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Sample records for features trigger factors

  1. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  2. Trigger factors in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, A W; Kirchmann, M; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify trigger factors in migraine with aura (MA). A total of 629 MA patients representative of the Danish population were sent a questionnaire listing 16 trigger factors thought to be relevant as well as space for free text. Distinction was made between...... attacks with or without aura within each patient. The questionnaire was returned by 522 patients of whom 347 had current MA attacks. In total 80% with current attacks (278/347) indicated that at least one factor triggered their migraine, and 67% (187/278) in this group indicated that they were aware...... of at least one factor often or always giving rise to an attack of MA. Forty-one per cent (113/278) had co-occurring attacks of migraine without aura (MO). Stress (following stress), bright light, intense emotional influences, stress (during stress) and sleeping too much or too little were the trigger factors...

  3. Trigger factors and mechanisms in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, Geurt Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a severe headache syndrome, affecting approximately 33% of females and 13% of males. Patients suffer from recurring headache episodes in combination with nausea, vomiting, phono and photophobia. It is a paroxysmal disorder for which several several trigger factors have been identified by

  4. Is stress a trigger factor for migraine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, G.G.; Evers, D.J.; Ballieux, B.E.; de Geus, E.J.C.; de Kloet, E.R.; Terwindt, G.M.; van Dijk, J.G.; Ferrari, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although mental stress is commonly considered to be an important trigger factor for migraine, experimental evidence for this belief is yet lacking. Objective: To study the temporal relationship between changes in stress-related parameters (both subjective and objective) and the onset of

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  10. Summer Student Report: ATLAS Muon Trigger Scale Factors Tools Update

    CERN Document Server

    Veeorg, Janno

    2017-01-01

    The summer student project was done in ATLAS muon trigger group. The task was to improve different tools used to provide scale factors for muon trigger. They contained many hardcoded things which were removed to make code easier to read and maintain..

  11. Analysis of Trigger Factors in Episodic Migraineurs Using a Smartphone Headache Diary Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Wook Park

    trigger factors. The headaches with trigger factors had greater severity or migraine features. The type of triggers and the presence of preventive medication influenced the headache characteristics; hence, an investigation of trigger factors would be helpful in understanding migraine occurrences.

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  1. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  3. Odors as triggering and worsening factors for migraine in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of odors in triggering or worsening migraine in men. METHOD: Ninety-eight male migraineurs from the general population were assessed individually through questionnaires. Environmental factors relating to their migraine were reported, with special focus on the role of odors. RESULTS: Odors were the second most frequent triggering factor for migraine attacks (48%, behind stressful situations (59%. Likewise, odors were the second most frequent worsening factor (73%, just behind excessive light (74%. Thirty-three individuals (33.4% stated that odors were both triggering and worsening factors for their migraine attacks. Perfume, cigarette smoke and cleaning products were the most frequent migraine-related odors reported by these male migraineurs. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to assess the role of odors in migraine exclusively in men. There was a high degree of odor-related migraine among these men, thus suggesting that patient education could alert such individuals to gender-related factors, since different triggering and worsening factors have been reported by males and females.

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  8. Trigger factors in migraine patients Fatores desencadeantes de enxaqueca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Timy Fukui

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migraine is a chronic neurological disease with several trigger factors, including dietary, hormonal and environmental factors. PURPOSE: To analyse precipitating factors in a sample of migraine patients. METHOD: Two hundred consecutive migraine patients were interviewed about possible trigger factors for migraine attacks. RESULTS: Most patients showed at least one dietary trigger, fasting was the most frequent one, followed by alcohol and chocolate. Hormonal factors appeared in 53% , being the pre-menstrual period the most frequent trigger. Physical activities caused migraine in 13%, sexual activities in 2.5% and 64% reported emotional stress a trigger factor. 81% related some sleep problem as a trigger factor. Regarding environmental factors, smells were reported by 36.5%. CONCLUSION: Trigger factors are frequent in migraine patients, its avoidance may decrease headache frequency and also improve patients' quality of life.INTRODUÇÃO: A enxaqueca é uma doença neurológica crônica que apresenta diversos desencadeantes como fatores alimentares, hormonais e ambientais. OBJETIVO: Analisar os fatores desencadeantes em uma amostra de pacientes com enxaqueca. MÉTODO: Duzentos pacientes com diagnóstico de enxaqueca foram questionados sobre fatores que pudessem desencadear suas crises. RESULTADOS: 83,5% apresentaram algum fator alimentar, jejum foi o fator mais freqüente, seguido de álcool e chocolate. Dos fatores hormonais, o período pré-menstrual foi o mais freqüente. Atividade física causou enxaquecas em 13%, atividade sexual em 2,5%, estresse em 64% e 81% relataram o sono como fator desencadeante. Em relação aos fatores ambientais, odores foram desencadeantes em 36,5%. CONCLUSÃO: Os fatores desencadeantes são freqüentes em enxaqueca e a sua detecção deve ser pormenorizada para que se reduza a freqüência de crises e melhore a qualidade de vida do paciente.

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  12. Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Anna-Sara; Palmquist, Eva; Nordin, Steven

    2018-04-01

    Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents. Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI. All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors. The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Design and test performance of the ATLAS Feature Extractor trigger boards for the Phase-1 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222228; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In Run 3, the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger will be augmented by an Electron Feature Extractor (eFEX), to identify isolated e/g and particles, and a Jet Feature Extractor (jFEX), to identify energetic jets and calculate various local energy sums. Each module accommodates more than 450 differential signals that can operate at up to 12.8 Gb/s, some of which are routed over 30 cm between FPGAs. Presented here are the module designs, the processes that have been adopted to meet the challenges associated with multi-Gb/s PCB design, and the results of tests that characterize the performance of these modules.

  14. Structural Features of Sugars That Trigger or Support Conidial Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus niger germinate to produce hyphae under appropriate conditions. Germination is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilization of internal carbon and energy stores, followed by polarization and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. The effects of different pyranose sugars, all analogues of d-glucose, on the germination of A. niger conidia were explored, and we define germination as the transition from a dormant conidium into a germling. Within germination, we distinguish two distinct stages, the initial swelling of the conidium and subsequent polarized growth. The stage of conidial swelling requires a germination trigger, which we define as a compound that is sensed by the conidium and which leads to catabolism of d-trehalose and isotropic growth. Sugars that triggered germination and outgrowth included d-glucose, d-mannose, and d-xylose. Sugars that triggered germination but did not support subsequent outgrowth included d-tagatose, d-lyxose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Nontriggering sugars included d-galactose, l-glucose, and d-arabinose. Certain nontriggering sugars, including d-galactose, supported outgrowth if added in the presence of a complementary triggering sugar. This division of functions indicates that sugars are involved in two separate events in germination, triggering and subsequent outgrowth, and the structural features of sugars that support each, both, or none of these events are discussed. We also present data on the uptake of sugars during the germination process and discuss possible mechanisms of triggering in the absence of apparent sugar uptake during the initial swelling of conidia. PMID:23995938

  15. Structural features of sugars that trigger or support conidial germination in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B

    2013-11-01

    The asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus niger germinate to produce hyphae under appropriate conditions. Germination is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilization of internal carbon and energy stores, followed by polarization and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. The effects of different pyranose sugars, all analogues of d-glucose, on the germination of A. niger conidia were explored, and we define germination as the transition from a dormant conidium into a germling. Within germination, we distinguish two distinct stages, the initial swelling of the conidium and subsequent polarized growth. The stage of conidial swelling requires a germination trigger, which we define as a compound that is sensed by the conidium and which leads to catabolism of d-trehalose and isotropic growth. Sugars that triggered germination and outgrowth included d-glucose, d-mannose, and d-xylose. Sugars that triggered germination but did not support subsequent outgrowth included d-tagatose, d-lyxose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Nontriggering sugars included d-galactose, l-glucose, and d-arabinose. Certain nontriggering sugars, including d-galactose, supported outgrowth if added in the presence of a complementary triggering sugar. This division of functions indicates that sugars are involved in two separate events in germination, triggering and subsequent outgrowth, and the structural features of sugars that support each, both, or none of these events are discussed. We also present data on the uptake of sugars during the germination process and discuss possible mechanisms of triggering in the absence of apparent sugar uptake during the initial swelling of conidia.

  16. The Arjenyattah epidemic. A mass phenomenon: spread and triggering factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modan, B; Swartz, T A; Tirosh, M; Costin, C; Weissenberg, E; Donagi, A; Acker, C; Revach, M; Vettorazzi, G

    A massive epidemic of psychogenic aetiology occurred in three districts of the West Bank over two weeks in March-April, 1983. It affected 949 individuals, 727 (77%) of them adolescent females. The symptoms were not accompanied by positive physical signs or by laboratory findings. The epidemiological pattern was pathognomonic of that of a psychogenic disorder. The initial trigger was probably the odour of H2S escaping from a faulty latrine in the schoolyard of the first affected school. Subsequent spread of the disease was due to psychological and extra-medical factors, including publicity by the mass media. Spread was stopped immediately after closure of schools.

  17. Migraine Features, Associated Symptoms, and Triggers: A Principal Component Analysis in the Women's Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürks, Markus; Buring, Julie E.; Kurth, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Aims Migraine has a wide clinical spectrum. Our aim was to group information on migraine characteristics into meaningful components and to identify key components of the migraine phenotype. Methods We performed two principal component analyses, one among participants in the Women's Health Study enrolment cohort and one in a sub-cohort with additional migraine-specific information. Results Among the 9,427 women with migraine attack-related information at enrolment, the three most important components pertained to central nervous system (CNS) sensitization, attack frequency/pain location, and aura/visual phenomena. In the sub-group of 1,675 women with more detailed information, food triggers and unspecific symptoms constituted two principal components that explain more of the variance of the migraine phenotype than the three attack-related components. Conclusions Our results indicate that information on migraine-associated features, symptoms, and triggers is highly correlated allowing the extraction of principal components. Migraine attack-related symptoms are best summarized by symptoms related to CNS sensitization, attack frequency/pain location, and aura/visual phenomena. Taking a more general view, unspecific symptoms and food triggers appear to carry stronger importance in characterizing the migraine phenotype. These components are useful for future research on the pathophysiology and genetics of migraine and may have implications for diagnosing and treating patients. PMID:21398421

  18. [Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: malignant tumour as triggering factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, J; Carbonell, C; Donaire, L; De Miguel, J; Vaz, F

    2001-01-01

    Gastrectomy, alcoholism and malignant tumour are three predisponing risk factors for the development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We described the clinical case of a patient with history of alcoholism that developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome 30 years after undergoing gastrectomy. This patient had, in the last year, a diagnostic for prostatic adenocarcinoma and changes in dietary habits. We presented the clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. As well as some aspects in the treatment and prognosis.

  19. Development of the jet Feature EXtractor (jFEX) for the ATLAS Level 1 calorimeter trigger upgrade at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00547698; The ATLAS collaboration; Brogna, Andrea Salvatore; Buescher, Volker; Degele, Reinhold; Herr, Holger; Kahra, Christian; Rave, Stefan; Rocco, Elena; Schaefer, Uli; Vieira De Souza, Julio; Tapprogge, Stefan; Bauss, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the enhanced luminosity delivered by the Large Hadron Collider from 2021 onwards, the ATLAS experiment has planned several upgrades. The first level trigger based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit fine-granularity readout using a new system of Feature EXtractors (FEXs, FPGA-based trigger boards), each optimized to trigger on different physics objects. This contribution is focused on the jet FEX. The main challenges of such a board are the input bandwidth of up to 3.1 Tbps, dense routing of high-speed signals and power consumption. The design, PCB simulations and results of integrated tests of a prototype are shown in this document.

  20. Conjunction of factors triggering waves of seasonal influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Ishanu; Kiciman, Emre; Elliott, Joshua W; Shaman, Jeffrey L

    2018-01-01

    Using several longitudinal datasets describing putative factors affecting influenza incidence and clinical data on the disease and health status of over 150 million human subjects observed over a decade, we investigated the source and the mechanistic triggers of influenza epidemics. We conclude that the initiation of a pan-continental influenza wave emerges from the simultaneous realization of a complex set of conditions. The strongest predictor groups are as follows, ranked by importance: (1) the host population’s socio- and ethno-demographic properties; (2) weather variables pertaining to specific humidity, temperature, and solar radiation; (3) the virus’ antigenic drift over time; (4) the host population’€™s land-based travel habits, and; (5) recent spatio-temporal dynamics, as reflected in the influenza wave auto-correlation. The models we infer are demonstrably predictive (area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve 80%) when tested with out-of-sample data, opening the door to the potential formulation of new population-level intervention and mitigation policies. PMID:29485041

  1. Some Factors Trigger Increasing Foodborne Diseases Cases of Livestock Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Kusumaningsih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Food is an essential need for various human body activities. Consequently, food must be guaranteed to be free from biological, chemical, and physical contaminants and other hazardous substances that can obstruct health. The presence of various hazardous contaminants in food may result in the appearance of foodborne diseases, i.e. human diseases spread through contaminated food and drinks. Biological contaminants in food can be bacteria, viruses, parasites, moulds, or fungi. The most dangerous biological contaminants that may cause an epidemic disease in human are pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter spp., Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter sakazakii, Shigella, etc. Researchers believe that there are several factors that can be the trigger that increase of foodborne diseases cases such as community demography by increasing the individual groups that are more susceptible to pathogenic foodborne infections, human behaviour related to the changes in the community life style and consumption, the advances in industrial and technological sectors through the increase of large scale food industries concentrated in one location, the global trade or travel, and increasing bacterial resistances against antimicrobials as the result of the increasing the uses of antimicrobials for disease prevention and cure in animals and humans.

  2. Gastric surgery and restraint from food as triggering factors of eating disorders in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, Juan A; Vaz, Francisco J; López-Ibor, Juan J; López-Ibor, M Inés; del Río, Julia; Rubio, Miguel A

    2002-01-01

    Obese patients may share some clinical features with anorexia nervosa patients because they risk developing an eating disorder when they diet. Methods and Results Some common etiological, psychological, and social factors have been proposed for both disorders. We present two cases of patients suffering from morbid obesity who, after weight loss, presented an intense fear of regaining weight and developed anorexic-like symptoms. In the first case, the symptoms appeared after gastric reduction surgery. In the second case, a strict diet was the triggering factor. This paper stresses the need for psychiatric evaluation of all patients with morbid obesity who seek treatment in clinical settings, in order to identify the factors that may lead to psychiatric complications. Copyright 2002 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy.

  4. Hypoxia triggers high-altitude headache with migraine features: A prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broessner, Gregor; Rohregger, Johanna; Wille, Maria; Lackner, Peter; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Given the high prevalence and clinical impact of high-altitude headache (HAH), a better understanding of risk factors and headache characteristics may give new insights into the understanding of hypoxia being a trigger for HAH or even migraine attacks. In this prospective trial, we simulated high altitude (4500 m) by controlled normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) to investigate acute mountain sickness (AMS) and headache characteristics. Clinical symptoms of AMS according to the Lake Louise Scoring system (LLS) were recorded before and after six and 12 hours in hypoxia. O2 saturation was measured using pulse oximetry at the respective time points. History of primary headache, especially episodic or chronic migraine, was a strict exclusion criterion. In total 77 volunteers (43 (55.8%) males, 34 (44.2%) females) were enrolled in this study. Sixty-three (81.18%) and 40 (71.4%) participants developed headache at six or 12 hours, respectively, with height and SpO2 being significantly different between headache groups at six hours (p headache development (p headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) in n = 5 (8%) or n = 6 (15%), at six and 12 hours, respectively. Normobaric hypoxia is a trigger for HAH and migraine-like headache attacks even in healthy volunteers without any history of migraine. Our study confirms the pivotal role of hypoxia in the development of AMS and beyond that suggests hypoxia may be involved in migraine pathophysiology. © International Headache Society 2015.

  5. Provocation of migraine with aura using natural trigger factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal; Hauge, Anne Werner

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that migraine attacks can be precipitated by various stimuli. More than 50% of patients with migraine with aura (MA) know of at least one stimulus that always or often triggers their MA attacks. The objective of this study was to expose patients with MA to their self-reported tri......It is well-known that migraine attacks can be precipitated by various stimuli. More than 50% of patients with migraine with aura (MA) know of at least one stimulus that always or often triggers their MA attacks. The objective of this study was to expose patients with MA to their self...

  6. Trigger factors mainly from the environmental type are reported by adolescents with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Dalla Bernardina Fraga

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Migraine can be triggered by many factors such as stress, sleep, fasting and environmental causes. There are few studies that evaluated migraine trigger factors in the adolescent population. Methods: A total of 100 participants from 10 to 19 years were subjected to a detailed headache questionnaire, with demographic and clinical data, and a headache diary including trigger factors during a two-month period was asked. Results: Fifty of the participants exhibited chronic migraine and the other 50 participants demonstrated episodic migraine. The most common group of trigger factors reported was the environmental one, mainly sun/clarity, followed by hot weather and the smell of perfume. Conclusions: Ninety-one percent of children and adolescents with migraine reported a trigger factor precipitating the migraine attack.

  7. Rainstorms as a landslide-triggering factor in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Komac

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall plays an important role in the landslide triggering processes. Analyses of landslide occurrence in the area of Slovenia have shown that areas where intensive rainstorms occure (maximal daily rainfall for the 100 years period, and where the geologicalsettings are favourable, abundance of landslide can be expected. This clearly indicates the spatial and temporal dependence of landslide occurrence upon the intensive rainfall. Regarding the landslide occurrence, the intensity of maximal daily and average annual rainfall for the the 30 years period were analysed. Results have shown that daily rainfall intensity, which significantly influences the triggering of landslides, ranges from 100 to 150 mm, most probably above 130 mm. Despite the vague influence, if any at all,of the average annual rainfall, the threshold above which significant number of landslides occurs is 1000 mm.

  8. Design and test performance of the ATLAS Feature Extractor trigger boards for the Phase-I Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Weiming; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In Run 3, the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger will be augmented by an Electron Feature Extractor (eFEX), to identify isolated e/g and t particles, and a Jet Feature Extractor (jFEX), to identify energetic jets and calculate various local energy sums. Each module accommodates more than 420 differential signals that can operate at up to 12.8 Gb/s, some routed over 20 cm between FPGAs. Presented here are the module designs, the processes that have been adopted to meet the challenges associated with multi-Gb/s PCB design, and the results of tests that characterise the performance of these modules.

  9. Towards improved migraine management: Determining potential trigger factors in individual patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, Francesc; Donoghue, Stephen; Torres, Ferran; Mian, Alec; Wöber, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Background Certain chronic diseases such as migraine result in episodic, debilitating attacks for which neither cause nor timing is well understood. Historically, possible triggers were identified through analysis of aggregated data from populations of patients. However, triggers common in populations may not be wholly responsible for an individual's attacks. To explore this hypothesis we developed a method to identify individual 'potential trigger' profiles and analysed the degree of inter-individual variation. Methods We applied N = 1 statistical analysis to a 326-migraine-patient database from a study in which patients used paper-based diaries for 90 days to track 33 factors (potential triggers or premonitory symptoms) associated with their migraine attacks. For each patient, univariate associations between factors and migraine events were analysed using Cox proportional hazards models. Results We generated individual factor-attack association profiles for 87% of the patients. The average number of factors associated with attacks was four per patient: Factor profiles were highly individual and were unique in 85% of patients with at least one identified association. Conclusion Accurate identification of individual factor-attack profiles is a prerequisite for testing which are true triggers and for development of trigger avoidance or desensitisation strategies. Our methodology represents a necessary development toward this goal.

  10. Performance of a LVL2 Trigger Feature Extraction Algorithm for the Precision Tracker.

    CERN Document Server

    Baines, J T M; Sivoklokov, S Yu

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm to search for isolated high pT tracks in the ATLAS precision tracker suitable for use in the LVL2 trigger is described. A histogramming method employing a Hough transform is used to select sets of points forming track candidates. For each selected set of points, fits are performed to all combinations of one point per detection plane. The best candidate is chosen on the basis of the fit residuals. The algorithm has been implemented in the t2scFex package of the ATRIG trigger simulation program and also for benchmarking studies in a stand-alone program SCTFEX. Efficiency, fake track rate and timing measurements are presented for a number of algorithm options.

  11. The Lived Experience of Lupus Flares: Features, Triggers, and Management in an Australian Female Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marline L. Squance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals living with lupus commonly experience daily backgrounds of symptoms managed to acceptable tolerance levels to prevent organ damage. Despite management, exacerbation periods (flares still occur. Varied clinical presentations and unpredictable symptom exacerbation patterns provide management and assessment challenges. Patient perceptions of symptoms vary with perceived impact, lifestyles, available support, and self-management capacity. Therefore, to increase our understanding of lupus’ health impacts and management, it was important to explore lupus flare characteristics from the patient viewpoint. Lupus flares in 101 Australian female patients were retrospectively explored with the use of a novel flare definition. Qualitative methods were used to explore patient-perceived flare symptoms, triggers, and management strategies adopted to alleviate symptom exacerbations. A mean of 29.9 flare days, with 6.8 discrete flares, was experienced. The study confirmed that patients perceive stress, infection, and UV light as flare triggers and identified new potential triggers of temperature and weather changes, work, and chemical exposure from home cleaning. The majority of flares were self-managed with patients making considered management choices without medical input. Barriers to seeking medical support included appointment timings and past negative experiences reflecting incongruence between clinician and patient views of symptom impact, assessment, and ultimately flare occurrence.

  12. Clinical relevance of contextual factors as triggers of placebo and nocebo effects in musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossettini, Giacomo; Carlino, Elisa; Testa, Marco

    2018-01-22

    Placebo and nocebo effects are embodied psycho-neurobiological responses capable of modulating pain and producing changes at different neurobiological, body at perceptual and cognitive levels. These modifications are triggered by different contextual factors (CFs) presented in the therapeutic encounter between patient and healthcare providers, such as healing rituals and signs. The CFs directly impact on the quality of the therapeutic outcome: a positive context, that is a context characterized by the presence of positive CFs, can reduce pain by producing placebo effects, while a negative context, characterized by the presence of negative CFs, can aggravate pain by creating nocebo effects. Despite the increasing interest about this topic; the detailed study of CFs as triggers of placebo and nocebo effects is still lacked in the management of musculoskeletal pain.Increasing evidence suggest a relevant role of CFs in musculoskeletal pain management. CFs are a complex sets of internal, external or relational elements encompassing: patient's expectation, history, baseline characteristics; clinician's behavior, belief, verbal suggestions and therapeutic touch; positive therapeutic encounter, patient-centered approach and social learning; overt therapy, posology of intervention, modality of treatment administration; marketing features of treatment and health care setting. Different explanatory models such as classical conditioning and expectancy can explain how CFs trigger placebo and nocebo effects. CFs act through specific neural networks and neurotransmitters that were described as mediators of placebo and nocebo effects.Available findings suggest a relevant clinical role and impact of CFs. They should be integrated in the clinical reasoning to increase the number of treatment solutions, boosts their efficacy and improve the quality of the decision-making. From a clinical perspective, the mindful manipulation of CFs represents a useful opportunity to enrich a well

  13. [Uterine Carcinosarcoma: Clinicopathological Features and Prognostic Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Rita; Ferreira, Joana; Rocha, Mara; Jorge, Ana Francisca; Félix, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Uterine carcinosarcoma is a rare and aggressive biphasic malignancy and is currently included in the high risk endometrial carcinoma group. The aims of this study were to determine the clinicopathological profile, treatment, recurrence/progression patterns, survival and prognostic factors. Retrospective study of 42 patients, surgically staged and followed-up at a cancer centre, between 2005 and 2013. Clinical data was retrieved from records and pathological characteristics were reviewed for this study. Median age was 72 years (61 - 78) and the majority presented comorbid diseases. Stage distribution as follows: 13 (31.0%) stage I; eight (19.0%) stage II; nine (21.4%) stage III; and 12 (28.6%) stage IV. Chemotherapy was instituted in 12 patients and 21 received radiotherapy. Disease progressed in 16 patients and recurred in nine after a short interval. Median overall survival was 18 months (6.8 - 40) and median disease-free survival was 6 months (0 - 22.8). The only independent prognostic factor related with poor survival was serosal invasion (p = 0.02; HR adjusted 4.22; IC 95% 1.29 - 13.79). In accordance to other studies, diagnosis of uterine carcinosarcoma is frequently done with advanced disease and presents a high rate of progression/recurrence. The variable which has been consistently identified as main prognostic factor is stage, but in this study the only independent factor was serosal invasion. The present study represents the larger series of uterine carcinosarcoma studied in Portugal and reflects the clinical presentation, histopathological characteristics and stage at diagnosis and confirms the aggressiveness of this rare tumor.

  14. Structure discrimination for the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yong; Bhabha, Gira; Kroon, Gerard; Landes, Mindy; Dyson, H. Jane

    2008-01-01

    NMR measurements can give important information on solution structure, without the necessity for a full-scale solution structure determination. The C-terminal protein binding domain of the ribosome-associated chaperone protein trigger factor is composed of non-contiguous parts of the polypeptide chain, with an interpolated prolyl isomerase domain. A construct of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli trigger factor containing residues 113-149 and 247-432, joined by a Gly-Ser-Gly-Ser linker, is well folded and gives excellent NMR spectra in solution. We have used NMR measurements on this construct, and on a longer construct that includes the prolyl isomerase domain, to distinguish between two possible structures for the C-terminal domain of trigger factor, and to assess the behavior of the trigger factor C-terminal domain in solution. Two X-ray crystal structures, of intact trigger factor from E. coli (Ferbitz et al., Nature 431:590-596, 2004), and of a truncated trigger factor from Vibrio cholerae (Ludlam et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:13436-13441, 2004) showed significant differences in the structure of the C-terminal domain, such that the two structures could not be superimposed. We show using NMR chemical shifts and long range nuclear Overhauser effects that the secondary and tertiary structure of the E. coli C-terminal domain in solution is consistent with the crystal structure of the E. coli trigger factor and not with the V. cholerae protein. Given the similarity of the amino acid sequences of the E. coli and V. cholerae proteins, it appears likely that the structure of the V. cholerae protein has been distorted as a result of truncation of a 44-amino acid segment at the C-terminus. Analysis of residual dipolar coupling measurements shows that the overall topology of the solution structure is completely inconsistent with both structures. Dynamics analysis of the C-terminal domain using T 1 , T 2 and heteronuclear NOE parameters show that the protein is

  15. Features of the triggering mehanism for single event burnout of power MOSFES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohl, J.H.; Johnson, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The feedback mechanism leading to second breakdown and burnout in a power MOSFET is reviewed briefly, and critical device design parameters are identified and chosen with regard to electrical specifications. Based on typical parameters, the avalanching conditions in the space charge region of the collector junction are investigated over a wide range of collector current densities. It is shown that the space charge associated with the collector current density modifies the electric field profile such that, with increasing collector current, the avalanche multiplication factor rises to a peak, then declines to a valley, and eventually rises monotonically. This behavior can be explained in simple terms. It may lead to a stable avalanching condition with a current density too low to damage the structure. This condition can be initiated by heavy ions with energies below a certain threshold. Ion energies beyond the threshold drive the avalanching process into the region of monotonic increase of the avalanche multiplication factor and lead to run-away and burnout. The threshold for runaway varies widely with changing configurations of the p + -plug and of the p-body region and promises configurations that are immune to burnout. Assessments of threshold currents in a typical hex cell are given

  16. Factors associated with and prevalence of depressive features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associated factors for depression. Results: The overall prevalence of depressive features in the surveyed population was 47.4% (45.9% in men and 48.5% in women). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the significant variables of depressive features ...

  17. Autophagic or necrotic cell death triggered by distinct motifs of the differentiation factor DIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, M F; Kubohara, Y; Kikuchi, H; Oshima, Y; Golstein, P

    2009-04-01

    Autophagic or necrotic cell death (ACD and NCD, respectively), studied in the model organism Dictyostelium which offers unique advantages, require triggering by the same differentiation-inducing factor DIF-1. To initiate these two types of cell death, does DIF-1 act through only one or through two distinct recognition structures? Such distinct structures may recognize distinct motifs of DIF-1. To test this albeit indirectly, DIF-1 was modified at one or two of several positions, and the corresponding derivatives were tested for their abilities to induce ACD or NCD. The results strongly indicated that distinct biochemical motifs of DIF-1 were required to trigger ACD or NCD, and that these motifs were separately recognized at the onset of ACD or NCD. In addition, both ACD and NCD were induced more efficiently by DIF-1 than by either its precursors or its immediate catabolite. These results showed an unexpected relation between a differentiation factor, the cellular structures that recognize it, the cell death types it can trigger and the metabolic state of the cell. The latter seems to guide the choice of the signaling pathway to cell death, which in turn imposes the cell death type and the recognition pattern of the differentiation factor.

  18. Asthma in Children: Risk Factors, Clinical Features and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Balci

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. It is known that asthma prevalence has increased significantly especially in children in last 20 years. To stop this increase in asthma, causes and prevention measures should be known better. For the management of the illness, control of environmental and trigger factors causing asthma attack are extremely important. Asthmatic children and family should be informed by health staff about changes in their life and measures to prevent the attacks. Through this information asthmatic children and their families can be supported for a better quality of life. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 79-86

  19. The development of the Global Feature Extractor for the LHC Run-3 upgrade of L1 Calorimeter trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00065614; The ATLAS collaboration; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Lanni, Francesco; Takai, Helio; Tang, Shaochun; Wu, Weihao; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) is one of several modules in LHC Run-3 upgrade of Level 1 Calorimeter (L1Calo) trigger system in ATLAS experiment. It is a single Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) module for large-area jet identifying with three Xilinx Virtex UltraScale FPGAs for data processing and a system-on-chip (SoC) FPGA for control and monitoring. A pre-prototype board has been designed to verify all functionalities, which includes one Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA, one Zynq FPGA, several MiniPODs, MicroPODs, DDR3 SDRAM and other components. The performance of pre-prototype has been tested and evaluated. As a major challenge, the high-speed links in FPGAs are stable at 12.8 Gb/s with Bit Error Ratio (BER) < 10-15 (no error detected). The low-latency parallel GPIO (General Purpose I/O) buses for communication between FPGAs are stable at 960 Mb/s. The peripheral components of Zynq FPGA like DDRs, UART, SPI flashes, Ethernet and so on, have also been verified. The test results of pre-...

  20. Platelet- and erythrocyte-derived microparticles trigger thrombin generation via factor XIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Meijden, P E J; Van Schilfgaarde, M; Van Oerle, R; Renné, T; ten Cate, H; Spronk, H M H

    2012-07-01

    The procoagulant properties of microparticles (MPs) are due to the of the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and tissue factor (TF) on their surface. The latter has been demonstrated especially on MPs derived from monocytes. To investigate the relative contribution of TF and factor (F)XII in initiating coagulation on MPs derived from monocytes, platelets and erythrocytes. Microparticles were isolated from calcium ionophore-stimulated platelets, erythrocytes and monocytic THP-1 cells. MPs were quantified, characterized for cell-specific antigens and analyzed for TF, PS exposure and their thrombin-generating potential. The MP number was not proportional to PS exposure and the majority of the MPs exposed PS. TF activity was undetectable on platelet- and erythrocyte-derived MPs (monocyte-derived MPs exposed TF (32 fM nM(-1) PS). Platelet-, erythrocyte- and monocyte-derived MPs, but not purified phospholipids, initiated thrombin generation in normal plasma in the absence of an external trigger (lag time derived MPs, but interfered with monocyte MP-triggered coagulation. Platelet- and erythrocyte-derived MPs completely failed to induce thrombin generation in FXII-deficient plasma. In contrast, monocyte-derived MPs induced similar thrombin generation in normal vs. FXII-deficient plasma. MPs from platelets and erythrocytes not only propagate coagulation by exposing PS but also initiate thrombin generation independently of TF in a FXII-dependent manner. In contrast, monocyte-derived MPs trigger coagulation predominantly via TF. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Clinical Features and the Factors Associated with Poor Outcome of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical Features and the Factors Associated with Poor Outcome of. Measles Patients at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital. Robin L Broadhead. Paul Courtright. Lincy Misoya. Affiliation: 1. Department of Paediatrics College of. Medicine University of Malawi. 2. International Eye FoundatiQn. 3. Department of Paediatrics ...

  2. Gangrenous stomatitis (cancrum oris): clinical features, etiologic factors, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L; Guthua, S W; Kimaro, S S; Moshy, J

    1997-04-01

    Gangrenous stomatitis (cancrum oris) is a lesion involving the orofacial structures that is primarily seen in areas where the socioeconomic standards are low and there is poor hygiene. The general clinical features, associated etiologic factors, and ensuing complications in eight consecutive cases diagnosed between 1991 and 1995 are presented and discussed.

  3. Risk and trigger factors for the development of eating disorders in female elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgot-Borgen, J

    1994-04-01

    This study examined risk factors and triggers for eating disorders in female athletes. Subjects included were all of the elite female athletes in Norway (N = 603), ages 12-35 yr, representing six groups of sports: technical, endurance, aesthetic, weight dependent, ball games, and power sports. The Eating Disorder Inventory was used to classify individuals at risk for eating disorders. Of the 117 athletes defined at risk, 103 were administered a structured clinical interview for eating disorders. A comparison group was also interviewed, consisting of 30 athletes chosen at random from a pool not at risk and matched to the at-risk subjects on age, community of residence, and sport. Ninety-two of the at-risk athletes met criteria for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia athletica. The prevalence of eating disorders was higher in sports emphasizing leanness or a specific weight than in sports where these are less important. Compared with controls, eating disordered athletes began both sports-specific training and dieting earlier, and felt that puberty occurred too early for optimal performance. Trigger factors associated with the onset of eating disorders were prolonged periods of dieting, frequent weight fluctuations, a sudden increase in training volume, and traumatic events such as injury or loss of a coach.

  4. Factors Associated with the Efficacy of Trigger Point Injection in Advanced Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Kanbara, Kenji; Abe, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Hiroko; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have reported the efficacy of trigger point injection (TPI) to myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in advanced cancer patients. Factors that are associated with TPI efficacy have not yet been elucidated. The study was aimed at evaluating factors that are associated with TPI efficacy to MTrPs in advanced cancer patients. Factors that are associated with TPI efficacy were retrospectively identified based on a comparison between clinically relevant responders and nonresponders by using multivariate regression analysis. One hundred five advanced cancer patients who visited the Palliative Care Department with a chief complaint of pain and who received TPI treatment to the MTrP at the pain site. The TPI efficacy rate on the day after TPI treatment was 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.68). Significant factors associated with TPI efficacy were coexistence of cancer pain with MTrP at the pain site (odds ratio [OR]: 3.87, 95% CI: 1.21-12.4), MTrP at areas other than lower back or hip (OR: 6.45, 95% CI: 1.98-21.0), and fewer MTrPs (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.42-0.99). Coexistence of cancer pain at the pain site of the chief complaint was observed in 64% of study subjects (95% CI: 0.55-0.73). The TPI efficacy is likely high when advanced cancer patients have fewer MTrPs together with cancer pain at areas other than the lower back or hip. MTrPs in advanced cancer patients are more commonly observed together with cancer pain rather than independently. Healthcare providers should recognize the relationship between MTrP and cancer pain and proactively perform physical examinations to detect MTrPs for potential TPI.

  5. Pilonidal sinus disease - Etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazim Duman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available and lsquo;Pilonidal sinus' disease, which is most commonly seen in reproductive populations, such as young adults - mostly in males who are in their twenties - is actually a controversial disease in that there is no consensus on its many facets. It is sometimes seen as an infected abscess draining from an opening or a lesion extending to the perineum. It may also present as a draining fistula opening to skin. In terms of etiological factors, various theories (main theories being congenital and acquired have been established since it was first described, no universal understanding achieved. A long and significant post-operative care period with different lengths of recovery depending on the type of operation are quite prevalent with regards to recurrence and complication status. In order to prevent recurrence and improve the quality of life, etiological and predisposing factors as well as clinical features of sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease should be well known, a detailed differential diagnosis should be made, and a suitable and timely intervention should be performed. It was aimed here to explain the etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical features of the disease that may present with various clinical symptoms. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(4.000: 228-232

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor and children featuring nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ko-Hsin; Lee, Fei-Peng; Cheng, Ya-Jian; Huang, Hung-Meng

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor within nasal polyps, and the implication of such expression as regards the development of nasal polyps amongst children. Sixty children suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis were enrolled in this study. Amongst them, 30 patients featured rhinosinusitis with associated nasal polyps. A biopsy specimen was taken from the stalk or the base of the nasal polyp for nasal-polyp sufferers, and the ethmoid sinus for study participants who featured no nasal polyps. The primary lesions biopsied were immunohistochemically stained with a specific endothelial-cell marker and also stained for the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor. The specific level of vascular endothelial growth factor and the mean number of blood vessels present in a visual microscopic (biopsied-specimen) field were calculated under light microscopy (x400). The number of vascular endothelial growth factor-expressing cells for the nasal-polyp group and for the sinusitis group was, respectively, 20.8+/-4.0 and 11.5+/-3.4 per visual field. Correspondingly, the mean intra-polyp blood-vessel density for the nasal-polyp group and that for the control group was, respectively, 10.5+/-2.6 and 5.0+/-1.9 per visual field. The mean intra-polyp blood-vessel density and the number of vascular endothelial growth factor-expressing cells proved to be significantly greater amongst individuals from the nasal-polyp group than was the case for their analogs from the sinusitis group (Ppolyp tissue. In addition, the level of vascular endothelial growth-factor expression and the mean blood-vessel count per field correlated significantly for nasal-polyp tissue (Ppolyps correlated significantly with the number of (intra-polyp) vascular endothelial-cell growth factor-expressing cells and the mean blood-vessel density (Ppolyps than within corresponding sinusitis mucosa. Clinically, the expression of both of these parameters correlated well

  7. Classifying transcription factor targets and discovering relevant biological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLisi Charles

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal in post-genomic research is discovering the network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs and the genes they regulate. We have previously reported the development of a supervised-learning approach to TF target identification, and used it to predict targets of 104 transcription factors in yeast. We now include a new sequence conservation measure, expand our predictions to include 59 new TFs, introduce a web-server, and implement an improved ranking method to reveal the biological features contributing to regulation. The classifiers combine 8 genomic datasets covering a broad range of measurements including sequence conservation, sequence overrepresentation, gene expression, and DNA structural properties. Principal Findings (1 Application of the method yields an amplification of information about yeast regulators. The ratio of total targets to previously known targets is greater than 2 for 11 TFs, with several having larger gains: Ash1(4, Ino2(2.6, Yaf1(2.4, and Yap6(2.4. (2 Many predicted targets for TFs match well with the known biology of their regulators. As a case study we discuss the regulator Swi6, presenting evidence that it may be important in the DNA damage response, and that the previously uncharacterized gene YMR279C plays a role in DNA damage response and perhaps in cell-cycle progression. (3 A procedure based on recursive-feature-elimination is able to uncover from the large initial data sets those features that best distinguish targets for any TF, providing clues relevant to its biology. An analysis of Swi6 suggests a possible role in lipid metabolism, and more specifically in metabolism of ceramide, a bioactive lipid currently being investigated for anti-cancer properties. (4 An analysis of global network properties highlights the transcriptional network hubs; the factors which control the most genes and the genes which are bound by the largest set of regulators. Cell-cycle and

  8. Inference of neuronal functional circuitry with spike-triggered non-negative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian K; Schreyer, Helene M; Onken, Arno; Rozenblit, Fernando; Khani, Mohammad H; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhyasankar; Panzeri, Stefano; Gollisch, Tim

    2017-07-26

    Neurons in sensory systems often pool inputs over arrays of presynaptic cells, giving rise to functional subunits inside a neuron's receptive field. The organization of these subunits provides a signature of the neuron's presynaptic functional connectivity and determines how the neuron integrates sensory stimuli. Here we introduce the method of spike-triggered non-negative matrix factorization for detecting the layout of subunits within a neuron's receptive field. The method only requires the neuron's spiking responses under finely structured sensory stimulation and is therefore applicable to large populations of simultaneously recorded neurons. Applied to recordings from ganglion cells in the salamander retina, the method retrieves the receptive fields of presynaptic bipolar cells, as verified by simultaneous bipolar and ganglion cell recordings. The identified subunit layouts allow improved predictions of ganglion cell responses to natural stimuli and reveal shared bipolar cell input into distinct types of ganglion cells.How a neuron integrates sensory information requires knowledge about its functional presynaptic connections. Here the authors report a new method using non-negative matrix factorization to identify the layout of presynaptic bipolar cell inputs onto retinal ganglion cells and predict their responses to natural stimuli.

  9. Molecular mechanism and structure of Trigger Factor bound to the translating ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Frieder; Boehringer, Daniel; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Preissler, Steffen; Hoffmann, Anja; Maier, Timm; Rutkowska, Anna; Lozza, Jasmin; Ban, Nenad; Bukau, Bernd; Deuerling, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Ribosome-associated chaperone Trigger Factor (TF) initiates folding of newly synthesized proteins in bacteria. Here, we pinpoint by site-specific crosslinking the sequence of molecular interactions of Escherichia coli TF and nascent chains during translation. Furthermore, we provide the first full-length structure of TF associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes by using cryo-electron microscopy. In its active state, TF arches over the ribosomal exit tunnel accepting nascent chains in a protective void. The growing nascent chain initially follows a predefined path through the entire interior of TF in an unfolded conformation, and even after folding into a domain it remains accommodated inside the protective cavity of ribosome-bound TF. The adaptability to accept nascent chains of different length and folding states may explain how TF is able to assist co-translational folding of all kinds of nascent polypeptides during ongoing synthesis. Moreover, we suggest a model of how TF's chaperoning function can be coordinated with the co-translational processing and membrane targeting of nascent polypeptides by other ribosome-associated factors. PMID:18497744

  10. Homelessness among problem drug users: prevalence, risk factors and trigger events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Peter A; Neale, Joanne; Robertson, Michele

    2006-07-01

    The present paper uses data from a prospective cohort study of 877 problem drug users entering treatment in Scotland to extend knowledge of homelessness and drug misuse in three important respects: First, the prevalence of homelessness among problem drug users is investigated; secondly, key risk factors for homelessness among problem drug users are identified; and thirdly, trigger events associated with movements into or out of homelessness by problem drug users over time are explored. Data were collected during two waves of interviewing which were conducted 8 months apart. Thirty-six per cent of problem drug users entering treatment were homeless at either or both interviews, a prevalence rate that is at least seven times greater than among the general population. Whilst many of the risk factors found to be associated with homelessness are common to homeless people in general, at least one homelessness risk factor - recent drug injection [OR = 1.40; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.96]- is clearly specific to those who take drugs. Movements into homelessness among problem drug users were associated with recently losing residency of children (OR = 2.28; 95% CI = 1.27-4.08), other recent family problems (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.21-2.94) and worsening general health (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.15-4.09). Movements out of homelessness were associated with not having recent family problems (OR = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.24-0.79). The findings provide empirical support for the good practice guidelines now being published by various UK Government departments, but also suggest that the relatives of problem drug users should be offered increased assistance to help them deal with the many stresses that having a drug-dependent family member can bring.

  11. Perinatal stroke in Saudi children: clinical features and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and presentations of perinatal stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the risk factors. Patients with perinatal stroke were identified from within a cohort of 104 Saudi children who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Neuroimaging for suspected cases of stroke consisted of cranial CT, MRI, or both. During the study period, 23 (22%) of 104 children (aged one months to 12 years) were diagnosed to have had perinatal stroke. The male: female ratio was 1.6:1. Ten (67%) of the 15 children who had unilateral ischemic involvement had their lesion in the left hemisphere. The presentation of the ischemic result was within 24-72 hours of life in 13 (57%) patients, and in 6 children (26%), motor impairment was recognized at or after the age of 4 months. Nine children (39%) had seizures at presentation. Pregnancy, labor, and delivery risk factors were ascertained in 18 (78%) cases. The most common of these included emergency cesarean section in 5 cases, and instrumental delivery in other 5. Screening for prothrombotic risk factors detected abnormalities in 6 (26%) patients on at least one test carried out between 2 months and 9 years of age. Four children (17%) had low protein C, which was associated low protein S and raised anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) in one patient, and low antithrombin III in another. Low proteins S was detected in a 42-month-old boy. The abnormality in the sixth child was confined to raised ACA. The present study highlights the non-specific features by which stroke presents during the neonatal period. The data are in keeping with the potential role for inherited and acquired thrombophilia as being the underlying cause. However, the high prevalence of

  12. Global Analysis of the Impact of Deleting Trigger Factor on the Transcriptome Profile of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chuanpeng

    2017-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a key component of prokaryotic chaperone network, which is involved various basic cellular processes such as nascent peptide folding, protein trafficking, ribosome assembly. To better understanding the physiological roles of TF, global transcriptome profiles of a variety of TF deletion mutant strains of Escherichia coli were determined. We found that deletion of the tig gene, encoding TF, led to a dramatic alteration of transcriptome profile, not only affecting the gene expression of members of the chaperone network, but also changing the levels of quite a few RNAs related to metabolism and other cellular processes. Further studies showed that this alteration was only partially recovered by knockin of TF domain-deletion mutants into the endogenous tig locus, indicating that structural integrity is crucial for the biological function of TF. Finally, by combining the transcriptome and phenotype results, a physiological mechanism underlying the impact of TF deletion on the transcriptome profile was proposed. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 141-153, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. News on Climate change, air pollution and allergic trigger factors of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, M; Cecchi, L; Annesi-Maesano, I; D'Amato, G

    2018-01-17

    The rising frequency of obstructive respiratory diseases,in particular allergic asthma, observed over the last years, can be partially explained by changes occurring in the environment, with increasing presence in atmosphere of chemical (particulate matter and gaseous components such as nitrogen dioxide and ozone) and biologic (aeroallergens) trigger factors. Aeroallergens are able to stimulate, in allergic subjects, the airways' sensitization, inducing symptoms of bronchial asthma. Over the last 50 years, global earth's temperature has markedly risen likely because of growing emission of anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations. Major changes involving the atmosphere and the climate, including global warming induced by human activity, have a major impact on the biosphere and human environment. Urbanization and high levels of vehicle emissions induce symptoms of bronchial obstruction (in particular bronchial asthma) prevalently in people living in urban areas compared with those who live in rural areas. Measures of mitigation need to be applied for reducing future impacts of climate change and global warming on our planet, but until global emissions continue to rise, adaptation to the impacts of future climate variability are required.

  14. Typhoid fever as a triggering factor in acute and intractable bronchial asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko E; Datau, E A

    2013-10-01

    Typhoid fever is an enteric infection caused by Salmonella typhi. In Indonesia, typhoid fever is endemic with high incidence of the disease. In daily practice we frequently have patients with bronchial asthma, and it is becoming worse when these patients get typhoid fever. After oral ingestion, Salmonella typhi invades the the intestine mucosa after conducted by microbial binding to epithelial cells, destroying the microfold cells (M cell) then passed through the lamina propria and detected by dendritic cells (DC) which express a variety of pathogen recognition receptors on the surfaces, including Toll-Like Receptor (TLR). expressed on macrophages and on intestinal epithelial cells inducing degradation of IB, and translocation of NF-B (Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta). This process initiates the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression profile adhesion molecules, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other proteins that induce and perpetuate the inflammation in host cells then will induce acute ant intractable attack of bronchial asthma. The role of typhoid fever in bronchial asthma, especially in persons with acute attack of bronchial asthma, is not well understood. In this article, we will discuss the role of typhoid fever in the bronchial asthma patients which may cause bronchial asthma significantly become more severe even triggering the acute and intractable attack of bronchial asthma. This fact makes an important point, to treat completely the typhoid fever in patients with bronchial asthma.

  15. Analysis of clinical features and risk factors for infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Zhao Liangping; Xu Weiting; Chen Jianchang; Tong Guangming; Hong Xiaosu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features of infective endocarditis (IE) and explore the risk factors for it's prognosis. Methods: Clinical data of 65 patients with IE were acquired retrospectively, and its causes, clinical characteristics, pathogenic microorganism, clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results: The major occurring heart diseases for IE in all patients were rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease, and there was no any previously known heart disease. The major clinical manifestations included fever and anemia. The major pathogenic bacteria is streptococcus, but percentage of other bacteria increased gradually. Thirteen patients were refractory, in hospital. Haematoglobin and seralbumin were significantly lower, and leucocyte, hsCRP, erythrocyte sedimentation were significantly higher in refractory group. Anaemia, lower seralbumin, higher hsCRP were independent predictors for bad prognosis. Conclusion: The proportion of rheumatic heart disease is decreasing as one of the risk factors for IE in recent years. Streptococcus is major pathogen of IE, and the mortality of IE is still very high. Anaemia, lower seralbumin, higher hsCRP are independent predictors for bad prognosis. (authors)

  16. [Risk factors and clinical features of ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Padilla, Beatriz; Perez-López, Carlos A; Martínez-Puon, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is the most frequent cause of maternal death in the first trimester of pregnancy. The objective was to establish the clinical features and risk factors associated with EP. Observational, retrospective, transversal and analytic case-control study. Two groups were included: the cases group (28 patients) and the control group (56 postpartum patients). Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistical analysis were carried out using the Pearson chi-square test, p pregnancy 82.1% (23), unruptured EP 60.7% (17), hemoperitoneum 60.7% (17). Gestational age for EP was of 4-8 weeks (75%) and surgical treatment 96.4%. The frequency of EP found in our population was 1 in every 122 live births. Risk factors associated with ectopic pregnancy with statistically higher values were: smoking, being multigravid, having a clinical record of EP, IUD use before conception, abdominal surgery. The more frequent clinical characteristics were pelvic pain, right EP, tubal pregnancy, EP with no ruptures, hemoperitoneum < 750 ml, a gestational age between four and eight weeks.

  17. May headache triggered by odors be regarded as a differentiating factor between migraine and other primary headaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Néto, Raimundo Pereira; Rodrigues, Ânderson Batista; Cavalcante, Dandara Coelho; Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Piauilino Benvindo; Nasi, Ema Pereira; Sousa, Kamila Maria de Holanda; Peres, Mário Fernando Pietro; Valença, Marcelo Moraes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to characterize olfactory stimulation as a trigger of headaches attacks and differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches. Participants and methods The study was prospective and experimental, with comparison of groups. A total of 158 volunteers (73 men and 85 women) were diagnosed with primary headaches, according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3β). The study was conducted by two examiners; one of them was assigned to diagnose the presence and type of primary headache, while the other was responsible for exposing the volunteers to odor and recording the effects of this exposure. Results Of the 158 volunteers with headache, there were 72 (45.6%) cases of migraine and 86 (54.4%) with other primary headaches. In both groups, there were differences in headache characteristics (χ 2  = 4.132; p = 0.046). Headache attacks (25/72; 34.7%) and nausea (5/72; 6.9%) were triggered by odor only in patients with migraine, corresponding to 19.0% (30/158) of the sample, but in none with other primary headaches (χ 2  = 43.78; p Headache occurred more often associated with nausea ( p = 0.146) and bilateral location ( p = 0.002) in migraineurs who had headache triggered by odor. Headache was triggered after 118 ± 24.6 min and nausea after 72.8 ± 84.7 min of exposure to odor. Conclusions The odor triggered headache attacks or nausea only in migraineurs. Therefore, headache triggered by odors may be considered a factor of differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches and this trigger seems very specific of migraine.

  18. Factors Associated with Clinical and Topographical Features of Laryngeal Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gustavo Corrêa Reis

    Full Text Available Laryngeal tuberculosis (LTB is the most frequent granulomatous disease of the larynx and represents less than 2% of extrapulmonary TB cases. There are no pathognomonic clinical and endoscopic features of this disease and studies on LTB that can assist in its diagnostic characterization are lacking.To identify factors associated with clinical and topographical features of LTB.a retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical records of 36 patients with confirmed LTB diagnosis.Dysphonia and cough were the main symptoms presented by patients and the true vocal folds the most frequently affected site. The average of the duration of the disease evolution was significantly higher in patients with dysphonia than in patients without this symptom. We observed association between dysphonia and true vocal fold lesions and between odynophagia and lesions in the epiglottis, arytenoids and aryepiglottic folds. Odynophagia was more frequent in individuals with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites. Weight loss equal or above 10% of the body weight was more frequent in patients with odynophagia as first symptom and in patients with ulcerated lesion. Dyspnea on exertion was more frequent in individuals with more extensive laryngeal lesions. The percentage of smokers with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites was greater than that found in non-smokers. Laryngeal tissue fragment bacilloscopy and culture examinations were less positive than sputum ones.Smoking appears to be associated with the development of more extensive LTB lesions, and LTB with dyspnea on exertion and odynophagia with consequent impairment of nutritional status. We emphasize the need for histopathologic confirmation, once positive sputum bacteriological examinations seem not to necessarily reflect laryngeal involvement.

  19. Factors Associated with Clinical and Topographical Features of Laryngeal Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, João Gustavo Corrêa; Reis, Clarissa Souza Mota; da Costa, Daniel César Silva; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Rolla, Valéria Cavalcanti; Conceição-Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal tuberculosis (LTB) is the most frequent granulomatous disease of the larynx and represents less than 2% of extrapulmonary TB cases. There are no pathognomonic clinical and endoscopic features of this disease and studies on LTB that can assist in its diagnostic characterization are lacking. To identify factors associated with clinical and topographical features of LTB. a retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical records of 36 patients with confirmed LTB diagnosis. Dysphonia and cough were the main symptoms presented by patients and the true vocal folds the most frequently affected site. The average of the duration of the disease evolution was significantly higher in patients with dysphonia than in patients without this symptom. We observed association between dysphonia and true vocal fold lesions and between odynophagia and lesions in the epiglottis, arytenoids and aryepiglottic folds. Odynophagia was more frequent in individuals with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites. Weight loss equal or above 10% of the body weight was more frequent in patients with odynophagia as first symptom and in patients with ulcerated lesion. Dyspnea on exertion was more frequent in individuals with more extensive laryngeal lesions. The percentage of smokers with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites was greater than that found in non-smokers. Laryngeal tissue fragment bacilloscopy and culture examinations were less positive than sputum ones. Smoking appears to be associated with the development of more extensive LTB lesions, and LTB with dyspnea on exertion and odynophagia with consequent impairment of nutritional status. We emphasize the need for histopathologic confirmation, once positive sputum bacteriological examinations seem not to necessarily reflect laryngeal involvement.

  20. Baculovirus DNA Replication-Specific Expression Factors Trigger Apoptosis and Shutoff of Host Protein Synthesis during Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Friesen, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense. To define the poorly understood pathways by which invertebrates respond to viruses by inducing apoptosis, we have identified replication events that trigger apoptosis in baculovirus-infected cells. We used RNA silencing to ablate factors required for multiplication of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Transfection with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) complementary to the AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) that are des...

  1. Baculovirus DNA Replication-Specific Expression Factors Trigger Apoptosis and Shutoff of Host Protein Synthesis during Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Friesen, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense. To define the poorly understood pathways by which invertebrates respond to viruses by inducing apoptosis, we have identified replication events that trigger apoptosis in baculovirus-infected cells. We used RNA silencing to ablate factors required for multiplication of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Transfection with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) complementary to the AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) that are designated as replicative lefs (lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, lef-11, p143, dnapol, and ie-1/ie-0) blocked virus DNA synthesis and late gene expression in permissive Spodoptera frugiperda cells. dsRNAs specific to designated nonreplicative lefs (lef-8, lef-9, p47, and pp31) blocked late gene expression without affecting virus DNA replication. Thus, both classes of lefs functioned during infection as defined. Silencing the replicative lefs prevented AcMNPV-induced apoptosis of Spodoptera cells, whereas silencing the nonreplicative lefs did not. Thus, the activity of replicative lefs or virus DNA replication is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. Confirming this conclusion, AcMNPV-induced apoptosis was suppressed by silencing the replicative lefs in cells from a divergent species, Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing replicative but not nonreplicative lefs also abrogated AcMNPV-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis, suggesting that virus DNA replication triggers inhibition of host biosynthetic processes and that apoptosis and translational arrest are linked. Our findings suggest that baculovirus DNA replication triggers a host cell response similar to the DNA damage response in vertebrates, which causes translational arrest and apoptosis. Pathways for detecting virus invasion and triggering apoptosis may therefore be conserved between insects and mammals. PMID:19706708

  2. Baculovirus DNA replication-specific expression factors trigger apoptosis and shutoff of host protein synthesis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kimberly L W; Friesen, Paul D

    2009-11-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense. To define the poorly understood pathways by which invertebrates respond to viruses by inducing apoptosis, we have identified replication events that trigger apoptosis in baculovirus-infected cells. We used RNA silencing to ablate factors required for multiplication of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Transfection with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) complementary to the AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) that are designated as replicative lefs (lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, lef-11, p143, dnapol, and ie-1/ie-0) blocked virus DNA synthesis and late gene expression in permissive Spodoptera frugiperda cells. dsRNAs specific to designated nonreplicative lefs (lef-8, lef-9, p47, and pp31) blocked late gene expression without affecting virus DNA replication. Thus, both classes of lefs functioned during infection as defined. Silencing the replicative lefs prevented AcMNPV-induced apoptosis of Spodoptera cells, whereas silencing the nonreplicative lefs did not. Thus, the activity of replicative lefs or virus DNA replication is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. Confirming this conclusion, AcMNPV-induced apoptosis was suppressed by silencing the replicative lefs in cells from a divergent species, Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing replicative but not nonreplicative lefs also abrogated AcMNPV-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis, suggesting that virus DNA replication triggers inhibition of host biosynthetic processes and that apoptosis and translational arrest are linked. Our findings suggest that baculovirus DNA replication triggers a host cell response similar to the DNA damage response in vertebrates, which causes translational arrest and apoptosis. Pathways for detecting virus invasion and triggering apoptosis may therefore be conserved between insects and mammals.

  3. The structure, logic of operation and distinctive features of the system of triggers and counting signals formation for gamma-telescope GAMMA-400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Kheymits, M. D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Yurkin, Y. T.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific project GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) relates to the new generation of space observatories intended to perform an indirect search for signatures of dark matter in the cosmic-ray fluxes, measurements of characteristics of diffuse gamma-ray emission and gamma-rays from the Sun during periods of solar activity, gamma-ray bursts, extended and point gamma-ray sources, electron/positron and cosmic-ray nuclei fluxes up to TeV energy region by means of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope represents the core of the scientific complex. The system of triggers and counting signals formation of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope constitutes the pipelined processor structure which collects data from the gamma-ray telescope subsystems and produces summary information used in forming the trigger decision for each event. The system design is based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices and fast data links. The basic structure, logic of operation and distinctive features of the system are presented.

  4. The Level-1 Calorimeter Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) Boosted Object Trigger for the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00235957; The ATLAS collaboration; Stark, Giordon; Miller, David

    2016-01-01

    The Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) module is a planned component of the Level 1 online trigger system for the ATLAS experiment planned for installation during the Phase I upgrade in 2018. This unique single electronics board with multiple high speed processors will receive coarse-granularity information from all the ATLAS calorimeters enabling the identification in real time of large-radius jets for capturing Lorentz-boosted objects such as top quarks, Higgs, $Z$ and $W$ bosons. The gFEX architecture also facilitates the calculation of global event variables such as missing transverse energy, centrality for heavy ion collisions, and event-by-event pile-up energy density. Details of the electronics architecture that provides these capabilities are presented, along with results of tests of the prototype systems now available. The status of the firmware algorithm design and implementation as well as monitoring capabilities are also presented.

  5. Non-negative matrix factorization in texture feature for classification of dementia with MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwinda, D.; Bustamam, A.; Ardaneswari, G.

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates applications of non-negative matrix factorization as feature selection method to select the features from gray level co-occurrence matrix. The proposed approach is used to classify dementia using MRI data. In this study, texture analysis using gray level co-occurrence matrix is done to feature extraction. In the feature extraction process of MRI data, we found seven features from gray level co-occurrence matrix. Non-negative matrix factorization selected three features that influence of all features produced by feature extractions. A Naïve Bayes classifier is adapted to classify dementia, i.e. Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and normal control. The experimental results show that non-negative factorization as feature selection method able to achieve an accuracy of 96.4% for classification of Alzheimer's and normal control. The proposed method also compared with other features selection methods i.e. Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

  6. Induced Genome-Wide Binding of Three Arabidopsis WRKY Transcription Factors during Early MAMP-Triggered Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Kracher, Barbara; Somssich, Imre E

    2017-01-01

    During microbial-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (MTI), molecules derived from microbes are perceived by cell surface receptors and upon signaling to the nucleus initiate a massive transcriptional reprogramming critical to mount an appropriate host defense response. WRKY transcription factors play an important role in regulating these transcriptional processes. Here, we determined on a genome-wide scale the flg22-induced in vivo DNA binding dynamics of three of the most prominent WRKY factors, WRKY18, WRKY40, and WRKY33. The three WRKY factors each bound to more than 1000 gene loci predominantly at W-box elements, the known WRKY binding motif. Binding occurred mainly in the 500-bp promoter regions of these genes. Many of the targeted genes are involved in signal perception and transduction not only during MTI but also upon damage-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity, providing a mechanistic link between these functionally interconnected basal defense pathways. Among the additional targets were genes involved in the production of indolic secondary metabolites and in modulating distinct plant hormone pathways. Importantly, among the targeted genes were numerous transcription factors, encoding predominantly ethylene response factors, active during early MTI, and WRKY factors, supporting the previously hypothesized existence of a WRKY subregulatory network. Transcriptional analysis revealed that WRKY18 and WRKY40 function redundantly as negative regulators of flg22-induced genes often to prevent exaggerated defense responses. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. SOME ASPECTS OF THE AGGRESSIVE ACTS, COMMITTED BY SCHIZOPHRENIC PATIENTS, TRIGGERED BY SOME PSYCHO-TRAUMATIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Todorov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The achievements of the contemporary psychopharmacology enable the out-patient treatment of schizophrenic patients, thus let them living in their usual social environment- family, relatives, neighbors, friends.In this connection, the real conditions of patients’ micro-social environment play an important role- either stimulating their compensatory mechanisms, or exercising negative impact on their adaptation and behavior.We examined 30 schizophrenic patients (22 males, 8 females, who have committed aggressive acts, triggered by psycho-traumatic situations with different sensible content, originating from their micro-social environment.Dominant were family conflicts, followed by conflicts with the neighbors. The aggressive acts were directed to concrete persons, from the close neighborhood, involved into the psycho-traumatic situations.Studying and evaluation of the aggressive acts, triggered by psycho-traumatic factors play an important role for their prevention.

  8. Fasting during Ramadan: a religious factor as a possible trigger or exacerbator for eating disorders in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Kanbur, Nuray Ö

    2014-12-01

    Culture-based contributors play a role in eating disorders (EDs). Here, we present one such factor that may play a role in triggering ED's in adolescents: Fasting during the holy period of Ramadan. Ramadan is the Islamic month of fasting, in which participating Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, and smoking, which starts from dawn lasting until sunset. For the past 2 years, we have noticed an increase in patients with disordered eating patterns that have applied to Hacettepe University, Division of Adolescent Medicine during or shortly after Ramadan. We document six of these patients, three of which were diagnosed with an ED and three that did not meet full criteria. We argue that the possible effects of a drastic change in ones diet such as that which occurs during Ramadan, play an important role in triggering ED's in adolescents with a predisposition or may exacerbate an eating pathology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Slow features nonnegative matrix factorization for temporal data decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafeiriou, Lazaros; Nikitidis, Symeon; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the principles of temporal slowness and nonnegative parts-based learning into a single framework that aims to learn slow varying parts-based representations of time varying sequences. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm arises naturally by embedding the Slow Features

  10. Factor best of ALWR features into operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes how many features of advanced light-water reactor designs are applicable to existing plants. While no new plants are being ordered, some advanced features have found their way into existing units and have been incorporated into the design of plants being built overseas. Ironically, two of the advanced light-water reactor (ALWR) plant designs--the ABWR and the System 80+--were finally approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the end of last year. Yet US utilities are probably further away from ordering a new nuclear unit than they ever have been. But that doesn't make the program irrelevant. Design advances from this program can affect the economics of nuclear power at a time when owner/operators are striving to compete in a less restrictive market for generation. Advances that can be considered by operating plants emanate from two major programs: (1) the standard plant designs which began in the late 1970s and (2) the ALWR program which sought--successfully, although it took a decade--to precertify designs and lessen the licensing burden on those contemplating a new unit. By using proven technology to simplify plants with higher design margins and enhanced safety features, the ALWR program's goal was to make new plants less expensive, safer, and easier to operate and maintain than their predecessors

  11. Measuring nuclear modification factors at high-$p_{T}$ using jet triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Krajczar, Krisztian

    2008-01-01

    The suppression of hadron production at high transverse momenta is one of the most important observables to study medium induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. In Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC, the transverse momentum reach of this measurement can be extended to about $300$ GeV/{\\it c}, due to the large hard scattering cross sections at the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5500$ GeV collision energy, the high luminosity and the large acceptance of the CMS tracking system ($\\vert \\eta \\vert <2.5$). To reach this high transverse momentum range a trigger is neccessary to enhance particle yields at high $p_{T}$. In this proceedings, the benefits of a calorimeter based high jet trigger are studied with a simulation including parton energy loss and parametrized responses for the calorimeters and the resulting statistical reach of charged particle $p_{T}$ spectra for the expected nominal $0.5$ nb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity is estimated.

  12. The prevalence, clinical features, risk factors and outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %), neck stiffness 76 (69%) and weight loss 53 (48%). Factors independently associated with CM were male sex, headache, blurred vision and previous antifungal drug use. Night sweats and current use of anti-retroviral therapy were ...

  13. Coagulopathy triggered autoimmunity: experimental antiphospholipid syndrome in factor V Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated interactions between genetically and autoimmune-mediated coagulopathies by inducing experimental antiphospholipid syndrome (eAPS) in mice carrying the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Methods eAPS was induced in heterozygous and homozygous FVL transgenic mice (C57BL/6 background) by immunization with β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI). Autoantibody levels were measured at 1 and 5 months post-immunization. Mice were tested at 4 months post-immunization for behavior and cognitive function in the staircase, elevated plus-maze, and swim T-maze tests. Brains were removed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for inflammatory markers and neurodegenerative processes. Results A single immunization with β2-GPI induced significantly higher and longer-lasting immune responses, and this was dependent on the number of FVL alleles. At 1 and 5 months post-immunization, levels of antibodies rose from 1.17 ± 0.07 to 1.62 ± 0.17 (optical density units; ODU) in homozygous FVL mice, compared with stable levels of 0.59 ± 0.17 and 0.48 ± 0.16 ODU in heterozygous FVL mice and a drop from 1.62 ± 0.21 to 0.61 ± 0.13 ODU in wild-type mice. Behavioral and cognitive clinical features of eAPS were also correlated with FVL allele load, as assessed by the elevated plus-maze (altered anxiety), staircase (hyperactivity and higher exploration), and swim T-maze (impaired learning) tests. Histological studies identified significant neurodegenerative changes in both grey and white matter in the eAPS-FVL brains. In spite of the potential interaction of two prothrombotic disease states, there were no ischemic lesions seen in this group. Conclusions The results indicate that genetically mediated coagulopathies increase the risk of developing coagulation-targeted autoimmune responses, and suggest the importance of antibody-mediated neurodegenerative processes in the brain in APS. PMID:23566870

  14. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS) and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1), 74.4% were less...

  15. Eating disorders in men: current features and childhood factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangweth-Matzek, B; Rupp, C I; Hausmann, A; Gusmerotti, S; Kemmler, G; Biebl, W

    2010-01-01

    Disturbed interactions with one's body and with other persons are two major features in eating disorders. This study was designed to assess current and childhood characteristics of eating-disordered men. The authors interviewed 32 men with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa: N=9, bulimia nervosa: N=15, eating disorders not otherwise specified: N=8) and 43 control participants with no such history similar in age and educational status. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used to assess Axis I disorders and a self-designed interview to assess actual social and sexual characteristics and childhood body-focused and social behaviors including sexual and physical abuse. The two groups differed significantly with regard to clinical, sexual and social features, with a three times higher rate of psychiatric disorders, fewer sexual and social relationships in the index group than in the controls. Eating-disordered men differed significantly from controls on most measures of body-focused and social behaviors, displaying higher rates of thumb sucking, nail biting, auto-aggressive behavior, and nudity as a familial taboo during childhood, as well as less parental bodily caressing than did controls. The index group reported significantly poorer relationships to their parents, fewer friends and persons of trust, and more often had adjustment problems at school than did their counterparts. Our data show that disturbed interactions with one's body and with other persons in eating-disordered men are associated with a body-denying and distant family climate and an auto-aggressive, anxious and inhibited social behavior during childhood.

  16. Clinicopathological Features and Prognostic Factors of Colorectal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjie Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Limited research is available regarding colorectal NENs and the prognostic factors remain controversial. Materials and Methods. A total of 68 patients with colorectal NENs were studied retrospectively. Clinical characteristics and prognosis between colonic and rectal NENs were compared. The Cox regression models were used to evaluate the predictive capacity. Results. Of the 68 colorectal NENs patients, 43 (63.2% had rectal NENs, and 25 (36.8% had colonic NENs. Compared with rectal NENs, colonic NENs more frequently exhibited larger tumor size (P<0.0001 and distant metastasis (P<0.0001. Colonic NENs had a worse prognosis (P=0.027, with 5-year overall survival rates of 66.7% versus 88.1%. NET, NEC, and MANEC were noted in 61.8%, 23.5%, and 14.7% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that tumor location was not an independent prognostic factor (P=0.081, but tumor size (P=0.037 and pathological classification (P=0.012 were independent prognostic factors. Conclusion. Significant differences exist between colonic and rectal NENs. Multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size and pathological classification were associated with prognosis. Tumor location was not an independent factor. The worse outcome of colonic NENs observed in clinical practice might be due not only to the biological differences, but also to larger tumor size in colonic NENs caused by the delayed diagnosis.

  17. Risk Factors, Clinical Features and Management Of Children With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the diarrhoeal disease control Programme of WHO and campaign efforts of the Nigerian government in the prevention and management ofdiarrhoea, the disease still remains a major causes of death among children under 5 years in Nigerian. Hence this study was aimed at assessing the risk factors, clinical ...

  18. The development of the Global Feature Extractor for the LHC Run-3 upgrade of the ATLAS L1 Calorimeter trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Weihao; The ATLAS collaboration; Chen, Hucheng; Lanni, Francesco; Takai, Helio; Tang, Shaochun; ATLAS TDAQ Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) is one of several modules in LHC Run-3 upgrade of Level 1 Calorimeter (L1Calo) trigger system in the ATLAS experiment. It is a single Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) module for large-area jet identification with three Xilinx UltraScale FPGAs for data processing and a system-on-chip (SoC) FPGA for control and monitoring. A pre-prototype board has been designed to verify all functionalities. The performance of this pre-prototype has been tested and evaluated. As a major achievement, the high-speed links in FPGAs are stable at 12.8 Gb/s with Bit Error Ratio (BER) < 10-15 (no error detected). The low-latency parallel GPIO (General Purpose I/O) buses for communication between FPGAs are stable at 960 Mb/s. Besides that, the peripheral components of Soc FPGA have also been verified. After laboratory tests, the link speed test with LAr (Liquid Argon Calorimeter) Digital Processing Blade (LDPB) AMC card has been carried out at CERN for determination of t...

  19. Triggering Risk Factors of the Burnout Syndrome in Ob/Gyn Physicians from a Reference Public University of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Bortoletti, Fátima; Teresa Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria; Vasconcellos, Esdras Guerreiro; Siqueira, José Oliveira; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Sebastiani, Ricardo Werner; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To identify the risk factors to the development of Burnout Syndrome in Ob/Gyn Brazilian physicians in four dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), professional repression (PR), dehumanization (De), and emotional distancing (EmD). Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study was realized with 48 Ob/Gyn physicians (12 lecturers, 12 attending physicians, 12 medical residents, and 12 graduate students) from Department of Obstetrics, São Paulo Federal University (UNIFESP). We used a sociodemographic questionnaire focusing on the activities (administrative, educational, healthcare, and research). We applied a Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI) composed of two parts: triggering factors (ISB1) and the Burnout Syndrome (ISB2). The ISB1 is composed of two scales: positive organizational conditions (POC) and negative organizational conditions (NOC). The ISB2 is composed of four scales: EE, PR, De, and EmD. Results. We observed a rate below and above average to POC and NOC, respectively. The dimensions recorded a level above average to EE, an index at the upper limit of the average to De, a median index to EmD, and a median index to PR. Conclusions. The Ob/Gyn physicians are in an area of vulnerability for the development of Burnout Syndrome due to the high level of EE and De, associated with a median index of PR. The high rate of NOC contributes to the triggering of this scenery. PMID:23304541

  20. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1, 74.4% were less there 24 months of age (Mean age 18.4 mo. 77% of patients had onset of BHS within 12 months of age. Family history of BHS in first degree relatives were found in 51% of patients. Parent consanguinity were found in 30% of cases. The commonest type of BHS were cyanotic (79.1%. Pallid (11.6% and mixed (9.3% were other types. Pain and anger were the commonest triggering factors. 78% of cases were iron deficient and 53% of cases had iron deficiency anemia.

  1. Aesthetic Experience as an Essential Factor to Trigger Positive Environmental Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ching Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current environmental attitude models are primarily composed of environmental knowledge, value, and intention. However, environmental aestheticians have maintained that aesthetic experience triggered by nature is the cornerstone of promoting environmental ethics. To verify this belief, this study proposes a new framework, which integrates the rational and emotional approaches, to describe the environmental attitudes of the public. Questionnaires are used to collect data from college students in Taiwan, and a total of 275 valid responses are received. The collected data are analyzed using structural equation modeling. The results support the proposed hypotheses. In addition to reconfirming the importance of environmental knowledge in the traditional models, this study confirms that aesthetic experience is also a determining dimension. The findings show that rational cognition and aesthetic perception complement and interact with each other and can strengthen environmental ethics, thereby enhancing the intention of pro-environmental behavior. The results of this study can serve as a reference for environmental protection or environmental education practice.

  2. Neuroblastoma: morphological pattern, molecular genetic features, and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Stroganova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial tumor of childhood, arises from the developing neurons of the sympathetic nervous system (neural cress stem cells and has various biological and clinical characteristics. The mean age at disease onset is 18 months. Neuroblastoma has a number of unique characteristics: a capacity for spontaneous regression in babies younger than 12 months even in the presence of distant metastases, for differentiation (maturation into ganglioneuroma in infants after the first year of life, and for swift aggressive development and rapid metastasis. There are 2 clinical classifications of neuroblastoma: the International neuroblastoma staging system that is based on surgical results and the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group Staging System. One of the fundamentally important problems for the clinical picture of neuroblastoma is difficulties making its prognosis. Along with clinical parameters (a patient’s age, tumor extent and site, some histological, molecular biochemical (ploidy and genetic (chromosomal aberrations, MYCN gene status, deletion of the locus 1p36 and 11q, the longer arm of chromosome 17, etc. characteristics of tumor cells are of considerable promise. MYCN gene amplification is observed in 20–30 % of primary neuroblastomas and it is one of the major indicators of disease aggressiveness, early chemotherapy resistance, and a poor prognosis. There are 2 types of MYCN gene amplification: extrachromosomal (double acentric chromosomes and intrachromosomal (homogenically painted regions. Examination of double acentric chromosomes revealed an interesting fact that it may be eliminated (removed from the nucleus through the formation of micronuclei. MYCN oncogene amplification is accompanied frequently by 1p36 locus deletion and longer 17q arm and less frequently by 11q23 deletion; these are poor prognostic factors for the disease. The paper considers in detail the specific, unique characteristics of the

  3. Women's Views and Experiences of the Triggers for Onset of Bacterial Vaginosis and Exacerbating Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; McNair, Ruth; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection affecting women of childbearing age. While the aetiology and transmissibility of BV remain unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest an association between BV and sexual activity. This study explored women's views and experiences of the triggers for BV onset and factors associated with recurrence. A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past five years took part in semi-structured interviews. The majority of women predominantly reported sexual contact triggered the onset of BV and sexual and non-sexual factors precipitated recurrence. Recurrence was most commonly referred to in terms of a 'flare-up' of symptoms. The majority of women did not think BV was a sexually transmitted infection however many reported being informed this by their clinician. Single women who attributed BV onset to sex with casual partners were most likely to display self-blame tendencies and to consider changing their future sexual behaviour. Women who have sex with women (WSW) were more inclined to believe their partner was responsible for the transmission of or reinfection with BV and seek partner treatment or change their sexual practices. Findings from this study strongly suggest women believe that BV onset is associated with sexual activity, concurring with epidemiological data which increasingly suggest BV may be sexually transmitted. Exacerbating factors associated with recurrence were largely heterogeneous and may reflect the fact it is difficult to determine whether recurrence is due to persistent BV or a new infection in women. There was however evidence to suggest possible transmission and reinfection among WSW, reinforcing the need for new approaches to treatment and management strategies including male and female partner treatment trials.

  4. Myocardial ischemia during everyday life in patients with arterial hypertension: prevalence, risk factors, triggering mechanism and circadian variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uen, Sakir; Un, Ismail; Fimmers, Rolf; Vetter, Hans; Mengden, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence, the risk factors, the hemodynamic triggering mechanisms, the circadian variability of ST segment depression (ST depression) and the effect of day and night fall in blood pressure on the prevalence of ST depression in hypertensive patients. In a multicentric study in Germany, 1,244 CardioTens registrations (combined 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement/electrocardiography with ST segment triggering; Meditech, Budapest, Hungary) from patients with arterial hypertension were consecutively monitored and evaluated centrally at the University of Bonn. Inclusion criterion was treated or untreated arterial hypertension. The ST segment was measured in accordance with the "1 : 1 : 1 rule" (horizontal or descending ST depression by 1 mm, 1 min duration, 1 min interval from the previous episode). ST segment depression was observed in 250 (20.1%) patients; 90.3% of the transient ST-segment depression was silent (without angina pectoris). Ambulatory 24-h blood pressure measurement, but not office-based blood pressure measurement, was predictive for the occurrence of ST-segment depression. Risk factors for ST-segment depression were the Sokolow index > or =3.5 mV, smoking status, severity of coronary heart disease, use of diuretics, reduced left ventricular function, pulse pressure > or =60 mmHg and increase of double product (1,000 mmHg/min). A significant rise of the systolic/diastolic blood pressure (+8+ or -18/+7+ or -10 mmHg), of the heart rate (+12+ or -13/min) and of the double product (+2,471+ or -2,517 mmHg/min) was found during the transient ST depression as compared with the corresponding 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement mean values (Pextreme dippers than in dippers (18.2%), risers (21.8%) and non-dippers (19.6%). ST depressions have a high prevalence of 20.1% in hypertensive patients. Clinical predictors for the occurrence of ST-segment depression were classical risk factors and

  5. Trigger finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  6. The Exploration of Factors Triggering Foreign Language Anxiety: Learners’ Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardi Marwan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the findings of a study looking at the factors which learners believe have contributed to their anxiety in their foreign language learning. A questionnaire with a three-point Likert scale was developed and used as the means for data collection. Descriptive analysis of the data, focusing on mean scores, was carried out using SPSS software. The results indicate that most learners experienced foreign language anxiety in their learning. Factors such as lack of preparation, lack of confidence and fear of failing the class have been the major contributors to learners' fo-reign language anxiety.

  7. Factors that trigger emergency physicians to contact a poison centre: findings from a Swiss study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurter, David; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Jahns, Maximilian; Haberkern, Monika; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Eriksson, Urs; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    Poison centres offer rapid and comprehensive support for emergency physicians managing poisoned patients. This study investigates institutional, case-specific and poisoning-specific factors which influence the decision of emergency physicians to contact a poison centre. Retrospective, consecutive review of all poisoning-related admissions to the emergency departments (EDs) of a primary care hospital and a university hospital-based tertiary referral centre during 2007. Corresponding poison centre consultations were extracted from the poison centre database. Data were matched and analysed by logistic regression and generalised linear mixed models. 545 poisonings were treated in the participating EDs (350 (64.2%) in the tertiary care centre, 195 (35.8%) in the primary care hospital). The poison centre was consulted in 62 (11.4%) cases (38 (61.3%) by the tertiary care centre and 24 (38.7%) by the primary care hospital). Factors significantly associated with poison centre consultation included gender (female vs male) (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.69 to 5.29; p1 vs 1) (OR 2.84; 95% CI 1.65 to 4.9; ppoison centre consultation. Poison centre consultation was significantly higher during the week, and significantly less during night shifts. The poison centre was consulted significantly more when patients were admitted to intensive care units (OR 5.81; 95% CI 3.25 to 10.37; ppoison centre consultation by emergency physicians. It appears that intensive care unit admission and other factors reflecting either complexity or uncertainty of the clinical situation are the strongest predictors for poison centre consultation. Hospital size did not influence referral behaviour.

  8. Light is a key factor in triggering sexual reproduction in the pennate diatom Haslea ostrearia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouget, Jean-Luc; Gastineau, Romain; Davidovich, Olga; Gaudin, Pierre; Davidovich, Nickolai A

    2009-08-01

    Sexual reproduction is an obligatory phase in the life cycle of most diatoms, as cell size decreases with successive vegetative divisions and the maximal cell size is only restored by a specialized cell, the auxospore, which follows zygote formation as a result of sexual reproduction. While in pennate diatoms the induction of sexual reproduction depends primarily on cell-cell interactions, the importance of different external factors for the induction of sexual reproduction is less well known. Here, we investigated the effects of light on sexualization in the marine benthic pennate diatom Haslea ostrearia (Gaillon) R. Simonsen. Compatible clones were crossed and exposed to different combinations of light levels, qualities, and photoperiods. Light was found to be a key factor for sexualization, and to a certain extent, to control auxosporulation in H. ostrearia. The light conditions most favorable for sexual reproduction were low irradiances (<50 micromolphotons m(-2) s(-1)) and short photoperiods (6-10 h), conditions that prevail during winter, and to a lesser extent, the higher irradiances and longer photoperiods that correspond to the spring and fall, when blooms of this organism form in the natural environment. Auxospore formation was very rare in continuous light, and maximum in presence of red radiation, while it was never observed in darkness or in radiation other than red.

  9. Crucial factors and emerging concepts in ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Bart; Dewitte, Heleen; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2012-12-28

    Time and space controlled drug delivery still remains a huge challenge in medicine. A novel approach that could offer a solution is ultrasound guided drug delivery. “Ultrasonic drug delivery” is often based on the use of small gas bubbles (so-called microbubbles) that oscillate and cavitate upon exposure to ultrasound waves. Some microbubbles are FDA approved contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and are nowadays widely investigated as promising drug carriers. Indeed, it has been observed that upon exposure to ultrasound waves, microbubbles may (a) release the encapsulated drugs and (b) simultaneously change the structure of the cell membranes in contact with the microbubbles which may facilitate drug entrance into cells. This review aims to highlight (a) major factors known so far which affect ultrasonic drug delivery (like the structure of the microbubbles, acoustic settings, etc.) and (b) summarizes the recent preclinical progress in this field together with a number of promising new concepts and applications.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection as a triggering factor of attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visy, Beáta; Füst, George; Bygum, Anette

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection is considered among the causative factors of urticaria and angioedema. Having conducted a study on 65 patients, Hungarian authors reported in 2001 that successful eradication of H. pylori is followed by a significant reduction in the number of attacks...... in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). The present study aimed to reinvestigate the relationship between H. pylori infection and the attack rate in the framework of an international collaborative study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within the framework of the PREHAEAT project launched by the European Union......, further 152 patients were studied in seven collaborating centers, and participants of the earlier study were followed up in order to detect any relationship between H. pylori infection and the occurrence of attacks in patients suffered from HAE. RESULTS: The proportion of patients experiencing frequent...

  11. Derangement of a factor upstream of RARalpha triggers the repression of a pleiotropic epigenetic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Corlazzoli

    Full Text Available Chromatin adapts and responds to extrinsic and intrinsic cues. We hypothesize that inheritable aberrant chromatin states in cancer and aging are caused by genetic/environmental factors. In previous studies we demonstrated that either genetic mutations, or loss, of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, can impair the integration of the retinoic acid (RA signal at the chromatin of RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha, and can lead to aberrant repressive chromatin states marked by epigenetic modifications. In this study we tested whether the mere interference with the availability of RA signal at RARalpha, in cells with an otherwise functional RARalpha, can also induce epigenetic repression at RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha.To hamper the availability of RA at RARalpha in untransformed human mammary epithelial cells, we targeted the cellular RA-binding protein 2 (CRABP2, which transports RA from the cytoplasm onto the nuclear RARs. Stable ectopic expression of a CRABP2 mutant unable to enter the nucleus, as well as stable knock down of endogenous CRABP2, led to the coordinated transcriptional repression of a few RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. The chromatin at these genes acquired an exacerbated repressed state, or state "of no return". This aberrant state is unresponsive to RA, and therefore differs from the physiologically repressed, yet "poised" state, which is responsive to RA. Consistent with development of homozygosis for epigenetically repressed loci, a significant proportion of cells with a defective CRABP2-mediated RA transport developed heritable phenotypes indicative of loss of function.Derangement/lack of a critical factor necessary for RARalpha function induces epigenetic repression of a RA-regulated gene network downstream of RARalpha, with major pleiotropic biological outcomes.

  12. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulkin Jay

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior. Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl. Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng or amphetamine (20 μg selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress

  13. RANTES and fibroblast growth factor 2 in jawbone cavitations: triggers for systemic disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lechner J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Johann Lechner,1 Volker von Baehr2 1Clinic for Integrative Dentistry, Munich, Germany; 2Compartment of Immunology and Allergology on Institute for Medical Diagnostics in MVZ GbR, Berlin, Germany Background: Jawbone cavitations (JC are hollow dead spaces in jawbones with dying or dead bone marrow. These areas are defined as fatty degenerative osteonecrosis of the jawbone or neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis and may produce facial pain. These afflictions have been linked to the immune system and chronic illnesses. Surgical debridement of JC is reported to lead to an improvement in immunological complaints, such as rheumatic, allergic, and other inflammatory diseases (ID. Little is known about the underlying cause/effect relationship. Objectives: JC bone samples were analyzed to assess the expression and quantification of immune modulators that can play a role in the pathogenesis of IDs. The study supports a potential mechanism where JC is a mediating link in IDs. Materials and methods: Samples of fatty softened bone taken from JCs were extracted from 31 patients. The specimens were analyzed by bead-based multiplex technology and tested for seven immune messengers. Results: Regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted (RANTES and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 were found at high levels in the JCs tested. Other cytokines could not be detected at excessive levels. Discussion: The study confirms that JC is able to produce inflammatory messengers, primarily RANTES, and, secondarily, FGF-2. Both are implicated in many serious illnesses. The excessive levels of RANTES/FGF-2 in JC patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and breast cancer are compared to levels published in medical journals. Levels detected in JCs are higher than in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis patients and four-fold higher than in breast cancer

  14. Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A induces anoikis by triggering cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Keisuke; Naito, Toshihiko; Iwakiri, Ryota; Haga, Makoto; Miura, Shougo; Saito, Yohei; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Kamiya, Sadahiro; Iyoda, Takuya; Yajima, Hirofumi; Iwashita, Shintaro; Ejiri, Shin-ichiro; Fukai, Fumio

    2012-05-04

    Anoikis, apoptosis because of loss of cell anchorage, is crucial for tissue homeostasis. Fibronectin not only provides a scaffold for cell anchorage but also harbors a cryptic antiadhesive site capable of inducing β1-integrin inactivation. In this study, this cryptic antiadhesive site is implicated in spontaneous induction of anoikis. Nontransformed fibroblasts (NIH3T3) adhering to a fibronectin substratum underwent anoikis during serum starvation culture. This anoikis was caused by proteolytic exposure of the cryptic antiadhesive site in fibronectin by matrix metalloproteinase. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) was identified as a membrane receptor for the exposed antiadhesive site. Serum starvation raised the membrane residence of eEF1A, and siRNA-based disruption of this increase rendered cells anoikis-resistant. By contrast, cells became more susceptible to anoikis in parallel with increased membrane residence of eEF1A by enforced expression. These results demonstrate that eEF1A acts as a membrane receptor for the cryptic antiadhesive site of fibronectin, which contributes to cell regulation, including anoikis, through negative regulation of cell anchorage.

  15. Supervised non-negative tensor factorization for automatic hyperspectral feature extraction and target discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dylan; Bapst, Aleksander; Coon, Joshua; Pung, Aaron; Kudenov, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides a highly discriminative and powerful signature for target detection and discrimination. Recent literature has shown that considering additional target characteristics, such as spatial or temporal profiles, simultaneously with spectral content can greatly increase classifier performance. Considering these additional characteristics in a traditional discriminative algorithm requires a feature extraction step be performed first. An example of such a pipeline is computing a filter bank response to extract spatial features followed by a support vector machine (SVM) to discriminate between targets. This decoupling between feature extraction and target discrimination yields features that are suboptimal for discrimination, reducing performance. This performance reduction is especially pronounced when the number of features or available data is limited. In this paper, we propose the use of Supervised Nonnegative Tensor Factorization (SNTF) to jointly perform feature extraction and target discrimination over hyperspectral data products. SNTF learns a tensor factorization and a classification boundary from labeled training data simultaneously. This ensures that the features learned via tensor factorization are optimal for both summarizing the input data and separating the targets of interest. Practical considerations for applying SNTF to hyperspectral data are presented, and results from this framework are compared to decoupled feature extraction/target discrimination pipelines.

  16. Formal features as a design factor of video segments in interactive video programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Pleunes Willem

    1993-01-01

    Video segments may be characterized by formal design features with respect to factors such as complexity of narration, mutual influence of picture and sound, use of superimposed texts, information load due to technical terms, and animation. The paper suggests ways to operationalize these factors and

  17. Activation of neuronal defense mechanisms in response to pathogenic factors triggering induction of amyloidosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Santockyte, Rasa; Bystryak, Simon; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2014-01-01

    We present a new model for etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) which postulates early involvement of specialized neuroprotective mechanisms in the pathology of AD. These neuroprotective mechanisms work in concert to regulate metabolic homeostasis in healthy neuronal cells, but contribute to the distinctive cytopathic phenotype of neuronal degeneration in AD. According to this model, two molecular/genetic hallmarks of AD, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, are associated with neuronal mechanisms for dissipating thermal energy associated with high levels of protein synthesis in highly temperature-sensitive neuronal cells. Development of effective methods of AD treatment will require a better understanding of how this neuronal defense system is activated in response to cytopathological triggers in sporadic AD. The cause and effect link between synthesis and processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the AD terminal phenotype of neurofibrillary tangles and neuron loss involve the formation of Aβ peptides that accumulate as oligomers, cannot be controlled by neurons, and are toxic to the surrounding neuronal membranes. We analyze experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the correlation between phosphorylation of some transport proteins and increased synthesis of proteins in neurons. We also review the evidence related to the possibility that protein hyperphosphorylation may be a byproduct of energetic imbalances in AD cells associated with high levels of protein synthesis, and that activation of defense systems, through which energy-rich molecules are eliminated from the site of protein synthesis and are sequestered to the peripheral neuronal areas, may bring about some of the distinctive morphological features of AD.

  18. A Computational Study of the Factors Influencing the PVC-Triggering Ability of a Cluster of Early Afterdepolarization-Capable Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimik, Soling; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), which are abnormal impulse propagations in cardiac tissue, can develop because of various reasons including early afterdepolarizations (EADs). We show how a cluster of EAD-generating cells (EAD clump) can lead to PVCs in a model of cardiac tissue, and also investigate the factors that assist such clumps in triggering PVCs. In particular, we study, through computer simulations, the effects of the following factors on the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump: (1) the repolarization reserve (RR) of the EAD cells; (2) the size of the EAD clump; (3) the coupling strength between the EAD cells in the clump; and (4) the presence of fibroblasts in the EAD clump. We find that, although a low value of RR is necessary to generate EADs and hence PVCs, a very low value of RR leads to low-amplitude EAD oscillations that decay with time and do not lead to PVCs. We demonstrate that a certain threshold size of the EAD clump, or a reduction in the coupling strength between the EAD cells, in the clump, is required to trigger PVCs. We illustrate how randomly distributed inexcitable obstacles, which we use to model collagen deposits, affect PVC-triggering by an EAD clump. We show that the gap-junctional coupling of fibroblasts with myocytes can either assist or impede the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump, depending on the resting membrane potential of the fibroblasts and the coupling strength between the myocyte and fibroblasts. We also find that the triggering of PVCs by an EAD clump depends sensitively on factors like the pacing cycle length and the distribution pattern of the fibroblasts. PMID:26675670

  19. Trigger factors mainly from the environmental type are reported by adolescents with migraine Fatores desencadeantes de migrânea relatados por adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Dalla Bernardina Fraga

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Migraine can be triggered by many factors such as stress, sleep, fasting and environmental causes. There are few studies that evaluated migraine trigger factors in the adolescent population. Methods: A total of 100 participants from 10 to 19 years were subjected to a detailed headache questionnaire, with demographic and clinical data, and a headache diary including trigger factors during a two-month period was asked. Results: Fifty of the participants exhibited chronic migraine and the other 50 participants demonstrated episodic migraine. The most common group of trigger factors reported was the environmental one, mainly sun/clarity, followed by hot weather and the smell of perfume. Conclusions: Ninety-one percent of children and adolescents with migraine reported a trigger factor precipitating the migraine attack.Crises de migrânea podem ser desencadeadas por muitos fatores, como estresse, sono, jejum e causas ambientais. Poucos estudos avaliaram os fatores desencadeantes de migrânea em adolescentes. Métodos: Cem pacientes, de 10 a 19 anos, foram submetidos a um questionário detalhado sobre sua cefaleia, com dados demográficos e clínicos e um diário da cefaleia, incluindo perguntas sobre os fatores desencadeantes, por um período de dois meses. Resultados: Cinquenta pacientes apresentavam migrânea episódica e 50, migrânea crônica. O grupo de fatores desencadeantes mais frequentemente relatado foi o ambiental, principalmente sol ou claridade, seguido pelo clima quente e pelo cheiro de perfume. Conclusões: Noventa e um por cento dos adolescentes com migrânea relataram pelo menos um fator desencadeante de crises álgicas.

  20. Visual features for perception, attention, and working memory: Toward a three-factor framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    Visual features are the general building blocks for attention, perception, and working memory. Here, I explore the factors which can quantitatively predict all the differences they make in various paradigms. I tried to combine the strengths of experimental and correlational approaches in a novel way by developing an individual-item differences analysis to extract the factors from 16 stimulus types on the basis of their roles in eight tasks. A large sample size (410) ensured that all eight tasks had a reliability (Cronbach's α) of no less than 0.975, allowing the factors to be precisely determined. Three orthogonal factors were identified which correspond respectively to featural strength (i.e., how close a stimulus is to a basic feature), visual strength (i.e., visual quality of the stimulus), and spatial strength (i.e., how well a stimulus can be represented as a spatial structure). Featural strength helped substantially in all the tasks but moderately less so in perceptual discrimination; visual strength helped substantially in low-level tasks but not in high-level tasks; and spatial strength helped change detection but hindered ensemble matching and visual search. Jointly, these three factors explained 96.4% of all the variances of the eight tasks, making it clear that they account for almost everything about the roles of these 16 stimulus types in these eight tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Specific features of domestic banks activity in the factoring services market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygub Olena V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses specific features of formation and development of the domestic factoring market. In the result of the study the article establishes that development of factoring in Ukraine took place due to active participation of banking institutions in this process and nowadays they are leaders in the domestic factoring services market due to possessing significant competitive advantages if compared with non-banking companies that specialise in factoring. The article detects that nowadays the banks are not only offerers of factoring services and finance factoring operations of other market participants, but also take an active part in establishment of factoring branches and are consumers of factoring services. In order to accelerate development of international factoring in Ukraine, the article offers such forms of state support of banks, which render factoring services to domestic exporters. The article recommends to focus banks’ attention, under modern conditions that are characterised with volatility of financial markets, on factoring servicing of those clients, whom they have long business relations with, without jeopardising themselves through provision of factoring services to a big number of small debtors. The article provides schemes of banks’ co-operation in the sphere of “non-classic” factoring with accredited factoring companies.

  2. Semantic Feature Learning for Heterogeneous Multitask Classification via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fuzhen; Li, Xuebing; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Dapeng; Qiu, Lirong; He, Qing

    2017-08-03

    Multitask learning (MTL) aims to learn multiple related tasks simultaneously instead of separately to improve the generalization performance of each task. Most existing MTL methods assumed that the multiple tasks to be learned have the same feature representation. However, this assumption may not hold for many real-world applications. In this paper, we study the problem of MTL with heterogeneous features for each task. To address this problem, we first construct an integrated graph of a set of bipartite graphs to build a connection among different tasks. We then propose a non-negative matrix factorization-based multitask method (MTNMF) to learn a common semantic feature space underlying different heterogeneous feature spaces of each task. Moreover, an improved version of MTNMF (IMTNMF) is proposed, in which we do not need to construct the correlation matrix between input features and class labels, avoiding the information loss. Finally, based on the common semantic features and original heterogeneous features, we model the heterogenous MTL problem as a multitask multiview learning (MTMVL) problem. In this way, a number of existing MTMVL methods can be applied to solve the problem effectively. Extensive experiments on three real-world problems demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods, and the improved version IMTNMF can gain about 2% average accuracy improvement compared with MTNMF.

  3. Trigger Factor-Induced Nascent Chain Dynamics Changes Suggest Two Different Chaperone-Nascent Chain Interactions during Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubek, Jiří; Chang, Yi-Che; Yang, Sunny Yao-Chen; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2017-06-02

    Protein biogenesis is poorly understood due to the ribosome that perturbs measurement attempted on the ribosome-bound nascent chain (RNC). Investigating nascent chain dynamics may provide invaluable insight into the co-translational processes such as structure formation or interaction with a chaperone [e.g., the bacterial trigger factor (TF)]. In this study, we aim to establish a platform for studying nascent chain dynamics by exploring the local environment near the fluorescent dye on site-specifically labeled RNCs with time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. To prepare a quantitative model of fluorescence depolarization, we utilized intrinsically disordered protein bound to ribosome, which helped us couple the sub-nanosecond depolarization with the motion of the nascent chain backbone. This was consistent with zinc-finger-domain-containing RNCs, where the extent of sub-nanosecond motion decreased upon the addition of zinc when the fluorophore was in close proximity of the domain. After the characterization of disordered nascent chain dynamics, we investigated the synthesis of a model cytosolic protein, Entner-Doudoroff aldolase, labeled at different sites during various stages of translation. Depending on the stage of translation, the addition of the TF to the nascent chain led to two different responses in the nascent chain dynamics serendipitously, suggesting steric hindrance between the nascent chain and the chaperone as a mechanism for TF dissociation from the ribosome during translation. Overall, our study demonstrates the possible use of site-specific labeling and time-resolved anisotropy to gain insight on chaperone binding event at various stages of translation and hints on TF co-translational mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increase of nerve growth factor levels in the human herniated intervertebral disc: can annular rupture trigger discogenic back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakajima, Arata; Ohtori, Seiji; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Fusako; Sonobe, Masato; Terajima, Fumiaki; Saito, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Toyone, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Atsuya; Nakajima, Takayuki; Takazawa, Makoto; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2014-07-28

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has an important role in the generation of discogenic pain. We hypothesized that annular rupture is a trigger for discogenic pain through the action of NGF. In this study, the protein levels of NGF in discs from patients with disc herniation were examined and compared with those from discs of patients with other lumbar degenerative disc diseases. Patients (n = 55) with lumbar degenerative disc disease treated by surgery were included. Nucleus pulposus tissue (or herniated disc tissue) was surgically removed and homogenized; protein levels were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for NGF. Levels of NGF in the discs were compared between 1) patients with herniated discs (herniated group) and those with other lumbar degenerative disc diseases (non-herniated group), and 2) low-grade and high-grade degenerated discs. Patient's symptoms were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI); the influence of NGF levels on pre- and post-operative symptoms was examined. Mean levels of NGF in discs of patients were significantly higher in herniated discs (83.4 pg/mg total protein) than those in non-herniated discs (68.4 pg/mg). This study reports that NGF increased in herniated discs, and may play an important role in the generation of discogenic pain. Analysis of patient symptoms revealed that pre-operative NGF levels were related to post-operative residual lower extremity pain and LBP in motion. The results suggest that NGF in the disc is related to pain generation, however, the impact of NGF on generation of LBP varies in individual patients.

  5. Regulation of Pathogen-Triggered Tryptophan Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana by MYB Transcription Factors and Indole Glucosinolate Conversion Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerigmann, Henning; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Molina, Antonio; Glawischnig, Erich; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Bednarek, Paweł

    2016-05-02

    MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 transcription factors are known as decisive regulators of indolic glucosinolate (IG) biosynthesis with a strong impact on expression of genes encoding CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 enzymes that redundantly convert tryptophan to indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx). This intermediate represents a branching point for IG biosynthesis, and pathways leading to camalexin and indole-carboxylic acids (ICA). Here we investigate how these MYBs affect the pathogen-triggered Trp metabolism. Our experiments indicated that these three MYBs affect not only IG production but also constitutive biosynthesis of other IAOx-derived metabolites. Strikingly, the PENETRATION 2 (PEN2)-dependent IG-metabolism products, which are absent in myb34/51/122 and pen2 mutants, were indispensable for full flg22-mediated induction of other IAOx-derived compounds. However, gene induction and accumulation of ICAs and camalexin upon pathogen infection was not compromised in myb34/51/122 plants, despite strongly reduced IG levels. Hence, in comparison with cyp79B2/B3, which lacks all IAOx-derived metabolites, we found myb34/51/122 an ideal tool to analyze IG contribution to resistance against the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Plectosphaerella cucumerina. The susceptibility of myb34/51/122 was similar to that of pen2, but much lower than susceptibility of cyp79B2/B3, indicating that MYB34/51/122 contribute to resistance toward P. cucumerina exclusively through IG biosynthesis, and that PEN2 is the main leaf myrosinase activating IGs in response to microbial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  7. The Development of the Global Feature eXtractor (gFEX) for ATLAS Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Shaochun; The ATLAS collaboration; Chen, Hucheng

    2018-01-01

    During the ATLAS Phase-I upgrade, the gFEX will be designed to maintain the trigger acceptance against the increasing luminosity for the ATLAS Level-1 calorimeter trigger system. The gFEX is designed to identify patterns of energy associated with the hadronic decays of high momentum Higgs, W, & Z bosons, top quarks, and exotic particles in real time at the LHC crossing rate. The prototype v1 and v2 have been designed and fully tested in 2015 and 2016 respectively. With the lessons learned, a pre-production board with three UltraScale+ FPGAs and one ZYNQ UltraScale+, and 35 MiniPODs are implemented in an ATCA module. This board will receive coarse-granularity (0.2x0.2) information from the entire ATLAS calorimeters on up to 300 optical fibers and each FPGA has 24 links to the L1Topo at the speed up to 12.8 Gb/s.

  8. Factors influencing incidental representation of previously unknown conservation features in marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Tom C L; Grech, Alana M; Pressey, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    Spatially explicit information on species distributions for conservation planning is invariably incomplete; therefore, the use of surrogates is required to represent broad-scale patterns of biodiversity. Despite significant interest in the effectiveness of surrogates for predicting spatial distributions of biodiversity, few researchers have explored questions involving the ability of surrogates to incidentally represent unknown features of conservation interest. We used the Great Barrier Reef marine reserve network to examine factors affecting incidental representation of conservation features that were unknown at the time the reserve network was established. We used spatially explicit information on the distribution of 39 seabed habitats and biological assemblages and the conservation planning software Marxan to examine how incidental representation was affected by the spatial characteristics of the features; the conservation objectives (the minimum proportion of each feature included in no-take areas); the spatial configuration of no-take areas; and the opportunity cost of conservation. Cost was closely and inversely correlated to incidental representation. However, incidental representation was achieved, even in a region with only coarse-scale environmental data, by adopting a precautionary approach that explicitly considered the potential for unknown features. Our results indicate that incidental representation is enhanced by partitioning selection units along biophysical gradients to account for unknown within-feature variability and ensuring that no-take areas are well distributed throughout the region; by setting high conservation objectives that (in this case >33%) maximize the chances of capturing unknown features incidentally; and by carefully considering the designation of cost to planning units when using decision-support tools for reserve design. The lessons learned from incidental representation in the Great Barrier Reef have implications for

  9. Feature selection and multi-kernel learning for adaptive graph regularized nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-20

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a popular part-based representation technique, does not capture the intrinsic local geometric structure of the data space. Graph regularized NMF (GNMF) was recently proposed to avoid this limitation by regularizing NMF with a nearest neighbor graph constructed from the input data set. However, GNMF has two main bottlenecks. First, using the original feature space directly to construct the graph is not necessarily optimal because of the noisy and irrelevant features and nonlinear distributions of data samples. Second, one possible way to handle the nonlinear distribution of data samples is by kernel embedding. However, it is often difficult to choose the most suitable kernel. To solve these bottlenecks, we propose two novel graph-regularized NMF methods, AGNMFFS and AGNMFMK, by introducing feature selection and multiple-kernel learning to the graph regularized NMF, respectively. Instead of using a fixed graph as in GNMF, the two proposed methods learn the nearest neighbor graph that is adaptive to the selected features and learned multiple kernels, respectively. For each method, we propose a unified objective function to conduct feature selection/multi-kernel learning, NMF and adaptive graph regularization simultaneously. We further develop two iterative algorithms to solve the two optimization problems. Experimental results on two challenging pattern classification tasks demonstrate that the proposed methods significantly outperform state-of-the-art data representation methods.

  10. Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, Robert D

    2016-10-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes caused by trigger points (TrPs) in muscle are a common cause of local and generalized pain. Trigger points are hyperirritable zones in contracted bands of muscle, thought to be caused by muscle overload or stress. Stress TrPs have characteristic electromyographic features, and can be visualized with ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography. Trigger point needling or injection can be effective in inactivating TrP, but correcting triggers is also critical. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. [Clinical features of suicide occurring in schizophrenia (I). Risk-factors identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnier, N; Gavaudan, G; Navez, A; Adida, M; Jollant, F; Courtet, P; Lançon, C

    2009-04-01

    Suicide is the leading cause of premature death in schizophrenia. Approximately 10 to 13% of deaths in schizophrenia are explained by suicide, despite widespread availability of generally effective antipsychotic treatments and suicide attempts have been reported among 20 to 50% of patients. This relatively low ratio of attempts/suicide is consistent with greater lethality of means - more violent - and intents - less ambivalence - in this population. Many studies have focused on risk factors and clinical characteristics for completed and/or attempted suicide. Commonly, sociodemographic risk factors for suicide are male sex, younger age and, among women, being unmarried, divorced or widowed. Previous suicidal behaviour is a strong risk factor for suicide and contrary to the common view, schizophrenic patients often communicate their suicidal intents shortly before death. Moreover, family history of suicide is associated with a heightened risk of suicide and is independent of the diagnosis, according to the growing literature that shows that vulnerability to suicidal behaviour is independent of psychiatric diagnosis. Suicide can occur throughout the entire course of schizophrenia. This is particularly true in those high-risk periods: early phase of the disease, active illness phase, period of relapse or during a depressive episode. The role of insight and positive symptoms remains unclear and probably needs further studies. Although not specifically for people with schizophrenia, hopelessness is a major risk factor and tragic loss is often presented as a trigger for suicide. It has been suggested that treatment side-effects, such as akathisia are associated with suicidal behaviour. A better knowledge of risk and protective factors is necessary to prevent suicide and suicidality.

  12. Differential impairment of social cognition factors in bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Allen, Daniel N; Sutton, Griffin P; Vertinski, Mary; Ringdahl, Erik N

    2013-12-01

    While it is well-established that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder exhibit deficits in social cognition, few studies have separately examined bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features. The current study addressed this gap by comparing patients with bipolar disorder with (BD+) and without (BD-) psychotic features, patients with schizophrenia (SZ), and healthy controls (NC) across social cognitive measures. Principal factor analysis on five social cognition tasks extracted a two-factor structure comprised of social/emotional processing and theory of mind. Factor scores were compared among the four groups. Results identified differential patterns of impairment between the BD+ and BD- group on the social/emotional processing factor while all clinical groups performed poorer than controls on the theory of mind factor. This provides evidence that a history of psychosis should be taken into account while evaluating social cognition in patients with bipolar disorder and also raises hypotheses about the relationship between social cognition and psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The development of Global Feature eXtractor (gFEX) - the ATLAS calorimeter Level 1 trigger for ATLAS at High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)759889; The ATLAS collaboration; Begel, Michael; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Lanni, Francesco; Takai, Helio; Wu, Weihao

    2017-01-01

    As part of the ATLAS Phase-I Upgrade, the gFEX is designed to help maintain the ATLAS Level-1 trigger acceptance rate with the increasing LHC luminosity. The gFEX identifies patterns of energy associated with the hadronic decays of high momentum Higgs, W, & Z bosons, top quarks, and exotic particles in real time at the 40MHz LHC bunch crossing rate. The prototype v1 and v2 were designed and fully tested in 2015 and 2016 respectively. A pre-production gFEX board has been manufactured, which is an ATCA module consisting of three UltraScale+ FPGAs and one ZYNQ UltraScale+, and 35 MiniPODs are implemented in an ATCA module. This board receives coarse-granularity (0.2x0.2) information from the entire ATLAS calorimeters on up to 300 optical fibers and 96 links to the L1Topo at the speed up to 12.8 Gb/s.

  14. Sunlight Triggers Cutaneous Lupus through a Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) Dependent Mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T.; Lucas, Julie A.; Rabacal, Whitney A.; Croker, Byron P.; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E. Richard; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2008-01-01

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø) -mediated mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Faslpr strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex-vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intra-dermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible, MRL-Faslpr mice, but not in lupus-resistant, BALB/c mice. Notably, UVB incites an increase in Mø, apoptosis in the skin and CLE in MRL-Faslpr, but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Faslpr mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Mø that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Faslpr, but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, we envision CSF-1 as the “match” and lupus-susceptibility as the “tinder” leading to CLE. PMID:18981160

  15. Dissociations between Featural versus Conjunction-based Texture Processing in Infancy: Analyses of Three Potential Contributing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Evelin; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined three possible explanations for findings that infants detect textural discrepancies based on individual features more readily than on feature conjunctions. Found that none of the proposed factors could explain 5.5-month-olds' superior processing of featural over conjunction-based textural discrepancies. Findings suggest that in infancy,…

  16. Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: risk factors, clinical features and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paño Pardo, José Ramón; Serrano Villar, Sergio; Ramos Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pintado, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) can present as several infectious syndromes, but they primarily present as respiratory, urinary and blood stream infections (primary or catheter-related) that are usually found as nosocomial or healthcare-associated infections. The risk of CPE infection is influenced by individual factors, such as the length of the hospital stay and their exposure to invasive procedures and/or to antimicrobials. Of note, exposure to several antimicrobials, not only carbapenems, has been linked to CPE colonization; the duration of antibiotic exposure is one of the primary drivers of CPE acquisition. Individual risk factors must be considered jointly with the local epidemiology of these microorganisms in healthcare institutions. Overall, these infections have a high associated mortality. Mortality is influenced by host factors (e.g., age, comorbidity and immune deficiency), infection-related variables (e.g., type and severity of the infection) and treatment-related factors such as the delay in the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and the use or monotherapy or combined antimicrobial therapy. Gaining knowledge concerning the epidemiology, clinical features and prognostic features of CPE infection could be useful for improving infection prevention and for the management of patients with infections caused by these microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of risk factors and demographic features of patients with peri partum cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharieff, S.; Khan, Shah-e-Zaman

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and identify the demographic features and risk factors for peri partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Design: A prospective study: The study was conducted at the department of Adult Cardiology, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), Karachi, Pakistan from December 1999 to August 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 35 consecutive patients diagnosed to have peri partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) on echocardiogram were enrolled. Proforma containing demographic characteristics and established risk factors for PPCM was established and filled carefully. The data gathered was analyzed statistically. Results: The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 30.8-6.74 years. Urdu speaking (Mohajir) population was found to be more affected ethnic group (42.9%) Majority of the patients was from lower socio-economic group with poor nutritional status (77%) and multiparous (77.14%). 25.7% had past history of PPCM and 71.4% presented during postpartum period. Mortality at six months was 22.8% while 42.9% had persistent disease and only 34.3% recovered completely. Conclusion: Advanced age, lower economic group with poor nutritional status, multi parity and past history of peri partum cardiomyopathy were identified as risk factors for the development of PPCM, especially among Mohajir population. There was no statistically significant difference between the clinical features and outcome of patients presented first time or with recurrent PPCM. We identified advanced age (>30 years), high LVEDD, and low ejection fraction (EF) at initial presentation as poor prognostic factors. (author)

  18. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  19. Electroencephalographic features of convulsive epilepsy in Africa: A multicentre study of prevalence, pattern and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Symon M; White, Steven; Chengo, Eddie; Wagner, Ryan G; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Masanja, Honorati; Ngugi, Anthony K; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G; Newton, Charles R

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence and pattern of electroencephalographic (EEG) features of epilepsy and the associated factors in Africans with active convulsive epilepsy (ACE). We characterized electroencephalographic features and determined associated factors in a sample of people with ACE in five African sites. Mixed-effects modified Poisson regression model was used to determine factors associated with abnormal EEGs. Recordings were performed on 1426 people of whom 751 (53%) had abnormal EEGs, being an adjusted prevalence of 2.7 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.5-2.9) per 1000. 52% of the abnormal EEG had focal features (75% with temporal lobe involvement). The frequency and pattern of changes differed with site. Abnormal EEGs were associated with adverse perinatal events (risk ratio (RR)=1.19 (95% CI, 1.07-1.33)), cognitive impairments (RR=1.50 (95% CI, 1.30-1.73)), use of anti-epileptic drugs (RR=1.25 (95% CI, 1.05-1.49)), focal seizures (RR=1.09 (95% CI, 1.00-1.19)) and seizure frequency (RR=1.18 (95% CI, 1.10-1.26) for daily seizures; RR=1.22 (95% CI, 1.10-1.35) for weekly seizures and RR=1.15 (95% CI, 1.03-1.28) for monthly seizures)). EEG abnormalities are common in Africans with epilepsy and are associated with preventable risk factors. EEG is helpful in identifying focal epilepsy in Africa, where timing of focal aetiologies is problematic and there is a lack of neuroimaging services. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelet-derived microparticles trigger THP-1 monocytic cell aggregation and release of pro-coagulant tissue factor-expressing microparticles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chang, Hui-Wen; Hsiao, Shun-Hung; Chou, Ming-Li; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Microparticles (MPs) released by blood or endothelial cells are present in plasma for transfusion. They originate from the collected donor blood or are triggered by the variable steps taking place during collection and production/storage processes of blood components. While MPs may contribute to hemostasis, their presence in transfused plasma may lead to uncontrolled thrombin generation when transfused to susceptible cancer or hypercoagulable patients. Understanding the biochemical and cellular triggers of MP-mediated thrombogenesis is therefore crucial. We isolated platelet MPs (PMPs) present in platelet concentrate supernatant plasma (N-PMPs) or prepared by activation of isolated platelets using 0.1 IU/mL thrombin (T-PMPs). N-PMPs and T-PMPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering and counted by tunable resistive pulse sensing to determine population size and number. T-MPMs, but not N-PMPs, induced immediate, long-lasting, strong aggregation of THP-1 monocytic cells in vitro. In addition, co-cultures of THP-1 cells with both N-PMPs and T-PMPs triggered the generation of pro-coagulant tissue factor (TF)-bearing MPs from THP-1 cells. Therefore, some PMPs may induce THP-1 monocytic cell aggregation in vitro and trigger immune cell-mediated thrombogenicity linked to the release of pro-coagulant tissue factor-bearing MPs. Controlling the impact of the presence of PMPs in transfused blood components in certain patient population or critically ill patients deserves in-depth consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm and influencing factors for its malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Liyan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN and influencing factors for benign and malignant MCN. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 43 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic MCN who were treated from January 2013 to December 2015, and according to the results of pathological diagnosis, the patients were divided into benign group (mucinous cystadenoma and pancreatic MCN with low/middle-grade dysplasia and malignant group (MCN with high-grade dysplasia and MCN with invasive carcinoma. The clinicopathological features and radiological features were summarized, and the risk factors for malignant transformation of pancreatic MCN were analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. ResultsThere were 14 male and 29 female patients aged 22-81 years (median 58.53 years. Of all patients, 30 (69.8% had clinical symptoms. The maximum tumor diameter was 4.8 cm (range 1.2-16 cm. Of all patients, 18 (41.9% had MCN in the head of the pancreas, 3 (7.0% had MCN in the neck of the pancreas, 20 (46.5% had MCN in the body and tail of the pancreas, and 2 (4.6% had multiple MCNs. There were significant differences between the two groups in age, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement of solid components, and cyst wall thickness >0.2 cm. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age and increased tumor markers were independent predictive factors for malignant pancreatic MCN (P <0.05. ConclusionAge, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, increased tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement

  2. Acanthamoeba, fungal, and bacterial keratitis: a comparison of risk factors and clinical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Prajna, N. Venkatesh; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; D’Silva, Sean S.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Borkar, Durga S.; Esterberg, Elizabeth J.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Keenan, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors and clinical signs that may differentiate between bacterial, fungal, and acanthamoeba keratitis among patients presenting with presumed infectious keratitis. Design Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Methods We examined the medical records of 115 patients with laboratory-proven bacterial keratitis, 115 patients with laboratory-proven fungal keratitis, and 115 patients with laboratory-proven acanthamoeba keratitis seen at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India, from 2006–2011. Risk factors and clinical features of the three organisms were compared using multinomial logistic regression. Results Of 95 patients with bacterial keratitis, 103 patients with fungal keratitis, and 93 patients with acanthamoeba keratitis who had medical records available for review, 287 (99%) did not wear contact lenses. Differentiating features were more common for acanthamoeba keratitis than for bacterial or fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis, patients with acanthamoeba keratitis were more likely to be younger and to have a longer duration of symptoms, and to have a ring infiltrate or disease confined to the epithelium. Conclusions Risk factors and clinical examination findings can be useful for differentiating acanthamoeba keratitis from bacterial and fungal keratitis. PMID:24200232

  3. Acanthamoeba, fungal, and bacterial keratitis: a comparison of risk factors and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Lalitha, Prajna; Prajna, N Venkatesh; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; D'Silva, Sean S; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Borkar, Durga S; Esterberg, Elizabeth J; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    To determine risk factors and clinical signs that may differentiate between bacterial, fungal, and acanthamoeba keratitis among patients presenting with presumed infectious keratitis. Hospital-based cross-sectional study. We examined the medical records of 115 patients with laboratory-proven bacterial keratitis, 115 patients with laboratory-proven fungal keratitis, and 115 patients with laboratory-proven acanthamoeba keratitis seen at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India, from 2006-2011. Risk factors and clinical features of the 3 organisms were compared using multinomial logistic regression. Of 95 patients with bacterial keratitis, 103 patients with fungal keratitis, and 93 patients with acanthamoeba keratitis who had medical records available for review, 287 (99%) did not wear contact lenses. Differentiating features were more common for acanthamoeba keratitis than for bacterial or fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with bacterial or fungal keratitis, patients with acanthamoeba keratitis were more likely to be younger and to have a longer duration of symptoms, and to have a ring infiltrate or disease confined to the epithelium. Risk factors and clinical examination findings can be useful for differentiating acanthamoeba keratitis from bacterial and fungal keratitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fisher Information Based Meteorological Factors Introduction and Features Selection for Short-Term Load Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Weather information is an important factor in short-term load forecasting (STLF. However, for a long time, more importance has always been attached to forecasting models instead of other processes such as the introduction of weather factors or feature selection for STLF. The main aim of this paper is to develop a novel methodology based on Fisher information for meteorological variables introduction and variable selection in STLF. Fisher information computation for one-dimensional and multidimensional weather variables is first described, and then the introduction of meteorological factors and variables selection for STLF models are discussed in detail. On this basis, different forecasting models with the proposed methodology are established. The proposed methodology is implemented on real data obtained from Electric Power Utility of Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, in southeast China. The results show the advantages of the proposed methodology in comparison with other traditional ones regarding prediction accuracy, and it has very good practical significance. Therefore, it can be used as a unified method for introducing weather variables into STLF models, and selecting their features.

  5. Solated Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Albajar, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    An Isolated Muon L1 Trigger is proposed to reject muons from decays of b and c-quarks preserving high efficiency for muons from heavier objects. It is shown that the proposed algorithm is feasible and significant rejection factor ( 3-10) can be achieved. Similar algorithm can be applied at L2.

  6. Gram-negative rod bacteremia after cardiovascular surgery: Clinical features and prognostic factors

    OpenAIRE

    田子, さやか

    2016-01-01

    博士(医学) 乙第2895号(主論文の要旨、要約、本文),著者名:Sayaka Tago・Yuji Hirai・Yusuke Ainoda・Takahiro Fujita・Ken Kikuchi,タイトル:Gram-negative rod bacteremia after cardiovascular surgery: Clinical features and prognostic factors,掲載誌:Journal of microbiology(1684-1182), immunology and infection,著作権関連情報:ℂ2015, Taiwan Society of Microbiology. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.DOI: 10.1016/j.jmii.2015.07.008

  7. Triggering Artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a general critique of the use of conceptual frameworks in design, illustrated by the well known synchronous/asynchronous, co-located/non-co-located framework. It argues that while frameworks are a necessary and inevitable starting point for design, the business of tailoring...... and adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  8. Retrospective Analysis of 255 Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas ≤2 cm: Clinicohistological Features and Prognostic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Pedro; Leite, Valeriano; Bugalho, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Background Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer. The widespread use of neck ultrasound (US) and US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology is triggering an overdiagnosis of PTC. Objective To evaluate clinical behavior and outcomes of patients with PTCs ≤2 cm, seeking for possible prognostic factors. Methods Clinical records of cases with histological diagnosis of PTC ≤2 cm followed at the Endocrine Department of Instituto Português de Oncologia, Lisbon between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Results We identified 255 PTCs, 111 were microcarcinomas. Most patients underwent near-total thyroidectomy, with lymph node dissections in 55 cases (21.6%). Radioiodine therapy was administered in 184 patients. At the last evaluation, 38 (14.9%) had evidence of disease. Two deaths were attributed to PTC. Median (±SD) follow-up was 74 (±23) months. Multivariate analysis identified vascular invasion, lymph node and systemic metastases significantly associated with recurrence/persistence of disease. In addition, lymph node involvement was significantly associated with extrathyroidal extension and angioinvasion. Median (±SD) disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated as 106 (±3) months and the 5-year DFS rate was 87.5%. Univariate Cox analysis identified some relevant parameters for DFS, but multivariate regression only identified lymph node and systemic metastases as significant independent factors. The median DFS estimated for lymph node and systemic metastases was 75 and 0 months, respectively. Conclusions In the setting of small PTCs, vascular invasion, extrathyroidal extension and lymph node and/or systemic metastases may confer worse prognosis, perhaps justifying more aggressive therapeutic and follow-up approaches in such cases. PMID:25759803

  9. Utility of dual source CT with ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition (Flash Spiral Cardio mode) to evaluate morphological features of ventricles in children with complex congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Nomura, Norikazu; Inukai, Sachiko; Tsubokura, Satoshi; Sakurai, Keita; Shimohira, Masashi; Ogawa, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the ability of dual source CT (DSCT) with ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition (Flash Spiral Cardio mode) to depict the morphological features of ventricles in pediatric patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). Between July 2013 and April 2015, 78 pediatric patients with CHD (median age 4 months) were examined using DSCT with the Flash Spiral Cardio mode. The types of ventricular abnormalities were ventricular septal defect (VSD) in 42 (the malaligned type in 11, perimembranous type in 23, supracristal type in 2, atrioventricular type in 2, and muscular type in 4), single ventricle (SV) in 11, and congenital corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) in 4. We evaluated the accuracy of the diagnosis of the VSD type. In cases of SV and ccTGA, we assessed the detectability of the anatomical features of both ventricles for a diagnosis of ventricular situs. DSCT confirmed the diagnoses for all VSDs. The type of defect was precisely diagnosed for all patients. The anatomical features of both ventricles were also depicted and ventricular situs of SV and ccTGA was correctly diagnosed. The results suggest that DSCT has the ability to clearly depict the configuration of ventricles.

  10. Clinical features and risk factor analysis for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in Chinese neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyou Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of neurosurgical patients; however, no data regarding lower extremity DVT in postoperative Chinese neurosurgical patients have been reported. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, 196 patients without preoperative DVT who underwent neurosurgical operations were evaluated by color Doppler ultrasonography and D-dimer level measurements on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days after surgery. Follow-up clinical data were recorded to determine the incidence of lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients and to analyze related clinical features. First, a single factor analysis, Chi-square test, was used to select statistically significant factors. Then, a multivariate analysis, binary logistic regression analysis, was used to determine risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Results: Lower extremity DVT occurred in 61 patients, and the incidence of DVT was 31.1% in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical patients. The common symptoms of DVT were limb swelling and lower extremity pain as well as increased soft tissue tension. The common sites of venous involvement were the calf muscle and peroneal and posterior tibial veins. The single factor analysis showed statistically significant differences in DVT risk factors, including age, hypertension, smoking status, operation time, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, postoperative dehydration, and glucocorticoid treatment, between the two groups (P < 0.05. The binary logistic regression analysis showed that an age greater than 50 years, hypertension, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, and postoperative dehydration were risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Conclusions: Lower extremity DVT was a common complication following craniotomy in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical

  11. A review of factors influencing underground construction quality and the performance of engineered features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, R.; Moy, D.; Breeds, C.D.; Kostelec, C.M.; Emsley, S.J.; Shuttle, D.; Cutler, J.; Hedman, T.; Carlsson, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes research to identify and rank the factors that should be considered for an assessment of the radioactive containment capability of repository engineered features. Containment is to be achieved through the use of multiple barriers to radionuclide movement, including the waste, waste container, repository structures and backfill, and repository seals. A review of the literature is used to identify radionuclide mobilisation and transport processes for the anticipated environmental conditions, and to compile a data base of repository design features, functional requirements, and design objectives. For selected design components, the report identifies alternative designs and factors contributing to design, focusing on the requirements for a design process, design specifications, construction requirements, and quality assurance requirements for the both design and construction. Existing practice in large, underground civil construction projects is used as a part of comparison, in conjunction with reported performance assessments, to determine those areas in which the repository developer will need to provide additional data, justification, and documentation prior to construction to ensure that performance requirements can be achieved. (Author)

  12. Nuptial flights behavior of the African weaver ant, Oecophylla longinoda Latreille (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and weather factors triggering flights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nene, Wilson; Rwegasira, Gration; Nielsen, Mogens Gissel

    2016-01-01

    Weaver ants (Oecophylla spp.) are intensively studied in basic and applied contexts. Yet, little is known about their mating behavior. Knowledge on their reproductive strategy is a prerequisite to the basic understanding of their life history and may provide valuable information facilitating...... their use in integrated pest management (IPM) and protein production (entomophagy). Here, we report on the behavior displayed by O. longinoda in relation with their nuptial flights in Tanzania and test for environmental cues that may trigger the flights. Based on observations of 56 flights recorded over 2...... parameters during the early part of the mating season, the trend changed thereafter probably due to depletion of sexuals in the nests as the season progressed. This information improves our understanding of ant nuptial flights and offers a tool to improve forecasts of O. longinoda flights, enabling easier...

  13. The CD27L and CTP1L endolysins targeting Clostridia contain a built-in trigger and release factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dunne

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bacteriophage ΦCD27 is capable of lysing Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that is a major cause for nosocomial infection. A recombinant CD27L endolysin lyses C. difficile in vitro, and represents a promising alternative as a bactericide. To better understand the lysis mechanism, we have determined the crystal structure of an autoproteolytic fragment of the CD27L endolysin. The structure covers the C-terminal domain of the endolysin, and represents a novel fold that is identified in a number of lysins that target Clostridia bacteria. The structure indicates endolysin cleavage occurs at the stem of the linker connecting the catalytic domain with the C-terminal domain. We also solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a slow cleaving mutant of the CTP1L endolysin that targets C. tyrobutyricum. Two distinct dimerization modes are observed in the crystal structures for both endolysins, despite a sequence identity of only 22% between the domains. The dimers are validated to be present for the full length protein in solution by right angle light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking experiments using the cross-linking amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpa. Mutagenesis on residues contributing to the dimer interfaces indicates that there is a link between the dimerization modes and the autocleavage mechanism. We show that for the CTP1L endolysin, there is a reduction in lysis efficiency that is proportional to the cleavage efficiency. We propose a model for endolysin triggering, where the extended dimer presents the inactive state, and a switch to the side-by-side dimer triggers the cleavage of the C-terminal domain. This leads to the release of the catalytic portion of the endolysin, enabling the efficient digestion of the bacterial cell wall.

  14. The CD27L and CTP1L Endolysins Targeting Clostridia Contain a Built-in Trigger and Release Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Jeffries, Cy M.; Thompson, Andrew; Lemke, Edward A.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage ΦCD27 is capable of lysing Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that is a major cause for nosocomial infection. A recombinant CD27L endolysin lyses C. difficile in vitro, and represents a promising alternative as a bactericide. To better understand the lysis mechanism, we have determined the crystal structure of an autoproteolytic fragment of the CD27L endolysin. The structure covers the C-terminal domain of the endolysin, and represents a novel fold that is identified in a number of lysins that target Clostridia bacteria. The structure indicates endolysin cleavage occurs at the stem of the linker connecting the catalytic domain with the C-terminal domain. We also solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a slow cleaving mutant of the CTP1L endolysin that targets C. tyrobutyricum. Two distinct dimerization modes are observed in the crystal structures for both endolysins, despite a sequence identity of only 22% between the domains. The dimers are validated to be present for the full length protein in solution by right angle light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking experiments using the cross-linking amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpa). Mutagenesis on residues contributing to the dimer interfaces indicates that there is a link between the dimerization modes and the autocleavage mechanism. We show that for the CTP1L endolysin, there is a reduction in lysis efficiency that is proportional to the cleavage efficiency. We propose a model for endolysin triggering, where the extended dimer presents the inactive state, and a switch to the side-by-side dimer triggers the cleavage of the C-terminal domain. This leads to the release of the catalytic portion of the endolysin, enabling the efficient digestion of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:25058163

  15. The Factors and Features of Museum Fatigue in Science Centres Felt by Korean Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchul; Dillon, Justin; Song, Jinwoong

    2018-03-01

    One of the objectives of science education in science centres has been the enhancement of interest in science. However, museum fatigue has a negative impact on interest. Museum fatigue has been described as physical tiredness or a decrease in visitors' interest in a museum. The learning experience of students in science centres is also influenced by museum fatigue. The purpose of this study is to identify the phenomena of museum fatigue in science centres and to identity how it is manifested. First, we identified the factors causing museum fatigue in science centres using the data from an open-ended questionnaire which was given to 597 primary, middle and high school students in South Korea. From the responses to the questionnaire, 50 factors causing museum fatigue in science centres were identified. A second Likert-type questionnaire with the 50 factors of museum fatigue in science centres was administered to 610 primary, middle and high school students in South Korea. Using reliability and factor analyses, we developed a framework of the factors causing museum fatigue in science centres, which consists of three contexts, 12 categories and 50 factors. Secondly, through statistical analyses including T test and ANOVA analysis, the features of students' museum fatigue in science centres were analysed and compared regarding student gender, school level, interest in science, grade of school science, the number of visits, and type of visit. The results, which were found to be statistically significant, are reported and discussed. The findings of this study are intended to serve for a deeper understanding and practical improvement of science learning in science centres.

  16. Clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yadegari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite increasing the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST has remained an under-diagnosed condition. In this study, characteristics and frequency of various risk factors of CVST patients in a tertiary referral hospital were closely assessed. Methods: Patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of CVST confirmed by MRI and magnetic resonance venography during 6 years of the study were included. All data from the onset of symptoms regarding clinical signs and symptoms, hospital admission, seasonal distribution, medical and drug history, thrombophilic profile, D-dimer, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings, mortality, and outcome were collected and closely analyzed. Result: A total of 53 patients with female to male ratio of 3.07 and mean age of 33.7 years were included in the study. Headache and papilledema were the most frequent clinical features (44 and 36 patients, respectively. An underlying disease (diagnosed previously or after admission was the most common identified risk factor for CVST in both females and males (21 patients. A total of 15 women used the oral contraceptive pill (OCP where 12 of them had simultaneously other predisposing factors. Overall, 19 patients (36% had more than one contributing factor. D-dimer had a sensitivity of 71.4% in CVST patients. The mortality of patients in this study was 3.7% (n = 2. Focal neurologic deficit and multicranial nerve palsy were associated with poor outcome which defined as death, recurrence, and massive intracranial hemorrhage due to anticoagulation (P = 0.050 and 0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Unlike most of the CVST studies in which OCP was the main factor; in this study, an underlying disease was the most identified cause. Considering the high probability of multiple risk factors in CVST that was shown by this study, appropriate work up should be noted to uncover them.

  17. Clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with intraventricular hemorrhage caused by ruptured arteriovenous malformations

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    Ye, Zengpanpan; Ai, Xiaolin; Hu, Xin; Fang, Fang; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) was associated with poor outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. IVH had a high incidence in patients with ruptured arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this study, we aimed to discuss the clinical features and prognostic factors of outcomes in the patients with AVM-related IVH. From January 2010 to January 2016, we collected the data of the patients with AVM-related IVH retrospectively. The data, including clinical and radiological parameters, were collected to evaluate the clinical features. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify the prognostic factors for clinical outcomes (hydrocephalus, 6-month outcomes measured by the modified Rankin scale) in our cohort. A total of 67 eligible patients were included and 19 patients (28%) only presented with IVH. Thirty-three patients (49%) presented hydrocephalus, and 12 patients (18%) presented brain ischemia. Nineteen patients (28%) had a poor outcome after 6 months. In multivariate logistic regression, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (P = .028) was associated with hydrocephalus and higher Graeb score (P = .080) tended to increase the risk of hydrocephalus. The high Glasgow coma scale (P = .010), large hematoma volume of parenchyma (P = .006), and high supplemented Spetzler–Martin (sup-SM) score (P = .041) were independent factors of the poor outcome. IVH was common in ruptured AVMs and increased the poor outcomes in patients with the ruptured AVMs. The AVM-related IVH patients had a high incidence of hydrocephalus, which was associated with brain ischemia and SAH. Patients with lower Glasgow coma scale, lower sup-SM score, and smaller parenchymal hematoma had better long-term outcomes. PMID:29137064

  18. Clinical Features and Risk Factors of Patients with Presumed Ocular Toxoplasmosis

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    Fuh, Ukamaka Celestina; Omoti, Afekhide E.; Enock, Malachi E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical features and risk factors of presumed ocular toxoplasmosis (POT) in patients affected with the condition at Irrua, Nigeria. Methods: The study included 69 patients with POT, and 69 age and sex matched subjects who served as the control group. Data was obtained using interviewer administered questionnaires. Examination included measurement of visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), slit lamp examination, gonioscopy and dilated fundus examination. Results: Mean age of cases and control subjects was 57.16 ± 18.69 and 56.09 ± 16.01 years respectively. The peak age group in patients with POT was 60 years and above. The most common presenting complaint was blurred vision occurring in 100% of cases. Drinking unfiltered water in 58 (84.1%) patients was the most common risk factor. Other risk factors included post cataract surgery status in 32 (46.4%) subjects, ingestion of poorly cooked meat in 30 (43.5%) cases and exposure to cats in 9 (13.0%) patients. All risk factors were more common in POT patients (P < 0.05). Out of 69 patients, 62 (89.9%) had unilateral while 7 (10.1%) had bilateral involvement. Out of 76 eyes with uveitis, 53 (69.7%) were blind. Active disease was significantly more common with increasing age (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients with POT were rather old and some risk factors were modifiable, therefore health education for preventing the transmission of toxoplasmosis and provision of sanitary water may help reduce the incidence of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:27195085

  19. Clinical Features and Factors Associated With Surgical Treatment in Patients With Complicated Colonic Diverticulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Pill Sun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Colonic diverticulitis is uncommon in Korea, but the incidence is rapidly increasing nowadays. The clinical features and the factors associated with complications of diverticulitis are important for properly treating the disease. Methods A retrospective review of the medical records of 225 patients that were prospectively collected between October 2007 and September 2016 was conducted. Results Diverticulitis was detected mainly in men and women aged 30 to 50 years. Diverticulitis more frequently affected the right colon (n = 194, 86.2%), but age was higher in case of left colonic involvement (42 years vs. 57 years, P diverticulitis. In the multivariate analysis, a risk factor for complicated diverticulitis was left colonic involvement (P diverticulitis, age over 50 was the only significant risk factor for surgical treatment (P = 0.024; RR, 19.350; 95% CI, 1.474–254.023). Conclusion In patients over 50 years of age with left colonic diverticulitis, a preventive colectomy should be reconsidered as one of the options for treatment. PMID:29159165

  20. Risk Factors and Microbiological Features of Patients Hospitalized for Microbial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Ma, David HK; Chen, Phil YF; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Sun, Chi-Chin; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Shin-Yi; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study to analyze predisposing factors, clinical features, and microbiological characteristics of patients with microbial keratitis hospitalized over 10 years. The medical records of 558 patients who were diagnosed with microbial keratitis and admitted to Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH), a referral center in Taiwan, from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2012 were reviewed. Demographics, predisposing factors, isolated organisms, treatment, and hospital stay were recorded. Yearly trends were tested using a linear-by-linear association. Contact lens wear was the most common predisposing factor (31.4%), followed by ocular and systemic diseases (26.3%) and trauma (23.5%). Contact lens-related infectious keratitis increased year by year (P = 0.011). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most commonly isolated organism (28%), followed by fungi (17.6%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (5.4%). Except for Serratia marcescens, the identified organisms did not change over 10 years. Most bacterial infections were controlled using antimicrobial treatment, but more than half of patients with fungal keratitis required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 13.7 ± 11.5 days. Previous ocular surgery, large ulcer size, nontuberculous myycobacteris infection, and surgery during admission were related to prolonged hospital stay. In Taiwan, contact lens-related pseudomonal keratitis remained the most common cause of microbial keratitis in patients hospitalized from 2003 to 2012. PMID:26512612

  1. Relationship of Virulence Factors and Clinical Features in Keratitis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Naoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eri; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Naoki; Gotoh, Naomasa; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2015-10-01

    To examine bacterial virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from contact lens (CL) wearers and non-CL wearers with P. aeruginosa keratitis, and to investigate relationships between virulence factors and clinical features of keratitis. The study involved 25 subjects including 18 CL and 7 non-CL-related P. aeruginosa keratitis patients. Slit-lamp photographs of all subjects were captured, and the focus occupancy ratio (FOR) was defined as the total focus area/entire cornea area, using image processing software. Twenty-five clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from keratitis were assessed for protease production, elastase production, biofilm formation, bacterial swimming and swarming motility, cell surface hydrophobicity, and genes encoding the type III secretion system (TTSS) effectors (ExoU and ExoS). Ring abscess was found in 9 of 18 CL-related P. aeruginosa keratitis cases (CL[+] ring[+] group) but not in another 9 cases (CL[+] ring[-] group). Expression or prevalence of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa isolates from the CL(+) ring(+) group, CL(+) ring(-) group, and CL(-) group were compared. The FOR for CL(+) ring(+) or CL(-) was higher than for CL(+) ring(-) (P keratitis.

  2. Special features of high-risk pregnancies as factors in development of mental distress: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Borba Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Approximately 22% of all pregnant women are classified as having high-risk pregnancies, which may involve feelings of vulnerability because of having a high-risk pregnancy, resulting in greater exposure to stressful feelings. Objective: To review aspects of high-risk pregnancy that can have a negative impact on the these women's mental health status. Method: Original articles were identified by conducting searches of the PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, followed by a manual search of references to select articles and additional bibliographic material. Articles from the last 22 years were included in the review (1992-2014. Results: Fifteen articles were found that specifically studied high-risk pregnancies and mental health outcomes. Women with high-risk pregnancies exhibited a significantly higher level of stress and reported negative emotions as they dealt with stress and had worse emotional status than women with normal pregnancies. Researchers found that hospitalized pregnant women had higher levels of anxiety than non-hospitalized women. Studies of women going through normal and high-risk pregnancies show that women with normal pregnancies had good self-perceived quality of life. Conclusion: Special features of high-risk pregnancies could be factors in development of mental distress, in addition to psychological and social factors. Therefore, only a biopsychosocial research study would be able to identify the factors that can affect the quality of mental health during high-risk pregnancy.

  3. Radiogenomic correlation in lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations: Imaging features and histological subtypes

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    Hong, Su Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won [Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Soo [Dankook Universicity, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin-Haeng [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To correlate imaging features of resected lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. In 250 consecutive patients with resected lung adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutation status was correlated with demographics, imaging features including ground-glass opacity (GGO) proportion and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in women (54.5 % vs. 38.1 %, p = 0.011) and in never-smokers (54.7 % vs. 35.3 %, p = 0.003). GGO proportion was significantly higher in tumours with EGFR mutation than in those without (30.3 ± 33.8 % vs. 19.0 ± 29.3 %, p = 0.005). EGFR mutation was significantly more frequent in tumours with GGO ≥ 50 % and tumours with any GGO (p = 0.026 and 0.008, respectively). Adenocarcinomas with exon 19 or 21 mutation showed significantly higher GGO proportion than that in EGFR wild-type tumours (p = 0.009 and 0.029, respectively). Absence of GGO was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation (odds ratio, 1.81; 95 % confidence interval, 1.16-3.04; p = 0.018). GGO proportion in adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type tumours, and the absence of GGO on CT was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation. (orig.)

  4. Clinical features and risk factors for patients with liver failure complicated by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAO Erhui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features and risk factors for patients with liver failure complicated by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA, and to provide a reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. MethodsThe clinical data of 477 patients with liver failure who were diagnosed and treated in Henan Provincial People′s Hospital from January 2010 to December 2014 were collected, and the clinical features, laboratory markers, and results of imaging examinations of patients with IPA were retrospectively analyzed. Another 49 patients with liver failure who were hospitalized within the same period, had similar ages, and were not complicated by pulmonary infection were randomly selected as controls. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test were used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the risk factors for liver failure complicated by IPA. ResultsAmong the 447 patients with liver failure, 43(96% were complicated by IPA. Age (P=0.023, hepatic encephalopathy (P=0.021, long-term use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (P=0.007, use of hormone (P=0.016, and deep venous catheterization (P<0.001 were independent risk factors for the development of IPA. Clinical manifestations of liver failure patients with IPA lacked specificity. Lung CT scan showed multiple nodules, masses, and wedge-shaped consolidation near the pleura in both lungs, but typical halo sign and air crescent sign were rarely seen. Among the 35 patients who received antifungal therapy, 30 were improved or cured, 3 died of digestive tract bleeding, 2 clied of plumonary infection, and all the other patients who did not receive therapy also died. ConclusionPatients with liver failure have various risk factors for the development of IPA, and the clinical manifestations are not typical, with high incidence

  5. [Features and influencing factors of self-discrimination among HIV/AIDS patients according to sex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, L H; Lyu, P; Xu, P; Chen, W Y; He, H J; Ma, L P

    2016-10-06

    Objective: To investigate the features and influencing factors of self-discrimination among patients with HIV/AIDS according to sex. Methods: A total of 2 432 HIV/AIDS patients were recruited in Yunnan, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Shanxi, Jilin, and Inner Mongolia provinces by a multistage stratified cluster sampling method, based on HIV epidemic and transmission modes, from May 2013 to October 2013. All participants were ≥18 years old, and we excluded those with mental disorders, hearing loss or other factors that prevented them from properly answering questions, and those who were unwilling to participate. A self-designed questionnaire was conducted to collect information about self-discrimination features and social behavior changes among HIV/AIDS patients. Differences in performance and self-discrimination features between participants of different sexes were compared using the chi-squared test. Factors influencing self-discrimination were analyzed by sex, using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of the 2 432 cases, 78.9%(1 918 cases)were male and 21.1%(514 cases)female. The proportion of self-discrimination overall was 76.1%(1 850 cases); this proportion among female HIV/AIDS patients was 80.5%(414 cases), which was higher than that among men(74.9%, 1 436 cases)(χ 2 =7.17, P= 0.007). Of the 11 forms of self-discrimination performance, proportions of feeling guilt, shame, and self-abasement among participants were greater than 50%. Proportions of feeling shame, inferiority, and blaming others among females were 61.3%, 59.5%, and 45.3%, respectively, which were higher than these among males(49.8%, 50.0%, 28.4%, respectively)( Pdiscrimination among those with HIV confirmatory testing time ≥1 year was higher than those with HIV confirmatory testing time discrimination among male farm workers was higher( OR= 1.62, 95 % CI :1.03-2.54). The risks of self-discrimination in males who had been infected with HIV by transmission routes of blood transfusion or

  6. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor triggers chemotaxis of CD74+CXCR2+ NKT cells in chemically induced IFN-γ-mediated skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2014-10-01

    IFN-γ mediates chemically induced skin inflammation; however, the mechanism by which IFN-γ-producing cells are recruited to the sites of inflammation remains undefined. Secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine, from damaged cells may promote immune cell recruitment. We hypothesized that MIF triggers an initial step in the chemotaxis of IFN-γ-producing cells in chemically induced skin inflammation. Using acute and chronic models of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation in mouse ears, MIF expression was examined, and its role in this process was investigated pharmacologically. The cell populations targeted by MIF, their receptor expression patterns, and the effects of MIF on cell migration were examined. TPA directly caused cytotoxicity accompanied by MIF release in mouse ear epidermal keratinocytes, as well as in human keratinocytic HaCaT cells. Treatment with the MIF antagonist (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester considerably attenuated TPA-induced ear swelling, leukocyte infiltration, epidermal cell proliferation, and dermal angiogenesis. Inhibition of MIF greatly diminished the dermal infiltration of IFN-γ(+) NKT cells, whereas the addition of exogenous TPA and MIF to NKT cells promoted their IFN-γ production and migration, respectively. MIF specifically triggered the chemotaxis of NKT cells via CD74 and CXCR2, and the resulting depletion of NKT cells abolished TPA-induced skin inflammation. In TPA-induced skin inflammation, MIF is released from damaged keratinocytes and then triggers the chemotaxis of CD74(+)CXCR2(+) NKT cells for IFN-γ production. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1–mediated characteristic features of cancer cells for tumor radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been attracting increasing attention in the fields of radiation biology and oncology since Thomlinson and Gray detected hypoxic cells in malignant solid tumors and showed that they exert a negative impact on the outcome of radiation therapy. This unfavorable influence has, at least partly, been attributed to cancer cells acquiring a radioresistant phenotype through the activation of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). On the other hand, accumulating evidence has recently revealed that, even though HIF-1 is recognized as an important regulator of cellular adaptive responses to hypoxia, it may not become active and induce tumor radioresistance under hypoxic conditions only. The mechanisms by which HIF-1 is activated in cancer cells not only under hypoxic conditions, but also under normoxic conditions, through cancer-specific genetic alterations and the resultant imbalance in intermediate metabolites have been summarized herein. The relevance of the HIF-1–mediated characteristic features of cancer cells, such as the production of antioxidants through reprogramming of the glucose metabolic pathway and cell cycle regulation, for tumor radioresistance has also been reviewed

  8. Strongyloidiasis: prevalence, risk factors, clinical and laboratory features among diarrhea patients in Ibadan Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada-Adegbola, H O; Oluwatoba, O A; Bakare, R A

    2010-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. The infection is usually mild or asymptomatic in normal immunocompetent individuals, but could be very severe or even fatal due to hyper infection in individuals who are immunosuppressed. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors and features of strongyloidiasis among diarrhea patients in Ibadan. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of diarrhea patients from a teaching hospital, three major government hospitals and one mission hospital in Ibadan. Self administered questionnaire, clinical assessment and laboratory investigations were used to confirm health status and presence of S. stercoralis. Diagnosis was made by microscopic examination of stool in saline preparation and formol-ether concentration. One thousand and ninety patients, (562 (51.6%) males and 528 (48.4%) females) consisting 380 (34.9%) children and 710 (65.1%) adults who had diarrhea were studied. The prevalence rate for the parasite among diarrhea patients was 3.0%. While the risk factor for infection remains contact with contaminated soil, malnutrition, steroid therapy, HIV/AIDS, lymphomas, tuberculosis, and chronic renal failure. Others are maleness, institutionalism and alcoholism. Predominant clinical presentations are abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, and bloating and weight loss, Strongyloides stercoralis should be considered in diarrhea patients who are either malnourished or immunosuppressed.

  9. Different clinical features of anaphylaxis according to cause and risk factors for severe reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Min-Hye; Cho, Young-Joo

    2018-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening allergic reaction. Several studies reported different anaphylactic reactions according to the causative substances. However, a comparison of anaphylaxis for each cause has not been done. This study was conducted to identify common causes of anaphylaxis, characteristics of anaphylactic reaction for each cause and to analyze the factors related to the severity of the reaction. Medical records of patients who visited the emergency room of Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital from March 2003 to April 2016 and diagnosed with anaphylactic shock were retrospectively reviewed. We compared the clinical features of anaphylaxis according to the cause. In addition, the severity of anaphylaxis was analyzed and contributing factors for severe anaphylaxis were reviewed. A total of 199 patients with anaphylaxis were analyzed. Food was the most common cause (49.7%), followed by drug reaction (36.2%), bee venom (10.1%), and unknown cause (4.0%). Cardiovascular symptoms of syncope and hypotension were more common in drug-induced anaphylaxis. The incidence of severe anaphylaxis was the highest in anaphylaxis due to drugs (54.2%). Urticaria and other skin symptoms were significantly more common in food-induced anaphylaxis. Risk factors for severe anaphylaxis included older age, male, and drug-induced one. Epinephrine treatment of anaphylaxis was done for 69.7% and 56.9% of patients with food-induced and drug-induced anaphylaxis, respectively. More severe anaphylaxis developed with drug treatment and in males. Low rate of epinephrine prescription was also observed. Male patients with drug induced anaphylaxis should be paid more attention. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Automatic feature selection for model-based reinforcement learning in factored MDPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.; Whiteson, S.; Wani, M.A.; Kantardzic, M.; Palade, V.; Kurgan, L.; Qi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Feature selection is an important challenge in machine learning. Unfortunately, most methods for automating feature selection are designed for supervised learning tasks and are thus either inapplicable or impractical for reinforcement learning. This paper presents a new approach to feature selection

  11. Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand triggers apoptosis in dividing but not in differentiating human epidermal keratinocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Bastiaan J. H.; van Ruissen, Fred; Cerneus, Stefanie; Cloin, Wendy; Bergers, Mieke; van Erp, Piet E. J.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2003-01-01

    Using serial analysis of gene expression we have previously identified the expression of several pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes in cultured human primary epidermal keratinocytes, including tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). TRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis

  12. Analysis of Clinicopathological Features and Prognostic Factors in 39 Cases of Bladder Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-Hui; Liu, Li-Yan; Yu, Guo-Hua; Qu, Gui-Mei; Gong, Pei-You; Yu, Xiao; Yang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Through analysis and summarization of clinicopathological features, immunohistochemical expression, pathological diagnostic criteria, prognostic and other factors in patients suffering from bladder neuroendocrine carcinoma (BNEC), a better understanding of BNEC could be achieved to provide solid evidence for clinicopathology and prognosis. The clinicopathological data of 39 cases of BNEC with up to 5-year follow-up data (median follow-up=650 days) were analyzed retrospectively based on immunohistochemical staining. Survival analyses were carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and tested with the log-rank method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was adopted to screen independent risk factors affecting patients' survival. In these 39 cases of BNEC, there were 26 cases of male patients, 13 female, with the proportion of male to female being 2:1. The ages of onset ranged from 44 to 86, with the median age being 62 and the average age 61.97 years, respectively. Histologically, referring to the WHO standard of neuroendocrine lung tumor classification, there were 7 cases of typical carcinoid tumors, 8 atypical carcinoid, 12 small-cell carcinomas and 12 large-cell carcinomas. In these cases there were 11 cases of featured urothelium carcinomas and 9 cases of adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining showed that, in these 39 cases of BNEC, the positive expression for the neuroendocrinic markers, including neural cell adhesion molecule 56 (CD56), synaptophysin (Syn), chromogranin A (CgA), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), cytokeratin (CK) and cytokeratin 7 (CK7), accounted for 39/39, 27/39, 18/39, 39/39, 19/39, 10/39 and 8/39, respectively. In contrast, cytokeratin 20 (CK20), protein 63 (P63), human melanoma black 45 (HMB45), S-lfln protein 100 (S-100) and leukocyte common antigen (LCA) were all negatively expressed. During the follow-up period, 12 patients died. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 76.92%, 74

  13. Estimation of landslide-triggering factors using clay minerals, ASTER satellite image and GIS in the Busan area, southeastern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G. C.; Kim, M. G.; Choi, J. J.; Ryu, J. O.; Nho, J. G.; Choo, C. O.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at estimating landslide-inducing factors such as extreme rainfall, slope, and geological factors in Busan city, southeastern Korea, using clay mineralogy, DM analysis and DB construction in order to develop the landslide evaluation standards suitable for the country. GIS-based data collected from the study area include geological maps, topological maps, soil maps, forest maps and others in the DB construction. Data extraction and processing for landslide-induced factors consist of expandable clay minerals identified using XRD, along with XRF and weathering sensitivity analysis and fundamental soil analysis on 38 bulk samples composed of weathered rocks and soils. Finally landslide sensibility maps were constructed using ArcGIS, together with ASTER satellite images for identifying clay minerals on regional areas helpful for saving time and money. In Mt. Cheonma, 16 samples are composed of quartz, albite, illite, vermiculite, and kaolinite, with little difference in mineralogy. In Mt. Hwangryeong and Mt. Geumryeun, 12 samples consist of quartz, albite, illite, vermiculite, kaolinite and hornblende, with little difference in mineralogy. In Mt. Songhak, 10 samples are composed of quartz, illite, vermiculite, and kaolinite. Quartz, albite and illite are abundant in most samples, regardless of sites studied. IDW interpolation method was applied to the Busan area. The resolution of space grids consists of 5 m x 5 m. Especially, illite was used as the most effective factor that induces landslide using IDW interpolation and ASTER satellite images. In conclusion, sensibility maps constructed using 16 layers including illite content, weathered sensibility are well in accordance with the real sites where landslides took place, showing that areas with high sensibility are closely related to the high frequencies of landslide. This research was supported by the Public Welfare & Safety Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded

  14. Risk factors and features of recurrent bacterial complications of upper respiratory tract viral infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko A.V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for recurrent bacterial complications of the upper respiratory tract viral infection (URTI in children, as well as the clinical and immunological features of the course of such complications. We enrolled 214 children aged 3-18 years with URTIs complicated with acute otitis media or acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Frequency of bacterial complications of URI in 128 children was low (group I and in 86 children it met the criteria of recurrent course (group II. In addition to the standard examination, lysozyme levels in the oropharyngeal secretion were determined three times during the disease. It was found that children of group II were characterized by an early debut of respiratory morbidity (at the age of 6.00 (4.00, 12.00 months against 13.00 (4.50, 16.00 months in children of group I (p<0,0001, as well as a longer duration of catarrhal and intoxication syndromes in similar forms of the disease. The most significant risk factors for the formation of the recurring complication pattern were maternal smoking (OR=2.73, 95% CI [1.34, 5.48], along with gastroenterological pathology and frequent URTI in the mother and a shortened period of breastfeeding. In children with recurrent bacterial complications of URTI, there was an impaired local resistance of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes (as a decrease in the concentrations of lysozyme in all periods of the disease, which persisted after recovery.

  15. Clinical features and prognostic factors of cutaneous vasculitis among dermatology patients in Johor Bahru, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, S; Choon, S E; Tey, K E; Chee, Y N

    2017-12-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis is common, yet the risk factors for its chronicity have not been established. To describe the clinical spectrum and identify risk factors for chronicity of cutaneous vasculitis. Retrospective data analysis of 275 patients diagnosed with cutaneous vasculitis from January 2008 to December 2013. The mean age was 33.7 (±17.89) years, with female predominance. The majority of patients were Malays (67.3%). Skin biopsy was performed in 110 (40%) patients. The commonest sign was palpable purpura (30.6%). The aetiology remained elusive in 51.3% of patients. Common identifiable causes include infection (19.7%) and connective tissue disease (10.2%). Extracutaneous features were noted in 46.5% of patients. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and antinuclear antibody were raised in 124 of 170 and 27 of 175 patients with documented results respectively. Cutaneous vasculitis was the presenting symptom in seven patients with newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Anti Streptolysin O Titre was positive in 82 of 156 patients with documented results. Despite antibiotics, 31.7% of them had chronic lesions. Prednisolone alone was used in 20% of patients while 16.4% needed steroid-sparing agents. Most patients who needed systemic therapy (62%) had unidentifiable aetiology. Among the 155 patients who remained under follow up, 36.4% had chronic disease, one patient succumbed due to septicaemia, and the rest fully recovered within three months. The presence of ulcerative lesion was significantly associated with developing chronic vasculitis (p=0.003). The clinical spectrum of cutaneous vasculitis in our population was similar to other studies. Ulcerative lesion predicts a chronic outcome.

  16. The influence of united psychosomatic factors on clinical features of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejanović Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceal unit. Dermatological disorders are often associated with a variety of psychological problems which the patient have. Psichodermatologic disorders (acne are associated with skin problems that are not directly connected to the mind, but that react to emotional states, such as stress. The aim of this article is to show if there is any psychological characteristic which are common for the whole group of ill-patients from acne, as well as whether there is correlation between any type of acne and psychological parameters. Own exploration consist at thirty patients with three clinical type of acne. Personality test-Kornel index were used for identification and diagnostic psychosomatic disorders. The results are: neurastenic parameters, parameters of conversion and parameters of psychopathy in different percent at both sex, and different clinical features. We show correlation united 2-6 psichosomatic disorders in male sex with softly type of acne. In female sex with any type of acne are responsible 7-12 united findings. The association of several psychosomatic factors could possibly be responsible for the onset of acne at any type.

  17. Structural features of Fab fragments of rheumatoid factor IgM-RF in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V. V., E-mail: vvo@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Lapuk, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zelinskii Institute of Organic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Shtykova, E. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Dembo, K. A.; Sokolova, A. V.; Amarantov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology (Russian Federation); Ziganshin, R. Kh. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Varlamova, E. Yu. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Hematology Research Center (Russian Federation)

    2008-05-15

    The structural features of the Fab fragments of monoclonal (Waldenstroem's disease) immunoglobulin M (IgM) and rheumatoid immunoglobulin M (IgM-RF) were studied by a complex of methods, including small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electron spin resonance (ESR), and mass spectrometry (MS). The Fab-RF fragment was demonstrated to be much more flexible in the region of interdomain contacts, the molecular weights and the shapes of the Fab and Fab-RF macromolecules in solution being only slightly different. According to the ESR data, the rotational correlation time for a spin label introduced into the peptide sequence for Fab is twice as large as that for Fab-RF (21{+-}2 and 11{+-}1 ns, respectively), whereas the molecular weights of these fragments differ by only 0.5% (mass-spectrometric data), which correlates with the results of molecular-shape modeling by small-angle X-ray scattering. The conclusion about the higher flexibility of the Fab-RF fragment contributes to an understanding of the specificity of interactions between the rheumatoid factor and the antigens of the own organism.

  18. Structural features of Fab fragments of rheumatoid factor IgM-RF in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Lapuk, V. A.; Shtykova, E. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Dembo, K. A.; Sokolova, A. V.; Amarantov, S. V.; Timofeev, V. P.; Ziganshin, R. Kh.; Varlamova, E. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The structural features of the Fab fragments of monoclonal (Waldenstroem's disease) immunoglobulin M (IgM) and rheumatoid immunoglobulin M (IgM-RF) were studied by a complex of methods, including small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electron spin resonance (ESR), and mass spectrometry (MS). The Fab-RF fragment was demonstrated to be much more flexible in the region of interdomain contacts, the molecular weights and the shapes of the Fab and Fab-RF macromolecules in solution being only slightly different. According to the ESR data, the rotational correlation time for a spin label introduced into the peptide sequence for Fab is twice as large as that for Fab-RF (21±2 and 11±1 ns, respectively), whereas the molecular weights of these fragments differ by only 0.5% (mass-spectrometric data), which correlates with the results of molecular-shape modeling by small-angle X-ray scattering. The conclusion about the higher flexibility of the Fab-RF fragment contributes to an understanding of the specificity of interactions between the rheumatoid factor and the antigens of the own organism.

  19. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) triggers unexpectedly complex global phosphorylation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Chris; Urbaniak, Michael D; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Williams, Jeffrey G

    2015-02-15

    Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide that induces Dictyostelium amoebae to differentiate as prestalk cells. We performed a global quantitative screen for phosphorylation changes that occur within the first minutes after addition of DIF-1, using a triple-label SILAC approach. This revealed a new world of DIF-1-controlled signaling, with changes in components of the MAPK and protein kinase B signaling pathways, components of the actinomyosin cytoskeletal signaling networks, and a broad range of small GTPases and their regulators. The results also provide evidence that the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a role in DIF-1 signaling to the DimB prestalk transcription factor. At the global level, DIF-1 causes a major shift in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibrium toward net dephosphorylation. Of interest, many of the sites that are dephosphorylated in response to DIF-1 are phosphorylated in response to extracellular cAMP signaling. This accords with studies that suggest an antagonism between the two inducers and also with the rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP receptor that we observe in response to DIF-1 and with the known inhibitory effect of DIF-1 on chemotaxis to cAMP. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001555. © 2015 Sugden et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 triggers skewed CD8(+) T cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian-Yong; Huang, Shao-hong; Li, Yun; Chen, Hui-guo; Rong, Jian; Ye, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Skewed CD8(+) T cell responses are important in airway inflammation. This study investigates the role of the airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in contributing to CD8(+) T cell polarization. Expression of IGF1 in the airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, was assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The role of IGF1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation was observed by coculture of mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells and naïve CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cell polarization was assessed by the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-dilution assay and the determination of cytotoxic cytokine levels in the culture medium. Exposure to mite allergen, Der p1, increased the expression of IGF1 by RPMI2650 cells. The epithelial cell-derived IGF1 prevented the activation-induced cell death by inducing the p53 gene hypermethylation. Mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells induced an antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. We conclude that mite allergens induce airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, to produce IGF1; the latter contributes to antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Acute kidney injury in Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion stung children: Risk factors and clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Valavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is frequently seen in Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion stung children. We have previously reported several victims with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 deficiency. Hence, we conducted this study to identify predictive factors and clinical features of AKI in H. lepturus scorpion stung patients. We included all 215 H. lepturus scorpion stung children with no previous renal diseases in two groups (with and without AKI and compared them based on their clinical and laboratory findings. AKI was found in 27.4% of patients, they were significantly younger and with lower body weight (P = 0.006, P = 0.011, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups with and without AKI in findings such as fever (P = 0.003, hypertension (P <0.001, hemolytic anemia (P <0.001, thrombocytopenia (P <0.001, massive proteinuria (P <0.001, hemoglobinuria (P <0.001, pyuria (P <0.001, and hematuria (P = 0.004. HUS was in 5.5% and disseminated intravascular coagulation in 14.6% which had a significant association with AKI (P <0.001.There were several independent predictors for AKI in a multivariate regression model including thrombocytopenia (P = 0.002, pyuria (P = 0.01, proteinuria (P =0.01, and fever (P = 0.02. Hemodialysis was performed in four patients but kidney function improved in all patients and there was no findings of renal impairment after three months follow-up. We found several predictors for AKI in children following H. lepturus scorpion sting including younger age, delay in receiving medical care, pigmenturia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, proteinuria, and pyuria.

  2. Social fear and social phobia types among community youth: differential clinical features and vulnerability factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Susanne; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Fehm, Lydia; Stein, Murray B; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    To compare different social fears and social phobia subtypes with regard to clinical (age of onset, avoidance, impairment, comorbidities) and vulnerability factors (behavioural inhibition (BI), parental psychopathology and parental rearing) among community youth. Fears of 6 social situations and Social Phobia (SP), along with their clinical features, were assessed using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (DIA-X/M-CIDI) in a population-based sample of N = 3021 14-24 year olds that were followed up for 10 years. BI and parental rearing were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Parental psychopathology was assessed directly in parents via DIA-X/M-CIDI, supplemented by offsprings' family history reports. In the total sample, 20.0%, 11.6%, 11.7% reported fear of 1, 2, 3 or more social situations, respectively; rates were 24.2%, 18.7%, and 57.1% in SP-cases (6.6% of the total sample). Exploring the factorial structure indicated rather unidimensionality of social fears than mutual distinction of social fears by interaction vs. performance situations. Except for fear of taking tests and public speaking, social fears rarely occurred in isolation. Social fears of both interaction and performance situations were associated with severe avoidance (vs. fear of either situation; Odds Ratios, OR = 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1-1.9) and impairment (OR = 3.6, 95%CI: 2.6-4.9), and more comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders (OR range 3.2-5.8, p > .001). Fear of interaction situations was associated with higher BI (vs. performance-related fears, OR range 1.2-2.1, p fear of interaction situations (vs. performance-related fears). Interactions with time indicated an earlier onset of SP for higher BI, but not for parental psychopathology or unfavourable parental rearing. Interaction-related social fears differ in their clinical and vulnerability factors from performance-related social fears. The current DSM-IV specifier of "generalized" SP may fall short of

  3. Comparison Between Polymicrobial and Fungal Keratitis: Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Merle; Vira, Divya; Dey, Mrinmoy; Tanzin, Tanuja; Kumar, Nagendra; Sharma, Savitri

    2015-11-01

    To compare the clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of polymicrobial keratitis with monomicrobial keratitis due to fungus. Retrospective, comparative interventional case series. Consecutive cases of microbial keratitis with significant growth of more than 1 organism in culture and culture-proven fungal keratitis treated with natamycin alone were retrieved from the microbiology department. Complete success was defined as resolution of the infiltrate with scar formation on medical treatment, partial success as resolution following tissue adhesive application, and failure as inadequate response to medical therapy with increasing infiltrate size, corneal melting, and/or perforation necessitating therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) or evisceration. There were 34 eyes of 34 patients with polymicrobial keratitis and 60 cases of fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with fungal keratitis, patients with polymicrobial keratitis were significantly older (50.03 ± 9.81 years vs 42.79 ± 12.15 years, P = .0038), with larger infiltrates at presentation (61.8% vs 24.1%, P = .0007), a higher association with endophthalmitis (11.8% vs 0%, P = .03), previous history of corneal graft (20.6% vs 0%, P = .0012), and prior topical corticosteroid use (23.5% vs 5%, P = .019). In the polymicrobial group, a combination of bacteria and fungus was more frequently isolated (23, 67.6%), among which filamentous fungi (25, 39.1%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (14, 21.9%) comprised a majority. Complete success was significantly lower in the polymicrobial group compared to the fungal keratitis group (39.3% vs 73.7%, P = .0045). In multivariate logistic regression analysis comparing factors affecting the outcome between the 2 groups, older age (P = .027) and ulcers larger than 6 mm (P = .001) at presentation adversely affected outcome. Polymicrobial keratitis with fungus and bacteria was more common and more challenging to treat, with a poorer outcome than fungal

  4. Edaphic factors trigger diverse AM fungal communities associated to exotic camellias in closely located Lake Maggiore (Italy) sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Roberto; Berruti, Andrea; Lumini, Erica; Della Beffa, Maria Teresa; Scariot, Valentina; Bianciotto, Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Camellia japonica L. is an acidophilic ornamental shrub of high economic value that has its center of origin in Japan and has been introduced in several European environmental niches. This exotic species forms arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), known for their ability to positively affect plant growth. However, AM fungal communities associated to C. japonica in the field have never been characterized. For the first time, the AM fungal community naturally selected by C. japonica was screened in three sites located on the shores of Lake Maggiore (Italy), where specimens of this plant were introduced in the nineteenth century. Mycorrhizal levels were assessed, and the AM fungal communities associated to roots and soil were molecularly characterized based on the small subunit (SSU) rDNA region. The frequency of mycorrhizal roots was high in all sampled root systems (>90 %). Overall, 39 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs; 22 Glomerales, 9 Paraglomerales, 7 Archaeosporales, and 1 Diversisporales) were found in the root and soil samples. OTU richness did not significantly differ between the root and the soil niche (5.7 ± 0.6 and 8.0 ± 1.1 average OTUs per sample, respectively) and the three sites analyzed (7.5 ± 0.7, 5.2 ± 1.0, and 7.8 ± 1.5 average OTUs per sample in the three sites, respectively). The AM fungal community composition significantly differed between root-colonizing and soil-dwelling communities and among the three sites under study. Data show a major involvement of edaphic factors, such as available N sources, P, Mg, and K content in soil and soil compaction, in the structuring of the AM fungal communities.

  5. Minimum Bias Interaction Triggers in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic ppcollisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.2 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presente...

  6. Upgrade trigger & reconstruction strategy: 2017 milestone

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Johannes; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Cattaneo, Marco; Marco, Clemencic; Couturier, Ben; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Lemaitre, Florian; Lupton, Olli; Matev, Rosen; Pearce, Alex; Promberger, Laura; Ponce, Sebastien; Quagliani, Renato; Raven, Gerhard; Schiller, Manuel Tobias; Sciascia, Barbara; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Stahl, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration is currently preparing an update of the experiment to take data in Run 3 of the LHC. The dominant feature of this upgrade is a trigger-less readout of the full detector followed by a full software trigger. To make optimal use of the collected data, the events are reconstructed at the inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz. This document presents the baseline trigger and reconstruction strategy as of the end of 2017.

  7. Contextual risk factors as predictors of disruptive behavior disorder trajectories in girls: the moderating effect of callous-unemotional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneman, Leoniek M; Hipwell, Alison E; Loeber, Rolf; Koot, Hans M; Pardini, Dustin A

    2011-02-01

    The presence of callous-unemotional (CU) features may delineate a severe and persistent form of conduct problems in children with unique developmental origins. Contextual risk factors such as poor parenting, delinquent peers, or neighborhood risk are believed to influence the development of conduct problems primarily in children with low levels of CU features. However, longitudinal studies examining the moderating effect of CU features on the relation between contextual risk factors and conduct problems trajectories in girls are rare. Growth curve analysis was conducted using five annual measurements of oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder (ODD/CD) behaviors in a community sample of 1,233 girls aged 7-8 at study onset. The relation between contextual risk factors in multiple domains (i.e., family, peer, community) and trajectories of ODD/CD behaviors across time were examined for girls with differing levels of CU features. Growth curve analysis indicated that CU features were associated with chronically high levels of ODD/CD symptoms over time. Low levels of parental warmth were also associated with chronically high levels of ODD/CD, and this effect was particularly pronounced for girls with high CU features. Exposure to harsh parenting was associated with higher ODD/CD behaviors for girls in childhood regardless of their level of CU features, but this effect dissipated over time. Girls with elevated CU features who are exposed to low levels of parental warmth seem to exhibit particularly severe ODD/CD symptoms and should be targeted for intensive intervention in childhood. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2010 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  8. Heterologous expression of Homo sapiens alpha-folate receptors in E. coli by fusion with a trigger factor for enhanced solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Beatriz Nogueira Messias; Fotoran, Wesley Luzetti; Canduri, Fernanda; Souza, Dulce Helena Ferreira; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2018-02-01

    The role of Alpha folate receptors (FRα) in folate metabolism and cancer development has been extensively studied. The reason for this is not only associated to its direct relation to disease development but also to its potential use as a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for cancers therapies. Over the recent years, the crystal structures of human FRα complexed with different ligands were described relying on an expensive and time-consuming production process. Here, we constructed an efficient system for the expression and purification of a human FRα in E. coli. Unlike a conventional expression method we used a specific protein fusion expressing the target protein together with a trigger factor (TF). This factor is a chaperone from E. coli that assists the correct folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains. The activity of rTFFRα was comparable to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins extracted from HeLa tumor cells. Our work demonstrates a straightforward and versatile approach for the production of active human FRα by heterologous expression; this approach further enhances the development of inhibition studies and biotechnological applications. The purified product was then conjugated to liposomes, obtaining a 35% higher signal from densitometry measurement on the immunoblotting assay in the contruct containing the Ni-NTA tag, as a mimesis of an exosome, which is of vital importance to nanotherapeutic techniques associated to treatment and diagnosis of tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The LHCb trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolko, I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes progress in the development of the LHCb trigger system since the letter of intent. The trigger philosophy has significantly changed, resulting in an increase of trigger efficiency for signal B events. It is proposed to implement a level-1 vertex topology trigger in specialised hardware. (orig.)

  10. Clinical features and risk factors of acute hepatitis E with severe jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Hai-Bin; Hui, Wei; He, Jia-Li; Wei, Lin-Lin; Wang, Zheng; Guo, Xin-Hui

    2012-12-28

    To compares the clinical features of patients infected with hepatitis E virus (HEV) with or without severe jaundice. In addition, the risk factors for HEV infection with severe jaundice were investigated. We enrolled 235 patients with HEV into a cross-sectional study using multi-stage sampling to select the study group. Patients with possible acute hepatitis E showing elevated liver enzyme levels were screened for HEV infection using serologic and molecular tools.HEV infection was documented by HEV antibodies and by the detection of HEV-RNA in serum. We used χ(2) analysis, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t test where appropriate in this study. Significant predictors in the univariate analysis were then included in a forward, stepwise multiple logistic regression model. No significant differences in symptoms, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, or hepatitis B virus surface antigen between the two groups were observed. HEV infected patients with severe jaundice had significantly lower peak serum levels of γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) (median: 170.31 U/L vs 237.96 U/L, P = 0.007), significantly lower ALB levels (33.84 g/L vs 36.89 g/L, P = 0.000), significantly lower acetylcholine esterase (CHE) levels (4500.93 U/L vs 5815.28 U/L, P = 0.000) and significantly higher total bile acid (TBA) levels (275.56 μmol/L vs 147.03 μmol/L, P = 0.000) than those without severe jaundice. The median of the lowest point time tended to be lower in patients with severe jaundice (81.64% vs 96.12%, P = 0.000). HEV infected patients with severe jaundice had a significantly higher viral load (median: 134 vs 112, P = 0.025) than those without severe jaundice. HEV infected patients with severe jaundice showed a trend toward longer median hospital stay (38.17 d vs 18.36 d, P = 0.073). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that there were significant differences in age, sex, viral load, GGT, albumin, TBA, CHE, prothrombin index, alcohol

  11. The HLT inclusive B triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Gligorov, Vladimir V; Williams, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The inclusive HLT strategy relies on triggering any B decay based on two signatures: a single significantly displaced, high transverse momentum track, and a significantly displaced vertex containing this track and 1-3 other tracks, with high total transverse momentum. In order to provide optimal signal efficiency and background rejection the displaced vertex selection is implemented in a novel boosted decision tree algorithm incorporating information about the experimental resolution in the boosting procedure to protect against overtraining. The performance of these triggers has been commissioned using data taken during 2011 LHCb running and is evaluated here in a data-driven manner. The HLT inclusive triggers are found to have a rejection factor of around 1000 with respect to events selected by the L0 hardware trigger and a bbar purity close to 100%.

  12. Application of nonnegative matrix factorization to improve profile-profile alignment features for fold recognition and remote homolog detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo-Young

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF is a feature extraction method that has the property of intuitive part-based representation of the original features. This unique ability makes NMF a potentially promising method for biological sequence analysis. Here, we apply NMF to fold recognition and remote homolog detection problems. Recent studies have shown that combining support vector machines (SVM with profile-profile alignments improves performance of fold recognition and remote homolog detection remarkably. However, it is not clear which parts of sequences are essential for the performance improvement. Results The performance of fold recognition and remote homolog detection using NMF features is compared to that of the unmodified profile-profile alignment (PPA features by estimating Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC scores. The overall performance is noticeably improved. For fold recognition at the fold level, SVM with NMF features recognize 30% of homolog proteins at > 0.99 ROC scores, while original PPA feature, HHsearch, and PSI-BLAST recognize almost none. For detecting remote homologs that are related at the superfamily level, NMF features also achieve higher performance than the original PPA features. At > 0.90 ROC50 scores, 25% of proteins with NMF features correctly detects remotely related proteins, whereas using original PPA features only 1% of proteins detect remote homologs. In addition, we investigate the effect of number of positive training examples and the number of basis vectors on performance improvement. We also analyze the ability of NMF to extract essential features by comparing NMF basis vectors with functionally important sites and structurally conserved regions of proteins. The results show that NMF basis vectors have significant overlap with functional sites from PROSITE and with structurally conserved regions from the multiple structural alignments generated by MUSTANG. The correlation between

  13. Working memory units are all in your head: Factors that influence whether features or objects are the favored units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwe, Evie; Cowan, Nelson

    2015-09-01

    We compared two contrasting hypotheses of how multifeatured objects are stored in visual working memory (vWM); as integrated objects or as independent features. A new procedure was devised to examine vWM representations of several concurrently held objects and their features and our main measure was reaction time (RT), allowing an examination of the real-time search through features and/or objects in an array in vWM. Response speeds to probes with color, shape, or both were studied as a function of the number of memorized colored shapes. Four testing groups were created by varying the instructions and the way in which probes with both color and shape were presented. The instructions explicitly either encouraged or discouraged the use of binding information and the task-relevance of binding information was further suggested by presenting probes with both color and shapes as either integrated objects or independent features. Our results show that the unit used for retrieval from vWM depends on the testing situation. Search was fully object-based only when all factors support that basis of search, in which case retrieving 2 features took no longer than retrieving a single feature. Otherwise, retrieving 2 features took longer than retrieving a single feature. Additional analyses of change detection latency suggested that, even though different testing situations can result in a stronger emphasis on either the feature dimension or the object dimension, neither one disappears from the representation and both concurrently affect change detection performance. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Nostalgia: content, triggers, functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Arndt, Jamie; Routledge, Clay

    2006-11-01

    Seven methodologically diverse studies addressed 3 fundamental questions about nostalgia. Studies 1 and 2 examined the content of nostalgic experiences. Descriptions of nostalgic experiences typically featured the self as a protagonist in interactions with close others (e.g., friends) or in momentous events (e.g., weddings). Also, the descriptions contained more expressions of positive than negative affect and often depicted the redemption of negative life scenes by subsequent triumphs. Studies 3 and 4 examined triggers of nostalgia and revealed that nostalgia occurs in response to negative mood and the discrete affective state of loneliness. Studies 5, 6, and 7 investigated the functional utility of nostalgia and established that nostalgia bolsters social bonds, increases positive self-regard, and generates positive affect. These findings demarcate key landmarks in the hitherto uncharted research domain of nostalgia.

  15. Factors that affect micro-tooling features created by direct printing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhani, Mayur N.

    Current market required faster pace production of smaller, better, and improved products in shorter amount of time. Traditional high-rate manufacturing process such as hot embossing, injection molding, compression molding, etc. use tooling to replicate feature on a products. Miniaturization of many product in the field of biomedical, electronics, optical, and microfluidic is occurring on a daily bases. There is a constant need to produce cheaper, and faster tooling, which can be utilize by existing manufacturing processes. Traditionally, in order to manufacture micron size tooling features processes such as micro-machining, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM), etc. are utilized. Due to a higher difficulty to produce smaller size features, and longer production cycle time, various additive manufacturing approaches are proposed, e.g. selective laser sintering (SLS), inkjet printing (3DP), fused deposition modeling (FDM), etc. were proposed. Most of these approaches can produce net shaped products from different materials such as metal, ceramic, or polymers. Several attempts were made to produce tooling features using additive manufacturing approaches. Most of these produced tooling were not cost effective, and the life cycle of these tooling was reported short. In this research, a method to produce tooling features using direct printing approach, where highly filled feedstock was dispensed on a substrate. This research evaluated different natural binders, such as guar gum, xanthan gum, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and their combinations were evaluated. The best binder combination was then use to evaluate effect of different metal (316L stainless steel (3 mum), 316 stainless steel (45 mum), and 304 stainless steel (45 mum)) particle size on feature quality. Finally, the effect of direct printing process variables such as dispensing tip internal diameter (500 mum, and 333 mum) at different printing speeds were evaluated.

  16. Levels of the epidermal growth factor-like peptide amphiregulin in follicular fluid reflect the mode of triggering ovulation: a comparison between gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist and urinary human chorionic gonadotrophin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær; Westergaard, Lars Grabow; Mikkelsen, Anne Lis

    2011-01-01

    . INTERVENTION(S): Ovulation triggered with either urinary hCG or GnRH agonist (GnRH-a). Controls: 15 FF samples from small antral follicles (3-9 mm) and 12 FF samples from natural cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Follicular fluid concentration of AR, P(4), E(2), vascular endothelial growth factor, and inhibin B....... RESULT(S): Significantly lower levels of AR were found in FF from the GnRH-a group versus the hCG group, 51 ± 3.5 versus 71 ± 6.0 ng/mL. In FF from natural cycles, levels of AR were significantly higher than those of GnRH-a triggering but significantly lower than those of urinary hCG triggering. In small...... antral follicles only 5 out of 15 follicles contained measurable amounts of AR. When urinary hCG and GnRH-a triggering were compared, FF P(4) was significantly higher after urinary hCG triggering, whereas no difference was seen regarding E(2), vascular endothelial growth factor, and inhibin B. A total...

  17. Postneedling soreness after deep dry needling of a latent myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle: Characteristics, sex differences and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pintado-Zugasti, Aitor; Rodríguez-Fernández, Ángel Luis; Fernandez-Carnero, Josue

    2016-04-27

    Postneedling soreness is considered the most frequent secondary effect associated to dry needling. A detailed description of postneedling soreness characteristics has not been previously reported. (1) to assess the intensity and duration of postneedling soreness and tenderness after deep dry needling of a trapezius latent myofascial trigger point (MTrP), (2) to evaluate the possible differences in postneedling soreness between sexes and (3) to analyze the influence on postneedling soreness of factors involved in the dry needling process. Sixty healthy subjects (30 men, 30 women) with latent MTrPs in the upper trapezius muscle received a dry needling intervention in the MTrP. Pain and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were assessed during a 72 hours follow-up period. Repeated measures analysis of covariance showed a significant effect for time in pain and in PPT. An interaction between sex and time in pain was obtained: women exhibited higher intensity in postneedling pain than men. The pain during needling and the number of needle insertions significantly correlated with postneedling soreness. Soreness and hyperalgesia are present in all subjects after dry needling of a latent MTrP in the upper trapezius muscle. Women exhibited higher intensity of postneedling soreness than men.

  18. Stem Cell Differentiation Stage Factors and Their Role in Triggering Symmetry Breaking Processes during Cancer Development: A Quantum Field Theory Model for Reprogramming Cancer Cells to Healthy Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biava, Pier Mario; Burigana, Fabio; Germano, Roberto; Kurian, Philip; Verzegnassi, Claudio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2017-09-20

    A long history of research has pursued the use of embryonic factors isolated during cell differentiation processes for the express purpose of transforming cancer cells back to healthy phenotypes. Recent results have clarified that the substances present at different stages of cell differentiation-which we call stem cell differentiation stage factors (SCDSFs)-are proteins with low molecular weight and nucleic acids that regulate genomic expression. The present review summarizes how these substances, taken at different stages of cellular maturation, are able to retard proliferation of many human tumor cell lines and thereby reprogram cancer cells to healthy phenotypes. The model presented here is a quantum field theory (QFT) model in which SCDSFs are able to trigger symmetry breaking processes during cancer development. These symmetry breaking processes, which lie at the root of many phenomena in elementary particle physics and condensed matter physics, govern the phase transitions of totipotent cells to higher degrees of diversity and order, resulting in cell differentiation. In cancers, which share many genomic and metabolic similarities with embryonic stem cells, stimulated re-differentiation often signifies the phenotypic reversion back to health and non-proliferation. In addition to acting on key components of the cellular cycle, SCDSFs are able to reprogram cancer cells by delicately influencing the cancer microenvironment, modulating the electrochemistry and thus the collective electrodynamic behaviors between dipole networks in biomacromolecules and the interstitial water field. Coherent effects in biological water, which are derived from a dissipative QFT framework, may offer new diagnostic and therapeutic targets at a systemic level, before tumor instantiation occurs in specific tissues or organs. Thus, by including the environment as an essential component of our model, we may push the prevailing paradigm of mutation-driven oncogenesis toward a closer

  19. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  20. The triggering factors of the Móafellshyrna debris slide in northern Iceland: Intense precipitation, earthquake activity and thawing of mountain permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sæmundsson, Þorsteinn; Morino, Costanza; Helgason, Jón Kristinn; Conway, Susan J; Pétursson, Halldór G

    2018-04-15

    On the 20th September 2012, a large debris slide occurred in the Móafellshyrna Mountain in the Tröllaskagi peninsula, central north Iceland. Our work describes and discusses the relative importance of the three factors that may have contributed to the failure of the slope: intense precipitation, earthquake activity and thawing of ground ice. We use data from weather stations, seismometers, witness reports and field observations to examine these factors. The slide initiated after an unusually warm and dry summer followed by a month of heavy precipitation. Furthermore, the slide occurred after three seismic episodes, whose epicentres were located ~60km NNE of Móafellshyrna Mountain. The main source of material for the slide was ice-rich colluvium perched on a topographic bench. Blocks of ice-cemented colluvium slid and then broke off the frontal part of the talus slope, and the landslide also involved a component of debris slide, which mobilized around 312,000-480,000m 3 (as estimated from field data and aerial images of erosional morphologies). From our analysis we infer that intense precipitation and seismic activity prior to the slide are the main preparatory factors for the slide. The presence of ice-cemented blocks in the slide's deposits leads us to infer that deep thawing of ground ice was likely the final triggering factor. Ice-cemented blocks of debris have been observed in the deposits of two other recent landslides in northern Iceland, in the Torfufell Mountain and the Árnesfjall Mountain. This suggests that discontinuous mountain permafrost is degrading in Iceland, consistent with the decadal trend of increasing atmospheric temperature in Iceland. This study highlights a newly identified hazard in Iceland: landslides as a result of ground ice thaw. Knowledge of the detailed distribution of mountain permafrost in colluvium on the island is poorly constrained and should be a priority for future research in order to identify zones at risk from this

  1. Schizophrenia with prominent catatonic features ('catatonic schizophrenia'). II. Factor analysis of the catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Gabor S; Goggins, William; Leung, Siu-Kau; Gerevich, Jozsef

    2007-03-30

    Previous factor analyses of catatonia have yielded conflicting results for several reasons including small and/or diagnostically heterogeneous samples and incomparability or lack of standardized assessment. This study examined the factor structure of catatonia in a large, diagnostically homogenous sample of patients with chronic schizophrenia using standardized rating instruments. A random sample of 225 Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria were selected from the long-stay wards of a psychiatric hospital. They were assessed with a battery of rating scales measuring psychopathology, extrapyramidal motor status, and level of functioning. Catatonia was rated using the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale. Factor analysis using principal component analysis and Varimax rotation with Kaiser normalization was performed. Four factors were identified with Eigenvalues of 3.27, 2.58, 2.28 and 1.88. The percentage of variance explained by each of the four factors was 15.9%, 12.0%, 11.8% and 10.2% respectively, and together they explained 49.9% of the total variance. Factor 1 loaded on "negative/withdrawn" phenomena, Factor 2 on "automatic" phenomena, Factor 3 on "repetitive/echo" phenomena and Factor 4 on "agitated/resistive" phenomena. In multivariate linear regression analysis negative symptoms and akinesia were associated with 'negative' catatonic symptoms, antipsychotic doses and atypical antipsychotics with 'automatic' symptoms, length of current admission, severity of psychopathology and younger age at onset with 'repetitive' symptoms and age, poor functioning and severity of psychopathology with 'agitated' catatonic symptom scores. The results support recent findings that four main factors underlie catatonic signs/symptoms in chronic schizophrenia.

  2. Common Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grass Other Triggers If you have asthma, an asthma attack can happen when you are exposed to “asthma ... a second person. Secondhand smoke can trigger an asthma attack. If you have asthma, people should never smoke ...

  3. Amphiregulin triggered epidermal growth factor receptor activation confers in vivo crizotinib-resistance of EML4-ALK lung cancer and circumvention by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Shinji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Arai, Sachiko; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yano, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Crizotinib, a first-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, is known to be effective against echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancers. Nonetheless, the tumors subsequently become resistant to crizotinib and recur in almost every case. The mechanism of the acquired resistance needs to be deciphered. In this study, we established crizotinib-resistant cells (A925LPE3-CR) via long-term administration of crizotinib to a mouse model of pleural carcinomatous effusions; this model involved implantation of the A925LPE3 cell line, which harbors the EML4-ALK gene rearrangement. The resistant cells did not have the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells, and these cells were cross-resistant to alectinib and ceritinib as well. In cell clone #2, which is one of the clones of A925LPE3-CR, crizotinib sensitivity was restored via the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by means of an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (erlotinib) or an anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab) in vitro and in the murine xenograft model. Cell clone #2 did not have an EGFR mutation, but the expression of amphiregulin (AREG), one of EGFR ligands, was significantly increased. A knockdown of AREG with small interfering RNAs restored the sensitivity to crizotinib. These data suggest that overexpression of EGFR ligands such as AREG can cause resistance to crizotinib, and that inhibition of EGFR signaling may be a promising strategy to overcome crizotinib resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. The KLOE trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, E.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A double-level trigger system has been developed for the KLOE experiment. Custom electronics asserts a trigger in a 2 μs decision time. The decision is based on the combined information of the electromagnetic calorimeter and the drift chamber. The entire trigger system is continuously monitored, and data flowing from the trigger system have allowed both an efficient online monitoring of the detector and an online luminosity measurement

  5. Hypothalamic dysfunction of the thrombospondin receptor α2δ-1 underlies the overeating and obesity triggered by brain-derived neurotrophic factor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeira, Joshua W; Felsted, Jennifer A; Teillon, Sarah; Daftary, Shabrine; Panessiti, Micaella; Wirth, Jena; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Rios, Maribel

    2014-01-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are critical components of the neural circuitry controlling appetite and body weight. Diminished BDNF signaling in mice results in severe hyperphagia and obesity. In humans, BDNF haploinsufficiency and the functional Bdnf Val66Met polymorphism have been linked to elevated food intake and body weight. The mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly defined. We demonstrate a chief role of α2δ-1, a calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor, in triggering overeating in mice with central BDNF depletion. We show reduced α2δ-1 cell-surface expression in the BDNF mutant ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), an energy balance-regulating center. This deficit contributes to the hyperphagia exhibited by BDNF mutant mice because selective inhibition of α2δ-1 by gabapentin infusion into wild-type VMH significantly increases feeding and body weight gain. Importantly, viral-mediated α2δ-1 rescue in BDNF mutant VMH significantly mitigates their hyperphagia, obesity, and liver steatosis and normalizes deficits in glucose homeostasis. Whole-cell recordings in BDNF mutant VMH neurons revealed normal calcium currents but reduced frequency of EPSCs. These results suggest calcium channel-independent effects of α2δ-1 on feeding and implicate α2δ-1-thrombospondin interactions known to facilitate excitatory synapse assembly. Our findings identify a central mechanism mediating the inhibitory effects of BDNF on feeding. They also demonstrate a novel and critical role for α2δ-1 in appetite control and suggest a mechanism underlying weight gain in humans treated with gabapentinoid drugs.

  6. Hypothalamic Dysfunction of the Thrombospondin Receptor α2δ-1 Underlies the Overeating and Obesity Triggered by Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeira, Joshua W.; Felsted, Jennifer A.; Teillon, Sarah; Daftary, Shabrine; Panessiti, Micaella; Wirth, Jena; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are critical components of the neural circuitry controlling appetite and body weight. Diminished BDNF signaling in mice results in severe hyperphagia and obesity. In humans, BDNF haploinsufficiency and the functional Bdnf Val66Met polymorphism have been linked to elevated food intake and body weight. The mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly defined. We demonstrate a chief role of α2δ-1, a calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor, in triggering overeating in mice with central BDNF depletion. We show reduced α2δ-1 cell-surface expression in the BDNF mutant ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), an energy balance-regulating center. This deficit contributes to the hyperphagia exhibited by BDNF mutant mice because selective inhibition of α2δ-1 by gabapentin infusion into wild-type VMH significantly increases feeding and body weight gain. Importantly, viral-mediated α2δ-1 rescue in BDNF mutant VMH significantly mitigates their hyperphagia, obesity, and liver steatosis and normalizes deficits in glucose homeostasis. Whole-cell recordings in BDNF mutant VMH neurons revealed normal calcium currents but reduced frequency of EPSCs. These results suggest calcium channel-independent effects of α2δ-1 on feeding and implicate α2δ-1–thrombospondin interactions known to facilitate excitatory synapse assembly. Our findings identify a central mechanism mediating the inhibitory effects of BDNF on feeding. They also demonstrate a novel and critical role for α2δ-1 in appetite control and suggest a mechanism underlying weight gain in humans treated with gabapentinoid drugs. PMID:24403154

  7. Prognostic Factors and Clinical Features of Non-typhoid Salmonella Bacteremia in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fong Yen

    2009-08-01

    Conclusion: S. enteritidis was the most frequently isolated serotype. High resistance rates of NTS to some readily available antimicrobials (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, TMP/SMX, fluoroquinolones were found. Patients with the factor of coma or inadequate antibiotic treatment had poor prognosis.

  8. Features and Prognostic Factors for Elderly With Acute Poisoning in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hui Hu

    2010-02-01

    Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that elderly patients with acute poisoning had a mortality rate of 9.6%. Suicide attempts resulted in more serious complications. The risk factors for mortality were herbicide intoxication, hypotension and respiratory failure.

  9. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  10. Features and Prognostic Factors for Elderly With Acute Poisoning in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hui Hu; Hsiu-Ling Chou; Wen-Hua Lu; Hsien-Hao Huang; Cheng-Chang Yang; David H.T. Yen; Wei-Fong Kao; Jou-Fan Deng; Chun-I Huang

    2010-01-01

    Elderly persons with acute poisoning in the emergency department (ED) and prognostic factors of outcomes have not been well addressed in previous research. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of elderly patients with acute poisoning visiting the ED, and to identify the possible predictive factors of mortality. Methods: Patients aged ≥ 65 years with acute poisoning who visited the ED in Taipei Veterans General Hospital from January 1, 2006 through to September 30, 2008 were ...

  11. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trigger selection configuration system of the ATLAS low- and high-level trigger (HLT) and the upgrades it received in preparation for LHC Run 2. The ATLAS trigger configuration system is responsible for applying the physics selection parameters for the online data taking at both trigger levels and the proper connection of the trigger lines across those levels. Here the low-level trigger consists of the already existing central trigger (CT) and the new Level-1 Topological trigger (L1Topo), which has been added for Run 2. In detail the tasks of the configuration system during the online data taking are Application of the selection criteria, e.g. energy cuts, minimum multiplicities, trigger object correlation, at the three trigger components L1Topo, CT, and HLT On-the-fly, e.g. rate-dependent, generation and application of prescale factors to the CT and HLT to adjust the trigger rates to the data taking conditions, such as falling luminosity or rate spikes in the detector readout ...

  12. Biochemical characterization of Sf9 Sp-family-like protein factors reveals interesting features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheedi, S; Ramachandran, A; Ehtesham, N Z; Hasnain, S E

    2007-01-01

    We earlier documented the involvement of novel Sp-family-like protein factors in transcription from the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) polyhedrin (polh) gene promoter [Ramachandran et al. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276: 23440-23449]. These zinc-dependent Sp-like factors bind to two putative Sp-factor-binding motifs, present within the AcSp sequence upstream of the polh promoter, with very high affinity (K(d) = 2.1 x 10(-12) M). Like other polh-promoter-associated host transcription factors, these Sp-like factors display tolerance to high ion concentrations up to even 3 M NaCl. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated a probable cross-talk between the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) Sp-family-like proteins and the TFIID complex. In complementary experiments, specific replacements of the Sp-factor-binding motifs with TATA-like elements resulted in expression of a luciferase reporter gene to almost the same level as that obtained with a wild-type native construct. Our results point to the possibility of the involvement of TFIID and Sf9 Sp protein interaction in transcription from the baculovirus polyhedrin promoter.

  13. Clinicopathological features and prognostic factors in extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Danish LYFO Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Amore, F; Christensen, B E; Brincker, H; Pedersen, N T; Thorling, K; Hastrup, J; Pedersen, M; Jensen, M K; Johansen, P; Andersen, E

    1991-01-01

    In a Danish population-based non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) registry, 1257 newly diagnosed NHL cases were registered over a 5-year period. Of these, 463 (37%) were extranodal. The gastrointestinal tract was the most common site of extranodal involvement (30% of the cases). Histologically, 44% of all extranodal NHL cases had high-grade, 17% intermediate and 27% low-grade features, while 12% were unclassified. The most common histological subtype (Kiel) was the centroblastic diffuse (23% of cases). 50% of all extranodal NHL were localised (stage IE or IIE) and 27% had B symptoms. Site-specific features included a strong age-correlation for thyroid and testes lymphoma (greater than 50 years) and a high prevalence of female cases in thyroid and salivary glands lymphomas (M/F 0.14 and 0.30, respectively). Overall 7-year survival for extranodal NHL was 46% (median 4.9 years). Poor prognosis patients could be identified by the presence of one or more of the following presentation characteristics: age greater than 65 years, B symptoms, high-grade histology, disseminated disease, elevated s-IgA and hyperuricaemia. Relative risk values ranged from 2.1 for age and B symptoms to 1.7 for hyperuricaemia.

  14. Features and prognostic factors for elderly with acute poisoning in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Hui; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Wen-Hua; Huang, Hsien-Hao; Yang, Cheng-Chang; Yen, David H T; Kao, Wei-Fong; Deng, Jou-Fan; Huang, Chun-I

    2010-02-01

    Elderly persons with acute poisoning in the emergency department (ED) and prognostic factors of outcomes have not been well addressed in previous research. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of elderly patients with acute poisoning visiting the ED, and to identify the possible predictive factors of mortality. Patients aged > or = 65 years with acute poisoning who visited the ED in Taipei Veterans General Hospital from January 1, 2006 through to September 30, 2008 were enrolled in the study. We collected demographic information on underlying diseases, initial presentations, causes and toxic substances, complications, dispositions, and outcomes. Analyses were conducted among different groups categorized according to age, suicide attempt, and outcome. Multiple logistic regression was applied to identify possible predictive clinical factors influencing mortality in the elderly with acute poisoning. A total of 250 patients were enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 77 years and male predominance. The most common cause of intoxication was unintentional poisoning. Medication accounted for 57.6% of poisonous substances, of which benzodiazepine was the most common drug, followed by warfarin. The overall mortality rate was 9.6%. The average length of stay in the ED increased significantly in the old (65-74 years), very old (75-84 years) and extremely old (> or = 85 years) groups. Suicide attempt patients experienced more complications including respiratory failure, aspiration pneumonia, hypotension and mortality. Three clinical predictive factors of mortality were identified: herbicide poisoning, hypotension and respiratory failure upon presentation. Our results demonstrated that elderly patients with acute poisoning had a mortality rate of 9.6%. Suicide attempts resulted in more serious complications. The risk factors for mortality were herbicide intoxication, hypotension and respiratory failure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  15. [Candidemia combined with bacterial bloodstream infection: analysis of clinical features and associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Sun, Yongchang; Zhuo, Jie; Liu, Xiaofang

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of and risk factors for candidemia combined with bacterial bloodstream infection(BSI) by retrospective analysis of cases. The clinical data of cases diagnosed as candidemia combined with BSI confirmed by blood culture were compared with those of cases with mono-candidemia in Beiing Tongren Hospital from January 2009 to December 2011. A logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the independent risk factors. Forty-two cases diagnosed as candidemia were analyzed including 14 cases of candidemia combined with BSI and 28 cases of mono-candidemia. Ten strains of gram-positive cocci and 4 strains of gram-negative bacilli were isolated from candidemia combined with BSI group.Six strains of C.albicans, 4 strains of C.glabrata, 3 strains of C.tropicalis and 1 strain of C.krosei were isolated. There was no C.parapsilosis isolated from candidemia combined with BSI group but 9 strains in the mono-candidemia group. The septic shock rate of the candidemia combined with BSI group was higher than that of the mono-candidemia group (12/14 vs 7/28, P = 0.000). The mortality rate of the candidemia combined with BSI group was higher than that of the mono-candidemia group (10/14 vs 15/28), but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.266).Four factors were found statistically different by univariate analysis, including hospitalization more than 4 weeks (P = 0.001), bacteremia before candidemia(P = 0.005), hematological tumor (P = 0.01) and abdominal infection (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that hospitalization more than 4 weeks was the independent risk factor. Gram-positive cocci were the predominant species and septic shock was more common in candidemia combined with BSI. Hospitalization more than 4 weeks was the independent risk factor for candidemia combined with BSI.

  16. Irrelevant Words Trigger an Attentional Blink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, T.; Zwickel, J.; Kitzmantel, M.; Ritter, J.; Schneider, W.X.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that salient distractor items displayed during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) trigger an attentional blink (AB) when they share features with the target item. Here we demonstrate that salient distractor words induce an AB independently of feature overlap with the target.

  17. Management of germ cell tumors with somatic type malignancy: pathological features, prognostic factors and survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kevin R; Magers, Martin J; Beck, Stephen D W; Cary, K Clint; Einhorn, Lawrence H; Ulbright, Thomas M; Foster, Richard S

    2014-11-01

    Germ cell tumors with somatic type malignancy are rare, occurring in approximately 2.7% to 8.6% of germ cell tumor cases. Prognostic factors and optimal management remain poorly defined. The Indiana University testis cancer database was queried from 1979 to 2011 for patients demonstrating germ cell tumor with somatic type malignancy at orchiectomy or subsequent resection. Patients with transformation to primitive neuroectodermal tumor only were excluded from study due to distinct management. Chart review, pathological review and survival analysis were performed. A total of 121 patients met the study inclusion criteria. The most common somatic type malignancy histologies were sarcoma (59), carcinoma (31) and sarcomatoid yolk sac tumor (17). Of these patients 32 demonstrated somatic type malignancy at germ cell tumor diagnosis. For those with delayed identification, median time from germ cell tumor to somatic type malignancy diagnosis was 33 months. This interval was longest for carcinomas (108 months). At a median followup of 71 months, 5-year cancer specific survival was 64%. Predictors of poorer cancer specific survival included somatic type malignancy diagnosed at late relapse (p = 0.017), referral to Indiana University for reoperative retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (p = 0.026) and grade (p = 0.026). None of these factors maintained prognostic significance on multivariate analysis. Somatic type malignancy histology subtype, stage, risk category and number of resections were not predictive of cancer specific survival. Germ cell tumor with somatic type malignancy is associated with poorer cancer specific survival than traditional germ cell tumor. Established prognostic factors for germ cell tumor lose predictive value in the setting of somatic type malignancy. Aggressive and serial resections are often necessary to optimize cancer specific survival. Tumor grade is an important prognostic factor in sarcomas and sarcomatoid yolk sac tumors. Copyright

  18. Meta-analysis of early nonmotor features and risk factors for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, Alastair J; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Hawkes, Christopher H; Giovannoni, Gavin; Lees, Andrew J; Schrag, Anette

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the association between diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) and risk factors or early symptoms amenable to population-based screening. A systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors for PD. The strongest associations with later diagnosis of PD were found for having a first-degree or any relative with PD (odds ratio [OR], 3.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.65-3.93 and OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 3.39-5.83) or any relative with tremor (OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 2.10-3.57), constipation (relative risk [RR], 2.34; 95% CI, 1.55-3.53), or lack of smoking history (current vs never: RR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.39-0.50), each at least doubling the risk of PD. Further positive significant associations were found for history of anxiety or depression, pesticide exposure, head injury, rural living, beta-blockers, farming occupation, and well-water drinking, and negative significant associations were found for coffee drinking, hypertension, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcium channel blockers, and alcohol, but not for diabetes mellitus, cancer, oral contraceptive pill use, surgical menopause, hormone replacement therapy, statins, acetaminophen/paracetamol, aspirin, tea drinking, history of general anesthesia, or gastric ulcers. In the systematic review, additional associations included negative associations with raised serum urate, and single studies or studies with conflicting results. The strongest risk factors associated with later PD diagnosis are having a family history of PD or tremor, a history of constipation, and lack of smoking history. Further factors also but less strongly contribute to risk of PD diagnosis or, as some premotor symptoms, require further standardized studies to demonstrate the magnitude of risk associated with them. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  19. Risk Factors and Clinical Follow-Up Features of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Anuk İnce, Deniz; Takcı, Şahin; Altıntaş, Buket

    2015-01-01

    AbstractAim: Meconium aspiration syndrome is usually seen in full-term and post-term infants and may cause complications including respiratory failure, pulmonary air leaks, and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors of meconium aspiration syndrome and assess the clinical course of the disease.Material and Methods: Fourteen of 508 infants diagnosed with meconium aspiration syndrome between January 2013 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed...

  20. Primary small bowel adenocarcinoma: current view on clinical features, risk and prognostic factors, treatment and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Korcz, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Emilia; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej

    2017-11-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) is a rare but increasing cause of gastrointestinal malignancy, being both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The goal of treatment is margin negative resection of a lesion and local lymphadenectomy, followed by modern adjuvant chemotherapy combinations in selected cases. Improved outcomes in patients with SBA are encouraging, but elucidation of mechanisms of carcinogenesis and risk factors as well as improved treatment for this malignancy is very needed.

  1. Review article "Remarks on factors influencing shear wave velocities and their role in evaluating susceptibilities to earthquake-triggered slope instability: case study for the Campania area (Italy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Paoletti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocities have a fundamental role in connection with the mitigation of seismic hazards, as their low values are the main causes of site amplification phenomena and can significantly influence the susceptibility of a territory to seismic-induced landslides. The shear wave velocity (Vs and modulus (G of each lithological unit are influenced by factors such as the degree of fracturing and faulting, the porosity, the clay amount and the precipitation, with the latter two influencing the unit water content. In this paper we discuss how these factors can affect the Vs values and report the results of different analyses that quantify the reduction in the rock Vs and shear modulus values connected to the presence of clay and water. We also show that significant results in assessing seismic-induced slope failure susceptibility for land planning targets could be achieved through a careful evaluation, based only on literature studies, of the geo-lithological and geo-seismic features of the study area.

  2. Factors associated with and prevalence of depressive features amongst older adults in an urban city in eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Shao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health problems have become serious for older Chinese adults who have lived through the process of urbanisation. This current research aimed to determine the prevalence of and associated factors for depressive features in a community-based sample of older adults in China. Methods: A community-based survey of 4077 adults aged 60 or older was conducted in Suzhou, China. Information including demographic characteristics, health behaviours, social support, disease histories and physical function was collected using a pre-designed questionnaire. Depressive features were assessed using the self-rating depression scale. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associated factors for depression. Results: The overall prevalence of depressive features in the surveyed population was 47.4% (45.9% in men and 48.5% in women. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the significant variables of depressive features were no fixed occupation (odds ratio [OR] = 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21–0.37, doing non-technical and service work (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.19–0.28 or being a manager and technical personnel (OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.19–0.32, physical activities (OR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.61–0.82, never taking dietary supplements (OR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.58–0.91, not having hobbies (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.15–1.56, never interacting with neighbours (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.28–2.50, cold relationship with a spouse (OR = 3.34; 95% CI: 1.18–9.45 and limited activities of daily living (OR = 2.27; 95% CI: 1.91–2.69. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for public policy interventions to address depression in elderly people located in Suzhou in China.

  3. Clinical features, predictive factors and outcome of hyperglycaemic emergencies in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unachukwu Chioma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycaemic emergencies are common acute complications of diabetes mellitus (DM but unfortunately, there is a dearth of published data on this entity from Nigeria. This study attempts to describe the clinical and laboratory scenario associated with this complication of DM. Methods This study was carried out in DM patients who presented to an urban hospital in Nigeria with hyperglycaemic emergencies (HEs. The information extracted included biodata, laboratory data and hospitalization outcome. Outcome measures included mortality rates, case fatality rates and predictive factors for HEs mortality. Statistical tests used are χ2, Student's t test and logistic regression. Results A total of 111 subjects with HEs were recruited for the study. Diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA and hyperosomolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS accounted for 94 (85% and 17 (15% respectively of the HEs. The mean age (SD of the subjects was 53.9 (14.4 years and their ages ranged from 22 to 86 years. DKA occurred in all subjects with type 1 DM and 73 (81% of subjects with type 2 DM. The presence of HSS was noted in 17 (19% of the subjects with type 2 DM. Hypokalaemia (HK was documented in 41 (37% of the study subjects. Elevated urea levels and hyponatraemia were noted more in subjects with DKA than in those subjects with HHS (57.5%,19% vs 53%,18%. The mortality rate for HEs in this report is 20% and the case fatality rates for DKA and HHS are 18% and 35% respectively. The predictive factors for HEs mortality include, sepsis, foot ulceration, previously undetected DM, hypokalaemia and being elderly. Conclusion HHS carry a higher case fatality rate than DKA and the predictive factors for hyperglycaemic emergencies' mortality in the Nigerian with DM include foot ulcers, hypokalaemia and being elderly.

  4. [Semiological features and risk factors associated with osteoarthritis of the hip in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, D D; Ouédraogo, T; Tiéno, H; Zabsonré-Tiendrébéogo, J; Pédro, C; Draho, J

    2015-01-01

    To study the epidemiological and clinical aspects of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip in Ouagadougou, as well as its risk factors. This retrospective study covered cases treated over a 3-year period (February 2006 through January 2009) in the internal medicine department of the Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) and the surgery department of the private hospital Notre-Dame-de la Paix of Ouagadougou. All patients included had OA of the hip that met the Kellgren and Lawrence criteria. There were 46 patients who met the study criteria, but only 40 files could be used. The patients' mean age was 46.4 years ± 15.2 years (range 25-80 years; 10 patients were older than 56 years). Men accounted for more than half (n=23, 57.5%). The mean duration of disease was 6.2 years ± 4.5 years (range: 1-19 years). The right hip alone was concerned in 20 patients (50%), the left hip in 16 (40%), and the OA was bilateral in four (10%). Seventeen patients had sickle cell disease (42.5%), 11 SC and 6 SS. The risk factors included necrosis of the femoral head in 19 cases (59.37%), hip dysplasia in 6 (18.74%), hip trauma in 3 (9.37%), inflammatory arthropathy in 3 more (9.37%), and epiphysitis in one (3.13%). The OA of the hip was primary in 8 cases (20%). Three patients were at stage 1, 9 at stage 2, 15 at stage 3, and 13 at stage 4 according to the Arlet-Ficat classification. OA of the hip arises in a young population and is dominated by secondary OA. The dominant risk factor was aseptic necrosis of the femoral head associated with sickle cell disease. In view of the small number of patients with primary OA, no definitive conclusions can be drawn about it.

  5. FEATURES OF THE SEED DORMANCY IN UMBELLIFER CROPS CAUSED BY VARIOUS FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Baleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out at FGBNU VNIIO in 20112016. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of different types of organic dormancy caused by various factors on seed quality of some representatives of umbellifer crops. The objects of the study were seeds: parsnip ‘Kulinar’ (Pastinaca sativa L.; carrot ‘Rogneda’ (Daucus carrota L.; root parsley ‘Ljubasha’ (Petroselinum crispum (Mill. Nyman ex A.W. Hill.; root celery ‘Kupidon’ (Apium graveolens L.; coriander ‘Yantar’ (Coriandrum sativum L. and dill ‘Kentavr’ (Anethum graveolens L.. In all seeds studied, the speed of embryo growth was decreased by 30% or0.03 mma day. Under influence of the induced dormancy caused by incubation in extract from dill seeds, the speed of embryo growth in all species was decreased by 94-97% on average. The process of germination of just picked seeds in all crops studied showed itself in reduction of germinated seed number by 54% as compared with control variant. Under the effect of incubation at high temperature the seeds of parsnip and root celery didn’t germinate, whereas the germination in the seeds of coriander, root parsley and carrot was decreased by 51%, 47% and 46%, respectively as compared with control. There is no germination observed in parsnip, carrot, root celery and coriander under influence of induced dormancy caused by incubation in extract from dill seeds. In this case, the germination of seeds of root parsley and dill was 8.1% and 15%, respectively. The Pearson correlation between the speed of embryo growth and percent of seed germination showed the significant and positive relationship in the range 0.706-0.952. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that induced by temperature or allelopathic dormancy had impact on the speed of embryo’s growth in the crops studied, where factor effect was 89-86% depending on type of dormancy. Analysis of variance between the factors of dormancy and germination revealed that all

  6. [Clinical features and risk factors of co-morbid tic disorder in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ying; Xiao, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Yan-Zhao; Zhang, Zhao-Xia; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Chun-He; Gao, Mei-Hao

    2014-09-01

    To study the clinical features and risk factors of co-morbid tic disorder (TD) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 312 children with ADHD were involved in this study. Subtypes of co-morbid TD, incidences of TD in different subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-I, ADHD-HI and ADHD-C) were observed. Thirteen potential factors influencing the comorbidity rate of TD in ADHD were evaluated by univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis. Forty-two of 312 children with ADHD suffered from co-morbid TD (13.5%). Comorbidity rate of TD in children with ADHD-C (24.1%) was significantly higher than in those with ADHD-HI (10.9%) and ADHD-I (8.8%) (P<0.05). There were 21 cases (50.0%) of transient TD, 12 cases (28.6%) of chronic TD, and 9 cases (21.4%) of Tourette syndrome. The univariate analysis revealed 6 factors associated with comorbidity: addiction to mobile phone or computer games, poor eating habits, infection, improper family education, poor relationship between parents and poor relationship with schoolmates. Multiple logistic analysis revealed two independent risk factors for comorbidity: improper family education (OR=7.000, P<0.05) and infection (OR=2.564, P<0.05). The incidence of co-morbid TD in children with ADHD is influenced by many factors, and early interventions should be performed based on the main risk factors.

  7. The ATLAS b-jet Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira de Lima, D E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS b-jet Trigger The online event selection is crucial to reject most of the events containing uninteresting background collisions while preserving as much as possible the interesting physical signals. The b-jet selection is part of the trigger strategy of the ATLAS experiment and a set of dedicated triggers is presently contributing to the event selection for the 2011 running. The b-jets acceptance is increased and the background reduced by lowering jet transverse energy thresholds at the first trigger level and applying b-tagging techniques at the subsequent levels. Different physics channels, especially topologies containing more than one b-jet where higher rejection factors are achieved, benefit from requesting this trigger to be fired. An overview of the status-of-art of the b-jet trigger menu and performance on real data is presented in this poster.

  8. Psychiatric Disorders, Sociodemographic Features and Risk Factors in Children Driving to Committing Crime (Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyüboğlu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Object: The aim of this study was to examine children driving to committing crime who were brought to psychiatry clinic for forensic evaluation because of the crimes they committed to. Additionally, evaluation of these children's psychiaytric disorders, crime characteristics, sociodemographic data, factors driving to committing crime and forensic reports arranged by the physician were other aims. Methods: In this study 204 children, who were brought to the clinic in order to be evaluated whether they perceive the legal meaning and consequences of that action or possess sufficient ability to channel their behaviors, were included. In order to diagnose any psychiatric disorder, a structured interrogation schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for present and lifetime was applied all children and families and sociodemographic data form was completed. Results: At least one psychiatric disorder was present in 47% (n =96 of children driving to committing crime. The most common disorders were Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Conduct Disorder. Almost none of them have been treated before. 45% of them dropped out their school, and 40% were smoking. Additionally, most of their parents who had low socioeconomical level also had very low education level. Discussion: It was determined that being male, living in a low socioeconomic family environment, living in large families, using drugs, smoking, not attending school and having parents with low education level were significant related factors for juvenile delinquency.

  9. Clinical Features of and Risk Factors for Rhabdomyolysis Among Adult Patients with Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Yu; Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Kung, Chia-Te; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Among 1,076 dengue patients, 9 patients with rhabdomyolysis and 1,067 patients without rhabdomyolysis (controls) were retrospectively analyzed. Of nine patients with rhabdomyolysis, the most commonly reported symptom other than fever was myalgia; dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) was found in seven cases, and acute kidney injury was found in six cases. Furthermore, one (11.1%) patient died. The median duration from hospital admission to rhabdomyolysis diagnosis was 3 days. Patients with rhabdomyolysis had higher age, proportion of men, prevalence of hypertension, frequency of myalgia, and incidences of DHF, pleural effusion, and acute kidney injury than controls. Multivariate analysis showed that hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 14.270), myalgia (OR = 20.377), and acute kidney injury (OR = 65.547) were independent risk factors for rhabdomyolysis. Comparison of cytokine/chemokine concentrations in 101 DHF patients, including those with (N = 4) and without (N = 97) rhabdomyolysis, showed that interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased in the former. PMID:25349377

  10. Clinical features, outcomes, and survival factor in patients with vertebral osteomyelitis infected by methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hirokazu; Urakawa, Takaaki; Watanabe, Kei; Hirano, Toru; Katsumi, Keiichi; Ohashi, Masayuki; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Yajiri, Yoichi; Kikuchi, Ren; Hosaka, Noboru; Sawakami, Kimihiko; Miura, Kazuto; Nakamura, Ichiro; Fujikawa, Ryuta; Wakasugi, Masashi; Endo, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate clinico-radiological features, therapeutic outcomes, and survival factors of vertebral osteomyelitis patients infected by methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Vertebral osteomyelitis patients admitted to the orthopaedic department between 2007 and 2011 (n = 248) were selected for this multicenter study. We compared patients' backgrounds, therapeutic course, and in-hospital mortality between MRS and methicillin-susceptible staphylococci (MSS). We also examined survival factors of vertebral osteomyelitis due to MRS. Sixteen patients of MRS vertebral osteomyelitis and 55 patients of MSS were included in this study. In MRS vertebral osteomyelitis, the rates of comorbid diabetes mellitus, involvement of >2 vertebral bodies, in-hospital mortality, and operation of surgical debridement were higher compared to those in MSS vertebral osteomyelitis. Univariate analysis showed that operation of surgical debridement was a factor related to survival in MRS patients. Higher rate of comorbid diabetes mellitus, involvement of >2 vertebral bodies, in-hospital mortality, and performing surgical debridement are peculiar features of MRS vertebral osteomyelitis compared to MSS vertebral osteomyelitis. If patients with MRS vertebral osteomyelitis respond poorly to antibiotic therapy, it might be better to consider surgical debridement not to lose an opportunity of operation due to exacerbation of systemic conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Features of cryptic promoters and their varied reliance on bromodomain-containing factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha G Pattenden

    Full Text Available The Set2-Rpd3S pathway is important for the control of transcription memory. Mutation of components of this pathway results in cryptic transcription initiation within the coding region of approximately 30% of yeast genes. Specifically, deletion of the Set2 histone methyltransferase or Rco1, a component of the Rpd3S histone deacetylase complex leads to hyperacetylation of certain open reading frames (ORFs. We used this mutant as a system to study the role of histone modifications and co-activator recruitment in preinitiation complex (PIC formation. Specifically, we looked at the dependence of promoters on the bromodomain-containing RSC complex and the Bdf1 protein. We found that the dependence of cryptic promoters for these proteins varied. Overall, our data indicate that cryptic promoters are independently regulated, and their activation is dependent on factors that govern gene activation at canonical promoters.

  12. Ventilator-associated pneumonia due to extensive drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Eylem Sercan; Horasan, Elif Sahin; Karaca, Kerem; Ersöz, Gülden; Naycı Atış, Sibel; Kaya, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is characterized by a rapid development of resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. We investigated the risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by extensive drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB). Clinical parameters and overall in-hospital mortality rates were compared between the VAP with and without XDRAB infection groups. This study showed that VAP caused by XDRAB was not associated with in-hospital mortality. However, it was related to high Simplified Acute Physiology Score II scores and increasing durations of hospital stays. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The new UA1 calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhandler, E.

    1988-01-01

    The new UA1 first-level calorimeter trigger processor is described, with emphasis on the fast two-dimensional electromagnetic cluster-finding that is its most novel feature. This processor is about five times more powerful than its predecessor, and makes extensive use of pipelining techniques. It allows multiple combinations of triggers on electromagnetic showers, hadronic jets and energy sums, including a total-energy veto of multiple interactions and a full vector sum of missing transverse energy. (author)

  14. Sidelobe Suppression Featuring the Phase Coherence Factor in 3-D Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. N. Anwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI could be performed by beamforming of the signals from an array of ultrawideband (UWB antennas. Preferably the imaging is done in 3-D so that both the position and the height of the target be revealed. This is possible with planar array antenna geometry. However, implementing this technique that fulfills Nyquist criterion leads to a large number of antennas while sparse array suffers from an increase of the sidelobe level. In this work, the Phased Coherence Factor (PCF is applied to conventional delay and sum (DAS beamformer to suppress the sidelobe of a sparse planar antenna array. The performance of the proposed technique is experimentally evaluated in terms of the target-to-clutter ratio (TCR, and the separation resolution. It is discovered that PCF is effective in reducing the sidelobe’s artifacts, resulting in TCR of greater than 20 dB and a separation resolution of 20 cm at 2.5 m range.

  15. Unique Features of High-Density Lipoproteins in the Japanese: In Population and in Genetic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yokoyama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite its gradual increase in the past several decades, the prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease is low in Japan. This is largely attributed to difference in lifestyle, especially food and dietary habits, and it may be reflected in certain clinical parameters. Plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels, a strong counter risk for atherosclerosis, are indeed high among the Japanese. Accordingly, lower HDL seems to contribute more to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD than an increase in non-HDL lipoproteins at a population level in Japan. Interestingly, average HDL levels in Japan have increased further in the past two decades, and are markedly higher than in Western populations. The reasons and consequences for public health of this increase are still unknown. Simulation for the efficacy of raising HDL cholesterol predicts a decrease in CHD of 70% in Japan, greater than the extent by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicted by simulation or achieved in a statin trial. On the other hand, a substantial portion of hyperalphalipoproteinemic population in Japan is accounted for by genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, which is also commonly unique in East Asian populations. It is still controversial whether CETP mutations are antiatherogenic. Hepatic Schistosomiasis is proposed as a potential screening factor for historic accumulation of CETP deficiency in East Asia.

  16. Sexual infidelity as trigger for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Julianna M; Bonomi, Amy E; Lee, Meghan A; Ludwin, Jennifer M

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a qualitative study to examine acute, situational factors and chronic stressors that triggered severe intimate partner violence (IPV) in women. Our sample consisted of 17 heterosexual couples, where the male was in detention for IPV and made telephone calls to his female victim. We used up to 4 hours of telephone conversational data for each couple to examine the couple's understanding of (1) acute triggers for the violent event and (2) chronic stressors that created the underlying context for violence. Grounded theory guided our robust, iterative data analysis involving audiotape review, narrative summation, and thematic organization. Consistently across couples, violence was acutely triggered by accusations of infidelity, typically within the context of alcohol or drug use. Victims sustained significant injury, including severe head trauma (some resulting in hospitalization/surgery), bite wounds, strangulation complications, and lost pregnancy. Chronic relationship stressors evident across couples included ongoing anxiety about infidelity, preoccupation with heterosexual gender roles and religious expectations, drug and alcohol use, and mental health concerns (depression, anxiety, and suicide ideation/attempts). Disseminated models feature jealousy as a strategy used by perpetrators to control IPV victims and as a red flag for homicidal behavior. Our findings significantly extend this notion by indicating that infidelity concerns, a specific form of jealousy, were the immediate trigger for both the acute violent episode and resulting injuries to victims and were persistently raised by both perpetrators and victims as an ongoing relationship stressor.

  17. Epidemiological features and risk factors associated with the spatial and temporal distribution of human brucellosis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human brucellosis incidence in China has been increasing dramatically since 1999. However, epidemiological features and potential factors underlying the re-emergence of the disease remain less understood. Methods Data on human and animal brucellosis cases at the county scale were collected for the year 2004 to 2010. Also collected were environmental and socioeconomic variables. Epidemiological features including spatial and temporal patterns of the disease were characterized, and the potential factors related to the spatial heterogeneity and the temporal trend of were analysed using Poisson regression analysis, Granger causality analysis, and autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) models, respectively. Results The epidemic showed a significantly higher spatial correlation with the number of sheep and goats than swine and cattle. The disease was most prevalent in grassland areas with elevation between 800–1,600 meters. The ADL models revealed that local epidemics were correlated with comparatively lower temperatures and less sunshine in winter and spring, with a 1–7 month lag before the epidemic peak in May. Conclusions Our findings indicate that human brucellosis tended to occur most commonly in grasslands at moderate elevation where sheep and goats were the predominant livestock, and in years with cooler winter and spring or less sunshine. PMID:24238301

  18. Life at the limits: peculiar features of lichen symbiosis related to extreme environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, J.-P.; Horneck, G.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    A lichen is a symbiotic association formed by a mycobiont (fungi), a photobiont (algae) and/or a cyanobacteria. The special symbiotic contact and interaction between the bionts in a lichen is a prerequisite for maintainance of viability for each of them during influences by harsh environmental factors. In nature parameters like UV radiation, low or high temperatures and dryness may have a destructive impact on all life functions of an organism. But with lichens the evolution has created a peculiar symbiosis which enables a wide variety of lichen species to colonize habitats where their separate bionts would not be able to survive. The results of our investigations are demonstrating these aspects (de Vera et al. 2003, 2004).We have already investigated the viability of the entire lichen thallus, the embedded spores in lichen apothecia (fruiting bodies) as well as the isolated spores and isolated photobionts after exposure to most extreme conditions caused by simulated space parameters as extreme UV radiation and vacuum. The results presented here focuse on the survival capacity of the isolated photobionts from the two lichen species Xanthoria elegans and Fulgensia bracteata which are not protected by the fungal structure of the lichen thallus. They are based on examinations using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), analysed by modern methods of the Image Tool Program and by culture experiments. In contrast to photobionts embedded in the entire lichen thallus the isolated photobionts are much more sensitve to the extreme conditions of UV radiation and vaccum: while 50 % of the bionts in an entire lichen thallus are able to cope with simulated extreme space conditions (UV-radiation: λ quad ≥ 160nm and vacuum: p = 10-5 Pa) during an exposure time of 2 weeks, the viability of the isolated photobiont cells was already decreasing after 2 hours of exposure. All photobiont cells were inactivated after longer exposure times of about 8 hours. Further more analysis

  19. Touch-Trigger Probe Error Compensation in a Machining Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Lee, Eung Suk

    2011-01-01

    Kinematic contact trigger probes are widely used for feature inspection and measurement on coordinate measurement machines (CMMs) and computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine tools. Recently, the probing accuracy has become one of the most important factors in the improvement of product quality, as the accuracy of such machining centers and measuring machines is increasing. Although high-accuracy probes using strain gauge can achieve this requirement, in this paper we study the universal economic kinematic contact probe to prove its probing mechanism and errors, and to try to make the best use of its performance. Stylus-ball-radius and center-alignment errors are proved, and the probing error mechanism on the 3D measuring coordinate is analyzed using numerical expressions. Macro algorithms are developed for the compensation of these errors, and actual tests and verifications are performed with a kinematic contact trigger probe and reference sphere on a CNC machine tool

  20. Geomorphological survey and remote sensing analysis: a multidisciplinary approach to reconstruct triggering factors of a DSGSD in Maso Corto (South Tyrol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Gabriele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Piccin, Gianluca; Chinellato, Giulia; Iasio, Christian; Mosna, David; Morelli, Corrado

    2015-04-01

    In the Alpine regions, it is essential and urgent to define an improved and specific set of monitoring methods for the evolution of instability phenomena in order to avoid the closure of the installations because of the occurrence of natural calamities and to ensure the safety of citizens. In this context the SloMove Project aims at consolidate know-how of the ordinary monitoring applications of surface movements, evaluate their pros and cons and optimize the expected technical procedures of investigation. Within the SloMove project, an experimental composite monitoring has been carried out in the touristic site of Maso Corto (South Tyrol, Italy). Structural-Geomorphological Survey, GPS measurements and Time series analysis of SAR Interferometry data have been integrated. The purposes of this experiment are: 1) to reconstruct the geomorphological dynamics and their state of activity; 2) to provide considerations on the role of permafrost as an influential factor for landslide activity. Structural-Geomorphological survey highlighted control of structural asset of the outcropping lithologies on geomorphological markers, such as trenches, counterscarps, outcropping sliding surfaces. The area is characterized by metamorphic rocks, affected by foliation oriented between N350 and N30. Moreover, joints due to frost thaw activity are common in the shallow portions and the presence of two sets of tectonics fractures (N45, 45°-60° and N360, sub-vertical) has been recognized. In order to evaluate the state of permafrost, rock glaciers in the area have been investigated. SAR interferometry data have been processed by TRE® through the SqueeSAR™ analysis using Radarsat and Envisat images acquired during a period between 2003 and 2009. GPS surveys were carried out through the technique of Rapid-Static Relative Positioning during the summer months of 2012 and 2013. Data shows that an area of 2km2, north of Maso Corto, is affected by a Deep Seated Gravitational Slide

  1. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Stenosing tenosynovitis is a condition commonly known as “trigger finger.” It is sometimes also called “trigger thumb.” The tendons that bend the fingers glide easily with ...

  2. Causality and headache triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  3. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  4. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...

  5. Biomass digestibility is predominantly affected by three factors of wall polymer features distinctive in wheat accessions and rice mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat and rice are important food crops with enormous biomass residues for biofuels. However, lignocellulosic recalcitrance becomes a crucial factor on biomass process. Plant cell walls greatly determine biomass recalcitrance, thus it is essential to identify their key factors on lignocellulose saccharification. Despite it has been reported about cell wall factors on biomass digestions, little is known in wheat and rice. In this study, we analyzed nine typical pairs of wheat and rice samples that exhibited distinct cell wall compositions, and identified three major factors of wall polymer features that affected biomass digestibility. Results Based on cell wall compositions, ten wheat accessions and three rice mutants were classified into three distinct groups each with three typical pairs. In terms of group I that displayed single wall polymer alternations in wheat, we found that three wall polymer levels (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin) each had a negative effect on biomass digestibility at similar rates under pretreatments of NaOH and H2SO4 with three concentrations. However, analysis of six pairs of wheat and rice samples in groups II and III that each exhibited a similar cell wall composition, indicated that three wall polymer levels were not the major factors on biomass saccharification. Furthermore, in-depth detection of the wall polymer features distinctive in rice mutants, demonstrated that biomass digestibility was remarkably affected either negatively by cellulose crystallinity (CrI) of raw biomass materials, or positively by both Ara substitution degree of non-KOH-extractable hemicelluloses (reverse Xyl/Ara) and p-coumaryl alcohol relative proportion of KOH-extractable lignin (H/G). Correlation analysis indicated that Ara substitution degree and H/G ratio negatively affected cellulose crystallinity for high biomass enzymatic digestion. It was also suggested to determine whether Ara and H monomer have an interlinking with cellulose chains

  6. [Clinical features of invasive candidiasis and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in children: a multicenter study in Urumqi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai Er Ken, Ai Bi Bai; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Xiong, Dai-Qin; Xu, Pei-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features of invasive candidiasis in children and the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection. A retrospective study was performed on 134 children with invasive candidiasis and hospitalized in 5 tertiary hospitals in Urumqi, China, between January 2010 and December 2015. The Candida species distribution was investigated. The clinical data were compared between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection. The risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 134 Candida strains were isolated from 134 children with invasive candidiasis, and non-albicans Candida (NAC) accounted for 53.0%. The incidence of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and other pediatric wards were 41.8% and 48.5% respectively. Sixty-eight patients (50.7%) had Candida bloodstream infection, and 45 patients (33.6%) had Candida urinary tract infection. There were significant differences in age, rate of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and incidence rates of chronic renal insufficiency, heart failure, urinary catheterization, and NAC infection between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection (Pcandidiasis is similar between the PICU and other pediatric wards. NAC is the most common species of invasive candidiasis. Candida bloodstream infection is the most common invasive infection. Younger age (1-24 months) and NAC infection are the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection.

  7. Clinical and Microbiological Features and Factors Associated with Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Men with Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Gu; Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological features in the patients with community-acquired acute bacterial prostatitis (CA-ABP), as well as factors that affect fluoroquinolone resistance. A retrospective analysis was performed of 209 patients hospitalized for antibiotic treatment of CA-ABP. We investigated patient age, body mass index, underlying diseases, recurrence, prostate-related factors and results of urine culture examination and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Seventeen patients (8.1%) had fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial colonies. When we divided the subjects into groups according to the fluoroquinolone resistance, the group with resistant bacteria was significantly older, had larger prostates and had greater residual urine volumes. Bacteria were identified in 127 of 209 patients (60.8%), and the most commonly cultured included Escherichia coli (43.5%). The sensitivity of the cultured bacteria to fluoroquinolones was high compared to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin, but similar to cefotaxime. The bacteria were more sensitive to amikacin and imipenem than to fluoroquinolone. The multivariate analysis revealed that prostate volume ≥40 ml (p = 0.024) and residual urine volume >100 ml (p = 0.004) were independent predictive factors for fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy might be an effective treatment in CA-ABP. However, combination antibiotic therapy is recommended in cases with prostate volume ≥40 ml or residual urine volume >100 ml, because fluoroquinolone resistance can occur. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Detection and analysis of unusual features in the structural model and structure-factor data of a birch pollen allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Bernhard

    2012-04-01

    Physically improbable features in the model of the birch pollen structure Bet v 1d (PDB entry 3k78) are faithfully reproduced in electron density generated with the deposited structure factors, but these structure factors themselves exhibit properties that are characteristic of data calculated from a simple model and are inconsistent with the data and error model obtained through experimental measurements. The refinement of the 3k78 model against these structure factors leads to an isomorphous structure different from the deposited model with an implausibly small R value (0.019). The abnormal refinement is compared with normal refinement of an isomorphous variant structure of Bet v 1l (PDB entry 1fm4). A variety of analytical tools, including the application of Diederichs plots, Rσ plots and bulk-solvent analysis are discussed as promising aids in validation. The examination of the Bet v 1d structure also cautions against the practice of indicating poorly defined protein chain residues through zero occupancies. The recommendation to preserve diffraction images is amplified. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography. All rights reserved.

  9. Pregnancy-related systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical features, outcome and risk factors of disease flares--a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huaxia; Liu, Hui; Xu, Dong; Zhao, Lidan; Wang, Qian; Leng, Xiaomei; Zheng, Wenjie; Zhang, Fengchun; Tang, Fulin; Zhang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical features, outcome, and risk factors of disease flares in patients with pregnancy-related lupus (PRL). Medical charts of 155 consecutive PRL inpatients were systematically reviewed, including demographic data, clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, and outcome. PRL cases were divided into active (a-PRL) (n = 82, 53.0%) and stable lupus (s-PRL) (n = 73, 47.0%). Compared with nonpregnant active female systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, a-PRL including new-onset lupus (n-PRL) and flare lupus (f-PRL) (n = 41 respectively), had a higher incidence of renal and hematological involvement but less mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal involvement (plupus flares and serological activity (hypocomplementemia and/or anti-dsDNA positivity) at the time of conception were associated with lupus flares in PRL mothers. SLE patients with a flare history and serological activity at the time of conception were at an increased risk of disease flares during pregnancy and puerperium. a-PRL patients were more prone to renal and hematological involvement, pregnancy complications, and a poorer prognosis despite more vigorous glucocorticoid treatment.

  10. Foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease: clinical features, prognostic factors of surgical outcome and clinical stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and prognostic factors of surgical outcome of foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease and put forward the clinical stage. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 135 patients with foot drop due to lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical features and mechanism were analyzed. Age, sex, duration of palsy, preoperative muscle strength of tibialis anterior (TA, sensation defect of affected lower limb, affected foot, diagnosis and compressed nerve roots were recorded and compared with surgical outcome. RESULTS: Foot drop was observed in 8.1% of all inpatients of lumbar degenerative disease. L5 nerve root compression was observed in 126 of all 135 patients (93.3%. Single, double and triple roots compression was observed respectively in 43, 83, and 9 patients (31.9%, 61.5%, and 6.6%. But there was no significant relationship between preoperative muscle strength of TA and the number of compressed roots. The muscle strength of TA was improved in 113 (83.7% patients after surgery, but it reached to >=4 in only 21 (15.6% patients. Improvement of the muscle strength of TA was almost stable at the 6-month follow-up. At the last follow-up, the muscle strength of TA was 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 respectively in 28, 24, 62, 13, 8 patients. Multivariate logistic regression showed duration of palsy (p=0.0360, OR=2.543, preoperative muscle strength of TA (p=0.0064, OR=5.528 and age (p=0.0309, OR=3.208 were factors that influenced recovery following an operation. CONCLUSIONS: L5 nerve root was most frequently affected. The muscle strength of TA improved in most patients after surgery, but few patients can get a good recovery from foot drop. Patients of shorter duration of palsy, better preoperative muscle strength of TA and younger age showed a better surgical outcome.

  11. Upgrade of the CMS Global Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Sakulin, Hannes; Stahl, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity for Run-II of the Large Hadron Collider poses new challenges for the trigger systems of the experiments. To keep triggering with a similar performance as in Run-I, the CMS muon trigger is currently being upgraded. The new algorithms will provide higher resolution, especially for the muon transverse momentum and will make use of isolation criteria that combine calorimeter with muon information already in the level-1 trigger. The demands of the new algorithms can only be met by upgrading the level-1 trigger system to new powerful FPGAs with high bandwidth I/O. The processing boards will be based on the new μTCA standard. We report on the planned algorithms for the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT) which sorts and removes duplicates from boundaries of the muon trigger sub-systems. Furthermore, it determines how isolated the muon candidates are based on calorimetric energy deposits. The μGMT will be implemented using a processing board that features a larg...

  12. Multidisciplinary management of pyogenic spondylodiscitis: epidemiological and clinical features, prognostic factors and long-term outcomes in 207 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, Enrico; Taccari, F; Autore, G; Giovannenze, F; Pambianco, V; Cauda, R; Maccauro, G; Fantoni, M

    2018-04-17

    Pyogenic spondylodiscitis (PS) is a potentially life-threatening infection burdened by high morbidity rates. Despite the rising incidence, the proper management of PS is still controversial. Aim of this study was to describe the clinical features of PS and to evaluate the prognostic factors and the long-term outcomes of a large population of patients. 207 cases of PS treated from 2008 to 2016 with a 2-year follow-up were enrolled. Clinical data from each patient were recorded. The primary outcome was the rate of healing without residual disability. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, healing from infection, death, relapse, and residual disability. Binomial logistic regression and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate prognostic factors. Median diagnostic delay was 30 days and the rate of onset neurological impairment was 23.6%. Microbiological diagnosis was established in 155 patients (74.3%) and the median duration of total antibiotic therapy was 148 days. Orthopedic treatment was conservative for 124 patients and surgical in 47 cases. Complete healing without disability was achieved in 142 patients (77.6%). Statistically confirmed negative prognostic factors were: negative microbiological culture, neurologic impairment at diagnosis and underlying endocarditis (p ≤ 0.05). Healing from infection rate was 90.9%, while residual disabilities occurred in 23.5%. Observed mortality rate was 7.8%. The microbiological diagnosis is the main predictive factor for successful treatment. Early diagnosis and multidisciplinary management are also needed to identify underlying aggressive conditions and to avoid neurological complications associated with poorer long-term outcomes. Despite high healing rates, PS may lead to major disabilities still representing a difficult challenge. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary material.

  13. The Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Surgical Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache in Patients With Cervical Spine Disorders Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Keiko; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-07-01

    To clarify the clinical features and risk factors of cervicogenic headache (CEH; as diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta) in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery. CEH is caused by cervical spine disorders. The pathogenic mechanism of CEH is hypothesized to involve a convergence of the upper cervical afferents from the C1, C2, and C3 spinal nerves and the trigeminal afferents in the trigeminocervical nucleus of the upper cervical cord. According to this hypothesis, functional convergence of the upper cervical and trigeminal sensory pathways allows the bidirectional (afferent and efferent) referral of pain to the occipital, frontal, temporal, and/or orbital regions. Previous prospective studies have reported an 86-88% prevalence of headache in patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy requiring anterior cervical surgery; however, these studies did not diagnose headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Therefore, a better understanding of the prevalence rate, clinical features, risk factors, and treatment responsiveness of CEH in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery is necessary. We performed a single hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study and enrolled 70 consecutive patients with cervical spine disorders such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, and cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy who had been scheduled to undergo anterior cervical fusion or dorsal cervical laminoplasty between June 2014 and December 2015. Headache was diagnosed preoperatively according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and a 0-100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) were used to evaluate clinical

  14. The LVL2 trigger goes online

    CERN Document Server

    David Berge

    On Friday, the 9th of February, the ATLAS TDAQ community reached an important milestone. In a successful integration test, cosmic-ray muons were recorded with parts of the muon spectrometer, the central-trigger system and a second-level trigger algorithm. This was actually the first time that a full trigger slice all the way from the first-level trigger muon chambers up to event building after event selection by the second-level trigger ran online with cosmic rays. The ATLAS trigger and data acquisition system has a three-tier structure that is designed to cope with the enormous demands of proton-proton collisions at a bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, with a typical event size of 1-2 MB. The online event selection has to reduce the incoming rate by a factor of roughly 200,000 to 200 Hz, a rate digestible by the archival-storage and offline-processing facilities. ATLAS has a mixed system: the first-level trigger (LVL1) is in hardware, while the other two consecutive levels, the second-level trigger (LVL2)...

  15. Intelligent trigger processor for the crystal box

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, G H; Cooper, M D; Hart, G W; Hoffman, C M; Hogan, G E; Hughes, E B; Matis, H S; Rolfe, J; Sandberg, V D; Williams, R A; Wilson, S; Zeman, H

    1981-01-01

    A large solid angle angular modular NaI(Tl) detector with 432 phototubes and 88 trigger scintillators is being used to search simultaneously for three lepton flavor-changing decays of the muon. A beam of up to 10/sup 6/ muons stopping per second with a 6% duty factor would yield up to 1000 triggers per second from random triple coincidences. A reduction of the trigger rate to 10 Hz is required from a hardwired primary trigger processor. Further reduction to <1 Hz is achieved by a microprocessor-based secondary trigger processor. The primary trigger hardware imposes voter coincidence logic, stringent timing requirements, and a non-adjacency requirement in the trigger scintillators defined by hardwired circuits. Sophisticated geometric requirements are imposed by a PROM-based matrix logic, and energy and vector-momentum cuts are imposed by a hardwired processor using LSI flash ADC's and digital arithmetic logic. The secondary trigger employs four satellite microprocessors to do a sparse data scan, multiplex ...

  16. The ATLAS trigger: high-level trigger commissioning and operation during early data taking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalo, R

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the two general-purpose experiments due to start operation soon at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC will collide protons at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV, with a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. The ATLAS three-level trigger will reduce this input rate to match the foreseen offline storage capability of 100-200 Hz. This paper gives an overview of the ATLAS High Level Trigger focusing on the system design and its innovative features. We then present the ATLAS trigger strategy for the initial phase of LHC exploitation. Finally, we report on the valuable experience acquired through in-situ commissioning of the system where simulated events were used to exercise the trigger chain. In particular we show critical quantities such as event processing times, measured in a large-scale HLT farm using a complex trigger menu

  17. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  18. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  19. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your house and may trigger asthma. Your asthma or your child's asthma may be worse around products such as ... You Can Take If you find that your asthma or your child's asthma gets worse when you use a certain ...

  20. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Alexandre, G; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bee, C; Behera, P; Bell, P; Bendel, M; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I, P; Brelier, B; Brooks, W; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Casadei, D; Casado, P; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; De Santo, A; Degenhardt, J; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Diaz, M; Djilkibaev, R; Dobson, E; Dova, M, T; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Faulkner, P J W; Ferland, J; Flacher, H; Fleckner, J E; Flowerdew, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Fratina, S; Fhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Gallacher, M P; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gee, C N P; George, S; Gillman, A R; Goncalo, R; Grabowska-Bold, I; Groll, M; Gringer, C; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hauser, R; Hellman, S; Hidvgi, A; Hillier, S J; Hryn'ova, T; Idarraga, J; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Kalinowski, A; Khoriauli, G; Kirk, J; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Koeneke, K; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kwee, R; Landon, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit, F; Lei, X; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Losada, M; Maettig, S; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maltrana, D; Marino, C; Masik, J; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Mincer, A; Moa, T; Monticelli, F; Moreno, D; Morris, J D; Mller, F; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nemethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Oltmann, B; Olvito, D; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Parodi, F; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Perez Reale, V; Petersen, B; Pinzon, G; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Prokishin, F; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reinsch, A; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Rodriguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Rhr, F; Saavedra, A; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Schiavi, C; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schfer, U; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S; Sivoklokov, S; Sjlin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strom, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Torrence, E; Tripiana, M; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Vachon, B; Vercesi, V; Vorwerk, V; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Weidberg, T; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Whiteson, D; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wildt, M; Winklmeier, F; Wu, X; Xella, S; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; de Seixas, J M; dos Anjos, A; Asman, B; Özcan, E

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 105 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  1. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  2. 2017 Tau Trigger Efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Triggers selecting events with hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons ($\\tau_h$) are used in a wide variety of CMS analyses, in particular those targeting processes with a $H \\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$ decay. The performance of the $\\tau_h$ triggers is presented for data collected in 2017, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 41.5\\,fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV, and compared with simulation.

  3. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  4. Follicular thyroid cancer in children and adolescents. Clinicopathologic features, long-term survival, and risk factors for recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Keisuke; Enomoto, Yukie; Uchino, Shinya; Yamashita, Hiroto; Noguchi, Shiro

    2013-01-01

    Children and adolescents represent 1-1.5% of all patients with thyroid cancer (TC). The vast majority of TC in children and adolescents is papillary TC; follicular TC (FTC) is exceedingly rare. In this study, we evaluate the clinical and pathological features of FTC in children and adolescents. We also report the risk factors for post-operative tumor recurrence and the associated outcomes. Twenty children and adolescents (under 21 years old) with FTC have been treated and followed at Noguchi Thyroid Clinic and Hospital Foundation since 1946. All patients underwent surgery (lobectomy, 11; subtotal thyroidectomy, 8; and total thyroidectomy, 1), and 8 patients received postoperative external beam radiation therapy. The incidence of FTC in children and adolescents was 1.9% among all FTC patients treated in our hospital. Histopathology revealed vascular and capsular invasion in 9 and 20 patients, respectively. The tumor recurrence rate in FTC with vascular invasion is significantly higher than in those without it (p=0.038). No other factors were significant. Patients with recurrences were treated with completion thyroidectomy and 131 I radioactive iodine therapy. There were no significant differences in the rates of disease-free survival or cause-specific survival when pediatric/adolescent FTC patients were compared to adults with FTC. FTC is very rare among children and adolescents, but the outcomes are similar to those observed among adults. Vascular invasion is poor prognostic indicator in pediatric/adolescent FTC patients. (author)

  5. In Silico Analysis of the Structural and Biochemical Features of the NMD Factor UPF1 in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms regulating the accuracy of gene expression are still not fully understood. Among these mechanisms, Nonsense-mediated Decay (NMD is a quality control process that detects post-transcriptionally abnormal transcripts and leads them to degradation. The UPF1 protein lays at the heart of NMD as shown by several structural and functional features reported for this factor mainly for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This process is highly conserved in eukaryotes but functional diversity can be observed in various species. Ustilago maydis is a basidiomycete and the best-known smut, which has become a model to study molecular and cellular eukaryotic mechanisms. In this study, we performed in silico analysis to investigate the structural and biochemical properties of the putative UPF1 homolog in Ustilago maydis. The putative homolog for UPF1 was recognized in the annotated genome for the basidiomycete, exhibiting 66% identity with its human counterpart at the protein level. The known structural and functional domains characteristic of UPF1 homologs were also found. Based on the crystal structures available for UPF1, we constructed different three-dimensional models for umUPF1 in order to analyze the secondary and tertiary structural features of this factor. Using these models, we studied the spatial arrangement of umUPF1 and its capability to interact with UPF2. Moreover, we identified the critical amino acids that mediate the interaction of umUPF1 with UPF2, ATP, RNA and with UPF1 itself. Mutating these amino acids in silico showed an important effect over the native structure. Finally, we performed molecular dynamic simulations for UPF1 proteins from H. sapiens and U. maydis and the results obtained show a similar behavior and physicochemical properties for the protein in both organisms. Overall, our results indicate that the putative UPF1 identified in U. maydis shows a very similar sequence, structural organization

  6. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  7. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Multimedia

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  8. The dual nature of trehalose in citrus canker disease: a virulence factor for Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and a trigger for plant defence responses

    KAUST Repository

    Piazza, A.

    2015-03-14

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is a bacterial pathogen that causes citrus canker in susceptible Citrus spp. The Xcc genome contains genes encoding enzymes from three separate pathways of trehalose biosynthesis. Expression of genes encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (otsA) and trehalose phosphatase (otsB) was highly induced during canker development, suggesting that the two-step pathway of trehalose biosynthesis via trehalose-6-phosphate has a function in pathogenesis. This pathway was eliminated from the bacterium by deletion of the otsA gene. The resulting XccΔotsA mutant produced less trehalose than the wild-type strain, was less resistant to salt and oxidative stresses, and was less able to colonize plant tissues. Gene expression and proteomic analyses of infected leaves showed that infection with XccΔotsA triggered only weak defence responses in the plant compared with infection with Xcc, and had less impact on the host plant\\'s metabolism than the wild-type strain. These results suggested that trehalose of bacterial origin, synthesized via the otsA-otsB pathway, in Xcc, plays a role in modifying the host plant\\'s metabolism to its own advantage but is also perceived by the plant as a sign of pathogen attack. Thus, trehalose biosynthesis has both positive and negative consequences for Xcc. On the one hand, it enables this bacterial pathogen to survive in the inhospitable environment of the leaf surface before infection and exploit the host plant\\'s resources after infection, but on the other hand, it is a tell-tale sign of the pathogen\\'s presence that triggers the plant to defend itself against infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Non-contact lens use-related Acanthamoeba keratitis in southern Turkey: evaluation of risk factors and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Elif; Evcil, Yusuf; Yagmur, Meltem; Eroglu, Fadime; Koltas, Soner; Ersoz, Reha

    2014-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic methods, risk factors, and clinical features of Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in patients who do not wear contact lenses. Medical records of 26 consecutive patients with non-contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis, who were followed up at the tertiary eye care center between May 2010 and May 2012, were analyzed. Laboratory, demographic, and clinical findings were evaluated pertaining to the patients. Twenty-six non-contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis cases were included in the study. The main risk factors were trauma (group 1, n = 13 patients) and ocular surface disease (group 2, n = 12 patients). One patient had both of the risk factors mentioned above. Overall test results showed that Acanthamoeba positivity rates were 15.3% for direct microscopy, 46.1% for culture, 92.3% for conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and 100% for real-time PCR. The rates of full-thickness corneal involvement and ring-shaped infiltrations were higher in group 2, whereas superficial keratitis and radial keratoneuritis were higher in group 1. The final visual acuities were significantly better in group 1 than group 2 (pAcanthamoeba keratitis in non-contact lens users. A majority of cases admitted to a tertiary eye care center were related to trauma or ocular surface disease. Physician suspicion is critically important for the timely diagnosis of these cases. At this point, molecular diagnostic tests (PCR or real-time PCR) seem to support the clinical diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis with the help of fast and reliable results.

  10. The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to allow alignment, calibration and physics analysis to be performed in real time. An increased CPU capacity and improvements in the software have allowed lifetime unbiased selections of beauty and charm decays in the high level trigger. Thanks to offline quality event reconstruction already available online, physics analyses can be performed directly on this information and for the majority of charm physics selections a reduced event format can be written out. Beauty hadron decays are more efficiently triggered by re-optimised inclusive selections, and the HLT2 output event rate is increased by a factor of three.

  11. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  12. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  13. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Johnes, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, Jan; Baillie, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, MAR (2016), C03051 ISSN 1748-0221. [Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics (TWEPP). Lisbon, 28.09.2015-02.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Trigger concepts and systems * Trigger algorithms * digital electronics circuits Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  14. Fractal analysis of nuclear histology integrates tumor and stromal features into a single prognostic factor of the oral cancer microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of prognostic biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has hampered treatment decision making and survival in OSCC remains poor. Histopathological features are used for prognostication in OSCC and, although useful for predicting risk, manual assessment of histopathology is subjective and labour intensive. In this study, we propose a method that integrates multiple histopathological features of the tumor microenvironment into a single, digital pathology-based biomarker using nuclear fractal dimension (nFD) analysis. One hundred and seven consecutive OSCC patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2006 in Calgary, Canada were included in the study. nFD scores were generated from DAPI-stained images of tissue microarray (TMA) cores. Ki67 protein expression was measured in the tumor using fluorescence immunohistochemistry (IHC) and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA®). Lymphocytic infiltration (LI) was measured in the stroma from haematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained TMA slides by a pathologist. Twenty-five (23.4%) and 82 (76.6%) patients were classified as high and low nFD, respectively. nFD was significantly associated with pathological tumor-stage (pT-stage; P = 0.01) and radiation treatment (RT; P = 0.01). High nFD of the total tumor microenvironment (stroma plus tumor) was significantly associated with improved disease-specific survival (DSS; P = 0.002). No association with DSS was observed when nFD of either the tumor or the stroma was measured separately. pT-stage (P = 0.01), pathological node status (pN-status; P = 0.02) and RT (P = 0.03) were also significantly associated with DSS. In multivariate analysis, nFD remained significantly associated with DSS [HR 0.12 (95% CI 0.02-0.89, P = 0.04)] in a model adjusted for pT-stage, pN-status and RT. We also found that high nFD was significantly associated with high tumor proliferation (P < 0.0001) and high LI (P < 0.0001), factors that we and others have shown to be associated with improved survival in OSCC

  15. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  16. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  17. Upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221618; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In coming years the LHC is expected to undergo upgrades to increase both the energy of proton-proton collisions and the instantaneous luminosity. In order to cope with these more challenging LHC conditions, upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system will be required. This talk will focus on some of the key aspects of these upgrades. Firstly, the upgrade period between 2019-2021 will see an increase in instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. Upgrades to the Level 1 trigger system during this time will include improvements for both the muon and calorimeter triggers. These include the upgrade of the first-level Endcap Muon trigger, the calorimeter trigger electronics and the addition of new calorimeter feature extractor hardware, such as the Global Feature Extractor (gFEX). An overview will be given on the design and development status the aforementioned systems, along with the latest testing and validation results. \\\\ By 2026, the High Luminosity LHC will be able to deliver 14 TeV collisions ...

  18. Mammographic features of calcifications in DCIS: correlation with oestrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Won, Jae-Kyung; Jeon, Yoon-Kyung; Park, In Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    This study investigated the correlation of oestrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status with the probability of malignancy (POM) of mammographic calcifications in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 101 women (age range, 27-83 years) with pure DCIS that presented as mammographic calcifications were included. Three radiologists independently reviewed mammograms according to the BI-RADS lexicon and provided 100-point POM scores and a BI-RADS category. ER, HER2 and breast cancer subtypes were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Pairwise correlations between POM and IHC biomarker scores were calculated, and mammographic features were compared between breast cancer subtypes. HER2 level positively correlated with the POM score (P < 0.0001) and BI-RADS category (P < 0.0001), and ER level inversely correlated with the POM score (P < 0.013) and BI-RADS category (P < 0.010). Fine linear branching (P = 0.004) and segmental (P = 0.014) calcifications were significantly associated with HER2-positive cancers, and clustered calcifications were more frequently observed in ER-positive cancers (P = 0.014). HER2 status in DCIS correlated positively with the POM of mammographic calcifications, as determined by radiologists on the basis of the BI-RADS lexicon. (orig.)

  19. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  20. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  1. Trigger and decision processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, G.

    1980-11-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts in high energy physics to make trigger and decision processes faster and more sophisticated. This became necessary due to a permanent increase of the number of sensitive detector elements in wire chambers and calorimeters, and in fact it was possible because of the fast developments in integrated circuits technique. In this paper the present situation will be reviewed. The discussion will be mainly focussed upon event filtering by pure software methods and - rather hardware related - microprogrammable processors as well as random access memory triggers. (orig.)

  2. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  3. Youths on labour market.Features. Particularities. Pro-mobility factors for graduates. Elements of a balanced policy for labour migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina VASILE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The youths’ labour market, and especially insertion employment has a series of particularities defined by aspects such as: flexibility, efficient employment, interest for career but also informal employment, external mobility, including brain drain, segmentation, employment precariousness, income disadvantages, etc. Therefore, also the labour market policy and particularly managing labour mobility especially through the economic and social effects that might be triggered on the local labour market in the origin country, presents a special importance under the conditions of the economic turnaround stage, by promoting new and sustainable jobs, based on knowledge and competences. In the present paper an analysis is made about the youths’ labour market features, and the outcomes of an empirical analysis about graduates’ migration propensity are presented. Suggestions are made for developing a balanced policy for youths’ labour mobility to the benefit of the country of origin.

  4. Deciphering the Preparatory and Triggering Factors Responsible for Post-Glacial Slope Failures: Insights from Landslide Age and Morphology in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, G.; Dixon, J. L.; Pierce, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    Landslides are ubiquitous to post-glacial landscapes worldwide. Withdrawal of glacier ice exposes oversteepened landscapes that may be unstable, and consequently susceptible to landsliding. Several disparate mechanisms can act as triggers: glacial debuttressing can directly destabilize slopes; however, changes in climate resulting in greater effective moisture and subsequent degradation of permafrost may also play a role. Here, we quantify relative age, spatial relationships, and topographic metrics in a set of post-glacial landslides in northwest Yellowstone National Park. Preliminary analysis of high-resolution topography indicates increasing surface roughness of non-active landslides southward, consistent with younging ages along the retreat path of the Yellowstone Ice Cap. These roughness values in ancient slides are roughly half those of the active Slide Lake Landslide within the same study region. However, the changes in roughness within the non-active landslides disappear when we remove biases such as gullying, fluvial erosional contacts, and areas believed to have been remobilized. These removed areas appear largely linked to a Holocene incision pulse up the Gardiner River, which interacts with the toes of landslides in the southern region. Stream power analysis indicates that incision is focused at a knickpoint locally coincident with the toe of the modern and active Slide Lake Landslide. Our results indicate caution should be used when using surface roughness for landslide ages without accounting for both intrinsic and extrinsic changes in erosion of the landslide system, and suggest tight links between modern stream erosion and landslide reactivation. Insights from this dynamic landscape in Yellowstone National Park are actively being used by park officials to mitigate risk, and broadly show that quantifying the temporal and spatial patterns of landslides can provide diagnostic understanding of the long-term controls on post-glacial slope failure.

  5. Triggering in Thermoacoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Juniper

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions, the flow in a combustion chamber can sustain large amplitude oscillations even when its steady state is linearly stable. Experimental studies show that these large oscillations can sometimes be triggered by very low levels of background noise. This theoretical paper sets out the conditions that are necessary for triggering to occur. It uses a weakly nonlinear analysis to show when these conditions will be satisfied for cases where the heat release rate is a function of the acoustic velocity. The role played by non-normality is investigated. It is shown that, when a state triggers to sustained oscillations from the lowest possible energy, it exploits transient energy growth around an unstable limit cycle. The positions of these limit cycles in state space is determined by nonlinearity, but the tangled-ness of trajectories in state space is determined by non-normality. When viewed in this dynamical systems framework, triggering in thermoacoustics is seen to be directly analogous to bypass transition to turbulence in pipe flow.

  6. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one trigger that you shouldn't avoid because exercise is important for your health. Your doctor will want you to be active, so talk with him or her about what to do before playing ... or 15 minutes before you exercise or play sports. And, of course, you'll ...

  7. Simulation of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Trigger Sysmtem

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Tomoyuki; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the original design value to explore higher energy scale. In order to benefit from the expected high luminosity performance, the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap Small Wheel system will be replaced by a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector. The NSW provide precise track segment information to the muon Level-1 trigger to reduce fake triggers. This contribution will summarize a detail of the NSW trigger decision system, track reconstruction algorithm implemented into the trigger processor and results of performance studies on the trigger system.

  8. Clinical features and risk factors of oedematous Mycobacterium ulcerans lesions in an Australian population: beware cellulitis in an endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Daniel P; Friedman, N Deborah; McDonald, Anthony; Callan, Peter; Hughes, Andrew; Athan, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Oedematous lesions are a less common but more severe form of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. Misdiagnosis as bacterial cellulitis can lead to delays in treatment. We report the first comprehensive descriptions of the clinical features and risk factors of patients with oedematous disease from the Bellarine Peninsula of south-eastern Victoria, Australia. Data on all confirmed Mycobacterium ulcerans cases managed at Barwon Health, Victoria, were collected from 1/1/1998-31/12/2012. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess associations with oedematous forms of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. Seventeen of 238 (7%) patients had oedematous Mycobacterium ulcerans lesions. Their median age was 70 years (IQR 17-82 years) and 71% were male. Twenty-one percent of lesions were WHO category one, 35% category two and 41% category three. 16 (94%) patients were initially diagnosed with cellulitis and received a median 14 days (IQR 9-17 days) of antibiotics and 65% required hospitalization prior to Mycobacterium ulcerans diagnosis. Fever was present in 50% and pain in 87% of patients. The WCC, neutrophil count and CRP were elevated in 54%, 62% and 75% of cases respectively. The median duration of antibiotic treatment was 84 days (IQR 67-96) and 94% of cases required surgical intervention. On multivariable analysis, there was an increased likelihood of a lesion being oedematous if on the hand (OR 85.62, 95% CI 13.69-535.70; PMycobacterium ulcerans lesions present with similar symptoms, signs and investigation results to, and are commonly mistakenly diagnosed for, bacterial limb cellulitis. There is an increased likelihood of oedematous lesions affecting the hand, elbow or ankle, and in patients with diabetes.

  9. Novel antibody-cytokine fusion proteins featuring granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, interleukin-3 and interleukin-4 as payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Anja Sophie; Tintor, Diana; Neri, Dario

    2018-04-10

    Neutrophils can strongly influence disease activity in cancer and in chronic inflammation. Here, we report for the first time the construction and characterization of antibody-fusion proteins featuring granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-3 as payloads capable of enhancing neutrophil activity and a novel antibody-interleukin-4 fusion protein with neutrophil inhibitory potential. We used the F8 antibody specific to the alternatively-spliced extra domain A (EDA) of fibronectin as a targeting agent, since the cognate antigen is strongly upregulated in diseases characterized by angiogenesis. The fusion proteins GCSF-F8, F8-IL3 and F8-IL4-F8, were cloned, expressed, and their targeting ability assessed, exhibiting preferential tumor uptake with tumor:blood ratios at 24 h after injection of 3.3, 18.2 and 27.3, respectively. In F9 tumor bearing-mice GCSF-F8 and F8-IL3 did not provide a therapeutic benefit, while F8-IL4-F8 showed a potent tumor growth retardation. In the collagen-induced model of arthritis, GCSF-F8 and F8-IL3 induced a worsening of the disease, while F8-IL4-F8 slowed arthritis progression but, surprisingly, exhibited substantial toxicity when used in combination with dexamethasone. Collectively, the results indicate that the novel fusion proteins could be expressed and efficiently delivered to the site of disease. However, they were not superior to other antibody-cytokine fusions previously described by our laboratory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Clinical and Pathological Features and Associated Risk Factors in an Observational Study of 118 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Corpas, T; Morales-Suárez-Varela, M; Rausell Fontestad, N; Fuertes Prósper, A; Marquina-Vila, A; Jordá-Cuevas, E

    2015-12-01

    In the latest edition of its cancer staging manual, the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) revised the criteria for staging squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by introducing high-risk tumor features to define tumor stage (T) and help to identify tumors with a higher risk of metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics associated with SCC meeting the high-risk criteria defined by the AJCC for T2 lesions. We performed a case-case observational study in which patients with SCC were included over a period of 18 months. We collected clinical, anthropometric, and tumor data, and analyzed these using PASW Statistics (SPSS) version 18. One-hundred eighteen patients, the majority of whom were men, were included. Mean age was 77 years. Over 70% of the tumors were located in the head region and a majority of tumors measured 2 cm or less. The prevalence of SCC T2 was 61.9%. The risk factors significantly associated with SCC T2 were an age of over 85 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.48), location in the head and neck region (OR, 3.38), presence of solar elastosis in the peritumoral tissue (OR, 2.08), a higher tumor growth rate (>1.5 mm·wk(-1); OR, 5.73), and higher cumulative exposure to smoking (>20 pack-years, OR, 3.63). Advanced age, location in the head and neck region, presence of solar elastosis, high tumor growth rate, and high cumulative smoking exposure were all significantly associated with the presence of SCC T2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence, features and risk factors for malaria co-infections amongst visceral leishmaniasis patients from Amudat Hospital, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika van den Bogaart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY: Due to geographic overlap of malaria and visceral leishmaniasis (VL, co-infections may exist but have been poorly investigated. To describe prevalence, features and risk factors for VL-malaria co-infections, a case-control analysis was conducted on data collected at Amudat Hospital, Uganda (2000-2006 by Médecins sans Frontières. Cases were identified as patients with laboratory-confirmed VL and malaria at hospital admission or during hospitalization; controls were VL patients with negative malaria smears. A logistic regression analysis was performed to study the association between patients' characteristics and the occurrence of the co-infection. RESULTS: Of 2414 patients with confirmed VL, 450 (19% were positively diagnosed with concomitant malaria. Most co-infected patients were males, residing in Kenya (69%. While young age was identified by multivariate analysis as a risk factor for concurrent VL and malaria, particularly the age groups 0-4 (odds ratio (OR: 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.52-3.92 and 5-9 years (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.45-3-45, mild (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88 and moderate (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.27-0.77 anemia negatively correlated with the co-morbidity. VL patients harboring skin infections were nearly three times less likely to have the co-infection (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17-0.72, as highlighted by the multivariate model. Anorexia was slightly more frequent among co-infected patients (OR: 1.71; 95% CI: 0.96-3.03. The in-hospital case-fatality rate did not significantly differ between cases and controls, being 2.7% and 3.1% respectively (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.46-1.63. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent malaria represents a common condition among young VL patients living in the Pokot region of Kenya and Uganda. Although these co-morbidities did not result in a poorer prognosis, possibly due to early detection of malaria, a positive trend towards more severe symptoms was identified, indicating that routine

  12. The UA1 upgrade calorimeter trigger processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, M.; Charleton, D.; Ellis, N.; Garvey, J.; Gregory, J.; Jimack, M.P.; Jovanovic, P.; Kenyon, I.R.; Baird, S.A.; Campbell, D.; Cawthraw, M.; Coughlan, J.; Flynn, P.; Galagedera, S.; Grayer, G.; Halsall, R.; Shah, T.P.; Stephens, R.; Biddulph, P.; Eisenhandler, E.; Fensome, I.F.; Landon, M.; Robinson, D.; Oliver, J.; Sumorok, K.

    1990-01-01

    The increased luminosity of the improved CERN Collider and the more subtle signals of second-generation collider physics demand increasingly sophisticated triggering. We have built a new first-level trigger processor designed to use the excellent granularity of the UA1 upgrade calorimeter. This device is entirely digital and handles events in 1.5 μs, thus introducing no dead time. Its most novel feature is fast two-dimensional electromagnetic cluster-finding with the possibility of demanding an isolated shower of limited penetration. The processor allows multiple combinations of triggers on electromagnetic showers, hadronic jets and energy sums, including a total-energy veto of multiple interactions and a full vector sum of missing transverse energy. This hard-wired processor is about five times more powerful than its predecessor, and makes extensive use of pipelining techniques. It was used extensively in the 1988 and 1989 runs of the CERN Collider. (orig.)

  13. The 4G/4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene as an independent risk factor for placental insufficiency, which triggers fetal hemodynamic centralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P C P; Alves, J A G; Maia, S M; Araujo Júnior, E; Santana, E F M; Silva Costa, F Da

    2015-01-01

    To describe a case report of 4G/4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene as an independent risk factor for placental insufficiency. Case report. Department of Public Health, State University of Ceará (UECE), Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Hereditary hypofibrinolysis, which is mediated by 4G/4G homozygosity for the PAI-1 gene, is an independent risk factor for pregnancy complications, probably acting through thrombotic induction of placental insufficiency. We report a case of a low risk pregnancy, which separately presented placental insufficiency and fetal centralization at the beginning of the third trimester, without any other clinical manifestations during pregnancy. However, immediately after childbirth, the patient had a deep vein thrombosis of a lower limb. The anatomopathological examination of the placenta showed old and recent placental infarcts. Homozygosity for the 4G allele of PAI-1 gene was subsequently diagnosed as the sole probable causal factor.

  14. Assessment of anxiety frequency and its trigger factors in patients referred to general dental offices in the city of Hamedan in 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhadinasab A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Oral health is a sign of overall health. Sometimes fear of dental office deprives  patients from receiving proper care. This problem decreases the self-esteem of dentists and can also reduce health indices. Understanding anxiety factors may help solve this problem. The purpose of this study was to assess anxiety in patients undergoing treatment in dental offices in the city of Hamedan. "nMaterials and Methods: In this analytic cross sectional study patients above 9 years old and referred to general dental offices in Hamedan were randomly selected and surveyed with questionnaires in two stages. The first questionnaire included 17 standard items based on Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS and screened anxious patients. Then 400 anxious patients were evaluated with a questionnaire of 64 items based on Corah scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS 13 with multivariate analysis of variance. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: Factors related to dental office environment with 31.1%, those related to personal imaginations with 19.4% and factor concerning office management and dental treatment each with 19.1% frequency showed to be most related to anxiety in patients. Improper rest-rooms (46.3%, blood stains in the environment (44.5% and dirty dentist's gowns (43.8% were reported to be the most prominent environmental factors. Among the factors originated from personal imaginations, the risk of disease transmission was accounted for the most justifiable source of anxiety (67.3%. Regarding factors concerning office management, dentist's nervous behavior (47.8% and his carelessness to the patient (46.8% were considered as the most significant anxiety sources. Extraction, injection and root canal therapy (48.3%, 44.5%, 44.3% were the treatment related factors of higher importance respectively. Previous painful treatment experience (47.3% and poor oral hygiene of the dentist (34.5% were reported to be among the

  15. Enhancement factor sign inversion triggered by the variation of the incident direction of light in the azo-dye doped liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Luogen; Wang Liang; Luo Liyuan; Wang Guohui

    2006-01-01

    The optical reorientation process of the azo-dye doped liquid crystals (LCs) is studied and the dependence of the enhancement factor on the incident light direction is explained. By analysing the relation between the order parameter and the cis isomer concentration in the azo-dye doped LC system, an analytical expression that describes the dependence of the order parameters on the direction of the incident light is obtained. It is found that, since the order parameters of the guest-host LC system depend on the direction of the incident light, the intermolecular orientational interaction potentials are also related with the incident light direction. In order to describe the interaction of the cis isomer with the liquid crystalline molecules, a revised Maier-Saupe potential expression that allows for a higher-order interaction is used. A microscopic formula of the enhancement factor for the azo-dye doped LC system is derived on the basis of a simplified two-level model. From the microscopic formula, the mechanism behind the dependence of the enhancement factor on the incident direction of light is revealed. The comparison of our computational results with the existent experimental data verified our enhancement factor's microscopic form

  16. Biotic factors in induced defence revisited: cell aggregate formation in the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 is triggered by spent Daphnia medium and disrupted cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bioassays with the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, its non-toxic mutant ΔmcyB, and Daphnia magna as grazer were used to evaluate biotic factors in induced defence, in particular cyanobacterial and grazer-released info-chemicals. Three main questions were addressed in this

  17. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rados, Petar Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (W' and Z'), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented. (authors)

  18. Minimum risk trigger indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    A viable safeguards system includes among other things the development and use of indices which trigger various courses of action. The usual limit of error calculation provides such an index. The classical approach is one of constructing tests which, under certain assumptions, make the likelihood of a false alarm small. Of concern also is the test's failure to indicate a loss (diversion) when in fact one has occurred. Since false alarms are usually costly and losses both costly and of extreme strategic sinificance, there remains the task of balancing the probability of false alarm and its consequences against the probability of undetected loss and its consequences. The application of other than classical hypothesis testing procedures are considered in this paper. Using various consequence models, trigger indices are derived which have certain optimum properties. Application of the techniques would enhance the material control function

  19. The LPS trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benotto, F.; Costa, M.; Staiano, A.; Zampieri, A.; Bollito, M.; Isoardi, P.; Pernigotti, E.; Sacchi, R.; Trapani, P.P.; Larsen, H.; Massam, T.; Nemoz, C.

    1996-03-01

    The Leading Proton Spectrometer (LPS) has been equipped with microstrip silicon detectors specially designed to trigger events with high values of x L vertical stroke anti p' p vertical stroke / vertical stroke anti p p vertical stroke ≥0.95 where vertical stroke anti p' p vertical stroke and vertical stroke anti p p vertical stroke are respectively the momenta of outgoing and incoming protons. The LPS First Level Trigger can provide a clear tag for very high momentum protons in a kinematical region never explored before. In the following we discuss the physics motivation in tagging very forward protons and present a detailed description of the detector design, the front end electronics, the readout electronics, the Monte Carlo simulation and some preliminary results from 1995 data taking. (orig.)

  20. The ZEUS calorimeter first level trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, S.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Foudas, C.; Fordham, C.; Goussiou, A.; Jaworski, M.; Lackey, J.; Reeder, D.; Robl, P.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Dawson, J.; Krakauer, D.; Talaga, R.; Schlereth, J.; Zhang, H.

    1995-02-01

    An overview of the ZEUS calorimeter first level trigger is presented. The CFLT uses a pipelined architecture to accept and analyze calorimeter data for every 96 ns beam crossing interval. PMT signals are combined by analog electronics into electromagnetic and hadronic sums for 896 trigger towers. The analog sums are then digitized and analyzed. The CFLT determines the total, transverse, and missing transverse energy, identifies isolated electrons and muons, and sums energies in programmable subregions. Calculations are performed in 96 ns steps, and new data are accepted for every beam crossing. Trigger data are forwarded to the global first level trigger (GFLT) after 2 μs, allowing a GFLT accept to be issued 5 μs after the beam crossing which produced the event. Important features of the CFLT include a 12-bit effective dynamic range, extensive use of memory lookup tables for trigger calculations, fast pattern searches for isolated leptons, and low electronics noise. During the 1993 HERA run, the CFLT reduced a 50 kHz background rate to around 100 Hz.

  1. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  2. The ARGUS vertex trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, N.; Kolander, M.; Kolanoski, H.; Siegmund, T.; Bergter, J.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K.R.; Waldi, R.; Imhof, M.; Ressing, D.; Weiss, U.; Weseler, S.

    1995-09-01

    A fast second level trigger has been developed for the ARGUS experiment which recognizes tracks originating from the interaction region. The processor compares the hits in the ARGUS Micro Vertex Drift Chamber to 245760 masks stored in random access memories. The masks which are fully defined in three dimensions are able to reject tracks originating in the wall of the narrow beampipe of 10.5 mm radius. (orig.)

  3. Neural networks for triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denby, B.; Campbell, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Chriss, N.; Bowers, C.; Nesti, F.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detector at the international linear collider (ILC) should be able to run 'trig- gerless' which means that all events can be read out and then be analysed with the offline reconstruction program in a trigger farm. The event rates for 'high Q2' events like W-pairs or q¯q are low, about 0.1/train. However, there is a significant.

  5. Y-box Binding Protein-1 Enhances Oncogenic Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells via Triggering Phospho-Activation of Smad2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stope, Matthias B; Weiss, Martin; Koensgen, Dominique; Popp, Simone L; Joffroy, Christian; Mustea, Alexander; Buck, Miriam B; Knabbe, Cornelius

    2017-12-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) plays a role in diverse oncogenic pathways including cell proliferation and cell motility and is regulated by the pleiotropic factor Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1). In breast cancer, Sma/Mad related protein 2 (Smad2) represents the most common downstream transducer in TGFβ signaling. Here, YB-1's impact on Smad2 phospho-activation was characterized by incubation of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 with or without TGFβ1 in the absence or presence of overexpressed YB-1 protein. The phospho-status of Smad2 was assessed via western blotting. Analysis of MCF-7 cells revealed no induction of total Smad2 neither in the presence of TGFβ1, nor during YB-1 overexpression. In contrast, incubation with TGFβ1 led to an increase of phosphorylated Smad2 forms which was significantly amplified by simultaneously overexpressed YB-1 (2.8±0.2-fold). Oncogenic YB-1 indirectly enhances TGFβ signaling cascades via Smad2 phospho-activation and may represent a promising factor for future diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Commissioning of the ATLAS High Level Trigger with single beam and cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mattia, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS is one of the two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The trigger system is responsible for making the online selection of interesting collision events. At the LHC design luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1 it will need to achieve a rejection factor of the order of 10-7 against random proton-proton interactions, while selecting with high efficiency events that are needed for physics analyses. After a first processing level using custom electronics based on FPGAs and ASICs, the trigger selection is made by software running on two processor farms, containing a total of around two thousand multi-core machines. This system is known as the High Level Trigger (HLT). To reduce the network data traffic and the processing time to manageable levels, the HLT uses seeded, step-wise reconstruction, aiming at the earliest possible rejection of background events. The recent LHC startup and short single-beam run provided a "stress test" of the system and some initial calibration data. Following this period, ATLAS continued to collect cosmic-ray events for detector alignment and calibration purposes. After giving an overview of the trigger design and its innovative features, this paper focuses on the experience gained from operating the ATLAS trigger with single LHC beams and cosmic-rays.

  7. The ATLAS Trigger Algorithms for General Purpose Graphics Processor Units

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger Algorithms for General Purpose Graphics Processor Units Type: Talk Abstract: We present the ATLAS Trigger algorithms developed to exploit General­ Purpose Graphics Processor Units. ATLAS is a particle physics experiment located on the LHC collider at CERN. The ATLAS Trigger system has two levels, hardware-­based Level 1 and the High Level Trigger implemented in software running on a farm of commodity CPU. Performing the trigger event selection within the available farm resources presents a significant challenge that will increase future LHC upgrades. are being evaluated as a potential solution for trigger algorithms acceleration. Key factors determining the potential benefit of this new technology are the relative execution speedup, the number of GPUs required and the relative financial cost of the selected GPU. We have developed a trigger demonstrator which includes algorithms for reconstructing tracks in the Inner Detector and Muon Spectrometer and clusters of energy deposited in the Cal...

  8. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  9. A Study of Factors Affecting the Adoption of E-Learning Systems Enabled with Cultural Contextual Features by Instructions in Jamaican Tertiary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Niccardo S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding factors affecting the acceptance of E-Learning Systems Enabled with Cultural Contextual Features by lnstructors in Jamaican Tertiary Institutions is an important topic that's relevant to not only educational institutions, but developers of software for on line learning. The use of the unified theory of acceptance and use of…

  10. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-. beta. /sub 2//B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-05-05

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-..beta../sub 2/, 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1.

  11. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-β2/B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-β 2 , 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1

  12. Core features of suicide. Gender, age, alcohol and other putative risk factors in a low-incidence population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, August G; Stórá, Tormódur

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate some supposed core features of suicide through a study of suicide in a low-incidence population. The material covered all suicides and undetermined deaths 1945-2004 in the Faroe Islands (a low-incidence population) and the study made use of all available...... information. Results showed that suicide rate had been low since the Second World War. However, there was an increase throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Supposed core features of suicide, such as gender, marital status, former psychiatric admittance, former suicidal behaviour, alcohol and method preference were...... 25-64 years, unmarried, divorced and alcohol intoxicated. The main conclusion was that a low-incidence population of suicide population confirmed some supposed core features of the suicide phenomenon. Others, related to age and psychiatric disorders, were only partially confirmed. In periods...

  13. Multiscale simulation of thrombus growth and vessel occlusion triggered by collagen/tissue factor using a data-driven model of combinatorial platelet signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Lee, Mei Yan; Zhu, Shu; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2017-12-11

    During clotting under flow, platelets bind and activate on collagen and release autocrinic factors such as ADP and thromboxane, while tissue factor (TF) on the damaged wall leads to localized thrombin generation. Towards patient-specific simulation of thrombosis, a multiscale approach was developed to account for: platelet signalling [neural network (NN) trained by pairwise agonist scanning (PAS), PAS-NN], platelet positions (lattice kinetic Monte Carlo, LKMC), wall-generated thrombin and platelet-released ADP/thromboxane convection-diffusion (partial differential equation, PDE) and flow over a growing clot (lattice Boltzmann). LKMC included shear-driven platelet aggregate restructuring. The PDEs for thrombin, ADP and thromboxane were solved by finite element method using cell activation-driven adaptive triangular meshing. At all times, intracellular calcium was known for each platelet by PAS-NN in response to its unique exposure to local collagen, ADP, thromboxane and thrombin. When compared with microfluidic experiments of human blood clotting on collagen/TF driven by constant pressure drop, the model accurately predicted clot morphology and growth with time. In experiments and simulations at TF at 0.1 and 10 molecule-TF/$\\mu$m$^{2}$ and initial wall shear rate of 200 s$^{-1}$, the occlusive blockade of flow for a 60-$\\mu$m channel occurred relatively abruptly at 600 and 400 s, respectively (with no occlusion at zero TF). Prior to occlusion, intrathrombus concentrations reached 50 nM thrombin, ~ 1 $\\mu$M thromboxane and ~ 10 $\\mu$M ADP, while the wall shear rate on the rough clot peaked at ~ 1000-2000 s$^{-1}$. Additionally, clotting on TF/collagen was accurately simulated for modulators of platelet cyclooxygenase-1, P2Y$_{1}$ and IP-receptor. This multiscale approach facilitates patient-specific simulation of thrombosis under hemodynamic and pharmacological conditions. © The authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of

  14. Hadronic triggers and trigger object-level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous event rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors, such as storage and computing requirements...

  15. Hadronic Triggers and trigger-object level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program, and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors to more deeply probing for new physics, such as storage and computing requirements f...

  16. THE RISK FACTORS AND SPECIFIC FEATURES OF OSTEOPENIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC NON-INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Platitsyna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the risk factors (RFs of osteoporosis (OP, the risk of OP-related fractures, the specific features of osteopenic syndrome in patients with chronic non-infectious diseases (CNID (coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and asthma. Materials and methods. The investigation enrolled 377 patients (mean age 55.3 ± 1.6 years with CNID and 221 persons (mean age, 53.2 ± 1.3 years who formed a control group. According to the nosological entity, the patients were divided as follows: Group 1 included 84 patients with CHD and hypertension; Group 2 comprised 99 hypertensive patients; Group 3 consisted of 70 patients with COPD; and Group 4 included 124 asthmatic patients. The examinees of all the groups were matched for age, gender, and body mass index. The investigation excluded patients with functional class IV chronic heart failure, continuous atrial fibrillation, heart valve disease, or myocardial noncoronarogenic diseases and those with other diseases and conditions that could have an independent impact on bone metabolism. Prior to the examination, the patients had received no specific therapy for the prevention and treatment of OP. RFs for OP were assessed using the one-minute test recommended by the International OP Foundation (2008; 10-year risk for OP-related fractures were calculated applying the FRAX computer program in accordance with the guidelines of the International OP Association and the World Health Organization (WHO, 2008. To investigate bone mineral density (BMD, bioenergy X-ray densitometry of the lumbar spine and proximal femur was carried out by means of a Lunar DPX apparatus (USA. The results were assessed using the t-test in standard deviations (SD from the peak bone mass according to the WHO guidelines. Results. The RFs of OP were more frequently recorded in the patients with CNID than in the healthy individuals. RFs, such as smoking, low physical activity, and

  17. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  18. hCG-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers apoptosis and reduces steroidogenic enzyme expression through activating transcription factor 6 in Leydig cells of the testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Ji; Kim, Tae-Shin; Park, Choon-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Lee, In-kyu; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lawson, Mark A; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress generally occurs in secretory cell types. It has been reported that Leydig cells, which produce testosterone in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), express key steroidogenic enzymes for the regulation of testosterone synthesis. In this study, we analyzed whether hCG induces ER stress via three unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways in mouse Leydig tumor (mLTC-1) cells and the testis. Treatment with hCG induced ER stress in mLTC-1 cells via the ATF6, IRE1a/XBP1, and eIF2α/GADD34/ATF4 UPR pathways, and transient expression of 50 kDa protein activating transcription factor 6 (p50ATF6) reduced the expression level of steroidogenic 3β-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase Δ5-Δ4-isomerase (3β-HSD) enzyme. In an in vivo model, high-level hCG treatment induced expression of p50ATF6 while that of steroidogenic enzymes, especially 3β-HSD, 17α-hydroxylase/C17–20 lyase (CYP17), and 17β-hydrozysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD), was reduced. Expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes were restored by the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA). Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated transient expression of p50ATF6 reduced the expression level of 3β-HSD in the testis. Protein expression levels of phospho-JNK, CHOP, and cleaved caspases-12 and -3 as markers of ER stress-mediated apoptosis markedly increased in response to high-level hCG treatment in mLTC-1 cells and the testis. Based on transmission electron microscopy and H&E staining of the testis, it was shown that abnormal ER morphology and destruction of testicular histology induced by high-level hCG treatment were reversed by the addition of TUDCA. These findings suggest that hCG-induced ER stress plays important roles in steroidogenic enzyme expression via modulation of the ATF6 pathway as well as ER stress-mediated apoptosis in Leydig cells. PMID:23256993

  19. The D0 calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, J.

    1992-12-01

    The D0 calorimeter trigger system consists of many levels to make physics motivated trigger decisions. The Level-1 trigger uses hardware techniques to reduce the trigger rate from ∼ 100kHz to 200Hz. It forms sums of electromagnetic and hadronic energy, globally and in towers, along with finding the missing transverse energy. A minimum energy is set on these energy sums to pass the event. The Level-2 trigger is a set of software filters, operating in a parallel-processing microvax farm which further reduces the trigger rate to a few Hertz. These filters will reject events which lack electron candidates, jet candidates, or missing transverse energy in the event. The performance of these triggers during the early running of the D0 detector will also be discussed

  20. Core features of suicide. Gender, age, alcohol and other putative risk factors in a low-incidence population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stora, T.; Wang, August Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate some supposed core features of suicide through a study of suicide in a low-incidence population. The material covered all suicides and undetermined deaths 1945-2004 in the Faroe Islands (a low-incidence population) and the study made use of all available...... information. Results showed that suicide rate had been low since the Second World War. However, there was an increase throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Supposed core features of suicide, such as gender, marital status, former psychiatric admittance, former suicidal behaviour, alcohol and method preference were...... confirmed. Others were not, such as an increasing rate with old age. In diagnostics, the role of psychiatric disorders was confirmed, but so was a substantial role of "no disorder". Increase period revealed a high proportion of cases with alcohol involved and a substantial part included males, in age groups...

  1. Core features of suicide. Gender, age, alcohol and other putative risk factors in a low-incidence population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stora, T.; Wang, August Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    25-64 years, unmarried, divorced and alcohol intoxicated. The main conclusion was that a low-incidence population of suicide population confirmed some supposed core features of the suicide phenomenon. Others, related to age and psychiatric disorders, were only partially confirmed. In periods...... of increase, the most vulnerable were the young and middle-aged males, unmarried, divorced, and alcohol played a crucial role Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/10...

  2. Insulin-like growth factors in endometrioid adenocarcinoma: Correlation with clinico-pathological features and estrogen receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yuan-Jiao; Hao, Qun; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Wu, Yuan-Zhe; Wang, Jian-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is a common malignancy of female genital tract. Insulin-like growth factor is known to elicit estrogen-induced mitogenic activity and anti-apoptotic effect in endometrial tissues. The retrospective study investigated the expression of insulin-like growth factors, estrogen receptors and their associations in endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) from 80 EAC patients in immunohistochemistry, and 58 EAC patients and 42 control patients in quantitative RT-PCR. The Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyze their correlations with clinic-pathological parameters. Our results showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor-2 mRNA levels were higher in tumor tissues and tumor-adjacent tissues than those in control cells, and were inversely correlated with the malignancy of the tumor with a positive correlation with ERα and ERβ expression. Insulin-like growth factor-1R protein expression was correlated with clinical stage, and insulin-like growth factor-2R protein expression was inversely correlated with histological grade. Insulin-like growth factor system plays an important role in estrogen-induced endometrial carcinogenesis, and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1R in the advanced endometrioid adenocarcinoma is not estrogen-dependent

  3. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Gefitinib

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Al Mamun Bhuyan; Teresa Wagner; Hang Cao; Florian Lang

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib is effective against several malignancies and is mainly utilized in the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer. The anti-cancer effect of the drug involves stimulation of apoptosis. Side effects of gefitinib include anemia. At least in theory, the development of anemia during gefitinib treatment could result from triggering of eryptosis, the suicidal er...

  4. [Immediate drug hypersensitivity. Epidemiology, clinical features, triggers and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, K

    2014-05-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions affect more than seven percent of the population and are a concern for patients and doctors alike. In a substantial part of such reactions, IgE-mediated mechanisms have been documented. Clinical manifestations of immediate reactions, which occur directly after drug intake (mostly ≤ 1 h), are acute urticaria, angioedema, dyspnea and other symptoms of anaphylaxis in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract or cardiovascular system. Although normally leading to milder reactions, drugs are also the most frequent elicitors of fatal anaphylaxis. The median time interval between systemic drug application and clinical death is 5 min. The most common elicitors of immediate reactions are analgesics, antibiotics, radiocontrast media and muscle relaxants. The aim of history and experience guided skin tests ± laboratory tests is to document a sensitization, which depends on the eliciting drug and is only successful in less than half of the patients. Else a drug provocation test under controlled conditions is necessary to clarify the diagnosis and to confirm or exclude a drug hypersensitivity reaction. Therapy consists in drug avoidance or in pressing indications in tolerance induction by a "drug desensitization".

  5. CMS Triggers for the LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan Nguyen, Chi

    2009-01-01

    The LHC will collide proton beams at a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ each crossing results in an average of about 20 inelastic pp events. The CMS trigger system is designed to reduce the input rate to about 100 Hz. This task is carried out in two steps, namely the Level-1 (L1) and the High-Level trigger (HLT). The L1 trigger is built of customized fast electronics and is designed to reduce the rate to 100 kHz. The HLT is implemented in a filter farm running on hundreds of CPUs and is designed to reduce the rate by another factor of ~1000. It combines the traditional L2 and L3 trigger components in a novel way and allows the coherent tuning of the HLT algorithms to accommodate multiple physics channels. We will discuss the strategies for optimizing triggers covering the experiment`s early physics program.

  6. Software Validation Infrastructure for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Adorisio, C; Beauchemin, P; Bell, P; Biglietti, M; Coccaro, A; Damazio, D; Ehrenfeld, W; Faulkner, P; George, S; Giagu, S; Goncalo, R; Hamilton, A; Jones, G; Kirk, J; Kwee, R; Lane, J; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Masik, J; Mincer, A; Monticelli, F; Omachi, C; Oyarzun, A; Panikashvili, N; Potter, C; Quinonez, F; Reinsch, A; Robinson, M; Rodríguez, D; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sidoti, A; Sinev, N; Strom, D; Sutton, M; Ventura, A; Winklmeier, F; Zhao, L

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system is responsible for selecting the interesting collision events delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a ~10^-7 rejection factor against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select interesting events. After a first processing level based on hardware, the final event selection is based on custom software running on two CPU farms, containing around two thousand multi-core machines. This is known as the high-level trigger. Running the trigger online during long periods demands very high quality software. It must be fast, performant, and essentially bug-free. With more than 100 contributors and around 250 different packages, a thorough validation of the HLT software is essential. This relies on a variety of unit and integration tests as well as on software metrics, and uses both in-house and open source software. This presentation presents the existing infrastructure used for validating the high-level trigger softwar...

  7. Alcoholic drinks as triggers in primary headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panconesi, Alessandro; Franchini, Michela; Bartolozzi, Maria Letizia; Mugnai, Stefania; Guidi, Leonello

    2013-08-01

    This project aims to investigate the role of alcoholic drinks (ADs) as triggers for primary headaches. Patients followed in the Headache Centre and presenting with migraine without aura, migraine with aura (MA), chronic migraine (CM), and tension-type headache (TH) were asked if their headache was precipitated by AD and also about their alcohol habits. Individual characteristics and drink habits were evaluated within two binary logistic models. About one half (49.7%) of patients were abstainers, 17.6% were habitual consumers, and 32.5% were occasional consumers. Out of 448 patients, only 22 (4.9%), all with migraine, reported AD as a trigger factor. None of 44 patients with MA and none of 47 patients with TH reported AD as a trigger factor. Among those patients with migraine who consume AD, only 8% reported that AD can precipitate their headache. Multivariate analyses showed that AD use, both occasional and habitual, is unrelated to TH. Moreover, analysis performed among migraine patients, points out that occasional and habitual drinkers have a lower risk of presenting with CM than abstainers, although statistical significance occurred only among occasional drinkers. Only 3% of migraine patients who abstain from AD reported that they do not consume alcohol because it triggers their headache. Our study shows that AD acts as headache triggers in a small percentage of migraine patients. Differing from some prior studies, our data suggest that AD do not trigger MA and TH attacks. Moreover, the percentage of abstainers in our sample is higher compared with that reported in general population surveys. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. ATLAS LEVEL-1 CALORIMETER AND TOPOLOGICAL TRIGGER

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Sebastian Mario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In Run 2 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the ATLAS detector uses a two-level trigger system to reduce the event rate from the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz to the event storage rate of 1 kHz, while preserving interesting physics events. The first step of the trigger system, Level-1, reduces the event rate to 100 kHz with a latency of less than 2.5 μs. One component of this system is the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), which uses coarse-granularity information from the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters to identify regions of interest corresponding to electrons, photons, taus, jets, and large amounts of transverse energy and missing transverse energy. In this talk, we will discuss the improved performance of the L1Calo system in the challenging, high-luminosity conditions provided by the LHC in Run 2. As the LHC exceeds its design luminosity, it is becoming even more critical to reduce event rates while preserving physics. A new feature of the ATLAS Run 2 trigger system is the Level-1 Topolog...

  9. Event Reconstruction Algorithms for the ATLAS Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca-Martin, T.; /CERN; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Adragna, P.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Aleksandrov, E.; /Dubna, JINR; Aleksandrov, I.; /Dubna, JINR; Amorim, A.; /Lisbon, LIFEP; Anderson, K.; /Chicago U., EFI; Anduaga, X.; /La Plata U.; Aracena, I.; /SLAC; Asquith, L.; /University Coll. London; Avolio, G.; /CERN; Backlund, S.; /CERN; Badescu, E.; /Bucharest, IFIN-HH; Baines, J.; /Rutherford; Barria, P.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Bartoldus, R.; /SLAC; Batreanu, S.; /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /CERN; Beck, H.P.; /Bern U.; Bee, C.; /Marseille, CPPM; Bell, P.; /Manchester U.; Bell, W.H.; /Glasgow U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Regina U. /CERN /Annecy, LAPP /Paris, IN2P3 /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /Argonne /CERN /UC, Irvine /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /CERN /Montreal U. /CERN /Glasgow U. /Michigan State U. /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /New York U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Bucharest, IFIN-HH /UC, Irvine /CERN /Glasgow U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /UC, Irvine /Valencia U. /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /University Coll. London /New York U.; /more authors..

    2011-11-09

    The ATLAS experiment under construction at CERN is due to begin operation at the end of 2007. The detector will record the results of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The trigger is a three-tier system designed to identify in real-time potentially interesting events that are then saved for detailed offline analysis. The trigger system will select approximately 200 Hz of potentially interesting events out of the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate (with 10{sup 9} interactions per second at the nominal luminosity). Algorithms used in the trigger system to identify different event features of interest will be described, as well as their expected performance in terms of selection efficiency, background rejection and computation time per event. The talk will concentrate on recent improvements and on performance studies, using a very detailed simulation of the ATLAS detector and electronics chain that emulates the raw data as it will appear at the input to the trigger system.

  10. Event reconstruction algorithms for the ATLAS trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F-Martin, T; Avolio, G; Backlund, S; Abolins, M; Adragna, P; Aleksandrov, E; Aleksandrov, I; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Bartoldus, R; Asquith, L; Badescu, E; Baines, J; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Bell, P; Barria, P; Batreanu, S

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment under construction at CERN is due to begin operation at the end of 2007. The detector will record the results of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The trigger is a three-tier system designed to identify in real-time potentially interesting events that are then saved for detailed offline analysis. The trigger system will select approximately 200 Hz of potentially interesting events out of the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate (with 10 9 interactions per second at the nominal luminosity). Algorithms used in the trigger system to identify different event features of interest will be described, as well as their expected performance in terms of selection efficiency, background rejection and computation time per event. The talk will concentrate on recent improvements and on performance studies, using a very detailed simulation of the ATLAS detector and electronics chain that emulates the raw data as it will appear at the input to the trigger system

  11. Features of objectified body consciousness and sociocultural perspectives as risk factors for disordered eating among late-adolescent women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Todd; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Body surveillance and body shame are features of objectified body consciousness (OBC) that have been linked to disordered eating, yet the evidence base is largely cross-sectional and limited to samples in certain Western countries. Furthermore, it is not clear whether these factors contribute to the prediction of eating disturbances independent of conceptually related risk factors emphasized within other sociocultural accounts. In this prospective study, body surveillance, body shame, and features of complementary sociocultural models (i.e., perceived appearance pressure from mass media and close interpersonal networks, appearance social comparisons, negative affect, body dissatisfaction) were assessed as risk factors for and concomitants of eating disturbances over time. University-age, mainland Chinese women (n = 2144) and men (n = 1017) completed validated measures of eating-disorder pathology and hypothesized risk factors at baseline (T1) and 1-year follow-up (T2). Among women, elevations on T1 measures of sociocultural-model features predicted more T2 eating disturbances, independent of T1 disturbances. After controlling for other T1 predictors, body surveillance and shame made modest unique contributions to the model. Finally, heightened T2 body dissatisfaction, media, and interpersonal appearance pressure, negative affect, and body shame predicted concomitant increases in T2 eating concerns. For men, T1 features of sociocultural accounts (negative affect, body dissatisfaction) but not OBC predicted T2 eating disturbances, along with attendant elevations in T2 negative affect, interpersonal appearance pressure, and body shame. Implications are discussed for theory and intervention that target disordered eating. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  13. Triggering at high luminosity: fake triggers from pile-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Triggers based on a cut in transverse momentum (p/sub t/) have proved to be useful in high energy physics both because they indicte that a hard constituent scattering has occurred and because they can be made quickly enough to gate electronics. These triggers will continue to be useful at high luminosities if overlapping events do not cause an excessive number of fake triggers. In this paper, I determine if this is indeed a problem at high luminosity machines

  14. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  15. Simulation of the ATLAS New Small Wheel trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00399900; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the LHC will increase up to a factor of seven with respect to the original design value to explore physics at higher energy scale. The inner station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system (Small Wheel) will be replaced by the New Small Wheel (NSW) to benefit from the high luminosity. The NSW will provide precise track-segment information to the Level-1 trigger system in order to suppress the trigger rate from fake muon tracks. This article summarizes the NSW trigger decision system and track-segment finding algorithm implemented in the trigger processor, and discusses results of performance studies on the trigger system. The results demonstrate that the NSW trigger system is capable of working with good performance satisfying the requirements.

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Influenza-Associated Pneumonia of Adults: Clinical Features and Factors Contributing to Severity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Uozumi, Ryuji; Odashima, Kyuto; Takaku, Yotaro; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Noboru

    2017-06-01

    Background : Pneumonia is a major complication of influenza that contributes to mortality. Clinical characteristics and factors of influenza virus contributing to the severity and mortality of pneumonia have not been fully elucidated. Objective : The objective was to clarify clinical characteristics and factors contributing to the severity and mortality of influenza-associated pneumonia ( flu-p ). Methods : We retrospectively analyzed patients with flu-p . Results : From December 1999 to March 2016, 210 patients with a median age of 69 (range, 17 to 92) years with flu-p based on positive rapid antigen tests, increased antibody titers of paired sera, or positive results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were admitted to our institution. A multivariate analysis found that advanced age (≥ 65 years), pneumonia subtypes (unclassified), diabetes mellitus, and acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p were independent factors associated with disease severity, whereas pneumonia subtypes (mixed viral and bacterial pneumonia and unclassified), healthcare-associated pneumonia, acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p , and severity on admission (severe) were independent factors associated with non-survival. Conclusion : The clinical characteristics of flu-p are varied, and the contribution of several factors to the severity and mortality of flu-p suggest their importance in either preventing flu-p or managing flu-p after it develops.

  17. ATLAS trigger: Design and commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, F.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system was designed to select potentially interesting events and reduce the incoming rate to 100-200 Hz. The first trigger level (LVL1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the second and third trigger levels are realised in software. The trigger system and its design parameters will be described with focus on computing and data aquision challenges. The results from both commissioning cosmic runs and first experiences from the LHC beam in 2008 will be overviewed. These running periods allowed us to exercise the trigger system online, including its configuration and monitoring infrastructure, as well as reconstruction and selection algorithms. The details on the plans for commissioning the ATLAS trigger when the LHC starts operations will be presented.

  18. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  19. Reflex epilepsy: triggers and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudan ZV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeynep Vildan Okudan,1 Çiğdem Özkara2 1Department of Neurology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Reflex epilepsies (REs are identified as epileptic seizures that are consistently induced by identifiable and objective-specific triggers, which may be an afferent stimulus or by the patient’s own activity. RE may have different subtypes depending on the stimulus characteristic. There are significant clinical and electrophysiologic differences between different RE types. Visual stimuli-sensitive or photosensitive epilepsies constitute a large proportion of the RE and are mainly related to genetic causes. Reflex epilepsies may present with focal or generalized seizures due to specific triggers, and sometimes seizures may occur spontaneously. The stimuli can be external (light flashes, hot water, internal (emotion, thinking, or both and should be distinguished from triggering precipitants, which most epileptic patients could report such as emotional stress, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. Different genetic and acquired factors may play a role in etiology of RE. This review will provide a current overview of the triggering factors and management of reflex seizures. Keywords: seizure, reflex epilepsy, photosensitivity, hot water, reading, thinking

  20. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUSHITA, Takashi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41 fb‑1 with a peak luminosity of 1.5 × 1034 cm‑2s‑1 and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implementation of more algorithms at a time than previously possible, allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the available trigger bandwidth. Algorithms for a trigger menu, including topological requirements on multi-objects, can be realised in the Global Trigger using the newly developed trigger menu specification grammar. Analysis-like trigger algorithms can be represented in an intuitive manner and the algorithms are translated to corresponding VHDL code blocks to build a firmware. The grammar can be extended in future as the needs arise. The experience of implementing trigger menus on the upgraded Global Trigger system will be presented.

  1. The decrease of cell membrane fluidity by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug Licofelone inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and triggers apoptosis in HCA-7 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolari, Simona; Munarini, Alessandra; Storci, Gianluca; Laufer, Stefan; Chieco, Pasquale; Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2012-08-28

    The ability to induce changes in cell membrane properties is nowadays considered an additional mechanism to explain the pharmacological effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We previously demonstrated that the NSAID Licofelone, a dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, triggers apoptosis in HCA-7 colon cancer cells independently from the inhibition of these enzymes. Here, we provide evidence that, in HCA-7 cells, the pro-apoptotic effect of this drug relies, at least in part, on its ability to inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling by a decrease of cell membrane fluidity. Indeed, Licofelone induced a relevant change in the relative proportions of some saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids constituting HCA-7 phospholipid fraction and significantly increased the levels of cholesterol in HCA-7 cell membrane. All of these changes resulted in a remarkable decrease of membrane fluidity. Such phenomenon was associated with the block of EGFR kinase activity and of its downstream targets, the p44-42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT cascades, whose inhibitions were found to induce apoptosis in HCA-7 cells. Overall, these findings provide a new additional mechanism by which NSAIDs are effective toward colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pattern-triggered immunity suppresses programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin b1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Igarashi

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a crucial process for plant innate immunity and development. In plant innate immunity, PCD is believed to prevent the spread of pathogens from the infection site. Although proper control of PCD is important for plant fitness, we have limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating plant PCD. Plant innate immunity triggered by recognition of effectors (effector-triggered immunity, ETI is often associated with PCD. However pattern-triggered immunity (PTI, which is triggered by recognition of elicitors called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs, is not. Therefore we hypothesized that PTI might suppress PCD. Here we report that PCD triggered by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1 can be suppressed by PTI in Arabidopsis. FB1-triggered cell death was suppressed by treatment with the MAMPs flg22 (a part of bacterial flagellin or elf18 (a part of the bacterial elongation factor EF-Tu but not chitin (a component of fungal cell walls. Although plant hormone signaling is associated with PCD and PTI, both FB1-triggered cell death and suppression of cell death by flg22 treatment were still observed in mutants deficient in jasmonic acid (JA, ethylene (ET and salicylic acid (SA signaling. The MAP kinases MPK3 and MPK6 are transiently activated and inactivated within one hour during PTI. We found that FB1 activated MPK3 and MPK6 about 36-48 hours after treatment. Interestingly, this late activation was attenuated by flg22 treatment. These results suggest that PTI suppression of FB1-triggered cell death may involve suppression of MPK3/MPK6 signaling but does not require JA/ET/SA signaling.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data-Acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, E

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system cite{TriggerPerf} is responsible for reducing the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of 200 Hz. The ATLAS trigger is designed to select signal-like events from a large background in three levels: a first-level (L1) implemented in custom-built electronics, as well as the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) software triggers executed on large computing farms.\\ indent The first-level trigger is comprised of calorimeter, muon and forward triggers to identify event features such as missing transverse energy, as well as candidate electrons, photons, jets and muons. Input signals from these objects are processed by the L1 Central Trigger to form a L1 Accept (L1A) decision. L1A and timing information is consequently sent to all sub-detectors, which push their data to DAQ buffers. The first part of the HLT system (called Level 2) pulls the data from the buffers on demand, while the second part (called Event F...

  4. Viral triggers of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalacheva, Kristina; Münz, Christian; Lünemann, Jan D

    2011-02-01

    Genetic and environmental factors jointly determine the susceptibility to develop Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Collaborative efforts during the past years achieved substantial progress in defining the genetic architecture, underlying susceptibility to MS. Similar to other autoimmune diseases, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles within the HLA class II region on chromosome 6p21 are the highest-risk-conferring genes. Less-robust susceptibility effects have been identified for MHC class I alleles and for non-MHC regions. The role of environmental risk factors and their interaction with genetic susceptibility alleles are much less well defined, despite the fact that infections have long been associated with MS development. Current data suggest that infectious triggers are most likely ubiquitous, i.e., highly prevalent in the general population, and that they require a permissive genetic trait which predisposes for MS development. In this review article, we illustrate mechanisms of infection-induced immunopathologies in experimental animal models of autoimmune CNS inflammation, discuss challenges for the translation of these experimental data into human immunology research, and provide future perspectives on how novel model systems could be utilized to better define the role of viral pathogens in MS. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Features of and Risk Factors for Fatal Ebola Virus Disease, Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, December 2014-February 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaskjold, Yngvar Lunde; Bolkan, Håkon Angell; Krogh, Kurt Østhuus; Jongopi, James; Lundeby, Karen Marie; Mellesmo, Sindre; Garcés, Pedro San José; Jøsendal, Ola; Øpstad, Åsmund; Svensen, Erling; Fuentes, Luis Matias Zabala; Kamara, Alfred Sandy; Riera, Melchor; Arranz, Javier; Roberts, David P; Stamper, Paul D; Austin, Paula; Moosa, Alfredo J; Marke, Dennis; Hassan, Shoaib; Eide, Geir Egil; Berg, Åse; Blomberg, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    The 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa infected >28,000 people, including >11,000 who died, and disrupted social life in the region. We retrospectively studied clinical signs and symptoms and risk factors for fatal outcome among 31 Ebola virus-positive patients admitted to the Ebola Treatment Center in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone. We found a higher rate of bleeding manifestations than reported elsewhere during the outbreak. Significant predictors for death were shorter time from symptom onset to admission, male sex, high viral load on initial laboratory testing, severe pain, diarrhea, bloody feces, and development of other bleeding manifestations during hospitalization. These risk factors for death could be used to identify patients in need of more intensive medical support. The lack of fever in as many as one third of EVD cases may have implications for temperature-screening practices and case definitions.

  6. Endophthalmitis Occurring after Cataract Surgery: Outcomes of More Than 480 000 Cataract Surgeries, Epidemiologic Features, and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Hashemian, Hesam; Khodaparast, Mehdi; Jouhari, Mohammadkarim; Tabatabaei, Ali; Rezaei, Shadi

    2016-02-01

    To report the incidence of endophthalmitis after senile cataract surgery and to describe the epidemiology and main risk factors. Retrospective, single-center, cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients who underwent cataract surgery in Farabi Eye Hospital from 2006 through 2014. All patients were evaluated retrospectively to compare risk factors, epidemiologic factors, and prophylaxis methods related to endophthalmitis. Patient records were used to gather the data. Epidemiologic factors, systemic diseases, other ocular pathologic characteristics, complications during the surgery, technique of cataract surgery, intraocular lens type, method of antibiotic prophylaxis, surgeon experience, vitreous culture, and vision outcome were evaluated in these patients. One hundred twelve endophthalmitis cases among 480 104 operations reported, equaling an incidence of 0.023%. Patients with diabetes mellitus (14.3%) and of older age (mean age, 81 years), perioperative communication with the vitreous (17.9%), extracapsular cataract surgery procedure (11%), and surgery on the left eye (58.9% vs. 41.1% for right eye; P = 0.03) showed a statistically significant association with endophthalmitis. Short-term treatment with topical or systemic preoperative antibiotics or postoperative subconjunctival injection was associated with a 40% to 50% reduced odds of endophthalmitis compared with no prophylaxis (P = 0.2). No cases of endophthalmitis were observed among the 25 920 patients who received intracameral cefuroxime, suggesting that this approach to antibiotic prophylaxis may be far more effective than traditional topical or subconjunctival approaches. The incidence of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in our center was 0.023%, comparable with that of other previously published international studies. Older rural patients with immune suppressive diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, are particularly more prone to endophthalmitis. Vitreous loss at the time of surgery was

  7. Features associated with the development of non-motor manifestations in Parkinson's disease Factores asociados con el desarrollo de complicaciones no motoras en la enfermedad de Parkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Juri

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder, predominantly characterized by the presence of motor symptoms. However, the non motor manifestations (NMM are a frequent complaint in the PD patients. There is a lack of information about the risk factors associated with the NMM in these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of the more common NMM in a population of PD patients and to determine the features associated with its development. We studied 124 ambulatory PD patients. NMM were defined by the presence of neuropsychiatric manifestations, cognitive disorder, autonomic dysfunction or sleep related problems. In a multivariate analysis we found that the years of evolution of the PD and the presence of cognitive dysfunction are the risk factors for the neuropsychiatric and autonomic manifestations, whereas axial impairment is a risk factor for cognitive disorders and dyskinesias is for sleep related problems. In conclusion, this study shows that the features related to the PD progression appear as the main risk factors associated with NMM.La enfermedad de Parkinson (EP es un trastorno neurodegenerativo, caracterizado predominan-temente por la presencia de síntomas motores. No obstante, la presencia de manifestaciones no motoras (MNN son frecuentes en los pacientes con EP. Existe escasa información sobre los factores de riesgo asociados con la aparición de MNN en dichos pacientes. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la prevalencia de las MNN más comunes en una población de pacientes portadores de EP y determinar los factores de riesgo asociados con su aparición. Estudiamos 124 pacientes portadores de EP atendidos en forma ambulatoria. La presencia de MNN fue definida por la aparición de manifestaciones neuropsiquiátricas, trastorno cognitivo, disfunción autonómica o alteraciones del sueño. En el análisis multivariado encontramos que los años de evolución de la EP y la presencia de disfunci

  8. Thermally activated trigger device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.; Camaret, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear space reactor, a thermally activated trigger device for rendering the reactor subcritical upon reentry to the earth's atmosphere, the device comprising: a closed vessel, a piston slideably mounted in the vessel to divide it into first and second compartments, an inert gas contained within each of the compartments at substantially the same pressure, a connecting rod operatively connected to the piston and to actuator means, the actuator means providing for moving means for rendering the reactor subcritical upon movement of the connecting rod; a bellows having opposite ends, one of the ends being affixed to and in sealing engagement with the connecting rod and the other of the ends being affixed to and in sealing engagement with the vessel for permitting linear movement of the connecting rod and preventing any escape of the inert gas from the closed vessel; and normally closed pipes communicating with one of the compartments for venting the inert gas therefrom when any of the pipes is open, the pipes being located at different parts of the nuclear space reactor so that the closed ends thereof are exposed to the atmosphere upon reentry of the reactor to the atmosphere. The pipes are designed to open at a selected temperature resulting from the reentry so that the gas leaves the communicating compartment via an open pipe to cause a difference in pressure between the compartments sufficient for the higher pressure in the other compartment to move the piston and thereby activate the actuator means

  9. Trigger and data acquisition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Gaspar, C

    2001-01-01

    Past LEP experiments generate data at 0.5 MByte/s from particle detectors with over a quarter of a million readout channels. The process of reading out the electronic channels, treating them, and storing the date produced by each collision for further analysis by the physicists is called "Data Acquisition". Not all beam crossings produce interesting physics "events", picking the interesting ones is the task of the "Trigger" system. In order to make sure that the data is collected in good conditions the experiment's operation has to be constantly verified. In all, at LEP experiments over 100 000 parameters were monitored, controlled, and synchronized by the "Monotoring and control" system. In the future, LHC experiments will produce as much data in a single day as a LEP detector did in a full year's running with a raw data rate of 10 - 100 MBytes/s and will have to cope with some 800 million proton-proton collisions a second of these collisions only one in 100 million million is interesting for new particle se...

  10. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagliesi, M.G., E-mail: mg.bagliesi@pi.infn.i [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy); Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N. [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5{mu}s. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  11. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, M.G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  12. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  13. Clinical features and risk factors of cerebral infarction after mild head trauma under 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Liang, Hong-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Mild head trauma can cause cerebral infarction in children younger than 18 months of age, yet the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and risk factors are not fully understood. Data of 16 cases between August 2008 and September 2011, including clinical manifestations and imaging and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed. All patients had the history of mild head trauma. The median age of the cohort was 13.5 months (range 6 months to 18 months). All children developed neurologic symptoms and signs within 72 hours after trauma, 62.5% (10/16) within 30 minutes. The first symptoms included hemiparesis (9/16), facial paresis (4/16), and convulsion (6/16). Overall, 93.75% (15/16) of the lesions were in the basal ganglia region. Two risk factors were identified, basal ganglia calcification in 10 and cytomegalovirus infection in eight. After conservative therapy, the neurologic deficits recovered to some extent. Cerebral infarction after mild head trauma in children younger than 18 months of age may take place, especially under the circumstances of basal ganglia calcification or cytomegalovirus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenotypic features of first-generation transgenic goats for human granulocyte-colony stimulation factor production in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Melo, Carlos H S; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2014-11-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor used in neutropenic patients. It is produced in transgenic bacteria or cultured mammalian cells. As an alternative, we now show that hG-CSF can be expressed in the mammary gland of first-generation (F1) transgenic goats during induced lactation. Despite lower milk production, transgenic females presented a similar milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) when compared to non-transgenic (p > 0.05) ones. The mean concentration (±SD) of recombinant hG-CSF in milk during lactation was 360 ± 178 µg ml(-1). All clinical parameters, as well as kidney and liver function, indicated that F1 transgenic goats were healthy. Additionally, no ectopic hG-CSF expression was detected in studied tissues of F1 transgenic males. Thus, F1 hG-CSF-transgenic goats can express the recombinant protein in milk at quantities compatible with their use as bioreactors in a commercial-scale protein-production program.

  15. Evaluating National Environmental Sustainability: Performance Measures and Influential Factors for OECD-Member Countries featuring Canadian Performance and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbick, Kenneth S.

    This research reviews five studies that evaluate national environmental sustainability with composite indices; performs uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of techniques for building a composite index; completes principal components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy, sustainable food, nature conservation, and sustainable cities (Due to its current importance, the greenhouse gases (GHG) indicator is included individually as another policy measure.); analyses factors that seem to influence performance: climate, population growth, population density, economic output, technological development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control expenditures, and environmental pricing; and explores Canadian policy implications of the results. The techniques to build composite indices include performance indicator selection, missing data treatment, normalisation technique, scale-effect adjustments, weights, and aggregation method. Scale-effect adjustments and normalisation method are significant sources of uncertainty inducing 68% of the observed variation in a country's final rank at the 95% level of confidence. Choice of indicators also introduces substantial variation as well. To compensate for this variation, the current study recommends that a composite index should always be analysed with other policy subindices and individual indicators. Moreover, the connection between population and consumption indicates that per capita scale-effect adjustments should be used for certain indicators. Rather than ranking normalisation, studies should use a method that retains information from the raw indicator values. Multiple regression and cluster analyses indicate economic output, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important. It is statistically significant for five out of seven performance measures at the 95

  16. Triggering on electrons and photons with CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabi Alexandre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the year 2011, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has operated with an instantaneous luminosity that has risen continually to around 4 × 1033cm−2s−1. With this prodigious high-energy proton collisions rate, efficient triggering on electrons and photons has become a major challenge for the LHC experiments. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 106. The first level (L1 is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger (HLT combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In this intense hadronic environment, the L1 electron/photon trigger provides a powerful tool to select interesting events. It is based upon information from the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL, a high-resolution detector comprising 75848 lead tungstate (PbWO4 crystals in a “barrel” and two “endcaps”. The performance as well as the optimization of the electron/photon trigger are presented.

  17. Boredom and Passion: Triggers of Habitual Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine; Neergaard, Helle

    To date, habitual entrepreneurship research has mainly focused on comparing novice with habitual business founders and creating typologies. The purpose of this paper is to examine and explain the underlying reasons why habitual entrepreneurs establish new businesses repeatedly and continually....... The case based, the study identifies eight factors, which contribute to consecutive venture creation. The findings suggest that boredom and passion are necessary conditions triggering habitual entrepreneurship. Other important mechanisms included the joy of discovering and exploiting an opportunity...

  18. FEATURE ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic Role. T1DM is not inherited. It is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component that is thought to interact with specific environmental triggers. .... T1DM are education and emotional support, diet and insulin therapy. Education. Education is a continuous process at every stage of the life of the child and the ...

  19. Nosocomial infections with metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: molecular epidemiology, risk factors, clinical features and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, A; Dalla Costa, L M; Nogueira, K S; Matos, A P; Gales, A C; Paganini, M C; Castro, M E S; Raboni, S M

    2014-08-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) have emerged as one of the most important bacterial resistance mechanisms because of their ability to hydrolyse virtually all β-lactam agents. MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MBL-PA) are an important cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), where they are associated with serious infections and present a significant clinical risk. To assess the molecular epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes of nosocomial infections caused by MBL-PA in a teaching hospital in Southern Brazil. From January 2001 to December 2008, 142 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from distinct clinical samples from hospitalized patients. These isolates were screened for MBLs, and underwent polymerase chain reaction, sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Patients infected with carbapenem-resistant MBL-PA were considered as cases, and patients infected with non-MBL-PA were considered as controls. Eighty-four of 142 patients with positive carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa cultures met the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for infection. Fifty-eight patients were infected with MBL-PA (69%) and 26 patients were infected with non-MBL-PA (31%). Multi-variate analysis revealed that ICU stay [P = 0.003, odds ratio (OR) 4.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-14.01] and urinary tract infection (P = 0.001, OR 9.67, 95% CI 1.72-54.48) were important risk factors for MBL-PA infection. Patients infected with MBL-PA showed faster onset of infection (P = 0.002) and faster progression to death (P = 0.04). These results showed the severity of MBL-PA infections, and demonstrated the urgent need for strategies to improve infection control measures to prevent an increase in these nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A cluster of anaphylactic reactions in children with spina bifida during general anesthesia: epidemiologic features, risk factors, and latex hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K J; Pearson, M L; Kurup, V P; Havens, P L; Byrd, R S; Setlock, M A; Butler, J C; Slater, J E; Grammer, L C; Resnick, A

    1994-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions (ARs) in high-risk pediatric patients undergoing general anesthesia, especially those with spina bifida, have been attributed to anesthetics, muscle relaxants, antimicrobials, ethylene oxide, and latex. To identify risk factors for AR during general anesthesia and to investigate the role of latex allergy, we studied epidemiologic and immunologic characteristics of patients with ARs during general anesthesia during a 13-month cluster of such reactions at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin (case patients). Patients with AR were compared with patients with spina bifida undergoing uneventful general anesthesia during the same period (control patients). For each case patient and control patient, we conducted a chart review; a parental interview; skin prick testing with latex, anesthetics, aeroallergens, and banana extract; ELISA and RAST for latex-specific IgE; a total serum IgE; and an ELISA for IgE antibody to ethylene oxide. Anaphylactic reactions occurred exclusively in patients with spina bifida (n = 10) or patients with a congenital urinary tract anomaly (n = 1). Case-patients were more likely than control patients to have a history of asthma (p = 0.002), rubber contact allergy (p = 0.001), food allergy (p = 0.001), rash caused by adhesive tape (p = 0.05), daily rectal disimpaction (p < 0.001), nine or more prior surgical procedures (p < 0.002), latex-specific IgE (p = 0.027), or elevated total serum IgE levels (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis identified non-white race, rubber contact allergy, history of food allergy, and nine or more surgical procedures as significant independent risk factors. Logistic model equation identified the predicted probability of AR with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 82%, 97%, and 82%, respectively. These findings demonstrate that atopy, especially symptomatic latex allergy, is associated with AR during anesthesia in patients with spina bifida. Until a standardized latex test is

  1. Renal disease in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia: A report of prevalence, clinical features and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R A Bolarinwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal abnormalities in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia (SCA have not been extensively studied. To determine the prevalence, pattern and the associated risk factors of renal disease, 72 subjects with SCA from two centers in the southwestern Nigeria were investigated. Socio-demographic data, body mass index and clinical findings were documented. The urine analysis, serum bio-chemistry, hemogram and renal factors attributable to SCA were determined. Presence of albuminuria of at least 1+ or microalbuminuria in those negative with dipstick; and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Cockcroft-Gault formula categorized subjects to various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Subjects with and without albuminuria were compared to determine the relative risk associated with renal disease. Four (5.6% subjects had macro-albuminuria, while 32 (44.4% had micro-albuminuria and 30 (41.7% had hemoglobinuria. In the subjects with albuminuria, age, hematocrit, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urea and creatinine clearance were numerically higher while the eGFR was numerically lower. There was no significant difference in the clinical parameters studied in the two groups of subjects. The diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the albuminuric group. Based on eGFR, 22 (30.6% subjects had hyperfiltration (GFR > 140 mL/min/1.73 m2, of whom 36.4% had albuminuria, 18 (25.0% had stage 1 CKD, 30 (41.7% had stage 2 CKD and two (2.7% subjects had stage 3 CKD with albuminuria. None had stage 4 and 5 CKD. We conclude that renal abnormalities, importantly albuminuria, is common in adult Nigerians with SCA and the pattern and incidence are similar to those reported from other parts of the world. Regular blood pressure monitoring, early diagnosis and active intervention are advocated to delay progression to end-stage kidney disease in view of poor outcomes of renal replacement therapy in SCA patients with nephropathy.

  2. The role of bZIP transcription factors in green plant evolution: adaptive features emerging from four founder genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo Guedes Corrêa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs. The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments.

  3. DUMAND data acquisition with triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, A.E.; Theriot, D.; March, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A data acquisition scheme for the standard DUMAND array that includes a simple triggering scheme as a fundamental part of the system is presented. Although there are a number of not yet fully understood parameters, it is assumed that thresholds can be set in such a manner as to give rise to a triggered signal that is not so dominated by randoms that it gives a substantial decrease in the data acquisition rate over that which would be required by a nontriggered system. It is also assumed that the triggering logic is relatively simple and does not need major computational capabilities for a trigger logic decision. With these assumptions, it is possible to generate the trigger at the array and restrict the data transfer to shore. However, with a not unreasonable delay of 200 microseconds, it is even possible to transmit the information for the trigger to shore and perform all that logic on the shore. The critical point is to send the minimum amount of information necessary to construct the trigger such that one need not send all the possible information in all detectors of the array continuously to shore. 1 figure

  4. ATLAS Trigger: design and commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system was designed to select potentially interesting events and reduce the incoming rate to 100-200 Hz. The first trigger level (LVL1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the second and third trigger levels are realised in software. Based on calorimeter information and hits in dedicated muon-trigger detectors, the LVL1 decision is made by the central-trigger processor yielding an output rate of less than 100 kHz. The allowed latency for the trigger decision at this stage is less than 2.5 micro seconds. The two subsequent levels, called, High-Level Trigger (HLT) further reduce the rate to the offline storage rate while retaining the most interesting physics. The HLT is implemented in software running in commercially available computer farms and consists of Level 2 and Event Filter. To reduce the network data traffic and the processing time to managea...

  5. The ATLAS Missing ET trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few months, the ATLAS detector collected 900 GeV LHC collision events which allowed for the study the performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system (TDAQ). With the 7 TeV collision data collected recently, the performance studies of the trigger system are critical for a successful physics program. In particular a large spectrum of physics results will rely on the capacity of the ATLAS TDAQ system to collect events based on the estimate of the missing transverse energy (MET) contained in each event. The MET trigger would be, for example, the primary trigger to be used in new physics searches for processes involving new weakly interacting particles, which could account for the astronomically observed dark matter. In addition to discovery perspectives, the MET trigger can also be used in combination with other triggers to control the rate of signatures involving low energy objects. For example, the MET trigger is necessary in order to measure non-boosted W in the tau channel. Finally...

  6. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl, C.; Morisseau, C; Bomberger, J; Stanton, B; Hammock, B; O& apos; Toole, G; Madden, D

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  7. Study of influencing factors to chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption properties from fluorescence features in Taihu lake in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Chun Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the components of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM, confirm the influence of components to the absorption coefficient of CDOM (aCDOM, and estimate aCDOM from fluorescence spectra, fluorescence and optical measurements of CDOM were carried out in November 2008. The results indicate that, the primary component of CDOM is humic-like. The secondary component is tryptophan-like, which is the product of phytoplankton and aquatic debris rather than the wastewater treatment drainaged from city. In this study, six fluorophores with multiple excitation-emission matrices (EEMs peaks (A, B, C, N, M, T were identified according to the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. The average contribution of each component to the CDOM is 19.93, 18.82, 16.88, 16.39, 12.26, and 15.72%, respectively. Red Shifted phenomenon will happen with the increase of fluorescence intensity for ultraviolet and terrestrially humic-like. Conversely, marine humic-like will appear Reverse Red Shifted with the increase of fluorescence intensity. The primary contributor to the shoulder value of CDOM’s absorption coefficient at 275 nm is phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like. The main contributors to the shoulder shape are UV humic-like and phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like and tryptophan-like. A strong correlation between CDOM absorption and fluorescence intensity at emission wavelength of 424 nm and excitation wavelength ranging from 280 to 360 nm was found. The absorption coefficient can be retrieved successfully from the same excitation wavelength’s fluorescence intensity by an exponential model.

  8. Immunophenotypic features of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from mammary carcinomas in female dogs associated with prognostic factors and survival rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Araújo, Márcio S S; Costa-Neto, João M; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Barrouin-Melo, Stella M; Cardoso, Sergio V; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Serakides, Rogéria; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2010-06-04

    The immune system plays an important role in the multifactorial biologic system during the development of neoplasias. However, the involvement of the inflammatory response in the promotion/control of malignant cells is still controversial, and the cell subsets and the mechanisms involved are poorly investigated. The goal of this study was to characterize the clinical-pathological status and the immunophenotyping profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and their association with the animal survival rates in canine mammary carcinomas. Fifty-one animals with mammary carcinomas, classified as carcinomas in mixed tumors-MC-BMT = 31 and carcinomas-MC = 20 were submitted to systematic clinical-pathological analysis (tumor size; presence of lymph node and pulmonary metastasis; clinical stage; histological grade; inflammatory distribution and intensity as well as the lymphocytic infiltrate intensity) and survival rates. Twenty-four animals (MC-BMT = 16 and MC = 8) were elected to the immunophenotypic study performed by flow cytometry. Data analysis demonstrated that clinical stage II-IV and histological grade was I more frequent in MC-BMT as compared to MC. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the intensity of inflammation (moderate/intense) and the proportion of CD4+ (> or = 66.7%) or CD8+ T-cells ( or = 600 (P = 0.02) remained as independent prognostic factor. Despite the clinical manifestation, the lymphocytes represented the predominant cell type in the tumor infiltrate. The percentage of T-cells was higher in animals with MC-BMT without metastasis, while the percentage of B-lymphocytes was greater in animals with metastasized MC-BMT (P carcinomas.

  9. Clinical features and risk factors for adverse outcome in Ebola virus disease in Moyamba District Sierra Leone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaskjold, Yngvar Lunde [Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bolkan, Hakon Angell [St. Olav Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Krogh, Kurt Østhuus [St. Olav Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Jongopi, James [Moyamba District Hospital (Sierra Leone); Berg, Ase [Stavanger Univ. Hospital, Stavanger (Norway); Lundeby, Karen Marie [Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Mellesmo, Sindre [St. Olav Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Garces, Pedro San José [Medicos del Mundo, Madrid (Spain); Josendal, Ola [Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Opstad, Asmund [Haraldsplass Diaconal Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Svensen, Erling [Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Zabala, Matias [Medicos del Mundo, Madrid (Spain); Kamara, Alfred Sandy [Moyamba District Hospital (Sierra Leone); Riera, Melchor [Medicos del Mundo, Madrid (Spain); Arranz, Javier [Medicos del Mundo, Madrid (Spain); Stamper, Paul D. [MRIGlobal, Frederick, MD (United States); Austin, Paula [Moyamba District Hospital (Sierra Leone); Moosa, Alfredo J. [Moyamba District Hospital (Sierra Leone); Marke, Dennis [Moyamba District Hospital (Sierra Leone); Hassan, Shoaib [World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva (Switzerland); Blomberg, Bjorn [Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND The current outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has attacked 24000 people, killed more than 10000 and disrupted social life. METHODS We studied retrospectively the clinical presentation and risk factors for fatal outcome in EVD among all patients admitted to the Ebola Treatment Center in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone. RESULTS Among a total of 88 admitted patients, eighty-two were tested by PCR and 31 (38%) were positive for Ebola virus. Ninety percent reported previous contact with EVD patients and 35% had participated in burials of EVD suspect deceased. No healthworkers were admitted. The most common symptoms on admission were weakness (97%), diarrhea (68%), fever (62%), loss of appetite (62%), vomiting (58%), pain in muscles (62%) and joints (55%), headache (55%), abdominal pain (45%) and conjunctivitis (42%). On admission, bleeding was present in one-third (11/31), while more than half (17/31) bled during the hospital stay. Fifty-eight percent (18/31) died, most within 4-11 days of onset. Significant predictors for fatal outcome were shorter time from onset to admission (P=0.02), high initial viral load (P<0.001), bleeding (P=0.004), and severe pain (P=0.001). The only two patients with hiccups died. CONCLUSIONS Bleeding was more common in our cohort than reported elsewhere during this epidemic, and predicted poor prognosis. Severe pain was common, particularly in fatal cases, and calls for improved and safe palliation, for instance with transdermal opiates. The lack of fever in one third of EBV cases may have implications for screening procedures and case definitions.

  10. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow

  11. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  12. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  13. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Amerio, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Bevacqua, V; Bogdan, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Cavaliere, V; Canelli, F; Blazey, G; Cervigni, F; Cheng, Y; Citterio, M; Crescioli, F; Dell’Orso, M; Drake, G; Dunford, M; Giannetti, P; Giorgi, F; Hoff, J; Kapliy, A; Kasten, M; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Lanza, A; Liberali, V; Liu, T; Magalotti, D; McCarn, A; Melachrinos, C; Meroni, C; Negri, A; Neubauer, M; Penning, B; Piendibene, M; Proudfoot, J; Riva, M; Roda, C; Sabatini, F; Sacco, I; Shochet, M; Stabile, A; Tang, F; Tang, J; Tripiccione, R; Tuggle, J; Vercesi, V; Verzocchi, M; Villa, M; Vitillo, R A; Volpi, G; Webster, J; Wu, J; Yorita, K; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    A track reconstruction system for the trigger of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is described. The Fast Tracker is a highly parallel hardware system designed to operate at the Level-1 trigger output rate. It will provide high-quality tracks reconstructed over the entire inner detector by the start of processing in the Level-2 trigger. The system is based on associative memories for pattern recognition and fast FPGA’s for track reconstruction. Its design and expected performance under instantaneous luminosities up to 3 × 10^34/cm^2/s are discussed.

  14. Clinical features and prognostic factors for survival in patients with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma and comparison to the patients with the aggressive variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Tae-Sik; Kim, Tae-Yong; Kim, Kyung-Won

    2007-01-01

    We performed this study to compare the clinicopathologic features and outcomes between the patients with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and the patients with the aggressive variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). To evaluate the prognostic factors for survival of the patients with PDTC, we selected 49 patients with PDTC and 23 patients with the aggressive variants of PTC from three hospitals during the recent 15 years. The five-year survival rate and clinicopathologic features of the patients with PDTC were not different from those of the patients with the aggressive variants of PTC. Univariate analysis revealed the significant poor prognostic factors for survival of the patients with PDTC and the aggressive variants of PTC as follows: an age more than 45 years, a tumor size larger than 4 cm, the presence of tumor invasion to extrathyroidal tissue or the trachea, the presence of cervical lymph node invasion, the presence of distant metastasis, the absence of high-dose radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) stage II, III and IV. Distant metastasis and high-dose RAI therapy were independent significant predictors for survival of the patients with PDTC and the aggressive variants of PTC on multivariate analysis. However, distant metastasis was the only independent significant predictors for survival of the patients with PDTC excluding patients with the aggressive variants of PTC. (author)

  15. Immunophenotypic features of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from mammary carcinomas in female dogs associated with prognostic factors and survival rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Araújo, Márcio SS; Costa-Neto, João M; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Barrouin-Melo, Stella M; Cardoso, Sergio V; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Serakides, Rogéria; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2010-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the multifactorial biologic system during the development of neoplasias. However, the involvement of the inflammatory response in the promotion/control of malignant cells is still controversial, and the cell subsets and the mechanisms involved are poorly investigated. The goal of this study was to characterize the clinical-pathological status and the immunophenotyping profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and their association with the animal survival rates in canine mammary carcinomas. Fifty-one animals with mammary carcinomas, classified as carcinomas in mixed tumors-MC-BMT = 31 and carcinomas-MC = 20 were submitted to systematic clinical-pathological analysis (tumor size; presence of lymph node and pulmonary metastasis; clinical stage; histological grade; inflammatory distribution and intensity as well as the lymphocytic infiltrate intensity) and survival rates. Twenty-four animals (MC-BMT = 16 and MC = 8) were elected to the immunophenotypic study performed by flow cytometry. Data analysis demonstrated that clinical stage II-IV and histological grade was I more frequent in MC-BMT as compared to MC. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the intensity of inflammation (moderate/intense) and the proportion of CD4 + (≥ 66.7%) or CD8 + T-cells (<33.3%) were not associated with worse survival rate. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only lymphocytic infiltrate intensity ≥ 600 (P = 0.02) remained as independent prognostic factor. Despite the clinical manifestation, the lymphocytes represented the predominant cell type in the tumor infiltrate. The percentage of T-cells was higher in animals with MC-BMT without metastasis, while the percentage of B-lymphocytes was greater in animals with metastasized MC-BMT (P < 0.05). The relative percentage of CD4 + T-cells was significantly greater in metastasized tumors (both MC-BMT and MC), (P < 0.05) while the proportion of CD8 + T-cells was higher in MC-BMT without

  16. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57-6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76-7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64-3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13-2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61-5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02-1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03-3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64-0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42-3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28-0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01-2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05-2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55-0.63). Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season, frequency of diarrhea, frequency of vomiting, and eating shrimp or crab.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    "The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for reducing the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of 200 Hz. The ATLAS trigger is designed to select signal-like events from a large background in three levels: a first-level (L1) implemented in custom-built electronics, as well as the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) software triggers executed on large computing farms. The first-level trigger is comprised of calorimeter, muon and forward triggers to identify event features such as missing transverse energy, as well as candidate electrons, photons, jets and muons. Input signals from these objects are processed by the L1 Central Trigger to form a L1 Accept (L1A) decision. L1A and timing information is consequently sent to all sub-detectors, which push their data to DAQ buffers. The first part of the HLT system (called Level 2) pulls the data from the buffers on demand, while the second part (called Event Filter) works with the who...

  18. Three Cases of Organized Hematoma of the Maxillary Sinus: Clinical Features and Immunohistological Studies for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Imayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Organized hematoma (OH is a rare, nonneoplastic, hemorrhagic lesion causing mucosal swelling and bone thinning, mainly in the maxillary sinus. We aimed to clarify the clinical presentation and treatment of OH. Methods. Three cases of maxillary sinus OH and a literature review are presented. Results. Three men aged 16–40 years complained of nasal obstruction, frequent epistaxis, and/or headache. Clinical and radiological examinations revealed a maxillary sinus OH. They were cured in a piecemeal fashion via endoscopic middle meatal antrostomy. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor were expressed in the lesion. Conclusions. The pathogenesis of OH is unclear and it presents various histological and imaging findings; however, it is not difficult to rule out malignant tumors. Minimally invasive surgery such as endoscopic sinus surgery can cure it completely. Thus, it is important to determine the diagnosis using CT and MRI and to quickly provide surgical treatment.

  19. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the data reduction is easy since all data apart from the forward calorimeters can be deleted. For the ECAL and most detectors from the 'rest' a time stamping to one bunch is possible. This allows for a reduction in the data rate by a factor ten. Further reduction would require the selection of 'interesting regions'. Showers from.

  20. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzer, Julian

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of two with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the factor of two increase in the number of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to three different subdetector combinations. An overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis on the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects is given. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition system. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently at all stages of processing and are logged by the online computing system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. In addition, the synchronisation of trigger inputs is watched based on bunch-by-bunch trigger information. Several software tools allow for efficient display of the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts. The design of the framework aims at reliability, flexibility, and robustness of the system and takes into account the operational experience gained during Run 1. The Level-1 Central Trigger was successfully operated with high efficiency during the cosmic-ray, beam-splash and first Run 2 data taking with the full ATLAS detector.

  1. Triggering on 7 TeV Collisions with the ATLAS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorko, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    In 2010 ATLAS has seen the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Later this year a collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. Events of potential interest for physics analysis are selected by a three-level trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first level (L1) is implemented in customized hardware, the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers. The selection is described by the Trigger Configuration in the form of menus, each of which contains more than 500 signatures. Each signature corresponds to a chain of algorithms which reconstruct and refine specific event features. The HLT Steering receives information from the Configuration system, dynamically creates chains and controls the execution of algorithms and flow of information during event processing. The Steering tests each signature on L1-accepted events, and those satisfying one or more test are recorded for later analysis. To save execution time, the Steering has a facility to cache results, avoid...

  2. Clinical features of and risk factors for major depression with history of postpartum episodes in Han Chinese women: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuzhong; Gardner, Charles O; Bigdeli, Tim; Gao, Jingfang; Zhang, Zhen; Tao, Ming; Liu, Ying; Li, Youhui; Wang, Gang; Shi, Jianguo; Gao, Chengge; Zhang, Kerang; Li, Kan; Wang, Xumei; Liu, Lanfen; Sun, Jing; Du, Bo; Shi, Shenxun; Zhang, Jingbei; Wu, Wenyuan; Wang, Xueyi; Shen, Jianhua; Liu, Tiebang; Gu, Danhua; Liang, Wei; Deng, Hong; Pan, Jiyang; Yang, Lijun; Jian, Hu; Jiang, Guoqin; Meng, Huaqing; Miao, Guodong; Li, Yi; Hu, Chunmei; Huang, Guoping; Zhang, Yutang; Chen, Yunchun; Ha, Baowei; Gao, Shu; Fang, Xiang; Mei, Qiyi; Hong, Xiaohong; Yang, Donglin; Liu, Tieqiao; Fengyu, Yu; Zhong, Hui; Sang, Hong; Chen, Guibing; Cai, Min; Song, Yan; Dong, Jicheng; Shen, Zhenmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoping; Pan, Runde; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Yi; Liu, Zhengrong; Zhang, Qiwen; Li, Gongying; Flint, Jonathan; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2015-09-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical features of and risk factors for recurrent major depression (MD) with history of postpartum episodes (PPD) in Han Chinese women and the differences between first-onset postpartum MD (MD that has its first lifetime depressive episode in the postpartum period) and first-onset non-postpartum MD (MD with history of PPD and has its first lifetime depressive episode in a period other than postpartum). Data were derived from the China, Oxford and Virginia Commonwealth University Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology (CONVERGE) study (N=6017 cases) and analyzed in two steps. We first examined the clinical features of and risk factors for MD patients with (N=981) or without (N=4410) a history of PPD. We then compared the differences between first-onset postpartum MD (N=583) and first-onset non-postpartum MD (N=398) in those with a history of PPD. Linear, logistic and multinomial logistic models were employed to measure the associations. A history of PPD was associated with more guilt feelings, greater psychiatric comorbidity, higher neuroticism, earlier onset and more chronicity (OR 0.2-2.8). Severe premenstrual symptoms (PMS) and more childbirths increased the risk of PPD, as did a family history of MD, childhood sexual abuse, stressful life events and lack of social support (OR 1.1-1.3). In the MD with history of PPD subsample, first-onset postpartum MD was associated with fewer recurrent major depressive episodes, less psychiatric comorbidity, lower neuroticism, less severe PMS and fewer disagreements with their husbands (OR 0.5-0.8), but more childbirths (OR 1.2). Data were obtained retrospectively through interview and recall bias may have affected the results. MD with history of PPD in Han Chinese women is typically chronic and severe, with particular risk factors including severe PMS and more childbirths. First-onset postpartum MD and first-onset non-postpartum MD can be partly differentiated by their clinical features

  3. GnRH agonist triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2013-01-01

    The concept that a bolus of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) can replace human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) as a trigger of final oocyte maturation was introduced several years ago. Recent developments in the area strengthen this premise. GnRHa trigger offers important advantages......, including virtually complete prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), the introduction of a surge of FSH in addition to the LH surge and finally the possibility to individualize luteal-phase supplementation based on ovarian response to stimulation. We maintain that the automatic HCG...... triggering concept should be challenged and that the GnRHa trigger is the way to move forward with thoughtful consideration of the needs, safety and comfort of our patients. Routinely, human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is used to induce ovulation in fertility treatments. This approach deviates...

  4. FERMIGTRIG - Fermi GBM Trigger Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by one or more of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO). Note that there are two Browse catalogs resulting from GBM...

  5. The CDF level-3 trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has been operating at the Tevatron and collecting data on proton-antiproton interactions with collision rates above 250,000 Hz. Three levels of filtering select events for data logging at a rate of about 4 Hz. The Level 3 trigger provides most of the capabilities of the offline production programs for event reconstruction and physics analysis. The type of physics triggers, application of cuts, and combinations of logical requirements for event selection are controlled at run time by a trigger table using a syntax fully integrated with the Level 1 and Level 2 hardware triggers. The level 3 software operates in 48 RISC/UNIX processors (over 1000 mips) served by four 20-MByte/sec data buses for input, output and control. The system architecture, debugging, code validation, error reporting, analysis capabilities and performance will be described

  6. DNA double-strand break response factors influence end-joining features of IgH class switch and general translocation junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchakshari, Rohit A; Zhang, Xuefei; Kumar, Vipul; Du, Zhou; Wei, Pei-Chi; Kao, Jennifer; Dong, Junchao; Alt, Frederick W

    2018-01-23

    Ig heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) in B lymphocytes switches IgH constant regions to change antibody functions. CSR is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a donor IgH switch (S) region and a downstream acceptor S region. CSR is completed by fusing donor and acceptor S region DSB ends by classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and, in its absence, by alternative end-joining that is more biased to use longer junctional microhomologies (MHs). Deficiency for DSB response (DSBR) factors, including ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and 53BP1, variably impair CSR end-joining, with 53BP1 deficiency having the greatest impact. However, studies of potential impact of DSBR factor deficiencies on MH-mediated CSR end-joining have been technically limited. We now use a robust DSB joining assay to elucidate impacts of deficiencies for DSBR factors on CSR and chromosomal translocation junctions in primary mouse B cells and CH12F3 B-lymphoma cells. Compared with wild-type, CSR and c-myc to S region translocation junctions in the absence of 53BP1, and, to a lesser extent, other DSBR factors, have increased MH utilization; indeed, 53BP1-deficient MH profiles resemble those associated with C-NHEJ deficiency. However, translocation junctions between c-myc DSB and general DSBs genome-wide are not MH-biased in ATM-deficient versus wild-type CH12F3 cells and are less biased in 53BP1- and C-NHEJ-deficient cells than CSR junctions or c-myc to S region translocation junctions. We discuss potential roles of DSBR factors in suppressing increased MH-mediated DSB end-joining and features of S regions that may render their DSBs prone to MH-biased end-joining in the absence of DSBR factors.

  7. B physics triggers at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Starodumov, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    The CMS detector is mainly designed to investigate hard events. Only few Level-1 Trigger conditions are suitable to select soft B-meson decays. The B-physics potential of CMS depends strongly on a selection strategy at High-Level Trigger. The selection algorithms for some benchmark B-decay channels that allow CMS to perform competitive B-physics program are presented.

  8. Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Short-term Outcome of Ischemic Stroke, in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Data from a Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanksha, William G; Paramdeep, Kaur; Gagandeep, Singh; Rajinder, Bansal; Birinder, S Paul; Monika, Singla; Shavinder, Singh; Clarence, J Samuel; Shweta, J Verma; Sharma, Meenakshi; Jeyaraj, D Pandian

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder associated with stroke. This study was done to describe risk factors, clinical features, and short-term outcomes of stroke patients with AF. This study was a part of the Indian Council of Medical Research funded "Ludhiana urban population based Stroke Registry." Data were collected using WHO STEPS stroke method. All patients ≥18 years of age, who developed ischemic stroke between March 26, 2011, and March 25, 2013, were included in this study. Data about demographic details, clinical features, and risk factors were collected. The outcome was assessed at 28 days using modified Rankin scale (mRs) (good outcome: mRS ≤2; poor outcome >2). The statistical measures calculated were descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test, and independent t -test. Of the total 7199 patients enrolled in the registry, data of 1942 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria were analyzed, and AF was seen in 203 (10%) patients. AF patients were older (AF 62 ± 14 vs. non-AF 60 ± 15 years, P = 0.01), had more hypertension (AF 176 [87%] vs. non-AF 1396 [80%], P = 0.03), hyperlipidemia (AF 60 [32%] vs. non-AF 345 [21%], P = 0.001), coronary artery disease (AF 60 [30%] vs. non-AF 195 [11%], P 2; AF 90 [50%] vs. non-AF 555 [37%], P = 0.001). Ten percent of stroke patients had AF. They were older, had multiple risk factors and worse outcome. There was no gender difference in this large cohort.

  9. Using FPGA coprocessor for ATLAS level 2 trigger application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomich, Andrei; Hinkelbein, Christian; Kugel, Andreas; Maenner, Reinhard; Mueller, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Tracking has a central role in the event selection for the High-Level Triggers of ATLAS. It is particularly important to have fast tracking algorithms in the trigger system. This paper investigates the feasibility of using FPGA coprocessor for speeding up of the TRT LUT algorithm-one of the tracking algorithms for second level trigger for ATLAS experiment (CERN). Two realisations of the same algorithm have been compared: one in C++ and a hybrid C++/VHDL implementation. Using a FPGA coprocessor gives an increase of speed by a factor of two compared to a CPU-only implementation

  10. Risk Factors and Microbiological Features of Patients Hospitalized for Microbial Keratitis: A 10-Year Study in a Referral Center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Ma, David H K; Chen, Phil Y F; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Sun, Chi-Chin; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Shin-Yi; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study to analyze predisposing factors, clinical features, and microbiological characteristics of patients with microbial keratitis hospitalized over 10 years.The medical records of 558 patients who were diagnosed with microbial keratitis and admitted to Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH), a referral center in Taiwan, from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2012 were reviewed. Demographics, predisposing factors, isolated organisms, treatment, and hospital stay were recorded. Yearly trends were tested using a linear-by-linear association.Contact lens wear was the most common predisposing factor (31.4%), followed by ocular and systemic diseases (26.3%) and trauma (23.5%). Contact lens-related infectious keratitis increased year by year (P = 0.011). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most commonly isolated organism (28%), followed by fungi (17.6%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (5.4%). Except for Serratia marcescens, the identified organisms did not change over 10 years. Most bacterial infections were controlled using antimicrobial treatment, but more than half of patients with fungal keratitis required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 13.7 ± 11.5 days. Previous ocular surgery, large ulcer size, nontuberculous myycobacteris infection, and surgery during admission were related to prolonged hospital stay.In Taiwan, contact lens-related pseudomonal keratitis remained the most common cause of microbial keratitis in patients hospitalized from 2003 to 2012.

  11. Exploring Language-Independent Emotional Acoustic Features via Feature Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Shaukat, Arslan; Chen, Ke

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel feature selection strategy to discover language-independent acoustic features that tend to be responsible for emotions regardless of languages, linguistics and other factors. Experimental results suggest that the language-independent feature subset discovered yields the performance comparable to the full feature set on various emotional speech corpora.

  12. Global search of triggered non-volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tzu-Kai Kevin

    Deep non-volcanic tremor is a newly discovered seismic phenomenon with low amplitude, long duration, and no clear P- and S-waves as compared with regular earthquake. Tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults, providing new information about fault slip behaviors below the seismogenic zone. While tremor mostly occurs spontaneously (ambient tremor) or during episodic slow-slip events (SSEs), sometimes tremor can also be triggered during teleseismic waves of distance earthquakes, which is known as "triggered tremor". The primary focus of my Ph.D. work is to understand the physical mechanisms and necessary conditions of triggered tremor by systematic investigations in different tectonic regions. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I conduct a systematic survey of triggered tremor beneath the Central Range (CR) in Taiwan for 45 teleseismic earthquakes from 1998 to 2009 with Mw ≥ 7.5. Triggered tremors are visually identified as bursts of high-frequency (2-8 Hz), non-impulsive, and long-duration seismic energy that are coherent among many seismic stations and modulated by the teleseismic surface waves. A total of 9 teleseismic earthquakes has triggered clear tremor in Taiwan. The peak ground velocity (PGV) of teleseismic surface waves is the most important factor in determining tremor triggering potential, with an apparent threshold of ˜0.1 cm/s, or 7-8 kPa. However, such threshold is partially controlled by the background noise level, preventing triggered tremor with weaker amplitude from being observed. In addition, I find a positive correlation between the PGV and the triggered tremor amplitude, which is consistent with the prediction of the 'clock-advance' model. This suggests that triggered tremor can be considered as a sped-up occurrence of ambient tremor under fast loading from the passing surface waves. Finally, the incident angles of surface waves also play an important rule in controlling the tremor triggering potential. The next

  13. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41~fb$^{-1}$ with a peak luminosity of 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS \\mbox{Level-1} trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implemen...

  14. Human Factors in Green Office Building Design: The Impact of Workplace Green Features on Health Perceptions in High-Rise High-Density Asian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xue

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about human factors in green building, which is imperative in high-rise high-density urban environments. This paper describes our attempts to explore the influence of workplace green features (such as green certification, ventilation mode, and building morphology on health perceptions (personal sensation, sensorial assumptions, healing performance based on a survey in Hong Kong and Singapore. The results validated the relationship between green features and health perceptions in the workplace environment. Remarkably, participants from the air-conditioned offices revealed significant higher concerns about health issues than those participants from the mixed-ventilated offices. The mixed-ventilation design performs as a bridge to connect the indoor environment and outdoor space, which enables people to have contact with nature. Additionally, the preferred building morphology of the workplace is the pattern of a building complex instead of a single building. The complex form integrates the configuration of courtyards, podium gardens, green terrace, public plaza, and other types of open spaces with the building clusters, which contributes to better health perceptions. This research contributes to the rationalization and optimization of passive climate-adaptive design strategies for green buildings in high-density tropical or subtropical cities.

  15. Comparison of clinical features and prognostic factors in HIV-negative adults with cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculous meningitis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Junyan; Zhou, Taoyou; Zhong, Cejun; Deng, Rong; Lü, Xiaoju

    2017-01-10

    The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) and tuberculous meningitis (TBM) have gradually increased in recent years. These two types of meningitis are easily misdiagnosed which leads to a poor prognosis. In this study we compared differences of clinical features and prognostic factors in non-HIV adults with CM and TBM. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of CM and TBM patients from January 2008 to December 2015 in our university hospital in China. The data included demographic characteristics, laboratory results, imaging findings, clinical outcomes. A total of 126 CM and 105 TBM patients were included. CM patients were more likely to present with headache, abnormal vision and hearing, and they might be less prone to fever and cough than TBM patients (P meningitis which could help to improve the treatment outcome. Further studies are worth to be done.

  16. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  17. Trigger processing using reconfigurable logic in the CMS calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Brooke, J J; Heath, G P; Maddox, A J; Newbold, D; Rabbetts, P D

    2001-01-01

    We present the design of the Global Calorimeter Trigger processor for the CMS detector at LHC. This is a fully pipelined processor system which collects data from all the CMS calorimeters and produces summary information used in forming the Level-1 trigger decision for each event. The design in based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices (FPGAs) and fast data links. We present the results of device testing using a low-latency pipelined sort algorithm, which demonstrate that an FPGA can be used to perform processing previously foreseen to require custom ASICs. Our design approach results in a powerful, flexible and compact processor system. (0 refs).

  18. Review Document: Full Software Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Raven, G

    2014-01-01

    This document presents a trigger system for the upgraded LHCb detector, scheduled to begin operation in 2020. This document serves as input for the internal review towards the "DAQ, online and trigger TDR". The proposed trigger system is implemented entirely in software. In this document we show that track reconstruction of a similar quality to that available in the offline algorithms can be performed on the full inelastic $pp$-collision rate, without prior event selections implemented in custom hardware and without relying upon a partial event reconstruction. A track nding eciency of 98.8 % relative to oine can be achieved for tracks with $p_T >$ 500 MeV/$c$. The CPU time required for this reconstruction is about 40 % of the available budget. Proof-of-principle selections are presented which demonstrate that excellent performance is achievable using an inclusive beauty trigger, in addition to exclusive beauty and charm triggers. Finally, it is shown that exclusive beauty and charm selections that do not intr...

  19. Triggering on electrons and photons with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the year 2011, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has operated with an instantaneous luminosity that has risen continually to around 4x10^{33} cm^{-2} s^{-1}. With this prodigious high-energy proton collisions rate, efficient triggering on electrons and photons has become a major challenge for the LHC experiments. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10^6. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger (HLT) combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In this intense hadronic environment, the L1 electron/photon trigger provides a powerful tool to select interesting events. It is based upon information from the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL), a high-resolution detector comprising 75848 lead tungstate PbWO4 crystals in a "barrel" and two "endcaps''. The performance as well as the optimization ...

  20. Triggering on electrons and photons with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the year 2011, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has operated with an instantaneous luminosity that has risen continually to around 4x10^33cm-2 s-1. With this prodigious high-energy proton collisions rate, efficient triggering on electrons and photons has become a major challenge for the LHC experiments. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 106. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger (HLT) combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In this intense hadronic environment, the L1 electron/photon trigger provides a powerful tool to select interesting events. It is based upon information from the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL), a high-resolution detector comprising 75848 lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystals in a "barrel" and two "endcaps". The performance as well as the optimization of the elec...

  1. Upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system   

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221618; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In coming years the LHC is expected to undergo upgrades to increase both the energy of proton-proton collisions and the instantaneous luminosity. In order to cope with these more challenging LHC conditions, upgrades of the ATLAS trigger system will be required. This talk will focus on some of the key aspects of these upgrades. Firstly, the upgrade period between 2019-2021 will see an increase in instantaneous luminosity to $3\\times10^{34} \\rm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. Upgrades to the Level 1 trigger system during this time will include improvements for both the muon and calorimeter triggers. These include the upgrade of the first-level Endcap Muon trigger, the calorimeter trigger electronics and the addition of new calorimeter feature extractor hardware, such as the Global Feature Extractor (gFEX). An overview will be given on the design and development status the aforementioned systems, along with the latest testing and validation results. By 2026, the High Luminosity LHC will be able to deliver 14 TeV collisions wit...

  2. Review of trigger and on-line processors at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1984-07-01

    The role of trigger and on-line processors in reducing data rates to manageable proportions in e + e - physics experiments is defined not by high physics or background rates, but by the large event sizes of the general-purpose detectors employed. The rate of e + e - annihilation is low, and backgrounds are not high; yet the number of physics processes which can be studied is vast and varied. This paper begins by briefly describing the role of trigger processors in the e + e - context. The usual flow of the trigger decision process is illustrated with selected examples of SLAC trigger processing. The features are mentioned of triggering at the SLC and the trigger processing plans of the two SLC detectors: The Mark II and the SLD. The most common on-line processors at SLAC, the BADC, the SLAC Scanner Processor, the SLAC FASTBUS Controller, and the VAX CAMAC Channel, are discussed. Uses of the 168/E, 3081/E, and FASTBUS VAX processors are mentioned. The manner in which these processors are interfaced and the function they serve on line is described. Finally, the accelerator control system for the SLC is outlined. This paper is a survey in nature, and hence, relies heavily upon references to previous publications for detailed description of work mentioned here. 27 references, 9 figures, 1 table

  3. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Feature-centric comprehension of source code is essential during software evolution. However, such comprehension is oftentimes difficult to achieve due the discrepancies between structural and functional units of object-oriented programs. We present a tool for feature-centric analysis of legacy...

  4. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different subdetector combinations. An overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects is given. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently at...

  5. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different sub-detector combinations. In this contribution, we give an overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are m...

  6. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis in children of Central South China: Clinical features, treatment, influencing factors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Weixi; Yin, Jinghua; Lu, Qianjin; Yin, Fei; He, Fang; Peng, Jing

    2017-11-15

    We analyzed the clinical manifestations of children with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis in Central South China and the factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment. A retrospective study of children (0-14years old) with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in Central South China was carried out from March 2014 to November 2016. Demographics, clinical features, treatment, outcome, and the factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment were reviewed. Fifty-one patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were enrolled (age from 4months to 14years old; median age, 8years; 30 females). Forty-five patients (88%) presented with psychiatric symptoms, 40 (78%) with dyskinesia and movement disorders, 39 (77%) with sleep disturbances, 34 (67%) with seizures, 30 (59%) with a decreased level of consciousness (Glasgow scoreanti-NMDAR encephalitis in Central South China. Patients with decreased consciousness, PICU stay and autonomic instability were more likely to have no or limited response to first-line immunotherapy and to require second-line or even more aggressive immunotherapy. Children with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in China have a much lower incidence of tumors, lower mortality rates, and a lower proportion of lethal autonomic instability than adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  8. Feature Extraction

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  9. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  10. Fast processor for dilepton triggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsanevas, S.; Kostarakis, P.; Baltrusaitis, R.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a fast trigger processor, developed for and used in Fermilab experiment E-537, for selecting high-mass dimuon events produced by negative pions and anti-protons. The processor finds candidate tracks by matching hit information received from drift chambers and scintillation counters, and determines their momenta. Invariant masses are calculated for all possible pairs of tracks and an event is accepted if any invariant mass is greater than some preselectable minimum mass. The whole process, accomplished within 5 to 10 microseconds, achieves up to a ten-fold reduction in trigger rate

  11. Upgrade trigger: Bandwidth strategy proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Conor; Meloni, Simone; Boettcher, Thomas Julian; Whitehead, Mark Peter; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Vesterinen, Mika Anton

    2017-01-01

    This document describes a selection strategy for the upgrade trigger using charm signals as a benchmark. The Upgrade trigger uses a 'Run 2-like' sequence consisting of a first and second stage, in between which the calibration and alignment is performed. The first stage, HLT1, uses an inclusive strategy to select beauty and charm decays, while the second stage uses offline-quality exclusive selections. A novel genetic algorithm-based bandwidth division is performed at the second stage to distribute the output bandwidth among different physics channels, maximising the efficiency for useful physics events. The performance is then studied as a function of the available output bandwidth.

  12. Rosacea Triggers: Alcohol and Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinia, Hossein; Tuchayi, Sara Moradi; Patel, Nupur U; Patel, Nishit; Awosika, Olabola; Bahrami, Naeim; Cardwell, Leah A; Richardson, Irma; Huang, Karen E; Feldman, Steven R

    2018-04-01

    A variety of triggers are thought to exacerbate rosacea. A validated self-assessment tool and survey was used to study the relationship between rosacea severity and triggers. Subjects were adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of rosacea. Increased severity of disease was significantly associated with consumption of many alcoholic beverages in 1 day and employment at a job requiring extensive sun exposure. The authors' findings may inform physician counseling practices; patients may be provided with practical measures for managing their rosacea, such as limiting alcohol consumption over short periods of time and increasing sun protection, especially in the summer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. EMIC triggered chorus emissions in Cluster data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Benjamin; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.; Engebretson, M. J.; Pickett, J. S.; Omura, Y.; Robert, P.; Nomura, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 3 (2013), s. 1159-1169 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12026; GA ČR(CZ) GPP209/11/P848; GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284520 - MAARBLE Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : EMIC wave * triggered emission * plasmapause Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50178/abstract

  14. Fingerprint on trigger: A real case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amata, B; Aprea, G M; Chiuri, A; Zampa, F

    2015-08-01

    The results obtained by employing a usual technique for latent prints development on firearms are presented. A fingermark on a trigger was enhanced and this print was used to identify the person who handled the firearm. Indeed, it is not usual to find a useful fingermark in that position and, more in general, on firearms because of many different factors described in the following sections. The uniqueness of the results reported in this paper allow to consider the present casework as very interesting for the forensic community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Household triggers of bronchospasm in children aged less than two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Identified household trigger factors of bronchospasm in children less than two years of age include: insecticide spray, fumes, smoke from stove and firewood, and exposure to cold air. The elimination of these factors from the environment of the affected child would go a long way in preventing the attacks.

  16. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: a synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marlene S; Muir, Derek C G; Keating, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaowa

    2015-03-15

    This study was conducted to confirm sporadic measurements made over the late 1970s to the early 1990 s which determined that mercury (Hg) concentrations were low in anadromous char across Arctic and subarctic Canada including northern Québec and Labrador. Over 2004-2013, anadromous char populations across northern Canada were investigated at 20 sites for Hg concentrations and life history characteristics. Hg concentrations were extremely low in anadromous char muscle, typically Hg concentrations over the study area; longitude and latitude also were significant influencing variables. Char length, weight, age, condition factor and lipid content explained additional variance. A tendency towards higher Hg concentrations with increasing latitude may be partially related to decreasing growth of char towards the north. However, Hg concentrations in char were positively correlated with growth rates suggesting that Hg concentrations in char also were higher in the more productive study areas, including to the west where mainland riverine inputs of terrestrial carbon, nutrients, and Hg were greater. The data base for assessing time trends in char was limited by the small number of years investigated at most locations, variable fish size across years, small sample size, etc. Where temporal trends were detected, they were of increase on the long term (1970s, 1980s or early 1990 s to the present) but of decrease on the short term (early 2000s to present) with Nain (Labrador) showing the converse pattern. Higher Hg concentrations were also related to lower condition factor and cooler springs. Hg concentrations in anadromous char are compared with other terrestrial, aquatic and marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. Crown

  17. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: A synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Marlene S., E-mail: marlene.evans@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Muir, Derek C.G. [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Keating, Jonathan [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Wang, Xiaowa [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    and marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. - Highlights: • Mercury concentrations were very low (0.05 ± 0.02 µg/g) in anadromous char across northern Canada. • Hg concentrations increased with fish size, decreasing condition factor and cooler springs. • Hg concentrations seemed to increase on the long-term but decrease in recent times. • Char are a good food choice for those who want to maintain traditional diets while reducing Hg intake. • Anadromous char often are habitat-limited and most abundant in large lakes with ready sea access.

  18. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: A synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Marlene S.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Keating, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaowa

    2015-01-01

    marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. - Highlights: • Mercury concentrations were very low (0.05 ± 0.02 µg/g) in anadromous char across northern Canada. • Hg concentrations increased with fish size, decreasing condition factor and cooler springs. • Hg concentrations seemed to increase on the long-term but decrease in recent times. • Char are a good food choice for those who want to maintain traditional diets while reducing Hg intake. • Anadromous char often are habitat-limited and most abundant in large lakes with ready sea access

  19. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Clarisse; Charpin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs), molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Since avoidance is not easy to achieve, clean air policies remain the most effective strategy. Indoor air is also affected by air pollutants, such as cigarette smoke and

  20. Towards a Level-1 Tracking Trigger for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Santo, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Plans for a physics-driven upgrade of the LHC foresee staged increases of the accelerator's average instantaneous luminosity, of up to a factor of five compared to the original design. In order to cope with the sustained luminosity increase, and the resulting higher detector occupancy and particle interaction rates, the ATLAS experiment is planning phased upgrades of the trigger system and of the DAQ infrastructure. In the new conditions, maintaining an adequate signal acceptance for electro-weak processes will pose unprecedented challenges, as the default solution to cope with the higher rates would be to increase thresholds on the transverse momenta of physics objects (leptons, jets, etc). Therefore the possibility to apply fast processing at the first trigger level in order to use tracking information as early as possible in the trigger selection represents a most appealing opportunity, which can preserve the ATLAS trigger's selectivity without reducing its flexibility. Studies to explore the feasibility o...

  1. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and ...

  2. A new look at trigger point injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Clara S M; Wong, Steven H S

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection.

  3. Etiology of myofascial trigger points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, C.; Dommerholt, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is described as the sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms caused by myofascial trigger points (TrPs). Knowing the potential causes of TrPs is important to prevent their development and recurrence, but also to inactivate and eliminate existing TrPs. There is general

  4. Climatic triggers for peatland initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul J.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Valdes, Paul J.; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Smith, Mark W.; Tarasov, Lev; Haywood, Alan M.; Bacon, Karen L.

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are carbon-dense wetlands characterised by waterlogged, organic-rich soils. Modern-day peatlands have formed mainly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and despite covering only 3 % of the Earth's land surface are thought to store more than a third of all global soil carbon in the form of poorly decomposed plant detritus. Concern exists that this globally important carbon store may be vulnerable to near-future warming and changes in precipitation patterns, although the links between peatland development and climate are contested. The climatic and other environmental conditions that facilitate the initiation of peat are particularly poorly understood. We present the results of a novel, global study into the climate space of peat initiation since the LGM. We compiled a catalogue of radiocarbon dates of peat initiation from 942 sites that span a range of latitudes and biomes. We used the locations and ages of these peatlands to interrogate downscaled climate hindcasts at 500-yr intervals from a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model, HadCM3. This powerful combination of modelling and observational data provides a globally-consistent, temporally-extensive estimate of the climate spaces of peat initiation. In particular, it allows us to identify local and regional climatic changes that may have acted as triggers for peat formation. Peatlands in mid- and high-latitudes of both hemispheres, particularly in maritime locations, developed shortly after local increases in the time integral of growing season temperatures, and were seemingly not influenced by rainfall regime. Peat initiation at such sites appears to have been stimulated by temperature-driven increases in plant productivity in cold, postglacial landscapes, and was not water limited. The exception is the large peatland complex of the Western Siberian Lowlands, which was not glaciated during the last glacial period, and which appears to have been prompted instead by a strong

  5. Study On Aftershock Triggering In Consideration Of Tectonic Stress Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C.; Cai, Y.

    2007-12-01

    : The occurrence of earthquake is related to the strength of rock and tectonic stress field. The seismic risk factor (SRF),D=\\left|{τn }\\right|/(μσn ) is proposed to describe the dangerous status of aftershock triggering in this paper. Dearthquakes, velocity field from GPS as well as geological survey. As one order of approximation, the magnitudes of the regional tectonic stress field can be estimated by the Coulomb failure criterion. Finite element method (FEM) and the concept of the factor D are used to study the aftershock triggering of the 1976 Tangshan Ms=7.8 earthquake. The results show that: (1) Most of the aftershocks triggered by the Tangshan earthquake occurred in the two-leaf-shaped regions of D≥ 1 near the north-east end of the main-shock fault. The largest leaf is about 100km long and 40km wide. (2) The areas of aftershock triggering predicted by the seismic risk factorD and Δ CFS (the changes in the Coulomb failure stress) are almost the same near the fault. The difference between them is that the aftershock area predicted by Δ CFS≥ 0 is too large and the area predicted by the factor D≥ 1 is limited. The areas of aftershock triggering predicted by Δ CFS≥ 0.04 MPa are nearly the same as those of D≥ 1 obtained by the study. (3) Sometimes Δ CFS =0.01MPa is taken as a low threshold of aftershock triggering. However, Δ CFS≥ 0 only means the probability increase of the earthquake triggering, not means the earthquake will occur. The earthquake occurrence is not only related to Δ CFS, but also to the tectonic stress field before the main-shock.

  6. A calorimeter trigger system for the ISR axial field spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosselet, L.

    1981-01-01

    A fast and flexible trigger processor system designed to run in parallel up to 51 different types of trigger is used in a large hadron calorimeter experiment at CERN-ISR. A very fast data bus connected to 255 10 bit address ECE memory chips allows programmable selection of events according to their topology and energy pattern in less than 150 ns. In addition this system can interrogate two programmable processors (ESOP) to isolate events characterized by a large energy flow in the central drift chamber (< 500 μs). All functions of the trigger processor can be checked externally by a computer through injecting in parallel simulated input signals into various stages of the system. Salient features and performances will be discussed. (orig.)

  7. The human homolog of insect-derived growth factor, CECR1, is a candidate gene for features of cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, M A; Brinkman-Mills, P; Nguyen, T; Pan, H; Phan, S; Ying, F; Roe, B A; Tochigi, J; Shimizu, Y; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Buchwald, M; McDermid, H E

    2000-03-15

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is a developmental disorder with multiple organ involvement, associated with the duplication of a 2-Mb region of 22q11.2. Using exon trapping and genomic sequence analysis, we have isolated and characterized a gene, CECR1, that maps to this critical region. The protein encoded by CECR1 is similar to previously identified novel growth factors: IDGF from Sarcophaga peregrina (flesh fly) and MDGF from Aplysia californica (sea hare). The CECR1 gene is alternatively spliced and expressed in numerous tissues, with most abundant expression in human adult heart, lung, lymphoblasts, and placenta as well as fetal lung, liver, and kidney. In situ hybridization of a human embryo shows specific expression in the outflow tract and atrium of the developing heart, the VII/VIII cranial nerve ganglion, and the notochord. The location of this gene in the CES critical region and its embryonic expression suggest that the overexpression of CECR1 may be responsible for at least some features of CES, particularly the heart defects. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Correlation Feature Selection and Mutual Information Theory Based Quantitative Research on Meteorological Impact Factors of Module Temperature for Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The module temperature is the most important parameter influencing the output power of solar photovoltaic (PV systems, aside from solar irradiance. In this paper, we focus on the interdisciplinary research that combines the correlation analysis, mutual information (MI and heat transfer theory, which aims to figure out the correlative relations between different meteorological impact factors (MIFs and PV module temperature from both quality and quantitative aspects. The identification and confirmation of primary MIFs of PV module temperature are investigated as the first step of this research from the perspective of physical meaning and mathematical analysis about electrical performance and thermal characteristic of PV modules based on PV effect and heat transfer theory. Furthermore, the quantitative description of the MIFs influence on PV module temperature is mathematically formulated as several indexes using correlation-based feature selection (CFS and MI theory to explore the specific impact degrees under four different typical weather statuses named general weather classes (GWCs. Case studies for the proposed methods were conducted using actual measurement data of a 500 kW grid-connected solar PV plant in China. The results not only verified the knowledge about the main MIFs of PV module temperatures, more importantly, but also provide the specific ratio of quantitative impact degrees of these three MIFs respectively through CFS and MI based measures under four different GWCs.

  9. Clinical features, outcome and prognostic factors in dogs diagnosed with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours without adrenalectomy: 20 cases (1994-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, C; Pérez-Alenza, D; Melián, C

    2013-11-23

    The aims of this study were to describe the clinical features, the outcome and the prognostic factors of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal masses without adrenalectomy, and also to provide clinical data that can be useful for making decisions when managing dogs with these types of neoplasms. Medical records from 1994 to 2009 were reviewed and 20 dogs were included in the study. The results showed that mean age at diagnosis for dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal masses was 12 years with no sex predisposition. Most dogs were asymptomatic. The most frequent clinical signs, when present, were lethargy, weakness and hypertension. Radiological evidence of metastases at diagnosis was not frequent. The maximal dorso-ventral thickness of the adrenal mass ranged from 10.0 to 45.0 mm. Right adrenal gland masses were more frequent than left-sided. Hypertension was found to be related to tumour growth during follow-up. The median survival time of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting tumours was 17.8 months. Body weight at diagnosis, tumour size and the presence of metastases at diagnosis were inversely related to survival. In conclusion, survival of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours without adrenalectomy is relatively high and comparable with that of dogs treated with adrenalectomy. Dogs with metastasis and large adrenal tumours have a poorer prognosis. Hypertension is related to tumour growth, and might be used as an additional tool to assess the potential growing capacity of the tumour.

  10. T-705 (Favipiravir) suppresses tumor necrosis factor α production in response to influenza virus infection: A beneficial feature of T-705 as an anti-influenza drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Kamiyama, T; Daikoku, T; Takahashi, K; Nomura, N; Kurokawa, M; Shiraki, K

    Influenza virus infection induces the production of various cytokines, which play important roles in the pathogenesis of infection. Among the cytokines induced by influenza, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production has been correlated with the severity of lung lesions. We investigated the effects of T-705 (Favipiravir, 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) on cytokine production due to influenza virus infection in vitro and in vivo, compared with oseltamivir or GS 4071, an active form of oseltamivir. TNF-α production in mouse macrophage-derived P388D1 cells infected with the influenza virus was lower following treatment with T-705 at concentrations of 0.3 to 100 µg/ml than treatment with GS 4071 at the same concentrations. The effect of treatment with T-705 on the cytokine production induced by the influenza virus infection was investigated in mouse influenza virus infection model. At 48 h post-infection (p.i.) T-705 significantly suppressed the viral load in the lungs and TNF-α production in the airways of infected mice even when viral loads were high. Furthermore, T-705 suppressed only TNF-α production from the early phase of infection. In this study, T-705 showed the antiviral activity of reducing pulmonary viral load compared with oseltamivir, thereby suppressing the TNF-α production. This feature of T-705 is benefit against severe influenza infection.

  11. Relationship between morphological features and kinetic patterns of enhancement of the dynamic breast magnetic resonance imaging and clinico-pathological and biological factors in invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Guinea, Oscar; Andicoechea, Alejandro; González, Luis O; González-Reyes, Salomé; Merino, Antonio M; Hernández, Luis C; López-Muñiz, Alfonso; García-Pravia, Paz; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast cancer and its clinicopathological and biological factors. Dynamic MRI parameters of 68 invasive breast carcinomas were investigated. We also analyzed microvessel density (MVD), estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and expression of p53, HER2, ki67, VEGFR-1 and 2. Homogeneous enhancement was significantly associated with smaller tumor size (T1: < 2 cm) (p = 0.015). Tumors with irregular or spiculated margins had a significantly higher MVD than tumors with smooth margins (p = 0.038). Tumors showing a maximum enhancement peak at two minutes, or longer, after injecting the contrast, had a significantly higher MVD count than those which reached this point sooner (p = 0.012). The percentage of tumors with vascular invasion or high mitotic index was significantly higher among those showing a low percentage (≤ 150%) of maximum enhancement before two minutes than among those ones showing a high percentage (>150%) of enhancement rate (p = 0.016 and p = 0.03, respectively). However, there was a significant and positive association between the mitotic index and the peak of maximum intensity (p = 0.036). Peritumor inflammation was significantly associated with washout curve type III (p = 0.042). Variations in the early phase of dynamic MRI seem to be associated with parameters indicatives of tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer

  12. Trigger electronics for the ALICE PHOS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H; Musa, L; Yin, Z; Röhrich, D; Skaali, B; Sibiryak, Yu; Budnikov, D L

    2004-01-01

    The Photon Spectrometer of ALICE consists of 5 identical modules of 56 multiplied by 64 PWO crystals with a total of 100 degree azimuthal coverage of the barrel. The electronics required for implementing both the L0 trigger for high luminosity p-p physics and the L1 trigger for high p//T Pb+Pb physics has been studied. A full integration of the trigger logic into the detector's enclosure is based on analog transmission of fast trigger sums between stacks of front-end boards and trigger-router units. The latter contain 112 digitizer channels of 10bit, which are mapped into a single FPGA per trigger unit, covering areas of 24 multiplied by 16 crystals. The running modes allow for Level-0 trigger at 800ns and Level-1 at 6200ns trigger latencies. The design and status of the PHOS trigger electronics are outlined.

  13. Study and realisation of a digital TDC in the framework of the GANIL trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boujrad, Abderrahman

    2001-01-01

    In nuclear physics, the interaction between the ion beam and the target produces a large amount of events. Some of these events have no interest for the studied physical phenomenon; the useful events are sorted using a trigger. We have studied and realized a new trigger suitable for the GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) experiments. After an overview of the triggers used up to now at GANIL, we give the main features of the new trigger (GANIL Master Trigger, GMT) such as modularity, universality and versatility. After a description of the trigger operating modes, we depict the trigger realization steps. The trigger informs about fired detectors in a beam to target collision but gives no information about timing, nevertheless the timing is a very important piece of information if the trigger analysis duration is several times greater than the beam period. We suggest a timing measurement structure (Time to Digital Converter, TDC) able to eliminate this imprecision. The dead time, the low level integration and the consumption constraints lead us to prefer a digital architecture based on a digital counter associated with delay lines. Simple equations are given in order to define the operating area of the TDC. This area depends on the clock duty cycle and on the delay line taps. Measures of Differential Non Linearity (DNL) for different time resolutions (1, 2, 5 and 10 ns) allow us to establish the limits of this System and to underline some solutions to improve these features. (author) [fr

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae triggers a cytotoxic effect on airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llobet-Brossa Enrique

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated Gram negative bacterial pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Despite its clinical relevance, little is known about the features of the interaction between K. pneumoniae and lung epithelial cells on a cellular level, neither about the role of capsule polysaccharide, one of its best characterised virulence factors, in this interaction. Results The interaction between Klebsiella pneumoniae and cultured airway epithelial cells was analysed. K. pneumoniae infection triggered cytotoxicity, evident by cell rounding and detachment from the substrate. This effect required the presence of live bacteria and of capsule polysaccharide, since it was observed with isolates expressing different amounts of capsule and/or different serotypes but not with non-capsulated bacteria. Cytotoxicity was analysed by lactate dehydrogenase and formazan measurements, ethidium bromide uptake and analysis of DNA integrity, obtaining consistent and complementary results. Moreover, cytotoxicity of non-capsulated strains was restored by addition of purified capsule during infection. While a non-capsulated strain was avirulent in a mouse infection model, capsulated K. pneumoniae isolates displayed different degrees of virulence. Conclusion Our observations allocate a novel role to K. pneumoniae capsule in promotion of cytotoxicity. Although this effect is likely to be associated with virulence, strains expressing different capsule levels were not equally virulent. This fact suggests the existence of other bacterial requirements for virulence, together with capsule polysaccharide.

  15. Feature selection toolbox

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somol, Petr; Pudil, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 12 (2002), s. 2749-2759 ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 187; GA ČR GA402/01/0981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : pattern recognition * feature selection * subset search Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.038, year: 2002 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/somol- feature selection toolbox.pdf

  16. Construct development: The Suicide Trigger Scale (STS-2, a measure of a hypothesized suicide trigger state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberg Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to develop the construct of a 'suicide trigger state' by exploring data gathered with a novel psychometric self-report instrument, the STS-2. Methods The STS-2, was administered to 141 adult psychiatric patients with suicidal ideation. Multiple statistical methods were used to explore construct validity and structure. Results Cronbach's alpha (0.949 demonstrated excellent internal consistency. Factor analyses yielded two-component solutions with good agreement. The first component described near-psychotic somatization and ruminative flooding, while the second described frantic hopelessness. ROC analysis determined an optimal cut score for a history of suicide attempt, with significance of p Conclusions The STS-2 appears to measure a distinct and novel clinical entity, which we speculatively term the 'suicide trigger state.' High scores on the STS-2 associate with reported history of past suicide attempt.

  17. Triggers and Their Influence on Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Christine S

    2017-05-01

    This article provides a conceptual definition of the concept trigger within the context of health behaviors and applies it to the highly significant health issue of obesity. Healthy behaviors are essential to life and happiness, but they do not just happen. They are triggered, and an inner drive keeps them alive. To help patients gain and retain optimal health, nurses must understand the triggers of healthy behaviors. Walker and Avant's (2011) method of concept analysis is used as the basis for defining the concept of trigger. The antecedents, defining attributes, and consequences of trigger are identified. Findings suggest that nurses can play a role in triggering health behavior change through simple motivational efforts.

  18. Triggering on leptons, hadronic taus and photons in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Lepton and photon triggers covering transverse energies from a few GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses studying Standard Model processes and searching for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. In ATLAS, dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level 1 and a software based High Level Trigger, which feature dedicated components to improve lepton and photon selection. In LHC Run 2 the increasing instantaneous luminosity, higher collision centre-of-mass energy and larger number of interactions per bunch crossing (pileup) required the optimisation of the trigger selections at each level to control rates and keep efficiencies high. These improvements included new and enhanced selections in hardware at Level-1, as well as advanced...

  19. Expression of p53, inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial growth factor in gastric precancerous and cancerous lesions: correlation with clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Chang Wei; Wang, Li Dong; Jiao, Lian Hua; Liu, Bin; Zheng, Shu; Xie, Xin Ji

    2002-01-01

    The growth and metastasis of tumors depend on the development of an adequate blood supply via angiogenesis. Recent studies indicate that the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the tumor suppressor p53 are fundamental play-markers of the angiogenic process. Overexpression of iNOS and VEGF has been shown to induce angiogenesis in tumors. P53 suppresses angiogenesis by down-regulating VEGF and iNOS. The correlation of expression of p53, VEGF and iNOS and clinical features in gastric carcinogenesis, however, has not been well characterized. The expression of p53, iNOS and VEGF in gastric precancerous and cancerous lesions and its relation with the clinical features was determined with immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method) on 55 randomly selected GC patients and 60 symptom-free subjects from the mass survey in the high-incidence area for GC in Henan, northern China. The positive immunostainig rates for p53, iNOS and VEGF in gastric carcinomas were 51%, 44% and 51%, respectively, and correlated well with TNM stages, but did not show significant difference among the groups with different degrees of gastric wall invasion depth by GC. A positive immunostaining reaction for the iNOS protein was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.019; Spearman correlation coefficient). P53 protein accumulation was higher in the poorly-differentiated gastric carcinoma than in well-differentiated one. In gastric biopsies, no positive immunosatining was observed for p53, iNOS and VEGF in the histologically normal tissue and chronic superficial gastritis (CSG). However, p53, iNOS and VEGF positive immunostaining was observed in the tissues with different severities of lesions of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia (DYS), and the positive rates increased with the lesion progression from CAG to IM to DYS. A high coincidental positive and negative immunostaining

  20. Muon Trigger for Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyak, M.; Usvyatsov, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Shimmin, C.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2017-10-01

    The CRAYFIS experiment proposes to use privately owned mobile phones as a ground detector array for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays. Upon interacting with Earth’s atmosphere, these events produce extensive particle showers which can be detected by cameras on mobile phones. A typical shower contains minimally-ionizing particles such as muons. As these particles interact with CMOS image sensors, they may leave tracks of faintly-activated pixels that are sometimes hard to distinguish from random detector noise. Triggers that rely on the presence of very bright pixels within an image frame are not efficient in this case. We present a trigger algorithm based on Convolutional Neural Networks which selects images containing such tracks and are evaluated in a lazy manner: the response of each successive layer is computed only if activation of the current layer satisfies a continuation criterion. Usage of neural networks increases the sensitivity considerably comparable with image thresholding, while the lazy evaluation allows for execution of the trigger under the limited computational power of mobile phones.

  1. ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has introduced and recently commissioned a completely new hardware sub-system of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). L1Topo consist of two AdvancedTCA blades mounting state-of-the-art FPGA processors, providing high input bandwidth (up to 4 Gb/s) and low latency data processing (200 ns). L1Topo is able to select collision events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger will be presented. These results demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-pT leptons, including H->tau tau and J/Psi->mu mu. In addition to describing the L1Topo trigger system, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize...

  2. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  4. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, Guido; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the ATLAS Fast Tracker processor is presented, reporting the design of the system, its expected performance, and the integration status. The next LHC runs, with a significant increase in instantaneous luminosity, will provide a big challenge to the trigger and data acquisition systems of all the experiments. An intensive use of the tracking information at the trigger level will be important to keep high efficiency in interesting events, despite the increase in multiple p-p collisions per bunch crossing (pile-up). In order to increase the use of tracks within the High Level Trigger (HLT), the ATLAS experiment planned the installation of an hardware processor dedicated to tracking: the Fast TracKer (FTK) processor. The FTK is designed to perform full scan track reconstruction at every Level-1 accept. To achieve this goal, the FTK uses a fully parallel architecture, with algorithms designed to exploit the computing power of custom VLSI chips, the Associative Memory, as well as modern FPGAs. The FT...

  5. Seizures triggered by food intake in antimuscarinic-treated fasted animals: evaluation of the experimental findings in terms of similarities to eating-triggered epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye

    2010-07-01

    Food intake triggers convulsions in fasted mice and rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine or atropine. Bearing some similarities in triggering factor and manifestations of the seizures in patients with eating-evoked epilepsy, seizures in fasted animals may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of this rare and partially controlled form of reflex epilepsy.

  6. Ischemic Compression After Trigger Point Injection Affect the Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soo A; Oh, Ki Young; Choi, Won Hyuck; Kim, In Kyum

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of trigger point injection with or without ischemic compression in treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Methods Sixty patients with active myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius muscle were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (n=20) received only trigger point injections, group 2 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 30 seconds of ischemic compression, and group 3 (n=20) received trigger point injectio...

  7. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  8. Skier triggering of backcountry avalanches with skilled route selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinickas, Alexandra; Haegeli, Pascal; Jamieson, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Jamieson (2009) provided numerical estimates for the baseline probabilities of triggering an avalanche by a backcountry skier making fresh tracks without skilled route selection as a function of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e., hazard levels Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme). Using the results of an expert survey, he showed that triggering probabilities while skiing directly up, down or across a trigger zone without skilled route selection increase roughly by a factor of 10 with each step of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e. hazard level). The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of skilled route selection on the relationship between triggering probability and hazard level. To assess the effect of skilled route selection on triggering probability by hazard level, we analysed avalanche hazard assessments as well as reports of skiing activity and triggering of avalanches from 11 Canadian helicopter and snowcat operations during two winters (2012-13 and 2013-14). These reports were submitted to the daily information exchange among Canadian avalanche safety operations, and reflect professional decision-making and route selection practices of guides leading groups of skiers. We selected all skier-controlled or accidentally triggered avalanches with a destructive size greater than size 1 according to the Canadian avalanche size classification, triggered by any member of a guided group (guide or guest). These operations forecast the avalanche hazard daily for each of three elevation bands: alpine, treeline and below treeline. In contrast to the 2009 study, an exposure was defined as a group skiing within any one of the three elevation bands, and consequently within a hazard rating, for the day (~4,300 ratings over two winters). For example, a group that skied below treeline (rated Moderate) and treeline (rated Considerable) in one day, would receive one count for exposure to Moderate hazard, and one count for

  9. Performance of the CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, P; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Fobes, R; Gorski, T; Grogg, K; Grothe, M; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Weinberg, M

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) receives eight-bit energies and a data quality bit from the HCAL and ECAL Trigger Primitive Generators (TPGs). The RCT uses these trigger primitives to find e/γ candidates and calculate regional calorimeter sums that are sent to the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) for sorting and further processing. The RCT hardware consists of one clock distribution crate and 18 double-sided crates containing custom boards, ASICs, and backplanes. The RCT electronics have been completely installed since 2007. The RCT has been integrated into the CMS Level-1 Trigger chain. Regular runs, triggering on cosmic rays, prepare the CMS detector for the restart of the LHC. During this running, the RCT control is handled centrally by CMS Run Control and Monitor System communicating with the Trigger Supervisor. Online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) evaluates the performance of the RCT during these runs. Offline DQM allows more detailed studies, including trigger efficiencies. These and other r...

  10. Study on the correlation between spiral CT features and expression of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten, basic fibroblast growth factor in gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jianbo; Chen Xuejun; Yang Xuehua; Guo Hua; Zhou Zhigang; Yue Songwei; Li Hui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the spiral CT features of gastric carcinoma in the invasion and metastasis and its correlation with the expression of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Methods: Spiral CT plain scan and triphasic enhanced scans were performed in 83 patients. The postoperative specimens were embedded with paraffin to obtain 5 μm thickness tissues and stained with HE and immunohistochemistry. Spiral CT findings were compared with the expression of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Results: (1) The accuracy of spiral CT in T and N staging of gastric carcinoma was 94.0% (78/83) and 89.2% (74/83), respectively. (2) The expression of PTEN was 47.0% (39/83) in gastric carcinoma. The expression of PTEN in T 3-4 (40.8%, 29/71) and N 1+2 (38.3%, 23/60) gastric carcinoma was significantly lower than that of T 2 (10/12) and N 0 (16/23)gastric carcinoma, respectively (χ 2 =7.439, P=0.006; χ 2 =6.511, P=0.011). (3) The expression of bFGF was 63.9% (53/83) in gastric carcinoma. The expression of bFGF in T 3-4 (70.4%, 50/71 )and N 1+2 (71.7%, 43/60) gastric carcinoma was significantly higher than that of T 2 (3/12) and N 0 (10/23) gastric carcinoma, respectively (χ 2 =7.314, P=0.007; χ 2 =5.724, P=0.017). (4) Both PTEN-positive expression and bFGF-positive expression were detected in 16 specimens. The expression of PTEN (41.0%, 16/39) was negatively correlated with that of bFGF (30.2%, 16/53) (r=-0.447, P=0.000). Conclusion: Spiral CT triphasic enhanced scans combined with biologic characteristics can improve diagnostic accuracy of gastric carcinoma in the invasion, metastasis and prognosis. (authors)

  11. A first level trigger approach for the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinle, Christian Alexander

    2012-01-01

    implementation phase to suit the FPGA technology. However the limited resources of a FPGA compared to the needs of the algorithm clarify quickly that the algorithm has to be adapted for an implementation on a multi-chip platform. Therefore the same concepts are simply distributed to multiple FPGAs, which are connected by a fast network. For the development of such a now essential platform internal network concept a Sony Playstation III is employed for rapid prototyping, because the integrated CellBE chip features a quite similar network structure as the proposed FPGA platform requires. As the key objective of this thesis, which is implicitly mentioned above, is beyond that defined by the quickest possible processing of particle collisions, the realization of the algorithm on a Sony Playstation III can be already considered an improvement, because the processing of a common particle collision in a CBM experiment simulation needs about 30 seconds on a commercial PC running the CBMROOT framework, whereas a Sony Playstation III provides the same result in approximately 21.5 milliseconds. Hence a speed advantage of a factor of 1,000 is achieved by now. First results and estimations suggest further that another speed advantage around 250 can be reached by the realization of the proposed FPGA platform. Thereby the domain of approximately 80 microseconds seems to be attainable. Consequently such an implementation is evidently able to contribute a fundamental part to the first level trigger of the CBM experiment.

  12. Test of special resolution and trigger efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Benhammou, Y

    2015-01-01

    The forthcoming luminosity upgrade of LHC to super-LHC (sLHC) will increase the expected background rate in the forward region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer by approximately the factor of five. Some of the present Muon Spectrometer components will fail to cope with these high rates and will have to be replaced. The results of a test of a device consisting of Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) and a fast small-diameter Muon Drift Tube Chamber (sMDT) using the 180 GeV/c muons at the SPS-H8 muon beam at CERN are presented. The goal of the test was to study the combined TGC-sMDT system as tracking and triggering device in the ATLAS muon spectrometer after high-luminosity upgrades of the LHC. The analysis of the recorded data shows a very good correlation between the TGC and sMDT track position and inclination. This technology offers the combination of trigger and tracking and has good angular and spatial resolutions. The angular resolution is 0.4 mrad for each system individually. For the spatial resolution, the width of t...

  13. Pattern Recognition in the TRT for the ATLAS B-Physics Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Baines, J T M; Hinkelbein, C; Kugel, A; Männer, R; Müller, M; Sessler, M; Simmler, H; Singpiel, H; Smizanska, M

    1999-01-01

    The current B-physics trigger strategy in LVL2 starts with a scan of the full volume of the TRT to reconstruct all tracks with pT > 0.5 GeV. Since the detector volume to be analysed is 100 times larger than a typical RoI, and the pT range of the track search extends down to 0.5 GeV, an additional factor of 10 in processing power is required in comparison with the high-pT TRT feature extraction algorithm which has a 5 GeV threshold. At low luminosity, the full scan will be performed as part of the B-physics trigger with a frequency of 9 kHz. Taking into account all these factors, the full scan at low luminosity will require 100 times more computing power than the RoI-guided scan at design luminosity. It is the most challenging of all LVL2 algorithms in terms of computing power and bandwidth requirements. A very fast and therefore simple algorithm is thus essential, independent of the hardware realisation. This paper presents a TRT track reconstruction algorithm which is based on a Hough Transform using a look-...

  14. A Hardware Track Trigger (FTK) for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The design and studies of the performance for the ATLAS hardware Fast TracKer (FTK) are presented. The existing trigger system of the ATLAS experiment is deployed to reduce the event rate from the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to < 1 KHz for permanent storage at the LHC design luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. The LHC has performed exceptionally well and routinely exceeds the design luminosity and from 2015 is due to operate with higher still luminosities. This will place a significant load on the High Level trigger (HLT) system, both due to the need for more sophisticated algorithms to reject background, and from the larger data volumes that will need to be processed. The Fast TracKer is a custom electronics system that will operate at the full Level-1 accepted rate of 100 KHz and provide high quality tracks at the beginning of processing in the HLT. This will be performing by track reconstruction using hardware with massive parallelism using associative memories (AM) and FPGAs. The availability of the full...

  15. Performance of the ATLAS trigger system in 2015

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Hladík, Ondřej; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Penc, Ondřej; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-53, č. článku 317. ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : CERN LHC Coll * programming * trigger: upgrade * data analysis method * 13000 GeV-cms Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  16. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-17

    Apr 17, 2015 ... growth is a major contributing factor for the disorder which leads to reduced fat content in spongy tissue affected fruits. ... significant reduction in the biosynthesis of VLCFAs in seeds during fruit growth might trigger pre-germination events .... Intensity of spongy tissue was quantified as a percentage of.

  17. The D OE software trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, J.T.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    1992-10-01

    In the D OE experiment, the software filter operates in a processor farm with each node processing a single event. Processing is data-driven: the filter does local processing to verify the candidates from the hardware trigger. The filter code consists of independent pieces called ''tools''; processing for a given hardware bit is a ''script'' invoking one or more ''tools'' sequentially. An offline simulator drives the same code with the same configuration files, running on real or simulated data. Online tests use farm nodes parasiting on the data stream. We discuss the performance of the system and how we attempt to verify its correctness

  18. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  19. The ALICE high level trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, T [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Grastveit, G [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Helstrup, H [Faculty of Engineering, Bergen University College (Norway); Lindenstruth, V [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Loizides, C [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Roehrich, D [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Skaali, B [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Steinbeck, T [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Stock, R [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Tilsner, H [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Ullaland, K [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Vestboe, A [Faculty of Engineering, Bergen University College (Norway); Vik, T [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Wiebalck, A [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC will implement a high-level trigger system for online event selection and/or data compression. The largest computing challenge is posed by the TPC detector, which requires real-time pattern recognition. The system entails a very large processing farm that is designed for an anticipated input data stream of 25 GB s{sup -1}. In this paper, we present the architecture of the system and the current state of the tracking methods and data compression applications.

  20. Triggering for charm, beauty, and truth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    As the search for more and more rare processes accelerates, the need for more and more effective event triggers also accelerates. In the earliest experiments, a simple coincidence often sufficed not only as the event trigger, but as the complete record of an event of interest. In today's experiments, not only has the fast trigger become more sophisticated, but one or more additional level of trigger processing precedes writing event data to magnetic tape for later analysis. Further search experiments will certainly require further expansion in the number of trigger levels required to filter those rare events of particular interest

  1. Configuration of the ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Elsing, M; Armstrong, S; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, A; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Brandt, S; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Di Mattia, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drohan, J; Ellis, Nick; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kaczmarska, A; Karr, K M; Khomich, A; Konstantinidis, N P; Krasny, W; Li, W; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Ma, H; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Morettini, P; Moyse, E; Nairz, A; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rajagopalan, S; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Shears, T G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Soluk, R A; Stanescu, C; Tapprogge, Stefan; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V; Watson, A; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; CHEP 2003 Computing in High Energy Physics

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a conceptual overview is given of the software foreseen to configure the ATLAS trigger system. Two functional software prototypes have been developed to configure the ATLAS Level-1 emulation and the High-Level Trigger software. Emphasis has been put so far on following a consistent approach between the two trigger systems and on addressing their requirements, taking into account the specific use-case of the `Region-of-Interest' mechanism for the ATLAS Level-2 trigger. In the future the configuration of the two systems will be combined to ensure a consistent selection configuration for the entire ATLAS trigger system.

  2. Featuring animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ritter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algonquian languages are famous for their animacy-based grammatical properties—an animacy based noun classification system and direct/inverse system which gives rise to animacy hierarchy effects in the determination of verb agreement. In this paper I provide new evidence for the proposal that the distinctive properties of these languages is due to the use of participant-based features, rather than spatio-temporal ones, for both nominal and verbal functional categories (Ritter & Wiltschko 2009, 2014. Building on Wiltschko (2012, I develop a formal treatment of the Blackfoot aspectual system that assumes a category Inner Aspect (cf. MacDonald 2008, Travis 1991, 2010. Focusing on lexical aspect in Blackfoot, I demonstrate that the classification of both nouns (Seinsarten and verbs (Aktionsarten is based on animacy, rather than boundedness, resulting in a strikingly different aspectual system for both categories. 

  3. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clarisse Gautier,1 Denis Charpin1,2 1Department of Pulmonology and Allergy, North Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Abstract: Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs, molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and

  4. A fast processor for di-lepton triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Kostarakis, P; Barsotti, E; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Enagonio, J; Haldeman, M; Haynes, W; Katsanevas, S; Kerns, C; Lebrun, P; Smith, H; Soszyniski, T; Stoffel, J; Treptow, K; Turkot, F; Wagner, R

    1981-01-01

    As a new application of the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC logic modules a fast trigger processor was developed for Fermilab experiment E-537, aiming to measure the higher mass di-muon production by antiprotons. The processor matches the hit information received from drift chambers and scintillation counters, to find candidate muon tracks and determine their directions and momenta. The tracks are then paired to compute an invariant mass: when the computed mass falls within the desired range, the event is accepted. The process is accomplished in times of 5 to 10 microseconds, while achieving a trigger rate reduction of up to a factor of ten. (5 refs).

  5. FEATURE ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    or impaired glucose tolerance), insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, all well documented risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. People with the syndrome.

  6. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Gefitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Al Mamun Bhuyan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib is effective against several malignancies and is mainly utilized in the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer. The anti-cancer effect of the drug involves stimulation of apoptosis. Side effects of gefitinib include anemia. At least in theory, the development of anemia during gefitinib treatment could result from triggering of eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling potentially stimulating eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i and generation of oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether gefitinib stimulates eryptosis and, if so, whether its effect involves Ca2+ entry and/or oxidative stress. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to quantify cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS abundance from 2’,7’-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA dependent fluorescence. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to gefitinib (≥ 2 µg/ml significantly decreased forward scatter and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells. Gefitinib did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence but the effect of gefitinib on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Gefitinib further significantly increased DCFDA fluorescence. Conclusions: Gefitinib triggers erythrocyte shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and paralleled by oxidative stress.

  7. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mamun Bhuyan, Abdulla; Wagner, Teresa; Cao, Hang; Lang, Florian

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib is effective against several malignancies and is mainly utilized in the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer. The anti-cancer effect of the drug involves stimulation of apoptosis. Side effects of gefitinib include anemia. At least in theory, the development of anemia during gefitinib treatment could result from triggering of eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling potentially stimulating eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i) and generation of oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether gefitinib stimulates eryptosis and, if so, whether its effect involves Ca2+ entry and/or oxidative stress. Flow cytometry was employed to quantify cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) abundance from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) dependent fluorescence. A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to gefitinib (≥ 2 µg/ml) significantly decreased forward scatter and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells. Gefitinib did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence but the effect of gefitinib on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Gefitinib further significantly increased DCFDA fluorescence. Gefitinib triggers erythrocyte shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and paralleled by oxidative stress. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Belle-II High Level Trigger at SuperKEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Higuchi, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Won, E.

    2012-12-01

    A next generation B-factory experiment, Belle II, is now being constructed at KEK in Japan. The upgraded accelerator SuperKEKB is designed to have the maximum luminosity of 8 × 1035 cm-2s-1 that is a factor 40 higher than the current world record. As a consequence, the Belle II detector yields a data stream of the event size ~1 MB at a Level 1 rate of 30 kHz. The Belle II High Level Trigger (HLT) is designed to reduce the Level 1 rate to 1/5 by performing the real time full event reconstruction and by applying the physics level event selection as the software trigger. In this paper, the development of the high level trigger system for Belle II and its performance is discussed.

  9. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  10. Accounting for the Association Between BPD Features and Chronic Pain Complaints in a Pain Patient Sample: The Role of Emotion Dysregulation Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Caleb J; Carpenter, Ryan W; Tragesser, Sarah L

    2017-02-16

    Although borderline personality disorder (BPD) features consistently show strong relations with chronic pain, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. BPD is characterized by dysregulated emotion. Given previously observed relationships between emotion dysregulation and pain, we hypothesized that components of this dysregulation-elevated and labile negative affect and emotion sensitivity-would account for the relationship between BPD features and various pain complaints in a chronic pain patient sample. Specifically, we hypothesized that negative affect would indirectly predict pain through higher emotion sensitivity to pain, operationalized as pain anxiety sensitivity. To test these hypotheses, we administered a series of self-report measures to 147 patients at a chronic pain treatment facility. As expected, BPD features predicted pain severity (β = .19, p = .029), activity interference from pain (β = .22, p = .015), and affective interference from pain (β = .41, p BPD features and pain severity and interference were accounted for by serial indirect pathways through affective lability then pain anxiety and, to a lesser extent, through trait anxiety then pain anxiety. This is the first study to demonstrate roles for affective lability and pain anxiety sensitivity in the association between BPD features and chronic pain complaints in a chronic pain sample. We discuss implications for the relationship between dysregulated emotion and pain as well as for psychologically-focused treatment interventions for pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. The CMS Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundock, Aaron

    2017-11-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has implemented a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC has increased its centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV and will progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2×1034cm‑2s‑1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition (DAQ) system has been upgraded. A novel concept for the L1 calorimeter trigger is introduced: the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT). In this design, which is similar to the CMS DAQ or High Level Trigger (HLT) architecture, nine main processors each receive all of the calorimeter data from an entire event via 18 pre-processors. The advantage of the TMT architecture is that a global view and full granularity of the calorimeters can be exploited by complex algorithms. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds for calorimeter objects and improve the performance for their selection. The introduction of new triggers based on the combination of calorimeter objects is also foreseen.

  12. Subcutaneous accessory pain system (SAPS): A novel pain pathway for myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloqayli, Haytham

    2018-02-01

    Despite the accumulating neuro-physiological evidence of myofascial pain, many clinicians are skeptical about its existence as a separate disease entity. No single theory can fully explain the four cardinal features of MPS; taut bands, local tenderness, local twitching and the characteristic pattern of referred pain. Bridging the gap between basic and clinical knowledge mandates coupling the local trigger point changes with the clinically seen distant somatically innervated referred pain. The main question addressed by the present theory is why do trigger points behave differently in comparison to the surrounding muscle tissue and are trigger points the primary problem or secondary to a primary pathology. We propose that trigger points have an extra-innervation system that connect them with other spinal structures such as the facet, the annulus and other trigger points with a role for the subcutaneous fascia as part of trigger points pathogenesis or passage for the extra-innervation. The extra-innervation system is Subcutaneous accessory pain system (SAPS). The novel SAPS system connecting trigger points to the spinal segments via dorsal rami is presented. Individuals with this accessory pathway are prone to myofascial pain, trigger point activation and segmental referred somatic pain similar to other axial spinal structures. Despite the high prevalence of myofascial pain, the mechanism is not universally agreed upon. Why do the trigger points act differently from surrounding muscle tissue and are almost constant in location in different individuals is controversial. Why does myofascial pain and its two components, trigger points and referred pain, exist or are more prevalent in some individuals than in others is unexplained. The correlation between axial spinal structures pathology and the trigger points is not explored well. The existing theories about trigger point formation and referred pain is scientifically credible for each separate component and the SAPS

  13. The second level trigger of the L3 experiment. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beingessner, S.P.; Blaising, J.J.; Chollet-Le Flour, F.; Degre, A.; Dromby, G.; Goy, C.; Lecoq, J.; Morand, R.; Moynot, M.; Perrot, G.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Forconi, G.

    1993-07-01

    The events recorded by the L3 Data Acquisition System are selected by three levels of trigger. The event filtering performed by software at the second trigger level is described. First coded offline in FORTRAN, the filtering software is microcoded for online execution in a farm of 3 XOP processors operating in a round robin mode. It identifies and rejects background events. Depending on running conditions and trigger type, rejection factors ranging from 45% to 80% are obtained on first level energy, muon and tec triggers. Selection efficiencies greater than 99.95% are achieved. (authors). 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. CMS High Level Trigger for boosted $t\\bar{t}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Celli, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied the efficiency of a new CMS high level trigger path for boosted topology $t\\bar{t}$ events, available during the 2016 LHC run at 13 TeV. We found out that this trigger was affected by a prescale factor bug that did not allow us to register about 18.4% of candidate $t\\bar{t}$ events, leading to an apparent loss in the trigger efficiency. This work has also pointed out that as soon as this issue is solved we will be able to use the new trigger path with good performances, increasing the statistics in future measurements.

  15. Resolution and recurrence rates of idiopathic trigger finger after corticosteroid injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Marianne F.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Mudgal, Chaitanya; Ring, David

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses factors associated with apparent resolution and recurrence of triggering using data from providers with various treatment strategies. A retrospective review identified 878 adult patients with 1,210 Quinnell grade 2 or 3 trigger fingers that had one or more corticosteroid

  16. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  17. Acoustic localization of triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, Rene O.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Edens, Harald E.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Rison, William

    2011-05-01

    We use acoustic (3.3-500 Hz) arrays to locate local (thunder produced by triggered lightning in the Magdalena Mountains of central New Mexico. The locations of the thunder sources are determined by the array back azimuth and the elapsed time since discharge of the lightning flash. We compare the acoustic source locations with those obtained by the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) from Langmuir Laboratory, which is capable of accurately locating the lightning channels. To estimate the location accuracy of the acoustic array we performed Monte Carlo simulations and measured the distance (nearest neighbors) between acoustic and LMA sources. For close sources (6 km) the error increases to 800 m for the nearest neighbors and 650 m for the Monte Carlo analysis. This work shows that thunder sources can be accurately located using acoustic signals.

  18. Development of the new trigger processor board for the ATLAS Level-1 endcap muon trigger for Run-3

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00525035; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the LHC will be increased by up to a factor of three with respect to the original design value at Run-3 (starting 2021). The ATLAS Level-1 end-cap muon trigger in LHC Run-3 will identify muons by combining data from the Thin-Gap Chamber detector (TGC) and the New Small Wheel (NSW), which is a new detector and will be able to operate in a high background hit rate at Run-3, to suppress the Level-1 trigger rate. In order to handle data from both TGC and NSW, a new trigger processor board has been developed. The board has a modern FPGA to make use of Multi-Gigabit transceiver technology. The readout system for trigger data has also been designed with TCP/IP instead of a dedicated ASIC. This letter presents the electronics and its firmware of the ATLAS Level-1 end-cap muon trigger processor board for LHC Run-3.

  19. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychological features and teenage sexual behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbatova T.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an empirical study on the personality traits of sexually active teenagers. The research identified the personality traits of teenagers who are inclined to look for sexual relations. The research focused on the following: motivation and values, implicit representations about sexual contacts, parent-child relations, and self-concept. The study comprised 465 individuals including 405 school students aged 14-16 and 60 mothers of the teenagers examined. The results demonstrate that teenagers' refusal to begin sexual life, provided they have this opportunity (i.e. a partner, is linked to their subjective perception of the basic values reflected in their consciousness. The research also focused on the features of teenagers' implicit representations with regard to sexual intercourse. This allowed to identify the role of sexual intercourse in teenagers' life. The factors regulating sexual relations in the age under study have