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Sample records for femoral condyle friction

  1. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D.; Roger, B.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  2. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, University of California, San Diego (United States); Roger, B. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  3. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis.

    Simeone, F Joseph; Huang, Ambrose J; Chang, Connie Y; Smith, Maximilian; Gill, Thomas J; Bredella, Miriam A; Torriani, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome.

  4. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Boston Sports Medicine and Research Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  5. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin; Gill, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  7. Simultaneous avascular necrosis of both medial and lateral femoral condyles

    Mansberg, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Avascular necrosis (AVN) of a femoral condyle is a common orthopaedic condition. While both medial and lateral femoral condyles may be involved either singly or sequentially the simultaneous occurrence of AVN of both femoral condyles is extremely uncommon. A 57-year-old male is presented who developed the onset of severe left sided knee pain suddenly at rest. Plain and tomographic radiography was unremarkable and a bone scan was performed. Markedly increased vascularity was demonstrated in the left knee with intense osteoblastic activity in the left medial and femoral condyles more marked in the lateral femoral condyle. A diagnosis of AVN of both femoral condyles was made and a MRI exam was performed to confirm this unusual diagnosis. The MRI showed a diffuse increase in intensity bilaterally with subtle bony change in the subarticular bone consistent with AVN more marked in the left lateral femoral condyle. The patients' symptoms resolved with supportive treatment. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery

    Al-Kaar, M.; Garcia, J.; Fritschy, D.; Bonvin, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery. Retrospective review of 10 patients who presented with avascular necrosis of the ipsilateral femoral condyle following arthroscopic meniscectomy (9 medial, 1 lateral). The bone lesions were evaluated by radiography and MRI, which were repeated for few patients. MRI allows earlier diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral condyle and offers an evaluation of extent of the lesions whose evolution is variable: 3 patients required a knee prosthesis, the other 7 patients were treated medically. (authors)

  9. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery; Osteonecrose aseptique du condyle femoral apres meniscectomie par voie arthroscopique

    Al-Kaar, M.; Garcia, J. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Fritschy, D.; Bonvin, J.C. [Policlinique de Chirurgie, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle after arthroscopic surgery. Retrospective review of 10 patients who presented with avascular necrosis of the ipsilateral femoral condyle following arthroscopic meniscectomy (9 medial, 1 lateral). The bone lesions were evaluated by radiography and MRI, which were repeated for few patients. MRI allows earlier diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral condyle and offers an evaluation of extent of the lesions whose evolution is variable: 3 patients required a knee prosthesis, the other 7 patients were treated medically. (authors). 21 refs.

  10. Femoral Condyle Fracture during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Selahattin Ozyurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,We have greatly enjoyed reading the case report entitled “‘Femoral Condyle Fracture during Revision of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Case Report and a Review of Literature in the issue of Arch Bone Jt Surg. 2015;3(2 with great interest. We would like to commend the authors for their detailed and valuable work. Although various case reports have described postoperative distal femur fracture at a range of time intervals (1,2 intraoperative intra-articular distal femur fracture is a unique entity.However, we believe that some important additional observations seem necessary to be contributed through this study. In this article, the authors stated that, to the best of their knowledge, there is no other case report in the literature introducing a femoral condyle fracture during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction or revision reconstruction. Nevertheless, we would like to call the attention of the readers to the fact that that the literature contains one additional case report re‌porting on intraoperative distal femoral coronal plane (Hoffa fracture during primary ACL reconstruction (2. Werner BC and Miller MD presented of case report of an intraoperative distal femoral coronal plane (Hoffa fracture that occurred during independent femoral tunnel drilling and dilation in a primary ACL reconstruction. As in the their case, this type of fracture can occur with appropriately placed femoral tunnels, but the risk can increase with larger graft diameters in patients with smaller lateral femoral condyles The patient was treated with open reduction and internal fixation, without compromise of graft stability and with good recovery of function. We believe that tailoring graft size to the size of the patient is important to prevent similar adverse events.

  11. Osteoarthritis of the patella, lateral femoral condyle and posterior medial femoral condyle correlate with range of motion.

    Suzuki, Takashi; Motojima, Sayaka; Saito, Shu; Ishii, Takao; Ryu, Keinosuke; Ryu, Junnosuke; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki

    2013-11-01

    The type of osteoarthritis and the degree of severity which causes restriction of knee range of motion (ROM) is still largely unknown. The objective of this study was to analyse the location and the degree of cartilage degeneration that affect knee range of motion and the connection, if any, between femorotibial angle (FTA) and knee ROM restriction. Four hundreds and fifty-six knees in 230 subjects with knee osteoarthritis undergoing knee arthroplasty were included. Articular surface was divided into eight sections, and cartilage degeneration was evaluated macroscopically during the operation. Cartilage degeneration was classified into four grades based on the degree of exposure of subchondral bone. A Pearson correlation was conducted between FTA and knee flexion angle to determine whether high a degree of FTA caused knee flexion restriction. A logistic regression analysis was also conducted to detect the locations and levels of cartilage degeneration causing knee flexion restriction. No correlation was found between FTA and flexion angle (r = -0.08). Flexion angle was not restricted with increasing FTA. Logistic regression analysis showed significant correlation between restricted knee ROM and levels of knee cartilage degeneration in the patella (odds ratio (OR) = 1.77; P = 0.01), the lateral femoral condyle (OR = 1.62; P = 0.03) and the posterior medial femoral condyle (OR = 1.80; P = 0.03). For clinical relevance, soft tissue release and osteophyte resection around the patella, lateral femoral condyle and posterior medial femoral condyle might be indicated to obtain a higher degree of knee flexion angle.

  12. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament with erosion of the lateral femoral condyle

    Melloni, Pietro; Valls, Rafael; Yuguero, Mariano; Saez, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that produced osseous erosion of the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle. The MRI findings and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Anatomic variability of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle: an anatomical study

    Trung-Hau Le Thua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The anatomical study and clinical application for the vascularized corticoperiosteal flap from the medial femoral condyle have been performed and described previously. Although prior studies have described the composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, a detailed analysis of the vascularity of this region has not yet been fully evaluated. Methods: This anatomical study described the variability of the arteries from the medial femoral condyle in 40 cadaveric specimens. Results: The descending genicular artery (DGA was found in 33 of 40 cases (82.5%. The  superomedial genicular artery (SGA was present in 10 cases (25%. All 33 cases (100% of the DGA had articular branches to the periosteum of the medial femoral condyle. Muscular branches and saphenous branches of the DGA were present in 25 cases (62.5% and 26 cases (70.3%, respectively. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates that the size and length of the vessels to the medial femoral condyle are sufficient for a vascularized bone flap. A careful preoperative vascular assessment is essential prior to use of the vascularized composite osteomyocutaneous flap from the medial femoral condyle, because of the considerable anatomical variations in different branches of the DGA.

  14. Ossification variants of the femoral condyles are not associated with osteochondritis dissecans

    Jans, L., E-mail: lennartjans@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Jaremko, J., E-mail: jjaremko@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Alberta Hospital, 8440-112 Street, Edmonton T6G 2B7, Alberta (Canada); Ditchfield, M., E-mail: Michael.ditchfield@southernhealth.org.au [Department of Radiology, Monash University Clayton Campus, Wellington Road, Clayton 3800, VIC (Australia); De Coninck, T., E-mail: Tinekedeconinck@ugent.be [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Huysse, W., E-mail: Wouter.huysse@ugent.be [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Moon, A., E-mail: Anna.moon@rch.org.au [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville 3052, VIC (Australia); Verstraete, K., E-mail: Koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine if ossification variants of the femoral condyles involving the subchondral bone plate are associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Materials and methods: The prevalence of ossification variants of the unaffected femoral condyle in 116 patients (aged 9-14 years) with unicondylar OCD on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the knee was compared to a control group of 579 patients (aged 9-14 years) without OCD. The evolution of the ossification variants in both groups was studied by reviewing follow-up MR imaging side by side with the baseline study. Results: The prevalence of ossification variants in the unaffected condyle in patients with OCD (12.9%) and in the control group of patients without OCD (12.6%) was similar (p = 0.88). Evolution of ossification variants to OCD was not seen on follow-up MRI examinations. All variants had decreased in size or were no longer visible. Conclusion: Ossification variants of the femoral condyle that involve the subchondral bone plate are not associated with OCD. Clinical relevance statement: Ossification variants are not associated with OCD, indicating that routine MRI follow-up in affected children is not mandatory.

  15. Ossification variants of the femoral condyles are not associated with osteochondritis dissecans

    Jans, L.; Jaremko, J.; Ditchfield, M.; De Coninck, T.; Huysse, W.; Moon, A.; Verstraete, K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if ossification variants of the femoral condyles involving the subchondral bone plate are associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Materials and methods: The prevalence of ossification variants of the unaffected femoral condyle in 116 patients (aged 9–14 years) with unicondylar OCD on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the knee was compared to a control group of 579 patients (aged 9–14 years) without OCD. The evolution of the ossification variants in both groups was studied by reviewing follow-up MR imaging side by side with the baseline study. Results: The prevalence of ossification variants in the unaffected condyle in patients with OCD (12.9%) and in the control group of patients without OCD (12.6%) was similar (p = 0.88). Evolution of ossification variants to OCD was not seen on follow-up MRI examinations. All variants had decreased in size or were no longer visible. Conclusion: Ossification variants of the femoral condyle that involve the subchondral bone plate are not associated with OCD. Clinical relevance statement: Ossification variants are not associated with OCD, indicating that routine MRI follow-up in affected children is not mandatory.

  16. Anomalies of ossification in the posterolateral femoral condyle: assessment by MRI

    Nawata, K.; Teshima, Ryota; Morio, Yasuo; Hagino, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonaga (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Background. Anomalies of ossification in the lower femoral epiphysis are often radiographically indistinguishable from juvenile osteochondritis dissecans. Objective. To clarify the MRI characteristics of the anomalies of ossification in the posterolateral femoral condyle that distinguish it from juvenile osteochondritis dissecans. Materials and methods. We retrospectively examined the medical records, plain radiographs (n = 4), MRI (n = 4) and follow-up MRI (n = 2) of four boys (age 8-11 years) with anomalies of ossification in the posterolateral femoral condyle. Results. Plain radiography showed symmetrical marginal irregularity of the posterolateral femoral condyles of both knees. These lesions were asymptomatic, and the areas of irregular radiographic appearances reduced in size or disappeared without treatment within a mean observation period of 3.5 months. MRI showed a clearly demarcated low-intensity islet with the same signal intensity as subchondral bone (which was considered to be an accessory ossification nucleus) in a high-signal area in which the signal intensity was equal to that of normal articular cartilage. The areas observed as radiolucent zones on plain radiography were visualised at the same signal intensity as articular cartilage, and were continuous with articular cartilage on MRI; thus they were regarded as uncalcified cartilage. These MR findings are different from MR images of osteochondritis dissecans. Conclusions. MRI is considered to be the most effective non-invasive diagnostic method for these two conditions. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  17. Subchondral Impaction Fractures of the Medial Femoral Condyle in Weightlifters: A Report of 5 Cases.

    Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał Tomasz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Krochmalski, Marek; Domżalski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Although subchondral impaction fractures have already been reported in the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle, this study reveals the presence of an intra-articular impaction fracture of the postero-superior region of the non-weight-bearing portion of the medial femoral condyle recognized in 5 of a group of 22 representatives of the Polish national Olympic weightlifting team, who underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging examination. Articular cartilage lesions varied with regard to the type of injury and its severity ranging from healed or subchronic injuries to acute trauma. All described individuals had no clinical history of acute knee trauma and only 3 of them had minor pain symptoms. The accumulation of microtraumas occurring during participation in particular activities associated with weightlifting training seems to be responsible for the development of this type of contusion. This is the first description of impaction fracture observed in this location in professional weightlifters.

  18. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with tibial plateau and femoral condyle insufficiency stress fracture

    Narvaez, J.A.; Narvaez, J.; Lama, E.De; Sanchez, A. [Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, IDI Hospital Duran i Reynals, Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge, Gran Via s/n, 08907, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the association between spontaneous osteonecrosis and insufficiency stress fractures of the knee. To determine whether insufficiency stress fracture is associated with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, we retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and imaging studies of all patients with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, studied by MR imaging, seen in a tertiary hospital over an 8-year period. Four women (age range 66-84 years) presented spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau. One of these patients also presented a concomitant insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle. Radiographs were diagnostic of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle in three cases, and insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was detected in one case. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the diagnosis of both conditions in all four cases. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee may be associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle and the medial tibial plateau. This association provides additional arguments in favor of the traumatic etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of knee. (orig.)

  19. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with tibial plateau and femoral condyle insufficiency stress fracture

    Narvaez, J.A.; Narvaez, J.; Lama, E.De; Sanchez, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the association between spontaneous osteonecrosis and insufficiency stress fractures of the knee. To determine whether insufficiency stress fracture is associated with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, we retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and imaging studies of all patients with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, studied by MR imaging, seen in a tertiary hospital over an 8-year period. Four women (age range 66-84 years) presented spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau. One of these patients also presented a concomitant insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle. Radiographs were diagnostic of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle in three cases, and insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was detected in one case. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the diagnosis of both conditions in all four cases. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee may be associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle and the medial tibial plateau. This association provides additional arguments in favor of the traumatic etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of knee. (orig.)

  20. [Intramedullary nailing combined with cannulated screw in treating femoral condyles fractures].

    Shen, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Hao; Long, Da-Fu; Li, Zheng-Wen; Tan, Ying-Dong

    2017-07-25

    To observe the clinical effects of retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws in the treatment of femoral condylar fracture. From June 2009 to June 2015, 13 patients with femoral condyles fracture were treated by retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws including 6 males and 7 females with an average age of 46.1 years old ranging from 16 to 76 years old. There were 10 cases of closed fractures, 3 cases of open fraetures. According to AO classification criteriam, 4 cases were type C1, 7 cases were type C2, 2 cases were type C3. Postoperative reduction of fracture and the knee joint function recovery were observed. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months with a mean of 24 months. X-ray examination showed that the union time of fracture was 18 to 24 weeks, 21 weeks on average. There were no cases of loosening, breakage of internal fixators and re-fracture. Hospital for Special Surgery(HSS) knee score was 90.07±4.99 at 1 year after the operation. The clinical efficacy for retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screw for the treatment of femoral condyles fracture was excellent. It can improve the anatomical reattachment rate and reduce the complications and promote the knee functional recovery.

  1. Case report: multifocal subchondral stress fractures of the femoral heads and tibial condyles in a young military recruit.

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-03-01

    Subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head may be either of the insufficiency-type with poor quality bone or the fatigue-type with normal quality bone but subject to high repetitive stresses. Unlike osteonecrosis, multiple site involvement rarely has been reported for subchondral stress fractures. We describe a case of multifocal subchondral stress fractures involving femoral heads and medial tibial condyles bilaterally within 2 weeks. A 27-year-old military recruit began having left knee pain after 2 weeks of basic training, without any injury. Subsequently, right knee, right hip, and left hip pain developed sequentially within 2 weeks. The diagnosis of multifocal subchondral stress fracture was confirmed by plain radiographs and MR images. Nonoperative treatment of the subchondral stress fractures of both medial tibial condyles and the left uncollapsed femoral head resulted in resolution of symptoms. The collapsed right femoral head was treated with a fibular strut allograft to restore congruity and healed without further collapse. There has been one case report in which an insufficiency-type subchondral stress fracture of the femoral head and medial femoral condyle occurred within a 2-year interval. Because the incidence of bilateral subchondral stress fractures of the femoral head is low and multifocal involvement has not been reported, multifocal subchondral stress fractures can be confused with multifocal osteonecrosis. Our case shows that subchondral stress fractures can occur in multiple sites almost simultaneously.

  2. Shape and Site Dependent in Vivo Degradation of Mg-Zn Pins in Rabbit Femoral Condyle

    Pei Han

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A type of specially designed pin model of Mg-Zn alloy was implanted into the full thickness of lesions of New Zealand rabbits’ femoral condyles. The recovery progress, outer surface healing and in vivo degradation were characterized by various methods including radiographs, Micro-CT scan with surface rendering, SEM (scanning electron microscope with EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and so on. The in vivo results suggested that a few but not sufficient bridges for holding force were formed between the bone and the implant if there was a preexisting gap between them. The rapid degradation of the implantation in the condyle would result in the appearance of cavities. Morphological evaluation of the specially designed pins indicated that the cusp was the most vulnerable part during degradation. Furthermore, different implantation sites with distinct components and biological functions can lead to different degradation rates of Mg-Zn alloy. The rate of Mg-Zn alloy decreases in the following order: implantation into soft tissue, less trabecular bone, more trabecular bone, and cortical bone. Because of the complexities of in vivo degradation, it is necessary for the design of biomedical Mg-Zn devices to take into consideration the implantation sites used in clinics.

  3. Femoral condyle insufficiency fractures: associated clinical and morphological findings and impact on outcome

    Plett, Sara K.; Hackney, Lauren A.; Heilmeier, Ursula; Nardo, Lorenzo; Zhang, Chiyuan A.; Link, Thomas M. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yu, Aihong [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-15

    To determine the characteristics of femoral condyle insufficiency fracture (FCIF) lesions and their relative associations with the risk of clinical progression. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Seventy-three patients (age range, 19-95) were included after excluding patients with post-traumatic fractures, bone marrow infarct, osteochondritis dissecans, or underlying tumor. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists classified morphologic findings including lesion diameter, associated bone marrow edema pattern, and associated cartilage/meniscus damage. Electronic medical charts were evaluated for symptoms, risk factors, and longitudinal outcomes, including total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Imaging characteristics were correlated with clinical findings, and comparison of outcome groups was performed using a regression model adjusted for age. The majority of patients with FCIF were women (64.4 %, 47/73), on average 10 years older than men (66.28 ± 15.86 years vs. 56.54 ± 10.39 years, p = 0.005). The most common location for FCIF was the central weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle; overlying full thickness cartilage loss (75.7 %, 53/70) and ipsilateral meniscal injury (94.1 %, 64/68) were frequently associated. Clinical outcomes were variable, with 23.9 % (11/46) requiring TKA. Cartilage WORMS score, adjacent cartilage loss, and contralateral meniscal injury, in addition to decreased knee range of motion at presentation, were significantly associated with progression to TKA (p < 0.05). FCIF are frequently associated with overlying cartilage loss and ipsilateral meniscal injury. The extent of cartilage loss and meniscal damage, in addition to loss of knee range of motion at the time of presentation, are significantly associated with clinical progression. (orig.)

  4. Prevalence and clinical significance of chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle as a component of patellofemoral disease: observations at MR imaging.

    Chan, V O

    2013-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle as a component of patellofemoral disease in patients with anterior knee pain and to correlate it with patient demographics, patellar shape, and patellofemoral alignment.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  6. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2004-01-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p 0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion

  7. An anatomical study of the proximal aspect of the medial femoral condyle to define the proximal-distal condylar length

    Chia-Ming Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite its possible role in knee arthroplasty, the proximal-distal condylar length (PDCL of the femur has never been reported in the literature. We conducted an anatomic study of the proximal aspect of the medial femoral condyle to propose a method for measuring the PDCL. Materials and Methods: Inspection of dried bone specimens was carried out to assure the most proximal condylar margin (MPCM as the eligible starting point to measure the PDCL. Simulation surgery was performed on seven pairs of cadaveric knees to verify the clinical application of measuring the PDCL after locating the MPCM. Interobserver reliability of this procedure was also analyzed. Results: Observation of the bone specimens showed that the MPCM is a concavity formed by the junction of the distal end of the supracondylar ridge and the proximal margin of the medial condyle. This anatomically distinctive structure made the MPCM an unambiguous landmark. The cadaveric simulation surgical dissection demonstrated that the MPCM is easily accessed in a surgical setting, making the measurement of the PDCL plausible. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.78, indicating good interobserver reliability for this technique. Conclusion: This study has suggested that the PDCL can be measured based on the MPCM in a surgical setting. PDCL measurement might be useful in joint line position management, selection of femoral component sizes, and other applications related to the proximal-distal dimension of the knee. Further investigation is required.

  8. Use of the medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap in traumatic avascular necrosis of the navicular: a case report.

    Holm, Janson; Vangelisti, Garrett; Remmers, Jared

    2012-01-01

    The medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap has a high success rate in published literature regarding its use in nonunions and avascular necrosis of the upper and lower extremities. It is reported to have minimal donor site morbidity and the ability to provide structural support and torsional strength to load-bearing areas. The flap has found particular success in the treatment of scaphoid nonunions. The tarsal navicular, similar to the scaphoid, is largely articular cancellous bone with little surface area for vascular inflow. These anatomic features make the navicular prone to nonunion and avascular necrosis in traumatic scenarios. We describe a case of nonunion and avascular necrosis of the tarsal navicular occurring as sequelae of a high-impact midfoot injury sustained in an automobile accident. After an initial attempt at open reduction and internal fixation with midfoot bridge plating, subsidence and nonunion resulted. An attempt at arthrodesis of the talonavicular and naviculocuneiform joints was then undertaken. This too failed, leading to the development of additional collapse and avascular necrosis. The site was treated with a medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap. In this single case, the patient returned to pain-free ambulation and reported excellent outcomes and functional capacity. Although we present a successful case, a larger case series is necessary to establish the use of this flap as a reliable option for the treatment of nonunion and avascular necrosis of the tarsal navicular. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  10. Prevalence and clinical significance of chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle as a component of patellofemoral disease: observations at MR imaging.

    Chan, V O; Moran, D E; Mwangi, I; Eustace, S J

    2013-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle as a component of patellofemoral disease in patients with anterior knee pain and to correlate it with patient demographics, patellar shape, and patellofemoral alignment. Retrospective study over a 1-year period reviewing the MR knee examinations of all patients who were referred for assessment of anterior knee pain. Only patients with isolated lateral patellofemoral disease were included. Age, gender, distribution of lateral patellofemoral chondromalacia, and grade of cartilaginous defects were documented for each patient. Correlation between the distribution of lateral patellofemoral chondromalacia and patient demographics, patellar shape, and indices of patellar alignment (femoral sulcus angle and modified Q angle) was then ascertained. There were 50 patients (22 males, 28 females) with anterior knee pain and isolated patellofemoral disease. The majority of the patients (78 %) had co-existent disease with grade 1 chondromalacia. No significant correlation was found between patients with chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle and age, gender, patellar shape, or modified Q angle (p > 0.05). However, patients with chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle had a shallower femoral sulcus angle (mean 141.8°) compared to the patients with lateral patellar facet disease (mean 133.8°) (p = 0.002). A small percentage of patients with anterior knee pain have chondromalacia isolated to the anterior margin of the lateral femoral condyle. This was associated with a shallower femoral sulcus angle.

  11. Anatomical study of the radius and center of curvature of the distal femoral condyle

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Scheffer, Cornie; Dillon, Edwin Mark; Erasmus, Pieter J.

    2010-01-01

    In this anatomical study, the anteroposterior curvature of the surface of 16 cadaveric distal femurs was examined in terms of radii and center point. Those two parameters attract high interest due to their significance for total knee arthroplasty. Basically, two different conclusions have been drawn in foregoing studies: (1) The curvature shows a constant radius and (2) the curvature shows a variable radius. The investigations were based on a new method combining three-dimensional laser-scanning and planar geometrical analyses. This method is aimed at providing high accuracy and high local resolution. The high-precision laser scanning enables the exact reproduction of the distal femurs - including their cartilage tissue - as a three-dimensional computer model. The surface curvature was investigated on intersection planes that were oriented perpendicularly to the surgical epicondylar line. Three planes were placed at the central part of each condyle. The intersection of either plane with the femur model was approximated with the help of a b-spline, yielding three b-splines on each condyle. The radii and center points of the circles, approximating the local curvature of the b-splines, were then evaluated. The results from all three b-splines were averaged in order to increase the reliability of the method. The results show the variation in the surface curvatures of the investigated samples of condyles. These variations are expressed in the pattern of the center points and the radii of the curvatures. The standard deviations of the radii for a 90 deg arc on the posterior condyle range from 0.6 mm up to 5.1 mm, with an average of 2.4 mm laterally and 2.2 mm medially. No correlation was found between the curvature of the lateral and medial condyles. Within the range of the investigated 16 samples, the conclusion can be drawn that the condyle surface curvature is not constant and different for all specimens when viewed along the surgical epicondylar axis. For the portion

  12. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model

    Cui, Xu [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Huang, Wenhai [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Yadong, E-mail: zhangyadong6@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Pan, Haobo, E-mail: hb.pan@siat.ac.cn [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Rahaman, Mohamed N., E-mail: rahaman@mst.edu [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8 ± 2 MPa to 31 ± 2 MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0 g ml{sup −1} to 2.5 g ml{sup −1}). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12 weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. - Highlights: • New class of injectable bone cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and chitosan bonding phase was created. • The cement is biocompatible and bioactive, and has a much lower temperature increase during setting than PMMA cement. • The cement has a more controllable degradation rate and higher strength over a longer time than calcium sulfate cement. • The cement showed a better ability to heal bone defects than calcium sulfate over a twelve-week implantation period.

  13. A Scapholunate Ligament-Sparing Technique Utilizing the Medial Femoral Condyle Corticocancellous Free Flap to Reconstruct Scaphoid Nonunions With Proximal Pole Avascular Necrosis.

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Thibaudeau, Stephanie; Levin, L Scott

    2016-09-01

    This article demonstrates a technique for the treatment of scaphoid fracture waist and proximal pole nonunions with avascular necrosis using a free vascularized medial femoral condyle flap. We present our surgical technique and representative case examples in which the scapholunate ligament, a key structure required to preserve carpal kinematics, is spared. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  15. Return to sports after autogenous osteochondral mosaicplasty of the femoral condyles: 25 cases at a mean follow-up of 9 years.

    Cognault, J; Seurat, O; Chaussard, C; Ionescu, S; Saragaglia, D

    2015-05-01

    Autogenous osteochondral mosaicplasty is the most common cartilage restoration technique in standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the return to sports 9 years after mosaicplasty of the femoral condyles. The long-term results of an osteochondral autograft show that patients can regain their pre-injury activity level. This study is based on a series of 25 patients with a mean age of 28.9 years (range, 16-44 years) who had stage 3 or 4 chondral lesions of the femoral condyles (according to the ICRS or ICRS-OCD scores). The origin of the lesion was osteochondritis dissecans (13 knees), osteochondral fracture sequelae (ten knees), or aseptic osteonecrosis (two knees). The average size of the lesion was 2.11 ± 0.9 cm(2). Ten patients (40%) had an associated procedure during the osteochondral autograft. The patients were assessed clinically (IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores) and radiographically by a reviewer independent of the team of operators. All patients were re-examined at a mean follow-up of 9 years (range, 6-15 years), with 84% satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure. The average IKDC was 74.5 ± 18.5 points. The average Lysholm score was 87.3 ± 11.6 points. The average Tegner score ranged from 6.35 ± 1.53 points prior to surgery to 5.60 ± 1.64 points after surgery (P = 0.001). The average loss was 0.64 points for patients whose presurgery Tegner score was greater than or equal to 7 (P = 0.019) and 0.3 points if lower than 7. The radiologic evaluation of 21 patients showed complete osteointegration of the grafts in 90% of cases. The results of the femoral condyle mosaic autografts are satisfactory, a mean of 9 years after surgery. The most active patients lowered their activity level while the more sedentary did not have to adapt their lifestyle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Catastrophic complication following injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy of a medial femoral condyle subchondral cystic lesion in a 14 year old Arabian mare

    Darla K. Moser

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes fibrous cyst lining injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT of a medial femoral condyle (MFC subchondral cystic lesion (SCL resulting in catastrophic MFC fracture in an Arabian mare. The mare was presented for evaluation of a severe hind limb lameness of approximately 4 months duration. On presentation, a non-weight bearing lameness of the left hind limb with severe effusion and soft tissue swelling of the stifle region was noted. Radiographic evaluation of the stifle revealed a large SCL of the MFC with associated osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic guided intra-lesional injection of the SCL with corticosteroids and autologous bone marrow concentrate was performed followed by ESWT of the MFC. The mare was discharged walking comfortably 48-hours post-operatively. An acute increase in lameness was noted 14 days post-operatively. Imaging revealed catastrophic fracture of the left MFC. Possible mechanisms leading to failure of the MFC secondary to the described treatment are discussed.

  17. Heat transfer analysis of frictional heat dissipation during articulation of femoral implants.

    Davidson, J A; Gir, S; Paul, J P

    1988-12-01

    Previous studies have shown the tendency for frictional heating to occur during articulation of total hip systems in vitro under simulated hip loading conditions. The magnitude of this heating is sufficient to accelerate wear, creep, and oxidation degradation of the UHMWPE bearing surface. It was shown that ceramic articulating systems generate less frictional heating than polished cobalt alloy against UHMWPE. This frictional heating is expected to occur primarily for younger, heavier, and more active patients. Thus, long-term performance of the articulating hip system in these patients may not be that predicted from current, body-temperature wear, creep, and degradation studies. Although the tendency to generate frictional heat has been observed only during in vitro simulated hip loading, a heat transfer analysis of this phenomenon is presented to evaluate the ability of the hip joint to dissipate such heating in vivo. Additional experiments were performed using controlled resistance heaters inside a cobalt femoral head to verify the calculated levels of frictional heat and to assess the heat dissipation under simulated in vivo conditions. The effect of blood perfusion on the effective thermal conductivity of the joint capsule is also discussed. The present study describes and analyzes the various heat dissipation mechanisms present both in vitro and in vivo during articulation of metal and ceramic hip systems. From these tests and analyses, it is concluded that frictional heating in the reconstructed hip cannot be effectively removed, and that degredative elevated temperature processes can be expected to occur in vivo to both the UHMWPE and adjacent tissue under extended periods of excessive patient activity. This is particularly true for metal cobalt alloy femoral heads articulating on UHMWPE versus ceramic heads which generate significantly lower levels of heat.

  18. Age Predicts Disruption of the Articular Surface of the Femoral Condyles in Knee OCD: Can We Reduce Usage of Arthroscopy and MRI?

    Siegall, Evan; Faust, John R; Herzog, Mackenzie M; Marshall, Kelley W; Willimon, S Clifton; Busch, Michael T

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if patient age could accurately identify disrupted articular cartilage overlying an osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesion of the femoral condyle in adolescents. This could have important implications for imaging and treatment decisions. All patients from 2001 to 2014 who were arthroscopically treated for a femoral condyle OCD were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Exclusion criteria were trochlear and patellar OCD lesions, idiopathic arthritis, and traumatic osteochondral injuries. Arthroscopy was performed to visualize and probe the articular surface. Arthroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were recorded as "intact" or "disrupted" cartilage. Extra-articular drilling was performed when the articular cartilage was intact. There were 119 patients (81 male, 68%) with 139 OCD lesions in 136 knees. The mean age at time of surgery was 13.0 years (range, 7.2 to 19.3 y). At arthroscopy, 115 knees had intact cartilage and 24 had disrupted cartilage. There was a significant difference in age between patients with intact versus disrupted cartilage at arthroscopy (12.5 vs. 15.3 y; POCD lesions had MRIs preoperatively, showing 69 as intact and 19 (24%) disrupted. MRI reading for cartilage status had 94% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that age (P<0.01) and MRI status (P<0.0001) were strong predictors of cartilage status. Sixteen years was the critical age in which both sensitivity was maximized and false positive probability was minimized. Over the age of 17 years, 7 of 7 (100%) had disrupted cartilage. Age alone was 100% sensitive for children below the age of 10, and 96% sensitive below the age of 13. Age was a good predictor of cartilage status in both younger (<13 y) and older (≥17 y) patients in this study. For patients in the mid-range group (13 through 16 y), age alone is not an adequate predictor of cartilage status, but adding MRI

  19. Trunnion Failure of the Recalled Low Friction Ion Treatment Cobalt Chromium Alloy Femoral Head.

    Urish, Kenneth L; Hamlin, Brian R; Plakseychuk, Anton Y; Levison, Timothy J; Higgs, Genymphas B; Kurtz, Steven M; DiGioia, Anthony M

    2017-09-01

    Gross trunnion failure (GTF) is a rare complication in total hip arthroplasty (THA) reported across a range of manufacturers. Specific lots of the Stryker low friction ion treatment (LFIT) anatomic cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr) V40 femoral head were recalled in August 2016. In part, the recall was based out of concerns for disassociation of the femoral head from the stem and GTF. We report on 28 patients (30 implants) with either GTF (n = 18) or head-neck taper corrosion (n = 12) of the LFIT CoCr femoral head and the Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy femoral stems. All these cases were associated with adverse local tissue reactions requiring revision of the THA. In our series, a conservative estimate of the incidence of failure was 4.7% (n = 636 total implanted) at 8.0 ± 1.4 years from the index procedure. Failures were associated with a high-offset 127° femoral stem neck angle and increased neck lengths; 43.3% (13 of 30) of the observed failures included implant sizes outside the voluntary recall (27.8% [5 of 18] of the GTF and 75.0% [8 of 12] of the taper corrosion cases). Serum cobalt and chromium levels were elevated (cobalt: 8.4 ± 7.0 μg/mL; chromium: 3.4 ± 3.3 μ/L; cobalt/chromium ratio: 3.7). The metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated large cystic fluid collections typical with adverse local tissue reactions. During revision, a pseudotumor was observed in all cases. Pathology suggested a chronic inflammatory response. Impending GTF could be diagnosed based on aspiration of black synovial fluid and an oblique femoral head as compared with the neck taper on radiographs. In our series of the recalled LFIT CoCr femoral head, the risk of impending GTF or head-neck taper corrosion should be considered as a potential diagnosis in a painful LFIT femoral head and Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy THA with unknown etiology. Almost half of the failures we observed included sizes outside of the

  20. Evaluation and comparison of cartilage repair tissue of the patella and medial femoral condyle by using morphological MRI and biochemical zonal T2 mapping

    Welsch, Goetz H.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Quirbach, Sebastian; Trattnig, Siegfried; Zak, Lukas; Marlovits, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use advanced MR techniques to evaluate and compare cartilage repair tissue after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) in the patella and medial femoral condyle (MFC). Thirty-four patients treated with MACT underwent 3-T MRI of the knee. Patients were treated on either patella (n = 17) or MFC (n = 17) cartilage and were matched by age and postoperative interval. For morphological evaluation, the MR observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used, with a 3D-True-FISP sequence. For biochemical assessment, T2 mapping was prepared by using a multiecho spin-echo approach with particular attention to the cartilage zonal structure. Statistical evaluation was done by analyses of variance. The MOCART score showed no significant differences between the patella and MFC (p ≥ 0.05). With regard to biochemical T2 relaxation, higher T2 values were found throughout the MFC (p < 0.05). The zonal increase in T2 values from deep to superficial was significant for control cartilage (p < 0.001) and cartilage repair tissue (p < 0.05), with an earlier onset in the repair tissue of the patella. The assessment of cartilage repair tissue of the patella and MFC afforded comparable morphological results, whereas biochemical T2 values showed differences, possibly due to dissimilar biomechanical loading conditions. (orig.)

  1. {sup 99m}Tc-HDP Pinhole Bone Scan Features of Undetached Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle: Report of a Case with Radiography, CT, and MRI Correlation

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Hee [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    OCD may be initiated by arrest of bone growth and subchondral osteosclerosis followed by either cartilage hypertrophy with calcification or enfolding with osteochondral bridging. Diagnosis can be made in most instances using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) or invasive arthroscopy. As to usefulness of conventional radiography (CR) opinions diverge as some held it to be of limited value while others valuable. The controversy seems to be due to semantic confusion of OCD from osteonecrosis (ON) which are different entities. This report will describe a case of undetached OCD occurred in the medial femoral condyle in a middle-aged female. It was free of symptom and incidentally discovered on {sup 99m}Tc-HDP pinhole scan performed for patellar injury. Pinhole scan findings of OCD are correlated to those of CR, CT, and MRI. An electronic search of literature failed to reveal earlier publication of bone scan features of undetached OCD. Pathologically, OCD differs from ON in that the fragment in the former condition comes off from a normal vascular bony bed while that in the latter separates from an avascular bony bed. Indeed, bone fragment in ON is devascularized but that in OCD maintains vascularity until weighted images, respectively and the halo showed low signal intensity on both T1 and T2 images.

  2. Assessment of a polyelectrolyte multilayer film coating loaded with BMP-2 on titanium and PEEK implants in the rabbit femoral condyle

    Guillot, R.; Pignot-Paintrand, I.; Lavaud, J.; Decambron, A.; Bourgeois, E.; Josserand, V.; Logeart-Avramoglou, D.; Viguier, E.; Picart, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of titanium implants (Ti-6Al-4V, noted here TA6V) and poly(etheretherketone) PEEK implants induced by a BMP-2-delivering surface coating made of polyelectrolyte multilayer films. The in vitro bioactivity of the polyelectrolyte film-coated implants was assessed using the alkaline phosphatase assay. BMP-2-coated TA6V and PEEK implants with a total dose of 9.3 µg of BMP-2 were inserted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand white rabbits and compared to uncoated implants. Rabbits were sacrificed 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Histomorphometric analyses on TA6V and PEEK implants and microcomputed tomography on PEEK implants revealed that the bone-to-implant contact and bone area around the implants were significantly lower for the BMP-2-coated implants than for the bare implants. This was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy imaging. This difference was more pronounced at 4 weeks in comparison to the 8-week time point. However, bone growth inside the hexagonal upper hollow cavity of the screws was higher in the case of the BMP-2 coated implants. Overall, this study shows that a high dose of BMP-2 leads to localized and temporary bone impairment, and that the dose of BMP-2 delivered at the surface of an implant needs to be carefully optimized. PMID:26965394

  3. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the mid-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle and talus

    Bachmann, G.; Rominger, M.; Rau, W.S.; Juergensen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Definition of the prognostic value of clinical and morphological findings in the mid-term follow-up of OCD of the femoral condyle and talus. Demonstration of the consolidation of OCD on MRI depending on different therapies. Materials and Methods: 76 patients were examined before and at an average of 30 months after conservative or surgical therapy using T 1 and T 2 weighted SE and 3D-FISP sequences and contrast enhanced studies. Six clinical (age, gender, site, duration and severity of symptoms, therapy) and six morphological (size, signal intensity, fragmentation, contrast enhancement, condition of cartilage, staging) data were registered on first MRI and correlated with the degree of consolidation of OCD (partial and complete remission, no change and progression) on control MRI. Results: Patients under 17 years showed partial or complete remissions in 73%, those of 17 years or older in 33%. Conservatively treated patients had a higher remission rate (54%) than those treated with different surgical techniques (drilling 50%, refixation 43%, abrasio 38%). Small OCDs had a higher remission rate than large lesions (63% vs. 33%). OCDs covered with intact cartilage healed better than lesions with chondral defects (61% vs. 26%). Contrast enhancing fragments had a better prognosis than non-enhancing lesions (100% vs. 40%). Conclusions: Prognosis of OCD can be better estimated when size of OCD, condition of cartilage and enhancement of contrast agent is graduated with MRI and patient age is registered. The consequences for therapy planning are great. (orig.) [de

  4. Sequential chimeric medial femoral condyle and anterolateral thigh flow-through flaps for one-stage reconstructions of composite bone and soft tissue defects: Report of three cases.

    Henn, Dominic; Abouarab, Mohamed H; Hirche, Christoph; Hernekamp, Jochen F; Schmidt, Volker J; Kneser, Ulrich; Kremer, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Small recalcitrant non-unions with poor perfusion require reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps. Cases with concomitant large soft tissue defects are especially challenging, since vascularized soft tissue transfer is often indicated and distant microvascular anastomoses may be required. We introduce a sequential chimeric free flap composed of a medial femoral condyle corticoperiosteal flap anastomosed to an anterolateral thigh flow-through flap (MFC-ALT flap) and report its use for reconstruction of small non-unions with concomitant large soft tissue defects in three exemplary patients. Two female and one male patients ages 39-58 years suffered from composite bone and soft tissue defects of the lower extremity and clavicle caused by tumor resection and postoperative radiation resp. infected tibial pilon fracture. The sizes of the soft tissue defects ranged from 15-23 × 4.5-6 cm and the sizes of the bone defects ranged from 1.5-4 × 2-4 cm. Defect reconstructions were performed in all cases with sequential chimeric MFC-ALT flaps with sizes ranging from 2-4 × 1.6-4 cm for the MFC and 21-23 × 7-8 cm for the ALT skin paddles. Functional reconstructions were achieved in all cases resulting in stable unions and soft tissue coverage enabling the patients to bear full weight without assistance on 5-months follow-up. Postoperative course was uneventful and complications were restricted to a small skin necrosis at the suture line in one case. MFC-ALT flaps may be a safe, and effective procedure for one-stage reconstructions of small, irregularly shaped bone defects with concomitant large soft tissue loss or surrounding instable scarring, particularly in cases of recalcitrant non-unions after radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Short-term effect of zoledronic acid upon fracture resistance of the mandibular condyle and femoral head in an animal model.

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; López-Jornet, Pía; Vicente-Hernández, Ascensión

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects in terms of resistance to fracture of the mandibular condyle and femoral head following different doses of zoledronic acid in an animal model. A total of 80 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in a prospective randomized study. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of 20 rats each. Group 1 (control) received sterile saline solution, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received a accumulated dose of 0.2 mg, 0.4 mg and 0.6 mg of zoledronic acid, respectively. The animals were sacrificed 28 days after the last dose, and the right hemimandible and the right femur were removed. The fracture strength was measured (in Newtons) with a universal test machine using a 1 kN load connected to a metal rod with one end angled at 30 degrees. The cross-head speed was 1 mm/min. Later, the specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope with backscattered electron imaging (SEM-BSE). At last, chemical analysis and elemental mapping of the mineral bone composition were generated using a microanalytical system based on energy-dispersive and X-ray spectrometry (EDX). A total of 160 fracture tests were performed. The fracture resistance increased in mandible and femur with a higher accumulated dose of zoledronic acid. Statistically significant differences were recorded versus the controls with all the studies groups. The chemical analysis in mandible showed a significantly increased of calcium and phosphorous to compare the control with all of the study groups; however, in femur no statistically significant differences between the four study groups were observed. The administration of bisphosphonates increases the fracture resistance in mandible and femur.

  6. Wear, creep, and frictional heating of femoral implant articulating surfaces and the effect on long-term performance--Part II, Friction, heating, and torque.

    Davidson, J A; Schwartz, G; Lynch, G; Gir, S

    1988-04-01

    In Part I, (J.A. Davidson and G. Schwartz, "Wear, creep, and frictional heating of femoral implant articulating surfaces and the effect on long-term performance--Part I, A review," J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 21, 000-000 (1987) it was shown that lubrication of the artificial hip joint was complex and that long-term performance is governed by the combined wear, creep, and to a lesser extent, oxidation degradation of the articulating materials. Importantly, it was shown that a tendency for heating exists during articulation in the hip joint and that elevated temperatures can increase the wear, creep, and oxidation degradation rate of UHMWPE. The present study was performed to examine closely the propensity to generate heat during articulation in a hip joint simulator. The systems investigated were polished Co-Cr-Mo alloy articulating against UHMWPE, polished alumina ceramic against UHMWPE, and polished alumina against itself. Frictional torque was also evaluated for each system at various levels of applied loads. A walking load history was used in both the frictional heating and torque tests. The majority of tests were performed with 5 mL of water lubricant. However, the effect of various concentrations of hyaluronic acid was also evaluated. Results showed frictional heating to occur in all three systems, reaching an equilibrium after roughly 30 min articulation time. Ceramic systems showed reduced levels of heating compared to the cobalt alloy-UHMWPE system. The level of frictional torque for each system ranked similar to their respective tendencies to generate heat. Hyaluronic acid had little effect, while dry conditions and the presence of small quantities of bone cement powder in water lubricant significantly increased frictional torque.

  7. Contribuição ao estudo anatômico do retalho vascularizado corticoperiosteal do côndilo medial do fêmur Contribution to the anatomical study of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle

    Rômulo Guimarães Andrade

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar o estudo anatômico, em cadáveres, do retalho corticoperiosteal do côndilo femoral medial baseado na artéria genicular medial, avaliando a dificuldade de dissecção e padrões topográficos. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 15 membros de oito cadáveres, com idade variando de 19 a 74 anos. Dispostos em posição supina, foi realizada incisão longitudinal na face medial do terço distal da coxa, exposição dos vasos geniculares descendentes entre os músculos vasto medial e sartório. Foram analisados a distância entre a origem da artéria genicular descendente e a interlinha medial do joelho, o diâmetro do vaso, o comprimento do pedículo, a presença do ramo fasciocutâneo e sua localização. RESULTADOS: A distância entre a origem da artéria genicular descendente e a interlinha medial do joelho variou de 11,2cm a 14,5cm, com média de 12,63cm. O diâmetro médio da artéria foi de 2,5mm (de 2,25mm a 2,75mm. A distância entre a origem da artéria genicular descendente e o ramo fasciocutâneo variou entre 1,0 e 1,5cm. O comprimento médio do pedículo vascular, foi de 7,01cm, variando de 5,6 a 8,6cm. CONCLUSÃO: O retalho corticoperiosteal do côndilo femoral medial do joelho é de fácil dissecção, possui pedículo vascular constante, com comprimento médio de 7,0cm e diâmetro de 2,5mm, o que possibilita sua indicação em transplantes microcirúrgicos.OBJECTIVE: to perform the anatomical study, in cadavers, of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle, based on the medial genicular artery, evaluating challenges in dissection and the topographic patterns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: fifteen limbs from eight cadavers were studied, ages ranging from 19 to 74 years old. They were placed at supine position, and a longitudinal incision on the medial face of the lower part of the thigh was performed, exposing medial vastus and sartorius muscles, with descendent genicular vessels being also exposed. The distance

  8. Friction

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production In recent years, increased fuel efficiency of passenger car is required due to the CO2 emission issue. One of the solutions to improve fuel efficiency is to

  9. Osteochondroma involving mandibular condyle

    Latika Bachani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondroma is defined as an osteocartilagenous exostosis with cartilage capped exophytic lesion that arises from the bone cortex. It is a slow growing benign tumor that is rarely seen in the maxillofacial region. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle is a relatively rare condition that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction and malocclusion. Radiographically, there is a unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic growth of the tumor from the condylar head. The treatment of osteochondroma is primarily surgical resection of the tumor. This paper reports a case of osteochondroma of the right mandibular condyle presenting as a painless restricted mouth opening.

  10. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    Park, Su-Seong; Lee, Keun-Cheol; Kim, Seok-Kwun

    2012-01-01

    The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing of the mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facial asymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has been disagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review explores the misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatment strategies.

  11. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    Su-Seong Park

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing of the mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facial asymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has been disagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review explores the misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatment strategies.

  12. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    Su-Seong Park

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing ofthe mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facialasymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has beendisagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review exploresthe misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatmentstrategies.

  13. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle

    Ashish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondroma (OC of the mandibular condyle is a relatively rare condition that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction, and malocclusion. Radiographically, there is a unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic outgrowth of the tumor from the condylar head. We present a case of a left mandibular condylar OC that created a major facial asymmetry, malocclusion, and TMJ dysfunction. Discussion includes the rationale for treatment and the method used in this case. In actively growing OCs, surgical intervention is indicated to remove the tumor stopping the benign growth process and improve facial symmetry, occlusion, and jaw function.

  14. Fracture of the occipital condyle

    Wessels, L.S.

    1990-01-01

    The term fracture of the occipital condyle is a misnomer and and usually represents an extensive fracture of the posterior fossa skull base extending onto the squamous portion of the occipital bone and even further forward. These fractures should be suspected when the lower cranial nerves are affected after severe cranial trauma. Conservative management appears to be indicated. 2 figs., 5 refs

  15. Computer tomographic determination of femoral anteversion

    Jend, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-two macerated femora were examined by CT in order to determine the degree of anteversion and to relate this to the position of the femur and to the various reference lines quoted in the literature. The accuracy of CT is the same as that of the Rippstein method, provided the following conditions are met: 1. Position of the femur with its long axis perpendicular to the image plane. 2. Demonstration of the maximal configuration of the femoral condyles to enable one to construct a tangent to the dorsal aspect of the condyle. 3. Demonstration of the head and neck by a plane which divides the neck into approximately equal portions and sections the femoral head. These conditions are more easily met, even in immobile patients, than the requirements for the Rippstein method. (orig.) [de

  16. Increased friction coefficient and superficial zone protein expression in patients with advanced osteoarthritis.

    Neu, C P; Reddi, A H; Komvopoulos, K; Schmid, T M; Di Cesare, P E

    2010-09-01

    To quantify the concentration of superficial zone protein (SZP) in the articular cartilage and synovial fluid of patients with advanced osteoarthritis (OA) and to further correlate the SZP content with the friction coefficient, OA severity, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Samples of articular cartilage and synovial fluid were obtained from patients undergoing elective total knee replacement surgery. Additional normal samples were obtained from donated body program and tissue bank sources. Regional SZP expression in cartilage obtained from the femoral condyles was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and visualized by immunohistochemistry. Friction coefficient measurements of cartilage plugs slid in the boundary lubrication system were obtained. OA severity was graded using histochemical analyses. The concentrations of SZP and proinflammatory cytokines in synovial fluid were determined by ELISA. A pattern of SZP localization in knee cartilage was identified, with load-bearing regions exhibiting high SZP expression. SZP expression patterns were correlated with friction coefficient and OA severity; however, SZP expression was observed in all samples at the articular surface, regardless of OA severity. SZP expression and aspirate volume of synovial fluid were higher in OA patients than in normal controls. Expression of cytokines was elevated in the synovial fluid of some patients. Our findings indicate a mechanochemical coupling in which physical forces regulate OA severity and joint lubrication. The findings of this study also suggest that SZP may be ineffective in reducing joint friction in the boundary lubrication mode at an advanced stage of OA, where other mechanisms may dominate the observed tribological behavior.

  17. Condyle-Specific Matching Does Not Improve Midterm Clinical Outcomes of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee.

    Wang, Dean; Jones, Kristofer J; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pais, Mollyann D; Rodeo, Scott A; Williams, Riley J

    2017-10-04

    Condyle-specific matching for osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) pairs donor and recipient condyles in an attempt to minimize articular incongruity. While the majority of cartilage defects are located on the medial femoral condyle, lateral femoral condyles are more commonly available as a graft source. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of patients treated with non-orthotopic (lateral-to-medial condyle or medial-to-lateral condyle) OCA with those treated with traditional orthotopic (medial-to-medial condyle or lateral-to-lateral condyle) OCA. We hypothesized that clinical outcomes would be similar between groups at midterm follow-up. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data on patients treated with OCA from 2000 to 2014 was conducted. Seventy-seven patients with a full-thickness cartilage defect of a femoral condyle were treated with either orthotopic (n = 50) or non-orthotopic (n = 27) OCA. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was required for analysis. Patients in each group were matched according to sex, age, and total chondral defect size. Reoperations and patient responses to validated outcome measures were reviewed. Failure was defined as any revision cartilage procedure or conversion to knee arthroplasty. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.0 years (range, 2 to 16 years). The orthotopic and non-orthotopic OCA groups were comparable in terms of demographics, the mean number of prior ipsilateral knee operations, and the percentage of concomitant procedures at baseline. Reoperation (p = 0.427) and failure (p = 0.917) rates did not differ significantly between groups. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in the Short Form-36 (SF-36) physical functioning and pain, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Knee Outcome Survey-Activities of Daily Living (KOS-ADL) scores compared with baseline (p OCA and those treated with non-orthotopic OCA, suggesting that condyle-specific matching may not be

  18. Computerized tomography in evaluation of decreased acetabular and femoral anteversion

    Toennis, D.; Skamel, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Computerized tomography has received a new importance. It has been shown that decreased anteversion of femur and acetabulum, when both have decreased angles, are causing pain and osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Operative treatment should be performed before osteoarthritis develops. Exact measurements therefore are necessary. The investigation should be performed in prone position to have the pelvis lying in a defined and normal position. Femoral torsion is measured between the transverse axis of the knee and the femoral neck. The transverse axis for measurement of the femoral anteversion is defined by a rectangular line to the sagittal plane. For evaluation of the femoral anteversion in total the angle of the condyles has to be added to the femoral neck angle when the knee is found in internal rotation. Acetabular anteversion should be measured at the level where the femoral head is still in full contact and congruence with the anterior margin of the acetabulum. (orig.) [de

  19. Bilateral double-headed condyles: A rare case report

    Swati Phore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifid mandibular condyle is characterized by the duplicity of the head of the mandibular condyle, so the name double-headed condyle. It is usually diagnosed on routine radiographic examination and is described as a rare entity. Usually, bifid condyle is an incidental finding and its etiology is controversial, with no predilection for sex or ethnic background. Herein, we report a case of bilateral bifid condyles.

  20. [Stress analysis of femoral stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer].

    Oomori, H; Imura, S; Gesso, H

    1992-04-01

    To develop stem design achieving primary fixation of stems and effective load transfer to the femur, we studied stress analysis of stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer in stem-bone interface. The results of analyses of stem-bone interface stresses and von Mises stresses at the cortical bones indicated that ideal stem design features would be as follows: 1) Sufficient length, with the distal end extending beyond the isthmus region. 2) Maximum possible width, to contact the cortical bones in the isthmus region. 3) No collars but a lateral shoulder at the proximal portion. 4) A distal tip, to contact the cortical bones at the distal portion.

  1. Eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle

    Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Oh, Sung Won; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Mun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports a case of eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle. Eosinophilic granulomas on the mandibular condyle are very rare, but there are several common clinical and radiographic presentations. The clinical presentations involve swelling on preauricular area, limitation of opening, TMJ pain, etc. The radiographic presentations involve radiolucent lytic condylar lesion with or without pathologic fracture. Sometimes new bone formations are observed. The purpose of the article is to add new cases to the literatures.

  2. Eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle

    Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Oh, Sung Won; Lee, Sam Sun [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Medicine, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The present study reports a case of eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle. Eosinophilic granulomas on the mandibular condyle are very rare, but there are several common clinical and radiographic presentations. The clinical presentations involve swelling on preauricular area, limitation of opening, TMJ pain, etc. The radiographic presentations involve radiolucent lytic condylar lesion with or without pathologic fracture. Sometimes new bone formations are observed. The purpose of the article is to add new cases to the literatures.

  3. Mandibular Condyle Fractures and Treatment Modalities

    Halil ibrahim Kisa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial injuries are most commonly associated with falls, motor and vehicle accidents, sports-related trauma, and interpersonel violence. The complexity of mandibular condyle region and its anatomic proximity to other craniofacial structures complicate diagnosis and treatment. Thus, treatment approaches of mandibular condyle fracture are still controversial. In the literature, different success rates are reported about observation versus treatment, closed reduction versus open reduction and fixation methods. In the present article, controversial issues related to mandibular condyle fractures were reviewed under the light of current literature. In conclusion, the simplest way that can be done with the least risk of complication should be chosen during treatment planning. In addition, current adjunctive treatment methods accelerating healing of fracture should be considered. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 658-671

  4. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human...

  5. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. © IMechE 2016.

  6. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  7. [Computer assisted orthognathic surgery: Condyle repositioning.

    Bettega, G; Leitner, F

    2013-07-17

    Computer aided surgery has become a standard in many fields. It is rarely used in orthognathic surgery. Twenty years ago, we developed a navigation system adapted to this surgery, especially for mandibular condyle repositioning. The system has been improved along with technological progress. The authors of several clinical studies have validated this system. It is now routinely used in our department, because of its educational virtues among other assets. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. The radiologic spectrum of occipital condyle fractures

    Hanson, J.A.; Deliganis, A.V.; Baxter, A.B.; Cohen, W.A.; Wilson, A.J.; Mann, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) are increasingly diagnosed in survivors of high energy blunt trauma, and may be associated with craniocervical junction disruption.We aimed to describe and classify the imaging appearances of occipital condyle fractures in a large series of trauma patients. We reviewed conventional radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 95 patients with 107 OCFs, who were treated at a level 1 trauma centre (1992-1999). We described fracture patterns according to two current classification systems (Anderson and Montesano, and Tuli), and correlated imaging appearances with clinical findings, neurosurgical management and patient outcome. Fracture morphology and craniocervical junction integrity were best assessed by 1-1.5mm collimation CT. Inferomedial occipital condyle avulsion fractures (Anderson and Montesano type III) were the commonest OCF category, comprising 80/107 (75%). Unilateral OCFs were found in 73/95 (77%) patients, 58 of whom were managed by cervical orthotic brace or collar. Bilateral OCFs or occipito-atlanto-axial joint injuries were seen in the remaining 22/95 (23%) patients. Occipitocervical fusion or craniocervical halo traction were required in 12 patients, all of whom had CT evidence of bilateral occipito-atlanto-axial joint disruption. Associated cervical spine injuries were present in 29/95 (31%) patients. Ten (10/95, 10.5%) patients died in hospital, and 30/95 (32%) showed continuing disability. The remaining 55/95 (57.5%) patients showed good outcome and functional independence at 1 month. Occipital condyle fractures are rare injuries with a wide range of morphology, stability and clinical significance. Thorough radiological evaluation of all components of the occipito-atlanto-axial joint complex must be performed in order to determine the full extent of injury. In this series, most unilateral OCFs were managed by non-operative immobilisation, whereas bilateral occipito

  9. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis in the mandibular condyle during growth adaptation.

    Kantomaa, T; Pirttiniemi, P; Tuominen, M; Poikela, A

    1994-01-01

    Condylar growth was studied after an operation simulating functional orthodontic appliances. Twenty-five rabbits underwent a surgical operation for the induction of premature synostosis to displace the glenoid fossa posteriorly during growth. Twenty-five control rabbits underwent sham operations. At the age of 15 days, 10 experimental and 10 control animals and, at the age of 20 days, 5 experimental and 5 control animals were killed. Their mandibular condyles were organ-cultured for 3 h in the presence of radiolabelled sulphur. The condyles were used for autoradiographic purposes. Digital image analysis of autoradiograms of histological sections showed synthesis of glycosaminoglycans to have increased from the anterior to the posterior direction. This increase was more marked in experimental animals than in the condyles of control animals. Ten experimental and 10 control animals were killed at the age of 15 days, and mandibular condyles were organ-cultured for 1, 4 and 7 days. Differentiation of proliferating prechondroblasts into hypertrophied chondrocytes continued under organ culture conditions. A marked decrease in the proliferating cell layer was noticed, especially in control condyles. Hypertrophy was faster and came closer to the surface of the condyle in the anterior region of the condyle. This was most marked in the condyles of experimental animals. The results indicate that a procedure carried out on the glenoid fossa with the same effect as functional appliances increases the synthesis of extracellular matrix in the posterosuperior region of the mandibular condyle.

  10. Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular condyle on ...

    This article highlights the importance of routinely reviewing the mandibular condyle on computerised tomography brain studies in a trauma setting, that often extends to involve the mandibular condyles in the scan parameters. We discuss 4 cases seen over the last 18 months at our institution, and review the relevant ...

  11. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  12. Drilling the femoral tunnel during ACL reconstruction: transtibial versus anteromedial portal techniques.

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore

    2012-08-01

    Incorrect bone tunnel position, particularly on the femoral side, is a frequent cause of failed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Several studies have reported that drilling the femoral tunnel through the anteromedial portal allows a more anatomical placement on the lateral femoral condyle and higher knee stability than does transtibial reconstruction.In the current study, the femoral tunnel was drilled with transtibial (n=6) and anteromedial (n=6) portal techniques in 12 cadaveric knees. With appropriate landmarks inserted into bone tunnels, the direction and length of the tunnels were determined on anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. Knee stability was evaluated with a KT1000 arthrometer (MEDmetric Corporation, San Diego, California) and pivot shift test, comparing the pre- and postoperative values of both techniques. Finally, all knees were dissected to enhance vision of the insertion of the reconstructed ligament. The anteromedial portal technique led to better placement of the femoral tunnel in the coronal and sagittal planes, with higher knee stability according to the pivot shift test but not the KT1000 arthrometer. Anatomical and clinical results reported in the literature on transtibial and anteromedial portal techniques are controversial, but most of studies report better results with the anteromedial portal technique, especially regarding rotational stability. The current cadaveric study showed that the anteromedial portal technique provided better tunnel placement on the lateral femoral condyle in the coronal and sagittal planes, with an improvement in the rotational stability of the knee. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. A tomographic study of the condyle position in temporomandibular disorders

    Choi, Sung Youn; Ryu, Young Kyu

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether T.M.J. tomographic examination yielded significant difference in condyle positions among asymptomatic, myalgia, derangement, and arthrosis group of T.M.J. disorders. The author obtained sagittal linear tomograms of right and left T.M.Js. of 36 asymptomatic, 22 myalgia, 54 derangement, and 31 arthrosis patients taken at serial lateral, central, and medial sections in the intercuspal position after submentovertex radiographs analyzed. With the dual linear measurements of the posterior and anterior interarticular space, condyle positions were mathematically expressed as proportion. All data from these analysis was recorded and processed statistically. The results were obtained as follows: 1. In asymptomatic group, radiographically concentric condyle position was found in 50.0% to 65.4% of subjects, with a substance range of variability. No significant differences existed between men and women and also between right and left T.M.Js. for condyle position. 2. In women, significant difference for mean condyle position of left lateral section of each diagnostic category existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< .05). Also that of left central section existed between derangement and myalgia group, and that of left medial section existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< . 05). 3. In main-symptom side, condyle position in myalgia group was more concentric, and condyle position in derangement and group was more posterior. This showed significant differences between derangement and myalgia groups in lateral, central, and medial sections of main symptom side, and only between derangement and myalgia groups in central section of contra-lateral sides (P< .05). Condyle position in arthrosis group was broadly distributed among all positions. 4. In contra-lateral side, significant difference for mean condyle position of central section of each symptomatic group existed between derangement and myalgia group (P< .05

  14. A tomographic study of the condyle position in temporomandibular disorders

    Choi, Sung Youn; Ryu, Young Kyu [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether T.M.J. tomographic examination yielded significant difference in condyle positions among asymptomatic, myalgia, derangement, and arthrosis group of T.M.J. disorders. The author obtained sagittal linear tomograms of right and left T.M.Js. of 36 asymptomatic, 22 myalgia, 54 derangement, and 31 arthrosis patients taken at serial lateral, central, and medial sections in the intercuspal position after submentovertex radiographs analyzed. With the dual linear measurements of the posterior and anterior interarticular space, condyle positions were mathematically expressed as proportion. All data from these analysis was recorded and processed statistically. The results were obtained as follows: 1. In asymptomatic group, radiographically concentric condyle position was found in 50.0% to 65.4% of subjects, with a substance range of variability. No significant differences existed between men and women and also between right and left T.M.Js. for condyle position. 2. In women, significant difference for mean condyle position of left lateral section of each diagnostic category existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< .05). Also that of left central section existed between derangement and myalgia group, and that of left medial section existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< . 05). 3. In main-symptom side, condyle position in myalgia group was more concentric, and condyle position in derangement and group was more posterior. This showed significant differences between derangement and myalgia groups in lateral, central, and medial sections of main symptom side, and only between derangement and myalgia groups in central section of contra-lateral sides (P< .05). Condyle position in arthrosis group was broadly distributed among all positions. 4. In contra-lateral side, significant difference for mean condyle position of central section of each symptomatic group existed between derangement and myalgia group (P< .05

  15. Radiographic study of morphology of mandibular condyle

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-11-15

    Anatomical anomaly of temporo-mandibular joint and its dysfunction is becoming one of the important problem in dentistry because the number of these cases are increasing rapidly. Applying 'Lateral Transcranial Technic', 'Updegrave method' and 'Denar Accuard 100' to skull and adult with normal occlusion the author obtained following results: 1. Grewcock method combined with cephalos tat as one of 'Lateral Transcranial Technic' revealed clear picture but the image of condyle head was tend to incline downward. 2. Direction of central radiation in 'Updegrave method' should be 2 recommended inch upward from auditorial mearus. 3. For functional analysis and correct diagnosis 'Denar Accuard 100' should be highly recommended.

  16. Enlarging bilateral femoral condylar bone cysts without scintigraphic uptake in a yearling foal

    Squire, K.R.E.; Fessler, J.F.; Cantwell, H.D.; Widmer, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Bilateral subchondral bone cysts of the femoral condyles were diagnosed by conventional radiography in a 14 month old Appaloosa colt. Surgical debridement was performed, and over the next 18 months the appearance of the cysts was evaluated with radiography and bone scintigraphy. On the preoperative scintigrams, increased radiopharmaceutical uptake was associated with the cysts. Despite continued radiographic enlargement, the cysts did not demonstrate increased radiopharmaceutical uptake post-operatively

  17. Incomplete (bending) fractures of the mandibular condyle in children

    Ahrendt, D.; Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Texas Univ., Galveston

    1984-01-01

    Incomplete, bending or bowing fractures of the mandibular condyle in children frequently go undetected. The reason is that the bending deformity often is subtle and passes for normal. This is especially true if the fractures are bilateral. (orig.)

  18. Is There an Inherent Risk to Damage the Popliteus Tendon by Femoral Component With Inbuilt External Rotation? A Pilot Study in Indian Knees.

    Chouhan, Dervendra Kumar; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2016-02-01

    Femoral components with inbuilt rotation require thicker flexion resection of the lateral femoral condyle and could have a potential risk of damaging the popliteus tendon, especially in the smaller Asian knees. We prospectively evaluated 10 patients with bilateral varus osteoarthritis knee to size the cuts and their location in relation to the popliteus tendon. Two different types of implant were used on either side; one side requires resection in 3° external rotation (group A) and the other side requires a femoral component with inbuilt external rotation (group B). We observed the incidence of injury to the popliteus tendon and distance between flexion cut to its attachment over the lateral femoral condyle between both groups. We had popliteus tendon injury in 3 knees all from group B. Risk of damaging the popliteus tendon was found higher in group B, as the distance between flexion cut to popliteus tendon attachment was significantly low. Femoral component with inbuilt external rotation has more risk of injuring the popliteus tendon because flexion cut takes out more bone from the lateral femoral condyle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Observation of condyles by roentgenographic cephalogram

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1984-01-01

    In spite of many projections of TMJ, there are rarely satisfactory projections of TMJ. The author traced and measured the P-A cephalograms, which number is 70 in each male and female, them finding the following results. 1. The long axis of the condyle is 19.80 mm on the right, and 19.89 mm on the left in male, and that of 18.65 mm on the right and 18.10 mm on the left in female. 2. The intercondylar distance is 119.09 mm in male, and 108.20 mm in female, resulting that the intercondylar distance in male is much longer than that in female. 3. The right and left deviation of the midline passing through the center of the intercondylar distance and prosthion is +0.37 mm in male, +0.64 mm in female, and its range is from -4.6 to +5.7 mm in male, and from -3.2 to +6.1 mm in female, resulting that prosthion nearly coincides with midline. 4. The angle of the intercondylar distance and the long axis (vertical angle) is +5.48 degrees in male, and +6.02 degrees in female, resulting that there is a little difference between male and female and the angle of the right is greater than that of the left in both male and female. 5. The typology of the condyle in sum of male and female is; Right: A type 55 (39.3%), B type 66 (47.1%), C type 12 (8 .6%), D type 7 (5.0%), E type 0 (0%) Left: A type 60 (42.9%), B type 58 (41.4%), C type 14 (10.0%), D type 8 (5.7%), E type 0 (0%) 6. The distribution of the typology between the right and the left is; AA 26 (18.6%), AB 50 (35.7%), AC 10 (7.1%), AD 3 (2.1%) BB 26 (18.6%), BC 13 (9.3%), BD 9 (6.4%), CC 0 (0%), CD 3 (2.1%).

  20. Femoral rotational asymmetry is a common anatomical variant.

    Newman, Christopher R; Walter, William L; Talbot, Simon

    2018-05-01

    The sulcus line (SL) is a three-dimensional landmark that corrects for individual variation in the coronal alignment of the trochlear groove in contrast to the traditional Whiteside's line (WL). Femoral rotational asymmetry (FRA) is an anatomical variation in which the posterior condyles and trochlear groove are not perpendicular to each other. This study aims to measure the SL and assess its reliability relative to WL, in addition to measuring and classifying the FRA. A retrospective analysis of a series of 191 CT scans of nonarthritic knees was performed. Measurements were taken of rotational landmarks in three-dimensional reconstructions. The variability and outlier rate of SL was less than WL (P  0.05), however it decreased the rate of change of the rotational alignment of the trochlear groove between the native knee and the prosthetic knee from 31% to 5% (P 5° in 56/191 (29%) of cases. The SL technique is more accurate than WL for determining the rotational alignment of the trochlear groove. Nonarthritic femora have a high rate of rotational asymmetry. Identifying and classifying FRA in individual cases allows the femoral component to be inserted in a position which gives the best possible match to both the native posterior condyles and trochlear groove. Clin. Anat. 31:551-559, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sonographic evaluation of femoral articular cartilage in the knee

    Hong, Sung Hwan; Kong Keun Young; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Young Ho; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Heung Sik

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sonography for the evaluation of osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Ten asymptomatic volunteers and 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent sonographic evaluation. For this, the knee was maintained of full flexion in order to expose the deep portion of femoral condylar cartilage. Both transverse and longitudinal scans were obtained in standardized planes. Sonographic images of the articular cartilages were analyzed in terms of surface sharpness, echogenicity and thickness, along with associated bone changes. Normal cartilages showed a clearly-defined surface, homogeneously low echogenicity and regular thickness. Among 20 patients, the findings for medial and lateral condyles, respectively, were as follows: poorly defined cartilage surface, 16 (80%) and ten (50%); increased echogenicity of cartilage, 17 (85%) and 16 (80%); cartilage thinning, 16 (80%) and 14 (70%) (two medial condyles demonstrated obvious cartilage thickening); the presence of thick subchondral hyperechoic bands, five (25%) and four (20%); the presence of osteophytes, 13 (65%) and 12 (60%). Sonography is a convenient and accurate modality for the evaluation of femoral articular cartilage. In particular, it can be useful for detecting early degenerative cartilaginous change and for studying such change during clinical follow-up. (author)

  2. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78{sub 0}.84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images.

  3. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2007-01-01

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78 0 .84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images

  4. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures.

  5. Conservative orthodontic treatment of mandibular bilateral condyle fracture.

    Gašpar, Goran; Brakus, Ivan; Kovačić, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is rare in children younger than the age of 5 years (range 0.6%-1.2%), and they can require different clinical treatment strategies compared with fractures in the adult population because of concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A 5-year-old girl with a history of falling from a bicycle 7 hours earlier was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Multislice computed tomographic examination demonstrated a bilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle neck associated with minimal fracture of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla. The multislice computed tomographic scan also demonstrated dislocation on the right condyle neck and, on the left side, a medial inclination of approximately 45 degrees associated with greenstick fracture of the right parasymphysis region. In this particular case, orthodontic rubber elastics in combination with fixed orthodontic brackets provided good results in the treatment of bilateral condyle neck fractures associated with greenstick fracture of parasymphysis.

  6. Development of a method for measuring femoral torsion using real-time ultrasound

    Hafiz, Eliza; Hiller, Claire E; Nightingale, E Jean; Eisenhuth, John P; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Nicholson, Leslie L; Clarke, Jillian L; Grimaldi, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Excessive femoral torsion has been associated with various musculoskeletal and neurological problems. To explore this relationship, it is essential to be able to measure femoral torsion in the clinic accurately. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are thought to provide the most accurate measurements but CT involves significant radiation exposure and MRI is expensive. The aim of this study was to design a method for measuring femoral torsion in the clinic, and to determine the reliability of this method. Details of design process, including construction of a jig, the protocol developed and the reliability of the method are presented. The protocol developed used ultrasound to image a ridge on the greater trochanter, and a customized jig placed on the femoral condyles as reference points. An inclinometer attached to the customized jig allowed quantification of the degree of femoral torsion. Measurements taken with this protocol had excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability (ICC 2,1  = 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). This method of measuring femoral torsion also permitted measurement of femoral torsion with a high degree of accuracy. This method is applicable to the research setting and, with minor adjustments, will be applicable to the clinical setting. (paper)

  7. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo

    1995-01-01

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  8. Relation between anterior displacement of the temporomandibular joint disc and size of the condyle

    Ohgushi, Masatoshi; Kubota, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Shibata, Takanori

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate the cause of anterior displacement of the disc, we evaluated the relation between anterior displacement and the size of the condyle from MR images in 301 patients (602 TMJs) with clinical diagnosis of internal derangement. We found that the size of condyles with anterior displacement of the disc was significantly smaller than that of condyles without anterior displacement. This result suggests that small condyles may give rise to anterior displacement of the disc. (author)

  9. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo [Department of Dentistry, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  10. Nontraumatic Fracture of the Femoral Condylar Prosthesis in a Total Knee Arthroplasty Leading to Mechanical Failure

    Girish N. Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA. A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  11. Nontraumatic fracture of the femoral condylar prosthesis in a total knee arthroplasty leading to mechanical failure.

    Swamy, Girish N; Quah, Conal; Bagouri, Elmunzar; Badhe, Nitin P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  12. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  13. Evaluation of posterior lateral femoral condylar hypoplasia using axial MRI images in patients with complete discoid meniscus.

    Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Dongyang; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Hypoplasia of the lateral femoral condyle has been reported in discoid lateral meniscus patients, but associated imaging findings in the axial plane have not been characterized. In this study, we aimed to identify differences in the lateral femoral condyle between patients with discoid lateral meniscus and those with normal menisci using axial MRI images. Twenty-three patients (24 knees) with complete discoid lateral meniscus, 43 (45 knees) with incomplete discoid lateral meniscus, and 50 with normal menisci (50 knees) were enrolled and distributed into three groups. Two new angles, posterior lateral condylar angle (PLCA) and posterior medial condylar angle (PMCA), were measured on axial MRI images; the posterior condylar angle (PCA) was also measured. Differences between the three groups in the PLCA, PMCA, PCA, and PLCA/PMCA were analysed. The predictive value of PLCA and PLCA/PMCA for complete discoid lateral meniscus was assessed. In the complete discoid lateral meniscus group, PLCA and PLCA/PMCA were significantly smaller compared with the normal meniscus group and the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group compared with the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group (P meniscus. Hypoplasia of the posterior lateral femoral condyle is typically seen in patients with complete discoid lateral meniscus. PLCA and PLCA/PMCA can be measured from axial MRI images and used as excellent predictive parameters for complete discoid lateral meniscus. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  14. Robust femur condyle disambiguation on biplanar X-rays.

    Serrurier, Antoine; Quijano, Sergio; Nizard, Remy; Skalli, Wafa

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the skeleton from biplanar X-rays relies on scarce information digitalised by an operator on both frontal and lateral radiographs. In clinical routine, difficulties occur for non-skilled operators to discriminate the medial from the lateral femur condyle on the lateral view. Our study proposes an algorithm able to detect automatically a possible inversion of the two condyles by the operator at an early stage of the reconstruction process. It relies on the computation of two 3D femur surfaces, one directly from the operator digitalisation and the other from the same digitalisation with medial and lateral condyles automatically swapped. Pairs of virtual biplanar X-rays are computed for both reconstructions and the closest pair to the original X-rays is selected on the basis of similarity measures, pointing the correct 3D surface. The algorithm shows a success rate higher than 85% for both asymptomatic and pathological femurs whatever the initial condyle digitalisation of the operator, bringing automatically non-skilled operators acting in clinical routine to the level of skilled operators. This study validates moreover the proof-of-concept of automatic shape adjustments of a 3D surface on the basis of similarity measures in the process of 3D reconstruction from biplanar X-rays. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of mandibular condyles in children with unilateral posterior crossbite.

    Illipronti-Filho, Edson; Fantini, Solange Mongelli de; Chilvarquer, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of mandibular condyle dimensions and its association with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB) has been suggested in the literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate mandibular condyles on the left and right sides and between crossed and non-crossed sides in the sagittal and coronal planes, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty CBCT images of 40 temporo mandibular joints (TMJs) in individuals in mixed dentition phase, which included 9 males (mean 7.9 years) and 11 females (mean 8.2 years), with unilateral posterior crossbite without premature contacts and functional mandibular shifts and with transverse maxillary deficiency. The criteria for sample exclusion included the presence of painful symptoms, facial trauma history, systemic diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mouth opening limitation (anomalies, and skeletal asymmetries that may result in TMJ disorders. Dimensional measurements of the condyles between the right and left sides and crossed and non-crossed sides in sagittal and coronal view were made. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the crossed and non-crossed sides in both sagittal and coronal view. These findings suggest that the presence of unilateral posterior crossbite in children with UPXB did not result in changes between the mandibular condyles in the right and left sides or between the crossed and non-crossed sides in the coronal or sagittal plane.

  16. Evaluation of mandibular condyles in children with unilateral posterior crossbite

    Edson ILLIPRONTI-FILHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of mandibular condyle dimensions and its association with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB has been suggested in the literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate mandibular condyles on the left and right sides and between crossed and non-crossed sides in the sagittal and coronal planes, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Twenty CBCT images of 40 temporo mandibular joints (TMJs in individuals in mixed dentition phase, which included 9 males (mean 7.9 years and 11 females (mean 8.2 years, with unilateral posterior crossbite without premature contacts and functional mandibular shifts and with transverse maxillary deficiency. The criteria for sample exclusion included the presence of painful symptoms, facial trauma history, systemic diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mouth opening limitation (< 40 mm, congenital or genetic anomalies, and skeletal asymmetries that may result in TMJ disorders. Dimensional measurements of the condyles between the right and left sides and crossed and non-crossed sides in sagittal and coronal view were made. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the crossed and non-crossed sides in both sagittal and coronal view. These findings suggest that the presence of unilateral posterior crossbite in children with UPXB did not result in changes between the mandibular condyles in the right and left sides or between the crossed and non-crossed sides in the coronal or sagittal plane.

  17. Elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma: study of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Nogami, Shinnosuke; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Yamashita, Toshio; Kataoka, Yoshihiro; Hirayama, Bunichi; Tanaka, Kenko; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the trends and characteristic features of mandibular condyle fractures in elderly patients in terms of etiology, patterns, and treatment modalities. Records of 201 patients aged 65 years and older, who were treated for maxillofacial fractures at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University, and Tohoku University from January 2002 to December 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Patient records and radiographs were examined, with the following information: relevant medical history, cause of fracture, the presence and state of premolars and molars in the maxilla and mandible, number and location of mandible fracture, and method of treatment. As for the state of premolars and molars, premolars or molars in the mandible in contact with the maxilla were regarded as contacted. A fall was responsible for the majority of the fractures (173/201). With condyle fractures, there was a significant difference between the contacted and non-contacted group in regard to incidence. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater number of cases with symphysis and condyle combination fractures in the non-contacted group (70.9%) than in the contacted group (51.9%). As for the method of treatment, arthrocentesis was the most commonly employed. The present findings suggest that contacted molars in the maxilla and mandible have an influence on condyle fractures in elderly individuals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury: imaging by CT

    Bloom, A.I.; Neeman, Z.; Floman, Y.; Gomori, J.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1996-01-01

    The true incidence of fracture of the occipital condyles is unknown. It may be associated with instability at the craniocervical joint. CT is the modality of choice for the demonstration of these fractures, but its use for imaging of the associated ligament injury has not been reported. In order to demonstrate normal anatomy, occipital condyle fracture and ligament injury, and to estimate the incidence of this lesion, 21 children and young adults with high-energy blunt craniocervical injury were examined prospectively. Thin-slice, axial, contiguous, CT was performed from the base of C2 to above the foramen magnum. Bone and soft tissue windows and coronal, sagittal, and curvilinear 2D reconstructions were performed. Five occipital condyle fractures were identified in four patients (19 %), with demonstration of alar ligament injury in two cases and local hematoma in one. In four, artifacts or rotation precluded assessment of ligaments. In all remaining cases normal bone and ligament anatomy was demonstrated. Fracture of the occipital condyles following craniocervical injury is not uncommon in children and young adults. Normal bone and ligament anatomy and pathology can be safely and clearly demonstrated in seriously injured patients and others using this CT technique. Increased awareness of this entity and a low threshold for performing CT should avoid the potentially serious consequences of a missed diagnosis. (orig.). With 8 figs., 2 tabs

  19. CT-based morphometric analysis of the occipital condyle: focus on occipital condyle screw insertion.

    Zhou, Jinsong; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Kang, Xia; He, Jade; Zhang, Zhihai; Inoue, Nozomu; An, Howard S

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The segmental occipital condyle screw (OCS) is an alternative fixation technique in occipitocervical fusion. A thorough morphological study of the occipital condyle (OC) is critical for OCS placement. The authors set out to introduce a more precise CT-based method for morphometric analysis of the OC as it pertains to the placement of the segmental OCS, and they describe a novel preoperative simulation method for screw placement. Two new clinically relevant parameters, the height available for the OCS and the warning depth, are proposed. METHODS CT data sets from 27 fresh-frozen human cadaveric occipitocervical spines were used. All measurements were performed using a commercially available 3D reconstruction software package. The length, width, and sagittal angle of the condyle were measured in the axial plane at the base of the OC. The height of the OC and the height available for the segmental OCS were measured in the reconstructed oblique sagittal plane, fitting the ideal trajectory of the OCS recommended in the literature. The placement of a 3.5-mm-diameter screw that had the longest length of bicortical purchase was simulated into the OC in the oblique sagittal plane, with the screw path not being blocked by the occiput and not violating the hypoglossal canal cranially or the atlantooccipital joint caudally. The length of the simulated screw was recorded. The warning depth was measured as the shortest distance from the entry point of the screw to the posterior border of the hypoglossal canal. RESULTS The mean length and width of the OC were found to be larger in males: 22.2 ± 1.7 mm and 12.1 ± 1.0 mm, respectively, overall (p < 0.0001 for both). The mean sagittal angle was 28.0° ± 4.9°. The height available for the OCS was significantly less than the height of the OC (6.2 ± 1.3 mm vs 9.4 ± 1.5 mm, p < 0.0001). The mean screw length (19.3 ± 1.9 mm) also presented significant sex-related differences: male greater than female (p = 0.0002). The

  20. Friction dampers, the positive side of friction

    Lopez Arteaga, I.; Nijmeijer, H.; Busturia, J.M.; Sas, P.; Munck, de M.

    2004-01-01

    Friction is frequently seen as an unwanted phenomenon whose influence has to be either minimised or controlled. In this work one of the positive sides of friction is investigated: friction damping. Friction dampers can be a cheap and efficient way to reduce the vibration levels of a wide range of

  1. Recurrent osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: A case report

    Kwon, Young Eun; Choi, Karp Shik; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, So Young; An, Seo Young; Lee, Jae Seo

    2017-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman presented with facial asymmetry. Crepitus and clicking of the temporomandibular joint were noted. The midline deviated 5.5 mm to the left, and secondary malocclusion was observed. Panoramic and cone-beam computed tomographic images showed an irregular and exophytic bony mass on the anteromedial surface of the right mandibular condyle. A 3-phase bone scan revealed increased tracer uptake on the affected side. The lesion was treated with excision and reshaping under the diagnosis of osteochondroma confirmed by a histopathological examination. The lesion recurred after 3 years, and the patient underwent condylectomy. Mandibular condylar osteochondroma is often resected because it causes functional and aesthetic problems, but it rarely recurs. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of recurrent osteochondromas of the mandibular condyle have been reported previously. Surgical treatment of the osteochondroma should be performed considering the possibility of recurrence, and long-term follow-up is recommended

  2. Recurrent osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: A case report

    Kwon, Young Eun; Choi, Karp Shik; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, So Young; An, Seo Young [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A 21-year-old woman presented with facial asymmetry. Crepitus and clicking of the temporomandibular joint were noted. The midline deviated 5.5 mm to the left, and secondary malocclusion was observed. Panoramic and cone-beam computed tomographic images showed an irregular and exophytic bony mass on the anteromedial surface of the right mandibular condyle. A 3-phase bone scan revealed increased tracer uptake on the affected side. The lesion was treated with excision and reshaping under the diagnosis of osteochondroma confirmed by a histopathological examination. The lesion recurred after 3 years, and the patient underwent condylectomy. Mandibular condylar osteochondroma is often resected because it causes functional and aesthetic problems, but it rarely recurs. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of recurrent osteochondromas of the mandibular condyle have been reported previously. Surgical treatment of the osteochondroma should be performed considering the possibility of recurrence, and long-term follow-up is recommended.

  3. Multiple-slice spiral CT evaluation of occipital condyle fractures

    Wang Xifu; Zhang Guixiang; Li Kang'an; Zhao Jinglong; Wang Han; Feng Yan; Zheng Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MSCT findings of occipital condyle fracture (OCF) and improve its diagnostic accuracy. Methods: Nineteen patients with OCF, selected from 110 patients suffering high energy injuries at the craniocervical junction, were enrolled into the study. The MSCT appearances of OCFs were retrospectively analyzed by two experienced radiologists. OCF had four types: type Ⅰ was a comminuted fracture, type Ⅱ was a extension of basilar skull fracture, type Ⅲ was an avulsion fracture at the attachment site of alar ligament on occipital condyle, type Ⅳ was a fracture of mixed pattern consisting of two or more above fracture types. Results: In 19 patients, the left, right and bilateral OCFs were seen in 7, 11 cases, and 1 case, respectively. Type Ⅰ was found in one case, which was a comminution of the left occipital condyle. Type Ⅱ was found in 5 cases, which involved the middle and posterior parts of occipital condyles with 2 on the left and 3 on the right, Type Ⅲ was found in 12 cases which showed various degree of fragment displacement with 3 occurring on the left, 8 on the right, 1 involving bilateral sides, 6 involving articular surfaces and 7 accompanying by enlargement of alar ligaments. Type Ⅳ was found in one case, with coexistence of Type Ⅱ and type Ⅲ In addition, OCFs were accompanied by head and (or) cervical spine injuries in 14 cases, which included cranial fracture in 8 cases, epidural hematoma in 4 cases, subarachnoid hemorrhage in one case, cerebral contusion and laceration in one case, subfalcial hernia in one case, cervical spine fracture and dislocation in 9 cases, and so on. Conclusion: OCFs can be accurately diagnosed by MSCT, which is important for selection of treatment protocols. (authors)

  4. Fractured condyle in a 3-month-old infant.

    Cambell, R L; Moore, R F

    1975-07-01

    A 3-month-old infant sustained trauma to the mandibular symphysis resulting in radiographic evidence of a fracture of the right condylar head. This presented the diffculty of performing a clinical examination and total reliance on history of a trauma and subsequent swelling. Multiple radiographs of the condyles were used to establish the diagnosis and rule out a film artifact. No definitive treatment was required other than muscle exercises and parental instruction as to potential problems.

  5. Femoral shaft fractures

    Bender, C.E.; Campbell, D.C. II

    1985-01-01

    The femur is the longest, largest, and strongest bone in the body. Because of its length, width, and role as primary weight-bearing bone, it must tolerate the extremes of axial loading and angulatory stresses. Massive musculature envelopes the femur. This masculature provides abundant blood supply to the bone, which also allows great potential for healing. Thus, the most significant problem relating to femoral shaft fractures is not healing, but restoration of bone length and alignment so that the femoral shaft will tolerate the functional stresses demanded of it

  6. Laser Doppler flowmetry for bone blood flow measurement: correlation with microsphere estimates and evaluation of the effect of intracapsular pressure on femoral head blood flow

    Swiontkowski, M.F.; Tepic, S.; Perren, S.M.; Moor, R.; Ganz, R.; Rahn, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) was used to measure bone blood flow in the rabbit femoral condyles. To correlate the LDF output signal blood cell flux to in vivo blood flow, simultaneous measurements using LDF and 85 Sr-labeled microspheres were made in an adult rabbit model. There was no correlation between the two methods for blood flow in the femoral condyles and the correlation between the two methods for blood flow in the femoral head does not achieve statistical significance. An LDF signal of 0.4 V was approximately equal to a microsphere measured flow rate of 0.4 ml blood/g bone/min. The strength of the correlation in the latter case may have been affected by (a) large arteriovenous shunts, (b) inadequate mixing of the microspheres with a left ventricular injection, and (c) insufficient numbers of microspheres present in the bone samples. When LDF was used to evaluate the effect of elevated intracapsular pressure on femoral head blood flow in skeletally mature rabbits, femoral head subchondral bone blood flow declined with increasing intracapsular pressure from a baseline value of 0.343 +/- 0.036 to a value of 0.127 +/- 0.27 at 120 cm of water pressure. The decline in femoral head blood flow was statistically significant at pressures of 40 cm of water or higher (p less than 0.001), and evaluation of sections of the proximal femora made from preterminal disulphine blue injections confirmed these findings. Intracapsular tamponade has an adverse effect on femoral head blood flow beginning well below central venous pressure and should be considered in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic and nontraumatic necrosis of the femoral head. Laser Doppler flowmetry was easy to use and appears to be a reproducible technique for evaluating femoral head blood flow, offering distinct advantages over the microsphere technique for measuring bone blood flow

  7. An Atypical Variant of Superolateral Dislocation of the Mandibular Condyle: A Case Report.

    Malik, Kapil; Debnath, Subhas C; Adhyapok, Apurba K; Hazarika, Kriti

    2017-10-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle from the glenoid fossa can occur in anterior, posterior, lateral, and superior directions. Posterior, lateral, and superior dislocations are rare. Superolateral dislocation is seldom encountered in clinical practice. It is generally associated with fracture of the anterior or contralateral side of the mandible. The occurrence of superolateral dislocation of the condyle hooked above the zygomatic arch with an associated fracture of the medial pole of the condyle is rare and has been reported only once in the literature. This report describes another case in which the patient had superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle with a fractured medial pole without any associated fracture of the anterior or contralateral side of the mandible. The condyle was hooked laterally above the zygomatic arch. Open reduction of the dislocated condyle was performed and a good outcome was obtained. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vacuum friction

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Sonnleitner, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    We know that in empty space there is no preferred state of rest. This is true both in special relativity but also in Newtonian mechanics with its associated Galilean relativity. It comes as something of a surprise, therefore, to discover the existence a friction force associated with spontaneous emission. The resolution of this paradox relies on a central idea from special relativity even though our derivation of it is non-relativistic. We examine the possibility that the physics underlying this effect might be explored in an ion trap, via the observation of a superposition of different mass states.

  9. A Rare Case Report of an Unusual Dislocation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle

    Mishra, Madan; Singh, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Several cases have been reported regarding superolateral, posterior, or superior dislocation of mandibular condyle. The anteromedial dislocation of fractured condyle is the most common among all. This article reports an unusual and unique case of dislocated fractured mandibular condyle wherein the fractured left condylar head was dislocated to the left anatomic angle of mandible. We have not found a single such case in the world English literature published till date. The presented case falls...

  10. Superolateral Dislocation of Intact Mandibular Condyle: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Saikrishna, Degala; Shyam Sundar, S.; Mamata, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Anteromedial fracture dislocation of the mandibular condyle is common but a superolateral dislocation of an intact condyle is quite rare. This type of dislocation is often misdiagnosed or completely overlooked and hence inadequately addressed. We report a case of a 41-year-old male patient who experienced superolateral dislocation of the intact condyle with symphysis fracture and panfacial fracture following a road-traffic accident, and review of literature of superolateral dislocations from ...

  11. Proximal femoral fractures

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    searched the homepages of the national heath authorities and national orthopedic societies in West Europe and found 11 national or regional (in case of no national) guidelines including any type of proximal femoral fracture surgery. RESULTS: Pathway consensus is outspread (internal fixation for un...

  12. Superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle into the temporal fossa: case report and literature review.

    Sharma, Divashree; Khasgiwala, Ankit; Maheshwari, Bharat; Singh, Charanpreet; Shakya, Neelam

    2017-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint dislocation refers to the dislodgement of mandibular condyle from the glenoid fossa. Anterior and anteromedial dislocations of the mandibular condyle are frequently reported in the literature, but superolateral dislocation is a rare presentation. This report outlines a case of superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle that occurred in conjunction with an ipsilateral mandibular parasymphysis fracture. A review of the clinical features of superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle and the possible techniques of its reduction ranging from the most conservative means to extensive surgical interventions is presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Trochanteric femoral fractures].

    Douša, P; Čech, O; Weissinger, M; Džupa, V

    2013-01-01

    At the present time proximal femoral fractures account for 30% of all fractures referred to hospitals for treatment. Our population is ageing, the proportion of patients with post-menopausal or senile osteoporosis is increasing and therefore the number of proximal femoral fractures requiring urgent treatment is growing too. In the age category of 50 years and older, the incidence of these fractures has increased exponentially. Our department serves as a trauma centre for half of Prague and part of the Central Bohemia Region with a population of 1 150 000. Prague in particular has a high number of elderly citizens. Our experience is based on extensive clinical data obtained from the Register of Proximal Femoral Fractures established in 1997. During 14 years, 4280 patients, 3112 women and 1168 men, were admitted to our department for treatment of proximal femoral fractures. All patients were followed up until healing or development of complications. In the group under study, 82% were patients older than 70 years; 72% of those requiring surgery were in their seventies and eighties. Men were significantly younger than women (pfractures were 2.3-times more frequent in women than in men. In the category under 60 years, men significantly outnumbered women (pfractures were, on the average, eight years older than the patients with intertrochanteric fractures, which is a significant difference (pTrochanteric fractures accounted for 54.7% and femoral neck fractures for 45.3% of all fractures. The inter-annual increase was 5.9%, with more trochanteric than femoral neck fractures. There was a non-significant decrease in intertrochanteric (AO 31-A3) fractures. On the other hand, the number of pertrochanteric (AO 31-A1+2) fractures increased significantly (pfractures were treated with a proximal femoral nail; a short nail was used in 1260 and a long nail in 134 of them. A dynamic hip screw (DHS) was employed to treat 947 fractures. Distinguishing between pertrochanteric (21-A1

  14. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  15. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  16. Open versus closed reduction: diacapitular fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the literature regarding the evolution of current thoughts on management of diacapitular fractures (DFs) of the mandibular condyle. An electronic search in PubMed was undertaken in March 2012. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included studies reporting clinical series of DFs, including both animal and human studies, without date or language restrictions. The search strategy initially yielded 108 references. Twenty-eight studies were identified without repetition within the selection criteria. Additional hand-searching of the reference lists of selected studies yielded three additional papers. The current indications for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of DFs described in the literature are: (a) fractures affecting the lateral condyle with reduction of mandibular height; (b) fractures in which the proximal fragment dislocates laterally out of the glenoid fossa, which cannot be reduced by closed or open treatment of another part of the mandibular fracture. The indications for conservative treatment are: (a) fractures that do not shorten the condylar height (a fracture with displacement of the medial parts of the condyle); (b) undisplaced fractures; (c) comminution of the condylar head, when the bony fragments are too small for stable fixation; and (d) fractures in children. As the temporomandibular joint disk plays an important role as a barrier preventing ankylosis, it is important to reposition the disk (if displaced/dislocated) during the surgical treatment of DFs. The lateral pterygoid muscle should never be stripped from the medially displaced fragment because its desinsertion disrupts circulation to the medial bony fragment, and also because this muscle helps to restore the muscle function after surgery. ORIF of selected DFs improves prognosis by anatomical bone and soft tissue recovery when combined with physical

  17. Iodixanol in femoral arteriography

    Thorstensen, Oe.; Albrechtsson, U.; Calissendorff, B.; Larusdottir, H.; Norgren, L.; Tengvar, M.; Bolstad, B.; Aspelin, P.

    1994-01-01

    Two contrast media, iodixanol (Visipaque, Nycomed) 270 mg I/ml and iohexol (Omnipaque, Nycomed) 300 mg I/ml, were compared in femoral arteriography, in 147 patients. Both contrast media were diagnostically effective for use in femoral arteriography, without any significant difference. Pain was reported in connection with injection of iohexol by 36% of the patients, after injection of iodixanol none reported pain. Seventy-two percent of the patients in the iodixanol group reported a sensation of warmth in connection with contrast injection versus 90% in the iohexol group. The average intensity of the warmth was greater with iohexol than with iodixanol. Fourteen percent of patients in the iodixanol group and 1% in the iohexol group reported one or more subjective adverse events. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic femoral varus measurement is affected unpredictably by femoral rotation

    Miles, James Edward

    Radiographic measurements of femoral varus are used to determine if intervention to correct femoral deformity is required, and to calculate the required correction. The varus angle is defined as the angle between the proximal femoral long axis (PFLA) and an axis tangential to the distal femoral...... and externally by 5° and 10° using plastic wedges. Accuracy of rotation was within +1°. Digital radiographs were obtained at each position. Varus angles were measured using ImageJ, employing two definitions of PFLA. Mean varus angles increased with 10° of either internal or external rotation with both PFLA...... rotation angles. The effect of rotation on varus angle measurements in these femoral specimens contradicts a previous report using CT. The most probable explanation is the difference in femoral positioning: the CT study used a slightly elevated position compared to that in this study, resulting in better...

  19. Operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children.

    Wirmer, Johannes; Kruppa, Christian; Fitze, Guido

    2012-08-01

    The operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children remains controversial. The result of incorrectly treated fractures may lead to complications such as pseudoarthrosis and severe deformity, with considerable functional and cosmetic restrictions. The aim of this study was to determine whether operative treatment of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children using Screw-wires (Orthofix GmbH, Ottobrunn, Germany) has any advantage over treatment with Kirschner wires ("K-wires") (aap-Implantate AG, Berlin, Germany). These results were then compared with operative treatment using lag-screw osteosynthesis. We treated surgically 76 cases of fracture of the lateral humeral condyle in children at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Dresden between 1989 to 2002 and 2004 to 2008, from which 42 were available for follow-up examination. Within this group, there were seven children that were followed-up twice (in 1996 to 2002). Of these, 21 patients were treated with Screw-wires, and another 21 had K-wires inserted. The results were evaluated according to the Dhillon criteria. Only seven patients (17%) had a fair result in the overall grading according to the Dhillon criteria, four after K-wire and three after Screw-wire osteosyntheses. The remaining patients scored good to excellent results. There were no pseudoarthroses. Six patients (14%) had a varisation in the carrying angle between 10 and 16 degrees (three each procedure), and 15 patients (36%) had no difference in the carrying angle at all. Of these 15 patients, 10 were treated with Screw-wire osteosynthesis. Only one patient (2.4%) had a deficit of more than 10 degrees in elbow joint flexion, while only two (4.8%, one each procedure) had a deficit of more than 10 degrees in elbow joint extension, compared with the uninjured arm. Our results demonstrate that the employment of Screw-wire osteosynthesis is superior to the use of K-wires concerning the carrying angle while scoring alike on the

  20. 78 FR 9010 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    2013-02-07

    .... FDA-2012-N-1239] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY... condyle prostheses into class III, based on the recommendation of a Dental Products Panel (the Panel... Administration, Dental Products Advisory Panel Meeting Transcript, February 12, 1997; http://www.accessdata.fda...

  1. Function impairment and pain after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Stegenga, B.; de Bont, L.G.; Bos, R.R.

    Background: To determine the prognosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle after closed treatment. Methods: Patients (n = 144) with a fracture of the mandibular condyle, all treated closed, were included in the study. Fracture types and position of the fracture parts were determined on

  2. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: surgical excision followed by occlusal stabilization.

    Yoo, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Byung-Joon; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Lee, Deok-Won; Ohe, Joo-Young; Suh, Joon-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle in adults can be treated by surgical excision, condylectomy followed by costochondral graft or orthognathic surgery. Such complex treatment plan may not be appropriate for patients with old age, affected with chronic osteochondroma of the condyle. In this clinical report, we present a patient with osteochondroma of the condyle treated by surgical excision. The patient's postoperative occlusion was a contraindication for orthognathic surgery because of the severe abrasion of the teeth and the chronic compensation of the dentition to the deviated mandible. Surgical excision of the lesion was carried out under general anesthesia, and the remaining condylar head was salvaged as much as possible. No graft materials or posthodontic condyle reconstruction was carried out. Because there was no occlusal stop to secure the mandible in a centric relation position of the condyle, a stabilization splint was delivered to position the condyle in a relatively stable position. The stability of the condyle position was evaluated by follow-up cone beam computed tomographic scans of the pathologic and the contralateral condyle, along with clinical factors such as occlusal contact points and mandible movements assayed by ARCUSdigma (KaVo). After significant condylar position was achieved, full prosthodontic reconstruction was performed to both the patient's and the dentist's satisfaction.

  3. Effects of Autogenous Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate on Radiographic Integration of Femoral Condylar Osteochondral Allografts.

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Stannard, James P; Cook, Cristi R; Kfuri, Mauricio; Crist, Brett D; Smith, Matthew J; Cook, James L

    2017-10-01

    Transplantation of fresh osteochondral allografts (OCAs) is an attractive treatment option for symptomatic articular cartilage lesions in young, healthy patients. Because the lack of OCA bone integration can be a cause of treatment failure, methods for speeding and enhancing OCA bone integration to mitigate this potential complication are highly desirable. To determine if autogenous bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMC) treatment of large femoral condylar OCAs would be associated with superior radiographic OCA bone integration compared with nontreated allografts during the critical first 6 months after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A review of patients enrolled in a prospective registry who were treated with transplantation of large OCAs to one or both femoral condyles at our institution from March 12, 2013 to March 14, 2016 was performed. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on BMC treatment versus no BMC treatment; the treatment was nonrandomized and was rooted in a shift in practice and a continuing effort to optimize OCA transplantation at our institution. Patients were excluded if they did not have orthogonal view radiographs performed at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Each condyle undergoing OCA transplantation was assessed individually by an independent musculoskeletal radiologist, who was blinded to the treatment group and time point. OCAs were assessed with respect to graft integration (0%-100%; 0 = no integration, 100 = complete integration) and degree of sclerosis (0-3; 0 = normal, 1 = mild sclerosis, 2 = moderate sclerosis, and 3 = severe sclerosis) of the graft at each time point. This study identified 17 condyles in 15 patients who underwent OCA transplantation without BMC and 29 condyles in 22 patients who underwent OCA transplantation with BMC. The BMC group had significantly ( P = .033) higher graft integration scores at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Graft sclerosis was significantly ( P

  4. Acoustics of friction

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  5. The application of the Risdon approach for mandibular condyle fractures.

    Nam, Seung Min; Lee, Jang Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyuk

    2013-07-06

    Many novel approaches to mandibular condyle fracture have been reported, but there is a relative lack of reports on the Risdon approach. In this study, the feasibility of the Risdon approach for condylar neck and subcondylar fractures of the mandible is demonstrated. A review of patients with mandibular condylar neck and subcondylar fractures was performed from March 2008 to June 2012. A total of 25 patients, 19 males and 6 females, had 14 condylar neck fractures and 11 subcondylar fractures. All of the cases were reduced using the Risdon approach. For subcondylar fractures, reduction and fixation with plates was done under direct vision. For condylar neck fractures, reduction and fixation was done with the aid of a trochar in adults and a percutaneous threaded Kirschner wire in children. There were no malunions or nonunions revealed in follow-up care. Mild transient neuropraxia of the marginal mandibular nerve was seen in 4 patients, which was resolved within 1-2 months. The Risdon approach is a technique for reducing the condylar neck and subcondylar fractures that is easy to perform and easy to learn. Its value in the reduction of mandibular condyle fractures should be emphasized.

  6. In Vivo Quantitative Ultrasound Image Analysis of Femoral Subchondral Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Jana Podlipská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential of quantitative noninvasive knee ultrasonography (US for detecting changes in femoral subchondral bone related to knee osteoarthritis (OA was investigated. Thirty-nine patients referred to a knee arthroscopy underwent dynamic noninvasive US examination of the knee joint. The subchondral bone was semiautomatically segmented from representative US images of femoral medial and lateral condyles and intercondylar notch area. Subsequently, the normalized mean gray-level intensity profile, starting from the cartilage-bone interface and extending to the subchondral bone depth of ~1.7 mm, was calculated. The obtained profile was divided into 5 depth levels and the mean of each level, as well as the slope of the profile within the first two levels, was calculated. The US quantitative data were compared with the arthroscopic Noyes’ grading and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grading. Qualitatively, an increase in relative subchondral bone US gray-level values was observed as OA progressed. Statistically significant correlations were observed between normalized US mean intensity or intensity slope especially in subchondral bone depth level 2 and K-L grading (r=0.600, P<0.001; r=0.486, P=0.006, resp. or femoral arthroscopic scoring (r=0.332, P=0.039; r=0.335, P=0.037, resp.. This novel quantitative noninvasive US analysis technique is promising for detection of femoral subchondral bone changes in knee OA.

  7. Biomechanical and morphometric evaluation of occipital condyle for occipitocervical segmental fixation

    Hong, Jae-Taek; Takigaya, Tomoyuki; Sugisaki, Keizo; Orias, A.A.E.; Inoue, Nozomu; An, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    Two recent novel techniques of occipital fixation are the occipitoatlantal (C0-C1) transarticular screw technique and the direct occipital condyle screw technique. The present study evaluated and compared the biomechanical stability of the direct occipital condyle screw and C0-C1 transarticular screw with the established method for craniocervical spine fixation using the midline occipital keel screw and C1 lateral mass screw. Morphometric evaluation of the occipital condyle and the hypoglossal canal was performed to avoid hypoglossal nerve injury during the screw placement. Thirteen recently frozen cadaveric specimens were used. The occipital condyle anatomy and the hypoglossal canal dimension were measured using reconstructed computed tomography images. Insertion torque and pullout strength were evaluated to compare the midline occipital keel screw, C0-C1 transarticular screw, C1 lateral mass screw, and direct occipital condyle screw. The dimensions of the occipital condyle allow use of a 3.5 or 4.0-mm diameter screw. Mean pullout strength was 1619.6 N for the midline occipital keel screw, 870.7 N for the C0-C1 transarticular screw, 707.0 N for the C1 lateral mass screw, and 431.7 N for the direct occipital condyle screw. Mean insertion torque was 0.55 Nm for the midline occipital keel screw, 0.32 Nm for the C0-C1 transarticular screw, 0.14 Nm for the C1 lateral mass screw, and 0.11 Nm for the direct occipital condyle screw. The condylar anatomy allows direct insertion of the occipital condyle screw and C0-C1 transarticular screw. These techniques are suitable options for the treatment of craniovertebral junction instabilities in selected patients. (author)

  8. Three-dimensional computerized tomography in mandibular condyle fractures

    Bermeo, Fausto; Salazar, Abad

    2003-01-01

    Now, car accidents are so commons, this associated to the high technology in produce automobiles make this type of accidents so serious and the consequences of mandibular condyle fractures are more commons and with more gravity, some of these patients, generally need a traqueostomy to be operated, that is why every second that we can save during the surgery is important. The normal exams as X rays and simple TAC give as an important idea but no complete, on the contrary the three-dimensional TAC permits to observe every damages and its exact location, this contribute to make a better surgery organization, the number and type of plates that we have to put and the better way to treat each case, that contribute to reduce time in operating theatre which is in benefit of the patient, diminishing risks in serious patients as they are, that is why we recommend the utilization of the three-dimensional TAC. (The author)

  9. Medial Condyle Fracture (Kilfoyle Type III of the Distal Humerus with Transient Fishtail Deformity after Surgery

    Motoki Sonohata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A “Fishtail deformity” is one of the well-known complications following pediatric lateral condyle or supracondylar fractures of the humerus. We herein report a case of medial condyle fracture (Kilfoyle type III in an 11-year-old boy. He had a transient “fishtail deformity” of the trochlear groove after open reduction and internal fixation. As occurred in the current case, the bone remodeling and the improvement of ischemia of the trochlea after medial condyle fracture may be associated with the likelihood of recovery from transient “fishtail deformity.”

  10. [Biomechanical analysis on healing process of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle after rigid fixation].

    Jing, Jie; Qu, Ai-li; Ding, Xiao-mei; Hei, Yu-na

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the biomechanical healing process on rigid fixation of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle (SFMC), and to provide guidelines for surgical treatment. Three-dimensional finite element model (3D-FEAM) of mandible and condyle was established. The right condyle was simulated as SFMC with 0.1 mm space across the condyle length ways. The 3D-FEAM of rigid fixation was established. The biomechanical factors such as stress distribution of condylar surface, displacement around fracture, stress on the plate and stress shielding were calculated during 0, 4, 8 and 12-week after rigid fixation. The maximum equivalent stress of normal condyle was located at the area of middle 1/3 of condylar neck. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week after fixation was 23 times than that on normal condyle. They were located at the condylar stump and the plate near inferior punctual areas of fracture line. There were little stress on the other areas. The maximum equivalent stress at 4, 8 and 12-week was approximately 6 times than that on normal condyle. They were located at the areas same as the area at 0-week. There were little stress on the other areas at the condyle. The maximum total displacement and maximum total corner were increased 0.57-0.75 mm and 0.01-0.09° respectively during healing process. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week on the condylar trump was 5-6 times compared with that at 4, 8, and 12-week. The maximum equivalent stress, maximum total displacement and maximum total corner on the fractured fragment were not changed significantly during healing process. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week on the plate was 7-9 times compared with that at 4, 8, 12-week. The stress of the condyle and stress shielding of the plate may be the reasons of absorbing and rebuilding on the condyle in healing process of SFMC. The biomechanical parameters increase obviously at 4-week after fixation. Elastic intermaxillary traction is necessary to decrease total displacement

  11. Recurrent simple bone cyst of the mandibular condyle: a case report

    Kim, Kyung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, and Institute of Oral Bio Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Cysts of the mandibular condyle are rare and can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Clinically, a simple bone cyst is asymptomatic and often discovered incidentally on routine radiographic examination. This report shows an atypical simple bone cyst occurring in the mandibular condyle showing recurrence after surgical curettage. Radiologically, this lesion involving the mandibular condyle should be distinguished from other similar lesions such as a chondriome, a central giant cell granuloma, and an aneurysmal bone cyst. Radiographic assessment was useful for forecasting the prognosis of a simple bone cyst. Possible reasons for the recurrence were discussed radiographically.

  12. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    Koenoenen, M.; Helsinki Univ.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA. (orig.)

  13. Occipital condyle metastasis: an unusual clinical presentation in carcinoma of the lung

    Pasricha, R.; Mohanty, P.P.; Madan, R.C.; Datta, N.R.

    2005-01-01

    Metastases to the base of the skull and occipital condyle metastases are uncommon as a presenting feature of malignancy. Lung cancers are known for their metastatic potential to various sites, some of which could be the only presenting feature of the underlying malignancy. However, occipital condyle metastases are very rare and to the best of our knowledge, metastases to this site from carcinoma of the lung, as a presenting feature, have never been reported in the literature. The present case report describes the clinical, radiological and the therapeutic interventions that were undertaken in a patient presenting with lung cancer who had solely the features of occipital condyle metastasis

  14. [Study of friction and loosening in hip endoprostheses].

    Dovzak Bajs, Ivana; Cvjetko, Ivan; Car, Dolores; Kokić, Visnja

    2002-01-01

    Like any other operative procedure, the implantation of hip prosthesis is associated with certain complications, which diminishes the value and purpose of such a procedure. One of the complications in artificial hip implantation is loosening of the alloplastic material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of lubrication on the torsional moment and its role in the loosening of the femoral component, using an experimental mechanical model. The following hypothesis was tested: the magnitude of torsional loading in the "bone-endoprosthesis-bone cement system" is similar to any other known loading. The testing device was constructed with the possibility of simulation of positions similar to original performances in the implanted hip prosthesis. It refers primarily to the possibilities of achieving definite forces and velocities. The intention was to point quantitatively to the role of friction moment between the acetabular and femoral endoprosthesis part. Trials were conducted by combining 7 types of loading and 4 kinds of lubrication: dry, water, plasma, and light oil. The testing joint (Ring's prosthesis) was connected through tensometric measuring shaft upon the working forepart oscillating mechanism. Graded by the changeable static loading by means of the pendulum and via lever mechanism the testing joint was loaded by force from 610 to 7137 N. As the cause of friction resistance in the moving joint, torque deformaties of the measuring shaft occurred. The testing joint enabled oscillating movement using a four-part mechanism. In this way, it was possible to define not only the maximum values of the frictional moment (or the coefficient of friction) during one movement cycle but also to examine its relation to the kind of lubrication. Change in the measuring torsional moment were computer recorded. Before each trial, the gauging of the complete outfit was performed. Thereafter, cleaning of the frictional surfaces of the whole outfit was done

  15. One-stage lengthening using a locked nailing technique for distal femoral shaft nonunions associated with shortening.

    Wu, Chi-Chuan; Lee, Zhon-Liau

    2004-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a one-stage lengthening using a locked nail technique for the treatment of distal femoral shaft nonunions associated with shortening. Retrospective. University hospital. During a 6-year period, 36 distal femoral shaft nonunions associated with shortening (>1.5 cm) were treated by the one-stage lengthening technique. Indications for this technique were distal femoral shaft aseptic or quiescent infected nonunions, 1.5-5 cm shortening, and a fracture level suitable for the insertion of two distal locked screws. The surgical technique involved skeletal traction using the femoral condyle, local débridement, lengthening by lengthening was 2.5 cm (range 1.5-3.5 cm). One-stage lengthening using the locked nailing technique to treat distal femoral shaft nonunions associated with shortening can achieve a high success rate and low complication rate. The key to successful treatment is the patient's complete cooperation with strictly protected weight bearing until the fracture has healed.

  16. Origins of Rolling Friction

    Cross, Rod

    2017-01-01

    When a hard object rolls on a soft surface, or vice versa, rolling friction arises from deformation of the soft object or the soft surface. The friction force can be described in terms of an offset in the normal reaction force or in terms of energy loss arising from the deformation. The origin of the friction force itself is not entirely clear. It…

  17. Radiographic landmarks for locating the femoral origin of the superficial medial collateral ligament.

    Hartshorn, Timothy; Otarodifard, Karimdad; White, Eric A; Hatch, George F Rick

    2013-11-01

    Little has been written about the use of radiographic landmarks for locating the origin of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL). A standardized radiographic landmark for the sMCL origin using intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging may be of value in aiding the surgeon in accurate femoral tunnel placement in the setting of extensive soft tissue disruption and bony attrition. To determine a reproducible radiographic landmark that will assist in correct femoral tunnel placement in sMCL repair and reconstruction. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen unmatched human cadaveric knees were dissected, and the origin of the sMCL was exposed. A 2-mm metallic marker was then placed at the center of the femoral origin of the sMCL. True lateral fluoroscopically assisted digital radiographs were obtained of the knee with the posterior and distal femoral condyles overlapping in a standardized fashion. With the use of computer software, reference lines were drawn on the images, creating 4 quadrants. Two independent examiners performed quantitative measurements of the sMCL origin in relation to this axis and to the Blumensaat line. Mean measurements showed the sMCL origin to be closely related to the intersection point of the Blumensaat line and a line drawn distally from the posterior femoral cortex on a true lateral radiograph. The sMCL origin was found at a mean point 1.6 ± 4.3 mm posterior and 4.9 ± 2.1 mm proximal to the intersection of a line paralleling the posterior femoral cortex and a line drawn perpendicular to the posterior femoral cortical line, where it intersects the Blumensaat line. In 5 of 10 specimens, the center of the sMCL origin fell precisely on the Blumensaat line. The remaining specimens had sMCL origins anterior to the Blumensaat line. The femoral origin of the sMCL was found in the proximal and posterior quadrants in 8 of 10 specimens. With a relatively small amount of deviation, the sMCL origin can be consistently identified on a true

  18. AN ANATOMICAL PERSPECTIVE OF HUMAN OCCIPITAL CONDYLES AND FORAMEN MAGNUM WITH NEUROSURGICAL CORRELATES

    Gaurav; Divya; Abha

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Knowledge of condylar anatomy helps the surgeon in making important decisions regarding extent and direction of condylar drilling and minimizing injury and retraction of neural structures. Important preoperative information includes length, width, axis/directions and overriding of occipital condyle in foramen magnum, relationships of condyles to foramen magnum and to hypoglossal canal. The antero-posterior and transverse diameters of foramen magnum and amount of over...

  19. Dislocation of a mandibular condyle in the middle cranial fossa, diagnosed 54 years after trauma

    De Mol, Antoni; Nicolielo, Laura; Ghekiere, Olivier; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma. We report the remarkable case of a 63-year-old patient in whom trauma 54 years prior to consultation resulted in intrusion of the right mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. The diagnosis was missed because of insufficient data provided by conventional radiographies. Failure of timely diagnosis and lack of appropriate treatment resulted in temporomandibular joi...

  20. A study of repair cartilage from osteochondrotic humeral condyles of swine: preliminary report.

    Nakano, T; Aherne, F X

    1992-01-01

    A total of 16 animals, including 12 lame and four normal boars, were used. All lame boars had severe osteochondrotic humeral condyles in which repair cartilage tissues originating from subchondral bone were observed. Quantitative chemical studies of repair cartilage and normal cartilage were carried out using humeral condyles from four selected animals (two lame and two normal boars, respectively). The repair cartilage contained a higher concentration of collagen and lower concentration of pr...

  1. [Design and fabrication of the custom-made titanium condyle by selective laser melting technology].

    Chen, Jianyu; Luo, Chongdai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Gong; Qiu, Weiqian; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-10-01

    To design and fabricate the custom-made titanium mandibular condyle by the reverse engineering technology combined with selective laser melting (SLM) technology and to explore the mechanical properties of the SLM-processed samples and the application of the custom-made condyle in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction. The three-dimensional model of the mandibular condyle was obtained from a series of CT databases. The custom-made condyle model was designed by the reverse engineering software. The mandibular condyle was made of titanium powder with a particle size of 20-65 µm as the basic material and the processing was carried out in an argon atmosphere by the SLM machine. The yield strength, ultimate strength, bending strength, hardness, surface morphology and roughness were tested and analyzed. The finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze the stress distribution. The complex geometry and the surface of the custom-made condyle can be reproduced precisely by the SLM. The mechanical results showed that the yield strength, ultimate strength, bending strength and hardness were (559±14) MPa, (659±32) MPa, (1 067±42) MPa, and (212±4)HV, respectively. The surface roughness was reduced by sandblast treatment. The custom-made titanium condyle can be fabricated by SLM technology which is time-saving and highly digitized. The mechanical properties of the SLM sample can meet the requirements of surgical implant material in the clinic. The possibility of fabricating custom-made titanium mandibular condyle combined with the FEA opens new interesting perspectives for TMJ reconstruction.

  2. Correlation Between Clinical and Radiological Outcomes After Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Femoral Condyles.

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-08-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects, although the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes after surgery is poorly understood. To determine the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes throughout the postoperative timeline to 5 years after MACI. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 83 patients (53 male, 30 female) with complete clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 2, and 5 years after MACI. The mean age of patients was 38.9 years (range, 13-62 years), with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.6 kg/m(2) (range, 16.8-34.8 kg/m(2)), mean defect size of 3.3 cm(2) (range, 1-9 cm(2)), and mean preoperative duration of symptoms of 9.2 years (range, 1-46 years). Patients indicated for MACI in this follow-up were 13 to 65 years of age, although they were excluded if they had a BMI >35 kg/m(2), had undergone prior extensive meniscectomy, or had ongoing progressive inflammatory arthritis. Patients were assessed clinically using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the graft using a 1.5-T or 3-T clinical scanner; the MRI assessment included 8 parameters of graft repair (infill, signal intensity, border integration, surface contour, structure, subchondral lamina, subchondral bone, and effusion) based on the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score as well as an MRI composite score. The degree of an association between the MRI parameters and the KOOS subscales at each postoperative time point was assessed with the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC), and significance was determined at P correlations over time and statistically significant associations at 5 years with KOOS-Pain (SCC, 0.25; P = .020), KOOS-Activities of Daily Living (SCC, 0.26; P = .018), and KOOS-Sport (SCC, 0.32; P = .003). Apart from a significant correlation between subchondral lamina and KOOS-Sport at 1 year (SCC, 0.27; P = .016), no further significant findings were observed. Apart from some consistent evidence of an association between the KOOS and effusion, this analysis demonstrated a limited correlative capacity between clinical and radiological outcomes up to 5 years after surgery. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. 99m-Technetium phosphate compound joint scintigraphy in the management of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyles

    Cahill, B.R.; Berg, B.C.

    1983-01-01

    The known sensitivity of joint scintigraphy in following the course of fracture healing caused the authors to believe that this radiologic technique might be valuable in the management of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Accordingly, 99mTc-diphosphonate joint scintigraphy was used on 18 patients with OCD of the knee. The average age was 13 1/2 years. The scintigrams were repeated at 6-week intervals until healing had occurred. When the diagnosis of OCD was established by standard roentgenograms and joint scintigraphy, the patients were placed on an activity restriction program, attempting to reach a symptom-free level. The patients were followed for an average of 18 months. Ninety-five scans were categorized according to their level of scintigraphic activity. This led to a discrete four-part scintigraphic classification that is indicative of the extent of healing or progression of this condition, and precedes changes seen on standard x-rays by months. Joint scintigraphy also rules out anomalies of ossification in the diagnosis of OCD since an anomaly should have a normal scintigraphic appearance. We have concluded that joint scintigraphy is valuable in the management of OCD because of its superior sensitivity to changes in the activity of the lesion. As experience is gained with this technique, those cases that should be prophylactically surgically stabilized may be indicated

  4. Quantifying the degradation of degradable implants and bone formation in the femoral condyle using micro-CT 3D reconstruction.

    Xu, Yichi; Meng, Haoye; Yin, Heyong; Sun, Zhen; Peng, Jiang; Xu, Xiaolong; Guo, Quanyi; Xu, Wenjing; Yu, Xiaoming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuyun; Lu, Shibi; Wang, Zhaoxu; Wang, Aiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Degradation limits the application of magnesium alloys, and evaluation methods for non-traumatic in vivo quantification of implant degradation and bone formation are imperfect. In the present study, a micro-arc-oxidized AZ31 magnesium alloy was used to evaluate the degradation of implants and new bone formation in 60 male New Zealand white rabbits. Degradation was monitored by weighing the implants prior to and following implantation, and by performing micro-computed tomography (CT) scans and histological analysis after 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks of implantation. The results indicated that the implants underwent slow degradation in the first 4 weeks, with negligible degradation in the first week, followed by significantly increased degradation during weeks 12-24 (Pformation increased as the implant degraded. The findings concluded that micro-CT, which is useful for providing non-traumatic, in vivo , quantitative and precise data, has great value for exploring the degradation of implants and novel bone formation.

  5. Overlooked metastatic lesions of the occipital condyle: a missed case treasure trove.

    Loevner, L A; Yousem, D M

    1997-01-01

    Radiologic images obtained in nine patients with known primary cancer and occipital or head and neck pain were retrospectively reviewed after having been initially interpreted as normal. Imaging studies included head computed tomography (CT) in five cases, brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in six cases, cervical spine CT and MR imaging in five cases, radiography in two cases, and scintigraphy in two cases. This reevaluation demonstrated lesions of the occipital condyles in all patients. Seven patients had unilateral occipital condyle masses, and two patients had bilateral condyle lesions. Lesions were found to either involve only the occipital condyle (n = 4), extend to the adjacent occipital bone (n = 3), or extend to the ipsilateral clivus (n = 2). Misinterpretation of radiologic examinations resulted in an average delay in diagnosis of 10 weeks from the onset of symptoms to definitive therapy (irradiation). It is important to evaluate the occipital condyles in all patients with occipital pain, especially those with cancer. Neoplastic disease involving the occipital condyles is not common; however, it is frequently missed at imaging. Careful review of unenhanced sagittal and axial T1-weighted MR images and of the inferior sections from axial head CT studies will make it possible to avoid this potential pitfall.

  6. Complications Using Bioabsorbable Cross-Pin Femoral Fixation: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Saqib Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of bioabsorbable cross-pin transcondylar fixation has remained a viable option for femoral fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Although numerous biomechanical studies have demonstrated high fixation strength and minimal slippage with use of this method of fixation, there have been increasing reports of a variety of clinical complications associated with these implants. We reviewed the literature for all complications associated with the Bio-TransFix implant and present a case report of a patient status after ACL reconstruction using Bio-TransFix cross-pin femoral fixation with iliotibial band friction syndrome from a broken cross-pin four month post-operatively.

  7. Femoral head necrosis; Hueftkopfnekrose

    Kramer, J.; Scheurecker, G.; Scheurecker, A.; Stoeger, A.; Huber, A. [Roentgeninstitut am Schillerpark, Linz (Austria); Hofmann, S. [Orthopaedisches Landeskrankenhaus Stolzalpe (Austria)

    2009-05-15

    The epidemiology and pathohistogenesis of avascular femoral head necrosis has still not been clarified in detail. Because the course of the disease runs in stages and over a long time period nearly always culminates in the necessity for a total hip prosthesis, an exact radiological evaluation is of paramount importance for the treatment. There is a need for a common staging system to enable comparison of different therapy concepts and especially their long-term results. In this article the ARCO staging system is described in full detail, which includes all radiological modalities as well as histopathological alterations. (orig.) [German] Bei der avaskulaeren Femurkopfnekrose handelt es sich um ein Krankheitsbild, dessen Ursachen noch immer nicht vollstaendig geklaert sind. Da die Erkrankung stadienhaft verlaeuft und ueber einen laengeren Zeitraum betrachtet nahezu immer in einem prothetischen Hueftersatz muendet, ist eine genaue radiologische Abklaerung fuer die Behandlung von enormer Bedeutung. Um Langzeiterfolge verschiedener Therapiekonzepte vergleichen zu koennen, sind eine exakte Beschreibung und darauf basierend die Verwendung einer einheitlichen Stadieneinteilung wuenschenswert. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die ARCO-Stadieneinteilung im Detail beschrieben, die alle bildgebenden Methoden beruecksichtigt und histopathologische Veraenderungen mit einbezieht. (orig.)

  8. [Evaluation of the clinical results of non-surgical treatment for pediatric sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle].

    Liu, Chang-kui; Tan, Xin-ying; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-wei; Liu, San-xia; Hu, Min

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the clinical results of occlusal splint in the treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) in children. Thirty-nine patients (48 condyles)aged 3-8 years with sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle were included in this study. All the patients were treated by occlusal splint.Slight open occlusion was maintained by occlusal splint for 3-6 months. Clinical and radiological examination was performed six mouths and every year after treatment. Good mandibular function was observed in 39 patients. Maximal mouth opening over 35 mm was achieved at 6 months. But 11 of the 39 patients presented with deviation on mouth opening at 6 months. The radiology showed an complete remodeling in 32 condyles (28 patients) and partial remodeling in 16 condyles (11 patients). Poor remodelling was not observed in any patients. Good clinical results can be obtained by using occlusal splint in the treatment of pediatric sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle.

  9. Diagnosis of occipital condyle fractures; Diagnostik von Frakturen der Okzipitalkondylen

    Hefele-Roedel, B. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Lochbuehler, H. [Dr. v. Haunersches Kinderspital, Kinderchirurgische Klinik, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Lissner, J. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    Following the conventional X-ray diagnosis of the skull and upper cervical spine, CT proved to be the primary diagnostic method after a skull and brain injury: For all 4 cases we succeeded in detecting the occipital condyle fracture and in determing its size and location by reconstructions (coronal, sagittal, 3-D). In the case of complex occompanying injuries like soft tissue hematomas (cerebral, in the spinal cord, and the soft tissue of the neck) or for the detection of brain stem contusion, MRT had significant advantages. MRT can offer a higher image quality in soft tissue, especially in the spinal cord and the brain. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Anschluss an die konventionelle Roentgendiagnostik des Schaedels und der Halswirbelsaeule, erwies sich die Computertomographie als primaer einzusetzendes diagnostisches Verfahren, nach erlittenem Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma. In allen Faellen gelang der exakte Frakturnachweis an den Okzipitalkondylen, die Bestimmung des Frakturausmasses und die genaue Frakturlokalisation in Rekonstruktionen (koronar, sagittal, 3-D). Bei komplexen Begleitverletzungen, wie Blutungen (zerebral, spinal und in den Halsweichteilen) oder zum Nachweis einer Hirnstammkontusion, erwies sich der Einsatz der MRT als vorteilhaft. Mit der MRT laesst sich ein deutlich hoeherer Weichteilkontrast, insbesondere spinal und zerebral, erzielen. (orig.)

  10. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Kaneshiro, Kayleigh [University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Schwarzkopf, Ran [University of California Irvine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Hara, Takeshi [Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  11. Custom total knee replacement in a dog with femoral condylar bone loss.

    Liska, William D; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Eskelinen, Esa V; Sidebotham, Christopher G; Harrysson, Ola L A; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K

    2007-06-01

    To report surgical planning, technique, and outcome of custom total knee replacement (TKR) performed to manage a medial femoral condylar nonunion in a dog. Clinical case report. A 3-year-old, 20 kg Karelian Bear Hound. Computed tomographic scan of the left pelvic limb was used to build a stereolithography model of the distal portion of the femur. The model was used to create a custom augment to replace the missing medial femoral condyle and a custom stem for intramedullary condylar cemented fixation. The augment and stem were adapted to femoral and tibial components already available. The model was used to rehearse the surgery and then the custom prosthesis was implanted. Weight bearing returned 8 hours after surgery and improved thereafter. Joint alignment was normal and prosthetic joint motion was 60-165 degrees postoperatively. The dog resumed moose hunting 3 months after surgery. Peak vertical force and impulse of the operated limb measured 17 months after surgery were 65% and 47% of the normal, contralateral limb. Based on short-term follow-up, cemented canine TKR was successfully achieved for management of a severely abnormal stifle joint. With further refinement and development of commercially available prostheses, TKR should be possible for canine patients.

  12. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  13. Posterior Femoral Single Limb Osteotomy for the Removal of Well-Fixed Modular Femoral Neck Components

    Keith A Fehring

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modular neck femoral components were introduced to optimize femoral neck anteversion, leg length, offset, and stability in total hip arthroplasty. However, concerns have been raised in recent years regarding early failure of these implants due to corrosion, pseudotumor, as well as fracture of the modular neck. Removing modular neck femoral implants is challenging as removal of the modular femoral neck leaves a proximally coated femoral stem level with the proximal bone of the femoral neck. We describe a posterior femoral single limb osteotomy  (posterior cut of an extended trochanteric osteotomy for the removal of a modular neck femoral component.

  14. Nontraumatic bifid mandibular condyles in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint subjects

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of bifid mandibular condyles (BMCs) in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) subjects with no traumatic history, and to assess their impact on clinical and radiographic manifestations of TMJ. A total of 3,046 asymptomatic and 4,378 symptomatic patients were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reviewed for bifid condyles. T-tests were used to compare the frequency of BMCs when stratified by symptom, gender, and side. In BMC patients, the clinical features of pain and noise, osseous changes, and parasagittal positioning of the condyles were compared between the normally shaped condyle side and the BMC side using chi-squared tests. Fifteen (0.49%) asymptomatic and 22 (0.50%) symptomatic patients were found to have BMCs. Among the bilateral cases, the number of condyles were 19 (0.31%) and 25 (0.29%), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, between female and male patients, or between the right and left sides (p>0.05). Compared with the normally shaped condyle side, the BMC side showed no statistically significant differences in the distribution of pain and noise, parasagittal condylar position, or condylar osseous changes, with the exception of osteophytes. In the symptomatic group, osteophytes were found more frequently on the normally shaped condyle side than the BMC side (p<0.05). BMCs tended to be identified as an incidental finding. The presence of BMC would not lead to any TMJ symptoms or cause osseous changes.

  15. Nontraumatic bifid mandibular condyles in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint subjects

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of bifid mandibular condyles (BMCs) in asymptomatic and symptomatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) subjects with no traumatic history, and to assess their impact on clinical and radiographic manifestations of TMJ. A total of 3,046 asymptomatic and 4,378 symptomatic patients were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reviewed for bifid condyles. T-tests were used to compare the frequency of BMCs when stratified by symptom, gender, and side. In BMC patients, the clinical features of pain and noise, osseous changes, and parasagittal positioning of the condyles were compared between the normally shaped condyle side and the BMC side using chi-squared tests. Fifteen (0.49%) asymptomatic and 22 (0.50%) symptomatic patients were found to have BMCs. Among the bilateral cases, the number of condyles were 19 (0.31%) and 25 (0.29%), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, between female and male patients, or between the right and left sides (p>0.05). Compared with the normally shaped condyle side, the BMC side showed no statistically significant differences in the distribution of pain and noise, parasagittal condylar position, or condylar osseous changes, with the exception of osteophytes. In the symptomatic group, osteophytes were found more frequently on the normally shaped condyle side than the BMC side (p<0.05). BMCs tended to be identified as an incidental finding. The presence of BMC would not lead to any TMJ symptoms or cause osseous changes.

  16. Proximity friction reexamined

    Krappe, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic excitations to radial and tangential friction form-factors in heavy-ion collisions is investigated in the frame-work of perturbation theory. The dependence of the form factors on the essential geometrical and level-density parameters of the scattering system is exhibited in a rather closed form. The conditions for the existence of time-local friction coefficients are discussed. Results are compared to form factors from other models, in particular the transfer-related proximity friction. For the radial friction coefficient the inelastic excitation mechanism seems to be the dominant contribution in peripheral collisions. (orig.)

  17. Femoral revision with impaction allografting and an uncemented femoral component

    Nickelsen, T N; Erenbjerg, M; Retpen, J B

    2008-01-01

    A technique for uncemented revision of the femoral component which combines impaction allografting and the use of a long-stemmed proximally coated titanium prostheses (Bimetric, Biomet Inc.) is described. The results after a mean follow-up of 112 months are reported. From 1991 to 1995 femoral...... implants 88% had no pain, 10% had slight pain and only 2% had severe pain. Thirty-eight patients had radiographic signs of remodelling of the graft and/or cortical repair. In cases with a successful outcome, the results have been encouraging in relation to clinical performance, regeneration of bone...

  18. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Bayram, Mehmet, E-mail: dtmehmetbayram@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Oemer Said [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Radiology, Trabzon (Turkey); Kuecuek, Murat [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers' measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers' measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  19. Assessment of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions by cone beam computed tomography

    Marques, Alexandre Perez; Perrella, Andreia; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pereira, Marlene Fenyo Soeiro de Matos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso, E-mail: alexperez34@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Estomatologia

    2010-10-15

    There are many limitations to image acquisition, using conventional radiography, of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a better option, due to its higher accuracy, for purposes of diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment of bone injuries. The aim of the present study was to analyze two protocols of cone beam computed tomography for the evaluation of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Spherical lesions were simulated in 30 dry mandibular condyles, using dentist drills and drill bits sizes 1, 3 and 6. Each of the mandibular condyles was submitted to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using two protocols: axial, coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR); and sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis of the mandibular condyles. For these protocols, 2 observers analyzed the CBCT images independently, regarding the presence or not of injuries. Only one of the observers, however, performed on 2 different occasions. The results were compared to the gold standard, evaluating the percentage of agreement, degree of accuracy of CBCT protocols and observers' examination. The z test was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 protocols. There was greater difficulty in the assessment of small-size simulated lesions (drill no.1). From the results of this study, it can be concluded that CBCT is an accurate tool for analyzing mandibular condyle bone lesions, with the MPR protocol showing slightly better results than the sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis. (author)

  20. Relationship between mandibular condyle and angle fractures and the presence of mandibular third molars.

    Mah, Deuk-Hyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Moon, Seong-Yong; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the impact of mandibular third molars on the occurrence of angle and condyle fractures. This was a retrospective investigation using patient records and radiographs. The sample set consisted of 440 patients with mandibular fractures. Eruption space, depth and angulation of the third molar were measured. Of the 144 angle fracture patients, 130 patients had third molars and 14 patients did not. The ratio of angle fractures when a third molar was present (1.26 : 1) was greater than when no third molar was present (0.19 : 1; odds ratio, 6.58; Pcondyle fractures patients, the third molar was present in 84 patients and absent in 57 patients. The ratio of condyle fractures when a third molar was present (0.56 : 1) was lower than when no third molar was present (1.90 : 1; odds ratio, 0.30; Pfractures with third molars and the ratio of condyle fractures without a third molar were statistically significant. The occurrence of angle and condyle fractures was more affected by the continuity of the cortical bone at the angle than by the depth of a third molar. These results demonstrate that a third molar can be a determining factor in angle and condyle fractures.

  1. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Bayram, Mehmet; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Ömer Said; Küçük, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers’ measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers’ measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  2. Femoral cartilage thickness measurements in healthy individuals: learning, practicing and publishing with TURK-MUSCULUS.

    Özçakar, Levent; Tunç, Hakan; Öken, Öznur; Ünlü, Zeliha; Durmuş, Bekir; Baysal, Özlem; Altay, Zuhal; Tok, Fatih; Akkaya, Nuray; Doğu, Beril; Çapkın, Erhan; Bardak, Ayşenur; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Buğdaycı, Derya; Toktaş, Hasan; Dıraçoğlu, Demirhan; Gündüz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Kocabaş, Hilal; Erden, Gül; Günendi, Zafer; Kesikburun, Serdar; Omaç, Özlem Köroğlu; Taşkaynatan, Mehmet Ali; Şenel, Kazım; Uğur, Mahir; Yalçınkaya, Ebru Yılmaz; Öneş, Kadriye; Atan, Çiğdem; Akgün, Kenan; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Ömer; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the femoral cartilage thickness by using in-vivo musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) has been previously shown to be a valid and reliable method in previous studies; however, to our best notice, normative data has not been provided before in the healthy population.The aim of our study was to provide normative data regarding femoral cartilage thicknesses of healthy individuals with collaborative use of MSUS. This is across-sectional study run at Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Departments of 18 Secondary and Tertiary Centers in Turkey. 1544 healthy volunteers (aged between 25-40 years) were recruited within the collaboration of TURK-MUSCULUS (Turkish Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography Study Group). Subjects who had a body mass index value of less than 30 and who did not have signs and symptoms of any degenerative/inflammatory arthritis or other rheumatic diseases, history of knee trauma and previous knee surgery were enrolled. Ultrasonographic measurements were performed axially from the suprapatellar window by using linear probes while subjects' knees were in maximum flexion. Three (mid-point) measurements were taken from both knees (lateral condyle, intercondylar area, medial condyle). A total of 2876 knees (of 817 M, 621 F subjects) were taken into analysis after exclusion of inappropriate images. Mean cartilage thicknesses were significantly lower in females than males (all p< 0.001). Thickness values negatively correlated with age; negatively (females) and positively (males) correlated with smoking. Men who regularly exercised had thicker cartilage than who did not exercise (all p < 0.05). Increased age (in both sexes) and absence of exercise (males) were found to be risk factors for decreased cartilage thicknesses. Further data pertaining to other countries would be interesting to uncover whether ethnic differences also affect cartilage thickness. Collaborative use of MSUS seems to be promising in this regard.

  3. Large Metal Heads and Vitamin E Polyethylene Increase Frictional Torque in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Meneghini, R Michael; Lovro, Luke R; Wallace, Joseph M; Ziemba-Davis, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Trunnionosis has reemerged in modern total hip arthroplasty for reasons that remain unclear. Bearing frictional torque transmits forces to the modular head-neck interface, which may contribute to taper corrosion. The purpose of this study is to compare frictional torque of modern bearing couples in total hip arthroplasty. Mechanical testing based on in vivo loading conditions was used to measure frictional torque. All bearing couples were lubricated and tested at 1 Hz for more than 2000 cycles. The bearing couples tested included conventional, highly crosslinked (XLPE) and vitamin E polyethylene, CoCr, and ceramic femoral heads and dual-mobility bearings. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t test for single-variable and analysis of variance for multivariant analysis. P ≤ .05 was considered statistically significant. Large CoCr metal heads (≥36 mm) substantially increased frictional torque against XLPE liners (P = .01), a finding not observed in ceramic heads. Vitamin E polyethylene substantially increased frictional torque compared with XLPE in CoCr and ceramic heads (P = .001), whereas a difference between conventional and XLPE was not observed (P = .69) with the numbers available. Dual-mobility bearing with ceramic inner head demonstrated the lowest mean frictional torque of all bearing couples. In this simulated in vivo model, large-diameter CoCr femoral heads and vitamin E polyethylene liners are associated with increased frictional torque compared with smaller metal heads and XLPE, respectively. The increased frictional torque of vitamin E polyethylene and larger-diameter femoral heads should be considered and further studied, along with reported benefits of these modern bearing couples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of patterns and treatment strategies for mandibular condyle fractures: review of 175 condyle fractures with review of literature.

    Reddy, N Viveka V; Reddy, P Bhaskar; Rajan, Ritesh; Ganti, Srinivas; Jhawar, D K; Potturi, Abhinand; Pradeep

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate incidence, patterns and epidemiology of mandibular condylar fractures (MCF) to propose a treatment strategy for managing MCF and analyze the factors which influence the outcome. One hundred and seventy-five MCF's were evaluated over a four year period and their pattern was recorded in terms of displacement, level of fracture, age of incidence and dental occlusion. Of the 2,718 facial bone fractures, MCF incidence was the third most common at 18.39 %. Of 175 MCF 58.8 % were unilateral and 41.12 % were bilateral. 67 % of bilateral fractures and 43.8 % of unilateral fractures were associated with midline symphysis and contralateral parasymphysis fractures respectively. Most of the MCF was seen in the age group of above 16 years and 50 % of them were at subcondylar level (below the neck of the condyle). Majority of MCF sustained due to inter personal violence were undisplaced (72.7 %) and contrary to this majority of MCF sustained during road traffic accident were displaced. 62.9 % of total fractures required open reduction and rigid fixation and 37.1 % were managed with closed reduction. 80 % of MCF managed with closed reduction were in the age group of below 16 years. From this study it can be concluded that the treatment algorithm proposed for managing MCF is reliable and easy to adopt. We observed that absolute indication for open reduction of MCF is inability to achieve satisfactory occlusion by closed method and absolute contraindication for open reduction is condylar head fracture irrespective of the age of the patient.

  5. Sex Prediction using Foramen Magnum and Occipital Condyles Computed Tomography Measurements in Sudanese Population

    Usama Mohamed El-Barrany

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination is important in establishing the identity of an individual. The foramen magnum is an important landmark of the skull base. The present research aimed to study the value of foramen magnum measurements to determine sex using computed tomography (CT among Sudanese individuals. Foramen magnum CT scans of 400 Sudanese individuals (200 males and 200 females aged 18 - 83 years were included in this study. Foramen magnum (length and width, right occipital condyle (length and width, left occipital condyle (length and width, minimum intercondylar distance, maximum bicondylar distance and maximum medial intercondylar distance were measured. All data were subjected to discriminant functions analysis. All nine measurements were significantly higher in males than females. Among these measurements, the right condyle length, minimum intercondylar distance, and foramen magnum width were able to determine sex in Sudanese individuals with an accuracy rate of 83 %.

  6. Femoral Component External Rotation Affects Knee Biomechanics: A Computational Model of Posterior-stabilized TKA.

    Kia, Mohammad; Wright, Timothy M; Cross, Michael B; Mayman, David J; Pearle, Andrew D; Sculco, Peter K; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Imhauser, Carl W

    2018-01-01

    The correct amount of external rotation of the femoral component during TKA is controversial because the resulting changes in biomechanical knee function associated with varying degrees of femoral component rotation are not well understood. We addressed this question using a computational model, which allowed us to isolate the biomechanical impact of geometric factors including bony shapes, location of ligament insertions, and implant size across three different knees after posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. Using a computational model of the tibiofemoral joint, we asked: (1) Does external rotation unload the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and what is the effect on lateral collateral ligament tension? (2) How does external rotation alter tibiofemoral contact loads and kinematics? (3) Does 3° external rotation relative to the posterior condylar axis align the component to the surgical transepicondylar axis (sTEA) and what anatomic factors of the femoral condyle explain variations in maximum MCL tension among knees? We incorporated a PS TKA into a previously developed computational knee model applied to three neutrally aligned, nonarthritic, male cadaveric knees. The computational knee model was previously shown to corroborate coupled motions and ligament loading patterns of the native knee through a range of flexion. Implant geometries were virtually installed using hip-to-ankle CT scans through measured resection and anterior referencing surgical techniques. Collateral ligament properties were standardized across each knee model by defining stiffness and slack lengths based on the healthy population. The femoral component was externally rotated from 0° to 9° relative to the posterior condylar axis in 3° increments. At each increment, the knee was flexed under 500 N compression from 0° to 90° simulating an intraoperative examination. The computational model predicted collateral ligament forces, compartmental contact forces, and tibiofemoral internal/external and

  7. Morphological changes of the mandibular condyle in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

    Itoh, Shiori

    1994-01-01

    The morphological changes of the mandibular condyle in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder were studied. The subjects were 420 patients (103 males and 317 females, 8 to 80 years of age, mean age 39.8 years) who were clinically diagnosed as temporomandibular joint disorder. MR imaging was performed with a GE-Signa 1.5 Tesla MR imaging system using the body coil as a transmitter and 3-inch bilateral surface coils. The patients were examined by a multiplanar gradient echo technique in a closed-loop cine fashion on both sagittal and coronal planes. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Morphological changes of the mandibular condyle were detected in 47.0% of the patients. The predominant morphological changes were then formation of osteophyte and marginal proliferation (65.8%). 2) The incidence of morphological changes in the mandubular condyle did not show any significant difference between male and female, and tended to be higher in patients over 40 years of age, and the incidence in patients under 20 years of age was lower, compared to that in patients from 20 to 39 years of age. 3) The incidence of morphological changes in patients with anterior disk displacement without reduction was higher than in those with anterior disk displacement with reduction (P<0.001). The incidence of morphological changes in patients with rotational disk displacement was higher than in those with medial disk displacement (P<0.001). 4) The anterior translation of mandibular condyle was influenced more by anterior disk displacement rather than by morphological changes. From these results. it is suggested that simultaneous bilateral condyle pseudodynamic MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of internal derangement, evaluation of morphological changes and assessment of motional abnormality of the condyle. (author)

  8. Size, shape and age-related changes of the mandibular condyle during childhood

    Karlo, Christoph A. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Stolzmann, Paul [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Habernig, Sandra; Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Mueller, Lukas [University of Zurich, Clinics for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Zurich (Switzerland); Saurenmann, Traudel [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    To determine age-related differences in the size and shape of the mandibular condyle in children to establish anatomical reference values. A total of 420 mandibular condyles in 210 children (mean age, 7 years) were retrospectively analysed by using computed tomography (CT) imaging. The greatest left-right (LRD) and anterior-posterior (APD) diameters and the anteversion angles (AA) were measured by two readers. An APD/LRD ratio was calculated. The shape of the condyles was graded into three types on sagittal images. Correlations of parameters with the children's age were assessed by using Pearson's correlation analyses. The LRD (mean, 14.1 {+-} 2.4 mm), APD (mean, 7.3 {+-} 1.0 mm) and LRD/APD ratio (mean, 1.9 {+-} 0.3) increased (r{sub LRD} = 0.70, p < 0.01; r{sub APD} = 0.56, p < 0.01; r{sub rat} = 0.28, p < 0.01) while the AA (mean, 27 {+-} 7 ) decreased significantly (r{sub antang} = -0.26, p < 0.001) with age. The condylar shape as determined on sagittal images correlated significantly with age (r = 0.69, p < 0.05). Boys had significantly higher anteversion angles (p < 0.01), greater LRDs (p < 0.05) and greater mean ratios (p < 0.05). The mandibular condyle is subject to significant age-related changes in size and shape during childhood. As the size of the condyles increases with age, the anteversion angles decrease and the shape of the condyle turns from round to oval. (orig.)

  9. Post-traumatic bifid mandibular condyle: A case report and literature review

    Woo, Min Ho; Yoon, Kyu Ho; Park, Kwan Soo; Park, Jae An

    2016-01-01

    Bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is an uncommon morphological variant of the mandibular condyle. Although authors have proposed various etiologies for BMC, no consensus has emerged. In addition, varying findings have been reported regarding the epidemiological parameters of BMC (e.g., prevalence, gender ratio, and age), possibly due to its low incidence. BMC is occasionally associated with symptoms of the temporomandibular joint, such as ankylosis, pain, and trismus; however, it is difficult to detect this condition on conventional radiographs. This study reports a case of BMC with radiographic findings, and reviews the literature on the epidemiology of BMC

  10. Post-traumatic bifid mandibular condyle: A case report and literature review

    Woo, Min Ho; Yoon, Kyu Ho; Park, Kwan Soo; Park, Jae An [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is an uncommon morphological variant of the mandibular condyle. Although authors have proposed various etiologies for BMC, no consensus has emerged. In addition, varying findings have been reported regarding the epidemiological parameters of BMC (e.g., prevalence, gender ratio, and age), possibly due to its low incidence. BMC is occasionally associated with symptoms of the temporomandibular joint, such as ankylosis, pain, and trismus; however, it is difficult to detect this condition on conventional radiographs. This study reports a case of BMC with radiographic findings, and reviews the literature on the epidemiology of BMC.

  11. Morphology of the lateral pterygoid muscle associated to the mandibular condyle in the human prenatal stage.

    Carranza, Miriam L; Carda, Carmen; Simbrón, Alicia; Quevedo, María C Sánchez; Celaya, Gabriela; de Ferraris, Maria Elsa Gómez

    2006-01-01

    The lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) inserts at the condyle and the articular disc and plays a central role in mandibular movement via the Temporomandibular Articular Complex. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the morphology of LPM muscular fascicles and the degree of mineralization of the mandibular condyle in the prenatal stage employing structural, ultrastructural and microanalytical evaluation. Sixteen human fetuses at 11-37 weeks of gestation, with no apparent pathology and resulting from spontaneous abortions, were included in the study. Samples from lateral pterygoid muscle and the mandibular condyle were processed for light microscopy and electron microscopy and microanalysis. Desmin immunolabeling (dilution 1: 25 Dako) and alpha sarcomeric actin immunolabeling (dilution 1:50 Dako) employing the avidin-biotin system were used in paraffin embedded samples. Contralateral samples were examine by transmission electron microscopy. Four condyles (at 17-21 weeks of gestation) were used to measure the relative content of calcium and phosphorous employing the X-ray diffraction microanalytical technique. At 11-16 weeks of gestation, the LPM was composed of secondary myotubes associated to satellite cells and nerve fibers. At 18 weeks, the muscle exhibited multiple compact fascicles and the condyle showed a thin, external, subperiostal mineralized layer with few central bone spicules. At 20 weeks, at the site of insertion of the LPM, the bone trabeculae of the condyle contained an electrondense matrix with abundant mineralization nuclei. At 17-21 weeks of gestation no significant variations in the contents of phosphorous and calcium were observed. At 24 weeks, transmission electron calcium and microscopy studies revealed a marked increase in the functional units of the muscle fascicles. Also, at this age muscle fibers exhibited differences in the expression of desmin and alpha sarcomeric actin. At 37 weeks the muscle became multipennate in

  12. Characterizing occipital condyle loads under high-speed head rotation.

    Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie

    2005-11-01

    Because of the need to evaluate anthropomorphic test device (ATD) biofidelity under high-head angular accelerations, the purpose of the present investigation was to develop appropriate instrumentation for intact post mortem human subject (PMHS) testing, validate the instrumentation, and obtain information to characterize the response of the head-neck complex under this loading scenario. A series of rigid-arm pendulum, inertially loaded ATD tests was conducted. Head and neck ATD hydraulic piston chin pull tests were conducted. Subsequently, a series of PMHS tests was conducted to derive the response of the human head-neck under high-rate chin loading. Finally, Hybrid III and THOR-NT ATD head-neck systems were evaluated under the same scenario as the PMHS. A parametric analysis for center of gravity (CG) location and accelerometer orientation determined that even small errors (+/- 3 mm or 2 degrees), produced errors in the force and moment calculations by as much as 17 %. If the moment of inertia (MOI) term was varied by 5 %, resulting moment calculations were affected by as much as 8 %. If the 5 % error in MOI was used to compute occipital condyle moments, and results compared to upper load cell derived moments, peaks differed by as much as 24 %. The head CG and mass MOI should be directly measured for each preparation to obtain accurate results. The injury run on each specimen resulted in predominantly C1-C2 separations or partial separations. The 50(th) percentile probability of AIS=2+ neck injury using tensile force was about 2400 N; for AIS=3+ neck injury the 50(th) percentile risk was about 3180 N. When inserting extension moment as the criteria, the 50(th) percentile probability of an AIS=2+ injury was 51 Nm. The AIS=3+ extension moment at the 50(th) percentile probability was 75 Nm. The new THOR-NT ATD head-neck produced more biofidelic responses with an alternate head-neck junction design compared to the Hybrid III ATD.

  13. Evaluation of surgical treatment in mandibular condyle fractures.

    Vesnaver, Aleš; Ahčan, Uroš; Rozman, Janez

    2012-12-01

    In the past, fractures of the mandibular condylar process were, as a rule, treated conservatively. At the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery of the University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia, our doctrine was changed in 2002 on the basis of preliminary results and reports in the literature, and these fractures were started to be treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates and screws, which led to good results and a shorter rehabilitation period. The goal of this study was to determine the safety and efficiency of surgical treatment, as well as to compare long-term results of surgical and conservative treatment, as objectively as possible. Two groups of patients, which had all sustained a unilateral, extra-articular mandibular condyle fracture, were compared. In the test group, there were 42 surgically treated patients, and in the control group, 20 conservatively treated patients. Clinical parameters and X-ray images were assessed in both groups and compared by the two tailed Student t test, and in case of attributive variables by the χ(2) test. Within the surgically treated group, postoperative and intraoperative complications were noted: temporary facial nerve palsy, development of a parotid salivary fistula, disturbance of auricle sensibility due to injury of the greater auricular nerve, miniplate fracture, as well as intraoperative bleeding, postoperative haematoma formation, infection, reoperation due to fragment malposition and other complications. Postoperative scars were also assessed. Statistically significant differences between the surgically and conservatively treated patients were found when comparing clinical parameters as well as X-ray images, the results being better in the surgically treated group. Complications of surgical treatment were also noted, the most important among them temporary paresis of facial nerve branches, which occurred in 10 patients (24%). Plate fractures occurred in five patients (12

  14. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  15. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  16. [Determination of a Friction Coefficient for THA Bearing Couples].

    Vrbka, M; Nečas, D; Bartošík, J; Hartl, M; Křupka, I; Galandáková, A; Gallo, J

    2015-01-01

    The wear of articular surfaces is considered one of the most important factors limiting the life of total hip arthroplasty (THA). It is assumed that the particles released from the surface of a softer material induce a complex inflammatory response, which will eventually result in osteolysis and aseptic loosening. Implant wear is related to a friction coefficient which depends on combination of the materials used, roughness of the articulating surfaces, internal clearance, and dimensions of the prosthesis. The selected parameters of the bearing couples tested were studied using an experimental device based on the principle of a pendulum. Bovine serum was used as a lubricant and the load corresponded to a human body mass of 75 kg. The friction coefficient was derived from a curve of slowdown of pendulum oscillations. Roughness was measured with a device working on the principle of interferometry. Clearance was assessed by measuring diameters of the acetabular and femoral heads with a 3D optical scanner. The specimens tested included unused metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couples with the diameters of 28 mm and 36 mm. For each measured parameter, an arithmetic mean was calculated from 10 measurements. 1) The roughness of polyethylene surfaces was higher by about one order of magnitude than the roughness of metal and ceramic components. The Protasul metal head had the least rough surface (0.003 μm). 2) The ceramic-on-ceramic couples had the lowest clearance. Bearing couples with polyethylene acetabular liners had markedly higher clearances ranging from 150 μm to 545 μm. A clearance increased with large femoral heads (up to 4-fold in one of the couple tested). 3) The friction coefficient was related to the combination of materials; it was lowest in ceramic-on-ceramic surfaces (0.11 to 0.12) and then in ceramic-on-polyethylene implants (0.13 to 0.14). The friction coefficient is

  17. Paediatric treadmill friction injuries.

    Jeremijenko, Luke; Mott, Jonathan; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the severity and incidence of children injured by treadmills and to promote the implementation of safety standards. This retrospective review of children with treadmill friction injuries was conducted in a single tertiary-level burns centre in Australia between January 1997 and June 2007. The study revealed 37 children who sustained paediatric treadmill friction injuries. This was a presentation of 1% of all burns. Thirty-three (90%) of the injuries occurred in the last 3.5 years (January 2004 to June 2007). The modal age was 3.2 years. Thirty-three (90%) injuries were either full thickness or deep partial friction burns. Eleven (30%) required split thickness skin grafts. Of those who became entrapped, 100% required skin grafting. This study found that paediatric treadmill friction injuries are severe and increasing in incidence. Australian standards should be developed, implemented and mandated to reduce this preventable and severe injury.

  18. Friction stir welding tool

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  19. A new condyle implant design concept for an alloplastic temporomandibular joint in bone resorption cases.

    Ramos, António; Mesnard, Michel

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present and evaluate an innovative intramedullary implant concept developed for total alloplastic reconstruction in bone resorption cases. The main goal of this innovative concept is to avoid the main problems experienced with temporomandibular (TMJ) devices on the market, associated with bone fixation and changes in kinematics. A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on computed tomography (CT) scan images, before and after implantation of the innovative implant concept. To validate the numerical model, a clean cadaveric condyle was instrumented with four rosettes and loaded before and after implantation with the innovative concept TMJ implant. The experimental results validate the numerical models comparing the intact and implanted condyles, as they present good correlation. They show that the most critical region is around rosette #1, with an increase in strains in the proximal region of the condyle of 140%. The maximum principal strain and stress generated with the implant is less than 2200 με and 75 MPa in the posterior region of the cortical bone. Shortly after insertion of this press-fit implant, stress and strain results appear to be within the normal limits and show some similarities with the intact condyle. If these responses do not change over time, the screw fixation used at present could be avoided or replaced. This solution reduces bone resection and lessens surgical damage to the muscles. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Changed morphology and mechanical properties of cancellous bone in the mandibular condyles of edentate people

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Since edentate subjects have a reduced masticatory function, it can be expected that the morphology of the cancellous bone of their mandibular condyles has changed according to the altered mechanical environment. In the present study, the morphology of cylindrical cancellous bone specimens...

  1. Interpretation of mandibular condyle fractures using 2D- and 3D-computed tomography

    Costa e Silva Adriana Paula de Andrade da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT has been increasingly used in the examination of patients with craniofacial trauma. This technique is useful in the examination of the temporomandibular joint and allows the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle. Aiming to verify whether the three-dimensional reconstructed images from CT (3D-CT produce more effective visual information than the two-dimensional (2D-CT ones, we evaluated 2D-CT and 3D-CT examinations of 18 patients with mandibular condyle fractures. We observed that 2D-CT and 3D-CT reconstructed images produced similar information for the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle, although the 3D-CT allowed a better visualization of the position and displacement of bone fragments, as well as the comminution of fractures. These results, together with the possibility of refining and manipulating perspectives in 3D images, reinforce the importance of its use in the surgical planning and evaluation of treatment. We concluded that 3D-CT presented supplementary information for a more effective diagnosis of mandibular condyle fractures.

  2. Rate of displacement for Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures treated with a cast.

    Zale, C; Winthrop, Z A; Hennrikus, W

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to report the rate of displacement of Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures that were initially treated in a cast. We performed a retrospective review of all patients that were treated for a non-displaced (Jakob Type 1 displaced and were converted to a closed pinning treatment plan with a conversion rate of 8.5%. There was a mean of 13.2 days (4 to 21) between treatment by initial casting and closed pinning. This study demonstrates an 8.5% displacement and conversion rate from cast treatment to closed pinning for initially non-displaced Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures of the humerus. The internal oblique radiograph is most accurate to determine displacement. We recommend obtaining an internal oblique view at initial evaluation and at follow-up in the cast for lateral condyle fractures. To minimize movement at the fracture site, we recommend treating Jakob Type 1 lateral condyle fractures with a long arm cast with the elbow at 90° and the forearm in the supine position with a sling-loop design. IV - retrospective therapeutic study.

  3. 78 FR 79308 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    2013-12-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 872 [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1239] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY... delegated to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 872 is amended as follows: PART 872--DENTAL...

  4. Complaints related to mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle

    Niezen, E. T.; Bos, R. R. M.; de Bont, L. G. M.; Stegenga, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    This study analysed the relationship between complaints and mandibular function after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle in a prospective study. In a I-year follow-up, complaints were assessed during physical examination and function was assessed using the mandibular function

  5. Neurovascular structures of the mandibular angle and condyle: a comprehensive anatomical review.

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Won, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hu, Kyung-Seok

    2015-11-01

    Various surgical interventions including esthetic surgery, salivary gland excision, and open reduction of fracture have been performed in the area around the mandibular angle and condyle. This study aimed to comprehensively review the anatomy of the neurovascular structures on the angle and condyle with recent anatomic and clinical research. We provide detailed information about the branching and distributing patterns of the neurovascular structures at the mandibular angle and condyle, with reported data of measurements and proportions from previous anatomical and clinical research. Our report should serve to help practitioners gain a better understanding of the area in order or reduce potential complications during local procedures. Reckless manipulation during mandibular angle reduction could mutilate arterial branches, not only from the facial artery, but also from the external carotid artery. The transverse facial artery and superficial temporal artery could be damaged during approach and incision in the condylar area. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve can be easily damaged during submandibular gland excision or facial rejuvenation treatment. The main trunk of the facial nerve and its upper and lower distinct divisions have been damaged during parotidectomy, rhytidectomy, and open reductions of condylar fractures. By revisiting the information in the present study, surgeons will be able to more accurately prevent procedure-related complications, such as iatrogenic vascular accidents on the mandibular angle and condyle, complete and partial facial palsy, gustatory sweating (Frey syndrome), and traumatic neuroma after parotidectomy.

  6. The correlation between mineralization degree and bone tissue stiffness in the porcine mandibular condyle

    Willems, N.M.B.K.; Mulder, L.; Toonder, den J.M.J.; Zentner, A.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the local tissue mineral density (TMD) with the bone tissue stiffness. It was hypothesized that these variables are positively correlated. Cancellous and cortical bone samples were derived from ten mandibular condyles taken from 5 young and 5 adult female pigs.

  7. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  8. Friction in volcanic environments

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  9. Accuracy and Reliability of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Linear and Volumetric Mandibular Condyle Measurements. A Human Cadaver Study.

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Hernández, Virginia; Serrano-Sánchez, Pedro; Guarinos, Juan; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa

    2017-09-20

    The accuracy of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) on linear and volumetric measurements on condyles has only been assessed on dry skulls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of linear and volumetric measurements of mandibular condyles in the presence of soft tissues using CBCT. Six embalmed cadaver heads were used. CBCT scans were taken, followed by the extraction of the condyles. The water displacement technique was used to calculate the volumes of the condyles and three linear measurements were made using a digital caliper, these measurements serving as the gold standard. Surface models of the condyles were obtained using a 3D scanner, and superimposed onto the CBCT images. Condyles were isolated on the CBCT render volume using the surface models as reference and volumes were measured. Linear measurements were made on CBCT slices. The CBCT method was found to be reliable for both volumetric and linear measurements (CV  0.90). Highly accurate values were obtained for the three linear measurements and volume. CBCT is a reliable and accurate method for taking volumetric and linear measurements on mandibular condyles in the presence of soft tissue, and so a valid tool for clinical diagnosis.

  10. Mammary and femoral hydatid cysts.

    Shamim, Muhammad

    2010-08-01

    Hydatid cyst disease most commonly affects liver and lungs, but it can affect all viscera and soft tissues of the body. Simultaneous mammary and femoral hydatid cysts, without any other visceral involvement, are extremely rare. This is a case report of 25-years-old female, presenting with lump in left breast mimicking fibroadenoma and lump in right thigh mimicking fibroma. Both turned out to be hydatid cysts.

  11. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos; Almeida, Solange Maria

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  12. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores, E-mail: bastosluana@ymail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral e Maxilofacial; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Camaragibe, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral

    2013-11-15

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  13. Management of neglected lateral condyle fractures of humerus in children: A retrospective study

    Anil Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Late presentation of humeral lateral condylar fracture in children is a surgical dilemma. Osteosynthesis of the fracture fragment or correction of elbow deformity with osteotomies and ulnar nerve transposition or sometimes both procedures combined is a controversial topic. We retrospectively evaluated open reduction and fixation cases in late presentation of lateral humeral condyle fracture in pediatric cases with regards to union and functional results. Materials and Methods: Twenty two pediatric (≤12 years patients with fractures of lateral condyle presenting 4 weeks or more post injury between the study period of 2006 and 2010 were included. Multiple K-wires / with or without screws along with bone grafting were used. At final evaluation, union (radiologically and elbow function (Liverpool Elbow Score, LES was assessed. Results: There were 19 boys and 3 girls. Followup averaged 33 months. Pain (n=9, swelling (n=6, restriction of elbow motion (n=6, prominence of lateral condylar region (n=4, valgus deformity (n=4 were the main presenting symptoms. Ulnar nerve function was normal in all patients. There were nine Milch type I and 13 type II fractures. Union occurred in 20 cases. One case had malunion and in another case there was resorption of condyle following postoperative infection and avascular necrosis. Prominent lateral condyles (4/12, fish tail appearance (n=7, premature epiphyseal closure (n=2 were other observations. LES averaged 8.12 (range, 6.66-9.54 at final followup. Conclusions: There is high rate of union and satisfactory elbow function in late presenting lateral condyle fractures in children following osteosynthesis attempt. Our study showed poor correlation between patient′s age, duration of late presentation or Milch type I or II and final elbow function as determined by LES.

  14. Normal Development and Measurements of the Occipital Condyle-C1 Interval in Children and Young Adults.

    Smith, P; Linscott, L L; Vadivelu, S; Zhang, B; Leach, J L

    2016-05-01

    Widening of the occipital condyle-C1 interval is the most specific and sensitive means of detecting atlanto-occipital dislocation. Recent studies attempting to define normal measurements of the condyle-C1 interval in children have varied substantially. This study was performed to test the null hypothesis that condyle-C1 interval morphology and joint measurements do not change as a function of age. Imaging review of subjects undergoing CT of the upper cervical spine for reasons unrelated to trauma or developmental abnormality was performed. Four equidistant measurements were obtained for each bilateral condyle-C1 interval on sagittal and coronal images. The cohort was divided into 7 age groups to calculate the mean, SD, and 95% CIs for the average condyle-C1 interval in both planes. The prevalence of a medial occipital condyle notch was calculated. Two hundred forty-eight joints were measured in 124 subjects with an age range of 2 days to 22 years. The condyle-C1 interval varies substantially by age. Average coronal measurements are larger and more variable than sagittal measurements. The medial occipital condyle notch is most prevalent from 1 to 12 years and is uncommon in older adolescents and young adults. The condyle-C1 interval increases during the first several years of life, is largest in the 2- to 4-year age range, and then decreases through late childhood and adolescence. A single threshold value to detect atlanto-occipital dissociation may not be sensitive and specific for all age groups. Application of this normative data to documented cases of atlanto-occipital injury is needed to determine clinical utility. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Chemical origins of frictional aging.

    Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2012-11-02

    Although the basic laws of friction are simple enough to be taught in elementary physics classes and although friction has been widely studied for centuries, in the current state of knowledge it is still not possible to predict a friction force from fundamental principles. One of the highly debated topics in this field is the origin of static friction. For most macroscopic contacts between two solids, static friction will increase logarithmically with time, a phenomenon that is referred to as aging of the interface. One known reason for the logarithmic growth of static friction is the deformation creep in plastic contacts. However, this mechanism cannot explain frictional aging observed in the absence of roughness and plasticity. Here, we discover molecular mechanisms that can lead to a logarithmic increase of friction based purely on interfacial chemistry. Predictions of our model are consistent with published experimental data on the friction of silica.

  16. Application of Normative Occipital Condyle-C1 Interval Measurements to Detect Atlanto-Occipital Injury in Children.

    Corcoran, B; Linscott, L L; Leach, J L; Vadivelu, S

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies have found that widening or asymmetry of the occipital condyle-C1 interval on CT is a sensitive and specific marker for atlanto-occipital dislocation. Previously reported abnormal occipital condyle-C1 interval values are not age-specific, possibly leading to false-positive findings in younger children, in whom this joint space is normally larger than that in adults. This study assesses the utility of applying age-specific normative occipital condyle-C1 interval ranges to documented cases of atlanto-occipital injury compared with previously reported abnormal cutoff values. Retrospective review of CT and MR imaging of 14 subjects with atlanto-occipital injury was performed, and occipital condyle-C1 interval measurements were made for each subject. Sensitivities and specificities of proposed occipital condyle-C1 interval cutoffs of 2 and 3 SDs above the mean and previously published occipital condyle-C1 interval cutoffs for atlanto-occipital injury were then calculated on the basis of occipital condyle-C1 interval measurements for each subject. An occipital condyle-C1 interval 2 SDs above the age-specific mean has a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 89%-100%, depending on the age group. An occipital condyle-C1 interval 3 SDs above the age-specific mean has a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 95%-100%. A 4.0-mm occipital condyle-C1 interval has a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 100% in all age groups. A 2.5-mm occipital condyle-C1 interval has a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 18%-100%. Occipital condyle-C1 interval widening cutoffs used to establish atlanto-occipital injury lack both sensitivity and specificity in children and young teenagers. MR imaging is necessary to establish a diagnosis of atlanto-occipital injury in children and young teenagers when the appropriate mechanism of injury is present. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. A Morphological Insight of the Femoral Vein

    Ferreira AH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 13 cadavers (12 men and 1 women of different age group were used for the study with the purpose to determine the prevalence of femoral vein duplication. Lower limb regions (26 sides were carefully dissected as per the standard dissection procedure. Femoral vein (unitruncular was found in 96.15% of specimen. Bitruncular configurations (total bifidity was found in a male cadaver of 75 years of age (3.85%. In the right lower limb, 6.5 cms below the inguinal ligament the femoral vein - lateral ramus received the lateral circumflex femoral vein, and the medial circumflex femoral vein, and the lateral and medial ramii formed a common venous trunk. Knowledge of the truncular venous variations is important to recognize and avoid potential errors in diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis of the femoral vein, in the case of an occluded duplicated trunk.

  18. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro [Saiseikai Sendai Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Okano, Toshihiro [Ibusuki National Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Komiya, Setsuro [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  19. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro; Okano, Toshihiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2002-01-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  20. Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV ...

    Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV and BTV in automobile disc braking system. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  1. Topographical Variation of Human Femoral Articular Cartilage Thickness, T1rho and T2 Relaxation Times Is Related to Local Loading during Walking.

    Van Rossom, Sam; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Assche, Dieter; Jonkers, Ilse

    2018-01-01

    Objective Early detection of degenerative changes in the cartilage matrix composition is essential for evaluating early interventions that slow down osteoarthritis (OA) initiation. T1rho and T2 relaxation times were found to be effective for detecting early changes in proteoglycan and collagen content. To use these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, it is important to document the topographical variation in cartilage thickness, T1rho and T2 relaxation times in a healthy population. As OA is partially mechanically driven, the relation between these MRI-based parameters and localized mechanical loading during walking was investigated. Design MR images were acquired in 14 healthy adults and cartilage thickness and T1rho and T2 relaxation times were determined. Experimental gait data was collected and processed using musculoskeletal modeling to identify weight-bearing zones and estimate the contact force impulse during gait. Variation of the cartilage properties (i.e., thickness, T1rho, and T2) over the femoral cartilage was analyzed and compared between the weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing zone of the medial and lateral condyle as well as the trochlea. Results Medial condyle cartilage thickness was correlated to the contact force impulse ( r = 0.78). Lower T1rho, indicating increased proteoglycan content, was found in the medial weight-bearing zone. T2 was higher in all weight-bearing zones compared with the non-weight-bearing zones, indicating lower relative collagen content. Conclusions The current results suggest that medial condyle cartilage is adapted as a long-term protective response to localized loading during a frequently performed task and that the weight-bearing zone of the medial condyle has superior weight bearing capacities compared with the non-weight-bearing zones.

  2. Internal friction in uranium

    Selle, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted to relate internal friction measurements in U to allotropic transformations. It was found that several internal friction peaks occur in α-uranium whose magnitude changed drastically after annealing in the β phase. All of the allotropic transformations in uranium are diffusional in nature under slow heating and cooling conditions. Creep at regions of high stress concentration appears to be responsible for high temperature internal friction in α-uranium. The activation energy for grain boundary relaxation in α-uranium was found to be 65.1 +- 4 kcal/mole. Impurity atoms interfere with the basic mechanism for grain boundary relaxation resulting in a distribution in activation energies. A considerable distribution in ln tau 0 was also found which is a measure of the distribution in local order and in the Debye frequency around a grain boundary

  3. Solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the occipital condyle: a case report and review of the literature.

    Teranishi, Yu; Shin, Masahiro; Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-02-01

    Despite the recent advent of various radiographic imaging techniques, it is still very difficult to correctly distinguish a pediatric osteolytic lesion in the occipital condyle, which makes it further complicated to decide on the necessity of and the adequate timing for radical resection and craniocervical fusions. To establish a legitimate therapeutic strategy for this deep-seated lesion, surgical biopsy is a reasonable choice for first-line intervention. The choice of surgical approach becomes very important because a sufficient amount of histological specimen must be obtained to confirm the diagnosis but, ideally, the residual bony structures and the muscular structures should be preserved so as not to increase craniocervical instability. In this report, we present our experience with a case of solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the occipital condyle that was successfully treated with minimally invasive surgical biopsy with a far lateral condylar approach supported by preoperative 3D computer graphic simulation. An 8-year-old girl presented with neck pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) revealed an osteolytic lesion of the left occipital condyle. At surgery, the patient was placed in the prone position. A 3-cm skin incision was made in the posterior auricular region, and the sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles were dissected in the middle of the muscle bundle along the direction of the muscle fiber. Under a navigation system, we approached the occipital condyle through the space between the longissimus capitis muscle and the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and lateral to the superior oblique muscle, verifying each muscle at each depth of the surgical field and, finally, obtained sufficient surgical specimen. After the biopsy, her craniocervical instability had not worsened, and chemotherapy was performed. Twelve weeks after chemotherapy, her neck pain had gradually disappeared along with her

  4. Labour market frictions and migration

    Cremers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The 4th contribution to the series INT-AR papers is dedicated to the methods of assessing labour market frictions. The paper provides a (brief) international comparison of the role of labour migration in solving these frictions.

  5. Metrical analysis of disc-condyle relation with different splint treatment positions in patients with TMJ disc displacement

    Mu-Qing Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of bite positions characterizing different splint treatments (anterior repositioning and stabilization splints on the disc-condyle relation in patients with TMJ disc displacement with reduction (DDwR, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Material and Methods: 37 patients, with a mean age of 18.8±4.3 years (7 male and 30 females and diagnosed with DDwR based on the RDC/TMD, were recruited. MRI metrical analysis of the spatial changes of the disc/condyle, as well as their relationships, was done in three positions: maximum intercuspation (Position 1, anterior repositioning splint position (Position 2, and stabilization splint position (Position 3. Disc/condyle coordinate measurements and disc condyle angles were determined and compared. Results: In Position 1, the average disc-condyle angle was 53.4° in the 60 joints with DDwR, while it was −13.3° with Position 2 and 30.1° with Position 3. The frequency of successful "disc recapture" with Position 2 was significantly higher (58/60, 96.7% than Position 3 (20/60, 33.3%. In Positions 2 and 3, the condyle moved forward and downward while the disc moved backward. The movements were, however, more remarkable with Position 2. Conclusions: Anterior repositioning of the mandible improves the spatial relationship between the disc and condyle in patients with DDwR. In addition to anterior and inferior movement of the condyle, transitory posterior movement of the disc also occurred.

  6. Friction in sheet metal forming

    Wiklund, D.; Liljebgren, M.; Berglund, J.

    2010-01-01

    and calls for functional tool surfaces that are durable in these severe tribological conditions. In this study the influence of tool surface topography on friction has been investigated. The frictional response was studied in a Bending Under Tension test. The results did show that a low frictional response...

  7. Oral-motor and electromyographic characterization of patients submitted to open a nd closed reductions of mandibular condyle fracture.

    Silva, Amanda Pagliotto da; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    To characterize the oral-motor system of adults with mandibular condyle facture comparing the performance of individuals submitted to open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) and closed reduction with mandibulomaxillary fixation (CRMMF). Study participants were 26 adults divided into three groups: G1 - eight individuals submitted to ORIF for correction of condyle fracture; G2 - nine individuals submitted to CRMMF for correction of condyle fracture; CG - nine healthy volunteers with no alterations of the orofacial myofunctional system. All participants underwent the same clinical protocol: assessment of the orofacial myofunctional system; evaluation of the mandibular range of motion; and surface electromyography (sEMG) of the masticatory muscles. Results indicated that patients with condyle fractures from both groups presented significant differences compared with those from the control group in terms of mobility of the oral-motor organs, mastication, and deglutition. Regarding the measures obtained for mandibular movements, participants with facial fractures from both groups showed significant differences compared with those from the control group, indicating greater restrictions in mandibular motion. As for the analysis of sEMG results, G1 patients presented more symmetrical masseter activation during the task of maximal voluntary teeth clenching. Patients with mandibular condyle fractures present significant deficits in posture, mobility, and function of the oral-motor system. The type of medical treatment does not influence the results of muscle function during the first six months after fracture reduction. Individuals submitted to ORIF of the condyle fracture present more symmetrical activation of the masseter muscle.

  8. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  9. Student figures in friction

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

    , students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures...

  10. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    van der Heide, Emile; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is

  11. Coulomb Friction Damper

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    Standard hydraulic shock absorber modified to form coulomb (linear friction) damper. Device damps very small velocities and is well suited for use with large masses mounted on soft springs. Damping force is easily adjusted for different loads. Dampers are more reliable than fluid dampers and also more economical to build and to maintain.

  12. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  13. Friction welding method

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  14. Intra- and interobserver agreement of computed tomography in assessment of the mandibular condyle

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To study the intra- and interobserver agreement of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) in interpretation of degenerative changes of the mandibular condyle. Five observers independently evaluated one hundred temporomandibular joint MDCT images for signs of osteophytes, erosion, sclerosis and flattening. The intra- and interobserve agreements were calculated by using Kappa statistics. The intraobserver agreement was substantial for erosion (k=0.75), flattening (k=0.74) and sclerosis (k=0.72) and almost perfect for osteophytes (k=0.84). The interobserver agreement was fair for flattening (k=0.39), moderate for erosion (k=0.58) and sclerosis (k=0.48) and substantial for osteophytes (k=0.75). This study shows that we can expert good agreement for the presence of osteophytes, but not for flattening in the interpretation of MDCT images of the condyle.

  15. The effects of the low calcium diet and irradiation on the mandibular condyle of rats

    Ahn, Hee Mun; Lee, Sang Rae

    1993-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the changes of mandibular condyle by low diet and the effects of irradiation on the bone in ofteoporotic state. In order to carry out this experiment, 80 served-week old Sprague-Dawley strain rats about 150gm were selected and equally divided into one experimental group of 40 rats and one control group with the remainder. The experimental group and the control group of 40 rats and one control group with the remainder. The experimental group and the control group were then subdivided into two group and exposed to irradiation. The two irradiation groups received a single dose of 20 Gy on the jaw area only and irradiated with a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The rats in the control and experimental groups were serially terminated by fours on the 3rd, the 7th, the 14th, and the 21st day after irradiation. After termination, both sides of the dead rats mandibular condyle were removed and fixed with 10% neutral formalin. The bone mineral density of mandibular condle was measured by use of dual energy X-ray with Hitex HA-80 (Hitex Co., Japan). Thereafter, the obtained radiographs were observed, and the mandibular condyle was further decalcified and embedded in paraffin as the general method. The specimen sectioned and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, PAS and Rabbit Anti-Human Tumor Necrosis Factor-α observed by a light microscope. The obtained results were as follows: 1. In the non-irradiated group with low calcium diet, the bone mineral density of the condyle was markedly decreased after 14 days, and decrease the number of trabeculae of the condyle and resorption of the calcified cartilaginous zone were observed after 3 days. On microscopic observation, the number and size of trabecular were decreased after 7 days of experiment. 2. In the irradiated group with the low calcium diet, the bone mineral density of the condyle was markedly decreased after 14 days and resorption of the calcified cartilaginous zone and decrease the number and

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the occipital condyle imitating a malignant neoplasm - a case report

    Sznajder, K.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a non-neoplastic process of unknown etiology characterized by proliferation of connective tissue with an inflammatory infiltrate. IPT most frequently arises in the orbit, but can also be found in the larynx, the paranasal sinus and rarely in the skull base. We present the case of a 20-year-old patient with a 4-month history of headache and insomnia. Neurological examination showed limited head mobility and hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. The patient was afebrile and no abnormalities in blood tests were found. CT revealed the presence of a tumor mass destructing the right occipital condyle. MRI was performed and the mass was surgically removed. The histological diagnosis was non-specific chronic inflammatory granulation tissue. Inflammatory pseudotumors can often mimic malignant neoplasms, especially in cases where bone destruction is observed. IPT of the occipital condyle is a rare but aggressive lesion that should be treated by surgical excision. (author)

  17. Effect of occlusal (mechanical) stimulus on bone remodelling in rat mandibular condyle.

    Gazit, D; Ehrlich, J; Kohen, Y; Bab, I

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical load influences the remodelling of skeletal tissues. In the mandibular condyle, occlusal alterations and the consequent mechanical stimulus induce changes in chondrocytes and cartilage mineralization. In the present study we quantified in the mandibular condyle the effect of occlusal interference on remodelling of the subchondral bone. Computerized histomorphometry after 5-21-day exposure to the influence of a unilateral occlusal splint revealed an increased rate of trabecular remodelling, consisting of enhancement in osteoblast and osteoclast numbers and activities. The bone formation parameters reached their high values on Days 5 or 9 and remained stable thereafter. Bone resorption showed a gradual increase throughout the experimental period. These results further characterize the temporomandibular joint reaction to occlusal alterations. It is suggested that the present increase in bone turnover together with the known enhancement in chondrogenesis are part of a process of functional adaptation in response to mechanical stimulus.

  18. Computational Modelling of Patella Femoral Kinematics During Gait Cycle and Experimental Validation

    Maiti, Raman

    2016-06-01

    The effect of loading and boundary conditions on patellar mechanics is significant due to the complications arising in patella femoral joints during total knee replacements. To understand the patellar mechanics with respect to loading and motion, a computational model representing the patella femoral joint was developed and validated against experimental results. The computational model was created in IDEAS NX and simulated in MSC ADAMS/VIEW software. The results obtained in the form of internal external rotations and anterior posterior displacements for a new and experimentally simulated specimen for patella femoral joint under standard gait condition were compared with experimental measurements performed on the Leeds ProSim knee simulator. A good overall agreement between the computational prediction and the experimental data was obtained for patella femoral kinematics. Good agreement between the model and the past studies was observed when the ligament load was removed and the medial lateral displacement was constrained. The model is sensitive to ±5 % change in kinematics, frictional, force and stiffness coefficients and insensitive to time step.

  19. The impact of surface and geometry on coefficient of friction of artificial hip joints.

    Choudhury, Dipankar; Vrbka, Martin; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Stavness, Ian; Roy, Chanchal K; Mootanah, Rajshree; Krupka, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    Coefficient of friction (COF) tests were conducted on 28-mm and 36-mm-diameter hip joint prostheses for four different material combinations, with or without the presence of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles using a novel pendulum hip simulator. The effects of three micro dimpled arrays on femoral head against a polyethylene and a metallic cup were also investigated. Clearance played a vital role in the COF of ceramic on polyethylene and ceramic on ceramic artificial hip joints. Micro dimpled metallic femoral heads yielded higher COF against a polyethylene cup; however, with metal on metal prostheses the dimpled arrays significantly reduced the COF. In situ images revealed evidence that the dimple arrays enhanced film formation, which was the main mechanism that contributed to reduced friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of occlusal splints on TMJ condyle-fossa relationship and disc shape

    Braun, Barbara Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background. Occlusal splints are nowadays commonly used in dentistry to treat symptoms of myoarthropathies of the masticatory system, but also to treat simple occlusal parafunctions. Still, the exact mechanism by which the treatment works is unknown. The aim of this study was to find out the answers to following questions: 1. is there an immediate change of the minimum condyle-fossa distance and accompanying disc thickness by inserting a Michigan splint and 2. is it possible to displace the m...

  1. Remodeling process of the streptozotocln-induced diabetic rat's resected condyle

    Hong, Jung Pyo; Kim, Won Cheol; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the remodeling process of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's resected condyle. The experiment was performed with male Sprague-Dawley strain rats weighing approximately 250 gm, which were rendered diabetic by an intravenous injection of streptozotocin (70 mg/kg body weight). After condylectomy, experimental rats were serially terminated on the 1st week, the 2nd week, the 3rd week, and the 4th week. The following termination, the mandible were dissected out to make specimens. Each mandibular condyle was radiographed with Hitex HA-80 (Hitex Co., Ltd. Japan). In addition to radiographic observation, the mandibular condyles, further decalcified and embedded in paraffin, were sectioned and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Toluidine blue and Masson's trichrome. They were observed with a light microscope and a polarizing microscope. The results were as follows. 1. Soft X-ray radiograms revealed proliferation of bone after 1 week in both groups. Irregularly repaired bones and dense trabeculae were clearly observed in experimental group. 2. The resected condyles were repaired by intramembraneous and endochondral bone formation in both groups. 3. Bone tissue repair was initiated from the adjacent margin of resected bone, and cartilaginous tissues were observed at the top of repaired bone in both groups. 4. The number of osteoblasts of experimental group was small, compared with control group. Each osteoblast was small and flat. The thin trabeculae were irregularly formed. 5. Collagens of bone were gradually matured in both groups but the degree of maturation was lower in experimental group. 6. Fibrous tissues covered the upper parts of repaired bone were densely arranged in the both groups. Conclusively, atrophied osteoblasts, immature collagen of bone, and thin and irregular trabeculae function and caused disturbance of remodeling process of bone.

  2. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, PGIMER, Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Chandigarh (India); Verma, L. [Gian Sagar Dental College and Hospital, Department of Pedodontics, Patiala (India)

    2009-10-15

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  3. Bifid mandibular condyle with temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of two cases and review of literature

    Gulati, Ajay; Virmani, V.; Ramanathan, S.; Khandelwal, N.; Verma, L.

    2009-01-01

    Bifid mandibular condyle is an uncommon entity with a controversial etiology. It can be developmental or acquired and rarely may be associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Although the patient may be asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of this entity and its clinical implications. We report two cases of BMC, one developmental and the other secondary to trauma. Both were diagnosed using computed tomography, which additionally revealed the associated ankylosis of TMJ in both the patients. (orig.)

  4. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Choi, Kang-Young; Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and de...

  5. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Choi, Kang-Young; Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of ...

  6. Endoscope-Assisted Transoral Fixation of Mandibular Condyle Fractures: Submandibular Versus Transoral Endoscopic Approach.

    Hwang, Na-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hwan; You, Hi-Jin; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, endoscope-assisted transoral approach for condylar fracture treatment has attracted much attention. However, the surgical approach is technically challenging: the procedure requires specialized instruments and the surgeons experience a steep learning curve. During the transoral endoscopic (TE) approach several instruments are positioned through a narrow oral incision making endoscope maneuvering very difficult. For this reason, the authors changed the entry port of the endoscope from transoral to submandibular area through a small stab incision. The aim of this study is to assess the advantage of using the submandibular endoscopic intraoral approach (SEI).The SEI approach requires intraoral incision for fracture reduction and fixation, and 4 mm size submandibular stab incision for endoscope and traction wires. Fifteen patients with condyle neck and subcondyle fractures were operated under the submandibular approach and 15 patients with the same diagnosis were operated under the standard TE approach.The SEI approach allowed clear visualization of the posterior margin of the ramus and condyle, and the visual axis was parallel to the condyle ramus unit. The TE approach clearly shows the anterior margin of the condyle and the sigmoid notch. The surgical time of the SEI group was 128 minutes and the TE group was 120 minutes (P >0.05). All patients in the TE endoscope group were fixated with the trocar system, but only 2 lower neck fracture patients in the SEI group required a trocar. The other 13 subcondyle fractures were fixated with an angulated screw driver (P <0.05). There were no differences in complication and surgical outcomes.The submandibular endoscopic approach has an advantage of having more space with good visualization, and facilitated the use of an angulated screw driver.

  7. Changes in the main masticatory muscles in CT after mandibular condyle fracture

    Raustia, A.M.; Oikarinen, K.S.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1990-01-01

    The aim was to study changes in the main masticatory muscles after mandibular condyle fracture as seen by CT, comparing the densities and sizes of the masseter, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles on the fractured side with those on the non-fractured side. More or less permanent muscular changes are detectable several years after the accident, especially in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which is attached to the condylar head. This muscle was statistically significantly smaller (p [de

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandibular condyle with condylar neck fracture

    Park, Jeong Hoon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Jung; Kang, Ju Han; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is relatively rare, non-neoplastic expansible lesion of bone. The case of a 15-year-old male with a ABC of the left mandibular condyle is presented. Panoramic radiograph showed a unilocular radiolucency with thinned coritces and a subcondylar fracture which was due to the trauma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed expansible lesion which had similar attenuation soft tissue. The patient was treated surgically including iliac crestal bone graft.

  9. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandibular condyle with condylar neck fracture

    Park, Jeong Hoon; Yu, Jae Jung; Kang, Ju Han; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is relatively rare, non-neoplastic expansible lesion of bone. The case of a 15-year-old male with a ABC of the left mandibular condyle is presented. Panoramic radiograph showed a unilocular radiolucency with thinned coritces and a subcondylar fracture which was due to the trauma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed expansible lesion which had similar attenuation soft tissue. The patient was treated surgically including iliac crestal bone graft.

  10. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  11. Internal rotor friction instability

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  12. Condyle and mandibular bone change after unilateral condylar neck fracture in growing rats.

    Hu, Y; Yang, H-f; Li, S; Chen, J-z; Luo, Y-w; Yang, C

    2012-08-01

    Unilateral fracture of the condylar neck in immature subjects might lead to mandible asymmetry and condyle remodelling. A rat model was used to investigate mandibular deviation and condylar remodelling associated with condyle fracture. 72 4-week-old male rats were randomly divided into three groups: an experimental group (unilateral transverse condylar fracture induced surgically), a sham operation group (surgical exposure but no fracture), and a non-operative control group (no operation). The rats were killed at intervals up to 9weeks after surgery, and outcomes were assessed using various measures of mandible deviation, histological and X-ray observation, and immunohistochemical measures of expression levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and type II collagen (Col II). The fracture led to the degeneration of mandibular size, associated with atrophy of fractured condylar process. Progressive remodelling of cartilage and increasing expression levels of CTGF and Col II were found. The authors conclude that condylar fracture can lead to asymmetries in mandible and condyle remodelling and expression of CTGF and Col II in condylar cartilage on both the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture. PMID:22872830

  14. Strength of titanium intramedullary implant versus miniplate fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Frake, Paul C; Howell, Rebecca J; Joshi, Arjun S

    2012-07-01

    To test the strength of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures repaired with titanium miniplates versus titanium intramedullary implants. Prospective laboratory experimentation in urethane mandible models and human cadaveric mandibles. Materials testing laboratory at an academic medical center. Osteotomies of the mandibular condyle were created in 40 urethane hemimandible models and 24 human cadaveric specimens. Half of the samples in each group were repaired with traditional miniplates, and the other half were repaired with intramedullary titanium implants. Anteroposterior and mediolateral loads were applied to the samples, and the displacement was measured with reference to the applied force. Titanium intramedullary implants demonstrated statistically significant improved strength and stiffness versus miniplates in the urethane model experimental groups. Despite frequent plastic deformation and mechanical failures of the miniplates, a 1.6-mm-diameter titanium intramedullary pin did not mechanically fail in any of the cases. Intramedullary implantation failures were due to secondary fracture of the adjacent cortical bone or experimental design limitations including rotation of the smooth pin implant. Mechanical implant failures that were encountered with miniplate fixation were not seen with titanium intramedullary implants. These intramedullary implants provide stronger and more rigid fixation of mandibular condyle fractures than miniplates in this in vitro model.

  15. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture.

  16. Mandibular condyle dimensions in Peruvian patients with Class II and Class III skeletal patterns.

    Hugo Zegarra-Baquerizo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare condylar dimensions of young adults with Class II and Class III skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and methods: 124 CBCTs from 18-30 year-old patients, divided into 2 groups according to skeletal patterns (Class II and Class III were evaluated. Skeletal patterns were classified by measuring the ANB angle of each patient. The anteroposterior diameter (A and P of the right and left mandibular condyle was assessed from a sagittal view by a line drawn from point A (anterior to P (posterior. The coronal plane allowed the evaluation of the medio-lateral diameter by drawing a line from point M (medium to L (lateral; all distances were measured in mm. Results: In Class II the A-P diameter was 9.06±1.33 and 8.86±1.56 for the right and left condyles respectively, in Class III these values were 8.71±1.2 and 8.84±1.42. In Class II the M-L diameter was 17.94±2.68 and 17.67±2.44 for the right and left condyles respectively, in Class III these values were 19.16±2.75 and 19.16±2.54. Conclusion: Class III M-L dimensions showed higher values than Class II, whereas these differences were minimal in A-P.

  17. CAD-CAM-generated hydroxyapatite scaffold to replace the mandibular condyle in sheep: preliminary results.

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Donati, Davide; Fantini, Massimiliano; Landi, Elena; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Tampieri, Anna; Spadari, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Noemi; Scotti, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    In this study, rapid CAD-CAM prototyping of pure hydroxyapatite to replace temporomandibular joint condyles was tested in sheep. Three adult animals were implanted with CAD-CAM-designed porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds as condyle substitutes. The desired scaffold shape was achieved by subtractive automated milling machining (block reduction). Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Using the same technique, fixation plates were created and applied to the scaffold pre-operatively to firmly secure the condyles to the bone and to assure primary stability of the hydroxyapatite scaffolds during masticatory function. Four months post-surgery, the sheep were sacrificed. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds were explanted, and histological specimens were prepared. Different histological tissues penetrating the scaffold macropores, the sequence of bone remodeling, new apposition of bone and/or cartilage as a consequence of the different functional anatomic role, and osseointegration at the interface between the scaffold and bone were documented. This animal model was found to be appropriate for testing CAD-CAM customization and the biomechanical properties of porous, pure hydroxyapatite scaffolds used as joint prostheses.

  18. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    Anil K Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the "Pubmed" search with the keywords "NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture." A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG, (b closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective, classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu′s staging neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90

  19. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  20. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head

    Davies, M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Darby, A.J. [Department of Pathology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, SY10 7AG, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to increase awareness of, and to show the variable clinical and radiological features of, subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head. The clinical and radiological findings in 7 patients with subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically in 4 patients. Radiographs were performed in all patients, MRI in 5 and scintigraphy in 4 patients. Radiographs showed varying degrees of femoral head collapse in 4 patients. In the remaining 3 patients radiographs showed a normal femoral head, regional osteoporosis and focal sclerosis, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-signal band on T1- and T2-weighted images in the subchondral bone adjacent or parallel to the articular surface associated with bone marrow oedema. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake in the femoral head. Insufficiency fractures of the femoral head are easily overlooked or confused with avascular necrosis and, when there is significant joint destruction, osteoarthritis. Unsuspected insufficiency fracture of the femoral head can lead to significant and rapid loss of bone stock in osteoporotic patients waiting for arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. Increased awareness of this condition will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and a successful outcome of conservative treatment. (orig.)

  1. Bioinspired orientation-dependent friction.

    Xue, Longjian; Iturri, Jagoba; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; del Campo, Aránzazu

    2014-09-23

    Spatular terminals on the toe pads of a gecko play an important role in directional adhesion and friction required for reversible attachment. Inspired by the toe pad design of a gecko, we study friction of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars terminated with asymmetric (spatular-shaped) overhangs. Friction forces in the direction of and against the spatular end were evaluated and compared to friction forces on symmetric T-shaped pillars and pillars without overhangs. The shape of friction curves and the values of friction forces on spatula-terminated pillars were orientation-dependent. Kinetic friction forces were enhanced when shearing against the spatular end, while static friction was stronger in the direction toward the spatular end. The overall friction force was higher in the direction against the spatula end. The maximum value was limited by the mechanical stability of the overhangs during shear. The aspect ratio of the pillar had a strong influence on the magnitude of the friction force, and its contribution surpassed and masked that of the spatular tip for aspect ratios of >2.

  2. Frequency of ipsilateral femoral neck fractures in patients with ...

    Background: Ipsilateral associated femoral neck and shaft fractures are reported to occur in 2.5-6% of all femoral shaft fractures. Objective: To establish the frequency of ipsilateral femoral neck fractures amongst all patients presenting with femoral shaft fractures in Mulago Hospital. Methodology: This was a descriptive ...

  3. Identification of GMS friction model without friction force measurement

    Grami, Said; Aissaoui, Hicham

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with an online identification of the Generalized Maxwell Slip (GMS) friction model for both presliding and sliding regime at the same time. This identification is based on robust adaptive observer without friction force measurement. To apply the observer, a new approach of calculating the filtered friction force from the measurable signals is introduced. Moreover, two approximations are proposed to get the friction model linear over the unknown parameters and an approach of suitable filtering is introduced to guarantee the continuity of the model. Simulation results are presented to prove the efficiency of the approach of identification.

  4. Subtrochanteric femoral fracture during trochanteric nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fracture.

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-09-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nailing for femoral shaft fractures to improve its application and prevent implant-derived complications.

  5. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: ► Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. ► Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. ► Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. ► Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  6. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Gutkowski, Witold; Rothenburg, L.; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle

  7. The description of condyle position in disc displacement with reduction using Cone Beam Computed Tomography 3D radiographic analysis

    Liana Rahmayani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the temporomandibular joint disorders that mostly occurs is disc displacement with reduction. Disc displacement that causes the displacement of condyle position can be evaluated by using radiograph. The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT-3D is a radiograph equipment which is able to capture the condyle position from many directions. This research was aimed to see the condyle position in patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms. This research was conducted to 11 patients with symptoms of disc displacement with reduction and 3 patients without symptoms of disc displacement with reduction as the counterpart. What was conducted to the sample was the radiographic imaging using CBCT-3D radiography, followed by measuring the joint space distance in the sagittal and coronal directions. The result of the research was analyzed using the T-test. Statistically, the result of the test showed a significant difference ( = 0.05 between patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms and the patients without symptoms, in sagittal and coronal views. The conclusion led to the difference in condyle positions in patients with the disc displacement with reduction and patients without the symptoms which meant there was a condyle position displacement that caused the distance alteration in joint space in sagittal and coronal directions.

  8. Evaluation of reference gene suitability for quantitative expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the mandibular condyle of sheep.

    Jiang, Xin; Xue, Yang; Zhou, Hongzhi; Li, Shouhong; Zhang, Zongmin; Hou, Rui; Ding, Yuxiang; Hu, Kaijin

    2015-10-01

    Reference genes are commonly used as a reliable approach to normalize the results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and to reduce errors in the relative quantification of gene expression. Suitable reference genes belonging to numerous functional classes have been identified for various types of species and tissue. However, little is currently known regarding the most suitable reference genes for bone, specifically for the sheep mandibular condyle. Sheep are important for the study of human bone diseases, particularly for temporomandibular diseases. The present study aimed to identify a set of reference genes suitable for the normalization of qPCR data from the mandibular condyle of sheep. A total of 12 reference genes belonging to various functional classes were selected, and the expression stability of the reference genes was determined in both the normal and fractured area of the sheep mandibular condyle. RefFinder, which integrates the following currently available computational algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and the comparative ΔCt method, was used to compare and rank the candidate reference genes. The results obtained from the four methods demonstrated a similar trend: RPL19, ACTB, and PGK1 were the most stably expressed reference genes in the sheep mandibular condyle. As determined by RefFinder comprehensive analysis, the results of the present study suggested that RPL19 is the most suitable reference gene for studies associated with the sheep mandibular condyle. In addition, ACTB and PGK1 may be considered suitable alternatives.

  9. The role of the lateral pterygoid muscle in the sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) healing process.

    Liu, Chng-Kui; Liu, Ping; Meng, Fan-Wen; Deng, Bang-Lian; Xue, Yang; Mao, Tian-Qiu; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of the lateral peterygoid muscle in the reconstruction of the shape of the condyle during healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle. Twenty adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: all had a unilateral operation on the right side when the anterior and posterior attachments of the discs were cut, and an oblique vertical osteotomy was made from the lateral pole of the condyle to the medial side of the condylar neck. Ten sheep had the lateral pterygoid muscle cut, and the other 10 sheep did not. Sheep were killed at 4 weeks (n=2 from each group), 12 weeks (n=4), and 24 weeks (n=4) postoperatively. Computed tomograms (CT) were taken before and after operations. We dissected the joints, and recorded with the naked eye the shape, degree of erosion, and amount of calcification of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the group in which the lateral peterygoid muscle had not been cut the joints showed overgrowth of new bone and more advanced ankylosis. Our results show that the lateral pterygoid muscle plays an important part in reconstructing the shape of the condyle during the healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle, and combined with the dislocated and damaged disc is an important factor in the aetiology of traumatic ankylosis of the TMJ. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The effect of extracapsular injuries on growth and development of the mandible condyle: an experimental study in growing dogs.

    Liu, Siying; Tian, Lei; Ding, Mingchao; Liu, Yanpu; Li, Guiyu; Chen, Jinwu; Ding, Yin

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effects of condylar extracapsular injuries on the development of the mandibular condyle and try to find a way to treat condylar hyperplasia by electively using such injuries to restrict the overdeveloped mandibular condyle. Sixty 6-month-old beagle puppies were divided randomly into five groups: blank control; unilateral fracture to the condylar neck; unilateral fracture to the condylar neck treated with rigid internal fixation; unilateral periosteum injury; unilateral decortication of the condylar neck. Computed tomography, 99 m Tc single-photon emission computed tomography, and tetracycline-calcein double-labeling were performed after surgery. The puppies were sacrificed 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. Morphologic analyses and examination of growth activity were done. Unilateral fracture of the condylar neck without fixation caused local morphologic changes during the early postoperative period, but compensatory growth of the condyle altered such changes after healing. The other types of injury failed to inhibit the growth of the condyle and the mandible, whereas functional deviation of the chin was found after unilateral fracture of the condylar neck with or without fixation. The four types of extracapsular injury described here failed to inhibit the growth of the mandibular condyle and could not be selected as alternatives to treat condylar hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Herniography off femoral, obturator and perineal hernias

    Ekberg, O.; Nordblom, I.; Fork, F.T.; Gullmo, A.

    1985-01-01

    Positive contrast herniography was used in the workup of 550 patients with unclear groin pain. The majority of these patients had rather characteristic hernias of indirect, direct or femoral type. However, now and then diagnostic problems arose. A femoral hernia may look like a direct or even obturator hernia. There is also a variety of multilocular femoral hernias and other types. A femoral hernia may be present together with other hernias in the ipsilateral or contralateral groin. Obturator hernias are usually small but are always confined to the obturator canal laterally in the obturator foramen. Abnormalities in the pouch of Douglas may include a deep rectogenital pouch, diverticula and true herniations. These uncommon herniographic findings are described and discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. SEX DETERMINATION FROM FEMORAL HEAD DIAMETERS IN ...

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... In medico-legal cases where sophisticated methods of sex determination is lacking, these ... scientific methods(3). Using the visual method ... between the sexes and the values of the right and left femoral head diameters.

  13. The difference in centre position in the ACL femoral footprint inclusive and exclusive of the fan-like extension fibres.

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ryu, Keinosuke; Aizawa, Shin; Fu, Freddie H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the centre position of each anterior cruciate ligament bundle in its femoral footprint in measurements including and excluding the fan-like extension fibres. Fourteen non-paired human cadaver knees were used. All soft tissues around the knee were resected except the ligaments. The ACL was divided into antero-medial (AM) and postero-lateral (PL) bundles according to the difference in tension patterns. The ACL was carefully dissected, and two outlines were made of the periphery of each bundle insertion site: those which included and those which excluded the fan-like extension fibres. An accurate lateral view of the femoral condyle was photographed with a digital camera, and the images were downloaded to a personal computer. The centre position of each bundle, including and excluding the fan-like extension fibres, was measured with ImageJ software (National Institution of Health). Evaluation of the centre position was performed using the modified quadrant method. The centre of the femoral AM bundle including the fan-like extension was located at 28.8% in a shallow-deep direction and 37.2% in a high-low direction. When the AM bundle was evaluated without the fan-like extension, the centre was significantly different at 34.6% in a shallow-deep direction (p = 0.000) and 36% in a high-low direction. The centre of the PL bundle including the fan-like extension was found at 37.1% in a shallow-deep direction and 73.4% in a high-low direction. When the PL bundle was evaluated without the fan-like extension, the centre was significantly different at 42.7% in a shallow-deep direction (p = 0.000) and 69.3% in a high-low direction (p = 0.000). The centre position of the AM and PL bundles in the femoral ACL footprint was significantly different depending on the inclusion or exclusion of the fan-like extension fibres. For the clinical relevance, to reproduce the direct femoral insertion in the anatomical ACL reconstruction, tunnels should be

  14. Argo packing friction research update

    VanTassell, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of valve packing friction and its affect on the operability of motor- and air-operated valves (MOVs and AOVs). At this time, most nuclear power plants are required to perform postmaintenance testing following a packing adjustment or replacement. In many cases, the friction generated by the packing does not impact the operability window of a valve. However, to date there has not been a concerted effort to substantiate this claim. To quantify the effects of packing friction, it has become necessary to develop a formula to predict the friction effects accurately. This formula provides a much more accurate method of predicting packing friction than previously used factors based strictly on stem diameter. Over the past 5 years, Argo Packing Company has been developing and testing improved graphite packing systems at research facilities, such as AECL Chalk River and Wyle Laboratories. Much of this testing has centered around reducing and predicting friction that is related to packing. In addition, diagnostic testing for Generic Letter 89-10 MOVs and AOVs has created a significant data base. In July 1992 Argo asked several utilities to provide running load data that could be used to quantify packing friction repeatability and predictability. This technical paper provides the basis to predict packing friction, which will improve calculations for thrust requirements for Generic Leter 89-10 and future AOV programs. In addition, having an accurate packing friction formula will improve packing performance when low running loads are identified that would indicate insufficient sealing force

  15. Friction and wear calculation methods

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  16. Displaced humeral lateral condyle fractures in children: should we bury the pins?

    Das De, Soumen; Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if leaving Kirschner wires exposed is more cost-effective than burying them subcutaneously after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of humeral lateral condyle fractures. A retrospective cohort study of all lateral condyle fractures treated over a 10-year period at a single institution was performed. Data on surgical technique, fracture healing, and complications were analyzed, as well as treatment costs. A decision analysis model was then constructed to compare the strategies of leaving the pins exposed versus buried. Finally, sensitivity analyses were performed, assessing cost-effectiveness when infection rates and costs of treating deep infections were varied. A total of 235 children with displaced fractures were treated with ORIF using Kirschner wires. Pins were left exposed in 41 cases (17.4%) and buried in 194 cases (82.6%); the age, sex, injury mechanisms, and fracture patterns were similar in both the groups. The median time to removal of implants was shorter with exposed versus buried pins (4 vs. 6 wk, Pfracture union or loss of reduction rates. The rate of superficial infection was higher with exposed pins (9.8% vs. 3.1%), but this was not statistically significant (P=0.076). There were no deep infections with exposed pins, whereas the rate of deep infection was 0.5% with buried pins (P=1.00). Buried pins were associated with additional complications, including symptomatic implants (7.2%); pins protruding through the skin (16%); internal pin migration necessitating additional surgery (1%); and skin necrosis (1%). The decision analysis revealed that leaving pins exposed resulted in an average cost savings of $3442 per patient. This strategy remained cost-effective even when infection rates with exposed pins approached 40%. Leaving the pins exposed after ORIF of lateral condyle fractures is safe and more cost-effective than burying the pins subcutaneously. Retrospective cohort study (level III).

  17. Surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle using long-screw osteosynthesis.

    Luo, Shufang; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cai, Hengxing; Cheng, Yong

    2011-07-01

    The retrospective study evaluated long-screw (bicortical screw) osteosynthesis used in the surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle and compared it with titanium plates and removal of the condylar fragment. Ninety-five patients with sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle received open surgical treatment from 1997 to 2008. Among these patients, the condylar fragments were fixed with long screws in 56 cases (group A), were fixed with titanium plates in 12 cases (group B), and were completely removed in 24 cases (group C). Follow-up was carried out clinically and radiologically. The clinical features included limitation of mandibular mobility, occlusion disturbance, lateral deviation on mouth opening, joint pain, clicking, facial asymmetry, and patient's subjective evaluation. The radiologic parameters consisted of degree of bony resorption, bony change, change of osteosynthesis material, and shortening of mandibular ramus height. Anatomic reduction and functional restoration were obtained and no severe complication was detected in group A. However, 3 of 14 patients had severe osteoarthrosis and 2 of 14 patients had ankylosis in group B. In group C 3 of 24 patients had mandibular retrusion, 4 of 24 patients had front teeth open bite, 4 of 24 patients had severe osteoarthrosis, and 1 of 24 patients had ankylosis. The long-screw fixation group had a more favorable prognosis than the titanium plate group and the group in which removal of the condylar fragment was performed. The long-screw fixation technique might be suitable for use in the surgical treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Facilitation of bone resorption activities in synovial lavage fluid patients with mandibular condyle fractures.

    Takano, H; Takahashi, T; Nakata, A; Nogami, S; Yusa, K; Kuwajima, S; Yamazaki, M; Fukuda, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bone resorption effect of the mediators delivered in joint cavity of patients with mandibular condyle fractures by detecting osteoclast markers using cellular biochemistry methods, and by analysing bone resorption activities via inducing osteoclast differentiation of the infiltrated cells from arthrocentesis. Sixteen joints in 10 patients with mandibular condyle fractures were evaluated. The control group consisted of synovial fluid (SF) samples from seven joints of four volunteers who had no clinical signs or symptoms involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or disc displacement. We collected SF cells from all patients during therapeutic arthrocentesis. The infiltrating cells from TMJ SF were cultured, differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclast-like cells and examined bone resorption activities. We also investigated factors related to osteoclast induction of SF, using ELISA procedures. Osteoclast-like cells were induced from the SF cells obtained from all patients with condylar fractures. These multinucleated giant cells were positive for TRAP and actin, and had the ability to absorb dentin slices. The levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), soluble form of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (sRANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), in SF samples from the patients, were significantly higher than in the controls. These findings indicate that bone resorption activities in SF from patients with mandibular condyle fractures were upregulated and may participate in the pathogenesis and wound healing. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Analysis of two different surgical approaches for fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Kumaran, S; Thambiah, L J

    2012-01-01

    Fractures of the condyle account for one third of all the mandibular fractures. Different surgical approaches to the condyle described hitherto testify to the advantages and disadvantages of the different surgical techniques used for approaching the condyle in such cases of fractures. We have described and compared two of such surgical techniques in this study. The aim of this study is to compare the outcome of dealing with condylar fractures by two different surgical techniques: the mini retromandibular approach, and the preauricular approach. A prospective study of 31 patients who had suffered with mandibular condylar fractures was carried out. Of these, 26 patients had unilateral condylar fractures, and 5 patients had a bilateral fracture. Further, 19 of these patients were treated by the mini retromandibular approach and 12 by the preauricular approach. The treated patients were followed up and evaluated for a minimum period of 1 year and assessed for parameters such as the maximum mouth opening, lateral movement on the fractured side, mandibular movements such as protrusion, dental occlusion, scar formation, facial nerve weakness, salivary fistula formation and time taken for the completion of the surgical procedure. t- test was used for statistical analysis of the data obtained in the study. Dental occlusion was restored in all the cases, and good anatomical reduction was achieved. The mean operating time was higher 63.53 (mean) ± 18.12 minutes standard deviation (SD) in the preauricular approach compared to 45.22 (mean) ± 18.86 minutes SD in the mini retromandibular approach. Scar formation was satisfactory in almost all the cases.

  20. Bilateral femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation

    Mitsuda, Kenji; Nishi, Hosei; Oba, Hiroshi

    1977-01-01

    Over 300 cases of femoral neck fractures following radiotherapy for intrapelvic malignant tumor have been reported in various countries since Baensch reported this disease in 1927. In Japan, 40 cases or so have been reported, and cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures have not reached to ten cases. The authors experienced a case of 75 year-old female who received radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, and suffered from right femoral neck fracture 3 months after and left femoral neck fracture one year and half after. As clinical symptoms, she had not previous history of trauma in bilateral femurs, but she complained of a pain in a hip joint and of gait disturbance. The pain in left femoral neck continued for about one month before fracture was recognized with roentgenogram. As histopathological findings, increase of fat marrow, decrease of bone trabeculae, and its marked degeneration were recognized. Proliferation of some blood vessels was found out, but thickness of the internal membrane and thrombogenesis were not recognized. Treatment should be performed according to degree of displacement of fractures. In this case, artificial joint replacement surgery was performed to the side of fracture of this time, because this case was bilateral femoral neck fractures and the patient had received artificial head replacement surgery in the other side of fracture formerly. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  2. Friction in levitated superconductors

    Brandt, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A type I superconductor levitated above a magnet of low symmetry has a unique equilibrium position about which it may oscillate freely. In contrast, a type II superconductor has a continuous range of stable equilibrium positions and orientations where it floats rigidly without swinging or orbiting as if it were stuck in sand. A strong internal friction conspicuously indicates the existence and unpinning of flux lines in oxide superconductors levitated above liquid nitrogen. It is shown how these effects follow from the hysteretic magnetization curves and how the energy is dissipated

  3. Mechanical properties of cancellous bone in the human mandibular condyle are anisotropic

    Giesen, EB; Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was (1) to test the hypothesis that the elastic and failure properties of the cancellous bone of the mandibular condyle depend on the loading direction, and (2) to relate these properties to bone density parameters. Uniaxial compression tests were performed......). Archimedes' principle was applied to determine bone density parameters. The cancellous bone was in axial loading 3.4 times stiffer and 2.8 times stronger upon failure than in transverse loading. High coefficients of correlation were found among the various mechanical properties and between them...

  4. A paediatric case of bilateral mandibular condyle fracture presenting with bloody otorrhoea following trauma.

    Chan, Yat Chun; Au-Yeung, Kwan Leong

    2017-04-22

    A 7-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with bilateral bloody otorrhoea after falling from his scooter. Skull base fracture was suspected. CT showed no evidence of skull base fracture but bilateral mandibular condyle and external acoustic canals fractures. We report this case to illustrate a rare possibility of bilateral external acoustic canal fracture associated with condylar fracture in trauma patients presented with bloody otorrhoea. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Changes in the main masticatory muscles in CT after mandibular condyle fracture

    Raustia, A.M. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Prosthodontics and Stomatognathic Physiology); Oikarinen, K.S. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery); Pyhtinen, J. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-11-01

    The aim was to study changes in the main masticatory muscles after mandibular condyle fracture as seen by CT, comparing the densities and sizes of the masseter, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles on the fractured side with those on the non-fractured side. More or less permanent muscular changes are detectable several years after the accident, especially in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which is attached to the condylar head. This muscle was statistically significantly smaller (p<0,001) on the fractured side. Examination of the masticatory muscles immediately after the fracture and at intervals afterwards could reveal more about the pathogenesis of the changes in these muscles. (orig.).

  6. Architectural Measures of the Cancellous Bone of the Mandibular Condyle Identified by Principal Components Analysis

    Giese, E.B.; Ding, M.; Dalstra, M.

    2003-01-01

    embalmed mandibular condyles; the angle of the first principal direction and the axis of the specimen, expressing the orientation of the trabeculae, ranged from 10 degrees to 87 degrees. Morphological parameters were determined by a method based on Archimedes' principle and by micro-CT scanning......-like trabeculae, and not with more or thicker trabeculae. The trabecular orientation was most determinative (about 50%) in explaining stiffness, strength, and failure energy. The amount of bone was second most determinative and increased the explained variance to about 72%. These results suggest that trabecular...

  7. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free

  8. Frictional behaviour of high performance fibrous tows: Friction experiments

    Cornelissen, Bo; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Tow friction is an important mechanism in the production and processing of high performance fibrous tows. The frictional behaviour of these tows is anisotropic due to the texture of the filaments as well as the tows. This work describes capstan experiments that were performed to measure the

  9. Consensus or controversy? The classification and treatment decision-making by 491 maxillofacial surgeons from around the world in three cases of a unilateral mandibular condyle fracture

    Kommers, S.C.; Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many studies are available in the literature on both classification and treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures. To date however, controversy regarding the best treatment for unilateral mandibular condyle fractures remains. Material and methods In this study, an attempt was made

  10. Internal friction, microstructure, and radiation effects

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F.; Davidson, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is given of internal friction relaxation peaks and background internal friction. The microstructural origin of the internal friction is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on radiation effects

  11. Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  12. Post-operative 3D CT feedback improves accuracy and precision in the learning curve of anatomic ACL femoral tunnel placement.

    Sirleo, Luigi; Innocenti, Massimo; Innocenti, Matteo; Civinini, Roberto; Carulli, Christian; Matassi, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feedback from post-operative three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) on femoral tunnel placement in the learning process, to obtain an anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A series of 60 consecutive patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstrings single-bundle outside-in technique were prospectively included in the study. ACL reconstructions were performed by the same trainee-surgeon during his learning phase of anatomic ACL femoral tunnel placement. A CT scan with dedicated tunnel study was performed in all patients within 48 h after surgery. The data obtained from the CT scan were processed into a three-dimensional surface model, and a true medial view of the lateral femoral condyle was used for the femoral tunnel placement analysis. Two independent examiners analysed the tunnel placements. The centre of femoral tunnel was measured using a quadrant method as described by Bernard and Hertel. The coordinates measured were compared with anatomic coordinates values described in the literature [deep-to-shallow distance (X-axis) 28.5%; high-to-low distance (Y-axis) 35.2%]. Tunnel placement was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision. After each ACL reconstruction, results were shown to the surgeon to receive an instant feedback in order to achieve accurate correction and improve tunnel placement for the next surgery. Complications and arthroscopic time were also recorded. Results were divided into three consecutive series (1, 2, 3) of 20 patients each. A trend to placing femoral tunnel slightly shallow in deep-to-shallow distance and slightly high in high-to-low distance was observed in the first and the second series. A progressive improvement in tunnel position was recorded from the first to second series and from the second to the third series. Both accuracy (+52.4%) and precision (+55.7%) increased from the first to the third series (p process to improve accuracy and precision of femoral

  13. Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture during Trochanteric Nailing for the Treatment of Femoral Shaft Fracture

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-01-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nai...

  14. Blades Couple Dry Friction Connection

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk; Radolfová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2015), s. 31-40 ISSN 1802-680X Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : stick-slip dry friction * 3D friction characteristic * tangential contact stiffness * hysterezis loop * response curves Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  15. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  16. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly

  17. Custom-made lateral femoral hemiarthroplasty for traumatic bone loss: A case report.

    Stuyts, Bart; Peersman, Geert; Thienpont, Emmanuel; Van den Eeden, Elke; Van der Bracht, Hans

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old male patient involved in a road traffic accident in which he sustained a grade II open supra- and intercondylar fracture of the left distal femur with substantial bone loss of the lateral femoral condyle and trochlea (AO classification type 33 C3). Normal knee function was no longer possible, as the patella was trapped within the bony defect. Existing reconstructive options such as unicondylar osteoarticular allograft, arthrodesis, and arthroplasty were considered. However, as all these techniques present significant disadvantages, particularly in young and active patients, a custom-made lateral hemiarthroplasty was designed and implanted as an alternative treatment. Follow-up at 24 months revealed an excellent, pain-free level of function and radiographs showed no signs of implant loosening or migration. This technique offers the most anatomical means of reconstruction with maximal preservation of the bone stock, thereby better facilitating any revisions that may be necessary in the future. This is an experimental technique reserved for rare indications, and currently has no long-term follow-up results associated with its use. Additional research is therefore needed before widespread adoption of this technique can take place. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Femoral component rotation in patellofemoral joint replacement.

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W; Westerbeek, Robin E

    2018-06-01

    Clinical outcomes in patellofemoral joint replacement may be related to femoral component rotation. Assessment of rotational alignment is however difficult as patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis often have trochlear dysplasia. The use of the medial malleolus as a landmark to guide rotation has been suggested. The purpose of our study was to evaluate this technique with regard to femoral component rotation, and to correlate rotation with clinical outcomes at one-year follow-up. Forty-one knees in 39 patients had patellofemoral joint replacement using the Zimmer Gender-Solutions patellofemoral prosthesis. Intraoperatively, we determined femoral component rotational alignment using an extramedullary rod aimed at the inferior tip of the medial malleolus. Postoperatively, we measured the angle between the femoral component and the anatomical transepicondylar axis using CT. The amount of rotation was correlated with clinical outcomes at one-year follow-up. Forty knees in 38 patients were available for one-year follow-up. Mean femoral component rotation relative to the anatomical transepicondylar axis was 1.4° external rotation (range, -3.8 to 5.7°). We found no statistically significant correlation between femoral component rotation and change from baseline KOOS subscales at one-year follow-up. Our findings show that when using the medial malleolus as a landmark to guide rotation, the femoral component of the patellofemoral prosthesis was oriented in external rotation relative to the anatomical transepicondylar axis in 80% of knees. Our study did not show a relation between the amount of external rotation and clinical outcomes. Level III. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Femoral rotation unpredictably affects radiographic anatomical lateral distal femoral angle measurements

    Miles, James Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effects of internal and external femoral rotation on radiographic measurements of the anatomical lateral distal femoral angle (a-LDFA) using two methods for defining the anatomical proximal femoral axis (a-PFA). Methods: Digital radiographs were obtained of 14 right...... femora at five degree intervals from 10° external rotation to 10° internal rotation. Using freely available software, a-LDFA measurements were made using two different a-PFA by a single observer on one occasion. Results: Mean a-LDFA was significantly greater at 10° external rotation than at any other...... rotation. The response of individual femora to rotation was unpredictable, although fairly stable within ±5° of zero rotation. Mean a-LDFA for the two a-PFA methods differed by 1.5°, but were otherwise similarly affected by femoral rotation. Clinical significance: If zero femoral elevation can be achieved...

  20. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle. PMID:22872831

  1. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of surgically treated mandibular condyle fractures. A five years retrospective study.

    Zrounba, Hugues; Lutz, Jean-Christophe; Zink, Simone; Wilk, Astrid

    2014-09-01

    Surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures is still controversial. Although it provides better outcome than closed treatment questions still remain about the surgical approach and the osteosynthesis devices to be used. Between 2005 and 2010, we managed 168 mandibular condyle fractures with open treatment. Two surgical approaches were used in this study, a pre-auricular and a high submandibular approach (one or the other or as a combined approach). Internal fixation was performed using TCP(®) plates (Medartis, Basel, Switzerland) or with two lag screws (15 and 17 mm). Delta plates were used in 15 cases (8.9%). We report the epidemiology of these fractures and the outcomes of the surgical treatment. We assessed the complications related to the surgical procedure and those related to the osteosynthesis material. The facial nerve related complication rate was very low and the osteosynthesis materials used proved to be strong enough to realize a stable fixation. The two approaches used in this study appeared to be safe with good aesthetic results. Most of the surgical procedure failures occurred in high subcondylar fractures especially when bilateral. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of condylar fractures is high,but the management of fractures of the mandibularcondyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, externalfixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonlyused in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsularor intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on theage of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether thecondylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, thestate of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, theco-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;anappropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function oftheuninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, andcomplication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may causelong-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facialheight, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great cautionshould be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture.

  3. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closedreduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibularcondylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma.For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking intoconsideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient’sadaptation, patient’s masticatorysystem, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closedreduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixationduring the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment ofcondylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objectiveof this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open orclosed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages,and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness ofinterventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  5. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  6. Radiographic structural findings in the mandibular condyles of young individuals receiving orthodontic treatment

    Peltola, J.S.; Nystroem, M.; Koenoenen, M.; Wolf, J.

    1995-01-01

    Radiographic findings in mandibular condyles were studied from the pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs of 625 orthodontic patients. The subjects' mean age was 11 years at the start and 14 years at the end of active orthodontic treatment. Radiographic condylar findings were seen in 14 subjects before treatment and in 54 subjects after treatment. In age-related controls condylar findings were seen in 3%. The condylar findings was ''flattening only'' in half of the patients and in one-third of the controls with condylar findings. Activator treatment was associated with condylar findings. Condylar findings increased with age in the orthodontically treated subjects, but not in the unselected population controls. This may mean that condyles become more sensitive with age in children. Increase with age may be partly due to the radiographic interpretation, since minor condylar findings are difficult to observe in young children, and partly due to differences in treatment modalities and the duration of treatment. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. Evaluation of a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model

    Kim Harry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major cause of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is interruption of a blood supply to the proximal femur. In order to evaluate blood circulation and pathogenetic alterations, a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model was examined to address whether ligature of the femoral neck (vasculature deprivation induces a reduction of blood circulation in the femoral head, and whether transphyseal vessels exist for communications between the epiphysis and the metaphysis. We also tested the hypothesis that the vessels surrounding the femoral neck and the ligamentum teres represent the primary source of blood flow to the femoral head. Methods Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in Yorkshire pigs by transecting the ligamentum teres and placing two ligatures around the femoral neck. After heparinized saline infusion and microfil perfusion via the abdominal aorta, blood circulation in the femoral head was evaluated by optical and CT imaging. Results An angiogram of the microfil casted sample allowed identification of the major blood vessels to the proximal femur including the iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral, deep femoral and circumflex arteries. Optical imaging in the femoral neck showed that a microfil stained vessel network was visible in control sections but less noticeable in necrotic sections. CT images showed a lack of microfil staining in the epiphysis. Furthermore, no transphyseal vessels were observed to link the epiphysis to the metaphysis. Conclusion Optical and CT imaging analyses revealed that in this present pig model the ligatures around the femoral neck were the primary cause of induction of avascular osteonecrosis. Since the vessels surrounding the femoral neck are comprised of the branches of the medial and the lateral femoral circumflex vessels, together with the extracapsular arterial ring and the lateral epiphyseal arteries, augmentation of blood circulation in those arteries will improve

  8. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of femoral morphology and bone mineral density between femoral neck fractures and trochanteric fractures.

    Maeda, Yuki; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masanobu; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    Many studies that analyzed bone mineral density (BMD) and skeletal factors of hip fractures were based on uncalibrated radiographs or dual-energy xray absorptiometry (DXA). Spatial accuracy in measuring BMD and morphologic features of the femur with DXA is limited. This study investigated differences in BMD and morphologic features of the femur between two types of hip fractures using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Forty patients with hip fractures with normal contralateral hips were selected for this study between 2003 and 2007 (trochanteric fracture, n=18; femoral neck fracture, n=22). Each patient underwent QCT of the bilateral femora using a calibration phantom. Using images of the intact contralateral femur, BMD measurements were made at the point of minimum femoral-neck cross-sectional area, middle of the intertrochanteric region, and center of the femoral head. QCT images also were used to measure morphologic features of the hip, including hip axis length, femoral neck axis length, neck-shaft angle, neck width, head offset, anteversion of the femoral neck, and cortical index at the femoral isthmus. No significant differences were found in trabecular BMD between groups in those three regions. Patients with trochanteric fractures showed a smaller neck shaft angle and smaller cortical index at the femoral canal isthmus compared with patients with femoral neck fractures. We conclude that severe osteoporosis with thinner cortical bone of the femoral diaphysis is seen more often in patients with trochanteric fracture than in patients with femoral neck fracture. Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Correlation of ultrasound appearance, gross anatomy, and histology of the femoral nerve at the femoral triangle.

    Lonchena, Tiffany K; McFadden, Kathryn; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Correlation between ultrasound appearance, gross anatomic characteristics, and histologic structure of the femoral nerve (FN) is lacking. Utilizing cadavers, we sought to characterize the anatomy of the FN, and provide a quantitative measure of its branching. We hypothesize that at the femoral crease, the FN exists as a group of nerve branches, rather than a single nerve structure, and secondarily, that this transition into many branches is apparent on ultrasonography. Nineteen preserved cadavers were investigated. Ultrasonography was sufficient to evaluate the femoral nerve in nine specimens; gross dissection was utilized in all 19. Anatomic characteristics were recorded, including distances from the inguinal ligament to femoral crease, first nerve branch, and complete arborization of the nerve. The nerves from nine specimens were excised for histologic analysis. On ultrasound, the nerve became more flattened, widened, and less discrete as it coursed distally. Branching of the nerve was apparent in 12 of 18 images, with mean distance from inguinal ligament of 3.9 (1.0) cm. However, upon dissection, major branching of the femoral nerve occurred at 3.1 (1.0) cm distal to the inguinal ligament, well proximal to the femoral crease. Histologic analysis was consistent with findings at dissection. The femoral nerve arborizes into multiple branches between the inguinal ligament and the femoral crease. Initial branching is often high in the femoral triangle. As hypothesized, the FN exists as a closely associated group of nerve branches at the level of the femoral crease; however, the termination of the nerve into multiple branches is not consistently apparent on ultrasonography.

  11. Femoral head vitality after intracapsular hip fracture

    Stroemqvist, B.

    1983-01-01

    Femoral head vitality before, during and at various intervals from the operation was determined by tetracycline labeling and/or 99 sp (m)Tc-MDP scintimetry. In a three-year follow-up, healing prognosis could be determined by scintimetry 3 weeks from operation; deficient femoral head vitality predicting healing complications and retained vitality predicting uncomplicated healing. A comparison between pre- and postoperative scintimetry indicated that further impairment of the femoral head vitality could be caused by the operative procedure, and as tetracycline labeling prior to and after fracture reduction in 370 fractures proved equivalent, it was concluded that the procedure of osteosynthesis probably was responsible for capsular vessel injury, using a four-flanged nail. The four-flanged nail was compared with a low-traumatic method of osteosynthesis, two hook-pins, in a prospective randomized 14 month study, and the postoperative femoral head vitality was significantly better in the hook-pin group. This was also clearly demonstrated in a one-year follow-up for the fractures included in the study. Parallel to these investigations, the reliability of the methods of vitality determination was found satisfactory in methodologic studies. For clinical purpose, primary atraumatic osteosynthesis, postoperative prognostic scintimetry and early secondary arthroplasty when indicated, was concluded to be the appropriate approach to femoral neck fracture treatment. (Author)

  12. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Kokubo, Takeshi; Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro; Mitamura, Tadayuki

    1990-01-01

    T1-weighted MR images of thirty-six hips in 25 patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head were obtained two to five times during the course of 2 to 26 months. We investigated these MR images in the light of the chronological change and compared them with plain radiographs. MR images changes in 16 femoral head; in general, the abnormal low intensity area in the femoral head reduced in extent and the internal high intensity area became smaller of disappeared. Thirteen femoral heads among them became more flattened on plain radiographs in the same period. It is noted that four different zones are defined in the femoral head after bone necrosis takes place: the dead bone marrow, the dead marrow which still contains fat, the reactive interface and the hyperemic bone marrow. In T1-weighted MR images, the dead bone marrow, the reactive interface and the hyperemic bone marrow are demonstrated as low intensity area, while the dead marrow containing fat may remain high in intensity. On the basis of this knowledge of histopathology and MR images of this disease, we suggest that reduction of the abnormal low intensity area and disappearance of the internal high intensity area on MR images can be regarded as diminution of hyperemia in the living bone marrow and loss of fat in the dead bone marrow, respectively. (author)

  13. Frictional Heating with Time-Dependent Specific Power of Friction

    Topczewska Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analytical solutions of the thermal problems of friction were received. The appropriate boundary-value problems of heat conduction were formulated and solved for a homogeneous semi–space (a brake disc heated on its free surface by frictional heat fluxes with different and time-dependent intensities. Solutions were obtained in dimensionless form using Duhamel's theorem. Based on received solutions, evolution and spatial distribution of the dimensionless temperature were analyzed using numerical methods. The numerical results allowed to determine influence of the time distribution of friction power on the spatio-temporal temperature distribution in brake disc.

  14. Wave friction factor rediscovered

    Le Roux, J. P.

    2012-02-01

    The wave friction factor is commonly expressed as a function of the horizontal water particle semi-excursion ( A wb) at the top of the boundary layer. A wb, in turn, is normally derived from linear wave theory by {{U_{{wb}}/T_{{w}}}}{{2π }} , where U wb is the maximum water particle velocity measured at the top of the boundary layer and T w is the wave period. However, it is shown here that A wb determined in this way deviates drastically from its real value under both linear and non-linear waves. Three equations for smooth, transitional and rough boundary conditions, respectively, are proposed to solve this problem, all three being a function of U wb, T w, and δ, the thickness of the boundary layer. Because these variables can be determined theoretically for any bottom slope and water depth using the deepwater wave conditions, there is no need to physically measure them. Although differing substantially from many modern attempts to define the wave friction factor, the results coincide with equations proposed in the 1960s for either smooth or rough boundary conditions. The findings also confirm that the long-held notion of circular water particle motion down to the bottom in deepwater conditions is erroneous, the motion in fact being circular at the surface and elliptical at depth in both deep and shallow water conditions, with only horizontal motion at the top of the boundary layer. The new equations are incorporated in an updated version (WAVECALC II) of the Excel program published earlier in this journal by Le Roux et al. Geo-Mar Lett 30(5): 549-560, (2010).

  15. [Clinical evaluation of the ceramic femoral component used for reconstruction of total knee replacement].

    Vavrík, P; Landor, I; Denk, F

    2008-12-01

    The study evaluates mid-term results of total knee replacement with a zirconia ceramic (ZrO2) femoral component. The evaluated group comprised 20 knees in 19 patients (4 men and 15 women). In one patient the replacement was performed bilaterally. Two patients had in the contralateral knee the same type of prosthesis with a femoral chrome-cobalt component.The mean age at the time of operation was 65.2 years (range, 38-81 years).The primary indication was 14 times osteoarthritis and 5 times rheumatoid arthritis. The average follow-up period was 6.5 years (range, 2.1-8.5 years). Patients included in the study regardless of age, body mass and the basic diagnosis, agreed with the use of the ceramic femoral component. The evaluation covered a range of motion, mechanical axis, joint stability, pain, swelling, ability to walk on level ground and on stairs, subjective satisfaction (EULAR Knee Chart). Radiograph were assessed at one year intervals in two projections to identify the incidence of radiolucency around the implant. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used and compared with the survival curve in identical chrome-cobalt implants. At he final follow-up, 14 knees were evaluated, because 3 patients died without any connection with the implant, in one case the tibial component migrated due to necrosis of the tibial condyle in a patient with RA and two implants had to be revised and replaced due to polyethylene wear. No infection or negative tissue reaction was recorded in the evaluated group. The average flexion range was 109 degrees. All knees were stable and without swelling, in two cases there occurred slight femoropatellar pain. Twelve patients were fully satisfied, 2 patients were satisfied with a certain reservation. The differences in the course of the survival curves of chrome-cobalt and ceramic implants were statistically insignificant. Although the use of zirconia ceramics in vitro reduces the amount of polyethylene wear, the clinical outcomes of total knee

  16. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  17. Frictional performance of ball screw

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. No positive effect of Acid etching or plasma cleaning on osseointegration of titanium implants in a canine femoral condyle press-fit model

    Saksø, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Vestergaard; Mortensen, Mikkel Saksø

    2013-01-01

    Implant surface treatments that improve early osseointegration may prove useful in long-term survival of uncemented implants. We investigated Acid Etching and Plasma Cleaning on titanium implants.......Implant surface treatments that improve early osseointegration may prove useful in long-term survival of uncemented implants. We investigated Acid Etching and Plasma Cleaning on titanium implants....

  19. Selective arteriography in femoral head fractures

    Mannella, P; Galeotti, R; Borrelli, M; Benea, G; Massari, L; Chiarelli, G M

    1986-01-01

    The choice between conservative and radical operation in case of femoral neck fractures is very important because it is the determining factor for a successfull therapy. In case of epiphysial necrosis, an endoprosthesis as well as an osteosynthesis will be carried out. Selective arteriography of the medical circumflex artery represents the most reliable study to establish, immediately after the fractures, the possible presence of a post-traumatic ischemic necrosis. Angiography, as a reliable diagnostic tool, has to be carried out in the most selective way and needs the image subtraction technique. The authors report their preliminary results on the reliability of angiography in the femoral epiphyseal ischemic necrosis diagnosed by comparing the results of angiography with the wood light test carried out on the surgically removed femoral head. 18 refs.

  20. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following femoral neck fracture

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Jun Hyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Soon Yong

    1985-01-01

    Secondary ischemic necrosis of femoral head due to loss of blood supply following to femoral neck fracture is well known. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuricals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the evaluation of vascularity of the femoral head. The authors made a comparative study of scintigraphic findings and operative findings of 28 cases of femoral neck fracture treated at Kyung Hee University Hospital from April 1980 to May 1984. The results were as follows: 1. In 16 cases of proven avascular necorsis of femoral head, scintigraphy showed absent or decreased activity in 14 cases (87.5%), while radiography showed increased density in 10 cases (62.5%). 2. In 12 cases of proven vital femoral head, scintigraphy showed increased activity in 9 cases (75%) and radiography showed decreased density in 9 cases (75%). 3. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy was an excellent and useful method for assessing bone vitality of femoral head

  1. {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following femoral neck fracture

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Jun Hyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Secondary ischemic necrosis of femoral head due to loss of blood supply following to femoral neck fracture is well known. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuricals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the evaluation of vascularity of the femoral head. The authors made a comparative study of scintigraphic findings and operative findings of 28 cases of femoral neck fracture treated at Kyung Hee University Hospital from April 1980 to May 1984. The results were as follows: 1. In 16 cases of proven avascular necorsis of femoral head, scintigraphy showed absent or decreased activity in 14 cases (87.5%), while radiography showed increased density in 10 cases (62.5%). 2. In 12 cases of proven vital femoral head, scintigraphy showed increased activity in 9 cases (75%) and radiography showed decreased density in 9 cases (75%). 3. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy was an excellent and useful method for assessing bone vitality of femoral head.

  2. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: Quality of life aspects

    van den Bergh, B.; van Otterloo, J.J.D.M.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  3. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  4. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  5. Recovery of mouth-opening after closed treatment of a fracture of the mandibular condyle : a longitudinal study

    Niezen, E. T.; Stuive, I.; Post, W. J.; Bos, R. R. M.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analyse which characteristics might influence recovery. We measured mouth opening in 142 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (14) years, 96 of whom were male) during

  6. Clinical and radiological outcomes after treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) by using occlusal splint in children.

    Liu, Chang-Kui; Meng, Fan-Wen; Tan, Xin-Ying; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Liu, San-Xia; Huang, Hai-Tao; Yan, Rong-Zeng; Hu, Min; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of occlusal splints in the treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in children. From January 1995 to December 2011, 37 sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in 30 patients aged 4-8 years old were included in this study. All the patients were treated with 1-2mm occlusal splints in the molar region. The mouths of the patients were kept slightly open by the occlusal splints for 3-6 months, and we reviewed the clinical and radiological remodelling of the affected condyles after treatment. Excellent (n=20) and good (n=10) clinical outcomes were achieved with full radiological remodelling seen in 19 and partial remodelling in 11. Treatment with occlusal splints is effective in delivering good results and function with minimal morbidity in children with sagittal fractures of the condyle, while permitting ongoing remodelling and growth in the short term. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: quality of life aspects

    van den Bergh, B.; de Mol van Otterloo, J.J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  8. Radiographic evaluation of the canine elbow joint with special reference to the medial humeral condyle and the medial coronoid process

    Voorhout, G.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of radiographic examination of clinically affected elbow joints in 14 young, large-breed dogs, including standard and oblique projections and linear tomography, were compared with the findings of medial arthrotomy. Radiographs revealed arthrosis (13 dogs), osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle (2 dogs), fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (5 dogs), and a combination of osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle and fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (2 dogs). In one dog fissures in the medial coronoid process and in another dog a linear radiopacity along the articular surface of the medial coronoid process were found. In three dogs both medial humeral condyle and medial coronoid process appeared normal. The radiographic findings were confirmed during surgery in 11 dogs. Cartilage erosion of the medial humeral condyle in two dogs and of the medial coronoid process in one dog had not resulted in radiographically visible abnormalities. Radiographic examination of the elbow joints in young, large-breed dogs should include standard mediolateral and craniocaudal projections, a mediolateral projection with the joint maximally extended and the leg supinated 15°, and a craniolateral-to-caudomedial projection

  9. The prevalence, radiographic appearance and gender predilection of bifid mandibular condyles in Punjabi population of North India: A retrospective study

    Bhawandeep Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and gender predilection of bifid mandibular condyle (BMC in Indian population using extra oral radiographs. Material and Methods: Previous record of 800 patients was evaluated by the observers who had undergone extra oral radiography for any diagnostic or treatment purposes between years 2012 and 2014. Results: Out of 800 extra oral radiographs, bifid condyles were found in 28, giving an overall prevalence of 3.5%. Out of 28 bifid condyles, 20 were in females (2.5% and eight were in males (1.7%. The prevalence of BMC was found to be more in females as compared to the males and this difference was statistically significant with P value equivalent to 0.001. Among 28 bifid condyles, 19 were unilateral (2.4% and nine were bilateral 1.5%. Chi-square test shows non-significant P value. Conclusion: It is possible that BMC is a more frequent condition than is commonly perceived. However, because of the minimal symptoms associated with this condition, the authors believe that it will remain an incidental finding upon routine radiographic examination, rather than a clinical observation.

  10. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  11. [Friction: self-ligating brackets].

    Thermac, Guilhem; Morgon, Laurent; Godeneche, Julien

    2008-12-01

    The manufacturers of self-ligating brackets advertise a reduction of the friction engendered between the wire and the bracket, which is an essential parameter for treatment's speed and comfort. We have compared the friction obtained with four types of self-ligating brackets - In-Ovation R, Damon 3, Smart Clip and Quick - with that of a standard bracket Omniarch associated with an elastomeric ligature. All bracket were tested on a bench of traction with three types of wires: steel .019"x.025", TMA .019"x.025" and NEO sentalloy F300 .020"x.020". The results confirm a clear friction reduction for all tested wire.

  12. Tribological changes in the articular cartilage of a human femoral head with avascular necrosis.

    Seo, Eun-Min; Shrestha, Suman K; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Tae-Woo; Vijayachandra, Ayyappan; Thompson, Mark S; Cho, Myung Guk; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Kwanghoon; Park, Seonghun; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2015-06-29

    The present study evaluated the tribological properties of the articular cartilage surface of the human femoral head with postcollapse stage avascular necrosis (AVN) using atomic force microscopy. The cartilage surface in the postcollapse stage AVN of the femoral head was reported to resemble those of disuse conditions, which suggests that the damage could be reversible and offers the possibilities of success of head-sparing surgeries. By comparing the tribological properties of articular cartilage in AVN with that of osteoarthritis, the authors intended to understand the cartilage degeneration mechanism and reversibility of AVN. Human femoral heads with AVN were explanted from the hip replacement surgery of four patients (60-83 years old). Nine cylindrical cartilage samples (diameter, 5 mm and height, 0.5 mm) were sectioned from the weight-bearing areas of the femoral head with AVN, and the cartilage surface was classified according to the Outerbridge Classification System (AVN0, normal; AVN1, softening and swelling; and AVN2, partial thickness defect and fissuring). Tribological properties including surface roughness and frictional coefficients and histochemistry including Safranin O and lubricin staining were compared among the three groups. The mean surface roughness Rq values of AVN cartilage increased significantly with increasing Outerbridge stages: Rq = 137 ± 26 nm in AVN0, Rq = 274 ± 49 nm in AVN1, and Rq = 452 ± 77 nm in AVN2. Significant differences in Rq were observed among different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN0, μ = 0.143 ± 0.025 in AVN1, and μ = 0.171 ± 0.039 in AVN2. Similarly to the statistical analysis of surface roughness, significant statistical differences were detected between different Outerbridge stages in all cases (p AVN. The underlying mechanism of these results can be related to proteoglycan loss within the articular cartilage that is also observed in osteoarthritis. With regard to the tribological properties, the

  13. frequency of ipsilateral femoral neck fractures in patients

    Background: Ipsilateral associated femoral neck and shaft fractures are reported to occur in 2.5-6% of all femoral shaft ... nailing of the shaft fracture, which makes treatment of the neck ... chest, spine), while the other had maxillofacial injuries.

  14. Femoral component loosening after hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    Zustin, Jozef; Sauter, Guido; Hahn, Michael; Morlock, Michael M.; Ruether, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Before the re-introduction of the current generation of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty, component loosening and osteolysis were of great concern to the orthopaedic community. Early, mid- and long-term clinical results are encouraging, but component loosening still exists. Macroscopic, contact radiographic and histopathological analyses after undecalcified preparation of bone tissue specimens were performed. To investigate the frequency and morphological patterns of the loosening of the femoral component, we analysed a series of 190 retrieved femoral remnants that were revised for aseptic failures. Thirty-five (18.4%) hips were revised for clinical and/or radiographic loosening of the femoral component. Pseudoarthrosis (n = 17; median in situ time: 16 weeks, interquartile range [IQR]: 9 to 34), collapsed osteonecrosis (n = 5; median in situ time: 79 weeks, IQR: 63 to 97), cement-socket debonding (n = 3; median in situ time: 89 weeks, IQR: 54 to 97) and at later follow-up bone-cement loosening (n = 10; median in situ time: 175 weeks; IQR 112 to 198; p =0.005) were distinct patterns of the femoral remnant-implant loosening. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia of interface bone trabeculae (n = 38; median in situ time: 61 weeks, IQR: 32 to 138) was strongly associated with femoral component loosening (p = 0.009). Both the trabecular hyperosteoidosis (n = 32; median in situ time: 71 weeks, IQR 50 to 129) and excessive intraosseous lymphocyte infiltration (n = 12; median in situ time: 75 weeks, IQR 51 to 98) at the bone-cement interface correlated strongly with fibrocartilaginous metaplasia (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016 respectively) and all three lesions were associated with the female gender (p = 0.021, p = 0.009, and p = 0.051). Femoral component loosening at early follow-up was mostly caused by pathological changes of the femoral remnant bone tissue: pseudoarthrosis and collapsed osteonecrosis. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia was frequently observed in hips with femoral

  15. Late presentation of fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus in children

    Shyam K Saraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current controversy regarding the management of fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus presenting between 3 to 12 weeks prompted us to evaluate our results of open reduction and internal fixation of such fractures. Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients operated between March 1995 and February 2001 qualified for this study. Five patients presented between 3-4 weeks, nine between 5-8 weeks and seven between 9-12 weeks post injury. Ten fractures were classified as stage II and eleven as stage III (Jacob et al. criteria. The mean age was 8 years (range: 4-14 years. All patients underwent surgery (open reduction and internal fixation with K-wires/screw, with or without bone grafting. The results were assessed by the modified criteria of Agarwal et al. after an average follow-up of 2.3 years. Results: Excellent to good results were observed in all the five patients presenting at 3-4 weeks post injury. In the patients presenting at 5-8 weeks, the results were excellent in one, good in four, fair in three, and poor in one patient. The fracture united in all cases; however, malunion was observed in four patients. The fractures that were operated at 9-12 weeks showed good results in one case, fair result in three cases, and poor result in three cases. Avascular necrosis of the lateral condyle in one patient, premature fusion in two patients, pin tract infection in three patients, and gross restriction of elbow movements in three patients were the major complications in this group. Accurate reduction was difficult as a result of new bone formation and remodeling at the fracture surfaces. Multiple incisions over the common extensor aponeurosis and bone graft supplementation were helpful for achieving acceptable reduction. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation is recommended in all cases of displaced fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus presenting at up to 12 weeks post injury. However, the results become

  16. Surgical treatment on displaced and dislocated sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Jing, Jie; Han, Yu; Song, Yu; Wan, Yingbiao

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on displaced and dislocated sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle (SFMC). Twenty-four patients with 28 displaced and dislocated SFMCs were distinguished into type M, type C, and type L fractures according the location of the fracture line. The fractured fragment was reduced and fixated with two 0.6-mm 4-hole micro-plates via a preauricular temporal incision. The fragment was extirpated when it was too small to be fixated. The postoperative position and profile of the fragment was examined by orthopantomogram radiograph or computed tomography (CT). The function of the temporal and zygomatic branches of the facial nerve was inspected. The occluding relation was surveyed, the interincisal distance at maximum mouth opening was measured, and the deviation from the midline during mouth opening was recorded. Twenty-three condyles (82%) suffered dislocated fractures with the condylar fragment out of the glenoid fossa. Five condyles (18%) were displaced, but not dislocated. There were 2 (7%) type M, 19 (68%) type C (3 comminuted), and 7 (25%) type L fractures (1 comminuted), respectively. Twenty-one (75%) fractured fragments received free-graft procedures with 2 micro-plates. Four (14%) fragments were reduced and fixated without being dissected free of their attachments. Three (11%) fragments were extirpated. There were no permanent facial never branch injuries. Micro-plate removal was necessary because of postoperative infection and necrosis of the fractured fragment in 1 condylar process. No other patients could be found with obvious postoperative bone resorption. The average postoperative maximum mouth opening and deviation at 6 months were improved significantly. The postoperative occlusion was good in 22 cases. Access with the preauricular incision, and the dislocated and displaced fragment can be reduced and fixated to its normal position easily. Free-graft procedure is a suitable

  17. Showing Area Matters: A Work of Friction

    Van Domelen, David

    2010-01-01

    Typically, we teach the simplified friction equation of the form F[subscript s] = [mu][subscript s]N for static friction, where F[subscript s] is the maximum static friction, [mu][subscript s] is the coefficient of static friction, and "N" is the normal force pressing the surfaces together. However, this is a bit too simplified, and…

  18. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    Pickett, Galen T.

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  19. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  20. Internal-external malalignment of the femoral component in kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty increases tibial force imbalance but does not change laxities of the tibiofemoral joint.

    Riley, Jeremy; Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2018-06-01

    the resection thickness of each posterior femoral condyle to within ± 0.5 mm of the thickness of the respective posterior region of the femoral component, the increase in imbalance can be effectively limited to 38 N. Generally laxities were unaffected within the ± 4º range tested indicating that instability is not a clinical concern and that manual testing of laxities is not useful to detect I-E malalignment.

  1. Increases in tibial force imbalance but not changes in tibiofemoral laxities are caused by varus-valgus malalignment of the femoral component in kinematically aligned TKA.

    Riley, Jeremy; Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2018-01-29

    adversely affect patient-reported outcomes and satisfaction, surgeons should strive to limit errors in resecting the distal femoral condyles to within ± 0.5 mm which in turn limits the average increase in tibial force imbalance to 68 N. Because laxities were generally unaffected, instability resulting from large increases in laxity is not a clinical concern within the ± 4° range tested. Therapeutic, Level II.

  2. Friction induced hunting limit cycles : a comparison between the LuGre and switch friction model

    Hensen, R.H.A.; Molengraft, van de M.J.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, friction induced limit cycles are predicted for a simple motion system consisting of a motor-driven inertia subjected to friction and a PID-controlled regulator task. The two friction models used, i.e., (i) the dynamic LuGre friction model and (ii) the static switch friction model,

  3. Comparison of conventional panoramic radiography and panoramic digital subtraction radiography in detection of simulated lesions of mandibular condyle

    Panjnoush M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and Aim: Digital subtraction Radiography (DSR is a method of accurate assessing condylar head changes. several studies have been carried out in applying DSR in dentistry, however there is a few number of studies in efficacy of DSR method in assesment of condylar head changes, The aim of this study was to compare panoramic radiography and DSR detecting simulated lesions of the mandibular condyl. "nMaterials and Methods: this was a process reaserch study, in which two dry human skulls with no obvious temporomandibular joint pathology were used. Osteophytic lesions were simulated using three sizes of bone chips that were placed on the medial portion of anterior and superolateral aspects of the condyle. Osteolytic lesions were simulated making 1 and 2 mm holes using round burr in the central portion of anterior aspect and Lateral pole of the condyle. Panoramic radiographs were prepared with and without the lesions in place. These paired radiographs were digitized and digital- subtraction images of the original panoramic images were obtained. Eight observers evaluated 155 images of each modality for the presence or absence and the type of simulated lesions of the mandibular condyle. Sensitivity, specificity, reliability and measure of agreement were analyzed using kappa test and crossed tables and qualitative variables were assess by chi-square and fisher's Exact test. "nResults: Specificity of panoramic and DSR methods were 15.4% and 66.7% respectively. Sensitivity of panoramic and DSR methods were 61.1% and 80.6% for osteophytic lesions and 37.5% and 83.3% for Osteolytic lesions. The percentage of correct decisions made in DSR method was significantly more than conventional panoramic method (82.6% vs 41.9% (p<0.0001. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study digital subtraction technique was significantly more accurate than the panoramic radiographs in detection of simulated lesions of the mandibular condyle.

  4. Treatment of mandibular condyle fractures using a modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision: experience with 31 cases.

    Jun Shi

    Full Text Available Surgery for mandibular condyle fractures must allow direct vision of the fracture, reduce surgical trauma and achieve reduction and fixation while avoiding facial nerve injury. This prospective study was conducted to introduce a new surgical approach for open reduction and internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures using a modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision, and surgical outcomes were evaluated. The modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision was applied and rigid internal fixation using a small titanium plate was carried out for 36 mandibular condyle fractures in 31 cases. Postoperative follow-up of patients ranged from 3 to 26 months; in the first 3 months after surgery, outcomes for all patients were analyzed by evaluating the degree of mouth opening, occlusal relationship, facial nerve function and results of imaging studies. The occlusal relationships were excellent in all patients and none had symptoms of intraoperative ipsilateral facial nerve injury. The mean degree of mouth opening was 4.0 (maximum 4.8 cm, minimum 3.0 cm. No mandibular deviations were noted in any patient during mouth opening. CT showed complete anatomical reduction of the mandibular condyle fracture in all patients. The modified transparotid approach via the smaller, easily concealed parotid mini-incision is minimally invasive and achieves anatomical reduction and rigid internal fixation with a simplified procedure that directly exposes the fracture site. Study results showed that this procedure is safe and feasible for treating mandibular condyle fracture, and offers a short operative path, protection of the facial nerve and satisfactory aesthetic outcomes.

  5. Comparison of accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions: An exvivo study

    Asieh Zamani Naser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiographic examination of TMJ is indicated when there are clinical signs of pathological conditions, mainly bone changes that may influence the diagnosis and treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the validity and diagnostic accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomographic images in the detection of simulated mandibular condyle erosions. Methods : Simulated lesions were created in 10 dry mandibles using a dental round bur. Using uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography techniques, mandibular condyles were imaged by a Cranex Tome X-ray unit before and after creating the lesions. The uncorrected and corrected tomography images were examined by two independent observers for absence or presence of a lesion. The accuracy for detecting mandibular condyle lesions was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, and validity values. Differences between the two radiographic modalities were tested by Wilcoxon for paired data tests. Inter-observer agreement was determined by Cohen′s Kappa. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and validity were 45%, 85% and 30% in uncorrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively, and 70%, 92.5% and 60% in corrected sagittal tomographic images, respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between the accuracy of uncorrected and corrected sagittal tomography in detection of mandibular condyle erosions (P = 0.016. The inter-observer agreement was slight for uncorrected sagittal tomography and moderate for corrected sagittal tomography. Conclusion: The accuracy of corrected sagittal tomography is significantly higher than that of uncorrected sagittal tomography. Therefore, corrected sagittal tomography seems to be a better modality in detection of mandibular condyle erosions.

  6. Assessment of osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint associated with avascular necrosis of the condyle on magnetic resonance imaging

    Segami, Natsuki; Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Hosaka, Hideo; Moriya, Yoshiyuki; Miyaki, Katsuaki; Chen, Wen-Hsi; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    1993-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis associated with findings of avascular necrosis of the mandibular condyle on magnetic resonance imaging was clinically evaluated. The subjects consisted of 5 female unilateral cases, with an average age of 55.4 years who had a mean duration of illness of 15.2 months. The symptoms were a mean interincisal opening distance of 32.8 mm with arthralgia in mild to moderate degree, and joint noise (crepitation) in all joints. MRI documented decreasing signal intensity of the condyle with 2 joints in high degree and 3 joints in moderate, as well as variable low signal density of the articular eminence, associated with concomitant anterior disk displacement. X-ray showed deformity of the condyle and eminence. The operative findings disclosed disk rupture and comparatively smooth cartilage with minimum remodeling of the condylar surface; however, avascular evidence was suggested when corticotomy was performed. 4 joints underwent diskectomy, condylar shaving, auricular cartilage grafts and corticotomy of the condyle. Arthroscopic corticotomy was applied for 1 joint with mild symptoms. Postoperative symptoms improved to mean opening distance of 41.4 mm and disappeared arthralgia in 4 joints. The surgical outcome was excellent in 3 joints and good in 2 joints. Follow-up MRI in 2 cases disclosed increasing signal intensity, which suggested recovery of condylar vascularity following corticotomy. It is suggested that the low-signal intensity on MRI in osteoarthrosis might indicate avascular lesions of the condyle, secondary to degenerative change. Histological investigations are required to evaluate avascular necrosis of the temporomandibular joints. (author)

  7. Assessment of osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint associated with avascular necrosis of the condyle on magnetic resonance imaging

    Segami, Natsuki; Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Hosaka, Hideo; Moriya, Yoshiyuki; Miyaki, Katsuaki; Chen, Wen-Hsi; Iizuka, Tadahiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1993-02-01

    Osteoarthrosis associated with findings of avascular necrosis of the mandibular condyle on magnetic resonance imaging was clinically evaluated. The subjects consisted of 5 female unilateral cases, with an average age of 55.4 years who had a mean duration of illness of 15.2 months. The symptoms were a mean interincisal opening distance of 32.8 mm with arthralgia in mild to moderate degree, and joint noise (crepitation) in all joints. MRI documented decreasing signal intensity of the condyle with 2 joints in high degree and 3 joints in moderate, as well as variable low signal density of the articular eminence, associated with concomitant anterior disk displacement. X-ray showed deformity of the condyle and eminence. The operative findings disclosed disk rupture and comparatively smooth cartilage with minimum remodeling of the condylar surface; however, avascular evidence was suggested when corticotomy was performed. 4 joints underwent diskectomy, condylar shaving, auricular cartilage grafts and corticotomy of the condyle. Arthroscopic corticotomy was applied for 1 joint with mild symptoms. Postoperative symptoms improved to mean opening distance of 41.4 mm and disappeared arthralgia in 4 joints. The surgical outcome was excellent in 3 joints and good in 2 joints. Follow-up MRI in 2 cases disclosed increasing signal intensity, which suggested recovery of condylar vascularity following corticotomy. It is suggested that the low-signal intensity on MRI in osteoarthrosis might indicate avascular lesions of the condyle, secondary to degenerative change. Histological investigations are required to evaluate avascular necrosis of the temporomandibular joints. (author).

  8. Rubber friction and tire dynamics

    Persson, B N J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

  9. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  10. Size scaling of static friction.

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  11. Rubber friction and tire dynamics.

    Persson, B N J

    2011-01-12

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

  12. Nuclear friction and chaotic motion

    Srokowski, T.; Szczurek, A.; Drozdz, S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of nuclear friction is considered from the point of view of regular versus chaotic motion in an atomic nucleus. Using a realistic nuclear Hamiltonian it is explicitly shown that the frictional description of the gross features of nuclear collisions is adequate if the system behaves chaotically. Because of the core in the Hamiltonian, the three-body nuclear system already reveals a structure of the phase space rich enough for this concept to be applicable

  13. Slipforming - Materials effect on friction

    Busterud, Jørgen Thomasgaard

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Structural engineering Slipforming is a construction method for concrete and it is especially suited for tall constructions with simple geometry. This method have occasionally caused lifting cracks and other surface damages, due to the friction between the slipform panel and the concrete has become to high. The thesis will look at how the choice of material composition in concrete mixes in the combination of a given slipform rate would affect the friction between the ...

  14. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Sinai, Yohai Bar; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2011-01-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not comple...

  15. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  16. Comparative study of manufacturing condyle implant using rapid prototyping and CNC machining

    Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Islam, MD; Venugopal, S.

    2018-04-01

    Injuries to the cranio-maxillofacial area caused by road traffic accidents (RTAs), fall from heights, birth defects, metabolic disorders and tumors affect a rising number of patients in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and require maxillofacial surgery. Mandibular reconstruction poses a specific challenge in both functionality and aesthetics, and involves replacement of the damaged bone by a custom made implant. Due to material, design cycle time and manufacturing process time, such implants are in many instances not affordable to patients. In this paper, the feasibility of designing and manufacturing low-cost, custom made condyle implant is assessed using two different approaches, consisting of rapid prototyping and three-axis computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining. Two candidate rapid prototyping techniques are considered, namely fused deposition modeling (FDM) and three-dimensional printing followed by sand casting The feasibility of the proposed manufacturing processes is evaluated based on manufacturing time, cost, quality, and reliability.

  17. Quantitative Assessment of Radioisotope Uptake in Condyles by SPECT Bone Scintigraphy

    Z. Dalili

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Condylar hyperplasia of the mandible is a self limiting abnormality which can cause facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJdysfunction and esthetic problems. Treatment planning is based on the results of isotope scanning, clinical findings and patient age. Single photon emission tomography(SPECT is considered to be a sensitive method in the calculation of condylar uptake differences.Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the growth activity occurring in the mandibular condyles, and to devise an index of side-to-side differences in condylar activity in different individuals.Material and Methods: 38 patients, with an age range of 13 to 34 years, undergoing skeletal scintigraphy for a variety of conditions, were chosen for this study. 25 mci TC-99 was injected to all subjects in order to assess the difference between right (Rt andleft (Lt condylar uptake percentage and to calculate the Lt to Rt condylar uptake ratio.The normal index was determined.Results: The maximum amount of difference between the uptake of Rt and Lt condyles was 6.2 percent (Lt side and Rt side were 53.1 % and 46.9 %, respectively in the male patients and 5.7 percent in the female patients (Lt side and Rt side were 52.85 % and 47.15 %, respectively. The condylar activity difference and ratio of Lt to Rt condylar uptakes did not show a significant difference between the male and female groups.Conclusion: The difference between the growth activity of RT and LT normal TMJs was less than 6.2 percent.

  18. Condyle-fossa modifications and muscle interactions during herbst treatment, part 1. New technological methods.

    Voudouris, John C; Woodside, Donald G; Altuna, Gurkan; Kuftinec, Mladen M; Angelopoulos, Gerassimos; Bourque, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    Changes in the condyle, the glenoid fossa, and the muscles of mastication were investigated in subjects undergoing continuous orthopedic advancement of the mandible with a Herbst-block appliance. The total sample consisted of 56 subjects and included 15 nonhuman primates (in the middle mixed, early permanent, and permanent dentitions), 17 human Herbst patients in the early permanent dentition, and 24 human controls from the Burlington Growth Center. The 8 nonhuman primates in the middle mixed dentition were the focus of this study. Mandibular advancement was obtained progressively in 5 animals by adding stops to the telescopic arms of fixed functional Herbst appliances with occlusal coverage; activations of 5.0 mm, 7.0 mm, and 8.0 mm were achieved. Two primates served as controls, and the third was a sham control. Two experimental animals and the 2 controls also wore surgically implanted electromyographic electrodes in the superior and inferior heads of the lateral pterygoid muscles and in the superficial masseter and anterior digastric muscles. Changes in condylar growth direction and amount were assessed with the Björk method from measurements made on serial cephalometric tracings superimposed on metallic implants. Undecalcified sections, treated with intravenous tetracycline vital staining, were viewed with fluorescence microscopy to examine histologic changes in the condyle and the glenoid fossa. New bone formation in the fossa associated with continuous mandibular protrusion was quantified by using computerized histomorphometric analysis of decalcified histological sections and polarized light. The unique combination of permanently implanted electromyographic electrodes, tetracycline vital staining, and histomorphometry represents a significant technological advancement in methods and materials. Together, they demonstrated different muscle-bone interaction results for functional appliances than those reported in previous studies. In Part 1 of this study, we

  19. A modified surgical technique for neglected fracture of lateral humeral condyle in children.

    Sulaiman, Abdul Razak; Munajat, Ismail; Mohd, Emil Fazliq

    2011-11-01

    Operative treatment for neglected fracture of lateral humeral condyle (LHC) is difficult because of contracted muscle, fibrous tissue formation, and indistinct bony edges. Its success depends on the ability to preserve blood supply during the surgery. We retrospectively reviewed eight cases of neglected fracture of LHC in children treated with open reduction with selected multiple 'V' lengthening of common extensor muscle and internal fixation. The patients were between 3 and 8 years of age. The period of neglect was between 3 and 20 weeks. Four patients with displacement of more than 10 mm and neglect for 5 weeks or more required lengthening of common extensor muscle aponeurosis. The follow-up assessments were between 1 and 6.3 years with a mean of 4.4 years. All patients had union by 2 months. They gained improvement of flexion range of motion between 60° and 120° with a mean of 86.3°. Loss of final range of motion compared with the normal side was between 5° and 35° with a mean of 10°. No patient had limitation of activities or pain. Six cases had excellent and two cases had good Dillon functional score. All patients had lateral condyle prominent with different severities. There was one mild avascular necrosis and one fishtail deformity. Both of them had almost full range of motion. All patients had early physeal closure, except one, who had only 1 year follow-up. There was no case of progressive valgus deformity. Children with neglected fracture of LHC would benefit from anatomical reduction and internal fixation through a proper exposure and if indicated combined with multiple 'V' lengthening of common extensor muscle aponeurosis. This is a level IV study.

  20. Preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for extracorporeal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures

    Rajasekhar Gali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Free grafting or extracorporeal fixation of traumatically displaced mandibular condyles is sometimes required in patients with severe anteromedial displacement of condylar head. Majority of the published studies report the use of a submandibular, retromandibular or preauricular incisions for the access which have demerits of limited visibility, access and potential to cause damage to facial nerve and other parotid gland related complications. Purpose: This retrospective clinical case record study was done to evaluate the preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid (P-TMAP approach for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures of the mandible. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study involved search of clinical case records of seven patients with displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures treated by open reduction and extracorporeal fixation over a 3-year period. The parameters assessed were as follows: a the ease of access for retrieval, reimplantation and fixation of the proximal segment; b the postoperative approach related complications; c the adequacy of anatomical reduction and stability of fixation; d the occlusal changes; and the e TMJ function and radiological changes. Results: Accessibility and visibility were good. Accurate anatomical reduction and fixation were achieved in all the patients. The recorded complications were minimal and transient. Facial nerve (buccal branch palsy was noted in one patient with spontaneous resolution within 3 months. No cases of sialocele or Frey's syndrome were seen. Conclusion: The P-TMAP approach provides good access for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of severely displaced condylar fractures. It facilitates retrieval, transplantation, repositioning, fixing the condyle and also reduces the chances of requirement of a vertical ramus osteotomy. It gives straight-line access to condylar head and ramus thereby

  1. Preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for extracorporeal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Gali, Rajasekhar; Devireddy, Sathya Kumar; Venkata, Kishore Kumar Rayadurgam; Kanubaddy, Sridhar Reddy; Nemaly, Chaithanyaa; Dasari, Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Free grafting or extracorporeal fixation of traumatically displaced mandibular condyles is sometimes required in patients with severe anteromedial displacement of condylar head. Majority of the published studies report the use of a submandibular, retromandibular or preauricular incisions for the access which have demerits of limited visibility, access and potential to cause damage to facial nerve and other parotid gland related complications. This retrospective clinical case record study was done to evaluate the preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid (P-TMAP) approach for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures of the mandible. This retrospective study involved search of clinical case records of seven patients with displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures treated by open reduction and extracorporeal fixation over a 3-year period. The parameters assessed were as follows: a) the ease of access for retrieval, reimplantation and fixation of the proximal segment; b) the postoperative approach related complications; c) the adequacy of anatomical reduction and stability of fixation; d) the occlusal changes; and the e) TMJ function and radiological changes. Accessibility and visibility were good. Accurate anatomical reduction and fixation were achieved in all the patients. The recorded complications were minimal and transient. Facial nerve (buccal branch) palsy was noted in one patient with spontaneous resolution within 3 months. No cases of sialocele or Frey's syndrome were seen. The P-TMAP approach provides good access for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of severely displaced condylar fractures. It facilitates retrieval, transplantation, repositioning, fixing the condyle and also reduces the chances of requirement of a vertical ramus osteotomy. It gives straight-line access to condylar head and ramus thereby permitting perpendicular placement of screws with minimal risk of damage to the facial

  2. Angiographic analysis of avascular necrosis of a femoral head -selective angiography of medial femoral circumflex artery-

    Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-15

    The degree of anatomical revascularization of a necrotic femoral head and traumatic hip would provide information about treatment and prognosis. The authors analyzed the vascular changes of femoral head among unilateral avascular necrosis, bilateral avascular necrosis, and traumatic hips. Forty - four patients with avascular necrosis and 19 patients with traumatic hips were examined by selective angiography of the medial femoral circumflex artery. In the traumatic hip cases, 12 (63%) showed occlusion, 2 (11%) hypertrophy of the capsular branches, and 5 ( 26 % ) were normal . In the avascular necrosis cases, 15 (25%) showed occlusion, 39 (67%) had hypertrophy of the capsular branches, and 4 (7%) had normal findings. Hypertrophy of the superior capsular branch of the medial femoral circumflex artery is more frequently observed in avascular necrosis than in traumatic hip. Bilateral avascular necrosis reveals more frequent incidences than unilateral cases. Selective angiography could help in the therapy plan and also provide information about the contralateral side.

  3. Angiographic analysis of avascular necrosis of a femoral head -selective angiography of medial femoral circumflex artery-

    Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    The degree of anatomical revascularization of a necrotic femoral head and traumatic hip would provide information about treatment and prognosis. The authors analyzed the vascular changes of femoral head among unilateral avascular necrosis, bilateral avascular necrosis, and traumatic hips. Forty - four patients with avascular necrosis and 19 patients with traumatic hips were examined by selective angiography of the medial femoral circumflex artery. In the traumatic hip cases, 12 (63%) showed occlusion, 2 (11%) hypertrophy of the capsular branches, and 5 ( 26 % ) were normal . In the avascular necrosis cases, 15 (25%) showed occlusion, 39 (67%) had hypertrophy of the capsular branches, and 4 (7%) had normal findings. Hypertrophy of the superior capsular branch of the medial femoral circumflex artery is more frequently observed in avascular necrosis than in traumatic hip. Bilateral avascular necrosis reveals more frequent incidences than unilateral cases. Selective angiography could help in the therapy plan and also provide information about the contralateral side

  4. Fibrous dysplasia of the femoral neck

    Savage, P.E.; Stoker, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the femur is usually observed in the intertrochanteric region. It is rarely confined to the femoral neck. We present four cases illustrating the radiographic appearance and spectrum of this condition which all showed the relatively lucent variety of fibrous dysplasia with varying degrees of expansion and surrounding sclerosis. The natural history of this condition is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Femoral Hernia At Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... consecutive patients operated for femoral hernia over a period of twelve months. Results: There were ... The age ranged from 42 years to 70 years old with a mean of 54.6 years old. All the .... cholecystectomy. At this point in ...

  6. Radiation-induced femoral head necrosis

    2011-03-25

    Mar 25, 2011 ... had open medial menisectomy of the left knee following medial meniscal tear ... postoperative recovery and mobilised full weight-bearing immediately [Figure 6]. ... obtained from the oncologists at the time of this review), and there was a ... previous trauma such as femoral neck fracture, Gaucher's disease ...

  7. Transvenous liver biopsy via the femoral vein

    Khosa, F.; McNulty, J.G.; Hickey, N.; O'Brien, P.; Tobin, A.; Noonan, N.; Ryan, B.; Keeling, P.W.N.; Kelleher, D.P.; McDonald, G.S.A.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety, effectiveness and diagnostic value of transvenous forceps biopsy of the liver in 54 patients with coagulopathy, gross ascites or morbid obesity and suspected liver disease in whom percutaneous liver biopsy was contraindicated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forceps biopsy of the liver via the femoral vein was attempted in 54 adult patients with advanced liver disease of unknown aetiology who had coagulation disorders (41 cases), gross ascites (11 cases) or morbid obesity (two cases). In each patient two to six biopsies (average four) were taken using a radial jaw forceps inserted via the right or left femoral vein. RESULTS: The procedure was successful in 53 cases. Hepatic vein catheterization failed in one patient. Adequate liver tissue for diagnosis was obtained in 84% of cases. One patient developed delayed haemorrhage at 12 h from a capsular leak that was undetected during the biopsy procedure. This patient required blood transfusions and laparotomy to control bleeding. There were no deaths in the 53 patients studied. Transient minor chest and shoulder pain was encountered during sheath insertion into a hepatic vein in 23 patients. Three patients developed a femoral vein haematoma, which resolved with conservative treatment. CONCLUSION: Transvenous liver biopsy via the femoral vein is another safe, effective, simple alternative technique of biopsy when the percutaneous route is contraindicated

  8. Postmortem Femoral Blood Concentrations of Risperidone

    Linnet, Kristian; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem femoral blood concentrations of the antipsychotic drug risperidone and the active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone were determined by an achiral LC-MS/MS method in 38 cases. The cause of death was classified as unrelated to risperidone in 30 cases, in which the sum of the concentration ...

  9. Femoral Prosthesis Infection by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    Savini, Vincenzo; Sozio, Federica; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Parruti, Giustino; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    This case report is a case history of a femoral prosthesis infection caused by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a human immunodeficiency virus patient. Though the pathogenicity of this organism for bone tissue has been previously reported, this is the first reported case of an orthopedic prosthesis infection by this species of the genus Rhodotorula. PMID:18753353

  10. Aseptic necrosis of femoral head complicating thalassemia

    Orzincolo, C.; Castaldi, G.; Scutellary, P.N.; Bariani, L.; Pinca, A.

    1986-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is described in 4 patients, selected from 280 patients with homozygous β-thalassemia (Cooley anemia). The incidence of the complication appears to be very high (14.5per mille) in thalassemia, compared to the general population. The possible mechanism are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Lateral femoral traction pin entry: risk to the femoral artery and other medial neurovascular structures

    Appleton Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral skeletal traction assists in the reduction and transient stabilization of pelvic, acetabular, hip, and femoral fractures when splinting is ineffective. Traditional teaching has recommended a medial entry site for insertion of the traction pin in order to minimize injury to the femoral artery as it passes through Hunter's canal. The present anatomical study evaluates the risk to the femoral artery and other medial neurovascular structures using a lateral entry approach. Methods Six embalmed cadavers (twelve femurs were obtained for dissection. Steinman pins were drilled from lateral to medial at the level of the superior pole of the patella, at 2 cm, and at 4 cm proximal to this point. Medial superficial dissection was then performed to identify the saphenous nerve, the superior medial geniculate artery, the adductor hiatus, the tendinous insertion of the adductor magnus and the femoral artery. Measurements localizing these anatomic structures relative to the pins were obtained. Results The femoral artery was relatively safe and was no closer than 29.6 mm (mean from any of the three Steinman pins. The superior medial geniculate artery was the medial structure at most risk. Conclusions Lateral femoral traction pin entry is a safe procedure with minimal risk to the saphenous nerve and femoral artery. Of the structures examined, only the superior medial geniculate artery is at a risk of iatrogenic injury due to its position. The incidence of such injury in clinical practice and its clinical significance is not known. Lateral insertion facilitates traction pin placement since it minimizes the need to move the contralateral extremity out of the way of the drilling equipment or the need to elevate or externally rotate the injured extremity relative to the contralateral extremity.

  12. Preoperative virtual reduction reduces femoral malrotation in the treatment of bilateral femoral shaft fractures.

    Omar, Mohamed; Suero, Eduardo M; Hawi, Nael; Decker, Sebastian; Krettek, Christian; Citak, Musa

    2015-10-01

    In bilateral femoral shaft fractures, significant malrotation (>15°) occurs in about 40 % of cases after intramedullary nailing. Most of the methods that provide rotational control during surgery are based on a comparison to the intact femur and, thus, not applicable for bilateral fractures. In this study, we evaluated if preoperative virtual reduction can help improving rotational alignment in patients with bilateral femoral shaft fractures. Seven patients with bilateral femoral shaft fractures were initially treated with external fixation of both femurs. After obtaining a CT scan of both legs, the fractures were reduced virtually using the software program VoXim®, and the amount and direction of rotational correction were calculated. Subsequently, the patients were treated by antegrade femoral nailing and rotation was corrected to the preoperatively calculated amount. After external fixation, the mean rotational difference between both legs was 15.0° ± 10.2°. Four out of seven patients had a significant malrotation over 15°. Following virtual reduction, the mean rotational difference between both legs was 2.1° ± 1.2°. After intramedullary nailing, no case of malrotation occurred and the mean rotational difference was 6.1° ± 2.8°. Preoperative virtual reduction allows determining the pretraumatic femoral antetorsion and provided useful information for the definitive treatment of bilateral femoral shaft fractures. We believe that this procedure is worth being implemented in the clinical workflow to avoid malrotation after intramedullary nailing.

  13. Friction of ceramic and metal hip hemi-endoprostheses against cadaveric acetabula.

    Müller, L P; Degreif, J; Rudig, L; Mehler, D; Hely, H; Rommens, P M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of hip arthroplasty have dealt mainly with total endoprosthesis, while tribology measurement values of hemi-endoprosthetic implants are rare. The small amount of experimental tribological data concerning materials of hemi-endoprosthetic implants in the form of pendulum trials, animal experiments, in vivo measurements on human hip joints and pin on disc studies report friction coefficients between 0.014 and 0.57; the friction coefficients measured in fresh human cadaver hip joints were determined between 0.001 and 0.08. The HEPFlEx-hip simulator was constructed to test the friction coefficients of unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses made of metal or ceramic against fresh cadaveric acetabula. Its plane of movement is uniaxial with a flexion-extension movement of +30/-18 degrees . The force is produced pneumatically dynamic with amounts of 2.5 kN. Newborn calf serum serves as a lubricant. We mounted 20 fresh porcine acetabula and 10 fresh human cadaver acetabula in the HEPFlEx-hip simulator and compared the two unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses (metal vs. ceramic). The mean friction coefficients against porcine acetabula were micro=0.017-0.082 for ceramic and micro=0.020-0.101 for metal; against human cadaver acetabula micro=0.017-0.083 for ceramic and micro=0.019-0.118 for metal. The frictional coefficient deltas (metal-ceramic) values of all measurements were Deltamicro=0.004 for porcine acetabula and Deltamicro=0.001 for cadaver acetabula. Box-plots graphics document significantly lower frictional coefficients of the ceramics. The lower frictional coefficients of ceramic compared to metal against fresh cadaveric acetabula may have a clinical impact on the process of the protrusion of the corresponding femoral head through the acetabulum.

  14. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    Grigsby, Perry W; Roberts, Heidi L; Perez, Carlos A

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication.

  15. Femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation

    Grigsby, Perry W.; Roberts, Heidi L.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence and risk factors are evaluated for femoral neck fracture following groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The radiation therapy records of 1313 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the vagina, vulva, cervix, and endometrium, treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology from 1954 to 1992, were reviewed. Median follow-up was 12.7 years. From this group, 207 patients were identified who received irradiation to the pelvis and groins with anterposterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA), 18 MV photons. Data were reviewed regarding irradiation dose to the femoral neck and other presumed risk factors including age, primary site, stage, groin node status, menopausal status, estrogen use, cigarette use, alcohol consumption, and osteoporosis. Results: The per-patient incidence of femoral neck fracture was 4.8% (10 out of 207). Four patients developed bilateral fractures. However, the cumulative actuarial incidence of fracture was 11% at 5 years and 15% at 10 years. Cox multivariate analysis of age, weight, and irradiation dose showed that only irradiation dose may be important to developing fracture. Step-wise logistic regression of presumed prognostic factors revealed that only cigarette use and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis prior to irradiation treatment were predictive of fracture. Conclusion: Femoral head fracture is a common complication of groin irradiation for gynecologic malignancies. Fracture in our database appears to be related to irradiation dose, cigarette use, and x-ray evidence of osteoporosis. Special attention should be given in treatment planning (i.e., shielding of femoral head/neck and use of appropriate electron beam energies for a portion of treatment) to reduce the incidence of this complication

  16. Modeling Friction in Modelica with the Lund-Grenoble Friction Model

    Aberger, Martin; Otter, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the Lund-Grenoble friction model are summarized and different types of friction elements - bearing friction, clutch, one-way clutch, are implemented in Modelica using this friction formulation. The dynamic properties of these components are determined in simulations and compared with the friction models available in the Modelica standard library. This includes also an automatic gearbox model where 6 friction elements are coupled dynamically.

  17. High speed friction microscopy and nanoscale friction coefficient mapping

    Bosse, James L; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for friction coefficient mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true maps of the coefficient of friction can be uniquely calculated for heterogeneous surfaces. These parameters are determined at a scan velocity as fast as 2 mm s −1 for microfabricated SiO 2 mesas and Au coated pits, yielding results that are identical to traditional speed measurements despite being ∼1000 times faster. To demonstrate the upper limit of sliding velocity for the custom setup, the friction properties of mica are reported from 200 µm s −1 up to 2 cm s −1 . While FCM is applicable to any AFM and scanning speed, quantitative nanotribology investigations of heterogeneous sliding or rolling components are therefore uniquely possible, even at realistic velocities for devices such as MEMS, biological implants, or data storage systems. (paper)

  18. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  20. CT study of avascular necrosis of femoral head in adults

    Liu Jihua; Du Yuqing; Xu Aide

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the early and new CT signs of avascular necrosis of femoral head in adults. Methods: The CT scans of 127 cases with this condition were analyzed. Results: There were 90 hip joints with femoral head normal in shape, including 67 femoral heads with only high-density sclerosis and 23 ones with high-density and low-density areas. In 111 hip joints, the femoral head was depressed and manifested purely high-density sclerosis in 25 and mixed-density areas in 86. Air-filled cysts appeared in 43 femoral heads. In follow-up cases, the changes in shape and density of femoral head followed some rules. Conclusion: Purely high-density sclerosis is an early sign and is of great diagnostic value combined with its special shape. Air in femoral heads is also a sign of the disease

  1. Real-Time Dynamic Observation of Micro-Friction on the Contact Interface of Friction Lining

    Zhang, Dekun; Chen, Kai; Guo, Yongbo

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the microscopic friction mechanism based on in situ microscopic observation in order to record the deformation and contact situation of friction lining during the frictional process. The results show that friction coefficient increased with the shear deformation and energy loss of the surfacee, respectively. Furthermore, the friction mechanism mainly included adhesive friction in the high-pressure and high-speed conditions, whereas hysteresis friction was in the low-pressure and low-speed conditions. The mixed-friction mechanism was in the period when the working conditions varied from high pressure and speed to low pressure and speed. PMID:29498677

  2. Structural Damping with Friction Beams

    L. Gaul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last several years, there has been increasing interest in the use of friction joints for enhancing damping in structures. The joints themselves are responsible for the major part of the energy dissipation in assembled structures. The dissipated work in a joint depends on both the applied normal force and the excitation force. For the case of a constant amplitude excitation force, there is an optimal normal force which maximizes the damping. A ‘passive’ approach would be employed in this instance. In most cases however, the excitation force, as well as the interface parameters such as the friction coefficient, normal pressure distribution, etc., are not constant. In these cases, a ‘semi-active’ approach, which implements an active varying normal force, is necessary. For the ‘passive’ and ‘semi-active’ approaches, the normal force has to be measured. Interestingly, since the normal force in a friction joint influences the local stiffness, the natural frequencies of the assembled structure can be tuned by adjusting the normal force. Experiments and simulations are performed for a simple laboratory structure consisting of two superposed beams with friction in the interface. Numerical simulation of the friction interface requires non-linear models. The response of the double beam system is simulated using a numerical algorithm programmed in MATLAB which models point-to-point friction with the Masing friction model. Numerical predictions and measurements of the double beam free vibration response are compared. A practical application is then described, in which a friction beam is used to damp the vibrations of the work piece table on a milling machine. The increased damping of the table reduces vibration amplitudes, which in turn results in enhanced surface quality of the machined parts, reduction in machine tool wear, and potentially higher feed rates. Optimal positioning of the friction beams is based on knowledge of the mode

  3. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  4. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  5. Nonlinear friction model for servo press simulation

    Ma, Ninshu; Sugitomo, Nobuhiko; Kyuno, Takunori; Tamura, Shintaro; Naka, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The friction coefficient was measured under an idealized condition for a pulse servo motion. The measured friction coefficient and its changing with both sliding distance and a pulse motion showed that the friction resistance can be reduced due to the re-lubrication during unloading process of the pulse servo motion. Based on the measured friction coefficient and its changes with sliding distance and re-lubrication of oil, a nonlinear friction model was developed. Using the newly developed the nonlinear friction model, a deep draw simulation was performed and the formability was evaluated. The results were compared with experimental ones and the effectiveness was verified.

  6. The relationship of lateral anatomic structures to exiting guide pins during femoral tunnel preparation utilizing an accessory medial portal.

    Farrow, Lutul D; Parker, Richard D

    2010-06-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament through an accessory medial portal has become increasingly popular. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship of guide pin exit points to the lateral anatomic structures when preparing the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel through an accessory medial portal. We utilized seven fresh frozen cadaveric knees. Utilizing an anteromedial approach, a guide wire was placed into the center of each bundle's footprint. Each guide wire was advanced through the lateral femoral cortex. The guide pins were passed at 90, 110, and 130 degrees of knee flexion. The distances from each guide pin to the closest relevant structures on the lateral side of the knee were measured. At 90 degrees the posterolateral bundle guide pin was closest to the lateral condyle articular cartilage (mean 5.4 +/- 2.2 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 5.7 +/- 2.1 mm). At 110 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 4.5 +/- 3.4 mm). At 130 degrees the posterolateral bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 7.2 +/- 5.5 mm) and lateral collateral ligament (mean 6.8 +/- 2.1 mm). At 90 degrees the anteromedial bundle guide pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 2.0 +/- 2.0 mm). At 110 degrees the anteromedial bundle pin was closest to the articular cartilage (mean 7.4 +/- 3.5 mm) and gastrocnemius tendon (mean 12.3 +/- 3.1 mm). At 130 degrees the AM bundle pin was closest to the gastrocnemius tendon (mean 8.2 +/- 3.2 mm) and LCL (mean 15.1 +/- 2.9 mm). Neither guide pin (anteromedial or posterolateral bundle) put the peroneal nerve at risk at any knee flexion angle. At low knee flexion angles the anteromedial and posterolateral bundle guide pins closely approximated multiple lateral structures when using an accessory medial arthroscopic portal. Utilizing higher flexion angles increases the margin of error when preparing both femoral tunnels. During preparation of

  7. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Avoiding Injury to the Physis, Lateral Collateral Ligament, Anterolateral Ligament, and Popliteus-A 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Study.

    Shea, Kevin G; Cannamela, Peter C; Fabricant, Peter D; Terhune, Elizabeth B; Polousky, John D; Milewski, Matthew D; Anderson, Allen F; Ganley, Theodore J

    2018-01-25

    To investigate the relation of the at-risk structures (distal femoral physis, lateral collateral ligament, anterolateral ligament, popliteus, and articular cartilage) during all-epiphyseal femoral tunnel drilling. A second purpose was 2-fold: (1) to develop recommendations for tunnel placement and orientation that anatomically reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) while minimizing the risk of injury to these at-risk structures, and (2) to allow for maximal tunnel length to increase the amount of graft in the socket to facilitate healing. Three-dimensional models of 6 skeletally immature knees (aged 7-11 years) were reconstructed from computed tomography and used to simulate all-epiphyseal femoral tunnels. Tunnels began within the ACL footprint and were directed laterally or anterolaterally, with the goal of avoiding injury to at-risk structures. The spatial relation between the ideal tunnel and these structures was evaluated. Full-length tunnels and partial length condyle sockets were simulated in the models using the same trajectories. An anterolateral tunnel could be placed to avoid direct injury to lateral structures. The safe zone on the anterolateral aspect of the femur was larger than that of a tunnel with a direct lateral trajectory (median 127 mm 2 vs 83 mm 2 , P = .028). Anterolateral tunnels were longer than direct lateral tunnels (median 30 mm vs 24 mm, P = .041). Safe angles for anterolateral tunnels were 34° to 40° from the posterior condylar axis; direct lateral tunnels were drilled 4° to 9° from the posterior condylar axis. Sockets could be placed without direct injury to structures at risk with either orientation. An all-epiphyseal ACL femoral tunnel can be placed without causing direct injury to at-risk structures. A tunnel angled anterolaterally from the ACL origin is longer and has a larger safe zone compared with the direct lateral tunnel. The largest safe zone for femoral all-epiphyseal ACL drilling was (1) anterior to

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelet Gel Improve Bone Deposition within CAD-CAM Custom-Made Ceramic HA Scaffolds for Condyle Substitution

    L. Ciocca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of a regenerative approach using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and CAD-CAM customized pure and porous hydroxyapatite (HA scaffolds to replace the temporomandibular joint (TMJ condyle. Methods. Pure HA scaffolds with a 70% total porosity volume were prototyped using CAD-CAM technology to replace the two temporomandibular condyles (left and right of the same animal. MSCs were derived from the aspirated iliac crest bone marrow, and platelets were obtained from the venous blood of the sheep. Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Sheep were sacrificed 4 months postoperatively. The HA scaffolds were explanted, histological specimens were prepared, and histomorphometric analysis was performed. Results. Analysis of the porosity reduction for apposition of newly formed bone showed a statistically significant difference in bone formation between condyles loaded with MSC and condyles without (P<0.05. The bone ingrowth (BI relative values of split-mouth comparison (right versus left side showed a significant difference between condyles with and without MSCs (P<0.05. Analysis of the test and control sides in the same animal using a split-mouth study design was performed; the condyle with MSCs showed greater bone formation. Conclusion. The split-mouth design confirmed an increment of bone regeneration into the HA scaffold of up to 797% upon application of MSCs.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells and platelet gel improve bone deposition within CAD-CAM custom-made ceramic HA scaffolds for condyle substitution.

    Ciocca, L; Donati, D; Ragazzini, S; Dozza, B; Rossi, F; Fantini, M; Spadari, A; Romagnoli, N; Landi, E; Tampieri, A; Piattelli, A; Iezzi, G; Scotti, R

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a regenerative approach using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and CAD-CAM customized pure and porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds to replace the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. Pure HA scaffolds with a 70% total porosity volume were prototyped using CAD-CAM technology to replace the two temporomandibular condyles (left and right) of the same animal. MSCs were derived from the aspirated iliac crest bone marrow, and platelets were obtained from the venous blood of the sheep. Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Sheep were sacrificed 4 months postoperatively. The HA scaffolds were explanted, histological specimens were prepared, and histomorphometric analysis was performed. Analysis of the porosity reduction for apposition of newly formed bone showed a statistically significant difference in bone formation between condyles loaded with MSC and condyles without (P < 0.05). The bone ingrowth (BI) relative values of split-mouth comparison (right versus left side) showed a significant difference between condyles with and without MSCs (P < 0.05). Analysis of the test and control sides in the same animal using a split-mouth study design was performed; the condyle with MSCs showed greater bone formation. The split-mouth design confirmed an increment of bone regeneration into the HA scaffold of up to 797% upon application of MSCs.

  10. Distraction of the temporomandibular joint condyle in patients with unilateral non-reducing disc displacement: Fact or fiction?

    Yıldız, Melih; Çağatay Dayan, Süleyman; Şakar, Olcay; Sülün, Tonguç

    2017-07-24

    This study investigated the distractive effect of a unilateral pivot splint on patients with unilateral disc displacement without reduction. The study group was comprised of 18 patients who had no history of treatment with removable prosthetic restorations of molars, premolars, or canine teeth, and no previous treatment for temporomandibular disorder. Joint spaces measurements made on magnetic resonance images indicated the affected side to be narrower than the healthy side. Unilateral distraction splints were made for all patients. An ultrasonic motion analyzer was used to measure the vertical shift occurring on the affected side as patients closed their mouths with maximal force with the splint in their mouths. Closing with maximal force on the unilateral distraction splint led to a noticeable downward movement of the affected condyle. The findings of this study indicate that the TMJ condyle of patients with unilateral disc displacement without reduction may be unilaterally distracted if the articular space is narrowed.

  11. Morphometric Evaluation of Occipital Condyles: Defining Optimal Trajectories and Safe Screw Lengths for Occipital Condyle-Based Occipitocervical Fixation in Indian Population.

    Bosco, Aju; Venugopal, Prakash; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Shanmuganathan, Rajasekaran; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh

    2018-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) morphometric analysis. To assess the feasibility and safety of occipital condyle (OC)-based occipitocervical fixation (OCF) in Indians and to define anatomical zones and screw lengths for safe screw placement. Limitations of occipital squama-based OCF has led to development of two novel OC-based OCF techniques. Morphometric analysis was performed on the OCs of 70 Indian adults. The feasibility of placing a 3.5-mm-diameter screw into OCs was investigated. Safe trajectories and screw lengths for OC screws and C0-C1 transarticular screws without hypoglossal canal or atlantooccipital joint compromise were estimated. The average screw length and safe sagittal and medial angulations for OC screws were 19.9±2.3 mm, ≤6.4°±2.4° cranially, and 31.1°±3° medially, respectively. An OC screw could not be accommodated by 27% of the population. The safe sagittal angles and screw lengths for C0-C1 transarticular screw insertion (48.9°±5.7° cranial, 26.7±2.9 mm for junctional entry technique; 36.7°±4.6° cranial, 31.6±2.7 mm for caudal C1 arch entry technique, respectively) were significantly different than those in other populations. The risk of vertebral artery injury was high for the caudal C1 arch entry technique. Screw placement was uncertain in 48% of Indians due to the presence of aberrant anatomy. There were significant differences in the metrics of OC-based OCF between Indian and other populations. Because of the smaller occipital squama dimensions in Indians, OC-based OCF techniques may have a higher application rate and could be a viable alternative/salvage option in selected cases. Preoperative CT, including three-dimensional-CT-angiography (to delineate vertebral artery course), is imperative to avoid complications resulting from aberrant bony and vascular anatomy. Our data can serve as a valuable reference guide in placing these screws safely under fluoroscopic guidance.

  12. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  13. Femoral head fracture without hip dislocation

    Aggarwal Aditya K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral head fractures without dislocation or subluxation are extremely rare injuries. We report a neglected case of isolated comminuted fracture of femoral head without hip dislocation or subluxation of one year duration in a 36-year-old patient who sustained a high en- ergy trauma due to road traffic accident. He presented with painful right hip and inability to bear full weight on right lower limb with Harris hip score of 39. He received cementless total hip replacement. At latest follow-up of 2.3 years, functional outcome was excellent with Harris hip score of 95. Such isolated injuries have been described only once in the literature and have not been classified till now. The purpose of this report is to highlight the extreme rarity, possible mechanism involved and a novel classification system to classify such injuries. Key words: Femur head; Hip dislocation; Classification; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  14. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head

  15. Finite element analysis of the contact interface between trans-femoral stump and prosthetic socket.

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Ling; Zheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Transfemoral amputees need prosthetic devices after amputation surgery, and the interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. The purpose of this study was to build a nonlinear finite element model to investigate the interface pressure between the above-knee residual limb and its prosthetic socket. The model was three-dimensional (3D) with consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. Contact analysis was used to simulate the friction conditions between skin and the socket. The normal stresses up to 80.57 kPa at the distal end of the soft tissue. The longitudinal and circumferential shear stress distributions at the limb-socket interface were also simulated. This study explores the influences of load transfer between trans-femoral residual limb and its prosthetic socket.

  16. A new method of CT scanning for the diagnosis of mandibular fractures; A preliminary report: diagnosis of condyle fractures

    Tsukagoshi, Taku; Satoh, Kaneshige; Onizuka, Takuya (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    The condylar neck of the mandible is one of the most common fracture sites in the facial skeleton. Such a fracture is routinely diagnosed by A-P, lateral oblique, and Towne projection roentgenography or orthopantomography. Despite the combination of these films, fracture of the neck of the mandible is still difficult to diagnose definitely. Therefore, a new CT scanning method was developed for diagnosing fractures of the neck of the condylar mandible. The CT axis is projected along the length of the mandible, extending from the condyle to the symphysis. This projection visualizes both the condyle and the mandibular symphysis in the same plane. The patient is placed in a supine position with the head fully extended. The base line, a line extending from the midpoint of the glenoid fossa to the menton, is determined with a lateral facial cephalogram. CT scanning with a 5 mm window is performed in parallel with and 2 cm anterior to and 2 cm posterior to the base line. When CT scanning was performed in a healthy volunteer, the condition of the condyle and the condylar neck of the mandible was clearly shown, and the view extended from the condyle to the symphysis. For automobile accident patients in whom fracture of the neck of the mandible was associated with fracture of the symphysis, two fractures were found in the same plane. A newly developed CT scanning technique is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the condylar neck of the mandible and in the identification of fractures at other mandibular sites. It also allows scanning of patients in a supine position, which may aid in managing patients with multiple traumas. (N.K.).

  17. Ipsilateral femoral neck and trochanter fracture

    Devdatta S Neogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ipsilateral fractures in the neck and trochanteric region of the femur are very rare and seen in elderly osteoporotic patients. We present a case of a young man who presented with ipsilateral fracture of the femoral neck and a reverse oblique fracture in the trochanteric region following a motor vehicle accident. A possible mechanism, diagnostic challenge, and awareness required for identifying this injury are discussed.

  18. Proximal focal femoral deficiency: A case report

    Shashank Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a rare congenital anomaly resulting in limb shortening and disability in young. The exact cause of the disease is not known and it may present as varying grades of affection involving the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Recognition of this rare abnormality on radiographs can help manage these cases better since early institution of therapy may help in achieving adequate growth of the femur.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation of two femoral head chondroblastomas

    Petsas, Theodore [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece); Megas, Panagiotis [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Patras (Greece)]. E-mail: panmegas@med.upatras.gr; Papathanassiou, Zafiria [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous bone tumor. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for pain relief and prevention of further growth. Open surgical techniques are associated with complications, particularly when the tumors are located in deep anatomical sites. The authors performed RF ablation in two cases of subarticular femoral head chondroblastomas and emphasize its positive impact. The clinical course, the radiological findings and the post treatment results are discussed.

  20. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    Porubský, Peter; Trč, Tomáš; Havlas, Vojtěch; Smetana, Pavel

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in adults is not common, but not too rare diseases. In orthopedic practice, it is one of the diseases that are causing implantation of hip replacement at a relatively early age. In the early detection and initiation of therapy can delay the implantation of prosthesis for several years, which is certainly more convenient for the patient and beneficial. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with the basic diagnostic procedures and therapy.

  1. Machine Learning of Fault Friction

    Johnson, P. A.; Rouet-Leduc, B.; Hulbert, C.; Marone, C.; Guyer, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    We are applying machine learning (ML) techniques to continuous acoustic emission (AE) data from laboratory earthquake experiments. Our goal is to apply explicit ML methods to this acoustic datathe AE in order to infer frictional properties of a laboratory fault. The experiment is a double direct shear apparatus comprised of fault blocks surrounding fault gouge comprised of glass beads or quartz powder. Fault characteristics are recorded, including shear stress, applied load (bulk friction = shear stress/normal load) and shear velocity. The raw acoustic signal is continuously recorded. We rely on explicit decision tree approaches (Random Forest and Gradient Boosted Trees) that allow us to identify important features linked to the fault friction. A training procedure that employs both the AE and the recorded shear stress from the experiment is first conducted. Then, testing takes place on data the algorithm has never seen before, using only the continuous AE signal. We find that these methods provide rich information regarding frictional processes during slip (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017a; Hulbert et al., 2017). In addition, similar machine learning approaches predict failure times, as well as slip magnitudes in some cases. We find that these methods work for both stick slip and slow slip experiments, for periodic slip and for aperiodic slip. We also derive a fundamental relationship between the AE and the friction describing the frictional behavior of any earthquake slip cycle in a given experiment (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017b). Our goal is to ultimately scale these approaches to Earth geophysical data to probe fault friction. References Rouet-Leduc, B., C. Hulbert, N. Lubbers, K. Barros, C. Humphreys and P. A. Johnson, Machine learning predicts laboratory earthquakes, in review (2017). https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.05774Rouet-LeDuc, B. et al., Friction Laws Derived From the Acoustic Emissions of a Laboratory Fault by Machine Learning (2017), AGU Fall Meeting Session S025

  2. MYCOTIC FEMORAL PSEUDOANEURYSMS FROM INTRAVENOUS DRUG ABUSE

    Vojko Flis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parenteral drug abuse is the most common cause of infected femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (IFAP. This complication of intravenous drug abuse is not only limb threatening but can also be life threatening. The management of the IFAP is difficult and controversial. Generally speaking, ligation and excision of the pseudoaneurysm without revascularization is accepted procedure in majority of the patients. However it is not regarded as an appropriate procedure for cases where the high probability of amputation is expected from acute interruption of the femoral artery flow.Patients, methods and results. We present three cases of young (average 20 years, range 18–24 patients with IFAP, in which a primary reconstruction was performed due to absence of doppler signal over pedal arteries after ligation of common femoral artery. In two of them complications in form of haemorrhage and repeated infection developed in late postoperative period. The first one, had an excision and ligation while the second one had a reconstruction made by means of a silver impregnated dacron prosthesis. None of the patients required an amputation.Conclusions. Overall prognosis and prognosis of the reconstruction in parenteral drug abuse patients is uncertain because there is a high incidence of postoperative drug injection despite aggressive drug rehabilitation.

  3. Radionuclide patterns of femoral head disease

    Webber, M M; Wagner, J; Cragin, M D [California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    1977-12-01

    The pattern of uptake of bone marrow specific radio-sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid and the pattern of uptake of bone mineral specific radio-sup(99m)Tc pryophosphate may be valuable in assessing bone vascularity in diseases suspected of causing impaired blood supply, or indicate the presence of reactive bone formation. The low energy of the technetium label has been shown to be superior to /sup 18/F and /sup 85/Sr, and leads to greater imaging detail on the scans. Femoral head scanning with mineral and/or marrow specific radionuclides offers the clinician a method of evaluating the status of the femoral head and possibly an early diagnosis of avascular necrosis before roentgenographic changes occur. This study, which reports on a 5-year experience using radionuclide scanning to assess femoral head vascularity, begins with baseline or normal studies followed by variations of the normal pattern. Typical scan patterns of hip pathology described above are also presented.

  4. Shaft-Condylar Angle for surgical correction in neglected and displaced lateral humeral condyle fracture in children.

    Mulpruek, Pornchai; Angsanuntsukh, Chanika; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Sa-Ngasoongsong, Paphon; Tawonsawatruk, Tulyapruek; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn

    2015-09-01

    To assess the outcome after using the Shaft-Condylar angle (SCA) as intraoperative reference for sagittal plane correction in displaced lateral humeral condyle fractures in children presented 3-weeks after injury. Ten children, with delayed presentation of a displaced lateral humeral condyle fracture and undergoing surgery during 1999-2011, were reviewed. The goal was to obtain a smooth articular surface with an intraoperative SCA of nearly 40° and nearest-anatomical carrying angle. They were allocated into two groups according to the postoperative SCA [Good-reduction group (SCA=30-50°), and Bad-reduction group (SCA50°)] and the final outcomes were then compared. All fractures united without avascular necrosis. The Good-reduction group (n=7) showed a significant improvement in final range of motion and functional outcome compared to the Bad-reduction group (n=3) (p=0.02). However, there was no significant difference in pain, carrying angle and overall outcome between both groups. SCA is a possible intraoperative reference for sagittal alignment correction in late presented displaced lateral humeral condyle fractures.

  5. Impacted mandibular third molars and their influence on mandibular angle and condyle fractures--a retrospective study.

    Gaddipati, Rajasekhar; Ramisetty, Sudhir; Vura, Nandagopal; Kanduri, Rajeev Reddy; Gunda, Vinay Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Previous retrospective analyses prove that impacted mandibular third molars (M3s) increase the risk of angle fractures and decrease the risk of concomitant fractures to the condyle. A retrospective cohort was designed for patients reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from January 2011 till June 2013. The study variables are presence or absence of third molar, if it is present, their position, classified using the Pell and Gregory system; angulation, classified using Shiller's method. The outcome variables were angle and condyle fractures. Hospital records and panoramic radiographs were used to determine and classify these variables. The study sample comprised of 118 mandibular angle and condyle fractures in 110 patients. Database was constructed and analysed using SPSS version 10.0. This present retrospective study concluded that the presence of impacted third molar predisposes the angle to fracture and reduces the risk of a concomitant condylar fracture. However absence of impacted third molar increases the risk of condylar fracture. The highest incidence of angle fracture was observed in position A impacted mandibular third molars. And there is no significant relationship, concerning ramus position and angulation of impacted mandibular third molars with the angle fracture. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Open reduction and internal fixation of intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle: our first experiences.

    Vesnaver, Ales

    2008-10-01

    Treatment of intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle head is conservative at most institutions dealing with facial fractures. Recently, reports had been published about benefits of surgical treatment in these fractures. From July 2004 until the end of June 2006, 13 patients with 16 displaced intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle were treated with open reduction and internal fixation at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Ljubljana, Slovenia, using the preauricular approach and the lag screw technique. Twelve of the 13 patients could open their mouths for 40 mm or more, and 10 had a deflection of the chin of less than 2 mm upon maximal opening. None of the patients experienced pain upon rest, palpation, or chewing. Occlusion was not noted as altered in any of the cases, neither subjectively, nor on examination. There were no cases of postoperative weakness of the temporal branch of the facial nerve. Surgical treatment of intra-articular condyle fractures using the preauricular approach achieves a good exposure and enables proper reduction. Stable fixation of fractured bony fragments can be achieved using the lag screw technique. Another benefit of open exposure is revision and repair of TMJ soft tissues. With the appropriate surgical technique, the surgical procedure is safe and leads to good results.

  7. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  8. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    WINTEC

    Abstract. An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous re- inforcing ... every manufacturer of automotive friction materials uses phenolics as ... The resin binder is a critical compo- nent. The limits ...

  9. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction ... Menezes et al (2006a,b) studied the effect of roughness parameters and grinding angle on ... as coefficient of friction, sliding velocity, normal load, hardness and thermal.

  10. Influence of knee flexion angle and transverse drill angle on creation of femoral tunnels in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transportal technique: Three-dimensional computed tomography simulation analysis.

    Choi, Chong Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Su-Keon; Eom, Nam-Kyu; Jung, Min

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find appropriate flexion angle and transverse drill angle for optimal femoral tunnels of anteromedial (AM) bundle and posterolateral (PL) bundle in double-bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Thirty three-dimensional knee models were reconstructed. Knee flexion angles were altered from 100° to 130° at intervals of 10°. Maximum transverse drill angle (MTA), MTA minus 10° and 20° were set up. Twelve different tunnels were determined by four flexion angles and three transverse drill angles for each bundle. Tunnel length, wall breakage, inter-tunnel communication and graft-bending angle were assessed. Mean tunnel length of AM bundle was >30mm at 120° and 130° of flexion in all transverse drill angles. Mean tunnel length of PL bundle was >30mm during every condition. There were ≥1 cases of wall breakage except at 120° and 130° of flexion with MTA for AM bundle. There was no case of wall breakage for PL bundle. Considering inter-tunnel gap of >2mm without communication and obtuse graft-bending angle, 120° of flexion and MTA could be recommended as optimal condition for femoral tunnels of AM and PL bundles. Flexion angle and transverse drill angle had combined effect on femoral tunnel in double-bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Achieving flexion angle of 120° and transverse drill angle close to the medial femoral condyle could be recommended as optimal condition for femoral tunnels of AM and PL bundles to avoid insufficient tunnel length, wall breakage, inter-tunnel communication and acute graft-bending angle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Distal Femoral Rotational Alignment with Spiral CT Scan before Total Knee Arthroplasty (A Study in Iranian Population

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluating the landmarks for rotation of the distal femur is a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Although the posterior femoral condyle axis is a good landmark for surgeons, the surgical transepicondylar axis may be a better option with the help of preoperative CT scanning. The purpose of this study was to ascertain relationships among the axes’ guiding distal femur rotational alignment in preoperative CT scans of Iranian patients who were candidates for total knee arthroplasty and the effects of age, gender, and knee alignment on these relationships. Methods: One hundred and eight cases who were admitted to two university hospitals for total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. The rotation of the distal femur was evaluated using single axial CT images through the femoral epicondyle. Four lines were drawn digitally in this view: anatomical and surgical transepicondylar axes, posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside anteroposterior line. The alignment of the extremity was evaluated in the standing alignment view. Then the angles were measured along these lines and their relationship was evaluated. Results: The mean angle between the anatomical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis and between the surgical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis were 5.9 ± 1.6 degrees and 1.6±1.7 degrees respectively. The mean angle between the Whiteside’s anteroposterior line and the line perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was 3.7±2.1 degrees. Significant differences existed between the two genders in these relationships. No significant correlation between the age of patients and angles of the distal femur was detected. The anatomical surgical transepicondylar axis was in 4.3 degrees external rotation in relation to the surgical transepicondylar axis. Conclusion: Preoperative CT scanning can help accurately determine rotational landmarks of the distal femur. If one of the reference axes cannot be

  12. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    . To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...... been tried in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs, which can now be used to measure Friction in both production situations and for research purposes....

  13. Advances on LuGre friction model

    Fuad, Mohammad; Ikhouane, Fayçal

    2013-01-01

    LuGre friction model is an ordinary differential equation that is widely used in describing the friction phenomenon for mechanical systems. The importance of this model comes from the fact that it captures most of the friction behavior that has been observed including hysteresis. In this paper, we study some aspects related to the hysteresis behavior induced by the LuGre friction model.

  14. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  15. A field theoretic model for static friction

    Mahyaeh, I.; Rouhani, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a field theoretic model for friction, where the friction coefficient between two surfaces may be calculated based on elastic properties of the surfaces. We assume that the geometry of contact surface is not unusual. We verify Amonton's laws to hold that friction force is proportional to the normal load.This model gives the opportunity to calculate the static coefficient of friction for a few cases, and show that it is in agreement with observed values. Furthermore we show that the ...

  16. The effect of bone cement particles on the friction of polyethylene and polyurethane knee bearings

    Ash, H E; Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A; Jones, E

    2004-01-01

    Compliant layer knee joints have been considered for use in an attempt to increase the serviceable life of artificial joints. If designed correctly, these joints should operate within the full-fluid film lubrication regime. However, adverse tribological conditions, such as the presence of bone and bone cement particles, may breach the fluid film and cause surface wear. The frictional behaviour of both polyurethane (PU) and conventional polyethylene (PE) tibial components against a metallic femoral component was therefore assessed when bone cement particles were introduced into the lubricant. The bone cement particles caused a large increase in the frictional torque of both the PE and PU bearings; however, the friction produced by the PU bearings was still considerably lower than that produced by the PE bearings. The volume of bone cement particles between each of the bearings and the resultant frictional torque both decreased over time. This occurred more quickly with the PE bearings but greater damage was caused to the surface of the PE bearings than the PU components

  17. The effect of irrigation time and type of irrigation fluid on cartilage surface friction.

    Stärke, F; Awiszus, F; Lohmann, C H; Stärke, C

    2018-01-01

    It is known that fluid irrigation used during arthroscopic procedures causes a wash-out of lubricating substances from the articular cartilage surface and leads to increased friction. It was the goal of this study to investigate whether this effect depends on the time of irrigation and type of fluid used. Rabbit hind legs were used for the tests. The knees were dissected and the friction coefficient of the femoral cartilage measured against glass in a boundary lubrication state. To determine the influence of irrigation time and fluid, groups of 12 knees received either no irrigation (control), 15, 60 or 120min of irrigation with lactated Ringer's solution or 60min of irrigation with normal saline or a sorbitol/mannitol solution. The time of irrigation had a significant effect on the static and kinetic coefficient of friction (CoF), as had the type of fluid. Longer irrigation time with Ringer's solution was associated with increased friction coefficients (relative increase of the kinetic CoF compared to the control after 15, 60 and 120min: 16%, 76% and 88% respectively). The sorbitol/mannitol solution affected the static and kinetic CoF significantly less than either Ringer's or normal saline. The washout of lubricating glycoproteins from the cartilage surface and the associated increase of friction can be effectively influenced by controlling the time of irrigation and type of fluid used. The time of exposure to the irrigation fluid should be as short as possible and monosaccharide solutions might offer a benefit compared to salt solutions in terms of the resultant friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Friction and dissipative phenomena in quantum mechanics

    Kostin, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    Frictional and dissipative terms of the Schroedinger equation are studied. A proof is given showing that the frictional term of the Schroedinger--Langevin equation causes the quantum system to lose energy. General expressions are derived for the frictional term of the Schroedinger equation. (U.S.)

  19. Adaptive friction compensation: a globally stable approach

    Verbert, K.A.; Tóth, R.; Babuska, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive friction compensation scheme is proposed. The friction force is computed as a timevarying friction coefficient multiplied by the sign of the velocity and an on-line update law is designed to estimate this coefficient based on the actual position and velocity errors.

  20. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  1. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  2. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to ...

  3. Incidence of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures

    Kim, Ji Wan; Oh, Jong-Keon; Byun, Young-Soo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Shon, Hyun Chul; Park, Ki Chul; Kim, Jung Jae; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures and to identify risk factors for developing AVNFH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral shaft fractures treated with antegrade intramedullary nailing at 10 institutions. Among the 703 patients enrolled, 161 patients were excluded leaving 542 patients in the study. Average age was 42.1 years with average follow-up of 26.3 months. Patient characteristics and fracture patterns as well as entry point of femoral nails were identified and the incidence of AVNFH was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to open versus closed physis, open versus closed fractures, and age (<20 versus ≥20 years). Overall incidence of AVNFH was 0.2% (1 of 542): the patient was 15-year-old boy. Of 25 patients with open physis, the incidence of AVNFH was 4%, whereas none of 517 patients with closed physis developed AVNFH (P < 0.001). The incidence of AVNFH in patients aged < 20 versus ≥20 years was 1.1% (1 of 93) and 0.0% (0 of 449), respectively (P = 0.172), which meant that the incidence of AVNFH was 0% in adult with femur shaft fracture. Of 61 patients with open fractures, the incidence of AVNFH was 0%. The number of cases with entry point at the trochanteric fossa or tip of the greater trochanter (GT) was 324 and 218, respectively, and the incidence of AVNFH was 0.3% and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.412). In patients aged ≥20 years with isolated femoral shaft fracture, there was no case of AVNFH following antegrade intramedullary nailing regardless of the entry point. Therefore, our findings suggest that the risk of AVNFH following antegrade femoral nailing is extremely low in adult patients. PMID:26844518

  4. Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures: An overlooked association

    Daffner, R.H.; Riemer, B.L.; Butterfield, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 304 patients with injuries to the femoral shaft and ipsilateral hip presented between 1984 and 1990. Some 253 of them suffered fractures of the femoral shaft and dislocated hips or fractures of the acetabulum, and 51 of these sustained fractures of the femoral shaft and neck or trochanteric region. All of the trochanteric injuries were demonstrated on the initial radiographs. However, in 11 of the patients with combined femoral shaft and neck fractures, the diagnosis was delayed by as much as 4 weeks. This delay related to the fact that these fractures tended not to separate in the initial evaluation period and that there was external rotation of the proximal femoral fragment due to the femoral shaft fracture. (orig./GDG)

  5. Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures: An overlooked association

    Daffner, R.H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (USA) Medical Coll. of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Riemer, B.L.; Butterfield, S.L. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (USA) Medical Coll. of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A total of 304 patients with injuries to the femoral shaft and ipsilateral hip presented between 1984 and 1990. Some 253 of them suffered fractures of the femoral shaft and dislocated hips or fractures of the acetabulum, and 51 of these sustained fractures of the femoral shaft and neck or trochanteric region. All of the trochanteric injuries were demonstrated on the initial radiographs. However, in 11 of the patients with combined femoral shaft and neck fractures, the diagnosis was delayed by as much as 4 weeks. This delay related to the fact that these fractures tended not to separate in the initial evaluation period and that there was external rotation of the proximal femoral fragment due to the femoral shaft fracture. (orig./GDG).

  6. MR evaluation of femoral neck version and tibial torsion

    Koenig, James Karl; Dwek, Jerry R. [University of California, San Diego, Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Pring, Maya E. [Rady Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Abnormalities of femoral neck version have been associated with a number of hip abnormalities in children, including slipped capital femoral epiphysis, proximal femoral focal deficiency, coxa vara, a deep acetabulum and, rarely, developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthopedic surgeons also are interested in quantifying the femoral neck anteversion or retroversion in children especially to plan derotational osteotomies. Historically, the angle of femoral version and tibial torsion has been measured with the use of radiography and later by CT. Both methods carry with them the risks associated with ionizing radiation. Techniques that utilize MR are used less often because of the associated lengthy imaging times. This article describes a technique using MRI to determine femoral neck version and tibial torsion with total scan times of approximately 10 min. (orig.)

  7. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  8. Delayed presentation of popliteal artery transection following undisplaced lateral condyle fracture of tibia

    Mohit Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature suggests that vascular damage occurring with orthopedic injury of the lower extremity is rare and uncommon. We present a case of a young adult male who presented to the emergency room with a history of road traffic accident with complaints of pain in the right ankle diagnosed as medial malleolus fracture and pain in the left knee diagnosed as undisplaced lateral tibial condyle fracture. At the time of presentation, the left leg appeared normal and was stabilized with a knee brace, which on the next day developed severe swelling with absence of distal pulses. Doppler revealed no blood flow distal to popliteal artery with severe soft tissue edema. The patient was posted for emergency basis vascular exploration where popliteal artery was surprisingly found transected and was repaired followed by timely fasciotomy. This case report has also been prepared to stress the importance of secondary survey in patients after high energy trauma as it can prevent the important injuries from being missed.

  9. Photoelastic analysis of bone deformation in the region of the mandibular condyle during mastication.

    Meyer, Christophe; Kahn, Jean-Luc; Boutemi, Philippe; Wilk, Astrid

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to demonstrate the stress patterns arising in the region of the mandibular condyle during mastication. Stress analysis was performed using reflection photoelasticity to demonstrate deformation occurring on the surface of the mandible. The rami of three fresh dentate human mandibles were coated with a shell of photoelastic resin. Using a novel loading device, these mandibles were then subjected to external forces (muscular traction, resultant mandibular forces and intra-articular reaction force) reproducing a unilateral biting task between the first right molars. Deformations were measured from the working side. The trace of isostatic lines from the isoclinic fringes revealed major differences in stress distributions between the three mandibles. These differences were attributed to differences in shape between the three mandibles. Conversely, we consistently found compressive stress patterns along the posterior border of the ramus and tensile stress patterns along the anterior border of the ramus and in the zone situated below the siqmoid notch. These findings suggest that during this particular task, the mandible is subjected to sagittal forces which tend to straighten the mandibular angle. This implies that new concepts are needed for the positioning of osteosynthesis plates in the condylar region, close to the tensile strain lines, as has been recommended also for other parts of the mandible when applying semi-rigid internal fixation. Copyright 2002 European Association for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. Finite element analysis of three patterns of internal fixation of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Aquilina, Peter; Chamoli, Uphar; Parr, William C H; Clausen, Philip D; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The most stable pattern of internal fixation for fractures of the mandibular condyle is a matter for ongoing discussion. In this study we investigated the stability of three commonly used patterns of plate fixation, and constructed finite element models of a simulated mandibular condylar fracture. The completed models were heterogeneous in the distribution of bony material properties, contained about 1.2 million elements, and incorporated simulated jaw-adducting musculature. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. This model was considerably larger and more complex than previous finite element models that have been used to analyse the biomechanical behaviour of differing plating techniques. The use of two parallel 2.0 titanium miniplates gave a more stable configuration with lower mean element stresses and displacements over the use of a single miniplate. In addition, a parallel orientation of two miniplates resulted in lower stresses and displacements than did the use of two miniplates in an offset pattern. The use of two parallel titanium plates resulted in a superior biomechanical result as defined by mean element stresses and relative movement between the fractured fragments in these finite element models. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ankylosis Due Sequel Of Fracture Of The Mandibular Condyle: Case Report

    Alina Alencar Ferreira Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a disorder of craniofacial complex that results in the merger between the condyle and the mandibular fossa, causing partial or complete immobilization of the mandible. The etiological factors are local and systemic inflammation, infection in the area of TMJ, rheumatic diseases and neoplasms, having the trauma as the main etiologic factor. The traumas are responsible for 31% to 98% of cases of ankylosis. The diagnosis is made from the anamnesis and imaging scans (computed tomography pointing to the union of joint components. The treatment of ankylosis is a big challenge due the high rate of recurrence that can be affected by factors such as type of ankylosis, surgical technique, age of the patient, post-operative physiotherapy and systematic follow-up of the patient. The various forms of treatment require careful analysis of type of ankylosis if it is intra or extra-articular, unilateral or bilateral and if it is bony or fibrous, There is no consensus in current literature regarding the best treatment. The aim of this work is to present through the report of a clinical case, a surgical treatment of Unilateral Temporomandibular joint Ankylosis, due to sequel of condylar fracture with re-establishment of the stomatognathic functions in postoperative follow-up.

  12. Pathology of the distal condyles of the third metacarpal and third metatarsal bones of the horse

    Riggs, C.M.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Boyde, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined material from Thoroughbred horses, the majority of which had been in race training, for evidence of pathology in the third metacarpal (McIII) and third metatarsal (MtIII) bones which might be related to the occurrence of distal condylar fractures. Whole bone samples were studied and documented by macrophotography prior to macroradiography and computed tomographic (CT) imaging. Microradiographs were made from 100 microm thick mediolateral sections cut perpendicular to the dorsal and palmar/plantar articular surfaces of distal condylar regions of McIII and MtIII. Blocks were prepared for morphological imaging using the backscattered electron mode of scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Linear defects in mineralised articular cartilage and subchondral bone were found in the palmar/plantar aspects of the condylar grooves adjacent to the sagittal ridge. These were closely related to the pattern of densification of the subchondral bone and were associated with intense focal remodelling of the immediately adjacent and subjacent bone. Parasagittal fractures of the condyles originated in similar defects. A unifying hypothesis for the aetiopathogenesis of these fractures is presented

  13. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively i...

  14. Improved Coulomb-Friction Damper

    Campbell, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Equal damping provided on forward and reverse strokes. Improved damper has springs and wedge rings symmetrically placed on both ends of piston wedge, so friction force same in both directions of travel. Unlike conventional automotive shock absorbers, they resemble on outside, both versions require no viscous liquid and operate over wide temperature range.

  15. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  16. Information frictions and monetary policy

    Matějka, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2012), s. 7-24 ISSN 1802-792X Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : nominal rigidity * information frictions * monetary economics Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.vsfs.cz/periodika/acta-2012-01.pdf

  17. Optimizing Functional Outcomes in Mandibular Condyle Reconstruction With the Free Fibula Flap Using Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing Technology.

    Lee, Z-Hye; Avraham, Tomer; Monaco, Casian; Patel, Ashish A; Hirsch, David L; Levine, Jamie P

    2018-05-01

    Mandibular defects involving the condyle represent a complex reconstructive challenge for restoring proper function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) because it requires precise bone graft alignment for full restoration of joint function. The use of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology can aid in accurate reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects with a vascularized free fibula flap without the need for additional adjuncts. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and functional outcomes after reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects using only a free fibula graft with the help of virtual surgery techniques. A retrospective review was performed to identify all patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with only a free fibula flap without any TMJ adjuncts after a total condylectomy. Three-dimensional modeling software was used to plan and execute reconstruction for all patients. From 2009 through 2014, 14 patients underwent reconstruction of mandibular defects involving the condyle with the aid of virtual surgery technology. The average age was 38.7 years (range, 11 to 77 yr). The average follow-up period was 2.6 years (range, 0.8 to 4.2 yr). Flap survival was 100% (N = 14). All patients reported improved facial symmetry, adequate jaw opening, and normal dental occlusion. In addition, they achieved good functional outcomes, including normal intelligible speech and the tolerance of a regular diet with solid foods. Maximal interincisal opening range for all patients was 25 to 38 mm with no lateral deviation or subjective joint pain. No patient had progressive joint hypomobility or condylar migration. One patient had ankylosis, which required release. TMJ reconstruction poses considerable challenges in bone graft alignment for full restoration of joint function. The use of CAD/CAM technology can aid in accurate reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects with a vascularized free fibula flap through precise

  18. Compartment Syndrome following Open Femoral Fracture with an Isolated Femoral Vein Injury Treated with Acute Repair

    David Walmsley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency and its diagnosis is more difficult in obtunded or insensate patients. We present the case of a 34-year-old woman who sustained a Gustilo-Anderson grade III open midshaft femur fracture with an isolated femoral vein injury treated with direct repair. She developed lower leg compartment syndrome at 48 hours postoperatively, necessitating fasciotomies. She was subsequently found to have a DVT in her femoral vein at the level of the repair and was started on therapeutic anticoagulation. This case highlights the importance of recognition of isolated venous injuries in a trauma setting as a risk factor for developing compartment syndrome.

  19. Delayed appearance of hypaesthesia and paralysis after femoral nerve block

    Stefan Landgraeber; Thomas Albrecht; Ulrich Reischuck; Marius von Knoch

    2012-01-01

    We report on a female patient who underwent an arthroscopy of the right knee and was given a continuous femoral nerve block catheter. The postoperative course was initially unremarkable, but when postoperative mobilisation was commenced, 18 hours after removal of the catheter, the patient noticed paralysis and hypaesthesia. Examination confirmed the diagnosis of femoral nerve dysfunction. Colour duplex sonography of the femoral artery and computed tomography of the lumbar spine and pelvis yie...

  20. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  1. Differences between the chewing and non-chewing sides of the mandibular first molars and condyles in the closing phase during chewing in normal subjects.

    Tomonari, Hiroshi; Kwon, Sangho; Kuninori, Takaharu; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess differences between the closing paths of the chewing and non-chewing sides of mandibular first molars and condyles during natural mastication, using standardized model food in healthy subjects. Thirty-two healthy young adults (age: 19-25 years; 22 men, 10 women) with normal occlusion and function chewed on standardized gummy jelly. Using an optoelectric jaw-tracking system with six degrees of freedom, we recorded the path of the mandibular first molars and condyles on both sides for 10 strokes during unilateral chewing. Variables were compared between the chewing side and the non-chewing side of first molars and condyles on frontal, sagittal, and horizontal views during the early-, middle- and late-closing phases. On superior/inferior displacements, the chewing side first molar and condyle were positioned superior to those on the non-chewing side during the early- and middle-closing phases. Conversely, the first molar and condyle on the non-chewing side were positioned significantly superior to those on the chewing side during the late-closing phase. On anterior/posterior displacements, the chewing side mandibular first molar and condyle were positioned significantly posterior to those on the non-chewing side throughout all closing phases. Our results showed the differences between the mandibular first molars and condyles on both sides with respect to masticatory path during natural chewing of a model food. These differences can be useful for informing initial diagnostic tests for impaired masticatory function in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative study of the prognosis of an extracorporeal reduction and a closed treatment in mandibular condyle head and/or neck fractures.

    Park, Jung-Min; Jang, Yong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Gon; Park, Young-Wook; Rotaru, Horatiu; Baciut, Grigore; Hurubeanu, Lucia

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was a comparison of the prognosis between an extracorporeal reduction technique and closed treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture. The relationship between condylar resorption and several clinical variables was also studied. Seventy-one patients who had a mandibular condyle fracture took part in this study. Thirty-five patients (female: 7, male: 28, age: 30.46 ± 14.27 years) were treated by extracorporeal reduction, and 36 patients (male: 24, female: 12, age: 24.28 ± 9.99 years) were treated using a closed treatment. The presence of complications such as condylar resorption, malocclusion, nerve disorder, and disc displacement was evaluated with panoramic radiographs and clinical examinations 12 months after treatment. The relationships between the complications and other clinical variables were evaluated statistically. The anatomic site and fracture type were closely related to condyle resorption in the bivariate analysis. Condylar head fractures showed significantly higher condyle resorption than condylar neck fractures (P = .023). A complex or compound fracture showed significantly higher condyle resorption compared with a simple fracture (P = .006). Patients who had a complex/compound fracture were 34.366 times more likely to have condyle resorption compared with those who had a simple fracture (P = .002). The patient's age and treatment method were also significant predictors for condyle resorption. Fracture type was the strongest predictor of condylar resorption. Because treatment method and patient age were also related to the prognosis, the optimal treatment for mandibular condylar head and/or neck fractures should be individualized according to the patient's condition. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pressure and Friction Injuries in Primary Care.

    Phillips, Shawn; Seiverling, Elizabeth; Silvis, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Pressure and friction injuries are common throughout the lifespan. A detailed history of the onset and progression of friction and pressure injuries is key to aiding clinicians in determining the underlying mechanism behind the development of the injury. Modifying or removing the forces that are creating pressure or friction is the key to both prevention and healing of these injuries. Proper care of pressure and friction injuries to the skin is important to prevent the development of infection. Patient education on positioning and ergonomics can help to prevent recurrence of pressure and friction injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Friction, Free Axes of Rotation and Entropy

    Alexander Kazachkov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction forces acting on rotators may promote their alignment and therefore eliminate degrees of freedom in their movement. The alignment of rotators by friction force was shown by experiments performed with different spinners, demonstrating how friction generates negentropy in a system of rotators. A gas of rigid rotators influenced by friction force is considered. The orientational negentropy generated by a friction force was estimated with the Sackur-Tetrode equation. The minimal change in total entropy of a system of rotators, corresponding to their eventual alignment, decreases with temperature. The reported effect may be of primary importance for the phase equilibrium and motion of ubiquitous colloidal and granular systems.

  5. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    Kaushik, Abhishek, E-mail: abhiortho27@gmail.co [Department of Orthopedics, 513, Thermal Colony, Sector-22, Faridabad 121005, Haryana (India); Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew [Department of Orthopedics, St Stephen' s Hospital, Tis hazari, Delhi, New Delhi 110054 (India)

    2010-09-15

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  6. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  7. Surgery for pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding femoral head and neck fractures: resection vs. stabilisation.

    Zacherl, Max; Gruber, Gerald; Glehr, Mathias; Ofner-Kopeinig, Petra; Radl, Roman; Greitbauer, Manfred; Vecsei, Vilmos; Windhager, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Pathological femoral head and neck fractures are commonly treated by arthroplasty. Treatment options for the trochanteric region or below are not clearly defined. The purpose of this retrospective, comparative, double-centre study was to analyse survival and influences on outcome according to the surgical technique used to treat pathological proximal femoral fractures, excluding fractures of the femoral head and neck. Fifty-nine patients with 64 fractures were operated up on between 1998 and 2004 in two tertiary referral centres and divided into two groups. One group (S, n = 33) consisted of patients who underwent intramedullary nailing alone, and the other group (R, n = 31) consisted of patients treated by metastatic tissue resection and reconstruction by means of different implants. Median survival was 12.6 months with no difference between groups. Surgical complications were higher in the R group (n = 7) vs. the S group (n = 3), with no statistically significant difference. Patients with surgery-related complications had a higher survival rate (p = 0.049), as did patients with mechanical implant failure (p = 0.01). Survival scoring systems did not correlate with actual survival. Resection of metastases in patients with pathological fractures of the proximal femur, excluding femoral head and neck fractures, has no influence on survival. Patients with long postoperative survival prognosis are at risk of implant-related complications.

  8. Self-designed femoral neck guide pin locator for femoral neck fractures.

    Xia, Shengli; Wang, Ziping; Wang, Minghui; Wu, Zuming; Wang, Xiuhui

    2014-01-01

    Closed reduction and fixation with 3 cannulated screws is a widely accepted surgery for the treatment of femoral neck fractures. However, how to obtain optimal screw placement remains unclear. In the current study, the authors designed a guide pin positioning system for femoral neck fracture cannulated screw fixation and examined its application value by comparing it with freehand guide needle positioning and with general guide pin locator positioning provided by equipment manufacturers. The screw reset rate, screw parallelism, triangle area formed by the link line of the entry point of 3 guide pins, and maximum vertical load bearing of the femoral neck after internal fixation were recorded. As expected, the triangle area was largest in the self-designed positioning group, followed by the general positioning group and the freehand positioning group. The difference among the 3 groups was statistically significant (P.05). The authors’ self-designed guide pin positioning system has the potential to accurately insert cannulated screws in femoral neck fractures and may reduce bone loss and unnecessary radiation.

  9. Biogeometry of femoral neck for implant placement

    Patwa J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Treatment of fracture neck femur with three cannulated cancellous screws in an apex proximal configuration is practised in many parts of the world. Methods : Dimensions of femoral neck at the middle of transcervical neck using CT scan (live neck and vernier caliper (dry cadeveric neck in 20 subjects respectively were measured. Results : Inferior half of the neck is narrower than superior half. Conclusion : Biogeometry of the neck of femur does not accomodate two inferior screws and thus fixation of fracture neck femur with three canulated cancellous screws in an apex distal configuration is recommended.

  10. Superficial femoral artery: current treatment options

    Tepe, Gunnar; Schmehl, Joerg; Heller, Stephan; Wiesinger, Benjamin; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) has been among the least effective of all endovascular procedures in terms of long-term patency. The relatively small vessel lumen, in conjunction with a high plaque burden, slow flow, and a high frequency of primary occlusions, contributes to a considerable rate of acute technical failures. Because of these technical limitations a much effort has been made during the past years. This manuscript should summarize the hopes and limitations of different approaches such as brachytherapy, cutting balloons, stents and stent grafts, drug-eluting stents, and drug-coated balloons. (orig.)

  11. [Treatment of avascular necrosis of femoral head after femoral neck fracture with pedicled iliac bone graft].

    Wang, Benjie; Zhao, Dewei; Guo, Lin; Yang, Lei; Li, Zhigang; Cui, Daping; Tian, Fengde; Liu, Baoyi

    2011-05-01

    To explore the effectiveness of pedicled iliac bone graft transposition for treatment of avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH) after femoral neck fracture. Between June 2002 and December 2006, 22 cases (22 hips, 16 left hips and 6 right hips) of ANFH after femoral neck fracture were treated with iliac bone graft pedicled with ascending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex vessels. There were 18 males and 4 females with an age range from 28 to 48 years (mean, 37.5 years). The time from injury to internal fixation was 2-31 days, and all fractures healed within 12 months after internal fixation. The ANFH was diagnosed at 15-40 months (mean, 22 months) after internal fixation. The ANFH duration was 3-11 months (mean, 8 months). According to Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) staging system, 2 hips were classified as stage IIa, 3 hips as stage IIb, 3 hips as stage IIc, 3 hips as stage IIIa, 7 hips as stage IIIb, and 4 hips as stage IIIc. The preoperative Harris hip score (HHS) was 64.10 +/- 5.95. All incisions healed by first intention and the patients had no complication of lung embolism, sciatic nerve injury, lower limb deep venous thrombosis, and numbness and pain of donor site. All patients were followed up 2.5 to 6.3 years (mean, 4.8 years). The fracture healing time was 8-12 months, and no femoral neck fracture recurred. The HHS was 90.20 +/- 5.35 at last follow-up, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative value (t = -18.447, P = 0.000). The hip function were excellent in 11 hips, good in 10 hips, fair in 1 hip, and the excellent and good rate was 95.5%. Four hips were radiographically progressed in ARCO staging, 18 hips remained stable with a stable rate of 81.8%. Pedicled iliac bone graft transposition is an ideal option for treatment of ANFH after internal fixation of femoral neck fracture for the advantages of femoral head revascularization, sufficient cancellous bone supply, and relatively simple procedure.

  12. Development of friction and wear full-scale testing for TKR prostheses with reliable low cost apparatus

    Suwandi, Agri; Soemardi, Tresna P.; Kiswanto, Gandjar; Kusumaningsih, Widjajalaksmi; I. Gusti Agung I. G., W.

    2018-02-01

    Prostheses products must undergo simulation and physical testing, before clinical testing. Finite element method is a preliminary simulation for in vivo test. The method visualizes the magnitude of the compressive force and the critical location of the Total Knee Replacement (TKR) prostheses design. In vitro testing is classified as physical testing for prostheses product. The test is conducted to evaluate the potential failure of the product and the characteristics of the prostheses TKR material. Friction and wear testing are part of the in vivo test. Motion of knee joints, which results in the phenomena of extension and deflection in the femoral and tibia insert, is represented by friction and wear testing. Friction and wear tests aim to obtain an approximate lifetime in normal and extreme load patterns as characterized by the shape of the friction surface area. The lifetime estimation requires friction and wear full-scale testing equipments for TKR prostheses products. These are necessary in obtaining initial data on potential product failures and characterizing of the material based on the ASTM F2724-08 standards. Based on the testing result and statistical analysis data, the average wear rate value per year is 2.19 × 10-3 mg/MC, with a 10 % safety limit of volume and 14,400 cycles times, for 15 hours moving nonstop then the prediction of wear life of the component tibia insert is ± 10 years.

  13. Friction and wear in sodium

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  14. Internal friction in irradiated textolite

    Zajkin, Yu.A.; Kozhamkulov, B.A.; Koztaeva, U.P.

    1996-01-01

    Structural relaxation in irradiated textolite of ST and ST-EhTF trade marks presenting pressed material got by method of impregnation of fibreglass by phenole and epoxytriphenole binders relatively. Measuring of temperature dependences of internal friction (TDIF) is carried out in torsional pendulum at oscillation frequency 0.6-1.0 Hz before and after irradiation by stopped gamma-quanta with energy 3 MeV on electron accelerator EhLU-4. α and β peaks, related with segments motion in base and side chains of macromolecular have being observed on TDIF of all textolite. Growth of peaks height after irradiation evident about increase of segments mobility in base chain and about de-freezing of segments in side chains and it could be considered as qualitative measure of radiation destruction rate. Comparison of temperature dependences of internal friction indicates on higher radiation stability of textolite of ST-EhTF trade mark

  15. [Outcome of endoscopically assisted surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures: a retrospective study of 22 patients].

    Prade, V; Seguin, P; Boutet, C; Alix, T

    2014-12-01

    The condylar region is a frequent localization of mandibular fractures; there are various types of management. Mini-invasive endoscopic surgery is an alternative to open reduction. We had as goal to evaluate the outcome of this technique. We performed a monocentric retrospective study of patients consecutively operated for a condylar fracture (type II to V in the Spiessl and Schroll classification) with intraoral route and endoscopic assistance, during 30 months. We assessed the functional and radiological outcomes, and the complications. Twenty-two patients (25 fractures) were included. Seventeen patients (19 fractures) could be followed (mean follow-up: 16.7 months). The mean values were: interincisal opening, 45mm (±8.4); protrusion, 8.3mm (±1.9); ipsilateral excursion of the jaw: 8.6mm (±2); contralateral excursion: 8.7mm (±4). Three routes were used combined with a preauricular approach. The fracture reduction was good for 10 of the 19 fractures and poor for 3. The complications were: 3 cases of infection, 1 case of fixation failure with good consolidation; for combined approaches: 2 cases of temporary facial palsy and 2 cases of Frey syndrome. Endoscopic assistance for the surgical management of the fracture of mandibular condyle is a reliable technique, with a good functional outcome, and a low rate of specific complications, especially for facial nerve lesion or esthetic outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Consensus or controversy? The classification and treatment decision-making by 491 maxillofacial surgeons from around the world in three cases of a unilateral mandibular condyle fracture.

    Kommers, Sofie C; Boffano, Paolo; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-12-01

    Many studies are available in the literature on both classification and treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures. To date however, controversy regarding the best treatment for unilateral mandibular condyle fractures remains. In this study, an attempt was made to quantify the level of agreement between a sample of maxillofacial surgeons worldwide, on the classification and treatment decisions in three different unilateral mandibular condyle fracture cases. In total, 491 of 3044 participants responded. In all three mandibular condyle fracture cases, a fairly high level of disagreement was found. Only in the case of a subcondylar fracture, assuming dysocclusion was present, more than 81% of surgeons agreed that the best treatment would be open reduction and internal fixation. Based on the study results, there is considerable variation among surgeons worldwide with regard to treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fracture. 3D imaging in higher fractures tends to lead to more invasive treatment decisions. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  18. Friction of elastomer-on-glass system and direct observation of its frictional interface

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Sugiura, Jun-ichi; Hirano, Motohisa; Nitta, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    We performed a study on the static friction of PDMS elastomers with well-defined surface topography sliding over glass. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of friction force and direct observations of frictional interface has been developed. The static friction force was nearly proportional to normal load. The static friction force was independent of stick time. The simultaneous measurements revealed that the static friction force was proportional to the total area of contact. The coefficient was nearly independent of the surface topography of PDMS elastomers

  19. Comparison of Radial Access, Guided Femoral Access, and Non-Guided Femoral Access Among Women Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Koshy, Linda M; Aberle, Laura H; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Hess, Connie N; Mazzaferri, Ernest; Jolly, Sanjit S; Jacobs, Alice; Gibson, C Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Gilchrist, Ian C; Rao, Sunil V

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association between radial access, guided femoral access, and non-guided femoral access on postprocedural bleeding and vascular complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Bleeding events and major vascular complications after PCI are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and cost. While the radial approach has been shown to be superior to the femoral approach in reducing bleeding and vascular complications, whether the use of micropuncture, fluoroscopy, or ultrasound mitigates these differences is unknown. We conducted a post hoc analysis of women in the SAFE-PCI for Women trial who underwent PCI and had the access method identified (n = 643). The primary endpoint of postprocedure bleeding or vascular complications occurring within 72 hours or at discharge was adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee and was compared based on three categories of access technique: radial, guided femoral (fluoroscopy, micropuncture, ultrasound), or non-guided femoral (none of the aforementioned). Differences between the groups were determined using multivariate logistic regression using radial access as the reference. Of the PCI population, 330 underwent radial access, 228 underwent guided femoral access, and 85 underwent non-guided femoral access. There was a statistically significant lower incidence of the primary endpoint with radial access vs non-guided femoral access; however, there was no significant difference between radial approach and femoral access guided by fluoroscopy, micropuncture, or ultrasound. This post hoc analysis demonstrates that while radial access is safer than non-guided femoral access, guided femoral access appears to be associated with similar bleeding events or vascular complications as radial access.

  20. Current indications for open Kuntscher nailing of femoral shaft ...

    Current indications for open Kuntscher nailing of femoral shaft fractures. A S Bajwa FCS(SA)ORTH. E Schnaid FCS(SA)ORTH. M E B Sweet MD PhD(rned). University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Key Words: Kuntscher nail, intramedullary nail, femoral fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with.

  1. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient ...

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical ...

  2. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A modern treatment protocol

    Slavković Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of a patient with slipped capital femoral epiphysis begins with an early diagnosis and accurate classification. On the basis of symptom duration, clinical findings and radiographs, slipped capital femoral epiphysis is classified as pre-slip, acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic. The long-term outcome of slipped capital femoral epiphysis is directly related to severity and the presence or absence of avascular necrosis and/or chondrolysis. Therefore, the first priority in the treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis is to avoid complications while securing the epiphysis from further slippage. Medical treatment of patients with acute and acute-on-chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis, as well as those presented in pre-slip stage, is the safest, although time-consuming. Manipulations, especially forced and repeated, are not recommended due to higher avascular necrosis risk. The use of intraoperative fluoroscopy to assist in the placement of internal fixation devices has markedly increased the success of surgical treatment. Controversy remains as to whether the proximal femoral epiphysis in severe, chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis should be realigned by extracapsular osteotomies or just fixed in situ. The management protocol for slipped capital femoral epiphysis depends on the experience of the surgeon, motivation of the patient and technical facilities.

  3. Femoral neck fractures: A prospective assessment of the pattern ...

    OBJECTIVE: To review the pattern of femoral neck fractures, complications and outcome following fixation with Austin-Moore endoprosthesis. METHOD: A two year prospective study in patients who had fracture of the femoral neck based on strict inclusion criteria. All the patients were treated by Austin-Moore ...

  4. Femoral bifurcation with ipsilateral tibia hemimelia: Early outcome of ...

    Hereby, we present a case report of a 2-year-old boy who first presented in our orthopedic clinic as a 12-day-old neonate, with a grossly deformed right lower limb from a combination of complete tibia hemimelia and ipsilateral femoral bifurcation. Excision of femoral exostosis, knee disarticulation and prosthetic fitting gives ...

  5. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency in Ibadan a Developing ...

    The cultural aversion to amputation in our environment makes it difficult to employ that option of treatment. Proximal focal femoral deficiency in Ibadan a developing country's perspective and a review of the literature. Keywords: Proximal focal femoral deficiency , congenital malformations , limb malformations , lower limb ...

  6. [Treatment of femoral neck fracture--preference to internal fixation].

    Minato, Izumi

    2011-03-01

    In the guidelines for the treatment of femoral neck fracture, prosthetic replacement is recommended in displaced one and internal fixation is in undisplaced one. However, in the long view, survived femoral head after internal fixation can be superior to prosthesis which will deteriorate as time goes by. Surgical method should be considered not only by type of fracture but general status of the patient.

  7. The effect of friction in coulombian damper

    Wahad, H. S.; Tudor, A.; Vlase, M.; Cerbu, N.; Subhi, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to analyze the damping phenomenon in a system with variable friction, Stribeck type. Shock absorbers with limit and dry friction, is called coulombian shock-absorbers. The physical damping vibration phenomenon, in equipment, is based on friction between the cushioning gasket and the output regulator of the shock-absorber. Friction between them can be dry, limit, mixture or fluid. The friction is depending on the contact pressure and lubricant presence. It is defined dimensionless form for the Striebeck curve (µ friction coefficient - sliding speed v). The friction may damp a vibratory movement or can maintain it (self-vibration), depending on the µ with v (it can increase / decrease or it can be relative constant). The solutions of differential equation of movement are obtained for some work condition of one damper for automatic washing machine. The friction force can transfer partial or total energy or generates excitation energy in damper. The damping efficiency is defined and is determined analytical for the constant friction coefficient and for the parabolic friction coefficient.

  8. Kinetic Friction of Sport Fabrics on Snow

    Werner Nachbauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available After falls, skiers or snowboarders often slide on the slope and may collide with obstacles. Thus, the skier’s friction on snow is an important factor to reduce incidence and severity of impact injuries. The purpose of this study was to measure snow friction of different fabrics of ski garments with respect to roughness, speed, and contact pressure. Three types of fabrics were investigated: a commercially available ski overall, a smooth downhill racing suit, and a dimpled downhill racing suit. Friction was measured for fabrics taped on a short ski using a linear tribometer. The fabrics’ roughness was determined by focus variation microscopy. Friction coefficients were between 0.19 and 0.48. Roughness, friction coefficient, and friction force were highest for the dimpled race suit. The friction force of the fabrics was higher for the higher contact pressure than for the lower one at all speeds. It was concluded that the main friction mechanism for the fabrics was dry friction. Only the fabric with the roughest surface showed friction coefficients, which were high enough to sufficiently decelerate a sliding skier on beginner and intermediate slopes.

  9. Nano-friction behavior of phosphorene.

    Bai, Lichun; Liu, Bo; Srikanth, Narasimalu; Tian, Yu; Zhou, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Nano-friction of phosphorene plays a significant role in affecting the controllability and efficiency of applying strain engineering to tune its properties. So far, the friction behavior of phosphorene has not been studied. This work studies the friction of single-layer and bilayer phosphorene on an amorphous silicon substrate by sliding a rigid tip. For the single-layer phosphorene, it is found that its friction is highly anisotropic, i.e. the friction is larger along the armchair direction than that along the zigzag direction. Moreover, pre-strain of the phosphorene also exhibits anisotropic effects. The friction increases with the pre-strain along the zigzag direction, but decreases with that along the armchair direction. Furthermore, the strong adhesion between the phosphorene and its substrate increases the friction between the phosphorene and the tip. For bilayer phosphorene, its friction highly depends on its stacking mode, which determines the contact interface with a commensurate or incommensurate pattern. This friction behavior is quite unique and greatly differs from that of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. Detailed analysis reveals that this behavior results from the combination effect of the friction contact area, the potential-energy profile of phosphorene, and its unique elongation.

  10. Exposed versus buried wires for fixation of lateral humeral condyle fractures in children: a comparison of safety and efficacy.

    Chan, Lester Wai Mon; Siow, Hua Ming

    2011-10-01

    Displaced fractures of the lateral condyle of the humerus are usually treated with open reduction and fixation with smooth Kirschner wires. These may be passed through the skin and left exposed or buried subcutaneously. Exposed wires may be removed in the outpatient clinic, whereas buried wires require a formal procedure under anaesthesia. This advantage may be offset if there is a higher rate of complications with exposed wires. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of exposed and buried wires. Retrospective cohort. Children with lateral condyle fractures of the humerus who had undergone surgery were identified from our departmental database. Case records and X-rays of 75 patients were reviewed. Forty-two patients had buried wires and 33 had exposed wires. There were no serious complications in either group. In the exposed wires group, 1 patient had a superficial wound infection that was treated effectively with 1 week of oral antibiotics, while 2 patients had hypergranulation of pin tracts treated with topical silver nitrate. None of the patients showed loss of reduction, deep infection, or any other complications requiring additional procedures. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the buried and exposed groups. We conclude that open reduction and exposed wiring is a safe and effective option for lateral condyle fractures, and recommend a period of 4 weeks of K-wire fixation followed by 2 weeks of backslab immobilisation as adequate for union with minimal risk of infection.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head necrosis

    Narita, Shinya; Asada, Kanji; Yoshida, Kenjiro and others

    1986-06-01

    Ten patients with avascular femoral head necrosis and four normal adults were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relationship between MRI and pathophysiology of three operated-on avascular femoral heads was evaluated. The medullary cavities of the normal femoral heads had a strong signal intensity on the saturation recovery (SR) image due to fat marrow, and the T/sub 1/ relaxation time was 160 +- 11 msec. In avascular femoral head necrosis, the necrotic area had a low signal intensity on the SR image and a prolonged T/sub 1/ relaxation time, while the reactive fibrous area had more prolonged T/sub 1/ relaxation time. For these reasons, MRI was found to show the pathological changes of avascular femoral head necrosis and can be expected to be useful for making early diagnoses and operation planning.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head necrosis

    Narita, Shinya; Asada, Kanji; Yoshida, Kenjiro

    1986-01-01

    Ten patients with avascular femoral head necrosis and four normal adults were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relationship between MRI and pathophysiology of three operated-on avascular femoral heads was evaluated. The medullary cavities of the normal femoral heads had a strong signal intensity on the saturation recovery (SR) image due to fat marrow, and the T 1 relaxation time was 160 ± 11 msec. In avascular femoral head necrosis, the necrotic area had a low signal intensity on the SR image and a prolonged T 1 relaxation time, while the reactive fibrous area had more prolonged T 1 relaxation time. For these reasons, MRI was found to show the pathological changes of avascular femoral head necrosis and can be expected to be useful for making early diagnoses and operation planning. (author)

  13. Outcomes of trochanteric femoral fractures treated with proximal femoral nail: an analysis of 100 consecutive cases

    Korkmaz MF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Fatih Korkmaz,1 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,2 Zeliha Disli,3 Engin Burak Selcuk,4 Mustafa Karakaplan,1 Abdullah Gogus5 1Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Inonu University School of Medicine, Malatya, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Nisantasi University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Malatya Government Hospital, Malatya, Turkey; 4Department of Family Medicine, Inonu University School of Medicine, Malatya, Turkey; 5Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: In this study, we aimed to report the results of a retrospective study carried out at our institute regarding cases of patients who had suffered proximal femoral fractures between January 2002 and February 2007, and who were treated with a proximal femoral nail. Materials and methods: One hundred consecutive cases were included in the study. A case documentation form was used to obtain intraoperative data including age, sex, mechanism of injury, type of fracture according to Association for Osteosynthesis/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF classification and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA physical status classification (ASA grade. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at the time of admission and at the 6th week; subsequent visits were organized on the 3rd month, 6th month, and 12th month, and in patients with longer follow-up and annually postoperatively. The Harris score of hip function was used, and any change in the position of the implants and the progress of the fracture union, which was determined radiologically, was noted. Results: The mean age of the patients was 77.66 years (range: 37–98 years, and the sex distribution was 32 males and 68 females. Seventy-three fractures were reduced by closed means, whereas 27 needed limited open reduction. The mean follow-up time for the study group was 31.3 months (range

  14. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  15. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  16. High temperature internal friction in pure aluminium

    Aboagye, J.K.; Payida, D.S.

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of internal friction of nearly pure aluminium (99.99% aluminium) has been carefully measured as a function of annealing temperature and hence grain size. The results indicate that, provided the frequency and annealing temperature are held constant, the internal friction increases with temperature until some maximum value is attained and then begins to go down as the temperature is further increased. It is also noted that the internal friction decreases with annealing temperature and that annealing time has the same effect as annealing temperature. It is also noted that the internal friction peak is shifted towards higher temperatures as annealing temperature is increased. It is surmised that the grain size or the total grain boundary volume determines the height of the internal friction curve and that the order-disorder transitions at the grain boundaries induced by both entropy and energy gradients give rise to internal friction peaks in polycrystals. (author)

  17. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  18. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  19. Investigation of squeal noise under positive friction characteristics condition provided by friction modifiers

    Liu, Xiaogang; Meehan, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Field application of friction modifiers on the top of rail has been shown to effectively curb squeal and reduce lateral forces, but performance can be variable, according to other relevant research. Up to now, most investigations of friction modifiers were conducted in the field, where it is difficult to control or measure important parameters such as angle of attack, rolling speed, adhesion ratio etc. In the present investigation, the effect of different friction modifiers on the occurrence of squeal was investigated on a rolling contact two disk test rig. In particular, friction-creep curves and squeal sound pressure levels were measured under different rolling speeds and friction modifiers. The results show friction modifiers can eliminate or reduce the negative slope of friction-creep curves, but squeal noise still exists. Theoretical modelling of instantaneous creep behaviours reveals a possible reason why wheel squeal still exists after the application of friction modifiers.

  20. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions.

  1. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  2. Friction & Wear Under Very High Electromagnetic Stress

    Cowan, Richard S; Danyluk, Steven; Moon, Francis; Ford, J. C; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes initial progress toward advancing the fundamental understanding of the friction, wear and mechanics of interfaces subjected to extreme electromagnetic stress, high relative...

  3. The friction cost method: a comment.

    Johannesson, M; Karlsson, G

    1997-04-01

    The friction cost method has been proposed as an alternative to the human-capital approach of estimating indirect costs. We argue that the friction cost method is based on implausible assumptions not supported by neoclassical economic theory. Furthermore consistently applying the friction cost method would mean that the method should also be applied in the estimation of direct costs, which would mean that the costs of health care programmes are substantially decreased. It is concluded that the friction cost method does not seem to be a useful alternative to the human-capital approach in the estimation of indirect costs.

  4. A Simple Device For Measuring Skin Friction

    Gupta A.B

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple device for measuring skin friction in vivo is described. The frictional coefficient of normal Indian skin and the effect of hydration and application of talc and glycerol on the frictional coefficient and also the friction of ichthyotic skin have been determined with its help. The average value of friction of friction of normal India skin at forearm is found to be 0.41 +- 0.08, the hydration raises the value to 0.71 +- 0.11 and the effect of glycerol is also to school it up to 0.70+- 0.05, almost equal to that of water. The effect of talc however is opposite and its application lowers the friction to 0.21+-0.07. The mean coeff of friction for ichthyotic skin is found to be 0.21+- 0.0.5, which closely agrees with talc-treated normal skin. A good positive correlation (p<0.01 between friction and sebum level at skin site, with r = 0.64, has been observed.

  5. Servo Reduces Friction In Flexure Bearing

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Proposed servocontrol device reduces such resistive torques as stiction, friction, ripple, and cogging in flexure bearing described in LAR-14348, "Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction". Reduces frictional "bump" torque encountered when bearing ball runs into buildup of grease on bearing race. Also used as cable follower to reduce torque caused by cable and hoses when they bend because of motion of bearing. New device includes torquer across ball race. Torquer controlled by servo striving to keep flexure at null, removing torque to outer ring. In effect, device is inner control loop reducing friction, but does not control platforms or any outer-control-loop functions.

  6. Outcomes of trochanteric femoral fractures treated with proximal femoral nail: an analysis of 100 consecutive cases.

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Erdem, Mehmet Nuri; Disli, Zeliha; Selcuk, Engin Burak; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Gogus, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to report the results of a retrospective study carried out at our institute regarding cases of patients who had suffered proximal femoral fractures between January 2002 and February 2007, and who were treated with a proximal femoral nail. One hundred consecutive cases were included in the study. A case documentation form was used to obtain intraoperative data including age, sex, mechanism of injury, type of fracture according to Association for Osteosynthesis/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF) classification and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) physical status classification (ASA grade). Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at the time of admission and at the 6th week; subsequent visits were organized on the 3rd month, 6th month, and 12th month, and in patients with longer follow-up and annually postoperatively. The Harris score of hip function was used, and any change in the position of the implants and the progress of the fracture union, which was determined radiologically, was noted. The mean age of the patients was 77.66 years (range: 37-98 years), and the sex distribution was 32 males and 68 females. Seventy-three fractures were reduced by closed means, whereas 27 needed limited open reduction. The mean follow-up time for the study group was 31.3 months (range: 12-75 months). Postoperative radiographs showed a near-anatomical fracture reduction in 78% of patients. The Harris hip score was negatively correlated with the ASA score and patient age. No cases of implant failure were observed. Three patients died before discharge (one due to pulmonary embolism, two due to cardiac arrest), and five patients died due to unrelated medical conditions within the first 3 months of the follow-up. Our study showed that proximal femoral nail is a reliable fixation with good fracture union, and it is not associated with major complications in any type of trochanteric femoral fracture.

  7. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture.

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-05-18

    The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. We evaluated the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with the use of contemporary techniques for femoral neck fracture fixation. We then sought to determine what potential risk factors influenced the development of avascular necrosis.Between 1990 and 2005, one hundred sixty-three intracapsular femoral neck fractures in 163 patients were treated with internal fixation at our level-I trauma center. All patients were monitored until conversion to total hip arthroplasty or for a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Ten patients (10 hips) died and 7 patients (7 hips) were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 hips) had a mean 5.2 years of follow-up (range, 3 months to 17 years). The incidence of avascular necrosis was 25.3% (37 hips). The average time to diagnosis of avascular necrosis was 18.8 months (range, 3-47 months). Patient sex, age, interval from injury to surgery, and mechanism of injury were statistically not associated with the development of avascular necrosis. The quality of fracture reduction, adequacy of fixation, degree of displacement, and comminution of the posterior cortex were significantly associated. After we controlled for patient and radiographic characteristics, multivariate analyses indicated that the important predictors for avascular necrosis are poor reduction (odds ratio=13.889) and initial displacement of the fracture (odds ratio=4.693). Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. "A" shape plate for open rigid internal fixation of mandible condyle neck fracture.

    Kozakiewicz, Marcin; Swiniarski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of the fracture is crucial for proper outcome of the treatment. The stability of reduction is closed connected to the method of its fixation. The topic of condylar fracture osteosynthesis still remains highly controversial and challenging. That is why authors decided to propose novel design of the fixating plate and the example of its application. The aim of this study was to present A-shape plate dedicated to rigid fixation of mandible condyle neck fracture. A-shape condylar plate (ACP) design is prepared of 1.0 mm thick titanium alloy (grade 5) sheet: posterior and anterior bars are reinforced by widening to 2.5 mm and anatomically curved along the compression and traction lines in ramus and condylar neck. Superior three-hole-group has triangular organization and located on the level of condylar head. The inferior extensions of the bars are equipped in three holes located at each of lower tails. Connecting bar (2.0 mm wide) connects the first hole of each lower tails closing upper part of ACP in triangular shape. The connecting bar runs along compression line of condylar neck. Holes in ACP has 2.0 mm diameter for locking or normal screws. Height of ACP is 31 mm. The proposed new type of plate was compared by finite element analysis (FEA) to nowadays manufactured 9-hole trapezoid plate as the most similar device. ACP design was evaluated by finite element analysis (FEA) and later applied in patient affected with high condylar neck fracture complicated by fracture of coronoid process. FEA revealed high strength of ACP and more stabile fixation than trapezoid plate. The result was caused by multipoint fixation at three regions of the plate and reinforced bars supported by semi-horizontal connecting bar. Clinical application of ACP was as versatile as makes possible to simultaneous fixation of high condylar neck and coronoid process fracture. Application of proposed A-shape condylar plate would be possible in all levels of neck fractures and can be use

  9. Analysis of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.; Sponseller, P.D.; Griffin, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    CT with multiplanar reconstruction (CT/MPR) was used to assess 25 adolescents with known or suspected slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). CT/MPR localizes the epiphysis in three planes, establishing its relationship to the acetabulum and the metaphyseal neck. MPR facilitates measurements of head-neck angles, residusal head-neck contact, and relative retrovision. CT/MPR may establish the true age of the epiphyseal failure and can reveal subtle SCFE in the face of normal plain films. Patients often present with confusing histories; clues to the true age of failure include subtle signs of healing, remodeling, or new bone buttressing. Characterization of acute versus chronic conditions influences preoperative planning. Postoperatively, CT/MPR confirms early results and follows epiphyseal fusion and remodelling. It also detects complications, such as pin or graft migration avascular necrosis (AVN), or chondrolysis

  10. Characterization of friction and wear behavior of friction modifiers used in wheel-rail contacts

    Oomen, M. A.; Bosman, R.; Lugt, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Reliable traction between wheel and rail is an important issue in the railway industry. To reduce variations in the coefficient of friction, so-called “friction modifiers” (carrier with particles) are used. Twin-disk tests were done with three commercial friction modifiers, based on different

  11. Friction-induced Vibrations in an Experimental Drill-string System for Various Friction Situations

    Mihajlovic, N.; Wouw, van de N.; Hendriks, M.P.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2005-01-01

    Friction-induced limit cycling deteriorates system performance in a wide variety of mechanical systems. In this paper, we study the way in which essential friction characteristics affect the occurrence and nature of friction-induced limit cycling in flexible rotor systems. This study is performed on

  12. On the nature of the static friction, kinetic friction and creep

    Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.; Mancosu, F.

    2003-01-01

    of capillary bridges. However, there is no single value of the static friction coefficient, since it depends upon the initial dwell time and on rate of starting.We argue that the correct basis for the Coulomb friction law, which states that the friction force is proportional to the normal load...

  13. A Physics-Based Rock Friction Constitutive Law: Steady State Friction

    Aharonov, Einat; Scholz, Christopher H.

    2018-02-01

    Experiments measuring friction over a wide range of sliding velocities find that the value of the friction coefficient varies widely: friction is high and behaves according to the rate and state constitutive law during slow sliding, yet markedly weakens as the sliding velocity approaches seismic slip speeds. We introduce a physics-based theory to explain this behavior. Using conventional microphysics of creep, we calculate the velocity and temperature dependence of contact stresses during sliding, including the thermal effects of shear heating. Contacts are assumed to reach a coupled thermal and mechanical steady state, and friction is calculated for steady sliding. Results from theory provide good quantitative agreement with reported experimental results for quartz and granite friction over 11 orders of magnitude in velocity. The new model elucidates the physics of friction and predicts the connection between friction laws to independently determined material parameters. It predicts four frictional regimes as function of slip rate: at slow velocity friction is either velocity strengthening or weakening, depending on material parameters, and follows the rate and state friction law. Differences between surface and volume activation energies are the main control on velocity dependence. At intermediate velocity, for some material parameters, a distinct velocity strengthening regime emerges. At fast sliding, shear heating produces thermal softening of friction. At the fastest sliding, melting causes further weakening. This theory, with its four frictional regimes, fits well previously published experimental results under low temperature and normal stress.

  14. Quantum friction across the vacuum

    Ebelein, C.

    1998-01-01

    Friction is so ubiquitous that it seems to be almost trivially familiar. The rubbing of two solid surfaces is opposed by a resistance and accompanied by the production of heat. Engineers still dream of perfectly smooth surfaces that can be moved against each other without any friction. However, this dream has now been shattered by John Pendry of Imperial College, London, who has published a theory that shows that even two perfectly smooth surfaces can experience an appreciable friction when moved relative to each other (J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 1997 9 10301-10320). Moreover, the two surfaces he considers are not even in contact but separated by a gap a lattice constant or so wide. The explanation of this lies in what Pendry calls the shearing of the vacuum in the gap. In quantum physics the vacuum is not just empty nothingness; it is full of virtually everything. The vacuum abounds with virtual photons. These zero-point fluctuations cannot normally be seen, but they give the vacuum a structure that manifests itself in a variety of effects (for example, the Casimir effect). A more subtle, yet more familiar, manifestation of these zero-point fluctuations is the van der Waals force. The effect described by Pendry can be understood as a van der Waals interaction between two infinite slabs of dielectric material moving relative to each other. Each slab will be aware of the motion of the other because the virtual photons reflected from the moving surface are Doppler-shifted up or down, depending on the direction of the photon wave vector relative to the motion. Pendry shows that this asymmetry in the exchange of virtual photons can lead to an appreciable effect for materials of reasonably strong dispersion. (author)

  15. Femoral neck buttressing: a radiographic and histologic analysis

    Dixon, T.; Benjamin, J.; Lund, P.; Graham, A.; Krupinski, E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To examine the incidence, radiographic and histologic findings of medial femoral neck buttressing in a consecutive group of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty.Design. Biomechanical parameters were evaluated on standard anteroposterior pelvic radiographs of 113 patients prior to hip replacement surgery. Demographic information on all patients was reviewed and histologic evaluation was performed on specimens obtained at the time of surgery.Results. The incidence of medial femoral neck buttressing was found to be 50% in a consecutive series of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. The incidence was slightly higher in women (56% vs 41%). Patients with buttressing had increased neck-shaft angles and smaller femoral neck diameters than were seen in patients without buttressing. Histologic evaluation demonstrated that the buttress resulted from deposition bone by the periosteum on the femoral neck in the absence of any evidence of femoral neck fracture.Conclusion. It would appear that femoral neck buttressing occurs in response to increased joint reactive forces seen at the hip being transmitted through the femoral neck. The increased joint reactive force can be related to the increased neck shaft angle seen in patients with buttressing. (orig.)

  16. Clinical study on 44 cases of femoral hernia

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Sasaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Femoral hernia is a surgical disease that is frequently associated with incarceration and necessitates emergency surgery. However, there are only a few studies referred which have compared emergency and elective surgery for femoral hernias. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed as having femoral hernia between 2005 and 2009 in our institution. The clinical features of emergency repairs were compared with those of elective ones, and diagnostic values of preoperative diagnostic modalities were studied. The mean age of the patients was 73±12 years. Females comprised 68% of the cases, and right femoral hernias comprised 70% of the cases. Incarceration was associated with 66% of the cases (29 patients), and emergency surgery was performed in 52% of the patients (23 patients). Bowel resection was performed in 32% of the cases (14 patients). The mean age, body temperature, white blood cell (WBC) count, and LDH value were higher in the emergency repairs than in the elective one, and most of the hernias were repaired with McVay's procedure. CT scans had a high diagnostic value in detecting femoral hernias (44%) and incarceration (88%). It was confirmed that femoral hernias were frequently associated with incarceration and CT scan has a high diagnostic value in femoral hernias. (author)

  17. Stabilizing Stick-Slip Friction

    Capozza, Rosario; Barel, Itay; Urbakh, Michael; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.; Fineberg, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Even the most regular stick-slip frictional sliding is always stochastic, with irregularity in both the intervals between slip events and the sizes of the associated stress drops. Applying small-amplitude oscillations to the shear force, we show, experimentally and theoretically, that the stick-slip periods synchronize. We further show that this phase locking is related to the inhibition of slow rupture modes which forces a transition to fast rupture, providing a possible mechanism for observed remote triggering of earthquakes. Such manipulation of collective modes may be generally relevant to extended nonlinear systems driven near to criticality.

  18. Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Daniel

    We develop a new directed search model of a frictional labor market with a continuum of heterogenous workers and firms. We estimate two versions of the model - auction and price posting - using Danish data on wages and productivities. Assuming heterogenous workers with no comparative advantage, we...... the job ladder, how the identification of assortative matching is fundamentally different in directed and undirected search models, how our theory accounts for business cycle facts related to inter-temporal changes in job offer distributions, and how our model could also be used to identify...

  19. Is 3D-CT reformation using free software applicable to diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles?

    Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the agreement of computed tomography (CT imaging using 3D reformations (3DR with shaded surface display (SSD and maximum intensity projection (MIP in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and compared findings with multiplanar reformation (MPR images, used as the criterion standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT images of 44 temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 22 patients with RA were used. Images were recorded in DICOM format and assessed using free software (ImageJ. Each sample had its 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP results compared in pairs with the MPR results. RESULTS: Slight agreement (k = 0.0374 was found in almost all comparisons. The level of agreement showed that 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP yielded a number of false-negative results that was statistically significant when compared with MPR. CONCLUSIONS: 3DR-SSD or 3DR-MIP should only be used as adjuvant techniques to MPR in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles.

  20. Structural variation of the distal condyles of the third metacarpal and third metatarsal bones in the horse

    Riggs, C.M.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Boyde, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined 3-dimensional (3D) distribution of sectors with contrasting density in the equine third metacarpal (McIII) and third metatarsal (MtIII) bones with a view to explaining the aetiology of distal condylar fractures. Macroradiography and computed tomographic (CT) imaging were used in the nondestructive study of bones obtained from horses, most of which were Thoroughbreds in race training. Distal condylar regions of McIII and MtIII were also studied in microradiographs of 100 mu m thick mediolateral sections cut perpendicular to the dorsal and palmar/plantar articular surfaces. Qualitative and quantitative results from all methods used (radiography, CTand microradiographic stereology) demonstrated densification (sclerosis) of subchondral bone located in the palmar/plantar regions of the medial and lateral condyles of both McIII and MtIII, Substantial density gradients between the denser condyles and the subchondral bone of the sagittal groove were shown to equate with anatomical differences in loading intensity during locomotion. It is hypothesised that such differences in bone density results in stress concentration at the palmar/plantar aspect of the condylar grooves, which may predispose to fracture

  1. Recovery of mouth-opening after closed treatment of a fracture of the mandibular condyle: a longitudinal study.

    Niezen, E T; Stuive, I; Post, W J; Bos, R R M; Dijkstra, P U

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analyse which characteristics might influence recovery. We measured mouth opening in 142 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (14) years, 96 of whom were male) during follow-up at 3, 6, 13, 26, and 52 weeks after the injury. Fractures were assessed on radiographs. Data were analysed using a multilevel analysis. Half the fractures were of the low condylar neck (n=71). Thirty-seven patients had bilateral condylar fractures, 29 had dislocated fractures, and in 80 the fracture was displaced. One or more additional mandibular fractures were present in 68. During follow-up mean (SD) mouth opening increased to: 33.6 (9.6) at 3 weeks, 40.1 (10.0) at 6 weeks, 45.1 (9.6) at 13 weeks, 49.8 (9.5) at 26 weeks, and 52.6 (7.5) at 52 weeks. Older age, female sex, displaced fracture, bilateral fractures, additional mandibular fractures, and the interaction between follow-up time and additional mandibular fractures, were predictors of a less favourable recovery of mouth opening. Clinicians can use the results of this study to predict recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle at first consultation. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial.

    van den Bergh, B; Blankestijn, J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-06-01

    A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of IMFS with the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The study population consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 31.8 years). Twenty-four (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group. Twenty-six (52%) patients were assigned to the arch bars group. In total 188 IMF-screws were used (5-12 screws per patient, mean 7.83 screws per patient). All pain scores were lower in the IMFS group. Three patients developed a malocclusion (IFMS-group: one patient, arch bars-group: two patients). Mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the IMFS group (59 vs. 126 min; pfractured on insertion (0.53%), one (0.53%) screw was inserted into a root. Six (3.2%) screws loosened spontaneously in four patients. Mucosal disturbances were seen in 22 patients, equally divided over both groups. Considering the advantages and the disadvantages of IMFS, and observing the results of this study, the authors conclude that IMFS provide a superior method for IMF. IMFS are safer for the patients and surgeons. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development plates for stable internal fixation: Study of mechanical resistance in simulated fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Celegatti Filho, Tóride Sebastião; Rodrigues, Danillo Costa; Lauria, Andrezza; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes; Consani, Simonides

    2015-01-01

    To develop Y-shaped plates with different thicknesses to be used in simulated fractures of the mandibular condyle. Ten plates were developed in Y shape, containing eight holes, and 30 synthetic polyurethane mandible replicas were developed for the study. The load test was performed on an Instron Model 4411 universal testing machine, applying load in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior positions on the head of the condyle. Two-way ANOVA with Tukey testing with a 5% significance level was used. It was observed that when the load was applied in the medial-lateral plate of greater thickness (1.5 mm), it gave the highest strength, while in the anteroposterior direction, the plate with the highest resistance was of the lesser thickness (0.6 mm). A plate with a thickness of 1.5 mm was the one with the highest average value for all displacements. In the anteroposterior direction, the highest values of resistance were seen in the displacement of 15 mm. After comparing the values of the biomechanical testing found in the scientific literature, it is suggested that the use of Y plates are suitable for use in subcondylar fractures within the limitations of the study. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Closed reduction of displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction.

    Kim, J H; Nam, D H

    2015-10-01

    Most surgeons agree that closed treatment provides the best results for condylar fractures in children. Nevertheless, treatment of the paediatric mandibular condyle fracture that is severely displaced or dislocated is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes following the treatment of displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction. This procedure can strengthen the advantage of closed reduction and make up for the shortcomings of open reduction. From March 1, 2005 to December 25, 2011, 11 children aged between 4 and 12 years with displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures were treated using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction under portable C-arm fluoroscopy. All patients had unilateral displaced or dislocated condylar fractures. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 42 months (mean 29.3 months). Normal occlusion and pain-free function of the temporomandibular joint, without deviation or limitation of jaw opening, was achieved in all patients. This closed reduction technique in displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children offers a reliable solution in preventing the unfavourable sequelae of closed treatment and the open technique, such as altered morphology, functional disturbances, and facial nerve damage. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle associated with panfacial fracture: a case report and literature review.

    Amaral, Márcio Bruno; Bueno, Sebastião Cristian; Silva, Alice Araújo Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2011-06-01

    Superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle (SDIMC) is rare. This case report focuses on a 15-year-old teenager who was involved in a motor vehicle accident as well a literature review regarding the SDIMC. Clinical examination demonstrated a diffuse edema in the midfacial area and a left lateral deflection of the mandible, including an open bite and a crepitation in the symphyseal region. Three-dimensional computed tomography scans were taken, which presented a superolateral dislocation of the left mandibular condyle as well as panfacial fracture. The patient was set in intermaxillary fixation for 2 weeks and underwent subsequent active jaw physiotherapy, the evaluation of which presented satisfactory results. This case study also presents a literature review, which demonstrated 21 well-documented cases of SDIMC. The patients' mean age was of 29 years. The male gender proved to be more prevalent, with road traffic collisions representing the most common form of accident. Type II, with unilateral dislocation, proved to be the most common. The mean reduction time was 7 days. The open methods were the most commonly used reduction methods. Mandible fracture was associated with dislocation in 82% of the cases, with other facial fractures appearing in only 23% of the cases. Patient follow up presented satisfactory results in 59% of the cases. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Treatment of the femoral neck peudoarthrosis in childhood: Case report

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Femoral neck fractures in children and adolescents are rare. However, their complications are frequent - avascular necrosis, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis, premature physeal closure with consequent growth disturbance and coxa vara deformity. Case Outline. A 9.5­year­old boy was injured in a car accident, and femoral neck fracture was diagnosed. Prior to admission at our hospital he was surgically treated several times. He was admitted at our hospital eight months following the accident. On the X­ray transcervical pseudoarthrosis of the femoral neck was found, as well as coxa vara deformity and metaphyseal avascular necrosis. He was operated at our hospital; all previously placed ostefixation material was removed, valgus osteotomy of 30 degrees was done as well as additional local osteoplasty using the commercial osteoindactive agent (Osteovit®. Postoperatively, we applied skin traction, bed rest and physical therapy. At the final follow­up, the patient was recovered completely. He is now painless, the legs are of equal length, range of movements in the left hip is full, life activity is normal. The X­ray shows that the femoral neck pseudoarthrosis is fully healed. Conclusion. This case is presented in order to encourage other colleagues to challenge the problematic situation such as this one. Also, we would like to remind them what one should think about and what should be taken into consideration in the primary treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Valgus femoral osteotomy, as a part of the primary treatment of femoral neck fracture in children (identically as in the adults can prevent the occurrence of femoral neck pseudoarthrosis.

  7. Ipsilateral femoral shaft and vertical patella fracture: a case report

    Ozkan, Korhan; Eceviz, Engin; Sahin, Adem; Ugutmen, Ender

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A femoral shaft fracture with an ipsilateral patella fracture has been, to our knowledge, given only cursory attention in English-speaking literature. Case presentation A 15 year old male patient had hitten by a car to his motorcycle came to emergency room and he had been operated for his femoral shaft freacture and vertical patellar fracture which was iniatally missed. Conclusion To us it is vital to obtain CT scan of the patient’s knee if there is an ipsilateral femoral fracture with an ipsilateral knee effusion and a punction which reveals hematoma even in the absence of a fracture line seen in AP and lateral projections. PMID:19829933

  8. Aneurysm of the superficial femoral artery in an infant

    Watanabe, M.; Komuro, H.; Matoba, K.; Kaneko, M. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    An isolated arterial aneurysm in childhood is extremely rare. We report a 1-year-old girl with an aneurysm of the right superficial femoral artery, presenting as an asymptomatic mass of the thigh. The aneurysm involved the whole superficial femoral artery (9 cm in length), and surgical treatment would have required replacement of the affected artery. Conservative treatment was chosen, influenced by the patient's rapid growth at that time. Non-invasive, 3-D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful as an alternative to conventional angiography for detailed evaluation of the femoral arteries, including the aneurysm. (orig.)

  9. Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm as a complication of angioplasty. How can it be prevented?

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Salam Basheer, Abdul; Sukumaran, Gireesh Gomaty; Padmajan, Sabin; Praveen, Satheesan; Velappan, Praveen; Nair, Bigesh Unnikrishnan; Nair, Sandeep Govindan; Kunjuraman, Usha Kumari; Madthipat, Unnikrishnan; R, Jayadevan

    2013-01-01

    Femoral pseudoaneurysm is a common complication of repeated femoral puncture during cardiac catheterisation. We describe here the development of femoral pseudoaneurysms in a patient with Takayasu's arteritis, which healed in response to conservative treatment, and review the literature on the prevention and treatment of femoral pseudoaneurysm. PMID:27326111

  10. Low-friction nanojoint prototype

    Vlassov, Sergei; Oras, Sven; Antsov, Mikk; Butikova, Jelena; Lõhmus, Rünno; Polyakov, Boris

    2018-05-01

    High surface energy of individual nanostructures leads to high adhesion and static friction that can completely hinder the operation of nanoscale systems with movable parts. For instance, silver or gold nanowires cannot be moved on silicon substrate without plastic deformation. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an operational prototype of a low-friction nanojoint. The movable part of the prototype is made either from a gold or silver nano-pin produced by laser-induced partial melting of silver and gold nanowires resulting in the formation of rounded bulbs on their ends. The nano-pin is then manipulated into the inverted pyramid (i-pyramids) specially etched in a Si wafer. Due to the small contact area, the nano-pin can be repeatedly tilted inside an i-pyramid as a rigid object without noticeable deformation. At the same time in the absence of external force the nanojoint is stable and preserves its position and tilt angle. Experiments are performed inside a scanning electron microscope and are supported by finite element method simulations.

  11. Mathematical models of viscous friction

    Buttà, Paolo; Marchioro, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph we present a review of a number of recent results on the motion of a classical body immersed in an infinitely extended medium and subjected to the action of an external force. We investigate this topic in the framework of mathematical physics by focusing mainly on the class of purely Hamiltonian systems, for which very few results are available. We discuss two cases: when the medium is a gas and when it is a fluid. In the first case, the aim is to obtain microscopic models of viscous friction. In the second, we seek to underline some non-trivial features of the motion. Far from giving a general survey on the subject, which is very rich and complex from both a phenomenological and theoretical point of view, we focus on some fairly simple models that can be studied rigorously, thus providing a first step towards a mathematical description of viscous friction. In some cases, we restrict ourselves to studying the problem at a heuristic level, or we present the main ideas, discussing only some as...

  12. Effect of Process Parameters on Friction Model in Computer Simulation of Linear Friction Welding

    A. Yamileva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction model is important part of a numerical model of linear friction welding. Its selection determines the accuracy of the results. Existing models employ the classical law of Amonton-Coulomb where the friction coefficient is either constant or linearly dependent on a single parameter. Determination of the coefficient of friction is a time consuming process that requires a lot of experiments. So the feasibility of determinating the complex dependence should be assessing by analysis of effect of approximating law for friction model on simulation results.

  13. Velocity Dependence in the Cyclic Friction Arising with Gears

    García Armada, Elena; González de Santos, Pablo; Canudas de Wit, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Recent research on friction in robot joints and transmission systems has considered meshing friction a position-dependent friction component. However, in this paper we show experimental evidence that meshing friction depends highly on joint speed.We identify the meshing friction in the gearboxes of a robotic leg, and we propose a new mathematical model that considers the rate dependency of meshing friction. The resulting model is validated through experimentation. Results...

  14. Friction Coefficient Determination by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-01-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino…

  15. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  16. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet…

  17. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  18. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  19. Friction in textile thermoplastic composites forming

    Akkerman, Remko; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Sachs, Ulrich; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Binetruy, C.; Boussu, F.

    2010-01-01

    A previously developed mesoscopic friction model for glass/PP textile composite laminates during forming is evaluated for glass and carbon/PPS laminates, at higher temperatures and lower viscosities than before. Experiments were performed for tool/ply and ply/ply configurations in a new friction

  20. The role of friction in tow mechanics

    Cornelissen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Friction plays and important role in the processing of fibrous materials: during production of tow materials, during textile manufacturing and during preforming operations for composite moulding processes. One of the poorly understood phenomena in these processes is the dynamic frictional behaviour