WorldWideScience

Sample records for federal plant breeding

  1. Plant Breeding Goes Microbial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Zhong; Jousset, Alexandre

    Plant breeding has traditionally improved traits encoded in the plant genome. Here we propose an alternative framework reaching novel phenotypes by modifying together genomic information and plant-associated microbiota. This concept is made possible by a novel technology that enables the

  2. Ornamental Plant Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Barbosa Silva Botelho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available World’s ornamental plant market, including domestic market of several countries and its exports, is currently evaluated in 107 billion dollars yearly. Such estimate highlights the importance of the sector in the economy of the countries, as well as its important social role, as it represents one of the main activities, which contributes to income and employment. Therefore a well-structured plant breeding program, which is connected with consumers’ demands, is required in order to fulfill these market needs globally. Activities related to pre-breeding, conventional breeding, and breeding by biotechnological techniques constitute the basis for the successful development of new ornamental plant cultivars. Techniques that involve tissue culture, protoplast fusion and genetic engineering greatly aid conventional breeding (germplasm introduction, plant selection and hybridization, aiming the obtention of superior genotypes. Therefore it makes evident, in the literature, the successful employment of genetic breeding, since it aims to develop plants with commercial value that are also competitive with the ones available in the market.

  3. Organic breeding: New trend in plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenji Janoš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic breeding is a new trend in plant breeding aimed at breeding of organic cultivars adapted to conditions and expectations of organic plant production. The best proof for the need of organic cultivars is the existence of interaction between the performances of genotypes with the kind of production (conventional or organic (graph. 1. The adaptation to low-input conditions of organic production by more eddicient uptake and utilization of plant nutrients is especially important for organic cultivars. One of the basic mechanism of weed control in organic production is the competition of organic cultivars and weeds i.e. the enhanced ability of organic cultivars to suppress the weeds. Resistance/tolerance to diseases and pests is among the most important expectations toward the organic cultivars. In comparison with the methods of conventional plant breeding, in case of organic plant breeding limitations exist in choice of methods for creation of variability and selection classified as permitted, conditionally permitted and banned. The use of genetically modified organisms and their derivated along with induced mutations is not permitted in organic production. The use of molecular markers in organic plant breeding is the only permitted modern method of biotechnology. It is not permitted to patent the breeding material of organic plant breeding or the organic cultivars. .

  4. Plant breeding and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of plant breeding is to develop improved crops. Improvements can be made in crop productivity, crop processing and marketing, and/or consumer quality. The process of developing an improved cultivar begins with intercrossing lines with high performance for the traits of interest, th...

  5. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.

    1984-01-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented. (Author)

  6. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  7. Evolution, plant breeding and biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Ceccarelli

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with changes in biodiversity during the course of evolution, plant domestication and plant breeding. It shows than man has had a strong influence on the progressive decrease of biodiversity, unconscious at first and deliberate in modern times. The decrease in biodiversity in the agricultures of the North causes a severe threat to food security and is in contrasts with the conservation of biodiversity which is part of the culture of several populations in the South. The concluding section of the paper shows that man could have guided evolution in a different way and shows an example of participatory plant breeding, a type of breeding which is done in collaboration with farmers and is based on selection for specific adaptation. Even though participatory plant breeding has been practiced for only about 20 years and by relatively few groups, the effects on both biodiversity and crop production are impressive. Eventually the paper shows how participatory plant breeding can be developed into ‘evolutionary plant breeding’ to cope in a dynamic way with climate changes.

  8. Current trends in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalani, B.S.; Rajanaidu, N.

    2000-01-01

    The current world population is 6 billion and it is likely to reach 7 billion in 2010 and 8 billion 2025. Sufficient food must be produced for the ever increasing human population. The available suitable land for intensive agriculture is limited. We have to produce more food from less land, pesticide, labour and water resources. Hence, increase in crop productivity are essential to feed the world in the next century. Plant breeding provides the avenue to increase the food production to feed the growing world population. Development of a cultivar involves (I) Construction of a genetic model (II) creating a gene pool (III) selection among plants and (IV) testing the selected genotypes for adaptation to the biotic and abiotic environments (Frey, 1999). This paper discusses the trends in plant breeding using the oil palm as a model. It covers (i) genetic resources (ii) physiological traits (III) exploitation of genotype x environment interaction (IV) oil palm clones, and (v) biotechnology application. (Author)

  9. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This is the second issue of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter. The Newsletter will inform you about current activities of the FAO/IAEA sub-programme on plant breeding and genetics which is implemented by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture (Vienna) in close collaboration with the Plant Breeding Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory (Seibersdorf)

  10. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This is the first issue of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter. The Newsletter will inform you about current activities of the FAO/IAEA sub-programme on plant breeding and genetics which is implemented by the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture (Vienna) in close collaboration with the Plant Breeding Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory (Seibersdorf)

  11. Mutation breedings in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Hisao

    1984-01-01

    Several methods of obtaining somatic mutant plants by γ-ray irradiation on pieces of tissues as in vitro adventitious bud technique or small cutting methods with repeated pruning are described. 1) The irradiation to the adventitious buds in the small pieces of organ cultured in vitro and to the small cuttings are employed. Culture beds of agar or of Japanese Kanuma soil were used in vitro culture. In these experiments, Japanese Kanuma soil bed in in vitro culture worked well for root development and transplant of the induced mutants. 2) Combination with in vitro culture and repeated pruning technique were used for isolation and fixation of solid somatic mutant from small sectorial mutation induced by irradiation. This method was successful for begonia, chrysanthemum, aberia and winter daphne. 3) These data indicates that most of the induced mutant plants were non-chimeric, while a few others were chimeric. Among the new varieties, ''Gin-Sei'', ''Ryoku-Ha'', ''Big-Cross'', ''Kaede-Iron'', ''Mei-Fu-Hana-Tsukubane-Utsugi'' and ''Daphne-γ-3'' are non-chimeric, and ''Mini-Mini-Iron'' and ''Orange-Iron'' are chimeric. Moreover, these new varieties have remarkably differed in size and in color pattern from original variety. From the experimental results of somatic mutation, it is indicated that plant tissue culture have enormous potential in radiation breeding and in rapid propagation of the somatic mutant. (author)

  12. Managing meiotic recombination in plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Crossover recombination is a crucial process in plant breeding because it allows plant breeders to create novel allele combnations on chromosomes that can be used for breeding superior F1 hybrids. Gaining control over this process, in terms of increasing crossover incidence, altering crossover

  13. Application of Genomic Tools in Plant Breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-de-Castro, A.M.; Vilanova, S.; Cañizares, J.; Pascual, L.; Blanca, J.M.; Díez, M.J.; Prohens, J.; Picó, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic...

  14. Genomic selection in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mark A; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor and major marker effects. Thus, the GEBV may capture more of the genetic variation for the particular trait under selection.

  15. Organic plant breeding and propagation : concepts and strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.

    2002-01-01

    Key-words : crop ideotype, genetic diversity, integrity of plants, intrinsic value, isophenic line mixture varieties, organic plant breeding, organic farming, organic propagation, participatory plant breeding, variety characteristics,

  16. On statistical selection in plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dourleijn, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate goal of plant breeding is the development of new varieties. An important phase in the development process is testing and selecting potential new varieties. The varieties are tested by means of experiments at various sites, (sometimes) in several years. The observations from the

  17. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This third issue of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter highlights forthcoming events including regional (Afra) training course on 'molecular characterization of genetic biodiversity in traditional and neglected crops selected for improvement through mutation techniques' and seminar on 'mutation techniques and biotechnology for tropical and subtropical plant improvement in Asia and Pacific regions'. Status of existing co-ordinated and technical co-operation research projects is also summarized

  18. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo

    2007-06-01

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits

  19. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits.

  20. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This year seems to be very promising for the Plant Breeding and Genetic sub-Programme. At the demand of geneticists, plant breeders, and more recently molecular geneticists for information on released mutant varieties of specific crops, the FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database (MVD) was transferred to the web site and is now available through Internet under the following URL: http://www-mvd.iaea.org. The idea to collect and transfer information on crop varieties developed with the use of mutation techniques to plant breeders ws conceived at almost the same time as the establishment of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section (PBG), Joint FAO/IAEA Division. The first classified list of induced mutant varieties was presented by Sigurbjoernsson at the Pullman Symposium, and published in 1969. Since the first issue of the MBNL (May, 1972) information on newly released mutant varieties was published at the end of each issue under the title 'List of Mutant Varieties'. The full list of 2252 mutant varieties has been published in the Mutation Breeding Review No. 12 (December 2000) to close this period of collecting data on mutant varieties. Such condensed but full information on mutant varieties should help geneticists, molecular biologists and plant breeders to asses the value of mutation techniques in germplasm enhancement, and stimulate the use of induced variation

  1. Application of genomic tools in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Castro, A M; Vilanova, S; Cañizares, J; Pascual, L; Blanca, J M; Díez, M J; Prohens, J; Picó, B

    2012-05-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic information. The analysis of NGS data by means of bioinformatics developments allows discovering new genes and regulatory sequences and their positions, and makes available large collections of molecular markers. Genome-wide expression studies provide breeders with an understanding of the molecular basis of complex traits. Genomic approaches include TILLING and EcoTILLING, which make possible to screen mutant and germplasm collections for allelic variants in target genes. Re-sequencing of genomes is very useful for the genome-wide discovery of markers amenable for high-throughput genotyping platforms, like SSRs and SNPs, or the construction of high density genetic maps. All these tools and resources facilitate studying the genetic diversity, which is important for germplasm management, enhancement and use. Also, they allow the identification of markers linked to genes and QTLs, using a diversity of techniques like bulked segregant analysis (BSA), fine genetic mapping, or association mapping. These new markers are used for marker assisted selection, including marker assisted backcross selection, 'breeding by design', or new strategies, like genomic selection. In conclusion, advances in genomics are providing breeders with new tools and methodologies that allow a great leap forward in plant breeding, including the 'superdomestication' of crops and the genetic dissection and breeding for complex traits.

  2. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    This issue reports on the creation of the Agency's Subprogramme of Sustainable Intensification of Crop Production Systems (E1) through the merger of the Soils and Plant Breeding and Genetics Subprogrammes together with part of the Entomology Subprogramme activities. Implementation of a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Effects of Mutagenic Agents on the DNA Sequence in Plants, and the successful submission of a new CRP proposal on Pyramiding of Mutated Genes Contributing to Crop Quality and Resistance to Stress Affecting Quality were among the major activities of our Subprogramme during the last six months. We actively participated in the International Year of Rice (IYR 2004) events such as the Meeting of the Informal International Working Group on the International Year of Rice (IIWG) and the FAO Rice Conference on Rice in Global Markets and Sustainable Production Systems (Rome, Italy), both in February this year. A lot of work has been concentrated this last semester on the preparation of Programme and Budget for the biennium 2006-2007 and the appraisal of TC proposals for the biennium 2005-2006. The Mutation Breeding Newsletter and the Mutation Breeding Review will merge to become the Mutation Breeding Newsletter and Reviews (MBN and R). Starting at the end of July, the MBN and R will appear on a regular basis

  3. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far

  4. Current status and research of plant space mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Xinmian

    2011-01-01

    Plant space mutation breeding and discussed themechanism of plant space mutagenesis. The variations of organisms were induced by the comprehensive effects of high vacuum, microgravity,incense radiat ion and so on. The application of space mutation breeding and inheritance in specially good grmplasm material in China were well summarized. The prospects of space mutat ion breeding was described. The space mutagenesis will provided a new way for the future breeding. (author)

  5. Ethical distinctions between different kinds of plant breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myskja, B.K.; Schouten, H.J.; Gjerris, Mickey

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses whether there are ethically significant distinctions between different forms of plant breeding. We distinguish different forms of plant breeding according to the kind of technology and degree of human intervention compared to plant reproduction occurring in nature. According...... differences between plant breeding methods. The framework can contribute to an improved dialogue between the scientific community and the wider public by making the scepticism towards GM-technology more intelligible....

  6. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Implementation of a new CRP on Physical mapping technologies for the identification and characterization of mutated genes contributing to crop quality, organization of mutant germplasm database and repository, implementation of new TC projects and activation of work on molecular characterization of Musa putative germplasm as well as sequencing of BAC clones were the major activities of our sub-Programme on Plant Breeding and Genetics during the last six months. A lot of work has been concentrated on organizing a mutant germplasm repository. The first collections of rice and linseed mutants have already arrived and their descriptions have been introduced into the mutated germplasm database. We found this activity especially important to stimulate exchange of crop germplasm among plant breeders. Similarly there is an urgent need to collect mutants of various crops as necessary material for functional genomics and germplasm enhancement. Nevertheless, many crop research institutes are initiating large-scale mutation programmes with the use of their own plant material. To help them in selecting the mutagen, doses and mutation treatment procedure, we published the third issue of Mutation Breeding Newsletter Index of No. 21-44. The Index is also available through our website http://www.iaea.org/programmes/nafa/d2/index.html. The numerous requests for issues of the Mutation Breeding Newsletter already received from various countries indicate the value of this 80-page index for plant breeders and research institutes. We were invited to present the activities, achievements and trends of our sub-Programme at two very important, international meetings: The International Conference on the Status of Plant and Animal Genome Research, known as the Plant and Animal Genome (PAG XI), and The International Congress on 'In the Wake of the Double Helix - From the Green Revolution to the Gene Revolution'. At this last meeting, an initiative was taken to organize the Crop Root Research

  7. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    These last six months, the Plant Breeding and Genetics (PBG) Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division (NAFA/AGE) implemented five Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs) and one Consultants Meeting for a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Molecular tools for quality improvement in vegetatively propagated crops including banana and cassava' (8-11 November 2004, Vienna). Other salient points were the training courses we implemented this semester in the framework of different Technical Cooperation (TC) projects.Details about these activities inside this Newsletter

  8. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    There have been a number of important events related to the activity of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-programme in the past six months. The joint FAO/IAEA RCMs on 'Molecular characterization of mutated genes controlling important traits for seed crop improvement' and 'Mutational analysis of root characters in annual food plants related to plant performance' were held in June, in Krakow, Poland. It was the third RCM of the CRP on crop plant genomics and the second in the CRP on root systems. More than 40 scientists from twenty countries participated in the meeting. Significant progress was achieved in presented projects of diverse areas of both CRPs. Although genomics and root genetics are methodologically among the most rapidly developing disciplines, the participants successfully tried to follow the latest developments. The Consultants Meeting on 'Physical mapping technologies for the identification and characterization of mutated genes contributing to crop quality' was also held in June, in Vienna. Physical mapping technologies provide new tools for the rapid advancement of breeding programs and are highly applicable to neglected crops in developing countries. Furthermore, they open new opportunities for developing modern approaches to plant improvement research. Consultants recommended the organization of a Co-ordinated Research Project dealing with application of these new technologies to breeding programmes with the use of induced mutations for crop improvement. It is expected that the new CRP will be initiated this year. In close collaboration with EU COST 851 'Gametic cells and molecular breeding for crop improvement' project we started with preparation and editing of a book on 'Doubled haploid production in crop plants. A manual'. More than 40 manuscripts were collected, reviewed by a team of EU COST 851 experts and are now in the final editing phase. Similarly, we finished editorial work on publishing the training material from the FAO/IAEA Training

  9. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    There have been a number of important events related to the activity of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-programme in the past six months. The joint FAO/IAEA RCMs on 'Molecular characterization of mutated genes controlling important traits for seed crop improvement' and 'Mutational analysis of root characters in annual food plants related to plant performance' were held in June, in Krakow, Poland. It was the third RCM of the CRP on crop plant genomics and the second in the CRP on root systems. More than 40 scientists from twenty countries participated in the meeting. Significant progress was achieved in presented projects of diverse areas of both CRPs. Although genomics and root genetics are methodologically among the most rapidly developing disciplines, the participants successfully tried to follow the latest developments. The Consultants Meeting on 'Physical mapping technologies for the identification and characterization of mutated genes contributing to crop quality' was also held in June, in Vienna. Physical mapping technologies provide new tools for the rapid advancement of breeding programs and are highly applicable to neglected crops in developing countries. Furthermore, they open new opportunities for developing modern approaches to plant improvement research. Consultants recommended the organization of a Co-ordinated Research Project dealing with application of these new technologies to breeding programmes with the use of induced mutations for crop improvement. It is expected that the new CRP will be initiated this year. In close collaboration with EU COST 851 'Gametic cells and molecular breeding for crop improvement' project we started with preparation and editing of a book on 'Doubled haploid production in crop plants. A manual'. More than 40 manuscripts were collected, reviewed by a team of EU COST 851 experts and are now in the final editing phase. Similarly, we finished editorial work on publishing the training material from the FAO/IAEA Training

  10. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The most important event related to the activity of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-programme in the past six months was the 2nd FAO/IAEA Interregional Training Course on 'Mutant Germplasm Characterization using Molecular Markers' which was held at Seibersdorf, 4-29 November 2002. In addition to basic molecular and marker techniques, which were also a subject of the first training course last year, fluorescence in situ hybridisation methods were included in the teaching and demonstration programme. As we informed you in the last edition of this Newsletter, a laboratory manual was published with detailed protocols on molecular markers techniques entitled 'Mutant germplasm characterization using molecular markers. A Manual'. (IAEA Training Course Series No. 19). (available for free distribution under conditions provided on page 11 of this Newsletter). We have also finished editing a book on 'Doubled haploid production in crop plants. A Manual.' This book was prepared in close collaboration with EU COST 851 activities. Ken Kasha (Canada), Brian Forster (UK) and lwona Szarejko (Poland) helped to edit more than 40 protocols for doubled haploid production in at least 23 crop species. The preparation of this manual reflects our our interest in the development and application of this technology for crop improvement. Two CRPs and numerous Technical Co-operation projects greatly contributed to the development of doubled haploid methods and also to implementation of this technology in crop improvement programmes of many countries. Numerous other important activities have been undertaken by the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-programme during the last 6 months. A consultants meeting on 'Low cost technology in plant tissue culture' was held in Vienna and its results will be summarized in the form of an IAEA-TECDOC which is now in the final stage of preparation. In addition to the implementation of five Co-ordinated Research Projects, nine workshops and national or regional

  11. Periclinal chimera technique: new plant breeding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakpetor, P M; Mohammed, H; Moreti, D; Nassar, N M A

    2017-09-21

    Plant interspecific periclinal chimeras are a mosaic formed by tissues from two species. They are manipulated here as an efficient plant breeding tool for cassava root yields. In this study, plants synthesized from two chimeras, designated as chimera 2 and chimera 4, were characterized morphologically and cytologically to unravel the origin of their tissue layers (L2 and L3). Root yield of the two chimeras was also evaluated. Chimera 2 that was developed from graft union between Manihot fortalezensis (F) as scion and M. esculenta (E) as rootstock and the same in chimera 4 was developed from grafting triploid cassava cultivar (2n = 54) (C) as scion and M. pohlii (P) (2n = 36) as rootstock. A new method of inducing interspecific chimeras without using hormones was also tested in this study. Five combinations between four cassava cultivars on one side and M. fortalezensis and an interspecific hybrid (M. glaziovii x M. esculenta) on the other side were experimented to determine compatibility between the parents. Wild species always gave L2 and L3, independent of being used as rootstock or scion. L3 is responsible for producing pericycle. Thus, its performance was different in each chimera due to specific epigenetic interaction. Of 48 grafts, it was obtained one chimera giving a percentage of 2.1% that is little lower than using hormones but much efficient to use. Chimera induction efficiency in this investigation was the same when using hormones. Thus, our new, less labor, and more cost-effective technique is as much efficient as hormones and is much potential to employ as an effective plant breeding method boosting cassava root yield.

  12. Analysis of Plant Breeding on Hadoop and Spark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangxi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of crop breeding technology is one of the important means of computer-assisted breeding techniques which have huge data, high dimensions, and a lot of unstructured data. We propose a crop breeding data analysis platform on Spark. The platform consists of Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS and cluster based on memory iterative components. With this cluster, we achieve crop breeding large data analysis tasks in parallel through API provided by Spark. By experiments and tests of Indica and Japonica rice traits, plant breeding analysis platform can significantly improve the breeding of big data analysis speed, reducing the workload of concurrent programming.

  13. Alternatives to Chromatography in Plant Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keusgen, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wild plants were taken into cultivation because of special features. Usually, medicinal plants or spices show distinct secondary metabolites combined with a specific pattern of these compounds. Typically, chromatographic methods like gas chromatography (GC or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were applied as standard methods for a meaningful analysis of secondary metabolites. However, these methods are labor and time intensive. In the breeding process, usually numerous single plants have to be analyzed and therefore, high throughput methods are required. In this article, some examples for alternative strategies are given. Besides spectroscopic methods like near infrared (NIR, also biosensoric approaches should be considered. For instance, several enzymes can oxidize or hydrolyze secondary metabolites in dependence of their functional groups. Polyphenols can be determined by laccases. Polyphenols like catechins and flavonoids contribute to the bioactivity of many medicinal plants. Also cysteine sulfoxides, which are typical for Allium species like garlic and onions, can be enzymatically determined with high specificity. Finally, toxic cyanogenic glycosides can be quantified by the enzyme cyanidase.

  14. Breeding business : the future of plant breeding in the light of developments in patent rights and plant breeder's rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.P.; Dons, J.J.M.; Overwalle, van G.; Raven, H.; Arundel, A.; Eaton, D.; Nelis, A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant breeding serves an important public interest. Two intellectual property (IP) systems are relevant for the protection of innovations in this sector: plant breeder's rights and patent rights. Some exemptions play an important role in plant breeding, such as the 'breeder's exemption', which is

  15. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The fifth issue of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter brings information on our activities in the first half of 2000. A new Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Mutational analysis of root characters in annual food plants related to plant performance' was initiated with the first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) held in February 2000 in Vienna. Scientists participating in the RCM presented papers and discussed work plans on the use of mutants for genetic analysis of root system morphology, tolerance to soil stresses and mycorrhizal relationships. Mutated genes responsible for defined root characters will be incorporated to molecular markers based genetic maps by building their root systems to make them more adaptive to particular soil conditions. Preparation for initiation of another CRP on 'Improvement of tropical and subtropical fruit trees through induced mutations and biotechnology' has been completed. We are expecting 14 participants at the first RCM, which will be held in Vienna in September 2000. It is expected that this CRP will make a real breakthrough in application of induced mutations for improvement of fruit trees. In vitro, especially somatic embryogenesis as well as conventional breeding methods will be used in combination with mutation techniques. Significant progress was noted, at the second RCM, on the application of biotechnology and mutation techniques for the improvement of local food crops in LIFCs held in San Jose, Costa Rica, June 2000. The RCM was combined with a workshop on 'In vitro culture techniques for the improvement of vegetatively propagated tropical fruit crops'. The Regional training course on 'New frontiers of developing and handling mutants' was organized under the Technical Cooperation Project on 'Mutational enhancement of genetic diversity in rice' and hosted by the Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China in June 2000. The course focus on current induced mutation

  16. PUBLIC SECTOR PLANT BREEDING IN A PRIVATIZING WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    Thirtle, Colin G.; Srinivasan, Chittur S.; Heisey, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Intellectual property protection, globalization, and pressure on public budgets in many industrialized countries have shifted the balance of plant breeding activity from the public to the private sector. Several economic factors influence the relative shares of public versus private sector plant breeding activity, with varying results over time, over country, and over crop. The private sector, for example, dominates corn breeding throughout the industrialized world, but public and private act...

  17. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    The activities of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-Programme concentrated, during the last six months, on organization of a new Coordinated Research Programmes and numerous training courses. To establish and implement the CRP on Effect of Mutagenic Agents on DNA Sequence in Plants a consultants meeting was held in Vienna, July 2003. As a result is was possible to implement this CRP with the participation of 12 institutes from nine.countries. Similarly, another consultant meeting was held in November to initiate a new CRP on Identification and pyramiding of genes responsible for crop quality characters and resistance to quality affecting stresses. It is expected that the CRP will be implemented in the beginning of 2004. Rapid development of molecular markers technology generated strong interest in identification and characterization of mutated genes. To meet this expectation numerous training courses and workshops were organized in the second half of the year, mainly related to regional Technical Cooperation projects implemented in Asia and Africa. Among them were training courses on: Application of induced mutations and biotechnology for crop improvement, organized by Horticultural Crop Research and Development Institute in Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Selection methods for low phytic acid mutants in rice, Hangzhou, China; Methodology for multi-location trials and selection of mutants tolerant to abiotic stresses, ICRISAT, India standardization of crop breeding methods for the improvement of drought tolerance, Lusaka, Zambia; First workshop on Improvement of plant salt tolerance for sustainable food and feed production in saline lands, Bangkok, Thailand. It was also possible to organize the 3rd Interregional Training Course on Mutant Germplasm Characterization using Molecular Markers. Twenty participants from all regions of the world participated in this event organized as usually in Seibersdorf, Austria. The last two years we have been very much involved in

  18. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The activities of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub-Programme concentrated, during the last six months, on organization of a new Coordinated Research Programmes and numerous training courses. To establish and implement the CRP on Effect of Mutagenic Agents on DNA Sequence in Plants a consultants meeting was held in Vienna, July 2003. As a result is was possible to implement this CRP with the participation of 12 institutes from nine.countries. Similarly, another consultant meeting was held in November to initiate a new CRP on Identification and pyramiding of genes responsible for crop quality characters and resistance to quality affecting stresses. It is expected that the CRP will be implemented in the beginning of 2004. Rapid development of molecular markers technology generated strong interest in identification and characterization of mutated genes. To meet this expectation numerous training courses and workshops were organized in the second half of the year, mainly related to regional Technical Cooperation projects implemented in Asia and Africa. Among them were training courses on: Application of induced mutations and biotechnology for crop improvement, organized by Horticultural Crop Research and Development Institute in Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Selection methods for low phytic acid mutants in rice, Hangzhou, China; Methodology for multi-location trials and selection of mutants tolerant to abiotic stresses, ICRISAT, India standardization of crop breeding methods for the improvement of drought tolerance, Lusaka, Zambia; First workshop on Improvement of plant salt tolerance for sustainable food and feed production in saline lands, Bangkok, Thailand. It was also possible to organize the 3rd Interregional Training Course on Mutant Germplasm Characterization using Molecular Markers. Twenty participants from all regions of the world participated in this event organized as usually in Seibersdorf, Austria. The last two years we have been very much involved in

  19. Plant mutation breeding for crop improvement. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the final two sessions of the FAO/IAEA Symposium on Plant Mutation Breeding for Crop Improvement, focussing on mutation breeding with particular objectives and the methodology of mutation breeding. The individual contributions are indexed separately. Although a wide variety of topics is included, the emphasis is on the use of (mainly gamma) radiation to induce economically useful mutants in cereals and legumes. The results of many conventional plant breeding programs are also presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Plant mutation breeding for crop improvement. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the first two sessions of the FAO/IAEA Symposium on Plant Mutation Breeding for Crop Improvement, focussing on mutation breeding in particular countries and crop-specific mutation breeding. The individual contributions are indexed separately. Although a wide variety of topics is included, the emphasis is on the use of (mainly gamma) radiation to induce economically useful mutants in cereals and legumes. The results of many conventional plant breeding programs are also presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Plant breeding: Induced mutation technology for crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, F.J.; Brunner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Plant breeding requires genetic variation of useful traits for crop improvement, but the desired variation is often lacking. Mutagenic agents, such as radiation and certain chemicals, can be used to induce mutations and generate genetic variations from which desirable mutants may be selected. After a brief summary of the methods currently employed in plant breeding, especially those inducing genetic engineering, this article describes the activities of the Plant Breeding Unit of the IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf, summarizing the research and development areas currently being pursued. The banana plant is chosen to exemplify the Laboratories' research

  2. New biotechnology enhances the application of cisgenesis in plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei eHou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cisgenesis is genetic modification to transfer beneficial alleles from crossable species into a recipient plant. The donor genes transferred by cisgenesis are the same as those used in traditional breeding. It can avoid linkage drag, enhance the use of existing gene alleles. This approach combines traditional breeding techniques with modern biotechnology and dramatically speeds up the breeding process. This allows plant genomes to be modified while remaining plants within the gene pool. Therefore, cisgenic plants should not be assessed as transgenics for environmental impacts.

  3. Will genomic selection be a practical method for plant breeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Akihiro; Isobe, Sachiko N

    2012-11-01

    Genomic selection or genome-wide selection (GS) has been highlighted as a new approach for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in recent years. GS is a form of MAS that selects favourable individuals based on genomic estimated breeding values. Previous studies have suggested the utility of GS, especially for capturing small-effect quantitative trait loci, but GS has not become a popular methodology in the field of plant breeding, possibly because there is insufficient information available on GS for practical use. In this review, GS is discussed from a practical breeding viewpoint. Statistical approaches employed in GS are briefly described, before the recent progress in GS studies is surveyed. GS practices in plant breeding are then reviewed before future prospects are discussed. Statistical concepts used in GS are discussed with genetic models and variance decomposition, heritability, breeding value and linear model. Recent progress in GS studies is reviewed with a focus on empirical studies. For the practice of GS in plant breeding, several specific points are discussed including linkage disequilibrium, feature of populations and genotyped markers and breeding scheme. Currently, GS is not perfect, but it is a potent, attractive and valuable approach for plant breeding. This method will be integrated into many practical breeding programmes in the near future with further advances and the maturing of its theory.

  4. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The FAO/IAEA Interregional Training Course on Mutant Germplasm Characterisation Using Molecular Markers was definitely the most important event of the Plant Breeding and Genetics sub- Programmes activity in 2001. The course was held at the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf, Austria, 1-25 October. The programme covered various DNA marker techniques such as genomic DNA isolation, restriction analysis of genomic and plasmid DNA, gel electrophoresis, southern transfer of genomic DNA, DNA hybridization, autoradiography, RFLP, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and RAPD analysis, and inverse PCR. The course was very successful mainly due to three major components: outstanding lecturers, very enthusiastic and motivated trainees, and last but not least, very efficient organization and excellent preparation of the course. We decided to prepare a laboratory manual on the basis of the reading materials and laboratory protocols, that were provided to the participants by the lecturers. Perry Gustafson (USA) and Brian Forster (UK), with the help of the lecturers, compiled and edited all protocols. It is expected that the manual will be printed before March 2002 and freely distributed to requesting scientists. The manual will also be available on CD-Rom and through our Homepage. 2001 was the last year of the Co-ordinated Research Project on 'Cellular biology and biotechnology including mutation techniques for creation of new useful banana genotypes'. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination Meeting was held in Leuven, Belgium, 24-28 September. This location was selected as the Belgium Government co-sponsored the CRP over the last five years. The CRP yielded many interesting results, which stimulated participants to apply to the Common Funds for Commodities for continuation of the work on banana improvement

  5. State of the science and challenges of breeding landscape plants with ecological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, H Dayton; Gandhi, Kamal J K; Colson, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Exotic plants dominate esthetically-managed landscapes, which cover 30–40 million hectares in the United States alone. Recent ecological studies have found that landscaping with exotic plant species can reduce biodiversity on multiple trophic levels. To support biodiversity in urbanized areas, the increased use of native landscaping plants has been advocated by conservation groups and US federal and state agencies. A major challenge to scaling up the use of native species in landscaping is providing ornamental plants that are both ecologically functional and economically viable. Depending on ecological and economic constraints, accelerated breeding approaches could be applied to ornamental trait development in native plants. This review examines the impact of landscaping choices on biodiversity, the current status of breeding and selection of native ornamental plants, and the interdisciplinary research needed to scale up landscaping plants that can support native biodiversity. PMID:26504560

  6. Future perspectives of in vitro culture and plant breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna; Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark

    2015-01-01

    Conventional breeding and plant improvement increasingly become inadequate to keep up with progression and high quality demands. Thus biotechnological techniques are more and more adopted. Initially, biotechnological tools have supported conventional breeding by in vitro culture techniques......, comprising micropropagation, speeding up multiplication and improving uniformity. Also, crossing barriers of incompatible plants have been overcome using in vitro methods and embryo rescue techniques in wide hybridization approaches. Marker-assisted breeding is employed for targeted selection of DNA...... fragments from parental plants in respect to identification of desired characteristics in offspring or among hybrid plants. Phylogeny-assisted breeding and knowledge about genetic relationships support the ability to develop new hybrids. Finally, chemical and radiation induced mutagenesis are established...

  7. Cisgenesis strongly improves introgression breeding and induced translocation breeding of plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, E.; Schouten, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    There are two ways for genetic improvement in classical plant breeding: crossing and mutation. Plant varieties can also be improved through genetic modification; however, the present GMO regulations are based on risk assessments with the transgenes coming from non-crossable species. Nowadays, DNA

  8. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    We are approaching the end of yet another year and it is logical to take stock of the activities undertaken by the sub Programme during 2000. Our primary focus has continued to help Member States in improving crops by using radiation-induced mutations. Many allied technologies, particularly tissue culture and molecular biology have been added to enhance the efficiency of mutant induction, isolation, multiplication and their release as new varieties. We have continued to bring the latest developments and innovations in these rapidly advancing technologies for integration into the conventional breeding of mutation-derived varieties. This is reflected in the on-going Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) on new and traditional industrial crops, creation of new useful banana genotypes, molecular characterization of mutated genes controlling important traits in seed crops, radioactively labeled DNA probes in crop improvement and the improvement of local food crops in Low Income Food Deficit Countries, and in the two newly initiated (CRPs), one on the analysis of root characters in annual food plants related to plant performance and the other on the improvement of tropical fruits. The necessity to have an inter-disciplinary approach to solve problems is also reflected in the implementation of Technical Co-operation Projects (TCPs). For example, in North Africa, date palm has a unique role in food security and the eco-system. However, 'Bayoud' disease has killed over 15 million trees and is posing a serious threat to date palm production in Tunisia. Under a regional TCP to control the disease, irradiation of embryogenic cultures was investigated and low dose gamma radiation was found to increase the formation of somatic embryos. Date palm trees can also be multiplied in vitro through either shoot formation or somatic embryos, which allows irradiation of large populations. Another example is fruit crops, many of which have not benefited from the use of radiation

  9. Does genomic selection have a future in plant breeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Elisabeth; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2013-09-01

    Plant breeding largely depends on phenotypic selection in plots and only for some, often disease-resistance-related traits, uses genetic markers. The more recently developed concept of genomic selection, using a black box approach with no need of prior knowledge about the effect or function of individual markers, has also been proposed as a great opportunity for plant breeding. Several empirical and theoretical studies have focused on the possibility to implement this as a novel molecular method across various species. Although we do not question the potential of genomic selection in general, in this Opinion, we emphasize that genomic selection approaches from dairy cattle breeding cannot be easily applied to complex plant breeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Willet M. Hays, great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of our association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, A F; Stoehr, H

    2003-01-01

    Willet M. Hays was a great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of the American Genetic Association (AGA). We commemorate the AGA's centennial. We mined university archives, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) yearbooks, plant breeding textbooks, scientific periodicals, and descendants for information. Willet Hays first recognized the individual plant as the unit of selection and started systematic pure-line selection and progeny tests in 1888. He developed useful plant breeding methods. He selected superior flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), wheat (Triticum vulgare L.), corn (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and oat (Avena sativa L.) varieties, and discovered Grimm alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.); all became commercially important. He initiated branch stations for better performance testing. Willet Hays befriended colleagues in other universities, in federal stations, in a London conference, and in Europe. He gathered and spread the scientific plant breeding gospel. He also improved rural roads and initiated animal breeding records and agricultural economics records. He started the AGA in 1903, serving as secretary for 10 years. He became assistant secretary of agriculture in 1904. He introduced the project system for agricultural research. He authored or coauthored the Nelson Amendment, the Smith-Lever Act, the Smith-Hughes Act, and the protocol leading to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization-all involved teaching agricultural practices that improved the world.

  11. Will genomic selection be a practical method for plant breeding?

    OpenAIRE

    Nakaya, Akihiro; Isobe, Sachiko N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic selection or genome-wide selection (GS) has been highlighted as a new approach for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in recent years. GS is a form of MAS that selects favourable individuals based on genomic estimated breeding values. Previous studies have suggested the utility of GS, especially for capturing small-effect quantitative trait loci, but GS has not become a popular methodology in the field of plant breeding, possibly because there is insufficient information avail...

  12. Microbiome Selection Could Spur Next-Generation Plant Breeding Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Murali; Gupta, Alka

    2016-01-01

    " No plant is an island too …" Plants, though sessile, have developed a unique strategy to counter biotic and abiotic stresses by symbiotically co-evolving with microorganisms and tapping into their genome for this purpose. Soil is the bank of microbial diversity from which a plant selectively sources its microbiome to suit its needs. Besides soil, seeds, which carry the genetic blueprint of plants during trans-generational propagation, are home to diverse microbiota that acts as the principal source of microbial inoculum in crop cultivation. Overall, a plant is ensconced both on the outside and inside with a diverse assemblage of microbiota. Together, the plant genome and the genes of the microbiota that the plant harbors in different plant tissues, i.e., the 'plant microbiome,' form the holobiome which is now considered as unit of selection: 'the holobiont.' The 'plant microbiome' not only helps plants to remain fit but also offers critical genetic variability, hitherto, not employed in the breeding strategy by plant breeders, who traditionally have exploited the genetic variability of the host for developing high yielding or disease tolerant or drought resistant varieties. This fresh knowledge of the microbiome, particularly of the rhizosphere, offering genetic variability to plants, opens up new horizons for breeding that could usher in cultivation of next-generation crops depending less on inorganic inputs, resistant to insect pest and diseases and resilient to climatic perturbations. We surmise, from ever increasing evidences, that plants and their microbial symbionts need to be co-propagated as life-long partners in future strategies for plant breeding. In this perspective, we propose bottom-up approach to co-propagate the co-evolved, the plant along with the target microbiome, through - (i) reciprocal soil transplantation method, or (ii) artificial ecosystem selection method of synthetic microbiome inocula, or (iii) by exploration of microRNA transfer

  13. NOTE - Program R: applications in plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alexandre Peternelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the demand for so-called free, or open source software for data analysis as well as the appeal to use it isgreat. An public domain software that has become extremely well-known, with ever-increasing numbers of fans and even coworkers, is Environment R, or simply R. R is extremely useful for data analysis and manipulation in view of a range of tools alreadyimplemented. Also, R is not simply a statistical program, because, by its easy on using internal functions and also creating new ones,statistical procedures applied to data can also be created, manipulated, evaluated and interpreted. R contains numerous libraries(or packages, some already included in the default setting. This course will focus on the application of R in statistical analyses inplant breeding. Explanations on the use of various commands and functions will be illustrated with examples, to facilitate theinterpretation and adaptation to other similar problems.

  14. The progress of mutation breeding for ornamental plants in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shouming

    1994-02-01

    In China, research on mutation breeding of ornamental plants was begun in the late 70's. In the past decade, about 40 plant species were tested, and hundreds of useful mutants were obtained. At least 63 mutant varieties have been produced, approved and released for cultivation in rose, chrysanthemum, canna, dahlia, bougainvillea and lotus. A rapid progress in methodology and technology of induced mutation breeding has been achieved, particularly in the selection of starting material, determination of suitable exposure and irradiation dose, expression and isolation of somatic mutation etc. In the future it is necessary to develop more plant species and mutation varieties to improve the mutation breeding method and to raise the economic benefit. Along with the development of China's economy and improvement of people's living standard more and more new varieties of ornamental plants will be required. In view of the good beginning, rich germplasm resource and favorable conditions, the prospect of mutation breeding for ornamental plants in China is very encouraging

  15. Microbiome selection could spur next-generation plant breeding strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gopal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants, though sessile, have developed a unique strategy to counter biotic and abiotic stresses by symbiotically co-evolving with microorganisms and tapping into their genome for this purpose. Soil is the bank of microbial diversity from which a plant selectively sources its microbiome to suit its needs. Besides soil, seeds, which carry the genetic blueprint of plants during trans-generational propagation, are home to diverse microbiota that acts as the principal source of microbial inoculum in crop cultivation. Overall, a plant is ensconced both on the outside and inside with a diverse assemblage of microbiota. Together, the plant genome and the genes of the microbiota that the plant harbours in different plant tissues i.e the ‘plant microbiome’, form the holobiome which is now considered as unit of selection: ‘the holobiont’. The ‘plant microbiome’ not only helps plants to remain fit but also offers critical genetic variability, hitherto, not employed in the breeding strategy by plant breeders, who traditionally have exploited the genetic variability of the host for developing high yielding or disease tolerant or drought resistant varieties. This fresh knowledge of the microbiome, particularly of the rhizosphere, offering genetic variability to plants, opens up new horizons for breeding that could usher in cultivation of next-generation crops depending less on inorganic inputs, resistant to insect pest and diseases and resilient to climatic perturbations. We surmise, from ever increasing evidences, that plants and their microbial symbionts need to be co-propagated as life-long partners in future strategies for plant breeding.

  16. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The Newsletter reports development of new Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) and on efficient implementation of Technical Coperaton Projects related to regional activities. Following the organization of the CRP on 'Molecular characterization of mutated genes controlling important traits for seed crop improvement' the CRP on 'Mutational analysis of root characters in annual food plants related to plant performance' was also established with the participation of 21 institutes. It also presents recent training activities and meetings undertaken

  17. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 19, July 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This issue of the newsletter announces the International Symposium on Induced Mutation in Plants (SIMP) which is being planned to take place at International Atomic Energy Agency , Vienna, Austria, 11-15 August 2008, to celebrate 80 years of mutation induction enhanced breeding and the renaissance of mutation induction

  18. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul and others; Yang, Seung Gyun; Choi, Soon Ho; Lee, Jang Ha; Lee, Hyo Yeon; Seo, Yong Won; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2003-04-01

    To improve the crop varieties by using radiation mutation, various mutant lines were selected from the materials irradiated with gamma ray by both in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis. As in vitro selection breeding, various cell lines each with salt, 5-MT and Systeine tolerance were selected from the irradiated calli of rice, and then DNA and molecular markers related with their tolerances were identified. And the rice mutant lines selected from cell lines were evaluated and then some of promising lines were selected by the field trial. Four mutant rice cultivars(Wonmibyeo, Wonpyongbyeo, Heugseonchalbyeo, Wongwangbyeo) were released and their seeds were distributed to farmers. A high quality mutant rice cultivar, Woncheongbyeo, was newly registered. And developed five new cultivars, Wonkangbyeo, Wonpumbyeo, Wonchubyeo, Heugkwangchalbyeo, Nogwonchalbyeo and three mutant cultivars of the rose of Sharon (Mugunghwa) such as Ggoma, Seonnyo, Daegwang were applied to register the national new cultivar list. About promising 30 mutant lines of rice and Mugunghwa were done the field trials and proliferation. Promising soybean mutant lines were selected for improvement of soybean disease resistant, ecological traits and soybean seed quality. Other related two researches not only on development of disease tolerant lines of hot pepper, but also on development of herbicide-resistant cell lines using radiation irradiation, were carried out as a joint projects

  19. A microcosm for the breeding of plants under controlled conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Aquino, Luigi; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Minarini, Carla; Pandolfi Giuseppe; Lanza, Bruno; Atrigna, Mauro; De Filippo, Giovanni; Giannotta, Giovanni; Pedicini Antonio; Aprano Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance studies of the effects of multiple stress on plant physiology laboratory scale, in collaboration with FOS Srl and Sesmat Srl and the project application for organic PON02 0 0556 3 420580 «SMARTAGS-SMARt TAGS 'was conceived, designed and built a 'microcosm for the breeding of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditioning '. [it

  20. Seeds That Give: Participatory Plant Breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The full text of the book is available online and leads the reader into a virtual ..... They select plant types (rather than varieties) based on their own .... Farmers and breeders, and other stakeholders — such as traders, processors, distributors, ...

  1. Ethics of Plant Breeding: The IFOAM Basic Principles as a Guide for the Evolution of Organic Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.

    2010-01-01

    The basic values of organic agriculture is laid down in the IFOAM four basic principles: the principle of health, the principle of ecology, the principle of fairness and the principle of care. These principles and the consequences and challenges for the further development of organic plant breeding

  2. Plant breeding with marker-assisted selection in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Sussumu Sakiyama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, molecular marker studies reached extraordinary advances, especially for sequencing and bioinformatics techniques. Marker-assisted selection became part of the breeding program routines of important seed companies, in order to accelerate and optimize the cultivar developing processes. Private seed companies increasingly use marker-assisted selection, especially for the species of great importance to the seed market, e.g. corn, soybean, cotton, and sunflower. In the Brazilian public institutions few breeding programs use it efficiently. The possible reasons are: lack of know-how, lack of appropriate laboratories, few validated markers, high cost, and lack of urgency in obtaining cultivars. In this article we analyze the use and the constraints of marker-assisted selection in plant breeding programs of Brazilian public institutes

  3. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 26, January 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Plant Breeding and Genetics Section (PBGS) in IAEA Headquarters, Vienna and the Plant Breeding and Genetics Laboratory (PBGL) in Seibersdorf are very grateful for the input and support of experts, consultants and lecturers from all the Member States that helped us implement our programmatic activities. We had the honour and the privilege to host 46 trainees, fellows, interns and scientific visitors for a total of 51 training months. Every single one has enriched this programme and we fondly remember our fruitful discussions. The Plant Breeding and Genetics Subprogramme provides technical support to Member States through the development and the promotion of technology packages based on mutation induction and efficiency enhancing molecular and biotechnologies applied to crop improvement through adaptive R and D in our Laboratory and four CRPs. This year, we worked on transferring these technology packages to 96 Member States by providing technical and scientific support through 63 national, regional and interregional Technical Cooperation Projects (TCPs) that are managed by IAEA's Department of Technical Cooperation. This transfer of technologies assists Member States in the implementation of national crop improvement programmes with specific breeding objectives or regional programmes addressing abiotic and/or biotic stresses, which represent serious threats impeding crop productivity in wide areas mostly in the developing world. In this issue, you will find more about services in support of activities in Member States, training and human capacity development and technology development/adaptation in the PBGL, including work on impact of NaCl stress on the biomass and mineral nutrient assimilation in different rice varieties, comparative studies of different mutagens on seed propagated crops, protocols and guidelines for mutation breeding lower cost molecular assays, and targeting deleterious mutations (including positive control kits)

  4. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 38, January 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This year significant progress was made on the discovery of mutations using next generation sequencing for different crops, including rice and banana. Also, a program for the development of molecular markers for important traits has been initiated to translate the molecular knowledge on mutant traits into applications for plant breeding and to enable wider utilization of available useful mutant germplasm by Member States. A semi-dwarf mutant trait in sorghum was chosen in the pilot phase. In October 2016, a film crew visited the Agency’s Laboratories in Seibersdorf, including PBGL, in the context of a National Geographics project on the application of nuclear technologies to help address global challenges such as food, agriculture and climate change. In December 2016 a 22-minute documentary was aired on the National Geographics Channel in Belgium, the Netherlands and France highlighting the work at PBGL and the contribution of plant mutation breeding to food security and climate-smart agriculture.

  5. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter, No. 24, January 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In the past biennium Plant Breeding and Genetics (PBG) subprogramme served 105 Member States through sixty-four national (30 Africa, 24 Asia and the Pacific, seven Latin America and the Caribbean, three Europe), seven regional (one Africa, four Asia and the Pacific, one Latin America and the Caribbean, one Europe) and one interregional Technical Cooperation Projects (TCPs), and six Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) . Chosen highlights of these activities, you will find inside this issue

  6. Contributions of plant breeding in Brazil: progress and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; Dias, Luiz Antônio dos Santos; Carvalho, Bruna Line

    2012-01-01

    Agribusiness is fundamental for the Brazilian economy. This has become possible due to the use of science and technology in agriculture in the last 35 years. Among the technologies, the use of improved cultivars stands out. This article presents the situation of the species grown in the country in recent years and the contribution of genetic plant breeding to the performance of these species. Challenges multiplied because of populational growth associated with the ever-growing concern of soci...

  7. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 18, January 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Plant Breeding and Genetics (PBG) Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme (NAFA/AGE) currently implement six Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs) ranging from fundamental aspects of effects of mutagens on DNA sequence to the assessment of nutrient uptake from biofortified crops. Particular attention was given the CRP: 'Identification and pyramiding of mutated genes: Novel approaches for improving crop tolerance to salinity and drought'. Highlight of training and other activities were also included

  8. Contributions of plant breeding in Brazil – progress and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Antonio Patto Ramalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Agribusiness is fundamental for the Brazilian economy. This has become possible due to the use of science and technology in agriculture in the last 35 years. Among the technologies, the use of improved cultivars stands out. This article presents the situation of the species grown in the country in recent years and the contribution of genetic plant breeding to the performance of these species. Challenges multiplied because of populational growth associated with the ever-growing concern of society with the environment. Breeders of the present and future must base plant selection in the field on new technologies so that it is possible to meet demand.

  9. Sustainable organic plant breeding. Final report: a vision, choices, consequences and steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Hulscher, M.; Haring, M.; Jongerden, J.; Mansvelt, van J.D.; Nijs, den A.P.M.; Ruivenkamp, G.T.P.

    1999-01-01

    In general, the characteristics of organic varieties - and by extension of organic plant breeding - differ from that of conventional breeding systems and conventional varieties. Realising an organic plant breeding system and subsequently steering it to meet changing demands is no less than a mammoth

  10. Studies on plant breeding and genetics by radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.H.; Chung, K.H.; Woon, J.L.; Oh, J.H.; Kim, J.R.; Chae, J.C.; Shin, I.C.

    1981-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain appropriate breeding materials for mutation breeding by evaluation of the soybean germ plasm and to select promising mutants from the progenies of various irradiated populations. Some fundamental studies were carried out to cope with the problems of diseases, insect pests and physiological stresses relevant to local adaptability in soybean. Establishment of a useful technique for induced mutation in barley and some vegetatively propagated plants was also carried out. As results, promising 5 soybean lines were selected from 21 entries tested for productivity and local adaptability at the four different locations. They showed superior yield potential (over 3,000 kg/ha) to the present leading varieties. It is to be hoped that they will be released as new varieties, if they keep the same yield potential in advance tests next year

  11. Collaborative Plant Breeding for Organic Agricultural Systems in Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Goldringer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Because organic systems present complex environmental stress, plant breeders may either target very focused regions for different varieties, or create heterogeneous populations which can then evolve specific adaptation through on-farm cultivation and selection. This often leads to participatory plant breeding (PPB strategies which take advantage of the specific knowledge of farmers. Participatory selection requires increased commitment and engagement on the part of the farmers and researchers. Projects may begin as researcher initiatives with farmer participation or farmer initiatives with researcher participation and over time evolve into true collaborations. These projects are difficult to plan in advance because by nature they change to respond to the priorities and interests of the collaborators. Projects need to provide relevant information and analysis in a time-frame that is meaningful for farmers, while remaining scientifically rigorous and innovative. This paper presents two specific studies: the first was a researcher-designed experiment that assessed the potential adaptation of landraces to organic systems through on-farm cultivation and farmer selection. The second is a farmer-led plant breeding project to select bread wheat for organic systems in France. Over the course of these two projects, many discussions among farmers, researchers and farmers associations led to the development of methods that fit the objectives of those involved. This type of project is no longer researcher-led or farmer-led but instead an equal collaboration. Results from the two research projects and the strategy developed for an ongoing collaborative plant breeding project are discussed.

  12. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 31, July 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    We have reached three quarters of the biennium 2012-2013. The negative effects of climate variability and change on biodiversity are becoming increasingly evident and feature more and more in our activities. The deleterious effects of climate variability and change cause devastating yield losses and threaten global food security and commodity prices. There is an urgency to develop and to produce new resilient mutant lines, to get these to farmers and to grow them on a large scale as fast as possible. We at the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section and Laboratory are adjusting our activities accordingly. We have initiated new activities for inducing and screening mutations more quickly, safely and efficiently. In this newsletter, you will find interesting news on alternatives to gamma irradiation using X rays, seed mass phenotyping using an X ray platform that we are developing and the first tests of our next generation sequencing (NGS) platform. A milestone has been reached in meeting the challenge of wheat black stem rust disease (race Ug99). In the TC section of this newsletter, you find more information on an unfolding success story involving 18 countries and four international organisations. Inducing mutations significantly speeds up the process of plant breeding and is more cost effective and environmentally friendly than using fungicides to prevent stem rust caused by race Ug99. While spontaneous mutations occurring in nature happen over a long period of time, mutation induction is used to achieve the same results much more quickly and efficiently, providing sustainable solutions to crop production constraints and responding to food security threats. In fact, this success story is a good example of the pipeline from the laboratory to the farm that we implement. This pipeline is demand driven, results based and outcome oriented: technology packages are adapted and/or developed in the Plant Breeding and Genetics Laboratory; services are provided (mutation

  13. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation - Development of radiation indicator plants by molecular breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jang Ryol; Kwak, Sang Soo; Kwon, Seok Yoon [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    - tSOD1, cytosolic CuZnSOD cDNA was cloned from tobacco cDNA library by PCR. To develop the under-producing the transgenic plants, the vectors were constructed using by antisense and co-supressing technology. The transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed that over 60% of kanamycin-resistant plants were introduced the foreign gene by PCR and transformed one copy through Southern blot analysis. - In an attempt to identify marker genes for gamma irradiation of plants, expression patterns of diverse genes upon gamma irradiation of young tobacco plants were investigated. With the knowledge of distinctive expression patterns of diverse genes, irradiation-indicating marker plants could be developed by engineering and monitoring multiple radiation-responsive genes. Additionally, a gamma irradiation-responsive NtTMK1 receptor-like kinase gene was molecular biologically characterized. -Uranium reductase gene (Cytochrome C3) and radiation resistance gene (recA) have been cloned from Desulfovibrio and Deinococcus radiodurans. -Two plant transformation vectors (pCYC3 and pDrecA) have been constructed. - Tobacco transgenic plants of have been obtained. 52 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  14. Selection and breeding of plant cultivars to minimize cadmium accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C.A. [AAFC Brandon Research Centre, Box 1000A, R.R. 3, Brandon, MB, R7A 5Y3 (Canada)], E-mail: cgrant@agr.gc.ca; Clarke, J.M. [AAFC Semiarid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre, Swift Current, SK, S9H 3X2 (Canada); Duguid, S. [AAFC Morden Research Station, Morden, MB, R6M 1Y5 (Canada); Chaney, R.L. [USDA, ARS, Animal Manure and Byproducts Laboratory, Room 013, Building 007, BARC-West, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Natural variation occurs in the uptake and distribution of essential and nonessential trace elements among crop species and among cultivars within species. Such variation can be responsible for trace element deficiencies and toxicities, which in turn can affect the quality of food. Plant breeding can be an important tool to both increase the concentration of desirable trace elements and reduce that of potentially harmful trace elements such as cadmium (Cd). Selection programs for a low-Cd content of various crops, including durum wheat, sunflower, rice and soybean have been established and low-Cd durum wheat cultivars and sunflower hybrids have been developed. In durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var durum), low-Cd concentration is controlled by a single dominant gene. The trait is highly heritable, and incorporation of the low-Cd allele can help to reduce the average grain Cd to levels below proposed international limits. The allele for low-Cd concentration does not appear to affect major economic traits and should not cause problems when incorporated into durum cultivars. The cost of Cd selection in a breeding program is initially large both in terms of Cd determination and reduced progress towards development of other economic traits, but declines as more breeding lines in the program carry the low-Cd trait and are utilized in new crosses. Production of low-Cd crop cultivars can be used as a tool to reduce the risk of movement of Cd into the human diet.

  15. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 20, January 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The highlight of this issue is the Second Coordinators Meeting under RAS/5/048 (ARASIA): 'Mutation Induction and Supportive Breeding and Biotechnologies for Improving Crop Productivity', on 11-15 November 2007, in Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic. A major achievement of this regional project was the adoption of the Standard Material Transfer Agreement (SMTA) for germplasm exchanges. It puts the ARASIA States Parties participating in this project into a leadership position for the regional application of the SMTA under the Multilateral System on Access and Benefit Sharing in the framework of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

  16. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 20, January 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-01-15

    The highlight of this issue is the Second Coordinators Meeting under RAS/5/048 (ARASIA): 'Mutation Induction and Supportive Breeding and Biotechnologies for Improving Crop Productivity', on 11-15 November 2007, in Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic. A major achievement of this regional project was the adoption of the Standard Material Transfer Agreement (SMTA) for germplasm exchanges. It puts the ARASIA States Parties participating in this project into a leadership position for the regional application of the SMTA under the Multilateral System on Access and Benefit Sharing in the framework of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.

  17. The utility of covariance of combining ability in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, V

    1976-11-01

    The definition of covariances of half- and full sibs, and hence that of variances of general and specific combining ability with regard to a quantitative character, is extended to take into account the respective covariances between a pair of characters. The interpretation of the dispersion and correlation matrices of general and specific combining ability is discussed by considering a set of single, three- and four-way crosses, made using diallel and line × tester mating systems in Pennisetum typhoides. The general implications of the concept of covariance of combining ability in plant breeding are discussed.

  18. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 32, January 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    One major event this last half of 2013 was the success story of the IAEA interregional TC project INT/5/150 'Responding to the Transboundary Threat of Wheat Black Stem Rust (Ug99)'. Results have been achieved in record time; the project was started in 2009, and by mid 2013, two advanced mutant lines, resistant to the most virulent strains of wheat black stem rust (Ug99), successfully passed the national performance trials in Kenya and are ready for commercial release. A Regional Training Course was organized at IRRI (The Philippines) in the framework of regional TC project RAS/5/065 'Supporting Climate-Proofing Rice Production Systems (CRiPS) Based on Nuclear Applications'. By joining efforts, the IAEA, FAO and IRRI aim to ensure that rice scientists are acquainted with the most recent plant breeding and phenotyping approaches, allowing them to address future threats to food security stemming from climate change and other stress factors. The project also aims to act as a platform for future collaboration in rice production. This second half of the year was also the period of 'first timers'. For the first time, Lesotho is using mutation breeding techniques in potato, sweet potato and amaranth. A fellow is being introduced to these techniques at the Plant Breeding and Genetics Laboratory (PBGL) in Seibersdorf, Austria. Similarly we are supporting and nurturing the first steps of national mutation breeding programmes in Oman, Palestine, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Another cause for excitement is the ReNuAL project: the Seibersdorf Laboratories will be upgraded and renovated, including the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratories. This is a huge project with many logistical challenges, which are being met with vigour and personal investment in time and energy by our staff. Our guidance in this endeavour is 'fit-forpurpose to the Member States' in the future. IAEA Member States adopted a resolution to support this initiative, and we are now seeking financial and

  19. The application of biotechnology in medicinal plants breeding research in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Ping; Li, Jin-Cai; Huang, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dian-Lei; Huang, Peng; Nie, Jiu-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Breeding is not only an important area of medicinal plants research but also the foundation for the superior varieties acquirement of medicinal plants. The rise of modern biotechnology provides good opportunities and new means for medicinal plants breeding research in China. Biotechnology shows its technical advantages and new development prospects in breeding of new medicinal plants varieties with high and stable yield, good quality, as well as stress-resistance. In this paper, we describe recent advances, problems, and development prospects about the application of modern biotechnology in medicinal plants breeding research in China.

  20. Radiation techniques in crop and plant breeding. Multiplying the benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahloowalia, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    World food production is based on growing a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and crops developed through advances in science. Plant breeders have produced multiple varieties that grow well in various types of soils and under diverse climates in different regions of the world. Conventionally, this is done by sexual hybridization. This involves transferring pollen from one parent plant to another to obtain hybrids. The subsequent generations of these hybrids are grown to select plants which combine the desired characters of the parents. However, another method exists by which the genetic make-up of a given plant variety can be changed without crossing with another variety. With this method, a variety retains all its original attributes but is upgraded in one or two changed characteristics. This method is based on radiation-induced genetic changes, and its referred to as ''induced mutations''. During the past thirty years, more than 1800 mutant varieties of plants have been released, many, of which were induced with radiation. Plant tissue and cell culture (also called in vitro culture) in combination with radiation is a powerful technique to induce mutations, particularly for the improvement of vegetatively propagated crops. These crops include cassava, garlic, potato, sweet potato, yams, sugarcane, ornamentals such as chrysanthemum, carnation, roses, tulips, daffodil, and many fruits (e.g. apple, banana, plantain, citrus, date palm, grape, papaya, passion fruit, and kiwi fruit). In some of these plants, either there is no seed set (e.g. banana) or the seed progeny produces plants which do not have the right combination of the desired characteristics. These techniques are also useful in the improvement of forest trees having a long lifespan before they produce fruit and seed. This article briefly reviews advances in plant breeding techniques, with a view towards improving the transfer of technologies to more countries

  1. Investment, regulation, and uncertainty: managing new plant breeding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Stuart J; McDonald, Jillian; Falck-Zepeda, Jose

    2014-01-01

    As with any technological innovation, time refines the technology, improving upon the original version of the innovative product. The initial GM crops had single traits for either herbicide tolerance or insect resistance. Current varieties have both of these traits stacked together and in many cases other abiotic and biotic traits have also been stacked. This innovation requires investment. While this is relatively straight forward, certain conditions need to exist such that investments can be facilitated. The principle requirement for investment is that regulatory frameworks render consistent and timely decisions. If the certainty of regulatory outcomes weakens, the potential for changes in investment patterns increases.   This article provides a summary background to the leading plant breeding technologies that are either currently being used to develop new crop varieties or are in the pipeline to be applied to plant breeding within the next few years. Challenges for existing regulatory systems are highlighted. Utilizing an option value approach from investment literature, an assessment of uncertainty regarding the regulatory approval for these varying techniques is undertaken. This research highlights which technology development options have the greatest degree of uncertainty and hence, which ones might be expected to see an investment decline.

  2. Molecular breeding for drought tolerance in plants: wheat perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.S.; Rivandi, A.; Rivandi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.em Thell.) is the first important and strategic cereal crop for the majority of world,s populations. It is the most important staple food of about two billion people (36% of the world population). Due to industrialization, erosion, urbanization, compaction, and the increase in acidity as a result of fertilization, there is a decrease in the available space for agriculture. Environmental conditions such as increased salinity, drought, and freezing cause adverse effects on the growth and productivity of cereal crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Though grown under a wide range of climates and soils, wheat is best adapted to temperate regions. Whether the cropping occurs in the temperate areas or the tropics, both types of environments are affected by global warming and the destabilizing effects that it causes, none more serious than the attendant increased variability in rainfall and temperature. Due to the limited insight into the physiological basis of drought tolerance in wheat, a better understanding of some of the mechanisms that enable the plants to adapt to stress and maintain growth during stress periods would help in breeding for drought tolerance. On the other hand, understanding the genetic and genome organization using molecular markers is of great value for plant breeding purposes. (author)

  3. Comparative regulatory approaches for groups of new plant breeding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusser, Maria; Davies, Howard V

    2013-06-25

    This manuscript provides insights into ongoing debates on the regulatory issues surrounding groups of biotechnology-driven 'New Plant Breeding Techniques' (NPBTs). It presents the outcomes of preliminary discussions and in some cases the initial decisions taken by regulators in the following countries: Argentina, Australia, Canada, EU, Japan, South Africa and USA. In the light of these discussions we suggest in this manuscript a structured approach to make the evaluation more consistent and efficient. The issue appears to be complex as these groups of new technologies vary widely in both the technologies deployed and their impact on heritable changes in the plant genome. An added complication is that the legislation, definitions and regulatory approaches for biotechnology-derived crops differ significantly between these countries. There are therefore concerns that this situation will lead to non-harmonised regulatory approaches and asynchronous development and marketing of such crops resulting in trade disruptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Global impact of induced mutation in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sudden, heritable changes in the genetic material, DNA, are known as mutations. Selection of naturally occurring mutations in wild, ancestral species helped humans in the domestication and further improvement of today's crop plants. Although Charles Darwin was unaware in 1859 of variation and mutations in living organisms, his theory of evolution by natural selection assumed variability. Much later, it was established that mutations are the source of biodiversity, and the driving force for evolution. Gregor Mendel in 1865 also used several mutants in his experiments with garden pea to formulate the laws of inheritance. The term mutation itself was used for the first time by Hugo de Vries in 1901 in his mutation theory. Plant breeding based on the science of genetics, as practiced over the past 100 years, exploited the available genetic variability in the primary gene pool of crop plants, and sometimes in related species. This approach enlarged the yield potential of crops several fold. It also a) improved the stability of yield by incorporating resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses; b) improved quality of the produce; and c) altered the adaptability of crop species, providing opportunities to grow new crops for food security outside their traditional range. Genetically improved seed (or other planting material) is the most significant input for developing sustainable cropping systems for food security and economic growth. Half of the increased productivity of today's crop plants comes from genetic improvements. The other half is contributed by inputs and management practices

  5. Consumers & plant genomics : the positioning and acceptance of a new plant breeding practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den T.

    2008-01-01

    Innovative developments in technology, such as the emergence of genomics as a plant breeding practice, hold the potential to change the supply side of the market. The success of these practices not only depends on the improved efficiency and effectiveness it brings, but also on how well they are

  6. Unused natural variation can lift yield barriers in plant breeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Gur

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural biodiversity is an underexploited sustainable resource that can enrich the genetic basis of cultivated plants with novel alleles that improve productivity and adaptation. We evaluated the progress in breeding for increased tomato (Solanum lycopersicum yield using genotypes carrying a pyramid of three independent yield-promoting genomic regions introduced from the drought-tolerant green-fruited wild species Solanum pennellii. Yield of hybrids parented by the pyramided genotypes was more than 50% higher than that of a control market leader variety under both wet and dry field conditions that received 10% of the irrigation water. This demonstration of the breaking of agricultural yield barriers provides the rationale for implementing similar strategies for other agricultural organisms that are important for global food security.

  7. Advancement of mutation breeding on ornamental plants in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handayati, W.

    2013-01-01

    Along with the increasing demand of ornamental plants in Indonesia and the change of consumers preference, Indonesian breeders have released 102 varieties in the last 5 year. However, the resulted varieties were not enough to substitute the imported varieties. A breeding method for a new variety was carried out through induced mutation. Many researches have been conducted in Indonesia, but these activities have not been comprehensively designed to create the potential genotypes that ready to be released as new superior varieties. Commonly, these activities were still in the stage of basic researches about the type and the most effective dose or lethal dose (LD 50 ), the sensitivity of both the plants cultured in-vitro and in-vivo to mutagen; and genetic or phenotypic diversity due to the mutagen treatments. Chrysanthemum and rose were the most of the ornamental plants that had been conducted. Some mutants have been released as new national superior varieties namely Julikara, Rosanda and Rosmarun (mini rose); Rosma (cut rose) and Mustika Kania (chrysanthemum). (author)

  8. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 34, January 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The year 2014 has passed, and we prepare for 2015. Many things have happened this year; please allow me to highlight some salient facts about the Plant Breeding and Genetic sub-programme. 2014 saw the achievement of a very successful regional IAEA/RCA Technical Cooperation project RAS/5/056 on ‘Supporting Mutation Breeding Approaches to Develop New Crop Varieties Adaptable to Climate Change’. In the mid-term project review meeting, it was highlighted that since inception, 17 mutant varieties have been officially released and that there are currently more than 100 advanced mutant lines in trials and more mutant populations in the pipeline for further selection and development. This project also demonstrated that mutation induction coupled with selection remains the cleanest and most inexpensive way to create varieties by changing single characters without affecting the overall phenotype. Our counterparts from RAS/5/056 also report on the beneficial products from mutant sorghum for human nutrition. The same is true for our colleagues participating in the CRP on food and feed, who report lignin modified sorghum mutant lines for animal nutrition. In addition, the final meeting of another successful interregional TC project ‘Responding to the Transboundary Threat of Wheat Black Stem Rust (Ug99)’, was held in Uganda, where it all began. The team of NAFA and TC got the IAEA Superior Achievement Team Award for the successful implementation of this project. This year, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is celebrating its 50th Anniversary. On the occasion of this milestone of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, Achievement and Outstanding Achievement Awards were initiated to honor and appreciate the successes of Member States in plant mutation breeding and to further promote the use of nuclear techniques for sustainable food security. Five Outstanding Achievement Awards and 18 Achievement Awards were handed out to the representatives

  9. Genetic engineering, a potential aid to conventional plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.J.; Soomro, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    To develop improve crop varieties, the most basic elements are crossing of desirable parents to provide genetic variation for evaluation and selection of desirable plants among the progenies. In conventional plant breeding, gene transfer is achieved by back crossing or less frequently by recurrent selection. Both processes take several generations to reach to a point where genetic milieu of the parents remains. Plant breeders also face the most difficult situation when the desired gene is present in the entirely diverse species where wide crosses become inevitable. In addition, genomic disharmony, unfavourable genic interaction and chromosomal instability also account for limited success of wide hybridization in the field crops. Under such circumstances, tissue culture techniques, such as somaclonal variation, Embryo Rescue Technique and Somatic hybridization are the ultimate options. There may be other cases where desired genes are present in entirely different genera or organisms and crossings of donor with recipient is no more a concern. Plant breeders also spend much of their time manipulating quantitatively inherited traits such as yield, that have low heritability. These characters are assumed to be determined by a large number of genes each with minor and additive effects. Direct selection for such traits is less effective. Genetic Engineering approaches like isozymes and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) with heritability of 1.0 make the selection very efficient and accurate as indirect selection criteria for quantitatively inherited traits. Hence isozymes and RFLPs techniques can easily be exercised at cellular or seedling stages thus reducing the time and labour oriented screening of plants at maturity. Rather new approach such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) will also be discussed in this article. (Orig./A.B.)

  10. Seminar of the irradiation uses in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    At the present time it is accepted the dependence of mankind to get its feeding starting from products proceeding of animals and plants. Such a dependence is affected by factors which overthrow production: in the case of vegetables this situation is evident in a diminution per surface unit, and in several cases in a reduction on the quality of the product. Since the beginning of agriculture, men has performed a selection of progenitors, generation by generation, in order to perpetuate the best of a cultivation for its exploitation. While an understanding of natural mechanisms capable of producing genetic variability is attained, men has to imitate the mechanisms in order to get what is known as artificial selection. This artificial selection reach a fortunate consecution via multiplication and exploitation of populations which fulfill the requisitions imposed by environment. Genetic variability has its origin in a natural process known as mutation which involve any change in the hereditary material, which besides to be capable to be heritable, be not product of genetic recombination. This genetic variability could be considered as few effective if no selection methodology was involved which have allowed its accurate canalization in the obtention of new varieties. The recognizance of agents capable to produce changes in hereditary material, it is to say, capable to induce mutations, brings with his self to contemplate the possibility of inducing changes in order to take advantage of the new varieties. In the global context, such a possibility began to be considered as feasible starting from the third decade of our century, while in the national context, starting from the sixties. The profits reached in our country are not enough impaction to give a reason for plant breeding and to use mutagens in research programs to institutions of the branch. Starting from 1974, the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) began a series of activities with the

  11. Cisgenesis: an important sub-invention for traditional plant breeding companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, E.; Schouten, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Modern plant breeding is highly dependent on new technologies to master future problems. More traits have to be combined, frequently originating from wild species. Traditional breeding is connected with linkage drag problems. The crop plant itself and its crossable species represent the traditional

  12. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 35, July 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    The mission of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division is continually evolving to address novel challenges in MSs and nuclear applications continue to provide added value to conventional approaches in addressing a range of agricultural problems and issues. Member States are increasingly concerned with climate change and have expressed support to respond to emerging challenges related to transboundary plant diseases. The FAO/IAEA’s Plant Breeding and Genetics Section is working with Member States in developing and introducing mutant crop varieties that respond to climate change and food security and has successfully supported the development of disease resistant mutant varieties, such as Ug99 wheat resistant varieties in Kenya. Future support is expected on developing resistant mutant varieties to TR4 (Fusarium wilt, known as Panama disease) in banana and to leaf rust in coffee. International collaboration is one of the priorities of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. We are pleased to announce our collaboration with Hernan Ceballos and his group at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) for the genotyping of cassava accessions held at CIAT in the context of which we will be developing Ecotilling and next generation sequencing approaches to characterize cassava germplasm for nucleotide variation in genes involved in traits such as starch quality and herbicide tolerance

  13. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 21, July 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    A major milestone for our subprogramme will be the upcoming International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants, which will be held 12-15 August 2008 in Vienna, Austria. This will be the eighth in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme?s Symposium series dedicated exclusively to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants, the first of which was held in 1969 and the most recent in 1995. These previous symposia dealt with themes relating to the development of efficient protocols for induced mutagenesis and their role in the enhancement of quality traits, as well as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in crops and the integration of in vitro and molecular genetic techniques in mutation induction. Topics which to be addressed at this symposium will be: Molecular genetics and biology of physical, chemical and transposon-induced mutagenesis; New mutation techniques, e.g. ion beam implantation, and their integration with other molecular and biotechnological techniques; Induced mutations in crop breeding programmes; Mutation induction for gene discovery and functional genomics, including targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) and other reverse genetic strategies; Mutational analysis of important crop characters (tolerance to abiotic stresses, resistance to diseases and insects, quality and nutritional characters, etc.); Socio-economic impact of widespread mutant varieties

  14. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 21, July 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-15

    A major milestone for our subprogramme will be the upcoming International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants, which will be held 12-15 August 2008 in Vienna, Austria. This will be the eighth in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme?s Symposium series dedicated exclusively to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants, the first of which was held in 1969 and the most recent in 1995. These previous symposia dealt with themes relating to the development of efficient protocols for induced mutagenesis and their role in the enhancement of quality traits, as well as resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in crops and the integration of in vitro and molecular genetic techniques in mutation induction. Topics which to be addressed at this symposium will be: Molecular genetics and biology of physical, chemical and transposon-induced mutagenesis; New mutation techniques, e.g. ion beam implantation, and their integration with other molecular and biotechnological techniques; Induced mutations in crop breeding programmes; Mutation induction for gene discovery and functional genomics, including targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) and other reverse genetic strategies; Mutational analysis of important crop characters (tolerance to abiotic stresses, resistance to diseases and insects, quality and nutritional characters, etc.); Socio-economic impact of widespread mutant varieties.

  15. Plant breeding in the turn of the millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluízio Borém

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition from hunting and gathering to farming happened about 10,000 years ago, independently and diffusely in several places in the world. Plant breeders were responsible for genetic progress in a number of crop species. It included hybrids, the introgression of wild species genes and also the Green Revolution, which started in the 1960's with the cereals. The varieties developed by breeding, along with the use of new crop technology (fertilization, soil tillage, etc. changed the status of some countries from importers to exporters of food. In the turn of the millennium,, plant breeding, faces new challenges in a globalized world, but it has new tools to deal with them. Notwithstanding the present contributions of plant breeding and crop management, its future contributions may be even greater. The partnership being developed between plant breeding and biotechnology will assure a more consistent and predictable genetic progress. Current contributions of biotechnology have arrived for many crops in different places of the world. Varieties developed by transformation are grown in large acreage in some countries. Some concerns have also arisen from the use of GMOs. For example, the introgression of a gene for insect resistance 4 into many different species could result in an undesirable endemic risk, here called interespecific biotechnological vulnerability. Another concern is that biotechnology race may create yield plateaus in programs using genes pyramiding for all new traits made available by biotechnology, resulting in what is called genetic gridlock. Nevertheless, the benefits of using biotechnology will substantially enhance the contributions of plant breeding to human lifeA transição da fase de coleta e caça para a agricultura ocorreu há cerca de dez mil anos independentemente e em vários locais no mundo. Naquela época iniciou-se a domesticação da maioria das espécies cultivadas, dando início às atividades agrícolas. Os

  16. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 33, July 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The Member States of IAEA have called for an initiative to renovate and modernize the Nuclear Sciences and Applications Laboratories in Seibersdorf, called the ReNuAL project. In the 52 years since the IAEA's Nuclear Applications Laboratories in Seibersdorf were established (five of which are in the field of agriculture under the Joint FAO/IAEA Division), there has been no comprehensive renovation or significant upgrading of equipment to ensure the continuing ability of the laboratories to respond to Member States' growing and evolving needs. The objective of the ReNuAL Project is to ensure that the laboratories are fit-for-purpose and appropriately positioned to meet the evolving needs of member countries with adequate infrastructure in place for the next 20 years. The goals are to: • Redesign and expand the current infrastructure to ensure the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory operations and services to better meet the current and future requirements of member countries; • Ensure that the laboratories remain a vibrant research and training institution that continues to attract highly qualified scientists and other staff committed to advancing applied nuclear sciences to serve the needs and interests of member countries. The ReNuAL project includes in its first phase those elements to be achieved from 2014-2017 within a Euro 31 million target budget established by the Director General. Ground-breaking is planned for 29 September 2014, with completion by December 2017. We are dependent upon additional financial support and donations of the countries we serve, in order to be able to realize all the necessary renovation works. This year we also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. This provides an opportunity to honour the endeavours of individuals, teams and institutions in Member States in increasing sustainable food security through plant mutation breeding: Outstanding and Superior Achievement Awards to celebrate successes in

  17. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 29, July 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-07-01

    Human population growth is projected to reach a staggering nine billion people by 2050. Who will feed the growing billions; how can more food be produced on less land; how can we protect crop yields from climate variability, pests and diseases? These are major issues of our generation. Thus, the theme of this year's Scientific Forum at the IAEA General Conference in September will be devoted to Food Security in all its aspects. Mutation breeding has played a major role in improving crops and stabilizing food security concerns worldwide. Classic examples are improved yields brought about by semi-dwarf mutant varieties of wheat and rice in the mid-twentieth century, which created the 'Green Revolution'. Mutation induction via irradiation is an established method in providing useful variation for crop improvement, despite this the sought after mutant is a rare event. Today these mutants can be detected efficiently using high-throughput phenotyping and genotyping methods. Read more about the direct involvement of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Laboratory in Seibersdorf pertaining to developing technology packages, and providing training and service to tackle the above mentioned topics in this issue. Also, we are proud to announce the 50th Anniversary of the Agency's laboratories in Seibersdorf, you will find more about this event in the News section inside this issue. In the section on Technical Cooperation Projects (TC) I want to highlight the first Coordination Meeting for the IAEA/RCA regional TC project RAS/5/056 on Supporting Mutation Breeding Approaches to Develop New Crop Varieties Adaptable to Climate Change. This regional TC project is a fully integrated endeavour between the Plant Breeding and Genetics Section and the Soil, Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section. This new TC project RAS/5/056 is a follow-up of the recently closed project RAS/5/045. Within this previous project, well characterized mutant lines improved for important agronomic traits such

  18. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 30, January 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Scientific Forum focused on sustainable food security in all its aspects. Plant Breeding and Genetics's (PBG) activities, which are demand driven, results based and outcome oriented, are already targeted towards broadening crop adaptation and change. In the future we will use the paradigm of 'climate smart agriculture' to even better meet the needs of the Member States. A central aspect of resilience to climate change, or adaptation to erratic weather variations, is broad biodiversity. According to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) biodiversity 'includes all The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is actively supporting Member States in adaptation strategies for climate change based on mutation induction and efficiency enhancing biotechnologies through various coordinated research projects (CRPs) and technical cooperation project (TCPs). Major thematic areas of the Plant Breeding and Genetics subprogramme are 'Crop improvement for high yield and enhanced adaptability to climate change' with major activities targeted towards fostering crop improvement (e.g. yield, quality, nutritional factors, market-preferred traits) as well as biodiversity protection, through applying mutation induction and efficiency enhancing bio-/molecular technologies, and 'Integrated soil-water-plant approaches to enhance food production and biomass productivity' with special emphasis on enhancing Member State capacities to advance food security through climate change mitigation and adaptation using integrated soil-plant approaches. The details of the coordinated research projects (CRPs) related to the issue of crop adaptability and supporting biodiversity implemented as part of the sub-programme are as follows: (1) The activities under the CRP 'Approaches to improvement of crop genotypes with high water and nutrient use efficiency for water scarce environments' focusses on assessing resources, in order to define and adapt best fit soil and

  19. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 17, July 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    The Plant Breeding and Genetics (PBG) Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme (NAFA/AGE) recently implemented two Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs). Particular attention was given to the first RCM of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Assessment of Nutrients Uptake from Bio-fortified Crops in Populations from Developing Countries, Vienna, Austria, 17-19 May 2006, which was co-organized with our nutritionist colleagues from the Division of Human Health, Nuclear Applications Department (NAHU), and sponsored by Harvest Plus. Hidden hunger and enhancing crop quality for nutrition will be given increased attention in the new biennium 2008-2009. We encourage you to share your input with us on this subject. Several training courses were implemented in the framework of different Technical Cooperation (TC) projects. Details about these activities are covered in this issue of the Newsletter. A highlight of these activities, as in every year since 2001, was the Inter-regional Training Course on Mutant Germplasm Characterization using Molecular Markers at the Seibersdorf Laboratories, Seibersdorf, Austria, 14 May to 16 June 2006

  20. Utilization of γ-irradiation technique on plant mutation breeding and plant growth regulation in Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Hirokatsu

    1997-01-01

    During about 30-years, we have developed γ-irradiation technique and breeding back pruning method for the study of mutation breeding of ornamental plants. As a result, we have made a wide variety of new mutant lines in chrysanthemum, narcissus, begonia rex, begonia iron cross, winter daphne, zelkova, sweet-scented oleander, abelia, kobus, and have obtained 7 plant patents. By the use of γ-irradiation to plant mutation breeding, we often observed that plants irradiated by low dose of γ-rays showed superior or inferior growth than the of non-irradiated plants. Now, we established the irradiation conditions of γ-rays for mutation breeding and growth of regulation in narcissus, tulip, Enkianthus perulatus Schneid., komatsuna, moyashi, african violet. In most cases, irradiation dose rate is suggested to be a more important factor to induce plant growth regulators than irradiation dose. (author)

  1. Plant hygiene and resistance breeding as plant protection and cultivation methods in areas where emission levels are high

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, H

    1967-01-01

    If plants are to be used for human or animal consumption, phyto-hygiene is of great importance wherever there are significant amounts of emissions. Breeding resistant plants for technical use is important in regions where atmospheric influences such as gas, steam and dust are encountered. Besides the climatic, orographic, edaphic and chronologic conditions, biologic, chemic and physico-mechanic factors influence the incompatible conceptions of phyto-hygiene and resistance breeding. Several examples are quoted.

  2. Genomic Selection in Plant Breeding: Methods, Models, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossa, José; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Cuevas, Jaime; Montesinos-López, Osval; Jarquín, Diego; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Burgueño, Juan; González-Camacho, Juan M; Pérez-Elizalde, Sergio; Beyene, Yoseph; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Singh, Ravi; Zhang, Xuecai; Gowda, Manje; Roorkiwal, Manish; Rutkoski, Jessica; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2017-11-01

    Genomic selection (GS) facilitates the rapid selection of superior genotypes and accelerates the breeding cycle. In this review, we discuss the history, principles, and basis of GS and genomic-enabled prediction (GP) as well as the genetics and statistical complexities of GP models, including genomic genotype×environment (G×E) interactions. We also examine the accuracy of GP models and methods for two cereal crops and two legume crops based on random cross-validation. GS applied to maize breeding has shown tangible genetic gains. Based on GP results, we speculate how GS in germplasm enhancement (i.e., prebreeding) programs could accelerate the flow of genes from gene bank accessions to elite lines. Recent advances in hyperspectral image technology could be combined with GS and pedigree-assisted breeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tritium breeding potential of the Princeton reference fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Price, W.G. Jr.

    1974-04-01

    A variational method is used to investigate the tritium breeding potential of the blanket of a fusion reactor. Effectiveness functions indicating the changes in the breeding ratio (BR) due to material density perturbations are calculated with the code SWAN. Results are presented analyzing the sensitivity of the BR both to cross section variations and to material density perturbations. For example, SWAN indicates a 0.176 increase in BR for the replacement of 10% of the flibe by beryllium. Implications of the sensitivity figures for design modification and optimization are discussed. 15 refs., 7 figs

  4. Use of radiation for plant breeding in Japan: results and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, I.

    1998-01-01

    In 1966, as the first breeds by radiation mutation in Japan, 'Reimei', a rice variety with increased lodging resistance by short culm mutation and Raiden', an early variety by mutation of soybean obtained by extreme late variety with nematoda resistance were bred and registered in the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. Since these characteristics of 'short culm' and early maturing' have a comparatively high mutation rate and ease of selection, among seed propagation crops many kinds of those varieties improved to have either of these characteristics or both of them at the same time by mutation breeding are bred. In Japan, varieties bred by use of mutation breeding count 107 (as of April 1998). Among crops, that with the most varieties is chrysanthemum, which has 20 varieties and the next is rice with 15 varieties. The other 38 varieties of crops such as grains, beans, industrial crops, vegetables, flowering plants, flowering trees and fruit trees, mutation breeding varieties are widely bred. Among mutagens used, gamma ray holds 80%. The recent development in the research of DNA recombination is amazing and plant bodies which have introduced useful genes which other plants have are being obtained. Radiation mutation breeding, however, has the advantages of breeding new varieties by improving only one or two characteristics of excellent races. Radiation mutation breeding and DNA recombination technologies, therefore, may need to be utilized separately according to respective purposes. In the future, for radiation mutation breeding, mutants with quality characteristics which others do not have, corresponding to the diverse demand on agricultural products must come to be required. On the other hand, by the crops like banana for which ordinary breeding is almost impossible, the expectation for radiation mutation breeding will be more and more heightened. In addition, the accumulation of studies on controlling the direction of mutation which has been regarded

  5. Plant breeding for resistance to insect pests: Considerations about the use of induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Panel was intended to stimulate proposals on specific plant breeding objectives, for immediate and long term solution. Nine papers considered the host plant resistance to particular insect pests in a variety of cases. The desirability of achieving some measure of pest control via the development of disease-resistant mutants was discussed. In its conclusions, the Panel stressed the need to consider host plant resistance as one of the primary lines of defense in all pest management programmes. Consequently, resistance to insects was recommended to become an integral part of plant breeding programmes. Preference might need to be given to developing insect resistance in those crop plants for which practical control is lacking or where current methods of pest control present critical environmental hazards. The roles of the IAEA and FAO in such projects is outlined. Guidelines and recommendations on mutation breeding for resistance to insects are given in an appendix

  6. Genetic data analysis for plant and animal breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book is an advanced textbook covering the application of quantitative genetics theory to analysis of actual data (both trait and DNA marker information) for breeding populations of crops, trees, and animals. Chapter 1 is an introduction to basic software used for trait data analysis. Chapter 2 ...

  7. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickey, John M.; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human...... that unifies breeding approaches, biological discovery, and tools and methods. Here we compare and contrast some animal and plant breeding approaches to make a case for bringing the two together through the application of genomic selection. We propose a strategy for the use of genomic selection as a unifying...... use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic prediction of breeding values has the potential to improve selection, reduce costs and provide a platform...

  8. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, John M; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian; Powell, Wayne

    2017-08-30

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic prediction of breeding values has the potential to improve selection, reduce costs and provide a platform that unifies breeding approaches, biological discovery, and tools and methods. Here we compare and contrast some animal and plant breeding approaches to make a case for bringing the two together through the application of genomic selection. We propose a strategy for the use of genomic selection as a unifying approach to deliver innovative 'step changes' in the rate of genetic gain at scale.

  9. Ethnobotanic importance of plants used in pigeon-breeding in Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Antonio; Cortés, Carolina; Peiró, Victoriano

    2013-05-20

    The importance that birds of the Columbidae family have had throughout history is visible on the Mediterranean coast. Pigeon fancying is the art of breeding and training carrier pigeons and currently, several breeds exist. The sport of racing pigeons consists in covering a distance at maximum possible speed. However, pigeon breeding has another modality called "sport pigeon", where several males follow a female. This study focusses on ethnobotanical knowledge of native and exotic plant species that are used for diet, breeding, stimulation, healing illnesses and staining the plumage of pigeons bred in captivity. Using semi-structured interviews, we gathered information about the different plant species traditionally used for pigeon-breeding in the region of Valencia. Background material on remedies for bird illnesses was gathered from folk botanical references, local books and journals.The plant species were collected in the study area, then identified in the laboratory using dichotomous keys and vouchered in the ABH (Herbarium of Alicante University). We used Excel (®) 2003 to perform a simple statistical analysis of the data collected. We collected 56 species of plants (and one variety) that included 29 botanical families. The total number of species was made up of 35 cultivated and 21 wild plants. The most common were Gramineae (14 species), Leguminosae (6 species), and Compositae (4 species). Pigeon breeding is an immensely popular activity in Eastern Spain, and ethnobiological knowledge about breeding pigeons and caring for them is considerable. The names and traditional uses of plants depend on their geographical location, vernacular names serve as an intangible heritage. Feeding, environmental features, and genetic makeup of individuals are relevant aspects in the maintenance of avian health.

  10. Designing Graduate-Level Plant Breeding Curriculum: A Delphi Study of Private Sector Stakeholder Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jane K.; Repinski, Shelby L.; Hayes, Kathryn N.; Bliss, Frederick A.; Trexler, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    A broad-based survey using the Delphi method was conducted to garner current information from private sector stakeholders and build consensus opinions supporting key ideas for enhancing plant breeder education and training. This study asked respondents to suggest and rate topics and content they deemed most important to plant breeding graduate…

  11. Use of molecular markers in plant breeding = [Het gebruik van moleculaire merkers in de plantenveredeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berloo, van R.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular markers provide plant breeding with an important and valuable new source of information. Linkage between molecular markers can be translated to genetic linkage maps, which have become an important tool in plant and animal genetics. Linkage between (quantitative) trait-data and

  12. Use of mutagenous factors in the breeding of vegetatively propagated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryagina, I.V.; Fomenko, N.N.

    1978-01-01

    Given is a review of the literature and authors data on using mutagenous factors with different nature to breed some new and useful forms of plants reproduced vegetatively. The problem history and prospects of the practical application of the method are stated. In particular the data on ionizing radiation use in fruit crop selection to breed mutation forms (effect on buds, pollen, seeds etc.) are presented

  13. The plant breeding industry after pure line theory: Lessons from the National Institute of Agricultural Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    In the early twentieth century, Wilhelm Johannsen proposed his pure line theory and the genotype/phenotype distinction, work that is prized as one of the most important founding contributions to genetics and Mendelian plant breeding. Most historians have already concluded that pure line theory did not change breeding practices directly. Instead, breeding became more orderly as a consequence of pure line theory, which structured breeding programmes and eliminated external heritable influences. This incremental change then explains how and why the large multi-national seed companies that we know today were created; pure lines invited standardisation and economies of scale that the latter were designed to exploit. Rather than focus on breeding practice, this paper examines the plant varietal market itself. It focusses upon work conducted by the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB) during the interwar years, and in doing so demonstrates that, on the contrary, the pure line was actually only partially accepted by the industry. Moreover, claims that contradicted the logic of the pure line were not merely tolerated by the agricultural geneticists affiliated with NIAB, but were acknowledged and legitimised by them. The history of how and why the plant breeding industry was transformed remains to be written. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of radiation indicator plants by molecular breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jang-Ryol; Min, Sung-Ran; Jeong, Won-Joong; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Seok-Yoon; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Hye-Sun; In, Dong-Su; Oh, Seung-Chol; Park, Sang- Gyu; Woo, Je-Wook; Kin, Tae-Hwan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Sook [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    To develop the transgenic plants with low level of antioxidant enzyme, transgenic tobacco plants (157 plants) using 8 different plant expression vectors which have APX genes in sense or antisense orientation under the control of CaMV 35S promoter or stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter were developed. The insertion of transgene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR analysis. The total APX activities of transgenic plants were enhanced or reduced by introduction of APX gene in plants. To clone the radiation-responsive genes and their promoter from plants, the NeIF2Bb, one of radiation-responsive genes from tobacco plant was characterized using molecular and cell biological tools. Promoter of GST6, a radiation-responsive gene, was cloned using RT-PCR. The GST6 promoter sequence was analyzed, and known sequence motif was searched. To develop the remediation technology of radioactively contaminated soil using transgenic plants uranium reductase and radiation resistance genes have been introduced in tobacco and indian mustard plans. The uranium reductase and radiation resistance (RecA) genes were confirmed in transgenic tobacco and indian mustard plants by PCR analysis. Also, Gene expression of uranium reductase and radiation resistance were confirmed in transgenic indian mustard plants by northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  15. Application of genetic markers in seed testing and plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic markers have been used at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad for a number of years, both for seed quality control and for research purposes. The Laboratory for Seed Testing was the first in the former Yugoslavia to use the method of control of hybrid seed genetic purity based on enzymatic polymorphism. This paper presents the application of protein markers, isozymes, seed storage proteins and DNA markers for evaluation of seed and breeding materials of various agricultural crops in Serbia.

  16. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 25, July 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Training Course on Mutation Induction and Breeding for Cereal - Wheat and Barley - Rust Resistance and Climate Hardening/Harsh Environment Adaptation Parts I and II see 'Forthcoming Events' in this issue). Regular yearly meetings are essential for harmonizing cooperation between participating Member States, the IAEA, FAO and its partners, CYMMYT (Kenya), ARS, BGRI, CAAS, BARC, ICARDA, DAFWA and the Secretariat of International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (FAO, Italy), (iii) multilocation trials of mutant germplasm in endemic hot spots/screen houses. These phases are not necessarily consecutive, but overlapping. If you navigate to our Homepage (http://wwwnaweb. iaea.org/nafa/pbg/index.html) you will find under 'Information Sources' our upgraded and updated Mutant Varieties and Genetic Stock Webpage (http://mvgs.iaea.org/). Have a look at the new features and do not forget to submit any new mutant variety (registration may be on-line). One of the new features, although still under construction, may be useful to you: our in-house protocols, Protocols and Guidelines Webpage (http://mvgs.iaea.org/LaboratoryProtocals.aspx). Here you will find detailed protocols developed/adapted and tested at the IAEA's Laboratories. You will also find information, forms and protocols for genotyping and mutagenesis services and positive control kits for mutation discovery

  17. Report from the FAO/IAEA Plant Breeding and Genetics Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-01-01

    In 1989 we cared for 44 IAEA Technical Co-operation projects involving 35 developing countries and 64 different research institutions. Under the IAEA Research Contract Programme we had 70 active research contracts and 32 research agreements grouped into the following co-ordinated research programmes: use of induced mutations in connection with haploids and heterosis in cereals (1986-1991); improvement of rice and other cereals through mutation breeding in Latin America (1986-1991); use of induced mutation and in vitro culture techniques for improving crop plant resistance to diseases (1987-1992); mutation breeding of oil seed crops (1988-1993); improvement of root and tuber crops in tropical countries of Asia (1988-1993); in vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains (1988-1993); improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations (1989-1994). New research programmes cannot be started before 1991 when present ones are phasing out. The new research programmes could eventually deal with: domestication of new crop plants, improvement of industrial crops, the use of induced mutations to establish RFLP systems for genetic mapping and for mutant selection, the use of RFLP techniques for identification of induced genetic variation in vegetatively propagated plants and in vitro cultures, the control of plant virus diseases with the help of nuclear techniques. Project proposals on these topics are welcome, although their approval will depend upon the availability of funds. Six research co-ordination meetings were held in 1989 in Thailand (2), India, Austria, Chile and Italy. The Section was also actively involved in the 12th EUCARPIA Congress 'Science for Plant Breeding' (Goettingen, FRG, 27 February - 3 March) and in the 6th Congress of SABRAO 'Breeding Research: The Key to the Survival of the Earth' (Tsukuba, Japan, 21-25 August)

  18. Natural transformation in plant breeding - a biotechnological platform for quality improvement of ornamental, agricultural and medicinal plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Himmelboe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Compactness is a desirable trait in ornamental plant breeding because it is preferred by producers, distributors and consumers. Presently, in ornamental plant production growth of many potted plants is regulated by application of chemical growth retardants, several of which are harmful to both...... (rol)-genes rolA, rolB, rolC and rolD among 18 ORFs, into the plant genome. Infection of plants by A. rhizogenes induces hairy roots, from which shoots containing rol-genes can be regenerated. Natural transformation with A. rhizogenes reveals very promising results in several plant species and can...... be useful in a broader range of application than ornamental breeding. One important aspect of this technology is that the hairy roots can be used directly in the selection proceß as a primary indicator of a succeßful transformation. Thus the technology avoids use of undesired antibiotic resistance marker...

  19. Be-Breeder – an application for analysis of genomic data in plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Inácio Matias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Be-Breeder is an application directed toward genetic breeding of plants, developed through the Shiny package of the R software, which allows different phenotype and molecular (marker analysis to be undertaken. The section for analysis of molecular data of the Be-Breeder application makes it possible to achieve quality control of genotyping data, to obtain genomic kinship matrices, and to analyze genomic selection, genome association, and genetic diversity in a simple manner on line. This application is available for use in a network through the site of the Allogamous Plant Breeding Laboratory of ESALQ-USP (http://www.genetica.esalq.usp.br/alogamas/R.html.

  20. Plant breeding and rural development in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KE Woeste; SB Blanche; KA Moldenhauer; CD Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Plant breeders contributed enormously to the agricultural and economic development of the United States. By improving the profitability of farming, plant breeders improved the economic condition of farmers and contributed to the growth and structure of rural communities. In the years since World War II, agriculture and the quality of rural life have been driven by...

  1. Intellectual property rights, international trade and plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eaton, D.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Seed is the physical embodiment of the invention of the plant breeder. Plant varieties thus constitute a special form of innovation, and an assessment of intellectual property right (IPR) systems needs to take this into account. This thesis concentrates on IPRs but breeders do have a number of means

  2. Invasion Success by Plant Breeding Evolutionary Changes as a Critical Factor for the Invasion of the Ornamental Plant Mahonia aquifolium

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Christel Anne

    2009-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to global biodiversity and cause significant economic costs. Studying biological invasions is both essential for preventing future invasions and is also useful in order to understand basic ecological processes. Christel Ross investigates whether evolutionary changes by plant breeding are a relevant factor for the invasion success of Mahonia aquifolium in Germany. Her findings show that invasive populations differ from native populations in quantitative-genetic traits and molecular markers, whereas their genetic diversity is similar. She postulates that these evolutionary changes are rather a result of plant breeding, which includes interspecific hybridisation, than the result of a genetic bottleneck or the releases from specialist herbivores.

  3. Mitigation of inbreeding while preserving genetic gain in genomic breeding programs for outbred plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zibei; Shi, Fan; Hayes, Ben J; Daetwyler, Hans D

    2017-05-01

    Heuristic genomic inbreeding controls reduce inbreeding in genomic breeding schemes without reducing genetic gain. Genomic selection is increasingly being implemented in plant breeding programs to accelerate genetic gain of economically important traits. However, it may cause significant loss of genetic diversity when compared with traditional schemes using phenotypic selection. We propose heuristic strategies to control the rate of inbreeding in outbred plants, which can be categorised into three types: controls during mate allocation, during selection, and simultaneous selection and mate allocation. The proposed mate allocation measure GminF allocates two or more parents for mating in mating groups that minimise coancestry using a genomic relationship matrix. Two types of relationship-adjusted genomic breeding values for parent selection candidates ([Formula: see text]) and potential offspring ([Formula: see text]) are devised to control inbreeding during selection and even enabling simultaneous selection and mate allocation. These strategies were tested in a case study using a simulated perennial ryegrass breeding scheme. As compared to the genomic selection scheme without controls, all proposed strategies could significantly decrease inbreeding while achieving comparable genetic gain. In particular, the scenario using [Formula: see text] in simultaneous selection and mate allocation reduced inbreeding to one-third of the original genomic selection scheme. The proposed strategies are readily applicable in any outbred plant breeding program.

  4. BreedVision — A Multi-Sensor Platform for Non-Destructive Field-Based Phenotyping in Plant Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Lucas; Mentrup, Daniel; Möller, Kim; Wunder, Erik; Alheit, Katharina; Hahn, Volker; Maurer, Hans Peter; Reif, Jochen C.; Würschum, Tobias; Müller, Joachim; Rahe, Florian; Ruckelshausen, Arno

    2013-01-01

    To achieve the food and energy security of an increasing World population likely to exceed nine billion by 2050 represents a major challenge for plant breeding. Our ability to measure traits under field conditions has improved little over the last decades and currently constitutes a major bottleneck in crop improvement. This work describes the development of a tractor-pulled multi-sensor phenotyping platform for small grain cereals with a focus on the technological development of the system. Various optical sensors like light curtain imaging, 3D Time-of-Flight cameras, laser distance sensors, hyperspectral imaging as well as color imaging are integrated into the system to collect spectral and morphological information of the plants. The study specifies: the mechanical design, the system architecture for data collection and data processing, the phenotyping procedure of the integrated system, results from field trials for data quality evaluation, as well as calibration results for plant height determination as a quantified example for a platform application. Repeated measurements were taken at three developmental stages of the plants in the years 2011 and 2012 employing triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmack L.) as a model species. The technical repeatability of measurement results was high for nearly all different types of sensors which confirmed the high suitability of the platform under field conditions. The developed platform constitutes a robust basis for the development and calibration of further sensor and multi-sensor fusion models to measure various agronomic traits like plant moisture content, lodging, tiller density or biomass yield, and thus, represents a major step towards widening the bottleneck of non-destructive phenotyping for crop improvement and plant genetic studies. PMID:23447014

  5. 78 FR 45494 - Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... areas, including a discussion of relevant work, goals, and results. In the late morning, the audience... development programs and/or their perception of needs and potential improvements in publicly-funded plant...

  6. Nuclear plant problem needs a federal solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitser, B.S.

    1984-01-01

    Utilities presently committed to nuclear construction programs, regardless of their stage of completion, are experiencing a marked decline in financial health which the author of the following believes will be a long-term trend. Concerns over quality control, siting misgivings, cost underestimates, and consequential rate shock have increased pessimism on the part of investors, ratepayers, and regulators. The article describes the financial challenges facing one nuclear utility and discusses the factors contributing to widely disparate rate impact projections offered by utilities and regulators. The solution to financing difficulties imposed by cancellations and delays may lie with yet another player: the federal government. Outlining its potential advantages and problems, the author offers his proposal

  7. Whole-genome regression and prediction methods applied to plant and animal breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los Campos, De G.; Hickey, J.M.; Pong-Wong, R.; Daetwyler, H.D.; Calus, M.P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic-enabled prediction is becoming increasingly important in animal and plant breeding, and is also receiving attention in human genetics. Deriving accurate predictions of complex traits requires implementing whole-genome regression (WGR) models where phenotypes are regressed on thousands of

  8. Following the genes that make resistant plants: shared tools for breeding and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although plant pathology and breeding are distinct disciplines with unique perspectives, they frequently share a common goal: that of identifying and understanding durable resistance, the kind of resistance that will not be overcome quickly and will remain effective against a wide array of isolates....

  9. The consequences of the concept of naturalness for organic plant breeding and propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Struik, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Organic agriculture is enhancing specific plant breeding activities to meet its requirements for varieties better adapted to the specific organic environment. In the past five years, therefore, attempts have been made to translate the principles of organic farming into rules, regulations and

  10. Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumanovic, J.; Ehrenberg, L. [Institute for the Application of Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Veterinary Medicine and Forestry, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1968-07-01

    Against the background of the world's urgent need for increased protein production and for an improved quality of vegetable proteins, the ability of plant breeding to contribute to this need is discussed. With examples especially from maize and wheat, existing variations in protein content and protein composition are surveyed, together with the interdependence of these characteristics and their co-variation with the yield. It is shown that plant breeding has a great potential for improving the world's food situation. It is also shown that more rapid achievements are possible than is generally considered to be characteristic of plant-breeding techniques. Special emphasis is stressed on: (a) The capacity of mutation breeding, alone and in conjunction with other methods, to contribute to an increased production of high quality protein; (b) The necessity for the success of programmes whereby fast, cheap, and if possible non-destructive analytical procedures are developed to determine protein and amino acids; (c) The importance of the close collaboration of plant breeders with specialists in related subjects such as soil fertilization, physiology and nutrition, food technology, and biochemistry; (d) The importance of international co-operation and co-ordination. (author)

  11. Climate Change Effects to Plant Ecosystems - Genetic Resources for Future Barley Breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvordsen, Cathrine Heinz

    were identified for possible use in breeding of climate resilient cultivars and SNP-markers that link to traits favourable in changed environments. Basic knowledge of plant response to multifactor climate treatments has been added as well as data on numerous genotypes modeling the impact of climate...

  12. Effectors as Tools in Disease Resistance Breeding Against Biotrophic, Hemibiotrophic, and Necrotrophic Plant Pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleeshouwers, V.G.A.A.; Oliver, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    One of most important challenges in plant breeding is improving resistance to the plethora of pathogens that threaten our crops. The ever-growing world population, changing pathogen populations, and fungicide resistance issues have increased the urgency of this task. In addition to a vital inflow of

  13. Participatory Plant Breeding with Traders and Farmers for White Pea Bean in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, T.; Sperling, L.; Dagne, B.; Argaw, W.; Tessema, D.; Beebe, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This research, conducted in Ethiopia, involved select stakeholders in the variety evaluation process early: to identify a greater number of acceptable varieties and to shorten a lengthy research and release process. Design/methodology/approach: A Participatory Plant Breeding (PPB) approach was used in both on-station and community-based…

  14. Genomic selection in plant breeding: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannink, Jean-Luc; Lorenz, Aaron J; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2010-03-01

    We intuitively believe that the dramatic drop in the cost of DNA marker information we have experienced should have immediate benefits in accelerating the delivery of crop varieties with improved yield, quality and biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. But these traits are complex and affected by many genes, each with small effect. Traditional marker-assisted selection has been ineffective for such traits. The introduction of genomic selection (GS), however, has shifted that paradigm. Rather than seeking to identify individual loci significantly associated with a trait, GS uses all marker data as predictors of performance and consequently delivers more accurate predictions. Selection can be based on GS predictions, potentially leading to more rapid and lower cost gains from breeding. The objectives of this article are to review essential aspects of GS and summarize the important take-home messages from recent theoretical, simulation and empirical studies. We then look forward and consider research needs surrounding methodological questions and the implications of GS for long-term selection.

  15. Report from the FAO/IAEA Plant Breeding and Genetics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Technology development is a pre-requisite for further success in practical applications of nuclear techniques in plant genetics and crop improvement. The Research Contract Programme of the IAEA is a good means to stimulate the needed technology development. Present FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programmes concentrate upon the incorporation of in-vitro culture techniques into mutation breeding projects: In cereals by doubled-haploids for accelerating mutation selection, in root and tuber crops by eliminating chimerism through somatic embryogenesis, in mutation breeding for disease resistance by attempting in-vitro selection using pathotoxins where applicable. The Plant Breeding Unit of the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory contributes particularly to the methodology of mutation induction by irradiation of plant material before or during in-vitro culture. Whether the FAO/IAEA Plant Breeding and Genetics Section should include already molecular genetics in its research and training programmes was the main question addressed to a Consultants' Meeting in November. The answer was definitely positive regarding the use of Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, but deferred other more sophisticated work recognizing the limited resources. Another new subject matter seriously considered now is the development of tracer techniques for the diagnosis of viruses, viroids and similar causal agents of plant diseases, which eventually could lead to better ways of distinguishing between resistance and susceptibility, particularly in vegetatively propagated and perennial crops. The resources for such work still have to be found. If resources become available, we would also like to start a co-ordinated research programme on domestication of plants for industrial purposes. Project proposals are welcome. As far as assistance to Member States is concerned, in 1988 we began to pay more attention to plant breeding problems in Africa. There was interaction with oil seed breeders during an

  16. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 37, July 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    The mission of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division is continually evolving to address novel challenges in MSs and nuclear applications continue to provide added value to conventional approaches in addressing a range of agricultural problems and issues. Member States are increasingly concerned with climate change and have expressed their support in responding to emerging challenges related to transboundary plant diseases

  17. Breeding crop plants with deep roots: their role in sustainable carbon, nutrient and water sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The soil represents a reservoir that contains at least twice as much carbon as does the atmosphere, yet (apart from ‘root crops’) mainly just the above-ground plant biomass is harvested in agriculture, and plant photosynthesis represents the effective origin of the overwhelming bulk of soil carbon. However, present estimates of the carbon sequestration potential of soils are based more on what is happening now than what might be changed by active agricultural intervention, and tend to concentrate only on the first metre of soil depth. Scope Breeding crop plants with deeper and bushy root ecosystems could simultaneously improve both the soil structure and its steady-state carbon, water and nutrient retention, as well as sustainable plant yields. The carbon that can be sequestered in the steady state by increasing the rooting depths of crop plants and grasses from, say, 1 m to 2 m depends significantly on its lifetime(s) in different molecular forms in the soil, but calculations (http://dbkgroup.org/carbonsequestration/rootsystem.html) suggest that this breeding strategy could have a hugely beneficial effect in stabilizing atmospheric CO2. This sets an important research agenda, and the breeding of plants with improved and deep rooting habits and architectures is a goal well worth pursuing. PMID:21813565

  18. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 36, January 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges facing humanity include climate variability and change with an impact on food security and agricultural development, health, elimination of poverty and management of water resources, together with the need for a cleaner and safer environment. In this regard, nuclear technologies have proven efficient to help meet these challenges. New crop varieties are bred with higher and more stable and sustainable yield potentials, with higher adaptability and resilience to climate variability and change. The use of mutation induction for creating useful new germplasm and developing new cultivars is a profitable approach to improvement. In 2015, we supported 52 national and regional TC projects. The major focus of these projects, especially the regional ones, is on adaptability and resilience to the negative effects of climate variability and change on agronomic productivity. For Latin America and sub- Saharan Africa, drought and heat are major constraints of crop production. Breeding drought tolerant varieties of staple crops providing the preferred consumer quality and market traits is a challenge for breeders. Floods are the most frequent calamities amongst all natural disasters and East Asia and the Pacific region, along with South Asia, are particularly vulnerable. Climate change and variability are expected to bring about increased typhoon activity, rising sea levels and out-of-phase monsoon seasons in South East Asia and other regions. Mitigating this situation requires an integrated approach to develop technology packages of mutant lines (broader adaptability to warrant sustainable high yield under variable climatic conditions) with proper water and nutrient utilization practices. In this context, mutation induction techniques have shown potential as a valuable tool in developing improved crop cultivars tolerant to flood/submergence

  19. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 28, January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Inside this issue, you will find reports (see especially 'Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) and Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs)' section) on approaches to improve genotypes with high water and nutrition use efficiency for water scarce environments and on climate proofing food crops. The improvement of crops for adaptation to high temperatures in drought prone areas, and addressing other negative effects of climate variability and change, is of prime importance to achieve sustainable food security. To this end, technology packages must be developed and adapted and capacity must be developed. We report on the availability of new protocols and guidelines on low cost, simple and user-friendly mutation detection (http://mvgs.iaea.org/LaboratoryProtocals.aspx). These genotyping and phenotyping protocols are adapted for use by breeders in developing countries and include DNA extraction techniques and simple gel electrophoresis methods as well as seedling salinity screening of rice in hydroponics and soil, and drought tolerance screening. There are also new protocols for irradiation screening and radiosensitivity testing for mutation induction. Further, this biennium, we provided 10 low cost technology packages for mutation detection to national breeding programmes and other research institutions, the last six months alone three, encompassing low cost, PBGL developed and adapted TILLING kits, including reference DNA and specific protocols and guidelines (learn more about further PBGL activities in this issue). In line with tradition, we aim to report highlights to you in each volume of our newsletter. One major achievement to single out for the current volume is undoubtedly the promising development reported by participants in the Technical Cooperation project INT/5/150 on 'Responding to the transboundary threat of wheat black stem rust (Ug99)', that ten M5 resistant lines have been submitted to international yield trials (read the full story inside this issue

  20. Plant cultivars derived from mutation induction or the use of induced mutants in cross breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micke, A.; Maluszynski, M.; Donini, B.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1969 we have collected information on cultivated varieties of plants, developed by using induced mutations. Whenever we learn about a cultivar presumably derived from an induced mutant or from use of mutants in crosses. we mail a questionnaire to the breeder. The information gathered in this way is stored in our file on ''Mutant Varieties''. Excerpts are published regularly in the form of a list in the FAO/IAEA Mutation Breeding Newsletter. Our mutant variety list has repeatedly provided a basis for analyses on the value and prospects of mutation breeding

  1. Plant cultivars derived from mutation induction or the use of induced mutants in cross breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micke, A; Maluszynski, M; Donini, B [Joint FAO/IAEA Division, Plant Breeding and Genetics Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-05-01

    Since 1969 we have collected information on cultivated varieties of plants, developed by using induced mutations. Whenever we learn about a cultivar presumably derived from an induced mutant or from use of mutants in crosses. we mail a questionnaire to the breeder. The information gathered in this way is stored in our file on ''Mutant Varieties''. Excerpts are published regularly in the form of a list in the FAO/IAEA Mutation Breeding Newsletter. Our mutant variety list has repeatedly provided a basis for analyses on the value and prospects of mutation breeding.

  2. Current status of molecular biological techniques for plant breeding in the Republic of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Si-Myung; Park, Bum-Seok; Yun, In-Sun; Goo, Doe-Hoe; Kim, Seok-Dong [Rural Development Administration, National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    Classical plant breeding has played an important role in developing new varieties in current agriculture. For decades, the technique of cross-pollination has been popular for breeding in cereal and horticultural crops to introduce special traits. However, recently the molecular techniques get widely accepted as an alternative tool in both introducing a useful trait for developing the new cultivars and investigating the characteristics of a trait in plant, like the identification of a gene. Using the advanced molecular technique, several genetically modified (GM) crops (e.g., Roundup Ready Soybean, YieldGard, LibertyLink etc.) became commercially cultivated and appeared in the global market since 1996. The GM crops, commercially available at the moment, could be regarded as successful achievements in history of crop breeding conferring the specific gene into economically valuable crops to make them better. Along with such achievements, on the other hand these new crops have also caused the controversial debate on the safety of GM crops as human consumption and environmental release as well. Nevertheless, molecular techniques are widespread and popular in both investigating the basic science of plant biology and breeding new varieties compared to their conventional counterparts. Thus, the Department of Bioresources at the National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (NIAST) has been using the molecular biological techniques as a complimentary tool for the improvement of crop varieties for almost two decades. (author)

  3. Responsible decision-making for plant research and breeding innovations in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Chatzopoulou, Sevasti

    2017-01-01

    Plant research and breeding has made substantial technical progress over the past few decades, indicating a potential for tremendous societal impact. Due to this potential, the development of policies and legislation on plant breeding and the technical progress should preferably involve all...... relevant stakeholders. However, we argue here that there is a substantial imbalance in the European Union (EU) regarding the influence of the various stakeholder groups on policy makers. We use evidence from three examples in order to show that the role of science is overlooked: 1) important delays...... in the decision process concerning the authorization of genetically modified (GM) maize events, 2) the significance attributed to non-scientific reasons in new legislation concerning the prohibition of GM events in EU member states, and 3) failure of the European Commission to deliver legal guidance to new plant...

  4. Managing phenol contents in crop plants by phytochemical farming and breeding-visions and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutter, Dieter

    2010-03-02

    Two main fields of interest form the background of actual demand for optimized levels of phenolic compounds in crop plants. These are human health and plant resistance to pathogens and to biotic and abiotic stress factors. A survey of agricultural technologies influencing the biosynthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds in crop plants is presented, including observations on the effects of light, temperature, mineral nutrition, water management, grafting, elevated atmospheric CO(2), growth and differentiation of the plant and application of elicitors, stimulating agents and plant activators. The underlying mechanisms are discussed with respect to carbohydrate availability, trade-offs to competing demands as well as to regulatory elements. Outlines are given for genetic engineering and plant breeding. Constraints and possible physiological feedbacks are considered for successful and sustainable application of agricultural techniques with respect to management of plant phenol profiles and concentrations.

  5. Participatory plant breeding and organic agriculture: A synergistic model for organic variety development in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C. Shelton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Organic farmers require improved varieties that have been adapted to their unique soils, nutrient inputs, management practices, and pest pressures. One way to develop adapted varieties is to situate breeding programs in the environment of intended use, such as directly on organic farms, and in collaboration with organic farmers. This model is a form of participatory plant breeding, and was originally created in order to meet the needs of under-served, small-scale farmers in developing countries. A robust body of literature supports the quantitative genetic selection theory of participatory plant breeding, and helps to explain its increasing prevalence among organic breeding projects in the United States. The history of the organic farming movement in the United States highlights the cultural relevance of engaging organic farmers in the breeding process, complementing the biological rationale for participatory plant breeding. In addition, limited private investment in organic plant breeding encourages the involvement of plant breeders at public institutions. This paper synthesizes the biological, cultural, and economic justifications for utilizing participatory plant breeding as an appropriate methodology for organic cultivar development.

  6. Gamma greenhouse for chronic irradiation in plant mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Rusli Ibrahim; Sobri Hussein

    2009-01-01

    The gamma greenhouse makes use of chronic irradiation from a 137 Cs source (double encapsulated 800 Ci caesium-137 pencil) producing a low dose rate, which is considered to be more effective in recovering and producing useful mutants in comparison to acute irradiation. The irradiation facility comprises an open topped irradiation area 30 m in diameter, protected by a partial concrete wall with entry maze and site topography. For safety, the facility is protected by a sophisticated interlock system, which only allows the source to be exposed when all the prerequisite safety conditions are met, and automatically returns the source to the safe storage position if any safety device is compromised. The main irradiation area is further protected by a 300 m diameter exclusion zone that is also protected by the safety interlock circuit. The facility can accommodate a wide range of plant materials such as seeds, seedlings in pots, cuttings, callus, somatic embryos and suspension cell cultures. Plant samples will be exposed to low dose gamma radiation over long periods of time (hours, weeks, months), depending on their nature and sensitivity. There was evidence whereby exposure of tissue culture materials to continuous low dose gamma irradiation resulting in considerably elevated somaclonal variation frequency without negative effects on culture response. It is not surprising that in vitro culture generating somaclonal variation together with in vitro mutagenesis inducing mutation lead to a higher variation frequency due to possible addition of mutagenic effect by in vitro mutagenesis to somaclonal variability arising from in vitro culture as well as the interaction between them. (Author)

  7. Report from the FAO/IAEA Plant Breeding and Genetics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In spite of a financial crisis of the UN-system, we were able to keep up essential activities. The co-ordinated research programme on cereal improvement using doubled-haploids but also heterosis from induced mutations started in 1986 and continued during the past year. A new regional co-ordinated research programme for Latin America, primarily for rice improvement had its first co-ordination meeting 30 March - 3 April 1987 in Quito, Ecuador. The co-ordinated research programme for identification and use of induced semi-dwarf mutants as alternative genetic sources for rice breeding completed its work with the final co-ordination meeting at Hangzhou, China, July 1987. In-vitro culture technology for mutation breeding is given high priority, e.g. for improving crop plant resistance to diseases. At the first co-ordination meeting of a new programme in September 1987, it was decided to concentrate efforts first on studying the use of toxins for in-vitro screening of resistant mutants and comparing toxin resistance with the reaction to pathogen attack under greenhouse and field conditions. Oil seeds and industrial crops have unfortunately so far received lower priority in FAO/IAEA projects, but we now look forward with some optimism to establish a global network on sesame improvement, in co-operation with the FAO Plant Production and Protection Division. A consultants meeting for this purpose was hosted by IAEA in Vienna in September 1987. The use of mutagenesis to accelerate the domestication of new crop plants - relevant for developing as well as for developed countries - had been subject of an expert discussion already in November 1986 (see MBNL No. 29). FAO and IAEA were advised to pay attention to this important task, but we still have to see whether funds become available. Vegetatively propagated plants like root and tuber crops, bananas and plantains, or woody perennials are looked upon frequently as a particular domaine of mutation breeding, which is not yet

  8. IAEA and FAO Honour Achievements in Radiation-Supported Plant Breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Awards honouring teams of scientists who have helped increase food security by using radiation to breed better crop varieties were presented today by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. Mutation breeding, which uses radiation to mimic natural plant mutation events, is a well-established method that enables plant breeders to work with farmers to develop variations of rice, barley, sesame and other crops that are higher-yielding and more resistant to disease. The awards were initiated by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture to celebrate successes achieved so far and promote the development of further sustainable crop varieties. The Joint Division - a strategic partnership between the IAEA and the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization that is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year - supports countries in their use of the method. ''Through the use of plant mutation breeding, nuclear techniques help to create new strains of plants with characteristics that allow them to resist disease and thrive under harsh conditions, such as high altitudes and saline soils,'' Director General Amano said at an award ceremony at the IAEA headquarters, where he handed certificates to representatives of the countries of award recipients. ''The development of new varieties of food crops will be increasingly important in the future as the world tries to adapt to the potential impacts of climate change.''

  9. Potential of in vitro mutation breeding for the improvement of vegetatively propagated crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Significant progress has been realized in a number of technologies (e.g., protoplast cultures), collectively referred to as plant cell and tissue culture, within the last decade. In vitro culture technologies offer great potentials for the improvement of crop plants, both sexually and asexually propagated; however, to realize these potentials plant regeneration from selected cells must be achieved for the species of interest. Where whole plants have been regenerated from selected cells, the mutant trait was expressed in some but not in all cases, and the inheritance patterns included maternal, recessive, semi-dominant and dominant (epigenetic events have also been reported). Improved cultivars of sugarcane have been developed from in vitro culture selections. In vitro mutation breeding can be done using an array of physical and chemical mutagens that has been found to be effective in the treatment of seeds, pollen, vegetative plant parts and growing plants. Selection at the cell level for a range of mutant traits has been demonstrated; however, innovative selection schemes will have to be developed to select for agriculturally important traits such as date of maturity, resistance to lodging, height etc. An interdisciplinary team approach involving the combined use of in vitro culture technology, mutagenesis, and plant breeding/genetics offers the greatest probability for success in crop improvement. (author)

  10. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 27, July 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    As a year has half passed by now, we might look back and consider the frailty of human nature. Besides natural and human made hazards and disasters, the continuous pressure of food insecurity is heightened by the more and more evident effects of climate variability and change. Amongst others, a change in climate would have an effect on the world's vegetation zones. An increase in temperature would affect species composition and thus affect ecosystems. Up to two thirds of the world's forests would undergo major changes, deserts would become hotter, and desertification would extend and become harder to reverse. A change in the boundaries between grassland, forest and shrublands would occur. This change in vegetation zones could cause famine in arid areas such as Africa that depend on a certain type of crop. This could cause an increased population pressure on urban and peri-urban zones due to the exodus from afflicted arid rural regions. The range of pests could also change if the vegetation changed. This could bring about an increase in disease levels. Global climate change has already had observable effects on the environment. Temperatures are rising, glaciers have shrunk, ice on rivers and lakes is breaking up earlier, plant and animal ranges have shifted, trees are flowering sooner, landscapes are changing also due to massive land erosion, there is an increased risk of drought, fire and floods, stronger storms cause increased storm damage and more heat-related spreads of diseases and pests put (agro-)biodiversity at risk and cause economic losses. Consequently, the concern about sustainable food security is a red thread leading through this issue of our Newsletter. In this issue, you will find some of our modest contributions to consolidate food security under the pressure of climate change.

  11. Plant Breeding and Genetics Newsletter, No. 27, July 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    As a year has half passed by now, we might look back and consider the frailty of human nature. Besides natural and human made hazards and disasters, the continuous pressure of food insecurity is heightened by the more and more evident effects of climate variability and change. Amongst others, a change in climate would have an effect on the world's vegetation zones. An increase in temperature would affect species composition and thus affect ecosystems. Up to two thirds of the world's forests would undergo major changes, deserts would become hotter, and desertification would extend and become harder to reverse. A change in the boundaries between grassland, forest and shrublands would occur. This change in vegetation zones could cause famine in arid areas such as Africa that depend on a certain type of crop. This could cause an increased population pressure on urban and peri-urban zones due to the exodus from afflicted arid rural regions. The range of pests could also change if the vegetation changed. This could bring about an increase in disease levels. Global climate change has already had observable effects on the environment. Temperatures are rising, glaciers have shrunk, ice on rivers and lakes is breaking up earlier, plant and animal ranges have shifted, trees are flowering sooner, landscapes are changing also due to massive land erosion, there is an increased risk of drought, fire and floods, stronger storms cause increased storm damage and more heat-related spreads of diseases and pests put (agro-)biodiversity at risk and cause economic losses. Consequently, the concern about sustainable food security is a red thread leading through this issue of our Newsletter. In this issue, you will find some of our modest contributions to consolidate food security under the pressure of climate change.

  12. Whole-Genome Regression and Prediction Methods Applied to Plant and Animal Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Hickey, John M.; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Daetwyler, Hans D.; Calus, Mario P. L.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic-enabled prediction is becoming increasingly important in animal and plant breeding and is also receiving attention in human genetics. Deriving accurate predictions of complex traits requires implementing whole-genome regression (WGR) models where phenotypes are regressed on thousands of markers concurrently. Methods exist that allow implementing these large-p with small-n regressions, and genome-enabled selection (GS) is being implemented in several plant and animal breeding programs. The list of available methods is long, and the relationships between them have not been fully addressed. In this article we provide an overview of available methods for implementing parametric WGR models, discuss selected topics that emerge in applications, and present a general discussion of lessons learned from simulation and empirical data analysis in the last decade. PMID:22745228

  13. Be-Breeder - an application for analysis of genomic data in plant breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Matias,Filipe Inácio; Granato,Italo Stefanine Correa; Dequigiovanni,Gabriel; Fritsche-Neto,Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Be-Breeder is an application directed toward genetic breeding of plants, developed through the Shiny package of the R software, which allows different phenotype and molecular (marker) analysis to be undertaken. The section for analysis of molecular data of the Be-Breeder application makes it possible to achieve quality control of genotyping data, to obtain genomic kinship matrices, and to analyze genome selection, genome association, and genetic diversity in a simple manner on line. ...

  14. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, John M; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian; Powell, Wayne; Implementing Genomic Selection in CGIAR Breeding Programs Workshop Participants

    2017-01-01

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic pre...

  15. Food science meets plant science: A case study on improved nutritional quality by breeding for glucosinolate retention during food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennig, K.; Verkerk, R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Dekker, M.; Bonnema, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional quality of vegetables is affected by several steps in the food chain. Up to now the effects of these different steps are mostly studied separately. We propose the cooperation between plant breeding and food technology by using food technological parameters as breeding traits to identify

  16. Responsible decision-making for plant research and breeding innovations in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Dennis; Chatzopoulou, Sevasti

    2018-01-02

    Plant research and breeding has made substantial technical progress over the past few decades, indicating a potential for tremendous societal impact. Due to this potential, the development of policies and legislation on plant breeding and the technical progress should preferably involve all relevant stakeholders. However, we argue here that there is a substantial imbalance in the European Union (EU) regarding the influence of the various stakeholder groups on policy makers. We use evidence from three examples in order to show that the role of science is overlooked: 1) important delays in the decision process concerning the authorization of genetically modified (GM) maize events, 2) the significance attributed to non-scientific reasons in new legislation concerning the prohibition of GM events in EU member states, and 3) failure of the European Commission to deliver legal guidance to new plant breeding techniques despite sufficient scientific evidence and advisory reports. We attribute this imbalance to misinformation and misinterpretation of public perceptions and a disproportionate attention to single outlier reports, and we present ideas on how to establish a better stakeholder balance within this field.

  17. Proceedings of the FNCA workshop on plant mutation breeding 2001. Molecular biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Tano, Shigemitsu

    2002-02-01

    The FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) Workshop on Plant Mutation Breeding was held on 20-24 August 2001 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Workshop was sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The Kasetsart University (KU), the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and Department of Agriculture (DOA) acted as local host and the organizer with the cooperation of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) of Japan, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The Workshop was attended by two participants, a Project Leader and an expert on molecular biological techniques for plant mutation breeding, from each of the participating countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam. One participant from the Republic of Korea, nine participants from Japan and thirteen participants from Thailand including three invited speakers attended the Workshop. Eleven papers including three invited papers on the current status of molecular biological techniques for plant mutation breeding were presented. Discussions were focused to further regional cooperation, to review and discuss results of past activities. The Medium-Term Plan of the project on the application of radiation and radioisotopes for agriculture in participating countries of Regional Nuclear Cooperation Activities (RNCA) was formulated and agreed. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers that were submitted from the speakers. (author)

  18. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS, an ultimate marker-assisted selection (MAS tool to accelerate plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng eHe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Marker-assisted selection (MAS refers to the use of molecular markers to assist phenotypic selections in crop improvement. Several types of molecular markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, have been identified and effectively used in plant breeding. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies has led to remarkable advances in whole genome sequencing, which provides ultra-throughput sequences to revolutionize plant genotyping and breeding. To further broaden NGS usages to large crop genomes such as maize and wheat, genotyping by sequencing (GBS has been developed and applied in sequencing multiplexed samples that combine molecular marker discovery and genotyping. GBS is a novel application of NGS protocols for discovering and genotyping SNPs in crop genomes and populations. The GBS approach includes the digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes followed by the ligation of barcode adapter, PCR amplification and sequencing of the amplified DNA pool on a single lane of flow cells. Bioinformatic pipelines are needed to analyze and interpret GBS datasets. As an ultimate MAS tool and a cost-effective technique, GBS has been successfully used in implementing genome-wide association study (GWAS, genomic diversity study, genetic linkage analysis, molecular marker discovery and genomic selection (GS under a large scale of plant breeding programs.

  19. The improvement of cotton plant in mutation breeding dry climate areas at NTB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilik Harsanti

    2015-01-01

    The opportunity of cotton plant to become a major crop in Indonesia is widely opened due to its extensive adaptability, productivity, efficiency of nutrient intake, and relatively resistant against pests and plant diseases. Generally, cotton plant is an important industrial crop in textile manufacture. Cotton plant has been known and planted for a long time ago by the local farmer, especially at Java, NTB and NTT. Plant mutation breeding have the mutant lines genetic for plant. The mutant lines of cotton plant, which originally come from embryogenic tissue culture (embryo axis, NIAB-999), were irradiated with dose of 20 Gy. Gamma Chamber 4000-A with source of 60 Cobalt was used for the irradiation treatment. The experiments were done at Citayam by designed by randomized Block design with five replications. Both of mutant lines were planted in the plot with size of 8 × 7 m 2 and 10 × 100 cm of spacing. Kanesia 15 variety was used as a control. The parameters observed were the days of maturity, plant height, number of generative branches, number of fruit/plant, weight of 100 cotton boll per plot. As the results, CN 2A has the biggest productivity, shown by the weight of the cotton fiber per plot, which is 447.510 kg compared to Kanesia 15 and NIAB 999 is control national and control mother. (author)

  20. Utilization of ionizing radiations and radioisotopes in plant breeding and crop improvement in Arab countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Hegazi, A.M.T.

    1983-01-01

    A review for research work in the field of utilizing ionizing radiations and radioisotopes in plant breeding and crop improvement conducted in Arab countries has been summerized and discussed in the light of some economic features of the crop or the plant on national or regional (arab) level. Among the 241 articles in the above mentioned fields reviewed, around 230 articles were conducted in Egypt, 6 in Iraq, 2 in Algeria and 2 in Sudan. Some of the articles dealing with more than one crop and/or more than one type of radiation or radioisotope

  1. Accelerated Generation of Selfed Pure Line Plants for Gene Identification and Crop Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Yan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of pure lines is an important step in biological studies and breeding of many crop plants. The major types of pure lines for biological studies and breeding include doubled haploid (DH lines, recombinant inbred lines (RILs, and near isogenic lines (NILs. DH lines can be produced through microspore and megaspore culture followed by chromosome doubling while RILs and NILs can be produced through introgressions or repeated selfing of hybrids. DH approach was developed as a quicker method than conventional method to produce pure lines. However, its drawbacks of genotype-dependency and only a single chance of recombination limited its wider application. A recently developed fast generation cycling system (FGCS achieved similar times to those of DH for the production of selfed pure lines but is more versatile as it is much less genotype-dependent than DH technology and does not restrict recombination to a single event. The advantages and disadvantages of the technologies and their produced pure line populations for different purposes of biological research and breeding are discussed. The development of a concept of complete in vitro meiosis and mitosis system is also proposed. This could integrate with the recently developed technologies of single cell genomic sequencing and genome wide selection, leading to a complete laboratory based pre-breeding scheme.

  2. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), an ultimate marker-assisted selection (MAS) tool to accelerate plant breeding

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Laroche, André; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Liu, HongKui; Li, Ziqin

    2014-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) refers to the use of molecular markers to assist phenotypic selections in crop improvement. Several types of molecular markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), have been identified and effectively used in plant breeding. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has led to remarkable advances in whole genome sequencing, which provides ultra-throughput sequences to revolutionize plant genotyping and breeding. To further broad...

  3. Prediction of genetic values of quantitative traits with epistatic effects in plant breeding populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Salah El-Basyoni, I; Stephen Baenziger, P; Crossa, J; Eskridge, K M; Dweikat, I

    2012-11-01

    Though epistasis has long been postulated to have a critical role in genetic regulation of important pathways as well as provide a major source of variation in the process of speciation, the importance of epistasis for genomic selection in the context of plant breeding is still being debated. In this paper, we report the results on the prediction of genetic values with epistatic effects for 280 accessions in the Nebraska Wheat Breeding Program using adaptive mixed least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). The development of adaptive mixed LASSO, originally designed for association mapping, for the context of genomic selection is reported. The results show that adaptive mixed LASSO can be successfully applied to the prediction of genetic values while incorporating both marker main effects and epistatic effects. Especially, the prediction accuracy is substantially improved by the inclusion of two-locus epistatic effects (more than onefold in some cases as measured by cross-validation correlation coefficient), which is observed for multiple traits and planting locations. This points to significant potential in using non-additive genetic effects for genomic selection in crop breeding practices.

  4. Genetic variation in degradability of wheat straw and potential for improvement through plant breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Wagner; Magid, Jakob; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2011-01-01

    contemporary gene pool. The cultivars were grown at two different locations to assess the potential for breeding for improved degradability. The straws exhibited much variation in degradability ranging from 258 g kg1 to 407 g kg1 of dry matter. The heritability for degradability was estimated to 29% indicating...... a reasonable potential for response to selection. Inclusion of height as a regression-term, indicated that only a minor part of genetic differences are directly related to plant height and that improvements in degradability may be achieved without unacceptable changes in straw length. Finally, a lack...... of correlation between degradability and grain yield indicated that straw degradability may be improved through breeding without serious negative effect on grain yield....

  5. Recurring off-types in lettuce: Their significance in plant breeding and seed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxon Smith, J W

    1977-03-01

    The lettuce cv. Valentine regularly produces non-heading off-type plants at the relatively high frequency of 4 × 10(-3). They result from mutation to the dominant condition. A similar propensity has been reported twice before in lettuce; it is highly heritable.The propensity to produce off-types was not present in the parents of Valentine so it must have arisen during the pedigree breeding programme. Closely related cultivars do not carry the character but it was subsequently transmitted to Dandie a new cultivar of which Valentine was one of the parents. Allelism tests to relate Valentine off-types to those in crisphead cultivars were not successful.The elimination of off-types in breeding programmes is discussed. Contrary to the findings in day-neutral crisphead cultivars, mutant phenotypes in long-day butterhead cultivars have no selective advantage for seed production. Consequently, strict roguing ensures adequate varietal stability.

  6. Breeding for plant adaptations and agricultural measures in response to climatic changes in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the production of different cultivated plant species is of great importance for both human and animals, as well as for industrial processing. In the light of global climate changing and searching for renewable sources of energy, this task becomes even more important. Scientists from different areas of research, are actively involved in solving this complex task. Climate changes represent a big challenge not only for agricultural practices, but also for the process of shaping agricultural strategies. Recent studies indicate that climate changes can not be stopped. Constantly growing problems brought by global climate changes could be, to a larger extent, overcome by breeding programs, along with application of adequate agrotechnical measures. Thus, development of new varieties and hybrids with improved performances in response to more frequent and unfavorable environmental conditions, is of prime importance in breeding centers.

  7. The ion-beam breeding makes great success in plant business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T; Yoshida, S [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan). Plant Functions Lab.; Fukunishi, N; Ryuto, H [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan). Cyclotron Center; Suzuki, K [Suntory Flowers Ltd., Yokaichi, Shiga (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The ion-beam breeding developed by the Ring cyclotron of RARF is highly effective to create new flower cultivars within a short duration. A new type of garden plants 'Temari' series (verbena hybrida) keeps many flower clusters from spring until autumn, however 'Coral Pink' of this series shows poor flower clusters. To improve 'Coral Pink' using the ion-beam irradiation. sixty four single nodes were cultured in one plastic dish which was treated with 1-10 Gy of the N-ion beam at 135 MeV/u. Finally, four mutant lines with rich blooming were successfully selected. These mutants grew well compared to host plant, and kept many flower clusters even in autumn. The best mutant had larger number of flower clusters than the host plant in the pot-planting test so that it was released to the market in 2002 with a level of several hundred thousand pots. The development period of the new 'Coral Pink' was only three years. The similar successful cases were demonstrated by the new Dahlia World' (2002), the new Verbena 'Sakura' (2003) and the new Petunia 'Rose' (2003). Thus, we conclude that the ion beam irradiation is an excellent tool for mutation breeding to improve horticultural and agricultural crops with high efficiency. (author)

  8. The Effect of Plants with Novel Traits (PNT) Regulation on Mutation Breeding in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, G.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1988) has within it a definition for biotechnology. This definition would have allowed the government department, Environment Canada, to regulate all genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in Canada. In response to this, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), which reports to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, developed the concept of a Plant with Novel Trait (PNT). Not only does this definition capture GMOs, it also includes induced mutations, natural mutations and exotic germplasm that have not previously been grown in Canada. It is a system that is product, not process based. However, apart from questions regarding the novelty of traits in new plant varieties, breeders are asked by CFIA to identify the process used to develop the trait or traits in question. Field trials involving breeding lines with a PNT may be subject to confined testing. This conference celebrated 80 years of unconfined development and testing of induced plant mutations. This regulation is time consuming, expensive and an innovation barrier for Canadian plant breeding. It can only be hoped that other nations, and particularly those that have successfully used induced mutations, will not emulate Canada's approach. (author)

  9. The ion-beam breeding makes great success in plant business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-01-01

    The ion-beam breeding developed by the Ring cyclotron of RARF is highly effective to create new flower cultivars within a short duration. A new type of garden plants 'Temari' series (verbena hybrida) keeps many flower clusters from spring until autumn, however 'Coral Pink' of this series shows poor flower clusters. To improve 'Coral Pink' using the ion-beam irradiation. sixty four single nodes were cultured in one plastic dish which was treated with 1-10 Gy of the N-ion beam at 135 MeV/u. Finally, four mutant lines with rich blooming were successfully selected. These mutants grew well compared to host plant, and kept many flower clusters even in autumn. The best mutant had larger number of flower clusters than the host plant in the pot-planting test so that it was released to the market in 2002 with a level of several hundred thousand pots. The development period of the new 'Coral Pink' was only three years. The similar successful cases were demonstrated by the new Dahlia World' (2002), the new Verbena 'Sakura' (2003) and the new Petunia 'Rose' (2003). Thus, we conclude that the ion beam irradiation is an excellent tool for mutation breeding to improve horticultural and agricultural crops with high efficiency. (author)

  10. Genomic Selection in the Era of Next Generation Sequencing for Complex Traits in Plant Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Javaid A; Ali, Sajad; Salgotra, Romesh K; Mir, Zahoor A; Dutta, Sutapa; Jadon, Vasudha; Tyagi, Anshika; Mushtaq, Muntazir; Jain, Neelu; Singh, Pradeep K; Singh, Gyanendra P; Prabhu, K V

    2016-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is a promising approach exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. In plant breeding, it provides opportunities to increase genetic gain of complex traits per unit time and cost. The cost-benefit balance was an important consideration for GS to work in crop plants. Availability of genome-wide high-throughput, cost-effective and flexible markers, having low ascertainment bias, suitable for large population size as well for both model and non-model crop species with or without the reference genome sequence was the most important factor for its successful and effective implementation in crop species. These factors were the major limitations to earlier marker systems viz., SSR and array-based, and was unimaginable before the availability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies which have provided novel SNP genotyping platforms especially the genotyping by sequencing. These marker technologies have changed the entire scenario of marker applications and made the use of GS a routine work for crop improvement in both model and non-model crop species. The NGS-based genotyping have increased genomic-estimated breeding value prediction accuracies over other established marker platform in cereals and other crop species, and made the dream of GS true in crop breeding. But to harness the true benefits from GS, these marker technologies will be combined with high-throughput phenotyping for achieving the valuable genetic gain from complex traits. Moreover, the continuous decline in sequencing cost will make the WGS feasible and cost effective for GS in near future. Till that time matures the targeted sequencing seems to be more cost-effective option for large scale marker discovery and GS, particularly in case of large and un-decoded genomes.

  11. Nuclear science for food security. IAEA says plant breeding technique can help beat world hunger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-02

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today called for increased investment in a plant breeding technique that could bolster efforts aimed at pulling millions of people out of the hunger trap. IAEA scientists use radiation to produce improved high-yielding plants that adapt to harsh climate conditions such as drought or flood, or that are resistant to certain diseases and insect pests. Called mutation induction, the technique is safe, proven and cost-effective. It has been in use since the 1920s. 'The global nature of the food crisis is unprecedented. Families all around the world are struggling to feed themselves,' says Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. 'To provide sustainable, long-term solutions, we must make use of all available resources. Selecting the crops that are better able to feed us is one of humankind's oldest sciences. But we've neglected to give it the support and investment it requires for universal application. The IAEA is urging a revival of nuclear crop breeding technologies to help tackle world hunger.' For decades the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has assisted its Member States to produce more, better and safer food. In plant breeding and genetics, its expertise is helping countries around the world to achieve enhanced agricultural output using nuclear technology. Already more than 3000 crop varieties of some 170 different plant species have been released through the direct intervention of the IAEA: they include barley that grows at 5000 meters (16,400 ft) and rice that thrives in saline soil. These varieties provide much needed food as well as millions of dollars in economic benefits for farmers and consumers, especially in developing countries. But with increased investment and broader application, the technology could positively impact the health and livelihood of even greater numbers of people. And as world hunger grows, the need has never been more urgent.

  12. Nuclear science for food security. IAEA says plant breeding technique can help beat world hunger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today called for increased investment in a plant breeding technique that could bolster efforts aimed at pulling millions of people out of the hunger trap. IAEA scientists use radiation to produce improved high-yielding plants that adapt to harsh climate conditions such as drought or flood, or that are resistant to certain diseases and insect pests. Called mutation induction, the technique is safe, proven and cost-effective. It has been in use since the 1920s. 'The global nature of the food crisis is unprecedented. Families all around the world are struggling to feed themselves,' says Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. 'To provide sustainable, long-term solutions, we must make use of all available resources. Selecting the crops that are better able to feed us is one of humankind's oldest sciences. But we've neglected to give it the support and investment it requires for universal application. The IAEA is urging a revival of nuclear crop breeding technologies to help tackle world hunger.' For decades the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has assisted its Member States to produce more, better and safer food. In plant breeding and genetics, its expertise is helping countries around the world to achieve enhanced agricultural output using nuclear technology. Already more than 3000 crop varieties of some 170 different plant species have been released through the direct intervention of the IAEA: they include barley that grows at 5000 meters (16,400 ft) and rice that thrives in saline soil. These varieties provide much needed food as well as millions of dollars in economic benefits for farmers and consumers, especially in developing countries. But with increased investment and broader application, the technology could positively impact the health and livelihood of even greater numbers of people. And as world hunger grows, the need has never been more urgent

  13. Mutation breeding in sorghum (sorghum bicolor L.) for improving plant as ruminant feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H, Soeranto

    1998-01-01

    Mutation breeding using gamma irradiation in sorghum was aimed at improving the quality and production of sorghum plant as ruminant feed. Seeds of local sorghum variety Keris with moisture of about 14% were irradiated with gamma rays from Cobalt-60 source using the dose levels up to 0.5 kgy. The MI plant were grown in Pasar Jumat, the M2 and M3 were grown in Citayam experimental station. The M2 plants were harvested 40 days after sowing by cutting plants 20 cm above ground surface. Two weeks later observations for the ability of plants to produce new buds (buds variable). The plants green products in green products in from of their dry weight (product variable) were collected 40 days after harvesting and drying process in oven at 105 0 C for 24 hours. Plant selections with intensity of 20% were done for the bud variable among samples of M2 plants. Selection responses in the M3 were found to vary from the lowest at 0.5 kgy population (R s = 0.8507). The share of genetic factors to selection responses in bud variable varied from 7.25% at 0,5 kgy population to 22.35% at 0.3 kgy population. Selection for bud variable gave directly impact in increasing product variable in the M3. (author)

  14. Use of physical/chemical mutagens in plant breeding program in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Duy Quy; Nguyen Huu Dong; Bui Huy Thuy; Le Van Nha; Nguyen Van Bich [Agricultural Genetics Institute, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    Among more than 1870 new plant varieties formed by mutation breeding in the world, 44 varieties of different plants were formed by Vietnamese scientists. Research on induced mutation in Vietnam started in 1966, was promoted in Agricultural Institute, Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, Institute of Food Crop Research, and Agriculture Universities, and has produced varieties of rice, maize, soybean, peanut, tomato, jujuba, green bean etc using physical and chemical mutagens: Irradiation with gamma rays or neutrons, and use of such chemicals as dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES), ethyleneimine (EI), N-nitrosomethylurea (NUM), N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), and sodium azide (NaN{sub 3}). In the present report, the results of cytological and genetic effects in M1 plants, the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutants, the mutants obtained and the genetic nature of the next generation are described, particularly for the case of rice. Radiation dose and dose rate used as mutagens are also reported. (S. Ohno)

  15. Use of physical/chemical mutagens in plant breeding program in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duy Quy; Nguyen Huu Dong; Bui Huy Thuy; Le Van Nha; Nguyen Van Bich

    2001-01-01

    Among more than 1870 new plant varieties formed by mutation breeding in the world, 44 varieties of different plants were formed by Vietnamese scientists. Research on induced mutation in Vietnam started in 1966, was promoted in Agricultural Institute, Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, Institute of Food Crop Research, and Agriculture Universities, and has produced varieties of rice, maize, soybean, peanut, tomato, jujuba, green bean etc using physical and chemical mutagens: Irradiation with gamma rays or neutrons, and use of such chemicals as dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES), ethyleneimine (EI), N-nitrosomethylurea (NUM), N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), and sodium azide (NaN 3 ). In the present report, the results of cytological and genetic effects in M1 plants, the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and morphological mutants, the mutants obtained and the genetic nature of the next generation are described, particularly for the case of rice. Radiation dose and dose rate used as mutagens are also reported. (S. Ohno)

  16. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  17. Heat tolerance of two hair sheep breeds in the Federal District, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada, Maurício; McManus, Concepta; Couto, Flávio Augusto D'Araújo

    2001-01-01

    O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar efeitos da temperatura ambiental sobre características fisiológicas de ovinos, no Distrito Federal. Foram selecionados dois grupos de 25 fêmeas vazias ou prenhas das raças Morada Nova e Santa Inês com idade variando entre dois e quatro anos. As fêmeas tiveram seus dados coletados seis vezes entre os meses de fevereiro e julho. As medições incluíram o peso vivo ( PV) (kg), a temperatura retal (TR), a freqüência respiratória (FR) e o batimento cardíaco (BC), ...

  18. Plant mutation breeding and application of isotopic tracer in Chinese agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Qu

    1993-03-01

    The progress and achievements made in plant mutation breeding and application of isotopic tracer in Chinese agriculture are outlined. Plant mutation breeding is well developed not only in improvement of crops but also in methodology of mutation induction. More than 325 mutant varieties and hundreds of various valuable mutants of 29 different species have been obtained. The mutant cultivars released have covered more than 10 million hectares in total area. The systematic studies on methodology such as techniques for mutagenic treatment, development of various mutagens, screening and selecting techniques of mutation etc. have been carried out in China. The techniques of radioisotopic tracer used in many research fields are described. Application of isotopic tracer in studies of fertilization and plant nutrition, environment protection, nitrogen-fixation, animal production and diagnosis of diseases, and so on, have made great achievements and benefits in China. Many kinds of labelled compounds, especially of labelled agro-chemicals have been synthesized in the Institute for Application of Atomic Energy (IAAE). Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS). The proposals for the region cooperation in Asia on application of atomic energy in agriculture are included

  19. Prediction of genetic values of quantitative traits in plant breeding using pedigree and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossa, José; Campos, Gustavo de Los; Pérez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; Burgueño, Juan; Araus, José Luis; Makumbi, Dan; Singh, Ravi P; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Yan, Jianbing; Arief, Vivi; Banziger, Marianne; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2010-10-01

    The availability of dense molecular markers has made possible the use of genomic selection (GS) for plant breeding. However, the evaluation of models for GS in real plant populations is very limited. This article evaluates the performance of parametric and semiparametric models for GS using wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays) data in which different traits were measured in several environmental conditions. The findings, based on extensive cross-validations, indicate that models including marker information had higher predictive ability than pedigree-based models. In the wheat data set, and relative to a pedigree model, gains in predictive ability due to inclusion of markers ranged from 7.7 to 35.7%. Correlation between observed and predictive values in the maize data set achieved values up to 0.79. Estimates of marker effects were different across environmental conditions, indicating that genotype × environment interaction is an important component of genetic variability. These results indicate that GS in plant breeding can be an effective strategy for selecting among lines whose phenotypes have yet to be observed.

  20. Neutronic performance issues of the breeding blanket options for the European DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion—Programme Management Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SERMA, LPEC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moro, F. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Breeder blanket concepts for DEMO—design features. • Neutronic characteristics of breeder blankets. • Evaluation of Tritium breeding potential. • Evaluation of shielding performance. - Abstract: This paper presents nuclear performance issues of the HCPB, HCLL, DCLL and WCLL breeder blankets, which are under development within the PPPT (Power Plant Physics and Technology) programme of EUROfusion, with the objective to assess the potential and suitability of the blankets for the application to DEMO. The assessment is based on the initial design versions of the blankets developed in 2014. The Tritium breeding potential is considered sufficient for all breeder blankets although the initial design versions of the HCPB, HCLL and DCLL blankets were shown to require further design improvements. Suitable measures have been proposed and proven to be sufficient to achieve the required Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) ≥ 1.10. The shielding performance was shown to be sufficient to protect the super-conducting toroidal field coil provided that efficient shielding material mixtures including WC or borated water are utilized. The WCLL blanket does not require the use of such shielding materials due to a very compact blanket support structure/manifold configuration which yet requires design verification. The vacuum vessel can be safely operated over the full anticipated DEMO lifetime of 6 full power years for all blanket concepts considered.

  1. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benjamin Kantar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crop wild relatives (CWR are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and niche occupancy in 36 taxa closely related to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.. Taxa lacking comprehensive ex situ conservation were identified. The predicted distributions for 36 Helianthus taxa identified substantial range overlap and asymmetry and niche conservatism. Specific taxa (e.g., Helianthus deblis Nutt., Helianthus anomalus Blake, and Helianthus divaricatus L. were identified as targets for traits of interest, particularly for abiotic stress tolerance and adaptation to extreme soil properties. The combination of techniques demonstrates the potential for publicly available ecogeographic and phylogenetic data to facilitate the identification of possible sources of abiotic stress traits for plant breeding programs. Much of the primary genepool (wild H. annuus occurs in extreme environments indicating that introgression of targeted traits may be relatively straightforward. Sister taxa in Helianthus have greater range overlap than more distantly related taxa within the genus. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that in plants (unlike some animal groups, geographic isolation may not be necessary for speciation.

  2. Mutations in plant breeding: a glance back and a look forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, A.

    1975-01-01

    This brief retrospect of previous shortcomings and procedures really indicates the need for a better co-ordination and co-operation in plant breeding. We now know which mutagens are essential in practical mutation work, and we include radiations as well as chemicals. We now know that there is no principal difference between natural and induced variation. We can easily induce mutational events covering the gap between gross chromosomal rearrangements and DNA-base substitutions. We also know that induced variation may in the future fill and replace the loss of natural variability, or may even extend the limits of variation. We know that mutation and recombination--as evidenced, for instance, by the successful work in barley--will be united into routine procedures, also leading to new breakthroughs in plant improvement. Moreover, ingenious techniques of mass testing are under way, combining traditional and prospective ideas. The mutation method has come to stay, not alone but with gene recombination, with heterosis and with polyploidy. We say that the present is the past's future. To glance back is then to look forward; failures give rise to progress. A synthesis of breeding methods is around the corner

  3. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Michael B.; Sosa, Chrystian C.; Khoury, Colin K.; Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P.; Achicanoy, Harold A.; Bernau, Vivian; Kane, Nolan C.; Marek, Laura; Seiler, Gerald; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and niche occupancy in 36 taxa closely related to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Taxa lacking comprehensive ex situ conservation were identified. The predicted distributions for 36 Helianthus taxa identified substantial range overlap, range asymmetry and niche conservatism. Specific taxa (e.g., Helianthus deblis Nutt., Helianthus anomalus Blake, and Helianthus divaricatus L.) were identified as targets for traits of interest, particularly for abiotic stress tolerance, and adaptation to extreme soil properties. The combination of techniques demonstrates the potential for publicly available ecogeographic and phylogenetic data to facilitate the identification of possible sources of abiotic stress traits for plant breeding programs. Much of the primary genepool (wild H. annuus) occurs in extreme environments indicating that introgression of targeted traits may be relatively straightforward. Sister taxa in Helianthus have greater range overlap than more distantly related taxa within the genus. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that in plants (unlike some animal groups), geographic isolation may not be necessary for speciation. PMID:26500675

  4. Elevating optimal human nutrition to a central goal of plant breeding and production of plant-based foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, David C; Morris, Cindy E; Dratz, Edward A; Pilgeram, Alice

    2009-11-01

    High-yielding cereals and other staples have produced adequate calories to ward off starvation for much of the world over several decades. However, deficiencies in certain amino acids, minerals, vitamins and fatty acids in staple crops, and animal diets derived from them, have aggravated the problem of malnutrition and the increasing incidence of certain chronic diseases in nominally well-nourished people (the so-called diseases of civilization). Enhanced global nutrition has great potential to reduce acute and chronic disease, the need for health care, the cost of health care, and to increase educational attainment, economic productivity and the quality of life. However, nutrition is currently not an important driver of most plant breeding efforts, and there are only a few well-known efforts to breed crops that are adapted to the needs of optimal human nutrition. Technological tools are available to greatly enhance the nutritional value of our staple crops. However, enhanced nutrition in major crops might only be achieved if nutritional traits are introduced in tandem with important agronomic yield drivers, such as resistance to emerging pests or diseases, to drought and salinity, to herbicides, parasitic plants, frost or heat. In this way we might circumvent a natural tendency for high yield and low production cost to effectively select against the best human nutrition. Here we discuss the need and means for agriculture, food processing, food transport, sociology, nutrition and medicine to be integrated into new approaches to food production with optimal human nutrition as a principle goal.

  5. Germplasm morgue or gold mine? Enhancing the value of plant genetic resource collections for plant breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity is the raw material that plant breeders require to develop cultivars that are productive, nutritious, pest and stress tolerant, and water and nutrient use efficient. The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) contains a wealth of genetic diversity, including improved varie...

  6. Arbitrarily amplified DNA: New molecular approaches to plant breeding, ecology and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caetano-Anolles, G [Department of Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2001-11-01

    Several DNA fingerprinting techniques that use arbitrary primers to characterize, scan and tag genomic DNA were optimized and used to study plants and microbial pathogens. The generated arbitrarily amplified DNA (AAD) profiles could be tailored in their complexity and polymorphic content, allowing analysis of closely related organisms, such as vegetatively-propagated horticultural crops or clonal fungal populations. AAD markers were used in cultivar and strain identification, map-based cloning, and marker-assisted breeding, sometimes as sequence-tagged sites. Phenetic analysis using parsimony, cluster, and numerical methods was applied successfully to the identification of genetic relationships in turfgrass species such as bermudagrass, woody plants such as dogwoods, and floricultural species such as petunia and chrysanthemum. AAD profiles were used to measure for the first time a genome-wide mutation rate, directly in a plant. Mutation rates in vegetatively propagated bermudagrass were comparable to those in human, mice, fruit flies, and worms. In combination with established tools used in molecular systematics (e.g. rDNA sequence analysis), AAD markers tracked the introduction of exotic dogwood anthracnose-causing fungi in North America. As part of a breeding effort to combat dogwood diseases, AAD was used in pseudo-testcross mapping of the tree at the intra-specific level. Markers were efficiently generated despite the close relatedness of parental dogwood material. Finally, DNA markers and tags were also generated in soybean, and were used to construct high density maps and walk towards defined genomic regions in the positional cloning of the supernodulation nts-1 symbiotic gene. (author)

  7. Arbitrarily amplified DNA: New molecular approaches to plant breeding, ecology and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caetano-Anolles, G.

    2001-01-01

    Several DNA fingerprinting techniques that use arbitrary primers to characterize, scan and tag genomic DNA were optimized and used to study plants and microbial pathogens. The generated arbitrarily amplified DNA (AAD) profiles could be tailored in their complexity and polymorphic content, allowing analysis of closely related organisms, such as vegetatively-propagated horticultural crops or clonal fungal populations. AAD markers were used in cultivar and strain identification, map-based cloning, and marker-assisted breeding, sometimes as sequence-tagged sites. Phenetic analysis using parsimony, cluster, and numerical methods was applied successfully to the identification of genetic relationships in turfgrass species such as bermudagrass, woody plants such as dogwoods, and floricultural species such as petunia and chrysanthemum. AAD profiles were used to measure for the first time a genome-wide mutation rate, directly in a plant. Mutation rates in vegetatively propagated bermudagrass were comparable to those in human, mice, fruit flies, and worms. In combination with established tools used in molecular systematics (e.g. rDNA sequence analysis), AAD markers tracked the introduction of exotic dogwood anthracnose-causing fungi in North America. As part of a breeding effort to combat dogwood diseases, AAD was used in pseudo-testcross mapping of the tree at the intra-specific level. Markers were efficiently generated despite the close relatedness of parental dogwood material. Finally, DNA markers and tags were also generated in soybean, and were used to construct high density maps and walk towards defined genomic regions in the positional cloning of the supernodulation nts-1 symbiotic gene. (author)

  8. Using modern plant breeding to improve the nutritional and technological qualities of oil crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Denis J.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The last few decades have seen huge advances in our understanding of plant biology and in the development of new technologies for the manipulation of crop plants. The application of relatively straightforward breeding and selection methods made possible the “Green Revolution” of the 1960s and 1970s that effectively doubled or trebled cereal production in much of the world and averted mass famine in Asia. During the 2000s, much attention has been focused on genomic approaches to plant breeding with the deployment of a new generation of technologies, such as marker-assisted selection, next-generation sequencing, transgenesis (genetic engineering or GM and automatic mutagenesis/selection (TILLING, TargetIng Local Lesions IN Genomes. These methods are now being applied to a wide range of crops and have particularly good potential for oil crop improvement in terms of both overall food and non-food yield and nutritional and technical quality of the oils. Key targets include increasing overall oil yield and stability on a per seed or per fruit basis and very high oleic acid content in seed and fruit oils for both premium edible and oleochemical applications. Other more specialised targets include oils enriched in nutritionally desirable “fish oil”-like fatty acids, especially very long chain !-3 acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, or increased levels of lipidic vitamins such as carotenoids, tocopherols and tocotrienes. Progress in producing such oils in commercial crops has been good in recent years with several varieties being released or at advanced stages of development.

  9. Induced mutation research in plant breeding; Recherche sur les mutations radioinduites en phytogenetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R. W. [Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1970-01-15

    The improvement of plants is of great importance to the developing countries. The author briefly describes, with references, recent work on mutation breeding by means of ionizing radiations. The aim of this work is to increase the quantity and quality of plants, e.g. by increasing yield, by developing disease- or insect-resistant varieties, by increasing nutritive value, by improving taste, storage life and appearance. (author) [French] L'amélioration des plantes présente une grande importance pour les pays en voie de développement. L’auteur décrit succinctement, en s'appuyant sur des exemples, certaines recherches récentes en phytogénétique faisant intervenir des mutations radioinduites. L'objet du travail exposé dans le mémoire est d'améliorer quantitativement et qualitativement les plantes, par exemple en augmentant les rendements, en créant des variétés résistant aux maladies et aux insectes, en augmentant la valeur nutritive des produits, ou en améliorant leur goût, leur durée de conservation et leur aspect. (author)

  10. Pollination patterns and plant breeding systems in the Galapagos: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Susana; Heleno, Ruben; Olesen, Jens M; McMullen, Conley K; Traveset, Anna

    2012-11-01

    Despite the importance of the Galápagos Islands for the development of central concepts in ecology and evolution, the understanding of many ecological processes in this archipelago is still very basic. One such process is pollination, which provides an important service to both plants and their pollinators. The rather modest level of knowledge on this subject has so far limited our predictive power on the consequences of the increasing threat of introduced plants and pollinators to this unique archipelago. As a first step toward building a unified view of the state of pollination in the Galápagos, a thorough literature search was conducted on the breeding systems of the archipelago's flora and compiled all documented flower-visitor interactions. Based on 38 studies from the last 100 years, we retrieved 329 unique interactions between 123 flowering plant species (50 endemics, 39 non-endemic natives, 26 introduced and eight of unknown origin) from 41 families and 120 animal species from 13 orders. We discuss the emergent patterns and identify promising research avenues in the field. Although breeding systems are known for pollinator fauna does not represent a constraint to the integration of new plant species into the native communities. Most interactions detected (approx. 90 %) come from a single island (most of them from Santa Cruz). Hymenopterans (mainly the endemic carpenter bee Xylocopa darwinii and ants), followed by lepidopterans, were the most important flower visitors. Dipterans were much more important flower visitors in the humid zone than in the dry zone. Bird and lizard pollination has been occasionally reported in the dry zone. Strong biases were detected in the sampling effort dedicated to different islands, time of day, focal plants and functional groups of visitors. Thus, the existing patterns need to be confronted with new and less biased data. The implementation of a community-level approach could greatly increase our understanding of pollination

  11. Pollination patterns and plant breeding systems in the Galápagos: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Susana; Heleno, Ruben; Olesen, Jens M.; McMullen, Conley K.; Traveset, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of the Galápagos Islands for the development of central concepts in ecology and evolution, the understanding of many ecological processes in this archipelago is still very basic. One such process is pollination, which provides an important service to both plants and their pollinators. The rather modest level of knowledge on this subject has so far limited our predictive power on the consequences of the increasing threat of introduced plants and pollinators to this unique archipelago. Scope As a first step toward building a unified view of the state of pollination in the Galápagos, a thorough literature search was conducted on the breeding systems of the archipelago's flora and compiled all documented flower–visitor interactions. Based on 38 studies from the last 100 years, we retrieved 329 unique interactions between 123 flowering plant species (50 endemics, 39 non-endemic natives, 26 introduced and eight of unknown origin) from 41 families and 120 animal species from 13 orders. We discuss the emergent patterns and identify promising research avenues in the field. Conclusions Although breeding systems are known for pollinator fauna does not represent a constraint to the integration of new plant species into the native communities. Most interactions detected (approx. 90 %) come from a single island (most of them from Santa Cruz). Hymenopterans (mainly the endemic carpenter bee Xylocopa darwinii and ants), followed by lepidopterans, were the most important flower visitors. Dipterans were much more important flower visitors in the humid zone than in the dry zone. Bird and lizard pollination has been occasionally reported in the dry zone. Strong biases were detected in the sampling effort dedicated to different islands, time of day, focal plants and functional groups of visitors. Thus, the existing patterns need to be confronted with new and less biased data. The implementation of a community-level approach could greatly increase

  12. Mutagenesis of Jatropha curcas - Exploring new traits in the breeding of a biofuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Sobri Hussein; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2010-01-01

    Mutagenesis in plant species is considered effective in recovering and producing useful mutants as it leads to a high degree of chimerism and produces high degree of somaclonal variations for further selection in breeding programmes. Jatropha curcas is a species with many attributes and considerable potential, especially as bio diesel. Narrow genetic background of Jatropha spp. gives less selection to growers for better quality plant materials. In this study, a new method through nuclear technology was used to increase the genetic variability of Jatropha towards novel superior potential mutant lines. The objective of the study is to generate new mutant varieties of Jatropha curcas through the mutagenesis approach in getting new sustainable mutants for high oil yield and improved plant characteristics. Seeds of a Jatropha cultivar were from selected materials from Lembaga Kenaf and Tembakau Negara, Kelantan. Radiosensitivity test was done by irradiating a total of each 60 seeds at multiple doses (0 Gy, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, 60 Gy, 80 Gy, 100 Gy, 200 Gy, 300 Gy, 400 Gy, 600 Gy and 700 Gy). After getting the LD 50 , three doses i.e. 250 Gy, 300 Gy and 350 Gy were selected for mutagenesis, where a total of 1000 seeds were exposed to gamma radiation. The seeds were hardened and field planted at close distance of 1 m x 1 m. Pruning was conducted three times at two months interval prior to screening for early flowering, short stature and high branching mutant lines. Radiosensitivity of seeds to acute gamma irradiation revealed that the LD 50 was at 320 Gy. At nursery stage, somatic mutations related to chlorophyll changes were observed on leaves with certain shapes. Screening of Jatropha via seed mutagenesis bore 6 early flowering mutants, 7 dwarf mutants and, 17 high branching plants. In narrowing the mutant lines, cuttings from each selected trait were collected and re-planted for further evaluation. (author)

  13. New Insights on plant salt tolerance mechanisms and their potential use for breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moez HANIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinization is a major threat to agriculture in arid and semi-arid regions, where water scarcity and inadequate drainage of irrigated lands severely reduce crop yield. Salt accumulation inhibits plant growth and reduces the ability to uptake water and nutrients, leading to osmotic or water-deficit stress. Salt is also causing injury of the young photosynthetic leaves and acceleration of their senescence, as the Na+ cation is toxic when accumulating in cell cytosol resulting in ionic imbalance and toxicity of transpiring leaves. To cope with salt stress, plants have evolved mainly two types of tolerance mechanisms based on either limiting the entry of salt by the roots, or controlling its concentration and distribution. Understanding the overall control of Na+ accumulation and functional studies of genes involved in transport processes, will provide a new opportunity to improve the salinity tolerance of plants relevant to food security in arid regions. A better understanding of these tolerance mechanisms can be used to breed crops with improved yield performance under salinity stress. Moreover, associations of cultures with nitrogen-fixing bactéria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could serve as an alternative and sustainable strategy to increase crop yields in salt affected fields.

  14. Contributions of classical and molecular cytogenetic in meiotic analysis and pollen viability for plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavinscky, M P; Souza, M M; Silva, G S; Melo, C A F

    2017-09-27

    The analysis of meiotic behavior has been widely used in the study of plants as they provide relevant information about the viability of a species. Meiosis boasts a host of highly conserved events and changes in genes that control these events will give rise to irregularities that can alter the normal course of meiosis and may lead to complete sterility of the plant. The recombination of genes that occur in meiosis is an important event to generate variability and has been important in studies for genetic improvement and to create viable hybrids. The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) in meiosis allows the localization of specific regions, enables to differentiate genomes in a hybrid, permits to observe the pairing of homoeologous chromosomes, and if there was a recombination between the genomes of progenitor species. Furthermore, the GISH allows us to observe the close relationship between the species involved. This article aims to report over meiosis studies on plants and hybrids, the use and importance of molecular cytogenetic in meiotic analysis and contributions of meiotic analysis in breeding programs.

  15. Between and beyond additivity and non-additivity : the statistical modelling of genotype by environment interaction in plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    1996-01-01

    In plant breeding it is a common observation to see genotypes react differently to environmental changes. This phenomenon is called genotype by environment interaction. Many statistical approaches for analysing genotype by environment interaction rely heavily on the analysis of variance model.

  16. Searching for an Accurate Marker-Based Prediction of an Individual Quantitative Trait in Molecular Plant Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Yang, Mo-Hua; Zeng, Fangqin; Biligetu, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Molecular plant breeding with the aid of molecular markers has played an important role in modern plant breeding over the last two decades. Many marker-based predictions for quantitative traits have been made to enhance parental selection, but the trait prediction accuracy remains generally low, even with the aid of dense, genome-wide SNP markers. To search for more accurate trait-specific prediction with informative SNP markers, we conducted a literature review on the prediction issues in molecular plant breeding and on the applicability of an RNA-Seq technique for developing function-associated specific trait (FAST) SNP markers. To understand whether and how FAST SNP markers could enhance trait prediction, we also performed a theoretical reasoning on the effectiveness of these markers in a trait-specific prediction, and verified the reasoning through computer simulation. To the end, the search yielded an alternative to regular genomic selection with FAST SNP markers that could be explored to achieve more accurate trait-specific prediction. Continuous search for better alternatives is encouraged to enhance marker-based predictions for an individual quantitative trait in molecular plant breeding. PMID:28729875

  17. Searching for an Accurate Marker-Based Prediction of an Individual Quantitative Trait in Molecular Plant Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bi Fu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular plant breeding with the aid of molecular markers has played an important role in modern plant breeding over the last two decades. Many marker-based predictions for quantitative traits have been made to enhance parental selection, but the trait prediction accuracy remains generally low, even with the aid of dense, genome-wide SNP markers. To search for more accurate trait-specific prediction with informative SNP markers, we conducted a literature review on the prediction issues in molecular plant breeding and on the applicability of an RNA-Seq technique for developing function-associated specific trait (FAST SNP markers. To understand whether and how FAST SNP markers could enhance trait prediction, we also performed a theoretical reasoning on the effectiveness of these markers in a trait-specific prediction, and verified the reasoning through computer simulation. To the end, the search yielded an alternative to regular genomic selection with FAST SNP markers that could be explored to achieve more accurate trait-specific prediction. Continuous search for better alternatives is encouraged to enhance marker-based predictions for an individual quantitative trait in molecular plant breeding.

  18. Searching for an Accurate Marker-Based Prediction of an Individual Quantitative Trait in Molecular Plant Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Yang, Mo-Hua; Zeng, Fangqin; Biligetu, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Molecular plant breeding with the aid of molecular markers has played an important role in modern plant breeding over the last two decades. Many marker-based predictions for quantitative traits have been made to enhance parental selection, but the trait prediction accuracy remains generally low, even with the aid of dense, genome-wide SNP markers. To search for more accurate trait-specific prediction with informative SNP markers, we conducted a literature review on the prediction issues in molecular plant breeding and on the applicability of an RNA-Seq technique for developing function-associated specific trait (FAST) SNP markers. To understand whether and how FAST SNP markers could enhance trait prediction, we also performed a theoretical reasoning on the effectiveness of these markers in a trait-specific prediction, and verified the reasoning through computer simulation. To the end, the search yielded an alternative to regular genomic selection with FAST SNP markers that could be explored to achieve more accurate trait-specific prediction. Continuous search for better alternatives is encouraged to enhance marker-based predictions for an individual quantitative trait in molecular plant breeding.

  19. Genetic divergence and its implication in breeding of desired plant type in coriander -Coriandrum sativum L.-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy germplasm lines of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. of diverse eco-geographical origin were undertaken in present investigation to determine the genetic divergence following multivariate and canonical analysis for seed yield and its 9 component traits. The 70 genotypes were grouped into 9 clusters depending upon the genetic architecture of genotypes and characters uniformity and confirmed by canonical analysis. Seventy percent of total genotypes (49/70 were grouped in 4 clusters (V, VI, VIII and IX, while apparent diversity was noticed for 30 percent genotypes (21/70 that diverged into 5 clusters (I, II, III, FV, and VII. The maximum inter cluster distance was between I and IV (96.20 followed by III and IV (91.13 and I and VII (87.15. The cluster VI was very unique having genotypes of high mean values for most of the component traits. The cluster VII had highest seeds/umbel (35.3 ± 2.24, and leaves/plant (12.93 ± 0.55, earliest flowering (65.05 ± 1.30 and moderately high mean values for other characters. Considering high mean and inter cluster distance breeding plan has been discussed to select desirable plant types.

  20. Determination of optimal doses of radiation for the plant breeding of pseudo cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez J, J.; Gomez P, L.

    2005-01-01

    With the purpose of promoting the use of the radiations for the plant breeding of pseudo cereals, it was determined a simple and economic method that allows the quick selection of radiation dose that induce in the vegetable organisms the changes wanted. For it it was work with quinua seeds (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) an Andean pseudo cereal that, due to their nutritious and physiologic characteristics it is considered by the FAO like one of the foods of the future and for the NASA like an organism that is good to remove the carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and at the same time, to generate food, oxygen and water for the crew during the space missions of long duration and that it has already improved by means of the radiation application. The proposed method consists on the evaluation, of the embryonic structures (radicule, hypocotyl and cotyledons) in the irradiated seeds as well as of the development of root, primary shaft and true leaves in the plants. The changes in the growth, form, number and color of the structures as well as the time of appearance of each one, allow to predict the morphological changes and inclusive some physiologic ones that will have the mature organisms, so that in only three weeks it is possible to select the doses more appropriate. (Author)

  1. Plant prebiotics and human health: Biotechnology to breed prebiotic-rich nutritious food crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangam Dwivedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota in the gut play essential roles in human health. Prebiotics are non-digestible complex carbohydrates that are fermented in the colon, yielding energy and short chain fatty acids, and selectively promote the growth of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillae in the gastro-intestinal tract. Fructans and inulin are the best-characterized plant prebiotics. Many vegetable, root and tuber crops as well as some fruit crops are the best-known sources of prebiotic carbohydrates, while the prebiotic-rich grain crops include barley, chickpea, lentil, lupin, and wheat. Some prebiotic-rich crop germplasm have been reported in barley, chickpea, lentil, wheat, yacon, and Jerusalem artichoke. A few major quantitative trait loci and gene-based markers associated with high fructan are known in wheat. More targeted search in genebanks using reduced subsets (representing diversity in germplasm is needed to identify accessions with prebiotic carbohydrates. Transgenic maize, potato and sugarcane with high fructan, with no adverse effects on plant development, have been bred, which suggests that it is feasible to introduce fructan biosynthesis pathways in crops to produce health-imparting prebiotics. Developing prebiotic-rich and super nutritious crops will alleviate the widespread malnutrition and promote human health. A paradigm shift in breeding program is needed to achieve this goal and to ensure that newly-bred crop cultivars are nutritious, safe and health promoting.

  2. Camelina as a sustainable oilseed crop: contributions of plant breeding and genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, Johann; Eynck, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Camelina is an underutilized Brassicaceae oilseed plant with a considerable agronomic potential for biofuel and vegetable oil production in temperate regions. In contrast to most Brassicaceae, camelina is resistant to alternaria black spot and other diseases and pests. Sequencing of the camelina genome revealed an undifferentiated allohexaploid genome with a comparatively large number of genes and low percentage of repetitive DNA. As there is a close relationship between camelina and the genetic model plant Arabidopsis, this review aims at exploring the potential of translating basic Arabidopsis results into a camelina oilseed crop for food and non-food applications. Recently, Arabidopsis genes for drought resistance or increased photosynthesis and overall productivity have successfully been expressed in camelina. In addition, gene constructs affecting lipid metabolism pathways have been engineered into camelina for synthesizing either long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, hydroxy fatty acids or high-oleic oils in particular camelina strains, which is of great interest in human food, industrial or biofuel applications, respectively. These results confirm the potential of camelina to serve as a biotechnology platform in biorefinery applications thus justifying further investment in breeding and genetic research for combining agronomic potential, unique oil quality features and biosafety into an agricultural production system. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular breeding to create optimized crops: from genetic manipulation to potential applications in plant factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko eHiwasa-Tanase

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Crop cultivation in controlled environment plant factories offers great potential to stabilize the yield and quality of agricultural products. However, many crops are currently unsuited to these environments, particularly closed cultivation systems, due to space limitations, low light intensity, high implementation costs, and high energy requirements. A major barrier to closed system cultivation is the high running cost, which necessitates the use of high-margin crops for economic viability. High-value crops include those with enhanced nutritional value or containing additional functional components for pharmaceutical production or with the aim of providing health benefits. In addition, it is important to develop cultivars equipped with growth parameters that are suitable for closed cultivation. Small plant size is of particular importance due to the limited cultivation space. Other advantageous traits are short production cycle, the ability to grow under low light, and high nutriculture availability. Cost-effectiveness is improved from the use of cultivars that are specifically optimized for closed system cultivation. This review describes the features of closed cultivation systems and the potential application of molecular breeding to create crops that are optimized for cost-effectiveness and productivity in closed cultivation systems.

  4. Analysing patent landscapes in plant biotechnology and new plant breeding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Claudia; Rodríguez-Cerezo, Emilio; Thangaraj, Harry

    2013-02-01

    This article aims to inform the reader of the importance of searching patent landscapes in plant biotechnology and the use of basic tools to perform a patent search. The recommendations for a patent search strategy are illustrated with the specific example of zinc finger nuclease technology for genetic engineering in plants. Within this scope, we provide a general introduction to searching using two online and free-access patent databases esp@cenet and PatentScope. The essential features of the two databases, and their functionality is described, together with short descriptions to enable the reader to understand patents, searching, their content, patent families, and their territorial scope. We mostly stress the value of patent searching for mining scientific, rather than legal information. Search methods through the use of keywords and patent codes are elucidated together with suggestions about how to search with or combine codes with keywords and we also comment on limitations of each method. We stress the importance of patent literature to complement more mainstream scientific literature, and the relative complexities and difficulties in searching patents compared to the latter. A parallel online resource where we describe detailed search exercises is available through reference for those intending further exploration. In essence this is aimed at a novice patent searcher who may want to examine accessory patent literature to complement knowledge gained from mainstream journal resources.

  5. Proceedings of the 8th workshop on plant mutation breeding. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Tano, Shigemitsu (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The Workshop on Plant Mutation Breeding of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), was held on 9-13 October 2000 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE of Vietnam) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD of Vietnam) in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF), National Institute of Agrobiological Resources (NIAR of Vietnam), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Two Scientists, a Project Leader and an expert on methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding, participated from each of the member countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. Also attending the Workshop were, one participant from Korea, seven participants from both Japan and Vietnam. The number of the participants in the Workshop totalled about sixty people including guests and observers. Sixteen papers including eight invited papers on the current status of methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding in the participating countries were presented. Discussions were focused on the subject concerning 'Effective Use of Physical/Chemical Mutagens', as well as a detailed report on the current status of research in each participating country. In addition, the topics of developing a mutant breeding database, an information exchange for plant/crop mutation breeding, and more tightly bound international co-operative research in the near future were also high on the agenda. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers that were submitted from the speakers. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the 8th workshop on plant mutation breeding. Effective use of physical/chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The Workshop on Plant Mutation Breeding of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), was held on 9-13 October 2000 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE of Vietnam) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD of Vietnam) in cooperation with the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF), National Institute of Agrobiological Resources (NIAR of Vietnam), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Two Scientists, a Project Leader and an expert on methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding, participated from each of the member countries, i.e. China, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Japan. Also attending the Workshop were, one participant from Korea, seven participants from both Japan and Vietnam. The number of the participants in the Workshop totalled about sixty people including guests and observers. Sixteen papers including eight invited papers on the current status of methodology for plant/crop mutation breeding in the participating countries were presented. Discussions were focused on the subject concerning 'Effective Use of Physical/Chemical Mutagens', as well as a detailed report on the current status of research in each participating country. In addition, the topics of developing a mutant breeding database, an information exchange for plant/crop mutation breeding, and more tightly bound international co-operative research in the near future were also high on the agenda. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers that were submitted from the speakers. (author)

  7. Ethnobotanic importance of plants used in pigeon-breeding in Eastern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Belda, Antonio; Cort?s, Carolina; Peir?, Victoriano

    2013-01-01

    Background: The importance that birds of the Columbidae family have had throughout history is visible on the Mediterranean coast. Pigeon fancying is the art of breeding and training carrier pigeons and currently, several breeds exist. The sport of racing pigeons consists in covering a distance at maximum possible speed. However, pigeon breeding has another modality called “sport pigeon”, where several males follow a female. This study focusses on ethnobotanical knowledge of native and exotic ...

  8. Breeding system and bumblebee drone pollination of an explosively pollen-releasing plant, Meliosma tenuis (Sabiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Sato, A A; Kato, M

    2018-05-01

    Explosive pollen release is a mechanism used by some angiosperms that serves to attach pollen to a pollinator's body. It is usually adopted by species with zygomorphic tubular flowers and pollinated by birds and bees. The tree genus Meliosma (Sabiaceae, Proteales) has unique disc-like flowers that are externally actinomorphic, but internally zygomorphic, and release pollen explosively. To elucidate the adaptive significance of explosive pollen release, we observed flowering behaviour, the breeding system and pollinator visits to flowers of the Japanese species Meliosma tenuis in a temperate forest. Flowers bloomed in June and were nectariferous and protandrous. Explosive pollen release was triggered by slight tactile stimuli to anther filaments or staminodes in male-stage flowers. Because pollen cannot come into contact with the pistils enclosed by staminodes, M. tenuis is functionally protandrous. Artificial pollination treatments revealed that M. tenuis is allogamous. The dominant flower visitors were nectar-seeking drones of the bumblebee species Bombus ardens (Apidae). The drones' behaviour, pollen attachment on their bodies and fruit set of visit-restricted flowers suggest that they are the only agent triggering the explosive pollen release mechanism, and are the main pollinator of M. tenuis. The finding that bumblebee workers rarely visit these flowers suggests that the explosive pollen release has another function, namely to discourage pollen-harvesting bumblebee workers. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Breeding for genetic improvement of forage plants in relation to increasing animal production with reduced environmental footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston-Smith, A H; Marshall, A H; Moorby, J M

    2013-03-01

    Animal production is a fundamental component of the food supply chain, and with an increasing global population production levels are set to increase. Ruminant animals in particular are valuable in their ability to convert a fibre-rich forage diet into a high-quality protein product for human consumption, although this benefit is offset by inefficiencies in rumen fermentation that contribute to emission of significant quantities of methane and nitrogenous waste. Through co-operation between plant and animal sciences, we can identify how the nutritional requirements of ruminants can be satisfied by high-quality forages for the future. Selective forage plant breeding has supported crop improvement for nearly a century. Early plant breeding programmes were successful in terms of yield gains (4% to 5% per decade), with quality traits becoming increasingly important breeding targets (e.g. enhanced disease resistance and digestibility). Recently, demands for more sustainable production systems have required high yielding, high-quality forages that enable efficient animal production with minimal environmental impact. Achieving this involves considering the entire farm system and identifying opportunities for maximising nutrient use efficiency in both forage and animal components. Forage crops of the future must be able to utilise limited resources (water and nutrients) to maximise production on a limited land area and this may require us to consider alternative plant species to those currently in use. Furthermore, new breeding targets will be identified as the interactions between plants and the animals that consume them become better understood. This will ensure that available resources are targeted at delivering maximum benefits to the animal through enhanced transformation efficiency.

  10. Between and beyond additivity and non-additivity : the statistical modelling of genotype by environment interaction in plant breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Eeuwijk, van, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    In plant breeding it is a common observation to see genotypes react differently to environmental changes. This phenomenon is called genotype by environment interaction. Many statistical approaches for analysing genotype by environment interaction rely heavily on the analysis of variance model. Genotype by environment interaction is then taken to be equivalent to non-additivity. This thesis criticizes the analysis of variance approach. Modelling genotype by environment interaction by non-addit...

  11. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), an ultimate marker-assisted selection (MAS) tool to accelerate plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Laroche, André; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Liu, HongKui; Li, Ziqin

    2014-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) refers to the use of molecular markers to assist phenotypic selections in crop improvement. Several types of molecular markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), have been identified and effectively used in plant breeding. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has led to remarkable advances in whole genome sequencing, which provides ultra-throughput sequences to revolutionize plant genotyping and breeding. To further broaden NGS usages to large crop genomes such as maize and wheat, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) has been developed and applied in sequencing multiplexed samples that combine molecular marker discovery and genotyping. GBS is a novel application of NGS protocols for discovering and genotyping SNPs in crop genomes and populations. The GBS approach includes the digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes followed by the ligation of barcode adapter, PCR amplification and sequencing of the amplified DNA pool on a single lane of flow cells. Bioinformatic pipelines are needed to analyze and interpret GBS datasets. As an ultimate MAS tool and a cost-effective technique, GBS has been successfully used in implementing genome-wide association study (GWAS), genomic diversity study, genetic linkage analysis, molecular marker discovery and genomic selection under a large scale of plant breeding programs.

  12. Breeding system and parental effect on fruit characters of Idesia polycarpa (Flacourtiaceae), a promising plant for biodiesel, in northwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.H.; Li, Z.Q.; Xie, Q.

    2017-01-01

    Idesia polycarpa Maxim. is a promising plant for biodiesel in China. We have reported the flowering phenology, breeding system and parental effect on fruit characters of this species distributed in Qinling-Bashan Mountain (Shaanxi Province) nature reserve. As a dioecious plant, the male and female flowered almost synchronously. The anthesis was from around 10th of May and proceeded until the end of May or the beginning of June at population level. To determine the breeding system of I. polycarpa, three pollination treatments were carried out on every three female plants: natural pollination (NP), apomixy (AP) and cross pollination (CP). Reproductive success of apoximy treatment indicated that, as a dioecious plant, I. polycarpa could also reproduce by apomixis. However, the mean fruit set under apomixy treatment was markerly lower (3.6–13.33%) than that of two pollination treatments (>65.69%). Fruit quality (fruit length, fruit width, 100 fruit weight, seed production and seed germination) of the cross pollination treatment was greater than the other two treatments, suggested that pollen competition in cross pollination treatment was the most intense in three treatments. To study parental effect on fruit characters, cross pollination was carried out with three female plants and three male plants. The result showed that maternal parents (P<0.001) and parental interaction significantly affected all the fruit characters (including 100 fruit weight, pulp/fruit ratio, oil content and seed germination) while paternal parents showed significant effects on 100 fruit weight, pulp/fruit ratio and seed germination. Fruit set was only significantly affected by maternal parents (P=0.001). Our findings will facilitate future breeding programs of I. polycarpa in parental selection. (author)

  13. A survey of exotic plants in federal wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilyn Marler

    2000-01-01

    I conducted a survey of wilderness areas to provide an overview of plant invasions in the National Wilderness Preservation System. Fifteen per cent of responding mangers reported that exotic plants were among their top 10 management concerns, either because they are actively dealing with control of exotic pest plants or have prioritized prevention of their...

  14. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantar, M.B.; Sosa, C.C.; Khoury, C.K.; Castaneda-Alvarez, N.P.; Achicanoy, H.A.; Bernau, V.; Kane, N.C.; Marek, L.; Seiler, G.; Rieseberg, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and

  15. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenhaus, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the legal background, the role of the 'Bund' (Federation) and the 'Laender' (States) in the field of atomic energy and radiation protection law and the licensing procedure for nuclear power plants. (RW) [de

  16. 75 FR 66387 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ...] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in Managing...) announces the availability for public review of a draft national plan to assist States, Federal agencies... Management, National Park Service, and FWS; St. Regis Mohawk Tribe; Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife...

  17. Reproductive biology and breeding system of Saraca asoca (Roxb.) De Wilde: a vulnerable medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, G R; Thondaiman, V

    2016-01-01

    Ashoka ( Saraca asoca ) is a perennial, evergreen tree valued for its ornamental flowers and medicinal values. This species is classified as 'vulnerable' under IUCN list due to its dwindling population because of destructive harvesting from natural habitats. Therefore, conservation and multiplication of this species is need of the hour to utilize its astonishing medicinal uses eternally. Conservation approaches of any plant species require in-depth study of its reproductive biology, which is lacking in this species. The present study is the first detailed report on reproductive biology of S. asoca . This tree bears fragrant flowers in paniculate corymbose inflorescence from December end to May, with peak flowering during February-March. The fruits attain its maturity during last week of May-July. Seeds were dispersed from the pod to the tree premises upon complete maturity. The time of anthesis in this species is noticed in the early morning from 3.00 to 5.30 am, which coincided with anther dehiscence, stigma receptivity and insect activity. The length of the stamen and pistil points towards the pollination compatibility in both male and female parts. Pollen viability was maximum within 2 h of anthesis, which decreased thereafter and no pollens were viable after 6 h. The stigma was receptive at the time of anthesis and continued for 24 h. The tree produces bright colour attractive flowers, which changed from yellow/light orange to scarlet/red from the inception of buds to wilting. The bright color of the flowers attracted floral visitors/pollinators thereby facilitated the pollination in this species. The observations of the floral biology and breeding system indicated the cross pollination behaviour, which limited the production of selfed seeds and would help to maintain the sustainable levels of heterozygosity among the various populations. Considerable amount of seeds produced in this species indicated that the species is capable of sustaining its progenies

  18. Contribution and perspectives of quantitative genetics to plant breeding in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henrique Ribeiro Barrozo Toledo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to show how quantitative genetics has contributed to the huge genetic progress obtained inplant breeding in Brazil in the last forty years. The information obtained through quantitative genetics has given Brazilian breedersthe possibility of responding to innumerable questions in their work in a much more informative way, such as the use or not of hybridcultivars, which segregating population to use, which breeding method to employ, alternatives for improving the efficiency of selectionprograms, and how to handle the data of progeny and/or cultivars evaluations to identify the most stable ones and thus improverecommendations.

  19. Cultural plant harvests on federal lands: perspectives from members of the Northwest Native American Basketweavers Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca Dobkins; Ceara Lewis; Susan Hummel; Emily. Dickey

    2016-01-01

    Native Americans who wish to harvest forest plants for traditional uses report difficulties gaining access to federal lands in the northwestern United States. To learn more about this issue, we reviewed the published literature on site access and resource harvests by tribal members and discussed it with Native American traditional users of plant resources. Specifically...

  20. Plant mutation breeding of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) using gamma irradiation for improvement of smooth cayenne variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeranto Human; S Loekito; M Trilaksono; A Syaifudin

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the most famous pineapple cultivar cultivated for the world trade is Smooth Cayenne. Many clones derived from this cultivar such as GP1, GP2, GP3, GP4, GP5, and F180 are grown by GGPC for fresh and processed fruits. GGPC started pineapple breeding and varietal improvement programs in 1986 with the objectives to increase quality, tonage and yield. Mutation breeding in pineapple was started in 2006 i.e. in collaboration with the Center for Isotopes and Radiation Application (CIRA), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). A number of 10 pineapple crowns originated from GP2, GP3 (A10) and F180 clones were treated with gamma irradiation from Cobalt-60 source installed in gamma chamber 4000 A, using the doses of 200 and 300 Gy. The irradiated crowns were then planted in the experimental field (as V1) and maintained following the GGPC commercial standard cultivation for pineapple. The results showed there was no significant differences between the two gamma irradiation doses (200 and 300 Gy) on pineapple phenotypic performances. However, high phenotypic variability was found in clones at the second vegetative propagation (V2). Some plant variations were recorded as follows: 47 % of normal vigour, 15 % of rosset, 11 % of spiny, 5 % of crowns with double tips, 4 % of plant having plenty of leaves and 18 % of fruits with abnormal shape. Significant mutant variation was also observed in clones the third vegetative propagation (V3) but some mutants seemed to be more stable in the V3 generation. This pineapple mutation breeding program will be continued for mutant evaluation that is related to improvement of productivity, quality and resistance to major insect and diseases. (author)

  1. Mapping quantitative trait loci in plant breeding populations : Use of parental haplotype sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Beavis, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Applied breeding programs evaluate large numbers of progeny derived from multiple related crosses for a wide range of agronomic traits and for tens to hundreds of molecular markers. This study was conducted to determine how these phenotypic and genetic data could be used for routinely mapping

  2. Participatory plant breeding: a way to arrive at better adapted onions varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemens-Hulscher, M.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Osman, A.M.; Jeuken, J.; Groenen, R.; Heer, de R.

    2006-01-01

    The search for varieties that are better adapted to organic farming is a current topic in the organic sector. Breeding programmes specific for organic agriculture should solve this problem. Collaborating with organic farmers in such programmes, particularly in the selection process, can potentially

  3. Trained to adapt: Researchers from Pakistan, Mauritius and Afghanistan breed mutant plants to take on a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawerth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    From cotton in Pakistan to tomatoes in Mauritius and wheat in Afghanistan, many crops around the world are being devastated by erratic rains, droughts, diseases and relentless heat, which are being exacerbated by climate change. As the global search for solutions to climate challenges continues, three researchers are using their training with the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture to develop new plant breeds that can withstand these adverse conditions and help keep their countries’ crops growing strong.

  4. A review of the latest concepts in molecular plant pathology and applications to potato breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co-evolution between pathogens and plants has led to the development of a range of constitutive and inducible resistance mechanisms that help plants survive pathogen attack. Different models have been proposed to describe the plant immune system. The most popular current model indicates that plants ...

  5. Forage plants of an Arctic-nesting herbivore show larger warming response in breeding than wintering grounds, potentially disrupting migration phenology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameris, T.K.; Jochems, Femke; van der Graaf, A.J.; Andersson, M.; Limpens, J.; Nolet, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    During spring migration, herbivorous waterfowl breeding in the Arctic depend on peaks in the supply of nitrogen-rich forage plants, following a “green wave” of grass growth along their flyway to fuel migration and reproduction. The effects of climate warming on forage plant growth are expected to be

  6. Virtual Plants Need Water Too: Functional-Structural Root System Models in the Context of Drought Tolerance Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndour, Adama; Vadez, Vincent; Pradal, Christophe; Lucas, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    Developing a sustainable agricultural model is one of the great challenges of the coming years. The agricultural practices inherited from the Green Revolution of the 1960s show their limits today, and new paradigms need to be explored to counter rising issues such as the multiplication of climate-change related drought episodes. Two such new paradigms are the use of functional-structural plant models to complement and rationalize breeding approaches and a renewed focus on root systems as untapped sources of plant amelioration. Since the late 1980s, numerous functional and structural models of root systems were developed and used to investigate the properties of root systems in soil or lab-conditions. In this review, we focus on the conception and use of such root models in the broader context of research on root-driven drought tolerance, on the basis of root system architecture (RSA) phenotyping. Such models result from the integration of architectural, physiological and environmental data. Here, we consider the different phenotyping techniques allowing for root architectural and physiological study and their limits. We discuss how QTL and breeding studies support the manipulation of RSA as a way to improve drought resistance. We then go over the integration of the generated data within architectural models, how those architectural models can be coupled with functional hydraulic models, and how functional parameters can be measured to feed those models. We then consider the assessment and validation of those hydraulic models through confrontation of simulations to experimentations. Finally, we discuss the up and coming challenges facing root systems functional-structural modeling approaches in the context of breeding.

  7. Virtual Plants Need Water Too: Functional-Structural Root System Models in the Context of Drought Tolerance Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adama Ndour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a sustainable agricultural model is one of the great challenges of the coming years. The agricultural practices inherited from the Green Revolution of the 1960s show their limits today, and new paradigms need to be explored to counter rising issues such as the multiplication of climate-change related drought episodes. Two such new paradigms are the use of functional-structural plant models to complement and rationalize breeding approaches and a renewed focus on root systems as untapped sources of plant amelioration. Since the late 1980s, numerous functional and structural models of root systems were developed and used to investigate the properties of root systems in soil or lab-conditions. In this review, we focus on the conception and use of such root models in the broader context of research on root-driven drought tolerance, on the basis of root system architecture (RSA phenotyping. Such models result from the integration of architectural, physiological and environmental data. Here, we consider the different phenotyping techniques allowing for root architectural and physiological study and their limits. We discuss how QTL and breeding studies support the manipulation of RSA as a way to improve drought resistance. We then go over the integration of the generated data within architectural models, how those architectural models can be coupled with functional hydraulic models, and how functional parameters can be measured to feed those models. We then consider the assessment and validation of those hydraulic models through confrontation of simulations to experimentations. Finally, we discuss the up and coming challenges facing root systems functional-structural modeling approaches in the context of breeding.

  8. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food products...

  9. Evaluation of approaches for estimating the accuracy of genomic prediction in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould Estaghvirou, Sidi Boubacar; Ogutu, Joseph O; Schulz-Streeck, Torben; Knaak, Carsten; Ouzunova, Milena; Gordillo, Andres; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2013-12-06

    In genomic prediction, an important measure of accuracy is the correlation between the predicted and the true breeding values. Direct computation of this quantity for real datasets is not possible, because the true breeding value is unknown. Instead, the correlation between the predicted breeding values and the observed phenotypic values, called predictive ability, is often computed. In order to indirectly estimate predictive accuracy, this latter correlation is usually divided by an estimate of the square root of heritability. In this study we use simulation to evaluate estimates of predictive accuracy for seven methods, four (1 to 4) of which use an estimate of heritability to divide predictive ability computed by cross-validation. Between them the seven methods cover balanced and unbalanced datasets as well as correlated and uncorrelated genotypes. We propose one new indirect method (4) and two direct methods (5 and 6) for estimating predictive accuracy and compare their performances and those of four other existing approaches (three indirect (1 to 3) and one direct (7)) with simulated true predictive accuracy as the benchmark and with each other. The size of the estimated genetic variance and hence heritability exerted the strongest influence on the variation in the estimated predictive accuracy. Increasing the number of genotypes considerably increases the time required to compute predictive accuracy by all the seven methods, most notably for the five methods that require cross-validation (Methods 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6). A new method that we propose (Method 5) and an existing method (Method 7) used in animal breeding programs were the fastest and gave the least biased, most precise and stable estimates of predictive accuracy. Of the methods that use cross-validation Methods 4 and 6 were often the best. The estimated genetic variance and the number of genotypes had the greatest influence on predictive accuracy. Methods 5 and 7 were the fastest and produced the least

  10. Genoproteomics-assisted improvement of Andrographis paniculata: toward a promising molecular and conventional breeding platform for autogamous plants affecting the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiani, Alireza; Talei, Daryush; Lattoo, Surrinder K; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgaard; Batley, Jacqueline; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Maziah, Mahmood; Sabu, Kallevettankuzhy K; Abiri, Rambod; Sakuanrungsirikul, Suchirat; Tan, Soon Guan

    2017-09-01

    Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Wall. ex Nees. (AP) is a hermaphroditic, self-compatible, and habitual inbreeding plant. Its main bioactive component is andrographolide, which is capable of inducing autophagic cell death in some human cancer cells and helps fight HIV/AIDS. Increasing the andrographolide content by investigating the genetic mechanisms controlling its biosynthesis in order to improve and develop high-yielding cultivars are the main breeding targets for AP. However, there might exist some limitations or barriers for crossability within AP accessions. Recently, this problem was addressed in AP by using a combination of crossbreeding and biotechnology-aided genetic methods. This review emphasizes that development of a breeding platform in a hard-to-breed plant, such as AP, requires the involvement of a broad range of methods from classical genetics to molecular breeding. To this end, a phenological stage (for example, flowering and stigma development) can be simplified to a quantitative morphological trait (for example, bud or stigma length) to be used as an index to express the highest level of receptivity in order to manage outcrossing. The outcomes of the basic crossability research can be then employed in diallel mating and crossbreeding. This review explains how genomic data could produce useful information regarding genetic distance and its influence on the crossability of AP accessions. Our review indicates that co-dominant DNA markers, such as microsatellites, are also capable of resolving the evolutionary pathway and cryptic features of plant populations and such information can be used to select the best breeding strategy. This review also highlights the importance of proteomic analysis as a breeding tool. In this regard, protein diversification, as well as the impact of normal and stress-responsive proteins on morphometric and physiological behaviors, could be used in breeding programs. These findings have immense potential for improving

  11. Experimental evidence for the ancestry of allotetraploid Trifolium repens and creation of synthetic forms with value for plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Warren M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White clover (Trifolium repens is a ubiquitous weed of the temperate world that through use of improved cultivars has also become the most important legume of grazed pastures world-wide. It has long been suspected to be allotetraploid, but the diploid ancestral species have remained elusive. Putative diploid ancestors were indicated by DNA sequence phylogeny to be T. pallescens and T. occidentale. Here, we use further DNA evidence as well as a combination of molecular cytogenetics (FISH and GISH and experimental hybridization to test the hypothesis that white clover originated as a hybrid between T. pallescens and T. occidentale. Results T. pallescens plants were identified with chloroplast trnL intron DNA sequences identical to those of white clover. Similarly, T. occidentale plants with nuclear ITS sequences identical to white clover were also identified. Reciprocal GISH experiments, alternately using labeled genomic DNA probes from each of the putative ancestral species on the same white clover cells, showed that half of the chromosomes hybridized with each probe. F1 hybrids were generated by embryo rescue and these showed strong interspecific chromosome pairing and produced a significant frequency of unreduced gametes, indicating the likely mode of polyploidization. The F1 hybrids are inter-fertile with white clover and function as synthetic white clovers, a valuable new resource for the re-incorporation of ancestral genomes into modern white clover for future plant breeding. Conclusions Evidence from DNA sequence analyses, molecular cytogenetics, interspecific hybridization and breeding experiments supports the hypothesis that a diploid alpine species (T. pallescens hybridized with a diploid coastal species (T. occidentale to generate tetraploid T. repens. The coming together of these two narrowly adapted species (one alpine and the other maritime, along with allotetraploidy, has led to a transgressive hybrid with a

  12. Experimental evidence for the ancestry of allotetraploid Trifolium repens and creation of synthetic forms with value for plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warren M; Ellison, Nicholas W; Ansari, Helal A; Verry, Isabelle M; Hussain, S Wajid

    2012-04-24

    White clover (Trifolium repens) is a ubiquitous weed of the temperate world that through use of improved cultivars has also become the most important legume of grazed pastures world-wide. It has long been suspected to be allotetraploid, but the diploid ancestral species have remained elusive. Putative diploid ancestors were indicated by DNA sequence phylogeny to be T. pallescens and T. occidentale. Here, we use further DNA evidence as well as a combination of molecular cytogenetics (FISH and GISH) and experimental hybridization to test the hypothesis that white clover originated as a hybrid between T. pallescens and T. occidentale. T. pallescens plants were identified with chloroplast trnL intron DNA sequences identical to those of white clover. Similarly, T. occidentale plants with nuclear ITS sequences identical to white clover were also identified. Reciprocal GISH experiments, alternately using labeled genomic DNA probes from each of the putative ancestral species on the same white clover cells, showed that half of the chromosomes hybridized with each probe. F1 hybrids were generated by embryo rescue and these showed strong interspecific chromosome pairing and produced a significant frequency of unreduced gametes, indicating the likely mode of polyploidization. The F1 hybrids are inter-fertile with white clover and function as synthetic white clovers, a valuable new resource for the re-incorporation of ancestral genomes into modern white clover for future plant breeding. Evidence from DNA sequence analyses, molecular cytogenetics, interspecific hybridization and breeding experiments supports the hypothesis that a diploid alpine species (T. pallescens) hybridized with a diploid coastal species (T. occidentale) to generate tetraploid T. repens. The coming together of these two narrowly adapted species (one alpine and the other maritime), along with allotetraploidy, has led to a transgressive hybrid with a broad adaptive range.

  13. Limitation of releases of radioactive effluents for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolksdorf, P.; Buehling, A.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical values relating to the effluents of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are now available. These values cover a period of several years of operation. The measured emissions of radioactive substances are often very much below the maximum permissible values, based on the dose limits for the environment stipulated in the legal regulations. Extensive technical and administrative measures contribute to the reduction of radioactive effluents. Furthermore, additional possibilities for improvement are mentioned which may lead to a further reduction of radioactive effluents. These are derived from investigations into the release of radioactive substances in nuclear power plants. The licensing procedure in the Federal Republic of Germany in fixing discharge limits is outlined. Proposals are made concerning licence values which may be determined for the radioactive effluents in modern standardized nuclear power plants with light-water reactors. The resulting radiation exposures are quoted for a typical nuclear power plant site. (author)

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  15. A desk evaluation review of project POL/5/006 plant breeding using induced mutations. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Projects POL/5/006 was initiated in 1985 to assist the Government of Poland in improving the mutation breeding efforts in the country to promote the development of new and higher yielding crop varieties. The difficult economic situation in the country at this time restricted the procurement of special equipment, spare parts and supplies from abroad and, therefore, impeded research and development work in this field. The project was implemented using a distinctive approach and design characterized by having six recipient institutions and the establishment of one central gamma-irradiation facility to be made available to all participating institutions for mutation induction. The project was formally closed in 1989. The review of project POL/5/006 was undertaken in accord with the expressed wishes of the Board of Governors for selected ex-post evaluations of completed projects. The main purpose of the review was to ascertain if the project objectives were achieved, and to determine what impact the technical assistance provided may have had on continued post-project and current plant breeding programmes in Poland

  16. A desk evaluation review of project POL/5/006 plant breeding using induced mutations. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-14

    Projects POL/5/006 was initiated in 1985 to assist the Government of Poland in improving the mutation breeding efforts in the country to promote the development of new and higher yielding crop varieties. The difficult economic situation in the country at this time restricted the procurement of special equipment, spare parts and supplies from abroad and, therefore, impeded research and development work in this field. The project was implemented using a distinctive approach and design characterized by having six recipient institutions and the establishment of one central gamma-irradiation facility to be made available to all participating institutions for mutation induction. The project was formally closed in 1989. The review of project POL/5/006 was undertaken in accord with the expressed wishes of the Board of Governors for selected ex-post evaluations of completed projects. The main purpose of the review was to ascertain if the project objectives were achieved, and to determine what impact the technical assistance provided may have had on continued post-project and current plant breeding programmes in Poland.

  17. Climate Change May Alter Breeding Ground Distributions of Eastern Migratory Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via Range Expansion of Asclepias Host Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species’ distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  18. Climate change may alter breeding ground distributions of eastern migratory monarchs (Danaus plexippus via range expansion of Asclepias host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Lemoine

    Full Text Available Climate change can profoundly alter species' distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp. host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in

  19. Climate change may alter breeding ground distributions of eastern migratory monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via range expansion of Asclepias host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Nathan P

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species' distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  20. Germination and Seed Bank Studies of Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae), a Federally Theatened Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Madsen Schulze; John L. Walker; Timothy P. Spira

    2002-01-01

    Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae) is a Federally threatened plant endemic to Florida. Seedlings are rarely observed in natural populations, but seed production has been documented. We assessed the germinability of dry-stored seeds and of experimentally buried seeds, and sampled soil to detect a persistent seed bank.More than 20% of recorded seeds...

  1. Optimizing the number of progenies and replications in plant breeding experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís da Silva Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A determination criterion was proposed for the number of replications, r, and of evaluated progenies, Nr, given P experimentalplots, with Nr=P/r, and n progenies to be selected; its application was discussed in the selection of progenies of bulk populations,derived from two homozygous parents. For a known heritability at the plot level, h20, there is a critical n below which the gain isgreater with selection evaluating P/(r+1 progenies in r+1 than P/r progenies in r replications. Different h20 scenarios were simulatedin the F2 and F∞ generations, assuming no dominance. It was demonstrated that at any h20 , if n > 18.5% of P, larger gains are obtainedby assuming Nr = P, showing that the augmented block design could be used in the early stages of breeding programs. The higher h20,the higher must be the selection intensity to justify the use of additional replications.

  2. An innovative procedure of genome-wide association analysis fits studies on germplasm population and plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianbo; Meng, Shan; Zhao, Tuanjie; Xing, Guangnan; Yang, Shouping; Li, Yan; Guan, Rongzhan; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Yufeng; Xia, Qiuju; Yang, Bing; Gai, Junyi

    2017-11-01

    The innovative RTM-GWAS procedure provides a relatively thorough detection of QTL and their multiple alleles for germplasm population characterization, gene network identification, and genomic selection strategy innovation in plant breeding. The previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been concentrated on finding a handful of major quantitative trait loci (QTL), but plant breeders are interested in revealing the whole-genome QTL-allele constitution in breeding materials/germplasm (in which tremendous historical allelic variation has been accumulated) for genome-wide improvement. To match this requirement, two innovations were suggested for GWAS: first grouping tightly linked sequential SNPs into linkage disequilibrium blocks (SNPLDBs) to form markers with multi-allelic haplotypes, and second utilizing two-stage association analysis for QTL identification, where the markers were preselected by single-locus model followed by multi-locus multi-allele model stepwise regression. Our proposed GWAS procedure is characterized as a novel restricted two-stage multi-locus multi-allele GWAS (RTM-GWAS, https://github.com/njau-sri/rtm-gwas ). The Chinese soybean germplasm population (CSGP) composed of 1024 accessions with 36,952 SNPLDBs (generated from 145,558 SNPs, with reduced linkage disequilibrium decay distance) was used to demonstrate the power and efficiency of RTM-GWAS. Using the CSGP marker information, simulation studies demonstrated that RTM-GWAS achieved the highest QTL detection power and efficiency compared with the previous procedures, especially under large sample size and high trait heritability conditions. A relatively thorough detection of QTL with their multiple alleles was achieved by RTM-GWAS compared with the linear mixed model method on 100-seed weight in CSGP. A QTL-allele matrix (402 alleles of 139 QTL × 1024 accessions) was established as a compact form of the population genetic constitution. The 100-seed weight QTL-allele matrix was

  3. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenhaus, W.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture is divided into three parts: 1) the legal conception and requirements of the German Atomic Energy Law (with special view on construction and operation of nuclear power plants), 2) the role of the Federation ('Bund') and the 'Laender' in the field of atomic energy and the Radiation Protection Ordinance (especially for licensing and supervision of nuclear power plants), 3) the function, participants, types and sequence of the strongly formalised licensing procedure for nuclear power plants, technical assessment in the frame of this procedure, content of a licence, possibility for altering the licence at a later date, role of administrative courts, continual supervision. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Improvement of Basic Food Crops in Africa Through Plant Breeding, Including the Use of Induced Mutations, funded by the Italian Government, was initiated in 1989 in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of stable food crops of Africa with the main emphasis on the indigenous species and their local cultivars. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination meeting under the CRP was held in Naples, Italy from 30 October - 3 November 1995. This publication includes the reports, conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. We hope that it will be of value to researchers, students and policy makers alike in their endeavour to promote plant breeding and increase food productions in Africa. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Improvement of Basic Food Crops in Africa Through Plant Breeding, Including the Use of Induced Mutations, funded by the Italian Government, was initiated in 1989 in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of stable food crops of Africa with the main emphasis on the indigenous species and their local cultivars. The fourth and final Research Co-ordination meeting under the CRP was held in Naples, Italy from 30 October - 3 November 1995. This publication includes the reports, conclusions and recommendations made by the participants. We hope that it will be of value to researchers, students and policy makers alike in their endeavour to promote plant breeding and increase food productions in Africa. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. PLANT BREEDING IS A SOLUTION FOR IMPORT SUBSTITUTION IN VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Pivovarov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The vegetable production  is one of the economic sectors  that  provides  the  population  with  foodstuff  products with high biological values. To achieve independence in production  of the agricultural foodstuffs,  the part of imported  products should not be beyond 25 % from total volume of foodstuffs  fabricated. As a result of national breeding program, the varieties and hybrids adapted to different growing conditions, with resistance to  local races of pathogens, temperature stresses, and ground frosts were developed to provide the sustainable production of vegetables with high nutritional and medicinal qualities. The varieties and hybrids F1  of white  head cabbage that have been created for the last 5 years are distinguished from foreign ones by taste qualities, appropriate pickling characteristics with increased  sugar,  and  decreased  cellulose  contents. The local onion varieties combine long shelf life, early maturing, well bulb formation, high dry matter content (18-20% and ability to form the bulb for one year. The cucumber  is  the  traditional  vegetable crop  in  Russia and very profitable for greenhouse enterprises. Breeders have developed bee-pollinated and parthenocarpic hybrids well adapted to local growing conditions and  suitable  for   open  field   cultivation   in  different regions of Russia. Parthenocarpic heterotic hybrids of the  multi-propose  use, corresponding  to  the  modern variety model with high productivity, early-ripening, bunch ovary disposition, resistance to abiotic stresses, and  most  harmful  diseases. The carrot  and  red  beet varieties with  high nutritional  qualities, long shelf-life, ecological plasticity that are widely used for seed production have been created. The varieties of nightshade crops have been developed to cultivate in NonChernozem zone, Far East, Western Siberia, the Middle Belt of Russia and the south of Russia, are also

  7. The potential role of biotechnology and induced mutations in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubluo, A.; Brunner, I.; Palomino, G.; Rodriguez Garay, B.

    2001-01-01

    Although conventional techniques including mutation induction have increased the productivity of crops, the application of biotechnological tools such as tissue culture and molecular markers can speed up crop improvement. Through the application of in vitro culture techniques in Mammilaria san-angelensis, an ornamental cactus severely endangered, we proved through flow cytometry, genetic uniformity in massive in vitro derived plantlets and after irradiation we were able to regenerate it up to M1V4 generation. Solid mutants are expected if somatic embryos are treated with mutagenic agents due to its unicellular origin. Somatic embryogenesis was successfully achieved in Agave tequilana and after irradiation of embryogenic callus cultures, survivors were challenged with pathogenic crude bacterial extracts allowing the selection of resistant or tolerant individuals. Specially important are studies on neglected crops due to the interruption of its domestication and they are locally important for indigenous people as marginal crops. The trend now is to combine biotechnology and induced mutations to overcome problems with this highly promising crops. Chenopodium quinoa exhibits a strong constraint as food due to the undesirable production of saponins. The mutation induction strategy has enabled the reduction of this compounds in M5 generation, but further research is needed to overcome productivity and adaptability problems. Here the use of molecular markers (RAPDS) and flow cytometry techniques acquire relevance in the study of related species such as Chenopodium berlandieri in order to design an inter-specific breeding programme among selected mutants and outstanding local races to combine productivity, adaptability and grain quality

  8. Reproductive biology of the rare plant, Dysosma pleiantha (Berberidaceae): breeding system, pollination and implications for conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gongi, X.; Guan, B.C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysosma pleiantha is an endangered and endemic species in China. We have reported the flowering phenology, breeding system and pollinator activity of the species distributed in Tianmu Mountain (Zhejiang Province) nature reserves. Flowering occurred during the months of early April to late May, with the peak in the middle of the April, and was synchronous across all four subpopulations. The anthesis of an intact inflorescence lasted from sixteen to twenty-three days with eight to eleven days blossom of an individual flower. In D. pleiantha, the morphological development of flowers and fruit leading to the development of mature seeds takes place over a period 3-5 months from flowering. The average of pollen-ovule ratio (P/O) was 18 898.7. The pollen transfer in this species was mainly performed by flies, Hydrotaea chalcogaster (Muscidae). Controlled pollination experiments indicated D. pleiantha was obligate xenogamyous and selfincompatible, and pollination was pollinator-dependent. Controlled pollination experiments showed that the mean fruit set (%) under the natural condition (17.1%) was markedly lower than that of manual cross-pollination (75.6%). It was concluded that pollen-limitation and mate limitation were responsible for the low fruit set of D. pleiantha in the field. Thus, the identification and translocation of compatible mating types to create reproductively viable populations were essential for the recovery of the rare species. (author)

  9. QTL mapping of soybean oil content for marker-assisted selection in plant breeding program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, D C; Pinheiro, J B; Campos, J B; Di Mauro, A O; Unêda-Trevisoli, S H

    2016-03-18

    The present study was undertaken to detect and map the quantitative trait loci (QTL) related to soybean oil content. We used 244 progenies derived from a bi-parental cross of the Lineage 69 (from Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho"/Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias - Breeding Program) and Tucunaré cultivar. A total of 358 simple sequence repeat (SSR; microsatellite) markers were used to investigate the polymorphism between the parental lines, and for the polymorphic lines all the F2 individuals were tested. Evaluation of the oil content and phenotype was performed with the aid of a Tango equipment by near infra-red reflectance spectroscopy, using single F2 seeds and F2:3 progenies, in triplicate. The data were analyzed by QTL Cartographer program for 56 SSR polymorphic markers. Two oil-content related QTLs were detected on K and H linkage groups. The total phenotypic variation explained by QTLs ranged from 7.8 to 46.75% for oil content. New QTLs were identified for the oil content in addition to those previously identified in other studies. The results reported in this study show that regions different from those already known could be involved in the genetic control of soybean oil content.

  10. Evaluation of the biological effect of the concentration of ''CMU''on the leaves plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla Pedreira, R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of CMU (3-p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea on the photosynthetic activity of six species of higher plants and on chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied. In the higher plants the absorption of CMU was studied using 14 C-CMU. The effect of different concentrations of this herbicide on the photosynthetic assimilation of CO 2 by the plant's leaves has also been determined. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of the CMU on the Hill reaction of isolated chloroplasts has been studied. The results indicate that there is a correlation between the concentration of the herbicide and the degree of inhibition of photosynthesis for concentration between 10 -8 M and 10 -4 M. As a consequence of the results obtained, a biotest is proposed for the detection of residues of the photosynthesis inhibitors using the alga chlorella pyrenoidosa as the sensory element. (auth.)

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  12. Efficiency of Sanitary Treatment in Poultry Breeding and Poultry Meat Processing Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kašková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe the effectiveness of disinfection on a broiler farm and in a plant processing the poultry from this farm. The broiler farm was disinfected with a preparation based on peracetic acid while a preparation based on quarternary ammonium salt was used in the processing plant. We evaluated swabs taken from surfaces, which come into contact with broilers and broiler meat. Results of the swabs taken by standard microbiological swabbing method were evaluated with results of the swabs taken by the ATP-bioluminescence method. The microbiological examination included total counts of microorganisms, coliform count and moulds. When using the standard plate counts method on the broiler farm we found that the plate counts in 0% of swabs were 100 CFU. In the processing plant, out of 22% of swabs 100. The bioluminescence method was applied only in the processing plant where 300 RLU were measured in 80, 10 and 10% of swabs, resp. Our observations and results allowed us to conclude that the disinfectants tested appeared suitable for the respective premises and the ATP bioluminescence method could be use as a as a suitable complement for detection of cleanliness of individual surfaces.

  13. A comparison of plant form and browsing height selection of four small stock breeds - Preliminary results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plessis, I.; Waal, van der C.; Webb, E.C.

    2004-01-01

    A direct observation technique was used to establish the foraging behaviour of Boer goats, Nguni goats, Pedi sheep and Dorper sheep. According to the Chi-square dissimilarity measure, plant-form (grass, forb, woody) differences between the diets of goats and sheep were greater than differences

  14. Improving sustainability of maize to ethanol processing by plant breeding and process optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Torres Salvador, A.F.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Trindade, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient management of plant resources is essential for a sustainable biobased economy. The biomass conversion efficiency and sustainability performance depend greatly on the choice of feedstock and the applied processing technology. The aim of this research was to enhance the biomass use of maize

  15. Development of Plant Mutation Breeding Techniques and Mutants Using by Ion Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Song, Hi Sup; Park, In Sook; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Hye Jeong

    2005-06-15

    In recent, Japanese scientists have revealed that high liner energy transfer (LET) heavy-ion beams have relative high biological effectiveness (RBE) and seem to be more effective for induced plant mutation than low LET radiation i.e., X-rays, gamma rays and electrons. This study was conducted to develop basic induced mutation techniques of ion-beam using the MC-50 cyclotron (50MeV) at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science. For the irradiation of ion-beam, not only dry seeds of Arabidopsis, tabacco, Zosiagrass, radish, rice and perilla were packed with thin plastic film to be a monolayer of seeds for homogenous irradiation, but also calli of Zosiagrass and Chrysanthemum were placed in the plastic petridish (diameter 5.5cm) with agar medium. They were irradiated with a proton beam of MC-50 cyclotron with various dose ranges of 10 to 5000Gy depend on plant materials and then measured germination rate and early growth of M1 plants. Arabidopsis, tabacco, and Zosiagrass showed little inhibition of germination and early growth at doses tested over than 1000 Gy. In particular, Arabidopsis showed less growth inhibition than 50 % even at dose of 5000Gy. On the other hand, radish, perilla and rice were not only sensitively inhibited at the lower doses, but also linearly decreased with accordance with the increasing irradiation dose. The lethal dose 50 (LD50) for two cultivars of perilla was estimated to be at approximately 25-30Gy. All M1 plants of rice did not growth over than 500Gy. These results indicate that the significant difference in sensitivity or in LD50 to irradiation of MC-50 proton beam was observed among plant species and materials.

  16. Plant prebiotics and human health: Biotechnology to breed prebiotic-rich nutritious food crops

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi,Sangam; Sahrawat,Kanwar; Puppala,Naveen; Ortiz,Rodomiro

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota in the gut play essential roles in human health. Prebiotics are non-digestible complex carbohydrates 19 that are fermented in the colon, yielding energy and short chain fatty acids, and selectively promote the growth of 20 Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillae in the gastro-intestinal tract. Fructans and inulin are the best-characterized plant prebiotics. Many vegetable, root and tuber crops as well as some fruit crops are the best-known sources of prebiotic carbohydrates, while the pre...

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  18. Regulatory inspection practices for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, Otto.

    1977-01-01

    Applicants for a licence as well as the competent bodies in this field are responsible for justifying the public's confidence in the quality and reliability of the uses of nuclear energy. This concern is reflected in the legal provisions and the philosophy applicable to statutory inspections in the Federal Republic of Germany. This paper describes the organisation, the purposes and the number of inspections performed at the design, the construction and the operational stages of nuclear power plants as well as the inspections organised following unexpected events and includes the comparison of various inspection costs with the overall costs of a nuclear power plant. (NEA) [fr

  19. The safety analysis report for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the standard format for drawing up safety analysis reports for stationary fission reactors - this format was published in 1959 by the competent Federal Ministry for Atomic Energy - a report is made on the format and scope of German safety analysis reports. The reasons for drawing up a standard safety analysis report for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactor or boiling water reactor and a KWU draft are discussed. (orig./RW) [de

  20. The design of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany as regards aircraft accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of investigation results of aircraft crashes for the Federal territory and site assessment data of the Ministry of the Interior, air traffic does not present a notable hazard for a nuclear power plant. As a precautionary measure for reducing the remaining risk, design requirements for LWRs were developed which, independently of existing aircraft types, contain mainly an abstract predetermination of an idealized impact load - time diagramme. (HP) [de

  1. A direct comparison of remote sensing approaches for high-throughput phenotyping in plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tattaris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing (RS of plant canopies permits non-intrusive, high-throughput monitoring of plant physiological characteristics. This study compared three RS approaches using a low flying UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle, with that of proximal sensing, and satellite-based imagery. Two physiological traits were considered, canopy temperature (CT and a vegetation index (NDVI, to determine the most viable approaches for large scale crop genetic improvement. The UAV-based platform achieves plot-level resolution while measuring several hundred plots in one mission via high-resolution thermal and multispectral imagery measured at altitudes of 30-100 m. The satellite measures multispectral imagery from an altitude of 770 km. Information was compared with proximal measurements using IR thermometers and an NDVI sensor at a distance of 0.5-1m above plots. For robust comparisons, CT and NDVI were assessed on panels of elite cultivars under irrigated and drought conditions, in different thermal regimes, and on un-adapted genetic resources under water deficit. Correlations between airborne data and yield/biomass at maturity were generally higher than equivalent proximal correlations. NDVI was derived from high-resolution satellite imagery for only larger sized plots (8.5 x 2.4 m due to restricted pixel density. Results support use of UAV-based RS techniques for high-throughput phenotyping for both precision and efficiency.

  2. Radiation exposure control of nuclear power plant personnel in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehl, J.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of exposure records of all persons engaged in radiation work at nuclear power plants of the Federal Republic of Germany has shown that annual collective doses increase rapidly with time. The annual gross electrical energy generated from nuclear power also increases rapidly with time, corresponding to about 11% of the total gross electrical energy produced in 1977/78. Therefore, it is obvious that there is an increase of both the risk and the benefit from nuclear power production. Whether in the course of time the situation develops more towards the risk or the benefit side is learned from the history of the annual ratio of the collective dose per gross electrical energy generated. This ratio shows a significant decrease since 1972. The decrease is due to the experience gained from operation of the first-generation plants, which led to several administrative measures aimed at an improved control of the collective doses of power plant personnel in the Federal Republic of Germany. The administrative measures include, among others, the introduction of the following requirements: (a) Everyone who applies for a nuclear power plant construction licence has to provide evidence that, in the design of the plant, full use is made of the experience gained from plants in operation with respect to reduction of collective doses of the power plant personnel. (b) Everyone who engages his employees on radiation work within operations for which an operation licence is required, but which is held by others, requires a special 'contractor licence'. (c) Every person engaged in radiation work on the basis of a contractor licence must carry a special exposure record book which is registered by the competent national authority. (author)

  3. Recurrent Selection and Participatory Plant Breeding for Improvement of Two Organic Open-Pollinated Sweet Corn (Zea mays L. Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C. Shelton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic growers face unique challenges when raising sweet corn, and benefit from varieties that maintain high eating quality, germinate consistently, deter insect pests, and resist diseases. Genotype by environment rank changes can occur in the performance of cultivars grown on conventional and organic farms, yet few varieties have been bred specifically for organic systems. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the changes made to open-pollinated sweet corn populations using recurrent selection and a participatory plant breeding (PPB methodology. From 2008 to 2011, four cycles of two open-pollinated (OP sweet corn populations were selected on a certified organic farm in Minnesota using a modified ear-to-row recurrent selection scheme. Selections were made in collaboration with an organic farmer, with selection criteria based on traits identified by the farmer. In 2012 and 2013, the population cycles were evaluated in a randomized complete block design in two certified organic locations in Wisconsin, with multiple replications in each environment. Significant linear trends were found among cycles of selection for quantitative and qualitative traits, suggesting the changes were due to recurrent selection and PPB methodology for these populations. However, further improvement is necessary to satisfy the requirements for a useful cultivar for organic growers.

  4. Behavior patterns of cows with Charolais or Nellore breed predominance fed diets with plant extract or monensin sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Rumpel Segabinazzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the ingestive behavior of feedlot cows fed additives based on plant extracts or monensin sodium. Twenty-four Charolais and Nellore crossbred cows with age and average initial weight of 7 years and 423 kg, respectively, were used. The experimental diets were plant extracts: basal diet + 5 g/animal/day of a natural additive composed of 750 mg of essential oil of thyme (Thymus vulgaris, 150 mg of garlic (Allium sativum, 250 mg of rosemary extract (Rosmarimus officinalis, 250 mg of canola oil (Brassica napus, 250 mg extract of quillaja (Quillaja saponaria, and 3350 mg of corn starch; sodium monensin: basal diet + 300 mg/monensin/animal/day; and control: basal diet without additive. The basal diet contained sorghum silage and concentrate in a 62:38 ratio. The experimental design was completely randomized with a 3 × 2 (3 diets and 2 breed predominances factorial arrangement, and means were compared using DMS test at 5% of significance. The type of additive consumed did not alter animal feeding behavior. Cows with Charolais predominance consumed more dry matter (13.78 vs. 12.38 kg/day and neutral detergent fiber (7.81 vs. 6.89 kg/day, ruminated for longer (8.47 vs. 7.82 h, spent more time chewing (13.05 vs 12.01 h, had a greater number of chews per minute (58.88 vs 53.21 and a greater number of ruminal bolus (541.43 vs. 464.09 boluses/day; however, cows with Nellore predominance had greater idling time (11.82 vs. 10.74 h.

  5. Nuclear power plant licensing and supervision in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrhardt, H.J.; Gottschalk, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly describes nuclear power plant licensing and supervision in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Peculiarities due to the federal structure of the FRG are outlined paying due regard to the long tradition of using consultation by qualified and independent technical experts. The participating authorities, commissions, expert organizations, vendors, utilities and the public as well as their respective competences are mentioned. Also, the hierarchy in nuclear legislation by means of ordinances, administrative regulations, guidelines and technical standards is pointed out. Typical examples are presented. The paper ends in mentioning important items concerning the evaluation of operating experience, recurrent tests, backfitting, lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident, safety research concerning accident management measures, on-site and off-site emergency planning, as well as qualification and occupational training of the responsible shift personnel. (orig.)

  6. Beznau nuclear power plant: comments of the Federal Department of Transport, Communications and Energy on the reproaches of Greenpeace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Answer of the chairman of the EVED (Federal Department of Transport, Communications and Energy) to the open letter in which Greenpeace Switzerland made massive accusations against the nuclear power plant Beznau and the HSK (Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate). All the charges are rebutted in this answer

  7. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains a brief account of FAO/IAEA meetings held in 1990 on plant breeding involving the use of induced mutations. It also features a list of commercially available plant cultivars produced by such techniques. Refs and tabs

  8. Genomics-assisted breeding in fruit trees

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Minamikawa, Mai F.; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Ishimori, Motoyuki; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomic analysis technologies have opened up new avenues to promote the efficiency of plant breeding. Novel genomics-based approaches for plant breeding and genetics research, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS), are useful, especially in fruit tree breeding. The breeding of fruit trees is hindered by their long generation time, large plant size, long juvenile phase, and the necessity to wait for the physiological maturity of the pl...

  9. Breeding system and pollination biology of paeonia delavayi (peaoniaceae), an endangered plant in the southwest of china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, B.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, L

    2014-01-01

    Breeding system and pollination biology of Paeonia delavayi (Peaoniaceae) from Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, southwest of China were studied. Flowering phenologies and flower visitors were observed or collected from 2008 to 2011. The pollen viability, stigma receptivity and pollination efficiency of different visitors were detected and tested. The florescence lasted for 6- 9d in a single flower from mid-May to late June. A high percentage of flower damage promoted early anther dehiscence. Flowers started disseminating pollen at 1-2 d after flowering, and lasted for 5-6 d. Pollen viability could be preserved for more than 10 d at normal temperature. High seed rate from the stigma was observed at 1 d before flowering to 3d after flowering, and the dissemination hysteresis was defined as protogyny. The P/O ratios were 6,124 to 9,713:1, suggesting that the larger quantity of pollen to increased the seed setting rate. Three species of bees, eight species of beetles, seven species of syrphid flies, four species of ants, and three species of butterflies were observed on the flowers. P. delavayi rewarded to the visitors by releasing fragrance, providing pollen and nectar. On the bodies of the visitors under stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), much pollen from the plants of similar flowering period inner community were found which indicated that these incompatible visitors were not species-specific pollinators. The bagging experiments showed that P. delavayi was selfincompatible and no apomixes. Anemophily only played a minor role in the fertilization. A few seeds with poor plumpness can be produced by geitonogamy. Seed setting rate of artificial xenogamy was higher than natural pollination. Artificial control of the visitors' species showed bees being the most important pollinators. Beetles and ants participated in pollination to someextent and were unstable. Syrphid flies and butterflies were very unreliable with low pollination efficiency

  10. Federal securities law and the need to disclose the risk of canceling nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponseller, D.

    1984-01-01

    Almost every electric utility company involved in nuclear plant construction has experienced difficulty as a result of the deteriorating condition of the nuclear industry as a whole. The thrust of a growing number of lawsuits brought against electric companies for alleged violations of federal securities laws is that the companies failed to reveal cost overruns, delays, and the risk of cancellation and write-off of nuclear plants in their annual reports and registration statements. A review of several suits and the disclosure requirements of securities statutes concludes that, although investors have known about utility problems, they have just become aware this year that the entire financial viability of the electric companies is threatened

  11. Safety concept of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurer, H.L.; Seipel, H.G.

    1983-01-01

    The safety philosophy of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) pertaining to nuclear power plants is presented. Its general approach makes much use of research and experience in other countries, especially the United States, but the FRG has also evolved approaches and aspects unique to itself. The article discusses the institutional interrelationships of the entities affecting German nuclear power plant safety and presents the resulting German safety philosophy. This philosophy is based, as in the United States, on multilevel defenses but with greater reliance on a number of accident-prevention and/or -mitigation concepts, including: (1) automated responses to off-normal conditions, (2) an operating-limit system that acts before initiation of protective actions by the reactor protection system, (3) multistrand independent safety trains, and (4) long-term self-contained safety under accident conditions without operator intervention. The practical realization of this philosophy in the design and operation of the chief reactor systems is described

  12. Domestication Origin and Breeding History of the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis in China and India Based on Nuclear Microsatellites and cpDNA Sequence Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muditha K. Meegahakumbura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although China and India are the two largest tea-producing countries, the domestication origin and breeding history of the tea plant in these two countries remain unclear. Our previous study suggested that the tea plant includes three distinct lineages (China type tea, Chinese Assam type tea and Indian Assam type tea, which were independently domesticated in China and India, respectively. To determine the origin and historical timeline of tea domestication in these two countries we used a combination of 23 nSSRs (402 samples and three cpDNA regions (101 samples to genotype domesticated tea plants and its wild relative. Based on a combination of demographic modeling, NewHybrids and Neighbour joining tree analyses, three independent domestication centers were found. In addition, two origins of Chinese Assam type tea were detected: Southern and Western Yunnan of China. Results from demographic modeling suggested that China type tea and Assam type tea first diverged 22,000 year ago during the last glacial maximum and subsequently split into the Chinese Assam type tea and Indian Assam type tea lineages 2770 year ago, corresponding well with the early record of tea usage in Yunnan, China. Furthermore, we found that the three tea types underwent different breeding histories where hybridization appears to have been the most important approach for tea cultivar breeding and improvements: a high proportion of the hybrid lineages were found to be F2 and BCs. Collectively, our results underscore the necessity for the conservation of Chinese Assam type tea germplasm and landraces as a valuable resource for future tea breeding.

  13. Mutation breeding in mangosteen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Mangosteen the queen of the tropical fruits is apomitic and only a cultivar is reported and it reproduces asexually. Conventional breeding is not possible and the other methods to create variabilities are through genetic engineering and mutation breeding. The former technique is still in the infantry stage in mangosteen research while the latter has been an established tool in breeding to improve cultivars. In this mutation breeding seeds of mangosteen were irradiated using gamma rays and the LD 50 for mangosteen was determined and noted to be very low at 10 Gy. After sowing in the seedbed, the seedlings were transplanted in polybags and observed in the nursery bed for about one year before planted in the field under old oil palm trees in Station MARDI, Kluang. After evaluation and screening, about 120 mutant mangosteen plants were selected and planted in Kluang. The plants were observed and some growth data taken. There were some mutant plants that have good growth vigour and more vigorous that the control plants. The trial are now in the fourth year and the plants are still in the juvenile stage. (Author)

  14. Slave Breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Sutch, Richard

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical work on slave breeding in the ante-bellum United States. Slave breeding consisted of interference in the sexual life of slaves by their owners with the intent and result of increasing the number of slave children born. The weight of evidence suggests that slave breeding occurred in sufficient force to raise the rate of growth of the American slave population despite evidence that only a minority of slave-owners engaged in such practices.

  15. Application of next-generation sequencing for rapid marker development in molecular plant breeding: a case study on anthracnose disease resistance in Lupinus angustifolius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Huaan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last 30 years, a number of DNA fingerprinting methods such as RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, DArT, have been extensively used in marker development for molecular plant breeding. However, it remains a daunting task to identify highly polymorphic and closely linked molecular markers for a target trait for molecular marker-assisted selection. The next-generation sequencing (NGS technology is far more powerful than any existing generic DNA fingerprinting methods in generating DNA markers. In this study, we employed a grain legume crop Lupinus angustifolius (lupin as a test case, and examined the utility of an NGS-based method of RAD (restriction-site associated DNA sequencing as DNA fingerprinting for rapid, cost-effective marker development tagging a disease resistance gene for molecular breeding. Results Twenty informative plants from a cross of RxS (disease resistant x susceptible in lupin were subjected to RAD single-end sequencing by multiplex identifiers. The entire RAD sequencing products were resolved in two lanes of the 16-lanes per run sequencing platform Solexa HiSeq2000. A total of 185 million raw reads, approximately 17 Gb of sequencing data, were collected. Sequence comparison among the 20 test plants discovered 8207 SNP markers. Filtration of DNA sequencing data with marker identification parameters resulted in the discovery of 38 molecular markers linked to the disease resistance gene Lanr1. Five randomly selected markers were converted into cost-effective, simple PCR-based markers. Linkage analysis using marker genotyping data and disease resistance phenotyping data on a F8 population consisting of 186 individual plants confirmed that all these five markers were linked to the R gene. Two of these newly developed sequence-specific PCR markers, AnSeq3 and AnSeq4, flanked the target R gene at a genetic distance of 0.9 centiMorgan (cM, and are now replacing the markers previously developed by a traditional DNA

  16. A simple language to script and simulate breeding schemes: the breeding scheme language

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult for plant breeders to determine an optimal breeding strategy given that the problem involves many factors, such as target trait genetic architecture and breeding resource availability. There are many possible breeding schemes for each breeding program. Although simulation study may b...

  17. Inventory of power plants in the United States. [By state within standard Federal Regions, using county codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this inventory of power plants is to provide a ready reference for planners whose focus is on the state, standard Federal region, and/or national level. Thus the inventory is compiled alphabetically by state within standard Federal regions. The units are listed alphabetically within electric utility systems which in turn are listed alphabetically within states. The locations are identified to county level according to the Federal Information Processing Standards Publication Counties and County Equivalents of the States of the United States. Data compiled include existing and projected electrical generation units, jointly owned units, and projected construction units.

  18. Survey of reportable incidents in nuclear power plants of the Federal Republic of Germany in the year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In 1991, there were 249 reportable nuclear power plant incidents in Germany (old and new federal Laender). The report comprehensively lists all these incidents. There was no release of radioactivity exceeding the maximum permissible limits, and there were no effects on man or the environment. There were no incidents of reporting category S (Urgent notification), and ten belonging to category E (immediate notification). The six incidents reported in the first half of 1991 from nuclear power plants in the new federal Laender all belonged to category AE 3, which is the lowest. (orig./DG) [de

  19. Report on nuclear power plant control and instrumentation activities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastl, W.

    1986-01-01

    The overall situation in I and C of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany can be characterized by three aspects. a) The improvement of man-machine communication by introducing integral information concepts for the control room by means of VDUs. b) Along with a) new data acquisition systems based upon process computers which facilitate the integration of operator aids like alarm analyses, disturbance analyses, post-mortem analyses, etc. c) The penetration of programmable processors into limitation systems in order to provide soft setback measures. d) The transition to I and C systems making use of the new generation of electronic components. The most important step towards advanced control rooms was the development of the Process Information System (PRINS) by KWU, which will be used with the German convoi-plants. The main emphasis regarding further R and D work in the field of operator aids is placed upon expert systems. Work will begin with a two years project aiming at the development of a basic module for a laboratory prototype

  20. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  1. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  2. From Mendel's discovery on pea to today's plant genetics and breeding : Commemorating the 150th anniversary of the reading of Mendel's discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smýkal, Petr; K Varshney, Rajeev; K Singh, Vikas; Coyne, Clarice J; Domoney, Claire; Kejnovský, Eduard; Warkentin, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses several selected topics of plant genetics and breeding in relation to the 150th anniversary of the seminal work of Gregor Johann Mendel. In 2015, we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the presentation of the seminal work of Gregor Johann Mendel. While Darwin's theory of evolution was based on differential survival and differential reproductive success, Mendel's theory of heredity relies on equality and stability throughout all stages of the life cycle. Darwin's concepts were continuous variation and "soft" heredity; Mendel espoused discontinuous variation and "hard" heredity. Thus, the combination of Mendelian genetics with Darwin's theory of natural selection was the process that resulted in the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology. Although biology, genetics, and genomics have been revolutionized in recent years, modern genetics will forever rely on simple principles founded on pea breeding using seven single gene characters. Purposeful use of mutants to study gene function is one of the essential tools of modern genetics. Today, over 100 plant species genomes have been sequenced. Mapping populations and their use in segregation of molecular markers and marker-trait association to map and isolate genes, were developed on the basis of Mendel's work. Genome-wide or genomic selection is a recent approach for the development of improved breeding lines. The analysis of complex traits has been enhanced by high-throughput phenotyping and developments in statistical and modeling methods for the analysis of phenotypic data. Introgression of novel alleles from landraces and wild relatives widens genetic diversity and improves traits; transgenic methodologies allow for the introduction of novel genes from diverse sources, and gene editing approaches offer possibilities to manipulate gene in a precise manner.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-05-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-05-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. The Role of Biodiversity, Traditional Knowledge and Participatory Plant Breeding in Climate Change Adaptation in Karst Mountain Areas in SW China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yiching; Li, Jingsong [Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy (China)

    2011-07-15

    This is a report of a country case study on the impacts of climate change and local people's adaptation. The research sites are located in the karst mountainous region in 3 SW China provinces - Guangxi, Guizhou and Yunnan – an area inhabited by 33 ethnic groups of small farmers and the poor, with rich Plant Genetic Resources (PGR) and culture. Climate change is exacerbating already harsh natural conditions and impacting on biodiversity of remote farmers living in extreme poverty, with very limited arable land. Genetic diversity has also suffered from the adoption of high yielding hybrids. Yet traditional varieties, related TK and Participatory Plant Breeding (PPB) for maize and rice are showing real potential for resilience and adaptation.

  8. The use of Citrus tissue culture for mutation breeding. Effects of plant growth substances and gamma irradiation on embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochba, J.; Spiegel-Roy, P.

    1976-01-01

    An embryogenic callus subcultured from unfertilized ovules of the 'Shamouti' orange (Citrus sinensis) was established and is used for mutation-breeding. The callus is habituated and lines of differing embryogenic potential were established. The effect of growth substances and of gamma-irradiation on embryogenesis were studied. Auxins and cytokinins inhibited embryogenesis while inhibitors of auxin synthesis and a cytokinin antagonist significantly stimulate embryogenesis in an embryogenic line. A non-embryogenic callus line did not respond to these treatments. Stimulation of embryogenesis was observed when callus but not when the medium was irradiated. Age of callus prior to subculture and irradiation intensities modify irradiation induced embryogenesis by changing optimal dose range and radiosensitivity of the callus. Addition of IAA to unirradiated medium resulted in increased embryogenesis and greatly stimulated plantlet development in certain combinations of irradiation dose and IAA concentration. (author)

  9. Future breeding for organic and low-input agriculture: integrating values and modern breeding tools for improving robustness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.

    2010-01-01

    Organic production and also the attention for plant breeding for organic agriculture is still increasing in Europe. The question often raised is how much does plant breeding for the organic sector differ from modern plant breeding and does a ban on GMO also include refraining from molecular marker

  10. Recent Advances in our Understanding of Tocopherol Biosynthesis in Plants: An Overview of Key Genes, Functions, and Breeding of Vitamin E Improved Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Steffi; Wang, Xingxing; Jung, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Tocopherols, together with tocotrienols and plastochromanols belong to a group of lipophilic compounds also called tocochromanols or vitamin E. Considered to be one of the most powerful antioxidants, tocochromanols are solely synthesized by photosynthetic organisms including plants, algae, and cyanobacteria and, therefore, are an essential component in the human diet. Tocochromanols potent antioxidative properties are due to their ability to interact with polyunsaturated acyl groups and scavenge lipid peroxyl radicals and quench reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus protecting fatty acids from lipid peroxidation. In the plant model species Arabidopsis thaliana, the required genes for tocopherol biosynthesis and functional roles of tocopherols were elucidated in mutant and transgenic plants. Recent research efforts have led to new outcomes for the vitamin E biosynthetic and related pathways, and new possible alternatives for the biofortification of important crops have been suggested. Here, we review 30 years of research on tocopherols in model and crop species, with emphasis on the improvement of vitamin E content using transgenic approaches and classical breeding. We will discuss future prospects to further improve the nutritional value of our food. PMID:29194404

  11. Using peer-to-peer energy-trading platforms to incentivize prosumers to form federated power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morstyn, Thomas; Farrell, Niall; Darby, Sarah J.; McCulloch, Malcolm D.

    2018-02-01

    Power networks are undergoing a fundamental transition, with traditionally passive consumers becoming `prosumers' — proactive consumers with distributed energy resources, actively managing their consumption, production and storage of energy. A key question that remains unresolved is: how can we incentivize coordination between vast numbers of distributed energy resources, each with different owners and characteristics? Virtual power plants and peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading offer different sources of value to prosumers and the power network, and have been proposed as different potential structures for future prosumer electricity markets. In this Perspective, we argue they can be combined to capture the benefits of both. We thus propose the concept of the federated power plant, a virtual power plant formed through P2P transactions between self-organizing prosumers. This addresses social, institutional and economic issues faced by top-down strategies for coordinating virtual power plants, while unlocking additional value for P2P energy trading.

  12. Use of induced mutations in soybean breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakri, A.H.; Jalani, B.S.; Ng, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Artificial induction of mutation in plants is carried out using #betta#-irradiation and ethyl metanesulphonate (EMS) to expand the genetic variability of locally-grown soybean. This aspect of mutation breeding complements of conventional breeding approach undertaken by the Joint Malaysia Soybean Breeding Project group. Recovery of agronomically-important mutants such as earliness, lateness, bigger seed size and improved plant architecture were recorded. The significance of these findings is discussed. (author)

  13. Leaf physiology and morphology of Castanea dentata (Marsh) Borkh., Castanea mollissima Blume, and three backcross breeding generations planted in the southern Appalachians, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin O. Knapp; G. Geoff Wang; Stacy L Clark; Lauren S. Pile; Scott E. Schlarbaum

    2014-01-01

    Backcross breeding programs have been used to transfer disease resistance and other traits from one forest tree species to another in order to meet restoration objectives. Evaluating the field performance of such material is critical for determining the success of breeding programs. In eastern North America, The American Chestnut Foundation has a backcross breeding...

  14. The aquatic fern Azolla as a natural plant-factory for ammonia removal from fish-breeding fresh wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Pietro; Padovani, Giulia

    2016-05-01

    This study has investigated the potential of an Azolla-Anabaena symbiosis, a marriage between the cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae and the aquatic fern (Azolla), to remove ammonia from freshwater fish breeding areas. Experiments were carried out under artificial light of 20, 70, and 140 μmol m(-2) s(-1). We investigated three different water temperatures for the growing Azolla, ranging from sub-optimal to optimal temperatures (15, 22, and 28 °C). The capability of Azolla to remove ammonia from wastewater was demonstrated, and the highest ammonia concentration tolerated by the symbiosis between Azolla-anabaena without any toxic effect on the aquatic ferns was ascertained. The shortest time taken to remove ammonia from wastes, 2.5 cm deep and at 28 °C, was 40 min. The ammonia removal rate (A RR) was both light and temperature dependent and the highest rate (6.394 h(-1)) was attained at light intensity of 140 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and at a temperature of 28 °C; the lowest (0.947 h(-1)) was achieved at 20 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and 15 °C. The depth of the fish-wastewater pool also affected the A RR with the relation between A RR and the depth being a hyperbolic function.

  15. Nonparametric method for genomics-based prediction of performance of quantitative traits involving epistasis in plant breeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Sun

    Full Text Available Genomic selection (GS procedures have proven useful in estimating breeding value and predicting phenotype with genome-wide molecular marker information. However, issues of high dimensionality, multicollinearity, and the inability to deal effectively with epistasis can jeopardize accuracy and predictive ability. We, therefore, propose a new nonparametric method, pRKHS, which combines the features of supervised principal component analysis (SPCA and reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS regression, with versions for traits with no/low epistasis, pRKHS-NE, to high epistasis, pRKHS-E. Instead of assigning a specific relationship to represent the underlying epistasis, the method maps genotype to phenotype in a nonparametric way, thus requiring fewer genetic assumptions. SPCA decreases the number of markers needed for prediction by filtering out low-signal markers with the optimal marker set determined by cross-validation. Principal components are computed from reduced marker matrix (called supervised principal components, SPC and included in the smoothing spline ANOVA model as independent variables to fit the data. The new method was evaluated in comparison with current popular methods for practicing GS, specifically RR-BLUP, BayesA, BayesB, as well as a newer method by Crossa et al., RKHS-M, using both simulated and real data. Results demonstrate that pRKHS generally delivers greater predictive ability, particularly when epistasis impacts trait expression. Beyond prediction, the new method also facilitates inferences about the extent to which epistasis influences trait expression.

  16. Nonparametric method for genomics-based prediction of performance of quantitative traits involving epistasis in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Ma, Ping; Mumm, Rita H

    2012-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) procedures have proven useful in estimating breeding value and predicting phenotype with genome-wide molecular marker information. However, issues of high dimensionality, multicollinearity, and the inability to deal effectively with epistasis can jeopardize accuracy and predictive ability. We, therefore, propose a new nonparametric method, pRKHS, which combines the features of supervised principal component analysis (SPCA) and reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) regression, with versions for traits with no/low epistasis, pRKHS-NE, to high epistasis, pRKHS-E. Instead of assigning a specific relationship to represent the underlying epistasis, the method maps genotype to phenotype in a nonparametric way, thus requiring fewer genetic assumptions. SPCA decreases the number of markers needed for prediction by filtering out low-signal markers with the optimal marker set determined by cross-validation. Principal components are computed from reduced marker matrix (called supervised principal components, SPC) and included in the smoothing spline ANOVA model as independent variables to fit the data. The new method was evaluated in comparison with current popular methods for practicing GS, specifically RR-BLUP, BayesA, BayesB, as well as a newer method by Crossa et al., RKHS-M, using both simulated and real data. Results demonstrate that pRKHS generally delivers greater predictive ability, particularly when epistasis impacts trait expression. Beyond prediction, the new method also facilitates inferences about the extent to which epistasis influences trait expression.

  17. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation - Development of disease tolerant lines of hotpepper by using radiation and interspecific hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Su; Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul [Nongwoo Seed Co., Suwon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To obtain disease resistant mutant lines, 6 inbred lines were hotppepers were irradiated with 250Gy of gamma ray and crossed between cultivar and wild species. 1) 4500 M{sub 1} plants were cultivated for obtaining M{sub 2} seed in 6 inbred lines of hotpeppers irradiated with 250 Gy of gamma ray. 2) Crossability was not generally existed among interspecific crosses, crossability between C. annum and C. chacoense was successful except crosses between C. annum, C. pubescens and C. eximium. 3) The embryo disected 45 days after pollination was suitable for embryo culture. 4) Hybrid plants were obtained from the embryo culture of the combination between C. annum and C. chacoense, while abnormal hybrid plants occurred from the combination between C. annum and C. baccatum. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  18. ANALYSIS OF INTERACTION OF PLANT GENOTYPE AND STRAIN AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS IN BREEDING OF POTATO RESISTANCE TO COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis I Bogomaz

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of potato transformation depends on plant genotype and bacterial strain. Genotypes with high regeneration ability have high transformation ability. It is shown, that transgenosis of Bt gene increases potato resistance to collorado potato beetle, transgenosis of ipt gene does not influence on resistance.

  19. Wide adaptation of Green Revolution wheat: international roots and the Indian context of a new plant breeding ideal, 1960-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, Marci R

    2015-04-01

    Indian wheat cultivation changed radically in the 1960s due to new technologies and policy reforms introduced during the Green Revolution, and farmers' adoption of 'packages' of modern seeds, fertilizer, and irrigation. Just prior to the Green Revolution, Indian scientists adopted a new plant breeding philosophy--that varieties should have as wide an adaptation as possible, meaning high and stable yields across different environments. But scientists also argued that wide adaptation could be achieved by selecting only plants that did well in high fertility and irrigated environments. Scientists claimed that widely adapted varieties still produce high yields in marginal areas. Many people have criticized the Green Revolution for its unequal spread of benefits, but none of these critiques address wide adaptation-the core tenant held by Indian agricultural scientists to justify their focus on highly productive land while ignoring marginal or rainfed agriculture. This paper also describes Norman Borlaug's and the Rockefeller Foundation's research program in wide adaptation, Borlaug's involvement in the Indian wheat program, and internal debates about wide adaptation and selection under ideal conditions among Indian scientists. It argues that scientists leveraged the concept of wide adaptation to justify a particular regime of research focused on high production agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of optimal doses of radiation for the plant breeding of pseudo cereals; Determinacion de dosis optimas de radiacion para el mejoramiento de seudocereales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, J [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez P, L [Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Lima (Peru)

    2005-07-01

    With the purpose of promoting the use of the radiations for the plant breeding of pseudo cereals, it was determined a simple and economic method that allows the quick selection of radiation dose that induce in the vegetable organisms the changes wanted. For it it was work with quinua seeds (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) an Andean pseudo cereal that, due to their nutritious and physiologic characteristics it is considered by the FAO like one of the foods of the future and for the NASA like an organism that is good to remove the carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and at the same time, to generate food, oxygen and water for the crew during the space missions of long duration and that it has already improved by means of the radiation application. The proposed method consists on the evaluation, of the embryonic structures (radicule, hypocotyl and cotyledons) in the irradiated seeds as well as of the development of root, primary shaft and true leaves in the plants. The changes in the growth, form, number and color of the structures as well as the time of appearance of each one, allow to predict the morphological changes and inclusive some physiologic ones that will have the mature organisms, so that in only three weeks it is possible to select the doses more appropriate. (Author)

  1. Physiological, vascular and nanomechanical assessment of hybrid poplar leaf traits in micropropagated plants and plants propagated from root cuttings: A contribution to breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurkovič, Jaroslav; Husárová, Hana; Javoříková, Lucia; Čaňová, Ingrid; Šuleková, Miriama; Kardošová, Monika; Lukáčik, Ivan; Mamoňová, Miroslava; Lagaňa, Rastislav

    2017-09-01

    Micropropagated plants experience significant stress from rapid water loss when they are transferred from an in vitro culture to either greenhouse or field conditions. This is caused both by inefficient stomatal control of transpiration and the change to a higher light intensity and lower humidity. Understanding the physiological, vascular and biomechanical processes that allow micropropagated plants to modify their phenotype in response to environmental conditions can help to improve both field performance and plant survival. To identify changes between the hybrid poplar [Populus tremula × (Populus × canescens)] plants propagated from in vitro tissue culture and those from root cuttings, we assessed leaf performance for any differences in leaf growth, photosynthetic and vascular traits, and also nanomechanical properties of the tracheary element cell walls. The micropropagated plants showed significantly higher values for leaf area, leaf length, leaf width and leaf dry mass. The greater leaf area and leaf size dimensions resulted from the higher transpiration rate recorded for this stock type. Also, the micropropagated plants reached higher values for chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters and for the nanomechanical dissipation energy of tracheary element cell walls which may indicate a higher damping capacity within the primary xylem tissue under abiotic stress conditions. The performance of the plants propagated from root cuttings was superior for instantaneous water-use efficiency which signifies a higher acclimation capacity to stressful conditions during a severe drought particularly for this stock type. Similarities were found among the majority of the examined leaf traits for both vegetative plant origins including leaf mass per area, stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rate, hydraulic axial conductivity, indicators of leaf midrib vascular architecture, as well as for the majority of cell wall nanomechanical traits. This research revealed that

  2. Siting of light-water reactor power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear power plant site requirements formulated for environment protection in Germany allow nuclear power plants to be built at any site provided these requirements are duly taken into account in preparing and monitoring the site and in the design of the proposed power plant. After a brief discussion of light water reactor power plant sites, prevailing practice in site planning, site selection criteria, licensing procedure and used criteria, rules and guidelines, this paper reports on some considerations taken into account by the expert advisers and by the licensing authorities and future site planning. (orig.) [de

  3. Federal tax effects on the financial attractiveness of renewable versus conventional power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.J.; Hadley, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of federal tax laws on the financial attractiveness of seven renewable and four conventional electric power generating technologies adopted by investor owned utilities (IOUs) and non-utility electricity generators (NUGs). The results show that federal income tax laws applicable to renewable generating technologies generally provide very attractive financial incentives for the adoption of these technologies by IOUs and NUGs. If an IOU and NUG is subject to the alternative minimum tax, however, it may not be able to take full advantage of these financial incentives. (author)

  4. Genomics-assisted breeding in fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Minamikawa, Mai F; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Ishimori, Motoyuki; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomic analysis technologies have opened up new avenues to promote the efficiency of plant breeding. Novel genomics-based approaches for plant breeding and genetics research, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS), are useful, especially in fruit tree breeding. The breeding of fruit trees is hindered by their long generation time, large plant size, long juvenile phase, and the necessity to wait for the physiological maturity of the plant to assess the marketable product (fruit). In this article, we describe the potential of genomics-assisted breeding, which uses these novel genomics-based approaches, to break through these barriers in conventional fruit tree breeding. We first introduce the molecular marker systems and whole-genome sequence data that are available for fruit tree breeding. Next we introduce the statistical methods for biparental linkage and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping as well as GWAS and GS. We then review QTL mapping, GWAS, and GS studies conducted on fruit trees. We also review novel technologies for rapid generation advancement. Finally, we note the future prospects of genomics-assisted fruit tree breeding and problems that need to be overcome in the breeding.

  5. 75 FR 70946 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... White-Nose Syndrome in Bats; Draft National Plan; Extension of Public Comment Period AGENCY: Fish and... plan to assist States, Federal agencies, and Tribes in managing white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats. See... to WhiteNoseBats@fws.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Jeremy Coleman, National WNS...

  6. Effect of Organic Potato Farming on Human and Environmental Health and Benefits from New Plant Breeding Techniques. Is It Only a Matter of Public Acceptance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pacifico

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming practices are commonly thought to reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and to preserve the naturalness of the products. Herein, we report the effect of crop management practices on nutritional and toxicological value of potato tubers. Comparative studies are often controversial and the results are dependent on genotype and methodological approach. Targeted analysis and “omics” strategies are discussed, pointing at the nutritional aspects and the corresponding biological and molecular processes involved. Organic farming supporters still do not accept the use of genetic modification to produce new varieties suited for organic agriculture and crop improvement by genetic engineering still sparks hot debate among various scientific and social factions whose major concern is the possible existence of unintended effects both on human and world health. In this context, the advent of “new plant breeding techniques” has reignited the discussion on genetic engineering and on the compatibility of the new technologies with an eco-friendly agriculture. Could cisgenic and genome-edited potatoes be new good options for organic agriculture? We discuss how these approaches can be used to address food security challenges and to overcome specific problems based on the biological characteristics of potato tubers, producing new varieties that can improve farmers’ profit with a lower impact on public opinion. However, political, ethical, and social fears will probably persist much longer, mainly in Italy, historically a fiercely anti-GM country with a European leadership in organic food production and export.

  7. Application of mutation breeding technique for producing NaCl tolerant plants of banana in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedadi, C.; Rahimi, M.; Naserian, B.; Rahmani, E.; Neshan, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: To study of possibility to induce salt tolerant clones in banana by using mutation technique, an experiment was conducted with factorial (gamma irradiation and salt concentration factors) in a CRD design. In this research, plantlets of banana cv. Dwarf Cavendish were produced by subculture of irradiated shoot tips. It deserves to mention that consequent subculturing was aimed at getting rid of chimera. Next, these explants were transferred to MS medium containing 2.5 mg. l- 1 BAP and NaCl concentrations of 0, 6, 7, 8, 9 g.l -1 for 2 months .Then, living buds were transferred to medium without salt. After one month, we repeated the first stage. All living buds rooted and were transferred to potted soil. Acclimatized plants were irrigated weekly with above NaCl solution. Other irrigation was done with salt-free water. There was also a negative relation between salt concentration and survival - proliferation. In second salinity stress, salt had no significant difference on survival percentage. No-significant difference of effect salt on survival in second salinity stress was observed. (author)

  8. Federal Administrative Court dismisses action of a nuclear power opponent against Grafenrheinfeld nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    With its decision of April 30, 1980 - BVerwG 7 C 88.79-, the Federal Administrative Court has dismissed an appeal against the decision of the Bavarian Administrative Court, in which the plaintiff's action had been dismissed. The cost of the appeal suit will be paid by the plaintiff. The value in litigation was set at DM 20,000 for the appeal proceedings. The grounds for the decision are given in full wording. (orig./HP) [de

  9. USE OF GROWTH CHAMBERS FOR CABBAGE BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Bondareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of the growth chambers for cabbage breeding allows the reducing of certain stages of the breeding process and the growing biennial varieties of cabbage in a one-year cycle. In these growth chambers, the nutritional conditions, temperature, and lighting of plants are under control; the open pollination is eliminated.

  10. Filling the toolbox of precision breeding methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant breeding has
    resulted in numerous
    high-quality crop
    varieties being
    cultivated nowadays.
    Breeding based on
    crossing and selection
    remains an important
    and ongoing activity for
    crop improvement, but
    needs innovation to be
    able to address

  11. Progress in a Crambe cross breeding programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastebroek, H.D.; Lange, W.

    1997-01-01

    Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex Fries) is an annual cruciferous oilseed crop with a high content of erucic acid (55-60%) in the seed oil. Since 1990, a breeding programme in crambe has been carried out at the DLO-Centre for Plant Breeding and Reproduction Research. Three accessions, two early

  12. Economic impact of the Federal Plant Health Law on the mexican market for persian lemon

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Ruíz, Marlene; Mora Flores, José Saturnino; Martínez Damián, Miguel Ángel; García Mata, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    La globalización comercial exige que los mercados mundiales de productos agroalimentarios, realicen prácticas de inocuidad en sus productos libres de contaminantes químicos, biológicos y físicos. En este contexto, México modificó el 26 de julio de 2007 la Ley Federal de Sanidad Vegetal, la cual ahora tiene como objetivo la aplicación, verificación y certificación de los sistemas de reducción de riesgos de contaminación en la producción y empaque de vegetales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue a...

  13. TO 135TH ANNIVERSARY FROM THE DATE OF BIRTH OF ZHEGALOV S.I. – AN ESTABLISHER OF NATIONAL SCHOOL FOR BREEDING AND SEED INDUSTRY OF VEGETABLE CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Pivovarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the second of October, in 1881, Sergey Ivanovich Zhegalov, an establisher of national breeding and seed production of vegetable crops was born in a little village Vasilkovo of Vyazemskogo uezda. He was a founder and a first director of Gribovskaya Vegetable Breeding Station. This year marked by 135th anniversary from the date of birth of the outstanding scientist. All the time at All-Russian Research Institute of Vegetable Breeding and Seed Production (VNIISSOK, its scientific leader and mastermind is honored and remembered for his heritage that is still preserved andaugmented. This scientist was at the beginning of plant breeding science and became the first who brought scientifically proved methods into agricultural plant science. The process of newplant- form-producing and development of new more qualified breeding forms through distant crossing, hybridization, heterosis effect, are the problems which interested the mind of Zhegalov and always were the sense of his life. These problems still remain in these days, where his ideas are embodied in scientific program of the institute covering theoretical researches for development of innovation method needed for creation of new highly qualified breeding plant material regarded as a source for nearest breeding practice and seed production. At VNIISSOK the richest plant collection with important genes and donor genotypes of productivity, fast ripening, high quality, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses is created in Cucurbitaceae, Solanaceae,Alliaceae, Fabaceae, root vegetables, Brassicas, leafy crops, aromatic and medicinal crops and ornamental crops. Core plant collection is substantially extending by means of introduction of new crops and non-traditional ones as well. The specialist-breeders of VNIISSOK have developed over 800 cultivars and hybrids F1 of vegetables, melons and gourds, aromatic plants, ornamental plants, non-traditional. 546 accessions out of 118 crops have been included

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This issue contains a number of contributions from readers describing experiments in plant breeding (the individual items are indexed separately) and a report on the 30th Gamma-Field Symposium held in Tsukuba, Japan in July 1991. Also included is a list of officially released mutant varieties of seed-propagated crops taken from the FAO/IAEA database of mutant varieties. It is planned to organize a database on available crop plant mutant variety germplasm collections. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This newsletter contains short descriptions of research methods for the use of radiation to induce mutations and facilitate plant breeding. This method is used to develop species of plants that can survive in harsh climates and thus provide a food supply for humans and animals. Some of the mutants discussed include a salt tolerant barley, a disease resistant shrub, a cold tolerant chickpea, a highly productive Canavalia virosa and productive tomato. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Technology of power plants - change in duties and problems. [German Federal Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knizia, K [Vereinigte Elektrizitaetswerke Westfalen A.G. (VEW), Dortmund (Germany, F.R.); VGB Technische Vereinigung der Grosskraftwerksbetreiber e.V., Essen (Germany, F.R.))

    1977-11-01

    The article shows that only the combined use of coal and nuclear energy can warrant the FRG's energy supply. The demand for nuclear power plants in the world and in the FRG is dealt with. The long-term objective must be an economical electricity-gas system on the basis of coal and nuclear energy. Briefly discussed is the question of the energy sources needed and the problem of environmental impacts.

  17. Federal Court of Administration dismissed appeals in nuclear power plant proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    On July 18, 1980 the Federal Court of Administration handed down several decisions made in proceedings on nuclear power stations. It dismissed the appeal field by the complaining party. 1. In the proceedings concerning the Kruemmel reactor being about to be completed, the World Association for the Protecteion of Life was again denied the right to file a complaint. 2. In the proceedings concerning the nuclear power station under construction at Muelheim-Kaerlich, the objections raised were regarded as being insufficient for repealing the licence. 3. In the proceedings concerning the nuclear power staion at Wyhl which has not been built yet, the objections raised were declared not to be sufficiently substantiated in time. The written opinions of all proceedings are not yet available. (HSCH) [de

  18. Manual on mutation breeding. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The manual is a compilation of work done on the use of induced mutations in plant breeding, and presents general methods and techniques in this field. The use of chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, α- and β-particles, protons, neutrons) are described as well as the effects of these mutagens. The different types of mutations achieved can be divided into genome mutations, chromosome mutations and extra nuclear mutations. Separate chapters deal with mutation techniques in breeding seed-propagated species and asexually propagated plants (examples of development of cultivars given). Plant characters which can be improved by mutation breeding include yield, ripening time, growth habit, disease resistance and tolerance to environmental factors (temperature, salinity etc.). The use of mutagens for some specific plant breeding problems is discussed and attention is also paid to somatic cell genetics in connection with induced mutations. The manual contains a comprehensive bibliography (60 p. references) and a subject index

  19. Breeds of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchanan, David S.; Lenstra, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview on the different breeds of cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus). Cattle breeds are presented and categorized according to utility and mode of origin. Classification and phylogeny of breeds are also discussed. Furthermore, a description of cattle breeds is provided.

  20. Conceptual basic and status of nuclear power plant decommissioning effort in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazounov, V.; Khamyanov, L.

    1998-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants, although a usual phase in nuclear facility life cycle still has significant peculiarities due to radioactive contamination of NPP equipment and structural elements. This paper deals with the phases in decommissioning process, as follows: NPP shutdown, meaning end of commercial operation; NPP unit mothballing, radiation review of the unit to justify particular concept of decommissioning; extended hold-up, which means maintaining of contaminated equipment in the isolated zone under radiologically safe conditions; unit dismantling and burial. Status of NPP decommissioning effort in Russia is described

  1. A history of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology FESPP since its foundation in 1978--including notes on events preceding the foundation and following re-naming as the Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) in 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthaler, Hartmut

    2004-06-01

    After several years of close contacts and extensive discussion between various plant physiologists of different European countries, the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology (FESPP) was established in 1978 in Edinburgh. The aim of the FESPP was and remains to promote up-to-date plant physiology research in all European countries and to stimulate scientific cooperation and the exchange of scientists between the different member societies by organizing congresses and workshops as well as editing four (recently five) Federation-affiliated journals. The short History of FESPP presented here covers the preparatory years of the 1970s that led to its actual foundation in 1978, and then its further development up to and following the Federation's reconstitution in 2002 as the Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB).

  2. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  3. In vitro technology for mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The ultimate aim of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on In Vitro Technology for Mutation Breeding is to provide new effective tools for plant breeders to construct new cultivars, thus increasing agricultural production of food, feed and industrial raw material, particularly in developing countries. The participants of the research co-ordination meetings considered the potential of new advances of agricultural biotechnology, especially the use of in vitro techniques for mutation breeding. They discussed and co-ordinated plans in conjunction with the impact on plant breeding of novel technologies, such as use of somaclonal variation, cell hybridization and molecular genetics

  4. Domestication and Breeding of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Juan M; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2016-12-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (jatropha) has a high, untapped potential to contribute towards sustainable production of food and bioenergy, rehabilitation of degraded land, and reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Tremendous progress in jatropha domestication and breeding has been achieved during the past decade. This review: (i) summarizes current knowledge about the domestication and breeding of jatropha; (ii) identifies and prioritizes areas for further research; and (iii) proposes strategies to exploit the full genetic potential of this plant species. Altogether, the outlook is promising for accelerating the domestication of jatropha by applying modern scientific methods and novel technologies developed in plant breeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Report of the third research co-ordination meeting of FAO/IAEA/ITALY co-ordinated research programme. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Programme, on ``Improvement of basic food corps in Africa through plant breeding including the use of induced mutations``, funded by the Italian Governmnet, was initiated in the Joint Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of staple food crops of Africa with main emphasis on the indigenous species and local cultivars. The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) under the FAO/IAEA/ITALY Co-ordinated Research Programme was held in Nairobi, Kenya, 20-24 September 1993 in which 24 persons participated and 18 scientific reports were presented. These included reports from 10 Research Contract holders from Africa, 3 Technical Contract holders from Italy and the update on the backstopping of research carried out at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf. The reports, and conclusions and recommendations made by the participants are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs.

  6. Improvement of basic food crops in Africa through plant breeding, including the use of induced mutations. Report of the third research co-ordination meeting of FAO/IAEA/ITALY co-ordinated research programme. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A Co-ordinated Research Programme, on ''Improvement of basic food corps in Africa through plant breeding including the use of induced mutations'', funded by the Italian Governmnet, was initiated in the Joint Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. The primary objective of this CRP was to breed improved varieties of staple food crops of Africa with main emphasis on the indigenous species and local cultivars. The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) under the FAO/IAEA/ITALY Co-ordinated Research Programme was held in Nairobi, Kenya, 20-24 September 1993 in which 24 persons participated and 18 scientific reports were presented. These included reports from 10 Research Contract holders from Africa, 3 Technical Contract holders from Italy and the update on the backstopping of research carried out at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf. The reports, and conclusions and recommendations made by the participants are presented in this publication. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Radiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected

  8. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  9. Biotechnology in maize breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Drinić Snežana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize is one of the most important economic crops and the best studied and most tractable genetic system among monocots. The development of biotechnology has led to a great increase in our knowledge of maize genetics and understanding of the structure and behaviour of maize genomes. Conventional breeding practices can now be complemented by a number of new and powerful techniques. Some of these often referred to as molecular methods, enable scientists to see the layout of the entire genome of any organism and to select plants with preferred characteristics by "reading" at the molecular level, saving precious time and resources. DNA markers have provided valuable tools in various analyses ranging from phylogenetic analysis to the positional cloning of genes. Application of molecular markers for genetic studies of maize include: assessment of genetic variability and characterization of germ plasm, identification and fingerprinting of genotypes, estimation of genetic distance, detection of monogamic and quantitative trait loci, marker assisted selection, identification of sequence of useful candidate genes, etc. The development of high-density molecular maps which has been facilitated by PCR-based markers, have made the mapping and tagging of almost any trait possible and serve as bases for marker assisted selection. Sequencing of maize genomes would help to elucidate gene function, gene regulation and their expression. Modern biotechnology also includes an array of tools for introducing or deieting a particular gene or genes to produce plants with novel traits. Development of informatics and biotechnology are resulted in bioinformatic as well as in expansion of microarrey technique. Modern biotechnologies could complement and improve the efficiency of traditional selection and breeding techniques to enhance agricultural productivity.

  10. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  11. Application of a high-speed breeding technology to apple (Malus × domestica) based on transgenic early flowering plants and marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachowsky, Henryk; Le Roux, Pierre-Marie; Peil, Andreas; Patocchi, Andrea; Richter, Klaus; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2011-10-01

    Breeding of apple (Malus × domestica) remains a slow process because of protracted generation cycles. Shortening the juvenile phase to achieve the introgression of traits from wild species into prebreeding material within a reasonable time frame is a great challenge. In this study, we evaluated early flowering transgenic apple lines overexpressing the BpMADS4 gene of silver birch with regard to tree morphology in glasshouse conditions. Based on the results obtained, line T1190 was selected for further analysis and application to fast breeding. The DNA sequences flanking the T-DNA were isolated and the T-DNA integration site was mapped on linkage group 4. The inheritance and correctness of the T-DNA integration were confirmed after meiosis. A crossbred breeding programme was initiated by crossing T1190 with the fire blight-resistant wild species Malus fusca. Transgenic early flowering F(1) seedlings were selected and backcrossed with 'Regia' and 98/6-10 in order to introgress the apple scab Rvi2, Rvi4 and powdery mildew Pl-1, Pl-2 resistance genes and the fire blight resistance quantitative trait locus FB-F7 present in 'Regia'. Three transgenic BC'1 seedlings pyramiding Rvi2, Rvi4 and FB-F7, as well as three other BC'1 seedlings combining Pl-1 and Pl-2, were identified. Thus, the first transgenic early flowering-based apple breeding programme combined with marker-assisted selection was established. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Cisgenesis, a new tool for traditional plant breeding, should be exempted from the regulation on genetically modified organisms in a step by step approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, E.; Schouten, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Modern potato breeding requires over 100,000 seedlings per new variety. Main reasons are (1) the increasing number of traits that have to be combined in this tetraploid vegetatively propagated crop, and (2) an increasing number of traits (e.g., resistance to biotic stress) originates from wild

  13. Acid-digestion plant for plutonium-contaminated waste at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentensperger, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR), plutonium-contaminated material (PCM) is accumulated in the ''hot-laboratory''. Acid digestion has been chosen for conditioning the combustible PCM at EIR. The acid-digestion process is based on the carbonization and oxidative decomposition of the PCM by means of concentrated sulphuric and nitric acids at temperatures around 250 0 C. The design study for the acid-digestion plant (ADA) for EIR has almost been completed, and the detailed design has begun. The shredded waste will be fed batchwise on to the surface of hot sulphuric acid in the digester tray where carbonization occurs. The oxidation of the carbonized particles to gaseous products occurs in the heater vessel where nitric acid is added to accelerate the reaction. The inorganic residues of the digested PCM accumulate in the heater vessel as suspended particles. Periodically the acid is drained and the solid residue is separated. The gaseous effluents pass through a battery of oxidation/absorption columns where SO 2 and NOsub(x) are oxidized to sulphuric and nitric acids, respectively. These acids are almost entirely absorbed in the washing solution which is fed continuously to the acid-rectification system. The separated and reconcentrated acids are reused. For safety reasons the ADA will be semi-automatic; the principal alarms are transmitted to a control centre. Automatic shut-down is achieved by cutting off the heater current and adding cold sulphuric acid. (author)

  14. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breeding focuses recent progress in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book is divided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advances in molecular biology and laboratory procedures that have been developed recently to manipulate DNA. Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomics approaches form as a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the plant responses to various types of abiotic stresses. Part III, Breeding for biotic stress addresses issues related to application of molecular based strategies in order to increase soybean resistance to various biotic factors. Part IV, Recent Technology reviews recent technologies into the realm of soybean monitoring, processing and product use. While the information accumulated in this book is of primary interest for plant breeders, valuable insights are also offered to agronomists, molecular biologists, physiologists, plant pathologists, food scientists and students. The book is a result of efforts made by many experts from different countries (USA, Japan, Croatia, Serbia, China, Canada, Malawi, Iran, Hong Kong, Brasil, Mexico.

  15. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.10 Recognition of additional breeds and books of...

  16. Li depletion effects on Li2TiO3 reaction with H2 in thermo-chemical environment relevant to breeding blanket for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvani, Carlo; Casadio, Sergio; Contini, Vittoria; Giorgi, Rossella; Mancini, Maria Rita; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    This is a report of the Working Group in the Subtask on Solid Breeder Blankets under the Implementing Agreement on a Co-operative Programme on Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors (International Energy Agency (IEA)). This Working Group (Task F and WG-F) was performed from 2000 to 2004 by a collaboration of European Union (EU) and Japan (JA). In this report, lithium depletion effects on the reaction of lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) with hydrogen (H 2 ) in thermo-chemical environment were discussed. The reaction of Li 2 TiO 3 ceramics with H 2 was studied in a thermo-chemical environment simulating (excepting irradiation) that of the hottest pebble-bed zone of breeding-blanket actually designed for fusion power plants. This 'reduction' as performed at 900degC in Ar+0.1%H, purge gas (He+0.1%H 2 being the designed reference') was found to be enhanced by TiO 2 doping of the specimens of simulate 6 Li-burn-up expected to reach 20% at their end-of-life. The reaction rates, however, were so slow to be not significantly extrapolated to the breeder material service time (years). In Ar+3%H 2 , faster reaction rates allowed a better identification of the process evolution (kinetics) by Temperature-Programmed Reduction' (TPR) and 'Oxidation' (TPO), and combined TG-DTA thermal analysis. The reduction of pure Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase to Li 4/5 TiO 12/5-y was found to reach in one day the steady state at the O-vacancy concentration y=0.2. Complimentary microscopy (SEM) and spectroscopy (XRD, XPS) techniques were used to characterize the reaction products among which the presence of the orthorhombic Li v TiO 2 (0 ≤ v ≤ 1/2) and Li 2 TiO 3 could be diagnosed. So that the complete spinel reduction to Li 1/2 TiO 2 was obtained according to a scheme involving the Li 1/2 TiO 2 -Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase solid solution for which y=3v/(10-5v). The reduction rate of pure meta-titanate to Li 2 TiO 3-x was found much lower (x approx. = 0.01) and even possibly due to the presence

  17. Induced mutations in sesame breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashri, A.

    2001-01-01

    The scope of induced mutations in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) breeding is reviewed. So far in Egypt, India, Iraq, Rep. of Korea, and Sri Lanka, 14 officially released varieties have been developed through induced mutations: 12 directly and 2 through cross breeding (one using the 'dt45' induced mutant from Israel). For another variety released in China there are no details. The induced mutations approach was adopted primarily in order to obtain genetic variability that was not available in the germplasm collection. The mutagens commonly applied have been gamma rays, EMS and sodium azide. Sesame seeds can withstand high mutagen doses, and there are genotypic differences in sensitivity between varieties. The mutants induced in the above named countries and others include better yield, improved seed retention, determinate habit, modified plant architecture and size, more uniform and shorter maturation period, earliness, resistance to diseases, genic male sterility, seed coat color, higher oil content and modified fatty acids composition. Some of the induced mutants have already given rise to improved varieties, the breeding value of other mutants is now being assessed and still others can serve as useful markers in genetic studies and breeding programmes. (author)

  18. Tritium management and anti-permeation strategies for three different breeding blanket options foreseen for the European Power Plant Physics and Technology Demonstration reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demange, D., E-mail: david.demange@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Boccaccini, L.V.; Franza, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Santucci, A.; Tosti, S. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Wagner, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In DT fusion reactors like DEMO, the commonly accepted tritium (T) losses through the steam generator (SG) shall not exceed about 2 mg/d that are more than 5 orders of magnitude lower than the T production rate of about 360 g/d in the breeding blanket (BB). A very effective mitigation strategy is required balancing the size and efficiency of the processes in the breeding and cooling loops, and the availability and efficiency of anti-permeation barriers. A numerical study is presented using the T permeation code FUS-TPC that computes all T flows and inventories considering the design and operation of the BB, the SG, and the T systems. Many scenarios are numerically analyzed for three breeding blankets concepts – helium cooled pebbles bed (HCPB), helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL), and water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) – varying the T processes throughput and efficiency, and the permeation regimes through the BB and SG to be either surface-limited or diffusion-limited with possible permeation reduction factor. For each BB concept, we discuss workable operation scenarios and suggest specific anti-permeation strategies.

  19. Mutation Breeding for Crop Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajbir, S. Sangwan

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomes contain genes responsible of different traits of any organism. Induced mutation using chemical mutagens and radiation to modify molecular structure of plants played a major role in the development of high genetic variability and help develop new superior crop varieties. The Mutation Breeding is applicable to all plants and has generated lot of agronomically interesting mutants, both in vegetatively and seed propagated plants. The technique is easy but long and challenging to detect, isolate and characterize the mutant and gene. A specific dose of irradiation has to be used to obtain desired mutants. However, with modern molecular technique, the gene responsible for mutation can be identified. The CRISPR-Cas9 allows the removal of a specific gene which is responsible of unwanted trait and replacing it with a gene which induces a desired trait. There have been more than 2700 officially released mutant varieties from 170 different plant species in more than 60 countries throughout the world and A more participatory approach, involving all stakeholders in plant breeding, is needed to ensure that it is demand/farmers driven.

  20. Maize sugary enhancer1 (se1) is a presence-absence variant of a previously uncharacterized gene and development of educational videos to raise the profile of plant breeding and improve curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro von Mogel, Karl J.

    Carbohydrate metabolism is a biologically, economically, and culturally important process in crop plants. Humans have selected many crop species such as maize (Zea mays L.) in ways that have resulted in changes to carbohydrate metabolic pathways, and understanding the underlying genetics of this pathway is therefore exceedingly important. A previously uncharacterized starch metabolic pathway mutant, sugary enhancer1 (se1), is a recessive modifier of sugary1 (su1) sweet corn that increases the sugar content while maintaining an appealing creamy texture. This allele has been incorporated into many sweet corn varieties since its discovery in the 1970s, however, testing for the presence of this allele has been difficult. A genetic stock was developed that allowed the presence of se1 to be visually scored in segregating ears, which were used to genetically map se1 to the deletion of a single gene model located on the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 2. An analysis of homology found that this gene is specific to monocots, and the gene is expressed in the endosperm and developing leaf. The se1 allele increased water soluble polysaccharide (WSP) and decreased amylopectin in maize endosperm, but there was no overall effect on starch content in mature leaves due to se1. This discovery will lead to a greater understanding of starch metabolism, and the marker developed will assist in breeding. There is a present need for increased training for plant breeders to meet the growing needs of the human population. To raise the profile of plant breeding among young students, a series of videos called Fields of Study was developed. These feature interviews with plant breeders who talk about what they do as plant breeders and what they enjoy about their chosen profession. To help broaden the education of students in college biology courses, and assist with the training of plant breeders, a second video series, Pollination Methods was developed. Each video focuses on one or two

  1. Compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.; Endrulat, H.J.; Haubelt, R.; Westpfahl, U.

    1976-04-01

    The present compilation of data on the release of radioactive substances in the vent air of nuclear power plants in the FRG is a continuation of a report series on aerosol filter and iodine filter samples from the exhaust air control systems of the nuclear power plants Gundremmingen, Obrigheim, Wuergassen, Stade, Lingen and Biblis A. The reports have been issued by the Federal public health office since 1972. This report is supplemented by annual release values on radioactive noble gases, on short- and long-lived aerosols, and on gaseous 131 I, supplied by the individual nuclear power plants as in previous years on uniform questionnaires. Data on the release of tritium are also available from some nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  2. External and internal accidents in PWR power plants. Comparison of current regulations in Belgium, United States, France, Federal Republic of Germany and United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maere, G. de; Roch, M.; Cavaco, A.; Preat, M.

    1986-01-01

    In this report a comparison is made of the rules and practices applied in various countries (Belgium, France, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom and United States of America) in designing PWR plants to resist natural hazards (first part of the report) and hazards associated with human activities (second part). The third part of the report deals with the practices in different countries concerning the protection against accidents of internal origin [fr

  3. Genomic dairy cattle breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Thomas; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    the thoughts of breeders and other stakeholders on how to best make use of genomic breeding in the future. Intensive breeding has played a major role in securing dramatic increases in milk yield since the Second World War. Until recently, the main focus in dairy cattle breeding was on production traits...... it less accountable to the concern of private farmers for the welfare of their animals. It is argued that there is a need to mobilise a wide range of stakeholders to monitor developments and maintain pressure on breeding companies so that they are aware of the need to take precautionary measures to avoid...

  4. Mutation breeding in jute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic studies in jute in general dealt with the morphological abnormalities of the M 1 generation in great detail. Of late, induction of a wide spectrum of viable mutations have been reported in different varieties of both the species. Mutations affecting several traits of agronomic importance such as, plant height, time of flowering, fibre yield and quality, resistance to pests and diseases are also available. Cytological analysis of a large collection of induced mutants resulted in the isolation of seven trisomics in an olitorius variety. Several anatomical parameters which are the components of fibre yield, have also received attention. Some mutants with completely altered morphology were used for interpreting the evolution of leaf shape in Tiliaceas and related families. A capsularis variety developed using mutation breeding technique has been released for cultivation. Several others, including derivatives of inter-mutant hybridization have been found to perform well at different locations in the All India Coordinated Trials. Presently, chemical mutagenesis and induction of mutants of physiological significance are receiving considerable attention. The induced variability is being used in genetic and linkage studies. (author)

  5. Mutation breeding in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, A T; Menten, J O.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil); Ando, A

    1980-03-01

    How mutation induction is used for plant breeding in Brazil is reported. For upland rice, the combined treatment with gamma-ray and mutagens (ethylene imine or ethylmethane sulfonate) has been used on the variety, Dourado Precoce, and some mutants with shortculm length and/or earliness without altering the productivity have been obtained. A project on the quantitative and qualitative protein improvement in upland rice was also started in 1979. In corn, the effect of gamma-irradiation on heterosis has been analyzed, and it was found that the single hybrids from two parental lines derived from irradiated seeds had increased ear productivity. For beans (Phaseolus yulgaris), gamma-irradiation and chemical mutagens have been used to induce the mutants with different seed color, disease resistance to golden mosaic virus and Xanthomonas phaseoli, earliness, high productivity and high protein content. Some mutants with partly improved characters have been obtained in these experiments. Two varieties of wheat tolerant to aluminum toxicity have been obtained, but the one showed high lodging due to its unfavorable plant height, and the other was highly susceptible to culm rust. Therefore, irradiation experiments have been started to improve these characters. The projects involving the use of gamma-irradiation have been tested to obtain the mutant lines insensitive to photoperiod and resistant to bud-blight in soybean, the mutant lines resistant to mosaic virus in papaya, the photoperiod-insensitive mutants in sorghum, the mosaic virus resistant and non-flowering mutants in sugar cane, and the Fusarium and nematode-resistant mutants in black pepper.

  6. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements

  7. Tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved

  8. Tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved

  9. indigenous cattle breeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Received 31 August 1996; accepted 20 March /998. Mitochondrial DNA cleavage patterns from representative animals of the Afrikaner and Nguni sanga cattle breeds, indigenous to Southern Africa, were compared to the mitochondrial DNA cleavage patterns of the Brahman (zebu) and the Jersey. (taurine) cattle breeds.

  10. Economic and agricultural impact of mutation breeding in fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel Roy, P.

    1990-01-01

    Constraints of conventional cross breeding in fruit trees, wide market acceptance of definite cultivars, especially in apple, pear, citrus and wine grape, and the increased impact of natural mutants provide incentives for mutation breeding. Only few induced mutants in fruit trees have been commercialized and are being planted on a large scale. The main method followed in mutation breeding of tree fruit has been acute irradiation of meristematic multicellular buds but, Chimera formation and reversion present a serious problem. 87 refs, 4 tabs

  11. Tritium breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.; Billone, M.; Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.; Mori, S.; Kuroda, T.; Maki, K.; Takatsu, H.; Yoshida, H.; Raffray, A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Simbolotti, G.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The terms of reference for ITER provide for incorporation of a tritium breeding blanket with a breeding ratio as close to unity as practical. A breeding blanket is required to assure an adequate supply of tritium to meet the program objectives. Based on specified design criteria, a ceramic breeder concept with water coolant and an austenitic steel structure has been selected as the first option and lithium-lead blanket concept has been chosen as an alternate option. The first wall, blanket, and shield are integrated into a single unit with separate cooling systems. The design makes extensive use of beryllium to enhance the tritium breeding ratio. The design goals with a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8--0.9 have been achieved and the R ampersand D requirements to qualify the design have been identified. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Eggplant variety breeding aerospace Hangqie No.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fuquan; Song Jianrong; Guo Zhenfang; Ding Yaohong; Kong Xiaojuan

    2012-01-01

    Hangqie No.4 is on the Shenzhou spacecraft carrying no. 3 local variety reported by four generations enterprise round tomato breeding 03-4-15-2-3-1 has breeding for female to the 18th retuning-type science technology and experimental satellite launch of the optimal tomato after 0448-1-3-1 has breeding for male parent, mixture of the generation of hybrid. Medium-early maturity, 667 m 2 production 5000 kg around. Plant growth potential of half erect, with strong sex is strong, leaves thicker, purple-brown, heart-shaped, flower violet, pulp green white, The weight of per fruit 0.15 ∼ 0.35 kg. It's can be planted in open land and protected area, and grow well. (authors)

  13. Eggplant variety breeding aerospace Hangqie No.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fuquan; Song Jianrong; Guo Zhenfang; Ding Yaohong; Kong Xiaojuan

    2011-01-01

    Hangqie No.4 is on the shenzhou spacecraft carrying no.3 local variety reported by four generations enterprise round tomato breeding 03-4-15-2-3-1 has breeding for female to the 18th retuning-type science technology and experimental satellite launch of the optimal tomato after 04-4-8-1-3-1 has breeding for male parent, mixture of the generation of hybrid. Medium-early maturity, 667 m 2 production 5000 kg around. Plant growth potential of half erect, with strong sex is strong, leaves thicker, purple-brown, heart-shaped, flower violet, pulp green white, The weight of per fruit 0.15∼0.35 kg. It's can be planted in open land and protected area, and grow well. (authors)

  14. Potentials of molecular based breeding to enhance drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of plant to sustain itself in limited water conditions is crucial in the world of agriculture. To breed for drought tolerance in wheat, it is essential to clearly understand drought tolerant mechanisms. Conventional breeding is time consuming and labor intensive being inefficient with low heritability traits like drought ...

  15. Obrigheim nuclear power plant. Federal Administrative Court, judgement of June 7, 1991. BVerWG 7 C 43.90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    With its judgement the Federal Administrative Court has reversed the decision of the Administrative Court of Justice (VGH) Baden-Wuerttemberg from May 1990. Legally incorrect the VGH has assumed that the nuclear power station Obrigheim was in operation without necessary license as the second operating license was limited to a test run and the time past was to long for a test run. In the opinion of the Federal Administrative Court by giving a license for the test run without determinating a limit in time permanent operation is not definitively permitted, but it is permitted until the office takes a decision about the end of the test run. (orig.) [de

  16. Welfare in horse breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, M.L.H.; Sandøe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    and identifies areas in which data is lacking. We suggest that all methods of horse breeding are associated with potential welfare problems, but also that the judicious use of ARTs can sometimes help to address those problems. We discuss how negative welfare effects could be identified and limited and how...... positive welfare effects associated with breeding might be maximised. Further studies are needed to establish an evidence base about how stressful or painful various breeding procedures are for the animals involved, and what the lifetime welfare implications of ARTs are for future animal generations....

  17. Studies on mutant breeding of Hibiscus syriacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Kim, Young Taik.

    1997-01-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has such a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plant exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Many domestic 91 varieties of Hibiscus syriacus were collected. Radiosensitivity of H. Syriacus irradiated with γ-ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45% in 5KR irradiated group, compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5KR could be recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Radiosensitivity of γ-ray irradiated Hibiscus seed were investigated. The germination rate, survival rate and plant height was better in the 4KR irradiation plot than control. The radiation dose of 10∼12KR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang, Wolsan no. 176, Ilpyondansim, Emille, Hanol, Yongkwang, Saeyongkwang, Chungmu, Imjinhong, Arang, Hungdansim-1 and Hongdansim-2. (author). 66 refs., 16 tabs., 13 figs

  18. Studies on mutant breeding of Hibiscus syriacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Kim, Young Taik

    1997-01-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has such a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plant exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Many domestic 91 varieties of Hibiscus syriacus were collected. Radiosensitivity of H. Syriacus irradiated with {gamma}-ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45% in 5KR irradiated group, compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5KR could be recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Radiosensitivity of {gamma}-ray irradiated Hibiscus seed were investigated. The germination rate, survival rate and plant height was better in the 4KR irradiation plot than control. The radiation dose of 10{approx}12KR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang, Wolsan no. 176, Ilpyondansim, Emille, Hanol, Yongkwang, Saeyongkwang, Chungmu, Imjinhong, Arang, Hungdansim-1 and Hongdansim-2. (author). 66 refs., 16 tabs., 13 figs.

  19. THE VIR COLLECTION – A SOURCE OF INITIAL BREEDING MATERIAL FOR THE PERSPECTIVE DIRECTIONS OF BREEDING OF A VEGETABLE MARROW AND PUMPKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Piskunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vegetable marrow and pumpkin are valuable vegetable crops thanks to high food and dietary qualities of fruits. Russia is on the third place in the world on gross yield of these crops, but on productivity takes the 11th place among the European countries. The state register of breeding achievements permitted for utilization in the territory of the Russian Federation for 2016, contains 152 varieties and a hybrids of vegetable marrows and the 138 pumpkins. But there are not enough varieties of a wide area, there are practically no ultra early varieties, there are not enough pumpkin varieties with a bush habitus of plants. The collection of pumpkins and vegetable marrows which is a source of valuable genotypes for the solution of actual tasks of breeding contains 2641 accessions from 99 countries of the world and wins the first place in the number of accessions among world genebanks. The greatest part of a collection (more than 1500 accessions is constituted by advanced varieties, the second part of a collection (more than one thousand accessions – local forms of pumpkins. Not large collection, about 50 accessions, but quite significant for its scientific and breeding values consists of hybrids, self-pollinated lines and donors of valuable traits. As a result of long-term evaluation of breeding accessions the germplasm collection that includes sources of valuable traits has been created. Genetic collection of pumpkin includes accessions with such traits as resistance to a virus mosaic, a naked seeds, bush habitus plants, spaghetti like fruit, parthenocarpy.

  20. Garlic breeding system innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, S.J.; Kamenetsky, R.; Féréol, L.; Barandiaran, X.; Rabinowitch, H.D.; Chovelon, V.; Kik, C.

    2007-01-01

    This review outlines innovative methods for garlic breeding improvement and discusses the techniques used to increase variation like mutagenesis and in vitro techniques, as well as the current developments in florogenesis, sexual hybridization, genetic transformation and mass propagation. Sexual

  1. Birds - Breeding [ds60

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This data set provides access to information gathered on annual breeding bird surveys in California using a map layer developed by the Department. This data layer...

  2. Survey of special events recorded in nuclear power plants of the Federal Republic of Germany in the first quarter of 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    50 special events were reported in the old Federal States, 47 of them belonged to the reporting category N (normal notification), three to the reporting category E (immediate notification). According to the international evluation scale (INES = International Nuclear Events Scale) five of those events fell under INES category 1, the rest under category 0. The Greifswald nuclear power plant reported three events of category AE-3 (lowest category) at KGR-5. There was no release of radioactivity involved in these incidents, and there were no effects on man or the environment reported. (HP) [de

  3. What drives cooperative breeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter D Koenig

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative breeding, in which more than a pair of conspecifics cooperate to raise young at a single nest or brood, is widespread among vertebrates but highly variable in its geographic distribution. Particularly vexing has been identifying the ecological correlates of this phenomenon, which has been suggested to be favored in populations inhabiting both relatively stable, productive environments and in populations living under highly variable and unpredictable conditions. Griesser et al. provide a novel approach to this problem, performing a phylogenetic analysis indicating that family living is an intermediate step between nonsocial and cooperative breeding birds. They then examine the ecological and climatic conditions associated with these different social systems, concluding that cooperative breeding emerges when family living is favored in highly productive environments, followed secondarily by selection for cooperative breeding when environmental conditions deteriorate and within-year variability increases. Combined with recent work addressing the fitness consequences of cooperative breeding, Griesser et al.'s contribution stands to move the field forward by demonstrating that the evolution of complex adaptations such as cooperative breeding may only be understood when each of the steps leading to it are identified and carefully integrated.

  4. The impact of the year 2000 issue on electricity grid performance and nuclear power plant operation in Bulgaria, the Russian Federation and Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Y2K date conversion is a potential source of problems to the operation of nuclear power plants through external events and interfaces with electrical power systems, telecommunication systems, and other supporting infrastructures, even if diagnostic and corrective actions within the plant itself, both planned or implemented, are successful. At the end of 1998 there were 425 nuclear power plants in operation in 31 Member States. Most countries and regions are conducting intensive diagnostic and corrective activities to 'find and fix' Y2K software (including embedded software) and equipment problems in their nuclear power plants. These efforts are supplemented by contingency plans. Other countries and regions have not been making comparable efforts and are relying mainly on contingency planning and preparedness. Results of diagnostic and corrective activities can be of benefit to all Member States. Activities on 'find and fix' Y2K problems in electricity grid control systems and computer related technology in national and regional dispatch centers could be of considerable benefit due to the widespread use of the same components, equipment, and software. Consistent with the objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Y2K program, an experts meeting was convened to collect information on Y2K activities related to grid operation in countries that operate nuclear power plants and also to identify specific actions to be taken and issues to be addressed in connection with expected grid disturbances. The countries of eastern Europe and the Russian Federation were considered to be a very important region due to delays in taking Y2K corrective actions but also due to the similarity of their electricity grid systems both in components and design but also in mode of operation. Most of these countries either operate their own nuclear power plants or are linked through their electricity grid interconnections to a neighboring country that operates nuclear power

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. Index issue no. 11-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. Index issue no. 11-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  7. Breeding of marine birds on Farwa Island, western Libya | Etayeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding of marine birds on Farwa Island, western Libya. ... They provide food, shelter and nesting grounds for many avifauna during their migration ... northern part of the island and at Ras-Attalgha, beside the plant cover of the island itself.

  8. 以沼气为纽带的种养结合循环农业系统能值分析%Energy analysis on planting-breeding circulating agriculture ecosystem linked by biogas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟珍梅; 黄勤楼; 翁伯琦; 黄秀声; 冯德庆; 陈钟佃

    2012-01-01

    将沼气工程与种植业相结合,构建以沼气为纽带的种养结合的循环农业模式是当前处理猪场粪水的循环农业新模式.该文针对循环农业模式缺乏科学评价体系,以单纯的生猪养殖(模式Ⅰ)为参照,运用能值理论对福清星源畜牧场循环农业模式(模式Ⅱ)进行评价,结果表明模式Ⅱ整体效益优于模式Ⅰ,环境负载率比模式Ⅰ降低了15.00%,可持续发展指数提高15.71%,经济效益比模式Ⅰ提高18.96%,生产效益略低于模式Ⅰ.模式Ⅱ实现“资源减量化、物质再循环和再利用”,并提高生态效益、经济效益,该文为种养结合循环农业模式推广提供科学依据.%Based on combining biogas engineering with planting, constructing circular agriculture model including planting and culture linked by biogas project is used to dealing with pig slurry at present. Taking model Ⅰ (system with only pig-breeding )as a reference, cycle agricultural system of livestock farm in Xingyuan Fuqing (the model Ⅱ )was evaluated using energy theory. Results indicated that whole benefit of the model Ⅱ was better than the the model I ; Compared with the model Ⅰ, the model Ⅱ decreased environmental loading ratio by 15.00%, increased sustainable development index by 15.71% and increased economic benefits by 18.96%, however slightly lowered at production efficiency. It was concluded that the model Ⅱ realized the aim that "reduction of resource, material recycling and reuse", and then eco-efficiency and economic benefits had been improved. This paper provides a scientific basis for extension of cycle agricultural system with planting and breeding.

  9. Biotechnology Assisted Wheat Breeding for Organic Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffan, Philipp Matthias

    model identified two novel QTL for common bunt resistance located on wheat chromosomes 2B and 7 A. The identification of new resistance loci may help to broaden our understanding of common bunt resistance in wheat, and QTL may potentially be exploited by marker assisted selection in plant breeding. QTL...... markers for common bunt resistance may potentially help to speed up resistance breeding by shortening the long time required for phenotypic disease screening. Here, we report the results of 1. an association mapping study for common bunt resistance, 2. a QTL mapping study for the localization of common...

  10. Federal Administrative Court dismisses appeal of the city of Schweinfurt in the matter of Grafenrheinfeld nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    With its decision of April 30, 1980, - BVerwG 7 C 91.79 - the Federal Administrative Court has dismissed the appeal of the city of Schweinfurt against the interim decision of the Bavarian Administrative Court of April 9, 1979. The cost will have to be paid by the plaintiff. The value of the appeal suit is set at DM 100.000. The main grounds for the decision are given in full wording. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab [Pathumthani Rice Research Center (Thailand)

    2001-03-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  12. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab

    2001-01-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  13. Biotechnological approach in crop improvement by mutation breeding in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeranto, H.; Sobrizal; Sutarto, Ismiyati; Manurung, Simon; Mastrizal [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Center for Research and Development of Isotope and Radiation Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2002-02-01

    Mutation breeding has become a proven method of improving crop varieties. Most research on plant mutation breeding in Indonesia is carried out at the Center for Research and Development of Isotope and Radiation Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). Nowadays, a biotechnological approach has been incorporated in some mutation breeding researches in order to improve crop cultivars. This approach is simply based on cellular totipotency, or the ability to regenerate whole, flowering plants from isolated organs, pieces of tissue, individual cells, and protoplasts. Tissue culture technique has bee extensively used for micro propagation of disease-free plants. Other usage of this technique involves in various steps of the breeding process such as germplasm preservation, clonal propagation, and distant hybridization. Mutation breeding combined with tissue culture technique has made a significant contribution in inducing plant genetic variation, by improving selection technology, and by accelerating breeding time as for that by using anther or pollen culture. In Indonesia, research on mutation breeding combined with tissue culture techniques has been practiced in different crop species including rice, ginger, banana, sorghum etc. Specially in rice, a research on identification of DNA markers linked to blast disease resistance is now still progressing. A compiled report from some research activities is presented in this paper. (author)

  14. Developments in breeding cereals for organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfe, M.S.; Baresel, J.P.; Desclaux, D.

    2008-01-01

    into the crop can be helped by diversification within the crop, allowing complementation and compensation among plants. Although the problems of breeding cereals for organic farming systems are large, there is encouraging progress. This lies in applications of ecology to organic crop production, innovations......The need for increased sustainability of performance in cereal varieties, particularly in organic agriculture (OA), is limited by the lack of varieties adapted to organic conditions. Here, the needs for breeding are reviewed in the context of three major marketing types, global, regional, local......, in European OA. Currently, the effort is determined, partly, by the outcomes from trials that compare varieties under OA and CA (conventional agriculture) conditions. The differences are sufficiently large and important to warrant an increase in appropriate breeding. The wide range of environments within OA...

  15. Studies on mutation breeding of hibiscus syriacuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Sub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has ahch a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plants exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Thirth two domestic varieties were propagated. Radiosensitivity of H. syriacus irradiated with gamma ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45 percent in 5 kR irradiated group compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5 kR could be rrecommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang Wolsan 176, I1pyondansim and Emille. 6 tabs., 2 figs., 13 refs., 4 ills. (Author).

  16. Studies on mutation breeding of hibiscus syriacuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hee Sub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek

    1995-12-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has ahch a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plants exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Thirth two domestic varieties were propagated. Radiosensitivity of H. syriacus irradiated with gamma ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45 percent in 5 kR irradiated group compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5 kR could be rrecommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang Wolsan 176, I1pyondansim and Emille. 6 tabs., 2 figs., 13 refs., 4 ills. (Author)

  17. Federal Holidays

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Federal law (5 U.S.C. 6103) establishes the following public holidays for Federal employees. Please note that most Federal employees work on a Monday through Friday...

  18. Studies on the utility of artificial mutations in plant breeding, 16: Gene analysis of male sterility induced in rice [Oryza sativa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, T.; Yamagata, H.

    1987-01-01

    Eleven male-sterile mutants were induced from a rice variety Sasanishiki by ethyleneimine and γ-ray treatments of seeds. Nine of them produced no pollen grains or only abortive ones and the other two showed extremely low pollen fertilities. The eleven mutants were crossed with the original variety. All F 1 hybrids were fertile, i.e., normal in both pollen and seed fertilities. In eight of their F 2 progenies, fertile and male-sterile plants segregated in a ratio of 3 to 1, indicating that the male sterility of the eight mutants was controlled by a single recessive gene. In one of the other three, segregation ratio suggested the participation of two recessive genes, while in the remaining two, the number of the genes responsible for male sterility could not be determined. (author)

  19. Mutation breeding for crop improvement: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    More than 70 years have passed since radiation was used successfully to generate genetic variation in plants. Since the research on theoretical basis of mutagenesis was performed with a peak in the mid sixties. The result of these investigations led to the formulation of methodological principles in the use of various mutagens for the creation and selection of desired variability. The induced genetic variability has been extensively used for evolution of crop varieties as well as in breeding programmes. More than 1800 varieties of 154 plants species have so far been released for commercial cultivation, of which cereals are at the top, demonstrating the economics of the mutation breeding technique. The most frequently occurring mutations have been the short stature and really maturity. In Pakistan, the use of mutation breeding technique for the improvement of crops has also led to the development of 34 cultivars of cotton, rice, wheat, chickpea, mungbean and rapeseed which have played a significant role in increasing crop production in the country. In addition, a wealth of genetic variability has been developed for use in the cross breeding programmes, and the breeders in Pakistan have released six varieties of cotton by using an induced mutant as one of the parents. (author)

  20. Regulations and control of fuel reprocessing plants in the Federal Republic of Germany with regard to environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    The principles of radiation protection in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) are reviewed. These principles are based on ICRP recommendations and are laid down in the Atomgesetz (Atomic Energy Act, 1959) and in the Strahlenschutzverordnung (Radiological Protection Ordinance, 1976). The licencing procedure in the FRG is outlined together with the extent of the information on environmental protection to be submitted by the applicant for a licence. Information is required about the site, safety against external and internal hazards, control of occupational radiation exposure, control of gaseous and liquid effluents, environmental dose limits and accident situations. The methods used to monitor releases to the environment are briefly discussed. Finally, figures for occupational and general public exposure in respect of the operation of the WAK reprocessing facility at Karlsruhe are given

  1. Development of breeding objectives for beef cattle breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mnr J F Kluyts

    However, to solve the simultaneous equations the ... The aggregate breeding value represents a fundamental concept, the breeding objective, which is ..... Two properties characterise a linear programming problem. The first is additivity, ...

  2. Breeding for Grass Seed Yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Studer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Seed yield is a trait of major interest for many fodder and amenity grass species and has received increasing attention since seed multiplication is economically relevant for novel grass cultivars to compete in the commercial market. Although seed yield is a complex trait and affected...... by agricultural practices as well as environmental factors, traits related to seed production reveal considerable genetic variation, prerequisite for improvement by direct or indirect selection. This chapter first reports on the biological and physiological basics of the grass reproduction system, then highlights...... important aspects and components affecting the seed yield potential and the agronomic and environmental aspects affecting the utilization and realization of the seed yield potential. Finally, it discusses the potential of plant breeding to sustainably improve total seed yield in fodder and amenity grasses....

  3. Sugar beet breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar beet is a recent crop developed solely for extraction of the sweetener sucrose. Breeding and improvement of Beta vulgaris for sugar has a rich historical record. Sugar beet originated from fodder beet in the 1800s, and selection has increased sugar content from 4 to 6% then to over 18% today. ...

  4. Penguin breeding in Edinburgh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, T.H.; F.R.S.E.,; F.Z.S.,

    1939-01-01

    The Scottish National Zoological Park at Edinburgh has been notably successful in keeping and breeding penguins. It is happy in possessing as a friend and benefactor, Mr Theodore E. Salvesen, head of the firm of Christian Salvesen & Co., Leith, to whose interest and generosity it owes the great

  5. Beyond breeding area management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lykke; Thorup, Kasper; Tøttrup, Anders P.

    Every year, billions of songbirds migrate thousands of kilometres between their European breeding grounds and African overwintering area. As migratory birds are dependent on resources at a number of sites varying in both space and time, they are likely to be more vulnerable to environmental chang...... and provide important information for conservation management of migratory birds....

  6. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  7. Análise bayesiana do modelo de herança monogênica no melhoramento vegetal: um exemplo com abobrinha Bayesian analisys of monogenic inheritance model in plant breeding: a case study with zucchini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Imaculada de Sousa Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma estratégia comum em programas de melhoramento é conduzir estudos básicos de herança para investigar a hipótese de controle do caráter por um ou poucos genes de efeito principal, associados ou não a genes modificadores de pequeno efeito. Neste trabalho, foi utilizada a inferência bayesiana para ajustar modelos de herança genética aditiva-dominante a experimentos de genética vegetal com várias gerações. Densidades normais com médias associadas aos efeitos genéticos das gerações foram consideradas em um modelo linear em que a matriz de delineamento dos efeitos genéticos tinha coeficientes indeterminados (precisando ser estimada para cada indivíduo. A metodologia foi ilustrada com um conjunto de dados de um estudo de herança da partenocarpia em abobrinha (Cucurbita pepo L. Tal ajuste permitiu explicitar a distribuição a posteriori das probabilidades genotípicas. . A análise corrobora resultados anteriores da literatura, porém foi mais eficiente que alternativas prévias que supunham a matriz de delineamento conhecida para as gerações. Conclui-se que a partenocarpia em abobrinha é governada por um gene principal com dominância parcial.A common breeding strategy is to carry out basic studies to investigate the hypothesis of a single gene controlling the trait (major gene with or without polygenes of minor effect. In this study we used Bayesian inference to fit genetic additive-dominance models of inheritance to plant breeding experiments with multiple generations. Normal densities with different means, according to the major gene genotype, were considered in a linear model in which the design matrix of the genetic effects had unknown coefficients (which were estimated in individual basis. An actual data set from an inheritance study of partenocarpy in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L. was used for illustration. Model fitting included posterior probabilities for all individual genotypes. Analysis agrees with results in the

  8. Federal and state regulatory requirements for the D ampersand D of the Alpha-4 Building, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etnier, E.L.; Houlberg, L.M.; Bock, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of Building 9201-4 (Alpha-4) at the Oak Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, The Alpha-4 Building was used from 1953--1962 to house a column exchange (Colex) process for lithium isotope separation. This process involved electrochemical and solvent extraction processes that required substantial quantities of mercury. Presently there is no law or regulation mandating decommissioning at DOE facilites or setting de minimis or ''below regulatory concern'' (BRC) radioactivity levels to guide decommissioning activities at DOE facilities. However, DOE Order 5820.2A, Chap. V (Decommissioning of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities), requires that the regulatory status of each project be identified and that technical engineering planning must assure D ampersand D compliance with all environmental regulations during cleanup activities. To assist in the performance of this requirement, this paper gives a brief overview of potential federal and state regulatory requirements related to D ampersand D activities at Alpha-4. Compliance with other federal, state, and local regulations not addressed here may be required, depending on site characterization, actual D ampersand D activities, and wastes generated

  9. Report on the fuel cycle centre for spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report takes into account the contents of the safety report which was presented on March 31st, 1977 to the Social Minister of Lower Saxony by the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Wiederaufbereitung von Kernbrennstoffen mbH, Hanover, together with the application for a licence for the construction and operation of a fuel cycle centre. However, the report is not to be seen as the brief description of the facility, as it is required according to section 3, sub-section 3 of the AtVfV (Nuclear Installations Ordinance). It is more introductory information. Statements and drafts are preliminary; they have neither been decided on nor have they been licensed. However, the report gives a survey of the present state-of-the-art and of planning activities concerning the nuclear fuel cycle centre, while paying special attention to data relevant to the site. The government of Lower Saxony has proposed as a preliminary site on Febr. 22nd, 1977 an area near Gorleben in the rural district of Luechow-Dannenberg. The Federal government has adopted this proposal on July 5th, 1977. (orig.) [de

  10. Studies on mutation breeding of hibiscus Syriacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heui Sub; Lee, Ki Woon; Im, Yong Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Hibiscus(Hibiscus syracuse L.) has been know as a national flower of Korea science old times. Although there are some ancient records that the Hibiscus had been planted in large quantities in Korea, Japanese had dug out all the good plants of Hibiscus in this country during their colonial period. But Hibiscus has such a characteristics of self-incompatibility that all the plants exist as a hybrid naturally and have heterogeneous genes. Therefore many good characters can be taken out from the surviving plants. Many domestic 78 varieties of Hibiscus syracuse were collected and propagated 26 varieties cuttings. Radiosensitivity of gamma-ray irradiated Hibiscus syracuse were investigated the germination rate, survival rate, plant height was with the increase of 4 kR better than control. The radiation doses of 10-12 kR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. 6 figs, 11 tabs, 41 refs. (Author).

  11. Studies on mutation breeding of hibiscus Syriacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Heui Sub; Lee, Ki Woon; Im, Yong Taek

    1994-12-01

    Hibiscus(Hibiscus syracuse L.) has been know as a national flower of Korea science old times. Although there are some ancient records that the Hibiscus had been planted in large quantities in Korea, Japanese had dug out all the good plants of Hibiscus in this country during their colonial period. But Hibiscus has such a characteristics of self-incompatibility that all the plants exist as a hybrid naturally and have heterogeneous genes. Therefore many good characters can be taken out from the surviving plants. Many domestic 78 varieties of Hibiscus syracuse were collected and propagated 26 varieties cuttings. Radiosensitivity of gamma-ray irradiated Hibiscus syracuse were investigated the germination rate, survival rate, plant height was with the increase of 4 kR better than control. The radiation doses of 10-12 kR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. 6 figs, 11 tabs, 41 refs. (Author)

  12. Genetically modified organisms authorized for cultivation and breeding in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V Matveeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In July 2016 the State Duma adopted the Federal Law “On Amendments to Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation in terms of improving the state regulation in the field of genetic engineering” (03.07.2016 N 358-FL. This review is devoted to the analysis of Article 4 of the Act, namely the discussion of what GMOs may be authorized for cultivation and breeding in Russia.

  13. Clonal forestry, heterosis and advanced-generation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report discusses the clonal planting stock offers many advantages to the forest products industry. Advanced-generation breeding strategies should be designed to maximize within-family variance and at the same time allow the capture of heterosis. Certainly there may be a conflict in the choice of breeding strategy based on the trait of interest. It may be that the majority of the traits express heterosis due to overdominance. Alternatively, disease resistance is expressed as the lack of a specific metabolite or infection court then the homozygous recessive genotype may be the most desirable. Nonetheless, as the forest products industry begins to utilize the economic advantages of clonal forestry, breeding strategies will have to be optimized for these commercial plant materials. Here, molecular markers can be used to characterize the nature of heterosis and therefore define the appropriate breeding strategy.

  14. Progress and tendency in heavy ion irradiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Libin; Li Wenjian; Qu Ying; Li Ping

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the intermediate energy heavy ion biology has been concerned rarely comparing to that of the low-energy ions. In this paper, we summarized the advantage of a new mutation breeding method mediated by intermediate energy heavy ion irradiations. Meanwhile, the present state of this mutation technique in applications of the breeding in grain crops, cash crops and model plants were introduced. And the preview of the heavy ion irradiations in gene-transfer, molecular marker assisted selection and spaceflight mutation breeding operations were also presented. (authors)

  15. Experiences in the treatment of radioactive wastes in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambros, R.; Rittscher, D.

    1983-01-01

    The liquid, gaseous and solid radioactive wastes arising from the operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) have - if they cannot be reused - to be disposed of according to rules set up by the competent authorities. In this paper the treatment of wastes from NPP is described as it is carried out today due to the actual lack of a waste repository in the FRG. As most NPP have only an interim storage capacity for 1 year, measures for a further reduction of waste arisings, for volume reduction of the waste and for extension of the storage capacity have become necessary. The reduction of the waste arisings to the possible minimum is being achieved by administrative measures. A volume reduction of the waste is achieved by improvement of already existing methods and by development of new methods. Mixed solid wastes are reduced in volume by baling at high pressure. Burnable wastes can be reduced in volume by incineration. Liquid radioactive concentrates are reduced in volume by water separation, evaporation or drying. The volume reduction factors achieved are large as compared to the formerly applied cementation. The products arising are put into cast-iron containers which following the actual knowledge, should meet the requirements for final disposal with respect to the pressure stability, corrosion resistance and leach resistance. Due to the high density of the container material and the great wall thickness the specific activity of the waste can be increased without exceeding the dose rate limits at the outside of the containers. (author)

  16. Impact of mutation breeding in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutger, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    More cultivars have been developed in rice through the use of mutation breeding than in any other crop. Direct releases of mutants as cultivars began some 30 years ago, and now total 198 cultivars. During the last 20 years, increasing use has been made of induced mutants in cross-breeding programs, leading to 80 additional cultivars. Principal improvements through mutation breeding have been earlier maturity, short stature, and grain character modifications. Rice has been a popular subject of mutagenesis because it is the world's leading food crop, has diploid inheritance, and is highly self-pollinated. In recent years induced mutation has been exploited to develop breeding tool mutants, which are defined as mutants that in themselves may not have direct agronomic application but may be useful genetic tools for crop improvement. Examples include the eui gene, hull colour mutants, normal genetic male steriles, and environmentally sensitive genetic male steriles. The environmentally sensitive genetic male steriles, especially those in which male sterility can be turned on or off by different photoperiod lengths, show promise for simplifying hybrid rice seed production both in China and the USA. Future applications of mutation in rice include induction of unusual endosperm starch types, plant types with fewer but more productive tillers, dominant dwarfs, dominant genetic male steriles, extremely early maturing mutants, nutritional mutants, and in vitro-derived mutants for tolerance to herbicides or other growth stresses. Refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Applied Genetics and Genomics in Alfalfa Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Charles Brummer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a perennial and outcrossing species, is a widely planted forage legume for hay, pasture and silage throughout the world. Currently, alfalfa breeding relies on recurrent phenotypic selection, but alternatives incorporating molecular marker assisted breeding could enhance genetic gain per unit time and per unit cost, and accelerate alfalfa improvement. Many major quantitative trait loci (QTL related to agronomic traits have been identified by family-based QTL mapping, but in relatively large genomic regions. Candidate genes elucidated from model species have helped to identify some potential causal loci in alfalfa mapping and breeding population for specific traits. Recently, high throughput sequencing technologies, coupled with advanced bioinformatics tools, have been used to identify large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in alfalfa, which are being developed into markers. These markers will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative traits and genome wide association mapping of agronomic traits and further advanced breeding strategies for alfalfa, such as marker-assisted selection and genomic selection. Based on ideas from the literature, we suggest several ways to improve selection in alfalfa including (1 diversity selection and paternity testing, (2 introgression of QTL and (3 genomic selection.

  18. Research progress on the space-flight mutation breeding of woodyplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Binbin; Sun Yuhan; Li Yun

    2013-01-01

    The space-flight mutation breeding conception, characteristics, mutagenic effects, research progress at home and abroad in woody plant were reviewed in this paper. Compared with crops, although the research of the woody plants space-flight mutation breeding in China started later, but it has developed rapidly and has gotten certain achievement. Now the satellite and high-altitude balloon experiment were conducted with over 20 tree species such as Populus ussuriensis and 50 flower species such as Paeonia suffruticosa. The above work will has profound significance for space-flight breeding technology application on woody plants. In the end, this thesis analyzes the prospect in the future from four aspects such as using woody plants asexual reproduction characteristic, strengthening the space mutation mechanism study, enhancing new space mutation varieties screen and strengthening ornamental specific types selection. This thesis also thinks that the space mutation breeding is expected to become an effective way in woody plant genetic breeding. (authors)

  19. The breeding of Japonica Yanjing 10 rice mutant induced by space mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhua; Chen Xiulan; Zhang Rong; Wang Jinrong; Liu Jian; Jiao Juan; He Zhentian; Wang Lin

    2011-01-01

    The dry seed of mid-maturing Japonica rice Yanjing 10 was used for space mutation breeding which was carried by a satellite for 15 days in 2006. Through three generations of breeding, a group of mutants were obtained. In the article, we reported in detail the breeding procedures, proposed the breeding technical method for space mutation for rice improvement. Planting multiple seedlings per hill to prohibit tillering at SP 1 generation, and bulked selection in combination with directional selection at the SP 2 ∼ SP 3 generation were the two key points of the breeding methods. (authors)

  20. Federalism Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. E. Dick

    1987-01-01

    Examines the concept of federalism in terms of its past history and its encouraging future. Calls for a revival of concern for federalism not simply as a convenient administrative arrangement but as a fundamental constitutional value. (BSR)

  1. Understanding Federalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Eugene W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Urges returning to the original federalist debates to understand contemporary federalism. Reviews "The Federalist Papers," how federalism has evolved, and the centralization of the national government through acts of Congress and Supreme Court decisions. Recommends teaching about federalism as part of teaching about U.S. government…

  2. Report of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Buildings and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The report of the Federal Environmental Ministry (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors covers the following issues: comprehensive requirements for aging management and its implementation, electric cables, non accessible pipes, reactor pressure vessel, calandria/pressure tubes (CANDU), concrete containment, pre-stressed concrete reactor pressure vessel (AGR).

  3. Forty years of mutation breeding in Japan. Research and fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Isao

    2003-01-01

    The radiation source used for breeding in the early years was mainly X rays. After the 2nd World War, gamma ray sources such as 60 Co and 137 Cs came to take a leading role in radiation breeding. The institute of Radiation Breeding (IRB) of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) was established on April 16, 1960. A gamma field with 2000Ci of a 60 Co source, the main irradiation facility of the IRB, was installed to study the genetically responses of crop plants to chronic exposures of ionizing radiation and their practical application to plant breeding. This paper consisted of 'forty years of research on radiobiology and mutation breeding in Japan', 'topics of mutation breeding research in IRB', 'outline of released varieties by mutation breeding' and 'future of mutation breeding'. The number of varieties released by the direct use of induced mutation in Japan amounts to 163 as of November 2001. Crops in which mutant varieties have been released range widely: rice and other cereals, industrial crops, forage crops, vegetables, ornamentals, mushrooms and fruit trees, the number of which reaches 48. The number of mutant varieties is highest (31) in chrysanthemum, followed by 22 in rice and 13 in soybean. By the indirect use of mutants, a total of 15 varieties of wheat, barley, soybean, mat rush and tomato have been registered by MAFF. Recent advances in biotechnological techniques have made it possible to determine DNA sequences of mutant genes. Accumulating information of DNA sequences and other molecular aspects of many mutant genes will throw light on the mechanisms of mutation induction and develop a new field of mutation breeding. (S.Y.)

  4. SEEDS THAT GIVE: Participatory Plant Breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    ICARDA: S. Ceccarelli. Working together, researchers, farmers, breeders, and social ... remember that for 10 000 years women and men con- sciously have been .... Because lines with good performance in unfavorable sites and poor response ...

  5. Seeds that give: Participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    Yet here, in a classroom in the town of Puchuni, in the highlands of ... four women and four men — are learning about the potato. ... understanding of their environment. They also .... inclusive of indigenous knowledge and culture, and seeks ...

  6. Seeds that give: participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    bridges to close the gap between scientists and resource-poor farmers. 5. Case study ... In Guangxi province, China, diversity means choice, diversity means life. ... by Canada's International Development Research Centre. (IDRC) and the ...

  7. Seeds that give: Participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    Resource-poor farmers all across Latin America are finding a new way to increase productivity and improve .... be curious and to assess different options for dealing with. Research .... mal research system are often high-maintenance varieties.

  8. Seeds that give: participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    It is market day in GuzHai township, and there is excite- ment on the streets because the fair has come to town. No ... Throughout the day the participants — farmers, researchers, and officials — exchange many opinions, ideas, experiences, ... Today this region is a treasure trove of maize genetic diversity that is vital to.

  9. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-07-01

    In this issue particular attention was given to two items which will accompany us as increasingly important foci of the Agency's Subprogramme on 'Sustainable Intensification of Crop Production Systems' into the next biennia: hardy crops in harsh environments and hidden hunger. You might refer to the First Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on 'Identification and Pyramiding of Mutated Genes: Novel Approaches for Improving Crop Tolerance to Salinity and Drought, which was held in Vienna, Austria this March and to the Technical Cooperation (TC) Regional Project RAS/7/014 -Monitoring of Food Fortification Programmes Using Nuclear Techniques' , for which the First Project Coordination Meeting was held this February in Bali, Indonesia in conjunction with the Second Reporting Meeting on -Selection Efficiency for Low Phytate (LP) Mutants in Rice and Nutrient Bioavailability from Fortified Foods

  10. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    In this issue particular attention was given to two items which will accompany us as increasingly important foci of the Agency's Subprogramme on 'Sustainable Intensification of Crop Production Systems' into the next biennia: hardy crops in harsh environments and hidden hunger. You might refer to the First Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on 'Identification and Pyramiding of Mutated Genes: Novel Approaches for Improving Crop Tolerance to Salinity and Drought, which was held in Vienna, Austria this March and to the Technical Cooperation (TC) Regional Project RAS/7/014 -Monitoring of Food Fortification Programmes Using Nuclear Techniques' , for which the First Project Coordination Meeting was held this February in Bali, Indonesia in conjunction with the Second Reporting Meeting on -Selection Efficiency for Low Phytate (LP) Mutants in Rice and Nutrient Bioavailability from Fortified Foods.

  11. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Il; Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lee, Sang Jae; Lim, Yong Tack; Lee, In Suk; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Yong Su; Yang, Seung Gyun; Choi, Soon Ho; Sim, Dong Bo; Kim, Bong Kyu; Lee, Jang Ha [and others

    2000-04-01

    To improve the crop varieties by using variation, various mutant lines were selected from the materials irradiated with gamma ray due to in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis. The selected mutant lines were evaluated in the agronomic characteristics by field observation and analysis of related DNA patterns in laboratory. the results are summarized as follow; 1. Registered new mutant varieties such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wonkwangbyeo, Wonmibyeo and Heogseonchalbyeo in the national variety list. 2. Advanced 800 mutant lines of rice soybean perilla and sweet potatoes were selected for radiation genetic resources. 3. Promising rice mutants were evaluated in several district regions for releasing. 4. Bagseul, a new mutant variety of Mugungwha (Hibiscus) were developed. 5. Promising soybean mutant lines were selected for improvement of soybean disease resistant, and soybean seed quality. 6. NaCl resistant cell lines were selected in in vitro and analysed the DNA banks. 7. 5-MT and Cysteine resistant cell lines were obtained from in vitro mutagenesis for improvement of rice quality. 8. Other related researches were carried out with coordinated projects. (author)

  12. Seeds that give: Participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    Faced with a unique economic crisis, Cuba's national agriculture system was near collapse ... tion, and distribution of improved maize and bean seeds. A secondary but ... ers rate 50 percent of the newly introduced varieties to be superior to ...

  13. Plant breeding and genetics newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The focus of our activities this semester is on reporting for the last biennium 2004-2005. This exercise is very beneficial, as it allows us to critically appraise our activities for the Member States, to feel good about our success stories, but most important of all, to spot weaknesses and to develop strategies and action plans to improve ourselves. We appreciate your input in this respect, and wish to express here our gratitude for the innumerable input we receive from you. The Mutant Variety Database (MVD) is nearing the 2500th accession. The 2500th mutant variety submitted to MVD will be especially celebrated. A special certificate will be issued to the breeder. This certificate will be officially presented to the invited breeder here in Vienna, Austria, at the IAEA Headquarters, the Vienna International Center (VIC)

  14. Materials for breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified

  15. Materials for breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as primary blanket materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and secondary blanket materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified. (orig.)

  16. Bibliography. Examples of literature related to the use of induced mutations in cross-breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micke, A.

    1976-01-01

    The bibliography contains about 400 references arranged alphabetically under the following 20 headings: Genetic analysis of mutants; Mutant gene combination and interaction; Pleiotropy versus linkage; Genetic background; Heterosis and overdominance; Mutations in heterozygous plants such as vegetatively propagated plants; Mutations in hybrids of self-pollinators; Distant hybridization; Increasing recombination; Alteration in the reproductive system; Alteration of photoperiodic response; Self and cross-incompatibility; Male or female sterility; Adaptability of mutants and mutant hybrids; Mutation induction in cross pollinators; Dwarfing mutant genes in cross-breeding; Protein mutants in cross-breeding; Disease resistant mutants in cross-breeding; Practical cross-breeding programmes using mutants; Spontaneous versus induced genetic diversity

  17. Breeds in danger of extintion and biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    A. Blasco

    2008-01-01

    Some arguments currently used to support breed conservation are examined. The central point is that we cannot conserve all breeds because we do not have financial resources enough to keep everything (mainly in developing countries) and in many cases we do not have special reasons to conserve breeds. A breed is a human product and it should not be confused with specie. A breed can be generated or transformed. We can create synthetic breeds with the best characteristics of several breeds. Selec...

  18. Selection problems and objectives in mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Key, J.

    1984-01-01

    In plant breeding, major genes are preferably handled by inbreeding, back-crosses and selection through the family/pedigree method. Polygenic systems need gene accumulation, i.e. handling in bulk allowing natural/recurrent selection to operate. The two types of genetic control normally occur together irrespective of whether the variation is created by crossing or by mutagenesis. Cross-breeding can conveniently work with both types of variation and offers a range of genetic backgrounds. Problems are the often enormous recombination potential risking the break-down of already accomplished genic constellations or undesirable linkages. Mutation induction implies a scattered mono- to oligo-factorial variation mostly functioning as a negative load. As a result, it will be difficult and unrealistic to try to explore micromutations, as defined by Gaul, in vegetatively propagated and autogamous crop plants. Quantitative analyses have not been able to give guidance since the induced variation includes disturbed vitality and main or side-effects of events that are possible to define as macro-mutations. The possibility of better exhausting the variation induced will mainly depend on the precision in selection techniques, i.e. by dividing complex traits into their components, by improving environmental conditions for selection, and/or by sharpening the screening technique. Contrary to recombination breeding, mutation-induced variation does not fit a plan encompassing overall agronomic traits simultaneously. The progress has to go step by step. Thus, even more than in cross-breeding, it is important that accurately outlined objectives be set. Some characters, such as flower colour, can easily be defined while others, such as yield, may be more interdependent, calling for compromises difficult to foresee. The complexity of the latter category of traits is illustrated by the interaction pattern in relation to grain yield in cereals where both shoot and root are considered

  19. Root phenotyping: from component trait in the lab to breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijken, René C P; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Marcelis, Leo F M; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade cheaper and faster sequencing methods have resulted in an enormous increase in genomic data. High throughput genotyping, genotyping by sequencing and genomic breeding are becoming a standard in plant breeding. As a result, the collection of phenotypic data is increasingly becoming a limiting factor in plant breeding. Genetic studies on root traits are being hampered by the complexity of these traits and the inaccessibility of the rhizosphere. With an increasing interest in phenotyping, breeders and scientists try to overcome these limitations, resulting in impressive developments in automated phenotyping platforms. Recently, many such platforms have been thoroughly described, yet their efficiency to increase genetic gain often remains undiscussed. This efficiency depends on the heritability of the phenotyped traits as well as the correlation of these traits with agronomically relevant breeding targets. This review provides an overview of the latest developments in root phenotyping and describes the environmental and genetic factors influencing root phenotype and heritability. It also intends to give direction to future phenotyping and breeding strategies for optimizing root system functioning. A quantitative framework to determine the efficiency of phenotyping platforms for genetic gain is described. By increasing heritability, managing effects caused by interactions between genotype and environment and by quantifying the genetic relation between traits phenotyped in platforms and ultimate breeding targets, phenotyping platforms can be utilized to their maximum potential. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Nuclear science for food security. IAEA says plant breeding technique can help beat world hunger; La ciencia nuclear al servicio de la seguridad alimentaria. Segun el OIEA, una tecnica de fitomejoramiento puede ayudar a acabar con el hambre en el mundo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-02

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today called for increased investment in a plant breeding technique that could bolster efforts aimed at pulling millions of people out of the hunger trap. IAEA scientists use radiation to produce improved high-yielding plants that adapt to harsh climate conditions such as drought or flood, or that are resistant to certain diseases and insect pests. Called mutation induction, the technique is safe, proven and cost-effective. It has been in use since the 1920s. 'The global nature of the food crisis is unprecedented. Families all around the world are struggling to feed themselves,' says Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. 'To provide sustainable, long-term solutions, we must make use of all available resources. Selecting the crops that are better able to feed us is one of humankind's oldest sciences. But we've neglected to give it the support and investment it requires for universal application. The IAEA is urging a revival of nuclear crop breeding technologies to help tackle world hunger.' For decades the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has assisted its Member States to produce more, better and safer food. In plant breeding and genetics, its expertise is helping countries around the world to achieve enhanced agricultural output using nuclear technology. Already more than 3000 crop varieties of some 170 different plant species have been released through the direct intervention of the IAEA: they include barley that grows at 5000 meters (16,400 ft) and rice that thrives in saline soil. These varieties provide much needed food as well as millions of dollars in economic benefits for farmers and consumers, especially in developing countries. But with increased investment and broader application, the technology could positively impact the health and livelihood of even greater numbers of people. And as world hunger grows, the need has never been more urgent.

  1. Textbook animal breeding : animal breeding andgenetics for BSc students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbroek, Kor; Waaij, van der Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    This textbook contains teaching material on animal breeding and genetics for BSc students. The text book started as an initiative of the Dutch Universities for Applied (Agricultural) Sciences. The textbook is made available by the Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre (ABGC) of Wageningen UR

  2. Genome-editing technologies and their potential application in horticultural crop breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jin-Song; Ding, Jing; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Plant breeding, one of the oldest agricultural activities, parallels human civilization. Many crops have been domesticated to satisfy human's food and aesthetical needs, including numerous specialty horticultural crops such as fruits, vegetables, ornamental flowers, shrubs, and trees. Crop varieties originated through selection during early human civilization. Other technologies, such as various forms of hybridization, mutation, and transgenics, have also been invented and applied to crop breeding over the past centuries. The progress made in these breeding technologies, especially the modern biotechnology-based breeding technologies, has had a great impact on crop breeding as well as on our lives. Here, we first review the developmental process and applications of these technologies in horticultural crop breeding. Then, we mainly describe the principles of the latest genome-editing technologies and discuss their potential applications in the genetic improvement of horticultural crops. The advantages and challenges of genome-editing technologies in horticultural crop breeding are also discussed. PMID:26504570

  3. Hybrid recreation by reverse breeding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnker, Erik; Deurhof, Laurens; van de Belt, Jose; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; Blankestijn, Hetty; Becker, Frank; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Chan, Simon W L; van Dun, Kees; Lelivelt, Cilia L C; de Jong, Hans; Dirks, Rob; Keurentjes, Joost J B

    2014-04-01

    Hybrid crop varieties are traditionally produced by selecting and crossing parental lines to evaluate hybrid performance. Reverse breeding allows doing the opposite: selecting uncharacterized heterozygotes and generating parental lines from them. With these, the selected heterozygotes can be recreated as F1 hybrids, greatly increasing the number of hybrids that can be screened in breeding programs. Key to reverse breeding is the suppression of meiotic crossovers in a hybrid plant to ensure the transmission of nonrecombinant chromosomes to haploid gametes. These gametes are subsequently regenerated as doubled-haploid (DH) offspring. Each DH carries combinations of its parental chromosomes, and complementing pairs can be crossed to reconstitute the initial hybrid. Achiasmatic meiosis and haploid generation result in uncommon phenotypes among offspring owing to chromosome number variation. We describe how these features can be dealt with during a reverse-breeding experiment, which can be completed in six generations (∼1 year).

  4. Accuracy of genomic selection in European maize elite breeding populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Gowda, Manje; Liu, Wenxin; Würschum, Tobias; Maurer, Hans P; Longin, Friedrich H; Ranc, Nicolas; Reif, Jochen C

    2012-03-01

    Genomic selection is a promising breeding strategy for rapid improvement of complex traits. The objective of our study was to investigate the prediction accuracy of genomic breeding values through cross validation. The study was based on experimental data of six segregating populations from a half-diallel mating design with 788 testcross progenies from an elite maize breeding program. The plants were intensively phenotyped in multi-location field trials and fingerprinted with 960 SNP markers. We used random regression best linear unbiased prediction in combination with fivefold cross validation. The prediction accuracy across populations was higher for grain moisture (0.90) than for grain yield (0.58). The accuracy of genomic selection realized for grain yield corresponds to the precision of phenotyping at unreplicated field trials in 3-4 locations. As for maize up to three generations are feasible per year, selection gain per unit time is high and, consequently, genomic selection holds great promise for maize breeding programs.

  5. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  6. Next generation breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabaschi, Delfina; Tondelli, Alessandro; Desiderio, Francesca; Volante, Andrea; Vaccino, Patrizia; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The genomic revolution of the past decade has greatly improved our understanding of the genetic make-up of living organisms. The sequencing of crop genomes has completely changed our vision and interpretation of genome organization and evolution. Re-sequencing allows the identification of an unlimited number of markers as well as the analysis of germplasm allelic diversity based on allele mining approaches. High throughput marker technologies coupled with advanced phenotyping platforms provide new opportunities for discovering marker-trait associations which can sustain genomic-assisted breeding. The availability of genome sequencing information is enabling genome editing (site-specific mutagenesis), to obtain gene sequences desired by breeders. This review illustrates how next generation sequencing-derived information can be used to tailor genomic tools for different breeders' needs to revolutionize crop improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Over-breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Greenhouse Effect has fuzzy parameters, as do the consequences of acid rain, accidental nuclear fallout, deforestation, even the depletion of oil and natural gas reserves, and other threatening calamities. But the consequences of human over-breeding do not fall within fuzzy parameters. Reliable demographic studies predict a world population by the year 2020 of twice the present four billion or so living human beings. Some of us will see that year. But the population will again have doubled by the year 2090: sixteen billion people. The author suggests in this paper some morally permissible steps that might be taken to circumvent what otherwise is most assuredly an impending world tragedy. We have an ethical obligation to future generations. They have the moral right to a qualitatively fulfilling life, not just on allotted number of years. Some of my suggestions will not be palatable to some readers. But I urge those readers seriously to consider and if possible, hopefully, to propose alternatives

  8. Statement by the Federal Government: Treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants with regard to the irregularities disclosed in the Transnuklear GmbH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toepfer, K.

    1988-01-01

    The Federal Government sees three major tasks to be done after inquiries have shown that irregularities disclosed in the Transnuklear business also include some relating to nuclear safety: (1) Initiate investigation of possible hazards to man or the environment, and into events and scope of events in order to provide full information. (2) Immediate consequences with regard to the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear power plant, and state supervision thereof. (3) Investigate possible consequences with regard to nuclear waste management in the FRG. The Federal Government has taken immediate action on all three levels. (orig./HSCH) [de

  9. Statement by the Federal Government: Treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants with regard to the irregularities disclosed in the Transnuklear GmbH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toepfer, K.

    1988-03-02

    The Federal Government sees three major tasks to be done after inquiries have shown that irregularities disclosed in the Transnuklear business also include some relating to nuclear safety: (1) Initiate investigation of possible hazards to man or the environment, and into events and scope of events in order to provide full information. (2) Immediate consequences with regard to the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear power plant, and state supervision thereof. (3) Investigate possible consequences with regard to nuclear waste management in the FRG. The Federal Government has taken immediate action on all three levels. (orig./HSCH).

  10. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin; Lee, Dong Won

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  11. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seungyon, E-mail: sycho@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  12. Application of molecular markers in wheat breeding: Reality or delusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobiljski Borislav

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional plant breeding use morphological and phenotypic markers for the identification of important agronomic traits. Plant breeders and scientists continuously seek to develop new techniques, which can be used for faster and more accurate introgression of desirable traits into plants. Over the last several years there has been significant increase in the application of molecular markers in the breeding programmes of different species. So far, detected level of polymorphism and informatitivnes of different molecular marker methods applied in MAS (Marker Assisted Selection studies (RFLP, AFLP, etc. were insufficient either to validate their further use or there were very expensive and of huge healthy risk. Fortunately for wheat (and other crops breeders, the new class of molecular markers - microsatellites have prove recently to be most powerful for MAS. But, due to lack of the knowledge, experience, valid informations and even tradition and habits, many breeders have either negative or repulsive attitude towards implementation of MAS in breeding programes. In this paper the relevant facts regarding implementation of MAS in breeding are discussed in general, and for wheat breeding in particular, in order to summarize merits and limitations in application of microsatellites in MAS selection. .

  13. RESULTS OF JOINT WORK OF ALLRRUSSIAN PUBLIC ORGANIZATION «THE ACADEMY OF NON TRADITIONAL AND RARE PLANTS» AND THE SSI ALLRRUSSIAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF VEGETABLE BREEDING AND SEED PRODUCTION OF RAAS FROM 1994 TO 2013 ON THE INTRODUCTION OF PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Kononkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results  of joint work of All-Russian public organization «The Academy of non traditional and rare plants» and the SSI All-Russian research  institute of vegetable breeding and seed production  of RAAS are presented.   The results of two decades of work on the introduction of new, less common and non-traditional plants by scientists from Russia and foreign countries published  in fifty volumes of the proceedings  of international symposia and conferences  and in the collections «The introduction of non6traditional and rare plants and the prospects for their practical use» are reviewed.

  14. ROOT VEGETABLES, BREEDING TRENDS, RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fedorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of root vegetables is their unique specificity and high economic importance. The benefits and medicinal properties of root vegetables being highly demanded by the market requirements to the commodity are highlighted in the article. The main directions of breeding program for root vegetable crops, including species of Apiaceae family with carrot, parsnips; Chenopodioideae family with red beet; Brassicaceae family with radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga. Initial breeding accessions of carrot, red beet, radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga have been selected out to be used for breeding program for heterosis. The mf and ms breeding lines were developed, and with the use of them the new gene pool was created. Variety supporting breeding program and methods were also proposed. 

  15. Federal Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sheila; Tawil, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The federal government pays for a wide range of goods and services that are expected to be useful some years in the future. Those purchases, called investment, fall into three categories: physical capital, research and development (R&D), and education and training. There are several economic rationales for federal investment. It can provide…

  16. Mutation breeding for disease resistance using in-vitro culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Breeding for disease resistance is a major aspect of plant breeding, which may take at least 20% of a plant breeder's time, effort and budget. Nevertheless, numerous resistance problems remain unsolved and present major constraints to the production of food, feed, fiber and industrial commodities. The application of novel biotechnology and genetic engineering will extend the possibilities of conventional plant breeding. Therefore a meeting of experts in plant protection, plant breeding and in-vitro culture technology was convened by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division in Vienna. The experts were asked to discuss and give advice on prospects of biotechnology, especially plant in-vitro cultures, to contribute towards improved chances of success in mutation breeding for disease resistance. The plant breeder, in searching for resistance to a particular pathogen, like for any other desirable character, needs genetic variation to begin with. In addition he needs an appropriate screening method to detect the desired character. Science has developed so fast that it is now time to apply the existing knowledge of biotechnology to practical problems in agriculture, also in developing countries. In the near future this may be true also for novel techniques of genetic engineering. The usefulness and feasibility of the application of in-vitro techniques for these purposes varies with crops and pathogens, but also depends on the strength of plant breeding and plant pathology and the facilities available in a particular country. The members of the Advisory Group attempted to discuss the various aspects and to reach sound conclusions

  17. Present state and problems of mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, A. (Agrartudomanyi Egyetem, Goedoelloe (Hungary))

    1983-09-01

    The major achievements and problems of mutation breeding are discussed according to recent international references. Examples for the production of microorganism resistant tobacco, maize, cabbage, disease resistant sugar cane and some freeze resistant plants are listed. Special opportunities offered by mutation to increase photosynthesis and to improve yields are discussed. The significance of the new techniques to produce induced mutants by means of tissue cultures, to fix N/sub 2/ for leguminosae and to affect the activities of N/sub 2/ fixing microorganisms is emphasized.

  18. Achievements in NS rapeseed hybrids breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović-Jeromela Ana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased production of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. is evident on a global scale, but also in Serbia in the last decade. Rapeseed is used primarily for vegetable oil and processing industry, but also as a source of protein for animal feed and green manure. Following the cultivation of varieties, breeding and cultivation of hybrid rapeseed started in the 1990's, to take advantage of heterosis in F1 generation, while protecting the breeder's rights during seed commercialization. The breeding of hybrid oilseed rape requires high quality starting material (lines with good combining abilities for introduction of male sterility. Ogura sterility system is primarily used at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Novi Sad, Serbia. To use this system, separate lines are modified with genes for cytoplasmic male sterility (cms female line - mother line and restoration of fertility (Rf male lines - father line. In order to maintain the sterility of the mother line it is necessary to produce a maintainer line of cytoplasmic male sterility. Creation of these lines and hybrids at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops was successfully monitored with intense use of cytogenetic laboratory methods. The structure and vitality of pollen, including different phases during meiosis were checked so that cms stability was confirmed during the introduction of these genes into different lines. Rapeseed breeding program in Serbia resulted in numerous varieties through collaboration of researchers engaged in breeding and genetics of this plant species. So far, in addition to 12 varieties of winter rapeseed and two varieties of spring rapeseed, a new hybrid of winter rapeseed NS Ras was registered in Serbia. NS Ras is an early-maturing hybrid characterized by high seed yield and oil content. Average yield of NS Ras for two seasons and three sites was 4256 kg ha-1 of seed and 1704 kg ha-1 of oil. Three promising winter rapeseed hybrids are in the process of

  19. Life extension of German nuclear power plants only with the consent of the Federal Council? The importance and extent of the need for consent to an amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-01-01

    In its coalition agreement of October 26, 2009, the new German federal government plans ''to extend the service life of German nuclear power plants while, at the same time, complying with the strict German and international safety standards.'' This has triggered a debate not only about (nuclear) energy, as in the past election campaign in the summer of 2009, but also about the constitutional law issue whether an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act resulting in longer operating life of nuclear power plants required the consent of the Federal Council (the ''Bundesrat,'' the second chamber of parliament). After the election to the state parliament in North Rhine-Westphalia on May 9, 2010, majority in the Federal Council changed. As a consequence, no consent to an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act must be expected. In view of the large number of recent statements about constitutional law in opinions for various federal and ministerial accounts as well as firms and associations, the outline by R. Scholz in the May issue of atw 2010 will be followed in this issue by the key points of examination of the need for consent, under aspects of constitutional law, and an attempt will be made to explain the evaluations underlying the generation of a legal concept about these items. The decision by the German Federal Constitutional Court of May 4, 2010, published on June 11, 2010, plays a major role in this respect because it established clarity in some important aspects of a legal subject matter in the field of state admini-stration on behalf of the federation, albeit in the field of air traffic law, not nuclear law. However, the structures of the norms in the German Basic Law (Art. 87c and Art. 87d, para.2) to be applied are almost identical. The energy policy and energy economy aspects of a plant life extension are considered along with the option of an appeal to the Federal Constitutional Court against any plant life extension. Finally, the key findings are summarized briefly

  20. Genomic selection accuracy using multi-family prediction models in a wheat breeding program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic selection (GS) uses genome-wide molecular marker data to predict the genetic value of selection candidates in breeding programs. In plant breeding, the ability to produce large numbers of progeny per cross allows GS to be conducted within each family. However, this approach requires phenotyp...