed ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimby, Patrick W.; Cao, Yang; Chen, Zibin; Han, Shuang; Hemker, Kevin J.; Lian, Jianshe; Liao, Xiaozhou; Rottmann, Paul; Samudrala, Saritha; Sun, Jingli; Wang, Jing Tao; Wheeler, John; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: The recent development of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in a scanning electron microscope enables fast, automated orientation mapping of electron transparent samples using standard electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) hardware. TKD in a scanning electron microscope has significantly better spatial resolution than conventional EBSD, enabling routine characterization of nanocrystalline materials and allowing effective measurement of samples that have undergone severe plastic deformation. Combining TKD with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides complementary chemical information, while a standard forescatter detector system below the EBSD detector can be used to generate dark field and oriented dark field images. Here we illustrate the application of this exciting new approach to a range of deformed, ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline samples, including duplex stainless steel, nanocrystalline copper and highly deformed titanium and nickel–cobalt. The results show that TKD combined with EDS is a highly effective and widely accessible tool for measuring key microstructural parameters at resolutions that are inaccessible using conventional EBSD

  6. Strong-Field Modulated Diffraction Effects in the Correlated Electron-Nuclear Motion in Dissociating H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Feng; Becker, Andreas; Thumm, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    We show that the electronic dynamics in a molecule driven by a strong field is complex and potentially even counterintuitive. As a prototype example, we simulate the interaction of a dissociating H 2 + molecule with an intense infrared laser pulse. Depending on the laser intensity, the direction of the electron's motion between the two nuclei is found to follow or oppose the classical laser-electric force. We explain the sensitive dependence of the correlated electronic-nuclear motion in terms of the diffracting electronic momentum distribution of the dissociating two-center system. The distribution is dynamically modulated by the nuclear motion and periodically shifted in the oscillating infrared electric field

  7. Femtosecond-laser induced dynamics of CO on Ru(0001): Deep insights from a hot-electron friction model including surface motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Robert; Floß, Gereon; Saalfrank, Peter; Füchsel, Gernot; Lončarić, Ivor; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin model accounting for all six molecular degrees of freedom is applied to femtosecond-laser induced, hot-electron driven dynamics of Ru(0001)(2 ×2 ):CO. In our molecular dynamics with electronic friction approach, a recently developed potential energy surface based on gradient-corrected density functional theory accounting for van der Waals interactions is adopted. Electronic friction due to the coupling of molecular degrees of freedom to electron-hole pairs in the metal are included via a local density friction approximation, and surface phonons by a generalized Langevin oscillator model. The action of ultrashort laser pulses enters through a substrate-mediated, hot-electron mechanism via a time-dependent electronic temperature (derived from a two-temperature model), causing random forces acting on the molecule. The model is applied to laser induced lateral diffusion of CO on the surface, "hot adsorbate" formation, and laser induced desorption. Reaction probabilities are strongly enhanced compared to purely thermal processes, both for diffusion and desorption. Reaction yields depend in a characteristic (nonlinear) fashion on the applied laser fluence, as well as branching ratios for various reaction channels. Computed two-pulse correlation traces for desorption and other indicators suggest that aside from electron-hole pairs, phonons play a non-negligible role for laser induced dynamics in this system, acting on a surprisingly short time scale. Our simulations on precomputed potentials allow for good statistics and the treatment of long-time dynamics (300 ps), giving insight into this system which hitherto has not been reached. We find generally good agreement with experimental data where available and make predictions in addition. A recently proposed laser induced population of physisorbed precursor states could not be observed with the present low-coverage model.

  8. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  9. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  10. In situ electron backscatter diffraction investigation of recrystallization in a copper wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure; Baudin, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of a cold drawn copper wire (reduction area of 38%) during primary recrystallization and grain growth was observed in situ by electron backscatter diffraction. Two thermal treatments were performed, and successive scans were acquired on samples undergoing heating from ambient temperature to a steady state of 200°C or 215°C. During a third in situ annealing, the temperature was continuously increased up to 600°C. Nuclei were observed to grow at the expense of the deformed microstructure. This growth was enhanced by the high stored energy difference between the nuclei and their neighbors (driving energy in recrystallization) and by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries of high mobility. In the early stages of growth, the nuclei twin and the newly created orientations continue to grow to the detriment of the strained copper. At high temperatures, the disappearance of some twins was evidenced by the migration of the incoherent twin boundaries. Thermal grooving of grain boundaries is observed at these high temperatures and affects the high mobile boundaries but tends to preserve the twin boundaries of lower energy. Thus, grooving may contribute to the twin vanishing.

  11. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  12. Structure of ultrathin Pd films determined by low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, B; De la Figuera, J [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Puerta, J M; Cerda, J I [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Herranz, T [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); McCarty, K F [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: benitosantos001@gmail.com

    2010-02-15

    Palladium (Pd) films have been grown and characterized in situ by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and microscopy in two different regimes: ultrathin films 2-6 monolayers (ML) thick on Ru(0001), and {approx}20 ML thick films on both Ru(0001) and W(110). The thinner films are grown at elevated temperature (750 K) and are lattice matched to the Ru(0001) substrate. The thicker films, deposited at room temperature and annealed to 880 K, have a relaxed in-plane lattice spacing. All the films present an fcc stacking sequence as determined by LEED intensity versus energy analysis. In all the films, there is hardly any expansion in the surface-layer interlayer spacing. Two types of twin-related stacking sequences of the Pd layers are found on each substrate. On W(110) the two fcc twin types can occur on a single substrate terrace. On Ru(0001) each substrate terrace has a single twin type and the twin boundaries replicate the substrate steps.

  13. In situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) during the compression of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederberger, C.; Mook, W.M.; Maeder, X.; Michler, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements during compression experiments by a modified nanoindenter on micron-sized single crystal pillars are demonstrated here. The experimental setup and the requirements concerning the compression sample are described in detail. EBSD mappings have been acquired before loading, under load and after unloading for consecutive compression cycles on a focused ion beam (FIB) milled GaAs micropillar. In situ EBSD allows for the determination of crystallographic orientation with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Thereby, it provides highly localized information pertaining to the deformation phenomena such as elastic bending of the micropillar or the formation of deformation twins and plastic orientation gradients due to geometrically necessary dislocations. The most striking features revealed by in situ EBSD are the non-negligible amount of reversible (elastic) bending of the micropillar and the fact that deformation twinning and dislocation glide initiate where the bending is strongest. Due to this high spatial and orientation resolution, in situ EBSD measurements during micromechanical testing are demonstrated to be a promising technique for the investigation of deformation phenomena at the nano- to micro-scale.

  14. Electron backscatter diffraction studies of focused ion beam induced phase transformation in cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.G., E-mail: helen.jones@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd, Claremont House, High St, Lydney GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Cox, D.C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A focused ion beam microscope was used to induce cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in a cobalt alloy, of similar composition to that of the binder phase in a hardmetal, in a controlled manner at 0°, 45° and 80° ion incident angles. The cobalt had an average grain size of ~ 20 μm, allowing multiple orientations to be studied, exposed to a range of doses between 6 × 10{sup 7} and 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/μm{sup 2}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine the original and induced phase orientations, and area fractions, before and after the ion beam exposure. On average, less phase transformation was observed at higher incident angles and after lower ion doses. However there was an orientation effect where grains with an orientation close to (111) planes were most susceptible to phase transformation, and (101) the least, where grains partially and fully transformed at varying ion doses. - Highlights: •Ion-induced phase change in FCC cobalt was observed at multiple incidence angles. •EBSD was used to study the relationship between grain orientation and transformation. •Custom software analysed ion dose and phase change with respect to grain orientation. •A predictive capability of ion-induced phase change in cobalt was enabled.

  15. Sample preparation and study by electronic diffraction of oxidations and fluorinations of some metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auguin, B.

    1963-06-01

    After having recalled that electron diffraction is particularly adapted to the study of thin films and surface layers, notably those forming during corrosions, and recalled some characteristics of this technique (wavelength, interactions with substances, parasite reactions, observation by transmission or reflection, obtained diagrams for polycrystalline and mono-crystalline substances), the author describes how samples are prepared in the case of examinations performed by transmission and by reflection. As fluorination agents are used for the separation of uranium 235 and 238, the second part discusses some works related to the fluorination of metals and alloys, some of them being used in these separation installations. Chlorine trifluoride is generally used and materials are generally oxidised. Thus, the author reports the study of the action of ClF 3 on different oxides. Oxidations of iron, nickel and Monel are addressed, as well as the behaviour of stainless steel. The study of fluorinations of metals (nickel, chromium, copper), alloys (stainless steel, Monel) and oxides is reported. The author finally addresses treatments performed after fluorinations: vacuum heating, action of humid air

  16. Thiobenzamide: Structure of a free molecule as studied by gas electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Inna N.; Putkov, Andrei E.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2018-06-01

    The equilibrium (re) molecular structure of thiobenzamide along with rh1 structure has been determined in gas phase using gas electron-diffraction (GED) at about 127 °C and quantum-chemical calculations (QC). Rovibrational distance corrections to the thermal averaged GED structure have been computed with anharmonic force constants obtained at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. According to the results of GED and QC thiobenzamide exists as mixture of two non-planar enantiomers of C1 symmetry. The selected equilibrium geometrical parameters of thiobenzamide (re, Å and ∠e, deg) are the following: (Cdbnd S) = 1.641(4), (Csbnd N) = 1.352(2), (Csbnd C) = 1.478(9), (Cdbnd C)av = 1.395(2), CCN = 114.7(5), CCS = 123.4(5), C2C1C7S = 31(4), C6C1C7N = 29(4). The structure of thiobenzamide in the gas phase is markedly different to that in the literature for the single crystal. The differences between the gas and the solid structures are ascribed to the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid phase.

  17. Analysis of soft magnetic materials by electron backscatter diffraction as a powerful tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schuller

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work demonstrates that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD is a powerful and versatile characterization technique for investigating soft magnetic materials. The properties of soft magnets, e.g., magnetic losses strongly depend on the materials chemical composition and microstructure, including grain size and shape, texture, degree of plastic deformation and elastic strain. In electrical sheet stacks for e-motor applications, the quality of the machined edges/surfaces of each individual sheet is of special interest. Using EBSD, the influence of the punching process on the microstructure at the cutting edge is quantitatively assessed by evaluating the crystallographic misorientation distribution of the deformed grains. Using an industrial punching process, the maximum affected deformation depth is determined to be 200 - 300 μm. In the case of laser cutting, the affected deformation depth is determined to be approximately zero. Reliability and detection limits of the developed EBSD approach are evaluated on non-affected sample regions and model samples containing different indentation test bodies. A second application case is the investigation of the recrystallization process during the annealing step of soft magnetic composites (SMC toroids produced by powder metallurgy as a function of compaction pressure, annealing parameters and powder particle size. With increasing pressure and temperature, the recrystallized area fraction (e.g., grains with crystallographic misorientations 3°.

  18. Crystallography of waxes - an electron diffraction study of refined and natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure of four waxes has been investigated by electron crystallography. Two of these waxes, including a refined petroleum product (Gulfwax) and a material from lignite (montan wax), form well ordered crystals and their structure could be solved quantitatively from the observed 0022-3727/30/3/018/img1 diffraction patterns. As also found previously for simpler binary n-paraffin solid solutions, the average structure resembles that of a pure paraffin (e.g. n-0022-3727/30/3/018/img2) but with a Gaussian distribution of atomic occupancies near the chain ends to account for the statistical distribution of chain lengths within a lamella. Two other waxes from living organisms, South African bee honeycomb and the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba palm, are much less ordered, even though they share the same methylene subcell packing of the most crystalline parts of the previous materials. It appears that these waxes cannot fully separate into distinct lamellae, perhaps due to the presence of very long `tie' molecules, and are therefore `frustrated' crystal structures.

  19. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies on the Formation of Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuli Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of a series of La-Mg-Ni-based superlattice metal hydride alloys produced by a novel method of interaction of a LaNi5 alloy and Mg vapor were studied using a combination of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The conversion rate of LaNi5 increased from 86.8% into 98.2%, and the A2B7 phase abundance increased from 42.5 to 45.8 wt % and reduced to 39.2 wt % with the increase in process time from four to 32 h. During the first stage of reaction, Mg formed discrete grains with the same orientation, which was closely related to the orientation of the host LaNi5 alloy. Mg then diffused through the ab-phase of LaNi5 and formed the AB2, AB3, and A2B7 phases. Diffusion of Mg stalled at the grain boundary of the host LaNi5 alloy. Good alignments in the c-axis between the newly formed superlattice phases and LaNi5 were observed. The density of high-angle grain boundary decreased with the increase in process time and was an indication of lattice cracking.

  20. Experimental evidence concerning the significant information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.w@uni-jena.de [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Saager, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Böbenroth, Andrea [Fraunhofer Institute for the Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS, Walter-Huelse-Straße 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rüssel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Experiments concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are performed on samples featuring an amorphous wedge on a crystalline substrate and a crystalline wedge on an amorphous substrate. The effects of the acceleration voltage and exemplary software settings on the ability to measure through an amorphous layer are presented. Changes in the EBSD-signal could be detected through a ≈142 nm thick layer of amorphous Si while orientation measurements could be performed through a ≈116 nm thick layer when using a voltage of 30 kV. The complexity of the information depth significant to a given EBSD-pattern and the multiple parameters influencing it are discussed. It is suggested that a “core information depth” is significant to high quality patterns while a larger “maximum information depth” becomes relevant when the pattern quality decreases or the sample is inhomogeneous within the information volume, i.e. in the form of partially crystalline materials or crystal layers in the nm scale. - Highlights: • Experimental evidence of the significant information depth of EBSD is presented. • Effects of the voltage and exemplary software settings are discussed. • Dependence of the significant information depth on the pattern quality is proposed. • The information depth may reach up to 142 nm in Si when using a voltage of 30 kV. • The information depth depends on the available technology.

  1. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  2. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al 2 O 3 ; 1.56g of Na 2 CO 3 ; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K 2 CO 3 ; 0.13g of CeO 2 . Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  3. Oxygen adsorption on Cu-9 at. %Al(111) studied by low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Michiko; Bera, Santanu; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Song, Weijie

    2003-07-01

    Cu-based alloys have been used for electric cables for long time. In the field of microelectronics, Al had been used for electrical wiring. However, it became clear that electromigration occurs in Al that causes breaking of wires in minute wirings. Due to this problem, Cu wiring is used in most advanced microprocessors. Cu metal is more corrosive than Al and Cu-based alloys with a small amount of Al is expected to solve problems both on electromigration and corrosion. The initial stage of corrosion is oxygen adsorption. We studied surface segregation of Al on Cu-9% Al(111) and oxygen adsorption on the surface with/without Al segregation in ultrahigh vacuum by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that Al segregates on the surface to form (√3×√3)R30° structure and the structure vanishes above 595 K to give (1×1) structure while Al still segregates. The specimen was exposed to oxygen at different temperatures. The amount of oxygen uptake was not structure dependent but temperature dependent. Below 595 K, only a small amount of oxygen adsorbed. Between 595 and 870 K, oxygen adsorbed surface showed amorphous LEED pattern. The specimen was annealed at 1070 K after oxygen exposure. When the specimen was exposed oxygen below 870 K, the oxygen Auger intensity decreased significantly by annealing and the annealed surface showed (√3×√3)R30° structure at room temperature. When the specimen was exposed to oxygen at 870 K, diffused spots developed newly in LEED pattern but the pattern disappeared after 1070 K annealing while oxygen Auger intensity remained almost constant. Exposing the specimen to oxygen at 995 K resulted in clear spots in the LEED pattern, which were attributed to the (7/√3×7√3)R30° structure.

  4. A Low-Temperature Electron Microscopy and Electron Diffraction Study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-Tc superconducting compound, La1.84Sr0.16CuO4, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K2NiF4-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed.

  5. A low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-01-01

    A high-T c superconducting compound, La 1.84 Sr 0.16 CuO 4 , has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K 2 NiF 4 -type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed. (author)

  6. Low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La/sub 1. 84/Sr/sub 0. 16/CuO/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-T/sub c/ superconducting compound, La/sub 1.84/Sr/sub 0.16/CuO/sub 4/, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K/sub 2/NiF/sub 4/-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed

  7. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  8. Elucidating structural order and disorder phenomena in mullite-type Al4B2O9 by automated electron diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Haishuang; Krysiak, Yaşar; Hoffmann, Kristin; Barton, Bastian; Molina-Luna, Leopoldo; Neder, Reinhard B.; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gesing, Thorsten M.; Schneider, Hartmut; Fischer, Reinhard X.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure and disorder phenomena of Al 4 B 2 O 9 , an aluminum borate from the mullite-type family, were studied using automated diffraction tomography (ADT), a recently established method for collection and analysis of electron diffraction data. Al 4 B 2 O 9 , prepared by sol-gel approach, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/m. The ab initio structure determination based on three-dimensional electron diffraction data from single ordered crystals reveals that edge-connected AlO 6 octahedra expanding along the b axis constitute the backbone. The ordered structure (A) was confirmed by TEM and HAADF-STEM images. Furthermore, disordered crystals with diffuse scattering along the b axis are observed. Analysis of the modulation pattern implies a mean superstructure (AAB) with a threefold b axis, where B corresponds to an A layer shifted by ½a and ½c. Diffraction patterns simulated for the AAB sequence including additional stacking disorder are in good agreement with experimental electron diffraction patterns. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and disorder phenomena of B-rich Al 4 B 2 O 9 studied by automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and described by diffraction simulation using DISCUS. - Highlights: • Ab-initio structure solution by electron diffraction from single nanocrystals. • Detected modulation corresponding mainly to three-fold superstructure. • Diffuse diffraction streaks caused by stacking faults in disordered crystals. • Observed streaks explained by simulated electron diffraction patterns.

  9. FY 1999 report on the results of the R and D of femtosecond technology. Development of ultra-short pulse optoelectronics technology; 1999 nendo femutobyo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chotan pulse hikari electronics gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The paper described the FY 1999 results of the R and D of femtosecond technology. For the purpose of creating new industrial basement technology which supports the highly information-oriented society in the 21st century, the ultra-high speed electronics technology is indispensable which is beyond speed limits of the existing electronics technology and has new functionality. The ultra-high speed electronics basement technology is established through the R and D of the technology to control the state of light and electronics in the femtosecond time domain (10{sup -15} - 10{sup -12} second). Themes of the R and D are technology to generate/transmit femtosecond optical pulse, technology for control/distribution, and ultra-short pulse optoelectronics common basement technology. In FY 1999, a lot of results were obtained in the following: generation of the pulse train highly repeated at 500GHz in semiconductor laser; 139km transmission of 250fs optical pulse; switching movement at ultra-high speed of 150fs-1.2ps in transition among subbands of GaN base and Sb base materials; DEMUXA movement toward 160-10Gb/s in Mach-Zehnder type optical switch. (NEDO)

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  11. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction of a hot worked Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cepeda-Jimenez, C.M., E-mail: cm.cepeda@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, CENIM, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hidalgo, P.; Carsi, M.; Ruano, O.A.; Carreno, F. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, CENIM, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The most favourable conditions for hot workability have been determined. {yields} EBSD was employed to characterize the obtained microtexture and microstructure. {yields} The Al 2024 alloy torsion tested at 408 deg. C and 2.1 s{sup -1} showed maximum ductility. {yields} Solid solution and fine precipitates favour a fine microstructure at 408 deg. C. {yields} The increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility. - Abstract: Hot torsion tests to fracture to simulate thermomechanical processing were carried out on a solution-treated Al-Cu-Mg alloy (Al 2024-T351) at constant temperature. Torsion tests were conducted in the range 278-467 deg. C, and at two strain rates, 2.1 and 4.5 s{sup -1}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was employed to characterize the microtexture and microstructure before and after testing. The microstructural evolution during torsion deformation at different temperatures and strain rate conditions determines the mechanical properties at room temperature of the Al 2024 alloy since grain refining, dynamic precipitation and precipitate coalescence occur during the torsion test. These mechanical properties were measured by Vickers microhardness tests. At 408 deg. C and 2.1 s{sup -1} the optimum combination of solid solution and incipient precipitation gives rise to maximum ductility and large fraction of fine and misoriented grains (f{sub HAB} = 54%). In contrast, the increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility, attributed to the high proportion of alloying elements in solid solution. Both the stress-strain flow curves obtained by torsion tests and the final microstructures are a consequence of recovery phenomena and the dynamic nature of the precipitation process taking place during deformation.

  12. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, I.; Chen, M.; Loeck, M.; Al-Samman, T.; Molodov, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order to nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10"–"8 m"4/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders of magnitude

  13. Analysis of soft magnetic materials by electron backscatter diffraction as a powerful tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, David; Hohs, Dominic; Loeffler, Ralf; Bernthaler, Timo; Goll, Dagmar; Schneider, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    The current work demonstrates that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful and versatile characterization technique for investigating soft magnetic materials. The properties of soft magnets, e.g., magnetic losses strongly depend on the materials chemical composition and microstructure, including grain size and shape, texture, degree of plastic deformation and elastic strain. In electrical sheet stacks for e-motor applications, the quality of the machined edges/surfaces of each individual sheet is of special interest. Using EBSD, the influence of the punching process on the microstructure at the cutting edge is quantitatively assessed by evaluating the crystallographic misorientation distribution of the deformed grains. Using an industrial punching process, the maximum affected deformation depth is determined to be 200 - 300 μm. In the case of laser cutting, the affected deformation depth is determined to be approximately zero. Reliability and detection limits of the developed EBSD approach are evaluated on non-affected sample regions and model samples containing different indentation test bodies. A second application case is the investigation of the recrystallization process during the annealing step of soft magnetic composites (SMC) toroids produced by powder metallurgy as a function of compaction pressure, annealing parameters and powder particle size. With increasing pressure and temperature, the recrystallized area fraction (e.g., grains with crystallographic misorientations particle boundaries or areas with existing plastic deformation. The progress of recrystallization is visualized as a function of time and of different particle to grain size distributions. Here, large particles with coarse internal grain structures show a favorable recrystallization behavior which results in large bulk permeability of up to 600 - 700 and lower amount of residual misorientations (>3°).

  14. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction of a hot worked Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda-Jimenez, C.M.; Hidalgo, P.; Carsi, M.; Ruano, O.A.; Carreno, F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The most favourable conditions for hot workability have been determined. → EBSD was employed to characterize the obtained microtexture and microstructure. → The Al 2024 alloy torsion tested at 408 deg. C and 2.1 s -1 showed maximum ductility. → Solid solution and fine precipitates favour a fine microstructure at 408 deg. C. → The increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility. - Abstract: Hot torsion tests to fracture to simulate thermomechanical processing were carried out on a solution-treated Al-Cu-Mg alloy (Al 2024-T351) at constant temperature. Torsion tests were conducted in the range 278-467 deg. C, and at two strain rates, 2.1 and 4.5 s -1 . Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was employed to characterize the microtexture and microstructure before and after testing. The microstructural evolution during torsion deformation at different temperatures and strain rate conditions determines the mechanical properties at room temperature of the Al 2024 alloy since grain refining, dynamic precipitation and precipitate coalescence occur during the torsion test. These mechanical properties were measured by Vickers microhardness tests. At 408 deg. C and 2.1 s -1 the optimum combination of solid solution and incipient precipitation gives rise to maximum ductility and large fraction of fine and misoriented grains (f HAB = 54%). In contrast, the increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility, attributed to the high proportion of alloying elements in solid solution. Both the stress-strain flow curves obtained by torsion tests and the final microstructures are a consequence of recovery phenomena and the dynamic nature of the precipitation process taking place during deformation.

  15. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles

  16. Effects of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogov, P Yu; Bespalov, V G

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes is presented occurring under the influence of femtosecond laser radiation on the skin. There was held an analysis and the numerical solution of an equation system describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems were received. The results can be used to determine the maximum permissible levels of energy generated by femtosecond laser systems and the establishment of Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems. (paper)

  17. LACDIF, a new electron diffraction technique obtained with the LACBED configuration and a C{sub s} corrector: Comparison with electron precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morniroli, J.P. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, USTL and ENSCL, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)], E-mail: jean-paul.morniroli@univ-lille1.fr; Houdellier, F.; Roucau, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Puiggali, J.; Gesti, S. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Redjaimia, A. [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Surfaces, UMR CNRS 7570, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt 54042 Nancy (France)

    2008-01-15

    By combining the large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) configuration together with a microscope equipped with a C{sub s} corrector it is possible to obtain good quality spot patterns in image mode and not in diffraction mode as it is usually the case. These patterns have two main advantages with respect to the conventional selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or microdiffraction patterns. They display a much larger number of reflections and the diffracted intensity is the integrated intensity. These patterns have strong similarities with the electron precession patterns and they can be used for various applications like the identification of the possible space groups of a crystal from observations of the Laue zones or the ab-initio structure identifications. Since this is a defocused method, another important application concerns the analysis of electron beam-sensitive materials. Successful applications to polymers are given in the present paper to prove the validity of this method with regards to these materials.

  18. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  19. Structure and microstructure of hexagonal Ba3Ti2RuO9 by electron diffraction and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunders, C.; Etheridge, J.; Whitfield, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used electron microscopy and diffraction to refine the structure and investigate the microstructure of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 . The parent compound is hexagonal BaTiO 3 with the space group P6 3 /mmc. Using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) combined with electron-sensitive image plates we have found that the space group of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 is the non-centrosymmetric group P6 3 mc. at room temperature and at ∝ 110 K. This is consistent with the Ru and Ti atoms occupying alternate face-sharing octahedral sites in the h0001i direction. This maintains the c-glide, but breaks the mirror normal to the c axis and consequently removes the centre of symmetry. Using powder X-ray diffraction, we have measured the lattice parameters from polycrystalline samples to be a = 5.7056 ± 0.0005, c = 14.0093 ± 0.0015 Aa at room temperature. Using high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) we observed highly coherent, low-strain {10 anti 10} grain boundaries intersecting at 60 and 120 . From CBED we deduce that adjacent grains are identical but for the relative phase of the Ti and Ru atom ordering along the c axis. HREM also revealed occasional stacking faults, normal to the c-axis

  20. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    between experiment and theory, and the study therefore demonstrates that synchrotron powder diffraction can indeed provide accurate structure-factor values based on data measured in minutes with limited sample preparation. Thus, potential systematic errors such as extinction and twinning commonly......Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...

  1. Determination of dislocation density by electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray line profile analysis in ferrous lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Jenei, Péter; Csóré, András; Lábár, János; Gubicza, Jenő

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and the dislocation density in as-quenched ferrous lath martensite were studied by different methods. The blocks, packets and variants formed due to martensitic transformation were identified and their sizes were determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Concomitant transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation revealed that the laths contain subgrains with the size between 50 and 100 nm. A novel evaluation procedure of EBSD images was elaborated for the determination of the density and the space distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations from the misorientation distribution. The total dislocation density obtained by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis was in good agreement with the value determined by EBSD, indicating that the majority of dislocations formed due to martensitic transformation during quenching are geometrically necessary dislocations.

  2. Quantitative investigation of precipitate growth during ageing of Al-(Mg,Si) alloys by energy-filtered electron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollgarten, M.; Chang, C. S. T.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    Besides other application fields, light-weight Al-(Mg, Si) (6XXX series) alloys are of substantial importance in automotive industries where they are used for the production of car body panels. The material gains its strength by precipitation of metastable Mg-Si-based phases. Though the general...... accepted that the early stages of precipitate growth are important for the understanding of this peculiar behaviour. During these stages, electron diffraction patterns of Al-(Mg, Si) alloys show diffuse features (Figure 1 (a) and (b)) which can be traced back to originate from β'' Mg5Si6 precipitates [5......-7]. In this paper, we use energy-filtered electron diffraction to determine dimensions of the β'' Mg5Si6 precipitates along their a, b and c-axes as a function of ageing time and alloy composition. In our contribution, we first derive that there is an optimal zone axis - - from the view point of practicability. We...

  3. Experimental determination of spin-dependent electron density by joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Maxime; Claiser, Nicolas; Pillet, Sébastien; Chumakov, Yurii; Becker, Pierre; Gillet, Jean Michel; Gillon, Béatrice; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    New crystallographic tools were developed to access a more precise description of the spin-dependent electron density of magnetic crystals. The method combines experimental information coming from high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and polarized neutron diffraction (PND) in a unified model. A new algorithm that allows for a simultaneous refinement of the charge- and spin-density parameters against XRD and PND data is described. The resulting software MOLLYNX is based on the well known Hansen-Coppens multipolar model, and makes it possible to differentiate the electron spins. This algorithm is validated and demonstrated with a molecular crystal formed by a bimetallic chain, MnCu(pba)(H(2)O)(3)·2H(2)O, for which XRD and PND data are available. The joint refinement provides a more detailed description of the spin density than the refinement from PND data alone.

  4. Strain characterization of fin-shaped field effect transistors with SiGe stressors using nanobeam electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun-Wook; Byeon, Dae-Seop; Jang, Hyunchul; Koo, Sang-Mo; Ko, Dae-Hong; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    This study undertook strain analysis on fin-shaped field effect transistor structures with epitaxial Si 1−x Ge x stressors, using nano-beam electron diffraction and finite elements method. Combining the two methods disclosed dynamic strain distribution in the source/drain and channel region of the fin structure, and the effects of dimensional factors such as the stressor thickness and fin width, offering valuable information for device design.

  5. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  6. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  7. Interpretation of the shape of electron diffraction spots from small polyhedral crystals by means of the crystal shape amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.; Hofmeister, H.; Heydenreich, J.; Komrska, J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the crystal shape on the fine structure of transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns described by the crystal shape amplitude is discussed. A general algebraic expression for the crystal shape amplitude of any crystal polyhedron is used for computing the intensity distribution of TED reflections. The computer simulation method is applied to the analysis of the fine structure of TED patterns of small gold and palladium crystals having octahedral and tetrahedral habits. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative low-energy electron diffraction analysis of the GaN(000-1) (1×1) reconstruction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Paskova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 606, 7-8 (2012), s. 740-743 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium nitride * semiconductor surfaces * quantitative low-energy electron diffraction * LEED Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2012

  9. Strain characterization of fin-shaped field effect transistors with SiGe stressors using nanobeam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun-Wook; Byeon, Dae-Seop; Jang, Hyunchul; Koo, Sang-Mo; Ko, Dae-Hong, E-mail: dhko@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoo-Jeong, E-mail: hlee@skku.edu [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-25

    This study undertook strain analysis on fin-shaped field effect transistor structures with epitaxial Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} stressors, using nano-beam electron diffraction and finite elements method. Combining the two methods disclosed dynamic strain distribution in the source/drain and channel region of the fin structure, and the effects of dimensional factors such as the stressor thickness and fin width, offering valuable information for device design.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary electron diffraction study to 3. 7 A of DNA helix-destabilizing protein gp32*I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, W; Hosoda, J

    1978-01-01

    A two-dimensionally large and thin crystal has been obtained from gp32*I, a proteolytically digested product of a DNA helix-destabilizing protein coded by gene 32 in bacteriophage T4. High-resolution electron diffraction patterns (approx. 3.7 A) are recorded from both unstained and stained protein crystals embedded in glucose. The crystal is of orthorhombic space group with a = 62.9 A and b = 47.3 A.

  11. Structure determination of a new phase Ni.sub.8./sub.Ti.sub.5./sub. by electron diffraction tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klementová, Mariana; Karlík, M.; Novák, P.; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, Jun (2017), s. 110-116 ISSN 0966-9795 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape- memory alloys * crystal chemistry * nanocrystalline structure * powder metallurgy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.140, year: 2016

  12. Distinguishing Biologically Controlled Calcareous Biomineralization in Fossil Organisms Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Jan-Filip; Jarochowska, Emilia; Bestmann, Michel; Munnecke, Axel

    2018-02-01

    Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, i.e. biologically induced calcification (BIM) vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM), result in different crystallographic structures which might be used as a criterion to test cyanobacterial affinities. Cyanobacteria are often used as a ‘wastebasket taxon’, to which various microfossils are assigned. The lack of a testable criterion for the identification of cyanobacteria may bias their fossil record severely. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Palaeozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella, hypothesized to be a cyanobacterium, and an incertae sedis microorganism Allonema. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a BCM reference. The mineralized structure of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. EBSD pole figures and misorientation axes distribution reveal a fibre texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°), indicating a highly ordered structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella, the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show an approximately random distribution. Rothpletzella also shares morphological similarities with extant cyanobacteria. We

  13. Monitoring non-pseudomorphic epitaxial growth of spinel/perovskite oxide heterostructures by reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, P.; Pfaff, F.; Scheiderer, P.; Sing, M.; Claessen, R. [Physikalisches Institut and Röntgen Center for Complex Material Systems (RCCM), Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    Pulsed laser deposition of spinel γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on bulk perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} is monitored by high-pressure reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The heteroepitaxial combination of two materials with different crystal structures is found to be inherently accompanied by a strong intensity modulation of bulk diffraction patterns from inelastically scattered electrons, which impedes the observation of RHEED intensity oscillations. Avoiding such electron surface-wave resonance enhancement by de-tuning the RHEED geometry allows for the separate observation of the surface-diffracted specular RHEED signal and thus the real-time monitoring of sub-unit cell two-dimensional layer-by-layer growth. Since these challenges are essentially rooted in the difference between film and substrate crystal structure, our findings are of relevance for the growth of any heterostructure combining oxides with different crystal symmetry and may thus facilitate the search for novel oxide heterointerfaces.

  14. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  15. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2010-10-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 1012 photons per pulse, 20 µm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  16. Vibrational frequencies and dephasing times in excited electronic states by femtosecond time-resolved four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Taiha; Albrecht, A. C.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved degenerate four-wave mixing (TRDFWM) for an electronically resonant system in a phase-matching configuration that measures population decay is reported. Because the spectral width of input light exceeds the vibrational Bohr frequency of a strong Raman active mode, the vibrational coherence produces strong oscillations in the TRDFWM signal together with the usual population decay from the excited electronic state. The data are analyzed in terms of a four-level system: ground and excited electronic states each split by a vibrational quantum of a Raman active mode. Absolute frequencies and their dephasing times of the vibrational modes at ≈590 cm -1 are obtained for the excited as well as the ground electronic state. The vibrational dephasing rate in the excited electronic state is about an order of magnitude faster than that in the ground state, the origin of which is speculated upon.

  17. Structural changes in femtosecond laser modified regions inside fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juodkazis, Saulius; Kohara, Shinji; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Norihisa; Vailionis, Arturas; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Saito, Akira; Rode, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    Structural characterization of photomodified microvolumes formed by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside silica glass was carried out using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The observed distinct separation between the O–O and Si–Si pair correlation peaks can be interpreted as a phase separation induced by microexplosions at the focal volume. The mechanisms of structural transitions induced by femtosecond laser pulses inside dielectrics are discussed

  18. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  19. Effect of prepulse on fast electron lateral transport at the target surface irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X. X.; Li, Y. T.; Liu, B. C.; Liu, F.; Du, F.; Wang, S. J.; Lu, X.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Wang, J.; Liu, F.; Liu, X. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of preplasma on lateral fast electron transport at front target surface, irradiated by ultraintense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulses, are investigated by Kα imaging technique. A large annular Kα halo with a diameter of ∼560 μm surrounding a central spot is observed. A specially designed steplike target is used to identify the possible mechanisms. It is believed that the halos are mainly generated by the lateral diffusion of fast electrons due to the electrostatic and magnetic fields in the preplasma. This is illustrated by simulated electron trajectories using a numerical model.

  20. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Donghui; Huang, Mei; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  1. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Donghui [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Huang, Mei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Wang, Zhijiang, E-mail: wangzj@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Feng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  2. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Experimental study for angular distribution of the hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interaction with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, D.F.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zheng, Z.J.; Wen, T.S.; Chunyu, S.T.; Wang, Z.B.; Yang, X.D.

    2003-01-01

    The experimental results of angular distribution of hot electrons in the interaction of a 60 fs, 125 mJ, 800 nm, ∼10 17 W cm -2 laser pulse with Al targets are reported. Three obvious peaks of hot electrons emission have been observed, as there is a weak normal component of the laser electric field. These emission peaks are located in the directions of the specular reflection of the laser, the target normal, and the backreflection of the laser, respectively. In the case of the P-polarized laser pulse, which has a strong normal component of the laser electric field, the peak in the backreflection of the laser disappeared, and only two obvious peaks of hot electron emissions existed. It shows that the different directions of hot electrons emission are dominated by different absorption or acceleration mechanisms. The experimental result of the hot electrons energy spectrum at the target normal shows that the effective temperature of hot electrons is about 190 keV, which is consistent with a scaling law of the resonance absorption

  4. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  5. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-01

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm 2 ) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO 2 and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been deeply involved in

  6. Structure studies by electron microscopy and electron diffraction at Physics Department, University of Oslo, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.K.; Olsen, A.

    1985-08-01

    The paper describes the reasearch activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Departmen, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  7. Femto-second pulses of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    A method capable of producing femto-second pulses of synchrotron radiation is proposed. It is based on the interaction of femto-second light pulses with electrons in a storage ring. The application of the method to the generation of ultra-short x-ray pulses at the Advance Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been considered. The same method can also be used for extraction of electrons from a storage ring in ultra-short series of microbunches spaced by the periodicity of light wavelength

  8. Temperature-dependent surface structure, composition, and electronic properties of the clean SrTiO3(111) crystal face: Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron-energy-loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the structure, composition, and electron energy distribution of a clean single-crystal (111) face of strontium titanate (perovskite). The dependence of the surface chemical composition on the temperature has been observed along with corresponding changes in the surface electronic properties. High-temperature Ar-ion bombardment causes an irreversible change in the surface structure, stoichiometry, and electron energy distribution. In contrast to the TiO 2 surface, there are always significant concentrations of Ti 3+ in an annealed ordered SrTiO 3 (111) surface. This stable active Ti 3+ monolayer on top of a substrate with large surface dipole potential makes SrTiO 3 superior to TiO 2 when used as a photoanode in the photoelectrochemical cell

  9. Structure of solid surfaces and of adsorbates by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    LEED theory has developed to the point where the diffraction beam intensities can be computed using the locations of the surface atoms as the only adjustable parameters. The position of atoms in many clean monatomic solid surfaces and the surface structures of ordered monolayers of adsorbed atoms have been determined this way. Surface crystallography studies are now extended to small hydrocarbon molecules that are adsorbed on metal surfaces. These studies are reviewed

  10. Diffraction and depths-of-field effects in electron beam imaging at SURF III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging an electron beam with visible light is a common method of diagnostics applied to electron accelerators. It is a straightforward way to deduce the transverse electron distribution as well as its changes over time. The electrons stored in the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) III at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were studied over an extended period of time to characterize the upgraded accelerator. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical horizontal beam sizes at three different electron energies

  11. Pilot study of synchronization on a femtosecond scale between the electronic gun REGAE and a laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titberidze, Mikheil

    2017-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a novel technique to accelerate charged particles. Acceleration is achieved by a high-power laser pulse transmitting a gas target where electrons and ions form a strong wakefield with gradients up to 100 GVm -1 . Hence, the size of the laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) is significantly smaller compared to conventional radio frequency (RF) accelerators, because its accelerating gradients are 3 orders of magnitude higher. At present, electron beams generated by LWFA do not satisfy all requirements to make them directly usable for applications such as LPA driven free-electron laser (FEL). Pointing stability and relatively high energy spread are the major limiting factors. Typically, plasma electrons are self-injected in the plasma wake which is created by a high-power laser. There is a lack of control for the injection process and there is no direct access for diagnostics. In order to overcome these challenges and better understand the overall LWFA process, external injection experiments are planned at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in the framework of the Laboratory for Laser and beam-driven plasma Acceleration (LAOLA) collaboration. Thus, well characterized and ultrashort (< 10 fs) electron bunches from the conventional RF accelerator Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) will be injected into the laser driven plasma wake. This approach allows to reconstruct and map the plasma wakefield by post diagnosing the injected electron bunches by measuring the energy spectra of it for different injection times. To conduct such a pump-probe type of experiment, synchronization with fs accuracy is required between the electron bunches from REGAE and the high-power driver laser. Two main aspects of the laser synchronization are presented in this thesis. First, a detailed experimental investigation of the conventional, fast photodiode based direct conversion laser-to-RF synchronization setup and its limitations are

  12. Pilot study of synchronization on a femtosecond scale between the electronic gun REGAE and a laser-plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titberidze, Mikheil

    2017-10-15

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a novel technique to accelerate charged particles. Acceleration is achieved by a high-power laser pulse transmitting a gas target where electrons and ions form a strong wakefield with gradients up to 100 GVm{sup -1}. Hence, the size of the laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) is significantly smaller compared to conventional radio frequency (RF) accelerators, because its accelerating gradients are 3 orders of magnitude higher. At present, electron beams generated by LWFA do not satisfy all requirements to make them directly usable for applications such as LPA driven free-electron laser (FEL). Pointing stability and relatively high energy spread are the major limiting factors. Typically, plasma electrons are self-injected in the plasma wake which is created by a high-power laser. There is a lack of control for the injection process and there is no direct access for diagnostics. In order to overcome these challenges and better understand the overall LWFA process, external injection experiments are planned at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in the framework of the Laboratory for Laser and beam-driven plasma Acceleration (LAOLA) collaboration. Thus, well characterized and ultrashort (< 10 fs) electron bunches from the conventional RF accelerator Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) will be injected into the laser driven plasma wake. This approach allows to reconstruct and map the plasma wakefield by post diagnosing the injected electron bunches by measuring the energy spectra of it for different injection times. To conduct such a pump-probe type of experiment, synchronization with fs accuracy is required between the electron bunches from REGAE and the high-power driver laser. Two main aspects of the laser synchronization are presented in this thesis. First, a detailed experimental investigation of the conventional, fast photodiode based direct conversion laser-to-RF synchronization setup and its limitations

  13. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  14. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  15. The vacancy order-disorder transition in Ba2YCu3Osub(7-delta) observed by means of electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendeloo, G. Van; Amelinckx, S.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown by means of electron microscopy and electron diffraction that the ''structural'' vacancies in Ba 2 YCu 3 Osub(7-delta) undergo an order-disorder transformation accompanied by a change in symmetry from orthorhombic to tetragonal. A superstructure due to the ordering of vacancies was found in certain crystal parts; it leads to doubling of the asub(0) parameter. It is shown that the ordering of the vacancies is important for the superconducting behaviour. In order to obtain a high Tsub(c) superconductor the final heat treatment is crucial. (author)

  16. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/. In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering

  17. Heavy atom disorder in the high Tsub(c) superconductor Ba2YCu3Osub(7-delta) studied by means of electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendeloo, G. van; Okabe, T.; Zandbergen, H.W.; Amelinckx, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that on rapid cooling of the compound Ba 2 YCu 3 Osub(7-δ) one obtains a highly disordered material in which the perovskite framework is conserved but in which barium and yttrium atoms exhibit a high degree of disorder. This leads to lattice deformations, which can be visualized in the electron microscope. The electron diffraction patterns also reveal the disorder. As-quenched specimens are no longer high Tsub(c) superconductors, but the superconducting properties can be recovered by an adequate heat treatment whereby the vacancies become ordered. (author)

  18. Elucidating structural order and disorder phenomena in mullite-type Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} by automated electron diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haishuang; Krysiak, Yaşar [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Jakob-Welder-Weg 11, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hoffmann, Kristin [Crystallography, Department of Geosciences, Klagenfurter Str. 2, GEO, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Crystallography, Leobener Str. NW2, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Barton, Bastian [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Jakob-Welder-Weg 11, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Molina-Luna, Leopoldo [Department of Materials and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Neder, Reinhard B. [Department of Physics, Lehrstuhl für Kristallographie und Strukturphysik, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr.3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kleebe, Hans-Joachim [Department of Materials and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Gesing, Thorsten M. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Crystallography, Leobener Str. NW2, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, Bibliothekstr.1, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Hartmut [Crystallography, Department of Geosciences, Klagenfurter Str. 2, GEO, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Fischer, Reinhard X. [Crystallography, Department of Geosciences, Klagenfurter Str. 2, GEO, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, Bibliothekstr.1, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); and others

    2017-05-15

    The crystal structure and disorder phenomena of Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9}, an aluminum borate from the mullite-type family, were studied using automated diffraction tomography (ADT), a recently established method for collection and analysis of electron diffraction data. Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9}, prepared by sol-gel approach, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/m. The ab initio structure determination based on three-dimensional electron diffraction data from single ordered crystals reveals that edge-connected AlO{sub 6} octahedra expanding along the b axis constitute the backbone. The ordered structure (A) was confirmed by TEM and HAADF-STEM images. Furthermore, disordered crystals with diffuse scattering along the b axis are observed. Analysis of the modulation pattern implies a mean superstructure (AAB) with a threefold b axis, where B corresponds to an A layer shifted by ½a and ½c. Diffraction patterns simulated for the AAB sequence including additional stacking disorder are in good agreement with experimental electron diffraction patterns. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and disorder phenomena of B-rich Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9} studied by automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and described by diffraction simulation using DISCUS. - Highlights: • Ab-initio structure solution by electron diffraction from single nanocrystals. • Detected modulation corresponding mainly to three-fold superstructure. • Diffuse diffraction streaks caused by stacking faults in disordered crystals. • Observed streaks explained by simulated electron diffraction patterns.

  19. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  20. A novel inert crystal delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsie E. Conrad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX has opened a new era in crystallography by permitting nearly damage-free, room-temperature structure determination of challenging proteins such as membrane proteins. In SFX, femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser pulses produce diffraction snapshots from nanocrystals and microcrystals delivered in a liquid jet, which leads to high protein consumption. A slow-moving stream of agarose has been developed as a new crystal delivery medium for SFX. It has low background scattering, is compatible with both soluble and membrane proteins, and can deliver the protein crystals at a wide range of temperatures down to 4°C. Using this crystal-laden agarose stream, the structure of a multi-subunit complex, phycocyanin, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution using 300 µg of microcrystals embedded into the agarose medium post-crystallization. The agarose delivery method reduces protein consumption by at least 100-fold and has the potential to be used for a diverse population of proteins, including membrane protein complexes.

  1. Electron-density distribution in cubic SrTiO3: a comparative γ-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauch, W.; Reehuis, M.

    2005-01-01

    The electron density and atomic displacements in the perovskite SrTiO 3 have been studied using extensive and accurate γ-ray diffraction data (λ=0.0392 Aa) at room temperature. The six strongest low-order structure factors have been determined under extinction-free conditions. Gram-Charlier series expansion of the thermal parameters have revealed no evidence for anharmonicity. The population of the 3d subshell on Ti is found to be close to zero, in agreement with the observed magnetic behaviour. The electronic properties at the bond critical points indicate ionic Ti-O and Sr-O interactions of different strengths, which is corroborated by the net charges of the atomic basins [q(Sr)=1.18 vertical stroke e vertical stroke, q(Ti)=3.10 vertical stroke e vertical stroke, q(O)=1.42 vertical stroke e vertical stroke ]. A critical comparison is made with earlier experimental results from laboratory X-ray, synchrotron X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction studies. Agreement and discrepancies are identified and resolved. (orig.)

  2. Electron-density distribution in cubic SrTiO{sub 3}: a comparative {gamma}-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Reehuis, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The electron density and atomic displacements in the perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} have been studied using extensive and accurate {gamma}-ray diffraction data ({lambda}=0.0392 Aa) at room temperature. The six strongest low-order structure factors have been determined under extinction-free conditions. Gram-Charlier series expansion of the thermal parameters have revealed no evidence for anharmonicity. The population of the 3d subshell on Ti is found to be close to zero, in agreement with the observed magnetic behaviour. The electronic properties at the bond critical points indicate ionic Ti-O and Sr-O interactions of different strengths, which is corroborated by the net charges of the atomic basins [q(Sr)=1.18 vertical stroke e vertical stroke, q(Ti)=3.10 vertical stroke e vertical stroke, q(O)=1.42 vertical stroke e vertical stroke ]. A critical comparison is made with earlier experimental results from laboratory X-ray, synchrotron X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction studies. Agreement and discrepancies are identified and resolved. (orig.)

  3. Atomic scattering in the diffraction limit: electron transfer in keV Li+-Na(3s, 3p) collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poel, M van der; Nielsen, C V; Rybaltover, M; Nielsen, S E; Machholm, M; Andersen, N

    2002-01-01

    We measure angle differential cross sections (DCS) in Li + + Na → Li + Na + electron transfer collisions in the 2.7-24 keV energy range. We do this with a newly constructed apparatus which combines the experimental technique of cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy with a laser-cooled target. This setup yields a momentum resolution of 0.12 au, an order of magnitude better angular resolution than previous measurements on this system. This enables us to clearly resolve Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns in the angle DCS. In particular, the angular width of the ring structure is given by the ratio of the de Broglie wavelength λ dB = 150 fm at a velocity v = 0.20 au and the effective atomic diameter for electron capture 2R = 20 au. Parallel AO and MO semiclassical coupled-channel calculations of the Na(3s, 3p) → Li(2s, 2p) state-to-state collision amplitudes have been performed, and quantum scattering amplitudes are derived by the eikonal method. The resulting angle-differential electron transfer cross sections and their diffraction patterns agree with the experimental level-to-level results over most scattering angles in the energy range

  4. Three-dimensional structure determination protocol for noncrystalline biomolecules using x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    Coherent and intense x-ray pulses generated by x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources are paving the way for structural determination of noncrystalline biomolecules. However, due to the small scattering cross section of electrons for x rays, the available incident x-ray intensity of XFEL sources, which is currently in the range of 10(12)-10(13) photons/μm(2)/pulse, is lower than that necessary to perform single-molecule diffraction experiments for noncrystalline biomolecules even with the molecular masses of megadalton and submicrometer dimensions. Here, we propose an experimental protocol and analysis method for visualizing the structure of those biomolecules by the combined application of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction methods. To compensate the small scattering cross section of biomolecules, in our protocol, a thin vitreous ice plate containing several hundred biomolecules/μm(2) is used as sample, a setup similar to that utilized by single-molecule cryoelectron microscopy. The scattering cross section of such an ice plate is far larger than that of a single particle. The images of biomolecules contained within irradiated areas are then retrieved from each diffraction pattern, and finally provide the three-dimensional electron density model. A realistic atomic simulation using large-scale computations proposed that the three-dimensional structure determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit embedded in a vitreous ice plate is possible at a resolution of 0.8 nm when an x-ray beam of 10(16) photons/500×500 nm(2)/pulse is available.

  5. Electron backscatter diffraction study of dislocation content of a macrozone in hot-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, T. Ben; Birosca, Soran; Preuss, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the dislocation substructure within macrozone and non-macrozone regions of hot-rolled Ti-6Al-4 V. Hough-based and cross-correlation-based analysis of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns are used to establish the grain orientations and intra-granular misorientations, respectively. The set of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) that support measured lattice curvatures and minimize the total GND line energy are calculated. The GND content in the macrozone is approximately twice that in the non-macrozone region, and GNDs are present at densities ∼10 times higher than GNDs.

  6. Quantitative analysis of localized stresses in irradiated stainless steels using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and molecular dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Kuhr, B.; Farkas, D.; Was, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of stress near dislocation channel–grain boundary (DC–GB) interaction sites were made using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HREBSD) and have been compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Tensile stress normal to the grain boundary was significantly elevated at discontinuous DC–GB intersections with peak magnitudes roughly an order of magnitude greater than at sites where slip transfer occurred. These results constitute the first measurement of stress amplification at DC–GB intersections and provide support to the theory that high normal stress at the grain boundary may be a key driver for the initiation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracks.

  7. Colloid morphological and crystalline studies in Bikini dust from the No. 5 Fukuryu Maru by electron microscopy and diffraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suito, E; Takiyama, K; Uyeda, N

    1954-01-01

    Dust was collected from the deck, fishes, and other parts of the ship. The dust was white granules, approximately 0.3 mm. in size and sp. gr. 2.42. These granules were composed of unit particles which were cubic or spindle of 0.1 to 3. ..mu.. in size. The Bikini dust was calcite as determined by electron microdiffraction and x-ray diffraction studies. The coral reef is aragonite. It is suggested that coral reef was evapd. by the H-bomb explosion.

  8. The effect of a non-hermitian crystal potential on the scattering matrix in reflection electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Josefsson, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    An extension to include general inelastic scattering effects is developed for the case of reflection electron diffraction scattering from surfaces. In this extension of work by Lynch and Moodie, it is shown how the resultant non-Hermitian matrix problem can be recast in a form that is suitable for computation. In particular, a computational method is outlined based on techniques developed by Eberlein for matrix diagonalisation using complex rotations and shears. The resultant methods are applied to the problem of Convergent Beam RHEED. 23 refs., 3 figs

  9. A semiclassical analysis of high energy electron diffraction by stacking faults: arrival at the classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    In a recent note the authors summarised results for an extension of Berry's theory to cover the one-dimensional problem of systematic reflections (planes) for a thin crystal sandwich consisting of two identical slabs of lattice parameter 'a' with a relative horizontal displacement 'f'. The diffraction amplitudes at the lower surface of the crystal were shown to depend on a double summation over the various transverse energy states in the upper and lower slab respectively, and on the transitions between them. In this report the authors demonstrate the arrival at the classical limit for the problem and, in particular, indicate briefly the nature of the topologically different classical paths. (Auth.)

  10. FreeDam - A webtool for free-electron laser-induced damage in femtosecond X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, H. Olof; Östlin, Christofer; Scott, Howard A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Aplin, Steve J.; Tîmneanu, Nicuşor; Caleman, Carl

    2018-03-01

    Over the last decade X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources have been made available to the scientific community. One of the most successful uses of these new machines has been protein crystallography. When samples are exposed to the intense short X-ray pulses provided by the XFELs, the sample quickly becomes highly ionized and the atomic structure is affected. Here we present a webtool dubbed FreeDam based on non-thermal plasma simulations, for estimation of radiation damage in free-electron laser experiments in terms of ionization, temperatures and atomic displacements. The aim is to make this tool easily accessible to scientists who are planning and performing experiments at XFELs.

  11. Disorder and transport properties of In3SbTe2 - an X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Thorsten; Rosenthal, Tobias; Grott, Sebastian; Stiewe, Christian; Boor, Johannes de; Oeckler, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Quenched metastable In 3 SbTe 2 was investigated by X-ray and neutron powder diffraction as well as by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The average structure corresponds to the rocksalt type, the anion position being occupied by antimony and tellurium. Neutron data indicate no antisite disorder of indium and antimony. The compound is a high-temperature phase that can be quenched to yield a metastable compound at ambient temperature which, upon heating, decomposes at ca. 320 C into InSb and InTe. Diffuse scattering in reconstructed X-ray and selected area electron diffraction patterns indicates local distortions of the crystal structure due to static atom displacement along <100> from the average positions, caused by the different size of the anions, but no superstructure. The electrical conductivity of In 3 SbTe 2 is 3.2 x 10 4 S.cm -1 at 25 C, the temperature characteristics correspond to metallic behavior. Consequently, the thermal conductivity is also rather high. The decomposition into InSb and InTe reduces the electrical conductivity by a factor of 3 in heterogeneous microstructures. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  13. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules.

  14. Fiscal 1998 R and D report on femtosecond technology (ultra-short pulse optoelectronics technology); 1998 nendo femuto byo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu (chotan pulse hikari electronics gijutsu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report reports the result of the fiscal 1998 R and D on femtosecond technology supported by NEDO. For creation of industrial basic technologies supporting the advanced information society in the 21st century, ultra-high speed electronics technology including new functions beyond the speed limit of conventional electronics technologies is indispensable. From such viewpoint, this R and D aims at establishment of the basic technology necessary for ultra- high speed electronics technology through R and D of technology controlling conditions of beams and electrons in a femtosecond (10{sup -15}-10{sup -12} seconds) region. In fiscal 1998, this project first succeeded in fabrication of a prototype pulse compressor by using semiconductors, and developed a new pulse compressing method by using fibers to generate ultra-short pulse of 38fs. By developing new materials for intersubband transition where ultra-high speed responses can be expected, optical absorption by intersubband transition was first confirmed at optical communication wavelength. The main result for every theme is reported and explained. (NEDO)

  15. Semianalytical study of the propagation of an ultrastrong femtosecond laser pulse in a plasma with ultrarelativistic electron jitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanović, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.jovanovic@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Zemun (Serbia); Fedele, Renato, E-mail: renato.fedele@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy); Belić, Milivoj, E-mail: milivoj.belic@qatar.tamu.edu [Texas A and M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); De Nicola, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.denicola@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario di M.S. Angelo, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    The interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma is studied analytically and numerically in a regime with ultrarelativistic electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The study is applied to a laser wakefield acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse. These have fundamentally different dispersive properties since in the core the electrons are almost completely expelled by a very strong ponderomotive force, and the electromagnetic wave packet is imbedded in a vacuum channel, thus having (almost) linear properties. Conversely, at the pulse edges, the laser amplitude is smaller, and the wave is weakly nonlinear and dispersive. New nonlinear terms in the wave equation, introduced by the nonlinear phase, describe without the violation of imposed scaling laws a smooth transition to a nondispersive electromagnetic wave at very large intensities and a simultaneous saturation of the (initially cubic) nonlocal nonlinearity. The temporal evolution of the laser pulse is studied both analytically and by numerically solving the model equations in a two-dimensional geometry, with the spot diameter presently used in some laser acceleration experiments. The most stable initial pulse length is estimated to exceed ≳1.5–2 μm. Moderate stretching of the pulse in the direction of propagation is observed, followed by the development of a vacuum channel and of a very large

  16. Investigation of ultrafast lattice heating in thin (semi-)metal films using time-resolved electron diffraction; Untersuchung der schnellen Gitteraufheizung in duennen (Halb-)Metallfilmen mit Hilfe zeitaufgeloester Elektronenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligges, Manuel

    2009-07-21

    In the framework of the present thesis the fast lattice heating in thin metal and bismuth layers after optical short-pulse excitation was studied. By irradiation of ultrathin solid films with ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses for sort times an extreme nonequilibrium state occurs: The electronic system is strongly excited, while the lattice system remains cold. An energetic exchange between both systems follows, which is based on the electron-phonon interaction and leads to heating of the lattice system. This lattice heating can be observed by means of the Debye-Waller effect in the electron diffraction image. By means of the excitation-interrogation scheme by a series of moment records this lattice heating can be observed time-resolvedly. The experimentally determind time scales for this process permit conclusions on the electron-phonon coupling in the studied materials. In this thesis a time-resolving transmissi9on-electron diffraction experiment with sub-picosecond time resolution was constructed and optimized. By means of this experiment the fast lattice heating in thin gold, silver, copper, and bismuth films was studied. The observed heating behaviour of the metal films shows agreement with theoretical predictions of different model calculations. The results of the measurements on bismuth films show a hitherto not observed coupling behaviour. [German] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die schnelle Gitteraufheizung in duennen Metall- und Wismutschichten nach optischer Kurzimpulsanregung untersucht. Durch Bestrahlung duenner Festkoerperfilme mit ultrakurzen (Femtosekunden-) Laserimpulsen entsteht fuer kurze Zeiten ein extremer Nichtgleichgewichtszustand: Das elektronische System wird stark angeregt, waehrend das Gittersystem kalt bleibt. Es folgt ein energetischer Austausch zwischen beiden Systemen, der auf der Elektron-Phonon-Wechselwirkung beruht und zur Aufheizung des Gittersystems fuehrt. Diese Gitteraufheizung kann anhand des Debye

  17. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, Michael J; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y; Sierra, Raymond G

    2010-01-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 10 12 photons per pulse, 20 μm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  18. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z., E-mail: mmo09@slac.stanford.edu; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [Faculty of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  19. Diffraction-unlimited optical imaging of unstained living cells in liquid by electron beam scanning of luminescent environmental cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2013-11-18

    An environmental cell with a 50-nm-thick cathodoluminescent window was attached to a scanning electron microscope, and diffraction-unlimited near-field optical imaging of unstained living human lung epithelial cells in liquid was demonstrated. Electrons with energies as low as 0.8 - 1.2 kV are sufficiently blocked by the window without damaging the specimens, and form a sub-wavelength-sized illumination light source. A super-resolved optical image of the specimen adhered to the opposite window surface was acquired by a photomultiplier tube placed below. The cells after the observation were proved to stay alive. The image was formed by enhanced dipole radiation or energy transfer, and features as small as 62 nm were resolved.

  20. Detection of Intramolecular Charge Transfer and Dynamic Solvation in Eosin B by Femtosecond Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Roscioli, Jerome D.; Beck, Warren F.

    2014-06-01

    We have employed 2D electronic photon echo spectroscopy to study intramolecular charge-transfer dynamics in eosin B. After preparation of the first excited singlet state (S_1) with 40-fs excitation pulses at 520 nm, the nitro group (--NO_2) in eosin B undergoes excited state torsional motion towards a twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. As the viscosity of the surrounding solvent increases, the charge-transfer rate decreases because the twisting of the --NO_2 group is hindered. These conclusions are supported by the time evolution of the 2D spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the the ground-to-excited-state energy gap time-correlation function, M(t). In comparison to the inertial and diffusive solvation time scales exhibited by eosin Y, which lacks the nitro group, the M(t) function for eosin B exhibits under the same conditions an additional component on the 150-fs timescale that arises from quenching of the S_1 state by crossing to the TICT state. These results indicate that 2D electronic spectroscopy can be used as a sensitive probe of the rate of charge transfer in a molecular system and of the coupling to the motions of the surrounding solvent. (Supported by grant DE-SC0010847 from the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Photosynthetic Systems program.)

  1. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  2. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of processing on the microstructure of finger millet by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaraj, Usha; Parameswara, P; Somashekar, R; Malleshi, Nagappa G

    2014-03-01

    Finger millet is one of the important minor cereals, and carbohydrates form its major chemical constituent. Recently, the millet is processed to prepare hydrothermally treated (HM), decorticated (DM), expanded (EM) and popped (PM) products. The present research aims to study the changes in the microstructure of carbohydrates using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Processing the millet brought in significant changes in the carbohydrates. The native millet exhibited A-type pattern of X-ray diffraction with major peaks at 2θ values of 15.3, 17.86 and 23.15°, whereas, all other products showed V-type pattern with single major peak at 2θ values ranging from 19.39 to 19.81°. The corresponding lattice spacing and the number of unit cells in a particular direction of reflection also reduced revealing that crystallinity of starch has been decreased depending upon the processing conditions. Scanning electron microscopic studies also revealed that the orderly pattern of starch granules changed into a coherent mass due to hydrothermal treatment, while high temperature short time treatment rendered a honey-comb like structure to the product. However, the total carbohydrates and non-starch polysaccharide contents almost remained the same in all the products except for DM and EM, but the individual carbohydrate components changed significantly depending on the type of processing.

  4. Electron diffraction and resistivity measurements on the one-dimensional orthorhombic and monoclinic structures of TaS3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roucau, C.; Ayroles, R.; Monceau, P.

    1980-01-01

    Electron diffraction patterns are obtained of the orthorhombic and monoclinic structures of TaS 3 . For the orthorhombic structure one set of superlattice spots is observed at (l+-0.5)a*, (m+-0.125)b*, (n+-0.25)c* below 210 K. For the monoclinic structure two sets of superlattice spots are observed, the first one at la*, (m+-0.253)b*, nc* below 240 K, the second one at (l+-0.5)a*, (m+-0.245)b*, (n+-0.5)c* below 160 K. Diffuse scattering lines are present for the two structures. Resistivity measurements are performed on crystals with the two structures which show strong increase of the resistivity indicating metal-semiconducting transitions at the same temperatures where the superlattice spots appear. These transitions are interpreted as successive Peierls transitions on the different types of chains of TaS 3 . Also electron diffraction patterns are shown of NbSe 3 at very low temperatures where the two charge density waves that occur at 145 and 59 K are formed. A comparison is given between TaS 3 and NbSe 3 . (author)

  5. Camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajt, Sasa; Chapman, Henry N.; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Alameda, Jennifer B.; Woods, Bruce W.; Frank, Matthias; Bogan, Michael J.; Barty, Anton; Boutet, Sebastien; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Hajdu, Janos; Shapiro, David

    2008-01-01

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The camera consists of a laterally graded multilayer mirror, which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter for both the wavelength and the angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from nonsample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 . The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates onto a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beam stop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) FEL (i.e., between 6 and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32, 16, 13.5, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH FEL with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance

  6. Electron-lattice energy relaxation in laser-excited thin-film Au-insulator heterostructures studied by ultrafast MeV electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Shen, X; Zheng, Q; Chase, T; Coffee, R; Jerman, M; Li, R K; Ligges, M; Makasyuk, I; Mo, M; Reid, A H; Rethfeld, B; Vecchione, T; Weathersby, S P; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2017-09-01

    We apply time-resolved MeV electron diffraction to study the electron-lattice energy relaxation in thin film Au-insulator heterostructures. Through precise measurements of the transient Debye-Waller-factor, the mean-square atomic displacement is directly determined, which allows to quantitatively follow the temporal evolution of the lattice temperature after short pulse laser excitation. Data obtained over an extended range of laser fluences reveal an increased relaxation rate when the film thickness is reduced or the Au-film is capped with an additional insulator top-layer. This behavior is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons in the Au film to phonons in the adjacent insulator layer(s). Analysis of the data using the two-temperature-model taking explicitly into account the additional energy loss at the interface(s) allows to deduce the relative strength of the two relaxation channels.

  7. Temperature-induced itinerant-electron metamagnetism in ErCo3 studied by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Markosyan, A.S.; Gaidukova, I.Yu.; Rodimin, V.E.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Hoser, A.; Stuesser, N.

    2002-01-01

    Powder neutron diffraction studies in the temperature range from 2 K to 450 K of the ferrimagnetic ErCo 3 compound (T C =401 K) revealed an increase of the unit-cell volume at 100 K (T m ) when cooling down (ΔV/V∼4 x 10 -3 ). This is referred to as a temperature-induced change in the Co sublattice magnetization from a low-magnetic state (T>T m ) to a high-magnetic state (T m ). From the temperature variation of the sublattice magnetization (ErI (3a sites), ErII (6c), CoI (3b), CoII (6c) and CoIII (18h)) it was found that the Co moments at the 6c and 18h sites change near 100 K, giving rise to the volume anomaly at T m . A qualitative discussion of the mechanism behind this phenomenon is given. (orig.)

  8. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  9. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pompili, Riccardo; Bellaveglia, M; Biagioni, A; Castorina, G; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Croia, M; Di Giovenale, D; Ferrario, M; Filippi, F; Gallo, A; Gatti, G; Giorgianni, F; Giribono, A; Li, W; Lupi, S; Mostacci, A; Petrarca, M; Piersanti, L; Di Pirro, G; Romeo, S; Scifo, J; Shpakov, V; Vaccarezza, C; Villa, F

    2017-01-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  10. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompili, R; Anania, M P; Bellaveglia, M; Biagioni, A; Castorina, G; Chiadroni, E; Croia, M; Giovenale, D Di; Ferrario, M; Gallo, A; Gatti, G; Cianchi, A; Filippi, F; Giorgianni, F; Giribono, A; Lupi, S; Mostacci, A; Petrarca, M; Piersanti, L; Li, W

    2016-01-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC-LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations. (paper)

  11. Amorphous to crystalline phase transition in carbon induced by intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaudin, J.; Peyrusse, O.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Toufarová, Martina; Vyšín, Luděk; Hájková, Věra; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, Tomáš; Dastjani-Farahani, S.; Graf, A.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Hoffmann, G.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; London, R.A.; Moeller, S.; Sinn, H.; Schorb, S.; Störmer, M.; Tschentscher, T.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Vu, H.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2012), "024103-1"-"024103-7" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : amorphous carbon * phase transition * graphitization * x-ray laser * free-electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  12. Amorphization of silicon by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jimmy; Li Ming; Thompson, Carl V.

    2004-01-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to drill submicron holes in single crystal silicon films in silicon-on-insulator structures. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of material adjacent to the ablated holes indicates the formation of a layer of amorphous Si. This demonstrates that even when material is ablated using femtosecond pulses near the single pulse ablation threshold, sufficient heating of the surrounding material occurs to create a molten zone which solidifies so rapidly that crystallization is bypassed

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of transparent microphotonic devices and computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Montelongo, Yunuen; Penchev, Pavel; Yetisen, Ali K; Dimov, Stefan; Butt, Haider

    2017-09-21

    Femtosecond laser ablation allows direct patterning of engineering materials in industrial settings without requiring multistage processes such as photolithography or electron beam lithography. However, femtosecond lasers have not been widely used to construct volumetric microphotonic devices and holograms with high reliability and cost efficiency. Here, a direct femtosecond laser writing process is developed to rapidly produce transmission 1D/2D gratings, Fresnel Zone Plate lenses, and computer-generated holograms. The optical properties including light transmission, angle-dependent resolution, and light polarization effects for the microphotonic devices have been characterized. Varying the depth of the microgratings from 400 nm to 1.5 μm allowed the control over their transmission intensity profile. The optical properties of the 1D/2D gratings were validated through a geometrical theory of diffraction model involving 2D phase modulation. The produced Fresnel lenses had transmission efficiency of ∼60% at normal incidence and they preserved the polarization of incident light. The computer-generated holograms had an average transmission efficiency of 35% over the visible spectrum. These microphotonic devices had wettability resistance of contact angle ranging from 44° to 125°. These devices can be used in a variety of applications including wavelength-selective filters, dynamic displays, fiber optics, and biomedical devices.

  14. Control of the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 superalloy by femtosecond laser beam cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.; Ye, Y.; Sun, Z. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Liu, L., E-mail: liulei@tsinghua.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zou, G., E-mail: sunzhg@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Effects of processing parameters on the kerf size in Inconel 738 are investigated. • Defocus is a key parameter affecting the kerf width due to the intensity clamping. • The internal surface microstructures with different scanning speed are presented. • The material removal mechanism contains normal vaporization and phase explosion. • Oxidation mechanism is attributed to the trapping effect of the dangling bonds. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser beam cutting is becoming widely used to meet demands for increasing accuracy in micro-machining. In this paper, the effects of processing parameters in femtosecond laser beam cutting on the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 have been investigated. The defocus, pulse width and scanning speed were selected to study the controllability of the cutting process. Adjusting and matching the processing parameters was a basic enhancement method to acquire well defined kerf size and the high-quality ablation of microstructures, which has contributed to the intensity clamping effect. The morphology and chemical compositions of these microstructures on the cut surface have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the material removal mechanism and oxidation mechanism on the Inconel 738 cut surface have also been discussed on the basis of the femtosecond laser induced normal vaporization or phase explosion, and trapping effect of the dangling bonds.

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring of molybdenum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biophotonics Lab: National Laser Centre Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano, Itala (Italy); Sechoghela, P.; Mongwaketsi, N. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)–CNR, Piazza Leanardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Color change of the molybdenum thin film from shinny to violet–yellowish color after laser irradiation at various laser powers. • Formation of the molybdenum dioxide coating after laser exposure, as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction spectrometry. • Selective solar absorbing nature of the laser exposed films. • Study of the binding energies is presented in this contribution using the XPS spectrometry. - Abstract: This contribution reports on the femtosecond surface structuring of molybdenum thin coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation onto Corning glass substrates. The 1-D type periodic grating lines created by such an ablation showed that the widths of the shallow grooves followed a logarithmic dependence with the laser energy incident on the molybdenum film. The electronic valence “x” of the created oxide surface layer MoO{sub x} was found to be incident laser power dependent via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations. Such a photo-induced MoO{sub x}–Mo nanocomposite exhibited effective selective solar absorption in the UV–vis–IR spectral range.

  16. Electron density distribution in ferromagnetic nickel: A γ -ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, W.; Reehuis, M.

    2008-12-01

    High-accuracy single-crystal structure factors, complete up to sinθ/λ=1.9Å-1 , have been measured from ferromagnetic nickel at 295 K using 316.5-keV gamma radiation. The experimental uncertainty of the structure factors is of the order of 10 millielectrons per atom for all data. A detailed description of the electron density distribution is presented in terms of a multipolar atomic deformation model. Achievement of a reliable Debye-Waller factor is of vital importance in this context. The charge asphericity is due to an excess eg orbital occupancy of 43.4(2)%. The 3d shell in the metal is contracted by 2.07(5)% relative to the free atom. The results are discussed and compared with earlier experimental and theoretical works. In contrast to bcc Cr and Fe, solid-state effects are less pronounced in fcc Ni. Clear disentanglement between the 3d and 4s valence electrons could be accomplished for the first time. The general expectation that the number of 3d electrons in the metal should be increased as compared to the atom was confirmed in the case of iron by combining spin and charge-density data. In the case of nickel, it is rejected as revealed by the γ -ray data alone. Only with the d8 configuration, consistency is achieved between observed and refined mosaic widths of the sample crystal. A 3d8 configuration implies that the majority-spin d band cannot be full. Strong support is lent to a localized atomic character of the valence electrons.

  17. Non-destructive assessment of the polarity of GaN nanowire ensembles using low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Fernández-Garrido, S.; Jiříček, Petr; Bartoš, Igor; Geelhaar, L.; Brandt, O.; Paskova, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 2 (2015), "021602-1"-"021602-4" ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101201 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : GaN nanowires * X-ray photoelectron diffraction * LEED I-V * GaN polarity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  18. Assessment of surface hardening effects from shot peening on a Ni-based alloy using electron backscatter diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, D.J.; West, G.D.; Thomson, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    An electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)-based tool is described to assess the depth of strain-hardening effects of shot-peening treatments applied to the Ni-based superalloy, Udimet (copy right) alloy 720Li. The method consists of a statistical analysis of a number of data points from each grain scanned based on the grain orientation spread and their relative position from the shot-peened edge. The output is a quantitative measure of the depth of strain-hardening effects. The tool is used at various shot-peening intensities to demonstrate the ability to distinguish between these changes, using a range of intensities from 4 to 10 Almen. An increase in shot-peening intensity is observed to increase the depth of strain-hardening effects in the alloy. A comparison with residual stress measurements using X-ray diffraction for the same material shows that the strain-hardened depth determined by EBSD extends to approximately half the distance of the residual stress present due to shot peening. A comparison is also made with predicted profiles from the Peenstress SM model and subsequent microhardness testing. A positive correlation is observed between strained hardened depth and surface roughness of the peened samples. In each case, the increases in surface roughness and strain-hardened depth diminish toward the upper end of the shot-peening intensity range studied for this alloy.

  19. Single-pass high-gain tapered free-electron laser with transverse diffraction in the postsaturation regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ying Tsai

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been well known that the resonant interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron beam and the radiation field in the single-pass high-gain free electron laser (FEL amplifier leads to the optical gain guiding. The transverse Laplacian term of the slowly varying wave equation in the linear regime can be approximated as a constant detuning parameter, i.e., |∇_{⊥}^{2}|∼k_{R}/z_{R} where k_{R} is the resonant wave number and z_{R} is the Rayleigh range of the laser. In the post-saturation regime, the radiation power begins to oscillate about an equilibrium for the untapered case while continues to grow by undulator tapering. Moreover, in this regime the gain guiding decreases and the simple constant detune is no longer valid. In this paper we study the single-pass high-gain FEL performance in the post-saturation regime with inclusion of diffraction effect and undulator tapering. Our analysis relies upon two constants of motion, one from the energy conservation and the other from the adiabatic invariant of the action variable. By constructing a two-dimensional axisymmetric wave equation and the coupled one-dimensional electron dynamical equations, the performance of a tapered FEL in the postsaturation regime can be analyzed, including the fundamental mode profile, the power efficiency and the scaled energy spread. We begin the analytical investigation with two different axisymmetric electron beam profiles, the uniform and bounded parabolic ones. It is found that the tapered FEL power efficiency can be smaller but close to the taper ratio provided the resonant phase remains constant and the beam-wave is properly matched. Such a tapered efficiency is nearly independent of transverse electron beam size before significant electron detrapping occurs. This is essentially different from the untapered case, where the power extraction efficiency is around the essential FEL gain bandwidth (or ρ, the Pierce or FEL parameter and depends on the beam

  20. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-01-01

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY

  1. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mueller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA. The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.

  2. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The molecular structure of 4-methylpyridine-N-oxide: Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Natalya V.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Kotova, Vitaliya E.; Korolkova, Kseniya A.; Trang, Nguyen Hoang

    2018-03-01

    The molecular structure of 4-methylpiridine-N-oxide, 4-MePyO, has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction monitored by mass spectrometry (GED/MS) and quantum chemical (DFT) calculations. Both, quantum chemistry and GED analyses resulted in CS molecular symmetry with the planar pyridine ring. Obtained molecular parameters confirm the hyperconjugation in the pyridine ring and the sp2 hybridization concept of the nitrogen and carbon atoms in the ring. The experimental geometric parameters are in a good agreement with the parameters for non-substituted N-oxide and reproduced very closely by DFT calculations. The presence of the electron-donating CH3 substituent in 4-MePyO leads to a decrease of the ipso-angle and to an increase of r(N→O) in comparison with the non-substituted PyO. Electron density distribution analysis has been performed in terms of natural bond orbitals (NBO) scheme. The nature of the semipolar N→O bond is discussed.

  4. Atmospheric deterioration of clean surface of epitaxial (001)-YBaCuO films studied by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Tomoyuki; Sakuta, Ken; Kamishiro, Makio; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1991-01-01

    The effects of gas exposure on the clean surface of the epitaxial YBaCuO thin films were closely investigated using the low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) method. The clean surface was obtained by in-vacuum annealing at 500degC. Once the clean surface was exposed to air, even at room temperature, the LEED spots disappeared or sometimes became faint. To ensure the degradation mechanism of the YBaCuO clean surface, the specimens were exposed to pure O 2 and N 2 gases separately and measured by LEED. As a result, it was found that O 2 is very safe but N 2 serves as a poisonous gas for the YBaCuO clean surface. (author)

  5. Analysis of recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite reconstructed from electron backscattering diffraction orientation maps of lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Manabu; Ushioda, Kohsaku; Miyamoto, Goro; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite of a 0.55% C steel at 800 °C was investigated by a method of reconstructing the parent austenite orientation map from an electron backscattering diffraction orientation map of lath martensite. Recrystallized austenite grains were clearly distinguished from un-recrystallized austenite grains. Very good correlation was confirmed between the static recrystallization behavior investigated mechanically by double-hit compression tests and the change in austenite microstructure evaluated by the reconstruction method. The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed 0.55% C steel at 800 °C is directly revealed and it was observed that by addition of 0.1% V the recrystallization was significantly retarded.

  6. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data for amyloid formation of Aβ40 and Aβ42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Selivanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “One of the possible mechanisms of amyloid fibrils formation based on the sizes of primary and secondary folding nuclei of Aβ40 and Aβ42” (Dovidchenko et al., 2016 [1]. Aβ peptide is one of the most intensively studied amyloidogenic peptides. Despite the huge number of articles devoted to studying different fragments of Aβ peptide there are only several papers with correct kinetics data, also there are a few papers with X-ray data, especially for Aβ42. Our data present X-ray diffraction patterns both for Aβ40 and Aβ42 as well for Tris–HCl and wax. Moreover, our data provide kinetics of amyloid formation by recombinant Аβ40 and synthetic Аβ42 peptides by using electron microscopy.

  7. Deformation micro-mechanism for compression of magnesium alloys at room temperature analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, G.S.; Chen, Q.Q.; Zhang, S.H.; Xu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ tracking on the evolution of grains orientation of magnesium alloy was carried out by EBSD. • Distributions of twin bands were closely related to the activation of extension twin variants. • Activation of extension twin significantly changes the order of Schmid factor of slips. • Pyramidal slips become the dominant deformation mode at the late stage of compression. - Abstract: In-situ tracking on the evolution of grains orientation of rolled magnesium alloy sheets compressed uniaxially at room temperature was carried out by the method of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and meanwhile, distributions of twin bands, activations of twin and slips were also analyzed. The results show that the distributions of twin bands were closely related to the activation of extension twin variants. The activation of extension twin significantly changes the order of Schmid factor of different slips, and accordingly affects the activation of slips during the subsequent deformation

  8. Photoelectron diffraction from single oriented molecules: Towards ultrafast structure determination of molecules using x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Misato; Fujikawa, Takashi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Mizuno, Tomoya; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We provide a molecular structure determination method, based on multiple-scattering x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) calculations. This method is applied to our XPD data on several molecules having different equilibrium geometries. Then it is confirmed that, by our method, bond lengths and bond angles can be determined with a resolution of less than 0.1 Å and 10∘, respectively. Differently from any other scenario of ultrafast structure determination, we measure the two- or three-dimensional XPD of aligned or oriented molecules in the energy range from 100 to 200 eV with a 4π detection velocity map imaging spectrometer. Thanks to the intense and ultrashort pulse properties of x-ray free-electron lasers, our approach exhibits the most probable method for obtaining ultrafast real-time structural information on small to medium-sized molecules consisting of light elements, i.e., a “molecular movie.”

  9. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  10. Convergent-beam electron diffraction study of incommensurately modulated crystals. Pt. 2. (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    The convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) method for determining three-dimensional space groups is extended to the determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups for one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. It is clarified than an approximate dynamical extinction line appears in the CBED discs of the reflections caused by an incommensurate modulation. The extinction enables the space-group determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional crystals or the one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. An example of the dynamical extinction line is shown using an incommensurately modulated crystal of Sr 2 Nb 2 O 7 . Tables of the dynamical extinction lines appearing in CBED patterns are given for all the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups of the incommensurately modulated crystal. (orig.)

  11. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  12. Characterization of x-ray diffraction and electron spin resonance: Effects of sintering time and temperature on bovine hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusrini, Eny; Sontang, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of a hydroxyapatite produced by the sintering of bovine bone were investigated by powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron spin resonance (ESR), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). A bovine bone powder was sintered at different temperatures ranging from 500 to 1400 °C. The influences of post-irradiation storage on the radiation ESR response of the bovine bone powder before and after sintering were also studied. The results indicate that the sintered bovine bone powder contained hydroxyapatite. Diffraction patterns were sharp and clear based on the (211), (300), and (202) reflections corresponding to bovine hydroxyapatite (BHA), which confirmed the phase purity and high crystalline grade of the BHA produced. The PXRD profile of BHA was dependent on sintering temperatures and times. The molecular formula of BHA was determined by Rietveld analysis showed a similar structure and composition to calcium hydroxyapatite in hexagonal P6 3 /m space group a=b=9.435 Å and c=6.895 Å. ESR data showed that the sintering process can decrease the number of free radicals in BHA; it also revealed that the number of free radicals is constant during long storage periods (75 days). The sintering technique described in this study may be used to extract hydroxyapatite from biowaste bovine bone, leading to its application as a bone filler. - Highlights: ► Natural hydroxyapatite was produced from the bio-wasting bovine bones by sintering method. ► PXRD profile of BHA is dependent on the different temperatures and times in sintering process. ► ESR data is useful to study the typical of free radicals formed in the samples after irradiation. ► Stability and physicochemical properties of BHA is dependent on the different storage times. ► Technique is able to be used to find the natural hydroxyapatite applicable for bone filler.

  13. Photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1991-10-01

    Successful operation of short wavelength FEL requires an electron bunch of current >100 A and normalized emittance < 1 mm-mrad. Recent experiments show that RF guns with photocathodes as the electron source may be the ideal candidate for achieving these parameters. To reduce the emittance growth due to space charge and RF dynamics effects, the gun may have to operate at high field gradient (hence at high RF frequency) and a spot size small compared to the aperture. This may necessitate the laser pulse duration to be in the subpicosecond regime to reduce the energy spread. We will present the behavior of metal photocathodes upon irradiation with femtosecond laser beams, comparison of linear and nonlinear photoemission, and scalability to high currents. Theoretical estimate of the intrinsic emittance at the photocathode in the presence of the anomalous heating of the electrons, and the tolerance on the surface roughness of the cathode material will be discussed

  14. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Katherine J.

    This thesis focuses on research I have done on ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers. These lasers operate in the near infrared region, lasing at 1030 nm. This wavelength is particularly important in biomedical applications, which includes but is not limited to confocal microscopy and ablation for surgical incisions. Furthermore, fiber lasers are advantageous compared to solid state lasers in terms of their cost, form factor, and ease of use. Solid state lasers still dominate the market due to their comparatively high energy pulses. High energy pulse generation in fiber lasers is hindered by either optical wave breaking or by multipulsing. One of the main challenges for fiber lasers is to overcome these limitations to achieve high energy pulses. The motivation for the work done in this thesis is increasing the output pulse peak power and energy. The main idea of the work is that decreasing the nonlinearity that acts on the pulse inside the cavity will prevent optical wave breaking, and thus will generate higher energy pulses. By increasing the output energy, ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers can be competitive with solid state lasers which are used commonly in research. Although fiber lasers tend to lack the wavelength tuning ability of solid state lasers, many biomedical applications take advantage of the 1030 microm central wavelength of ytterbium-doped fiber lasers, so the major limiting factor of fiber lasers in this field is simply the output power. By increasing the output energy without resorting to external amplification, the cavity is optimized and cost can remain low and economical. During verification of the main idea, the cavity was examined for possible back-reflections and for components with narrow spectral bandwidths which may have contributed to the presence of multipulsing. Distinct cases of multipulsing, bound pulse and harmonic mode-locking, were observed and recorded as they may be of more interest in the future. The third

  15. Structure determination of disordered organic molecules on surfaces from the Bragg spots of low-energy electron diffraction and total energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, H.C.; Weinert, M.; Saldin, D.K.; Stacchiola, D.; Zheng, T.; Tysoe, W.T.

    2004-01-01

    We show that an analysis of the intensity versus energy variation of Bragg spots due to low-energy electron diffraction from a disordered overlayer of molecules on a crystal surface allows a much more convenient method of determining the local adsorption geometries of such molecules than previously analyzed weak diffuse diffraction patterns. For the case of methanol on Pd(111), we show that the geometry determined by this means from experimental diffraction data is in excellent agreement with the predictions of density functional total energy calculations

  16. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire; Quey, Romain [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, CNRS, UMR5307, Laboratoire Georges Friedel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-04-28

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  17. Phasing of the Triatoma virus diffraction data using a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrozi, L.F.; Neumann, E.; Squires, G.; Rozas-Dennis, G.; Costabel, M.; Rey, F.A.; Guerin, D.M.A.; Navaza, J.

    2008-01-01

    The blood-sucking reduviid bug Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vector of American human trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is infected by the Triatoma virus (TrV). TrV has been classified as a member of the Cripavirus genus (type cricket paralysis virus) in the Dicistroviridae family. This work presents the three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction of the TrV capsid at about 25 A resolution and its use as a template for phasing the available crystallographic data by the molecular replacement method. The main structural differences between the cryo-EM reconstruction of TrV and other two viruses, one from the same family, the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the human rhinovirus 16 from the Picornaviridae family are presented and discussed

  18. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  19. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao, E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-03-21

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  20. Fiscal 1997 report under consignment from NEDO on the R and D of femto-second technology (development of ultra short pulse optoelectronics technology); 1997 nendo Shin energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku femto gyo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu (chotan pulse ko electronics gijutsu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Very high speed electronics technology is indispensable for the creation of industrial base technology which supports high grade informatizing in the 21st century. The state of light and electronics is controlled in the femto-second time domain. As to the development of femto-second light pulse generation/transmission technology, mode synchronous semiconductor laser was manufactured using the strain quantum well structure aiming at heightening profit, and the repeated frequency, 166GHz, was achieved. Relating to the pulse compression element, exciton photonic band was newly designed. A technology of coding was also studied. As to the development of technology of femto-second light pulse control/distribution, shortening of the wavelength down to 1.5{mu}m and a possibility of femto-second domain high speed response were indicated by the combined double quantum well structure. The quantitative measurement of spin relaxation characteristics was successfully made. By the Mach-Zehnder light switch, obtained was the world`s fastest light switching characteristic. To realize the femto-second class very high speed element, conditions were grasped on the crystal growth of Sb based ultra thin films operating in the 1.5{mu}m zone by studying the quantum well using transition among sub-bands. 242 refs., 280 figs., 12 tabs.