WorldWideScience

Sample records for feature-based landmark information

  1. Learning Combinatorial Map Information from Permutations of Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    Learning Combinatorial Map Information from Permutations of Landmarks Benjamı́n Tovar ∗, Luigi Freda†, and Steven M. LaValle‡ Abstract This paper...is B. Tovar . This work was founded by NSF grant 0904501 (IIS robotics), DARPA SToMP grant HR0011-05-1-0008, and MURI/ONR grant N00014-09-1-1052. ∗B... Tovar is with the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 602081, USA. email: b- tovar

  2. Incorporating global information in feature-based multimodal image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Stevenson, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal image registration framework based on searching the best matched keypoints and the incorporation of global information is proposed. It comprises two key elements: keypoint detection and an iterative process. Keypoints are detected from both the reference and test images. For each test keypoint, a number of reference keypoints are chosen as mapping candidates. A triplet of keypoint mappings determine an affine transformation that is evaluated using a similarity metric between the reference image and the transformed test image by the determined transformation. An iterative process is conducted on triplets of keypoint mappings, keeping track of the best matched reference keypoint. Random sample consensus and mutual information are applied to eliminate outlier keypoint mappings. The similarity metric is defined to be the number of overlapped edge pixels over the entire images, allowing for global information to be incorporated in the evaluation of triplets of mappings. The performance of the framework is investigated with keypoints extracted by scale invariant feature transform and partial intensity invariant feature descriptor. Experimental results show that the proposed framework can provide more accurate registration than existing methods.

  3. Ontogeny of learning walks and the acquisition of landmark information in desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Pauline N; Christian, Marcelo; Müller, Valentin L; Rössler, Wolfgang; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2016-10-01

    At the beginning of their foraging lives, desert ants (Cataglyphis fortis) are for the first time exposed to the visual world within which they henceforth must accomplish their navigational tasks. Their habitat, North African salt pans, is barren, and the nest entrance, a tiny hole in the ground, is almost invisible. Although natural landmarks are scarce and the ants mainly depend on path integration for returning to the starting point, they can also learn and use landmarks successfully to navigate through their largely featureless habitat. Here, we studied how the ants acquire this information at the beginning of their outdoor lives within a nest-surrounding array of three artificial black cylinders. Individually marked 'newcomers' exhibit a characteristic sequence of learning walks. The meandering learning walks covering all directions of the compass first occur only within a few centimeters of the nest entrance, but then increasingly widen, until after three to seven learning walks, foraging starts. When displaced to a distant test field in which an identical array of landmarks has been installed, the ants shift their search density peaks more closely to the fictive goal position, the more learning walks they have performed. These results suggest that learning of a visual landmark panorama around a goal is a gradual rather than an instantaneous process. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Contextual Query Perfection by Affective Features Based Implicit Contextual Semantic Relevance Feedback in Multimedia Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. Tripathi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia Information may have multiple semantics depending on context, a temporal interest and user preferences. Hence we are exploiting the plausibility of context associated with semantic concept in retrieving relevance information. We are proposing an Affective Feature Based Implicit Contextual Semantic Relevance Feedback (AICSRF to investigate whether audio and speech along with visual could determine the current context in which user wants to retrieve the information and to further investigate whether we could employ Affective Feedback as an implicit source of evidence in CSRF cycle to increase the systems contextual semantic understanding. We introduce an Emotion Recognition Unit (ERU that comprises of spatiotemporal Gabor filter to capture spontaneous facial expression and emotional word recognition system that uses phonemes to recognize the spoken emotional words. We propose Contextual Query Perfection Scheme (CQPS to learn, refine the current context that could be used in query perfection in RF cycle to understand the semantic of query on the basis of relevance judgment taken by ERU. Observations suggest that CQPS in AICSRF incorporating such affective features reduce the search space hence retrieval time and increase the systems contextual semantic understanding.

  5. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

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    Marcel eMertes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee’s visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee’s visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing.

  6. Learning Your Way around Town: How Virtual Taxicab Drivers Learn to Use Both Layout and Landmark Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ehren L.; Caplan, Jeremy B.; Kirschen, Matthew P.; Korolev, Igor O.; Sekuler, Robert; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    By having subjects drive a virtual taxicab through a computer-rendered town, we examined how landmark and layout information interact during spatial navigation. Subject-drivers searched for passengers, and then attempted to take the most efficient route to the requested destinations (one of several target stores). Experiment 1 demonstrated that…

  7. Virtual landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Bai, Peirui; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    Much has been published on finding landmarks on object surfaces in the context of shape modeling. While this is still an open problem, many of the challenges of past approaches can be overcome by removing the restriction that landmarks must be on the object surface. The virtual landmarks we propose may reside inside, on the boundary of, or outside the object and are tethered to the object. Our solution is straightforward, simple, and recursive in nature, proceeding from global features initially to local features in later levels to detect landmarks. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as an engine to recursively subdivide the object region. The object itself may be represented in binary or fuzzy form or with gray values. The method is illustrated in 3D space (although it generalizes readily to spaces of any dimensionality) on four objects (liver, trachea and bronchi, and outer boundaries of left and right lungs along pleura) derived from 5 patient computed tomography (CT) image data sets of the thorax and abdomen. The virtual landmark identification approach seems to work well on different structures in different subjects and seems to detect landmarks that are homologously located in different samples of the same object. The approach guarantees that virtual landmarks are invariant to translation, scaling, and rotation of the object/image. Landmarking techniques are fundamental for many computer vision and image processing applications, and we are currently exploring the use virtual landmarks in automatic anatomy recognition and object analytics.

  8. APFiLoc: An Infrastructure-Free Indoor Localization Method Fusing Smartphone Inertial Sensors, Landmarks and Map Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianga Shang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The utility and adoption of indoor localization applications have been limited due to the complex nature of the physical environment combined with an increasing requirement for more robust localization performance. Existing solutions to this problem are either too expensive or too dependent on infrastructure such as Wi-Fi access points. To address this problem, we propose APFiLoc—a low cost, smartphone-based framework for indoor localization. The key idea behind this framework is to obtain landmarks within the environment and to use the augmented particle filter to fuse them with measurements from smartphone sensors and map information. A clustering method based on distance constraints is developed to detect organic landmarks in an unsupervised way, and the least square support vector machine is used to classify seed landmarks. A series of real-world experiments were conducted in complex environments including multiple floors and the results show APFiLoc can achieve 80% accuracy (phone in the hand and around 70% accuracy (phone in the pocket of the error less than 2 m error without the assistance of infrastructure like Wi-Fi access points.

  9. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Finding Home: Landmark Ambiguity in Human Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Jetzschke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Memories of places often include landmark cues, i.e., information provided by the spatial arrangement of distinct objects with respect to the target location. To study how humans combine landmark information for navigation, we conducted two experiments: To this end, participants were either provided with auditory landmarks while walking in a large sports hall or with visual landmarks while walking on a virtual-reality treadmill setup. We found that participants cannot reliably locate their home position due to ambiguities in the spatial arrangement when only one or two uniform landmarks provide cues with respect to the target. With three visual landmarks that look alike, the task is solved without ambiguity, while audio landmarks need to play three unique sounds for a similar performance. This reduction in ambiguity through integration of landmark information from 1, 2, and 3 landmarks is well modeled using a probabilistic approach based on maximum likelihood estimation. Unlike any deterministic model of human navigation (based e.g., on distance or angle information, this probabilistic model predicted both the precision and accuracy of the human homing performance. To further examine how landmark cues are integrated we introduced systematic conflicts in the visual landmark configuration between training of the home position and tests of the homing performance. The participants integrated the spatial information from each landmark near-optimally to reduce spatial variability. When the conflict becomes big, this integration breaks down and precision is sacrificed for accuracy. That is, participants return again closer to the home position, because they start ignoring the deviant third landmark. Relying on two instead of three landmarks, however, goes along with responses that are scattered over a larger area, thus leading to higher variability. To model the breakdown of integration with increasing conflict, the probabilistic model based on a

  11. Landmark Agnosia: Evaluating the Definition of Landmark-based Navigation Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Ineke J M; Martens, Marieke A G; Claessen, Michiel H G; van den Berg, Esther

    2017-06-01

    Landmark agnosia is a rare type of navigation impairment, for which various definitions have been presented. From a clinical as well as theoretical perspective, consensus on the characteristics of landmark agnosia would be valuable. In the current study we review the literature concerning landmark agnosia and present a new case study. Existing literature highlights the importance of examining familiar as well as novel landmark processing and substantial variation in performance patterns of individual patients. We performed a case study with patient KS, a 53-year-old male, suffering from landmark agnosia, making use of elaborate neuropsychological screening and virtual reality-based tests of navigation ability. Our extensive examination of his impairment shows that landmark agnosia can be very narrow; in KS it is restricted to recognition of newly learned landmarks only. Also, he has no trouble recognizing familiar landmarks that are not part of a navigated route. The literature review shows that the right temporal lobe, and the right hippocampus in particular are the main lesion sites for landmark agnosia. Furthermore, our case study substantiates that this disorder can occur for both familiar and novel landmarks, and can affect novel landmarks in isolation from familiar landmarks. Moreover, it can occur in isolation from problems with processing route information.

  12. [Dyspraxia: landmarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeau, M

    2010-03-01

    Despite its frequency, little is known about dyspraxia. Dyspraxia, which represents disorders in development and learning movements, within the context of a deficiency in the management of spatial information (in children whose verbal intelligence is spared), is often a severe handicap at school and in social life. Dyspraxia must be distinguished from "common" difficulties of unmotivated children at school, with which it is often confused. Hence, the diagnosis must correspond to rigorous methodology. And one should avoid proposing endless training for the deficient action (writing, getting dressed...); indeed such strategies only lead to short-term 'pseudo' progress, without any long term efficacy on the educational success of these intelligent children. To the contrary, the child should be rapidly oriented in two therapeutic directions: (1) a battle between the "double-task" effect stemming from the graphical and spatial difficulties; (2) the use of palliatives (including computing). In conditions of early diagnosis (at 4-8/9 years of age) and well-coordinated management with the school, the prognosis would be excellent in terms of schooling, choice of a profession and social insertion. If not, or if (as is the case in almost a third of cases) dyspraxia is not isolated (associated with dyslexia, hyperactivity, attentional deficit and psychotic traits), the child should be oriented towards a specialised classroom and care.

  13. Feature-based Sentiment Analysis for Short Informal Text%基于特征的非正式短文本情感分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄正伟; 沈丹; 蔡政英

    2015-01-01

    The short formal text contains many complex semantic information, this increases the difficulty of studying the text sentiment analysis, such as cannot determine what theme, goal or feature the text expressed. We proposed a feature-based vector model and a novel weighting algorithm to study on the short informal text sentiment analysis, and we applies dependency parsing to extract sentiment tuple and calculate the score of sentiment, which can determine the polarity of the text is positive, negative or neutral, and, it can also conclude the sentiment strength by the adverb of degree.%非正式短文本包含着许多复杂的语义信息,这给文本情感分析研究工作增加了难度,例如不能明确文本所表达的主题、目的和特点。本文提出基于特征向量模型和依存法对非正式短文本作情感分析研究,利用依存句法提取文本的情感元组并计算其情感值,它可以判别文本的情感属性是积极地还是消极地,或者是中立的,并能够通过程度副词判断情感强度。

  14. Topological Features Based Entity Disambiguation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Chen Sun; De-Rong Shen; Tie-Zheng Nie; Ge Yu

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an unsupervised topological features based entity disambiguation solution. Most existing studies leverage semantic information to resolve ambiguous references. However, the semantic information is not always accessible because of privacy or is too expensive to access. We consider the problem in a setting that only relationships between references are available. A structure similarity algorithm via random walk with restarts is proposed to measure the similarity of references. The disambiguation is regarded as a clustering problem and a family of graph walk based clustering algorithms are brought to group ambiguous references. We evaluate our solution extensively on two real datasets and show its advantage over two state-of-the-art approaches in accuracy.

  15. Landmarks in Hybrid Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elkawkagy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although planning techniques achieved a significant progress during recent years, solving many planning problem still difficult even for modern planners. In this paper, we will adopt landmark concept to hybrid planning setting - a method that combines reasoning about procedural knowledge and causalities. Land-marks are a well-known concept in the realm of classical planning. Recently, they have been adapted to hierarchical approaches. Such landmarks can be extracted in a pre-processing step from a declarative hierarchical planning domain and problem description. It was shown how this technique allows for a considerable reduction of the search space by eliminating futile plan development options before the actual planning. Therefore, we will present a new approach to in¬tegrate landmark pre-processing technique in the context of hierarchical planning with landmark technique in the classical planning. This integration allows to incorporate the ability of using extracted landmark tasks from hierarchical domain knowledge in the form of HTN and using landmark literals from classical planning. To this end, we will construct a transformation technique to transform the hybrid planning domain into a classical domain model. The method¬ologies in this paper have been implemented successfully, and we will present some experimental results that give evidence for the consid-erable performance increase gained through planning system.

  16. Efficient and Accurate Indoor Localization Using Landmark Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, F.; Kealy, A.; Khoshelham, K.; Shang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor localization is important for a variety of applications such as location-based services, mobile social networks, and emergency response. Fusing spatial information is an effective way to achieve accurate indoor localization with little or with no need for extra hardware. However, existing indoor localization methods that make use of spatial information are either too computationally expensive or too sensitive to the completeness of landmark detection. In this paper, we solve this problem by using the proposed landmark graph. The landmark graph is a directed graph where nodes are landmarks (e.g., doors, staircases, and turns) and edges are accessible paths with heading information. We compared the proposed method with two common Dead Reckoning (DR)-based methods (namely, Compass + Accelerometer + Landmarks and Gyroscope + Accelerometer + Landmarks) by a series of experiments. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 73% accuracy with a positioning error less than 2.5 meters, which outperforms the other two DR-based methods.

  17. Robust feature-based object tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Roberts, William; Wu, Dapeng; Li, Jian

    2007-04-01

    Object tracking is an important component of many computer vision systems. It is widely used in video surveillance, robotics, 3D image reconstruction, medical imaging, and human computer interface. In this paper, we focus on unsupervised object tracking, i.e., without prior knowledge about the object to be tracked. To address this problem, we take a feature-based approach, i.e., using feature points (or landmark points) to represent objects. Feature-based object tracking consists of feature extraction and feature correspondence. Feature correspondence is particularly challenging since a feature point in one image may have many similar points in another image, resulting in ambiguity in feature correspondence. To resolve the ambiguity, algorithms, which use exhaustive search and correlation over a large neighborhood, have been proposed. However, these algorithms incur high computational complexity, which is not suitable for real-time tracking. In contrast, Tomasi and Kanade's tracking algorithm only searches corresponding points in a small candidate set, which significantly reduces computational complexity; but the algorithm may lose track of feature points in a long image sequence. To mitigate the limitations of the aforementioned algorithms, this paper proposes an efficient and robust feature-based tracking algorithm. The key idea of our algorithm is as below. For a given target feature point in one frame, we first find a corresponding point in the next frame, which minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference (SSD) between the two points; then we test whether the corresponding point gives large value under the so-called Harris criterion. If not, we further identify a candidate set of feature points in a small neighborhood of the target point; then find a corresponding point from the candidate set, which minimizes the SSD between the two points. The algorithm may output no corresponding point due to disappearance of the target point. Our algorithm is capable of tracking

  18. Landmarks in insulin research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLawrence

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of insulin and its role in the regulation of glucose uptake and utilization, there has been great interest in insulin, its structure and the way in which it interacts with its receptor and effects signal transduction. As the 90th anniversary of the discovery of insulin approaches, it is timely to provide an overview of the landmark discoveries relating to the structure and function of this remarkable molecule and its receptor.

  19. Landmarks in Insulin Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Colin W.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of insulin and its role in the regulation of glucose uptake and utilization, there has been great interest in insulin, its structure and the way in which it interacts with its receptor and effects signal transduction. As the 90th anniversary of the discovery of insulin approaches, it is timely to provide an overview of the landmark discoveries relating to the structure and function of this remarkable molecule and its receptor.

  20. Desert ants learn vibration and magnetic landmarks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Buehlmann

    Full Text Available The desert ants Cataglyphis navigate not only by path integration but also by using visual and olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest entrance. Here we show that Cataglyphis noda can additionally use magnetic and vibrational landmarks as nest-defining cues. The magnetic field may typically provide directional rather than positional information, and vibrational signals so far have been shown to be involved in social behavior. Thus it remains questionable if magnetic and vibration landmarks are usually provided by the ants' habitat as nest-defining cues. However, our results point to the flexibility of the ants' navigational system, which even makes use of cues that are probably most often sensed in a different context.

  1. Optical processing for landmark identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D.; Luu, T. K.

    1981-09-01

    A study of optical pattern recognition techniques, available components and airborne optical systems for use in landmark identification was conducted. A data base of imagery exhibiting multisensor, seasonal, snow and fog cover, exposure, and other differences was assembled. These were successfully processed in a scaling optical correlator using weighted matched spatial filter synthesis. Distinctive data classes were defined and a description of the data (with considerable input information and content information) emerged from this study. It has considerable merit with regard to the preprocessing needed and the image difference categories advanced. A optical pattern recognition airborne applications was developed, assembled and demontrated. It employed a laser diode light source and holographic optical elements in a new lensless matched spatial filter architecture with greatly reduced size and weight, as well as component positioning toleranced.

  2. Place cells are more strongly tied to landmarks in deep than in superficial CA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiller, Tristan; Fattahi, Mohammad; Choi, June-Seek; Royer, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Environmental cues affect place cells responses, but whether this information is integrated versus segregated in distinct hippocampal cell populations is unclear. Here, we show that, in mice running on a treadmill enriched with visual-tactile landmarks, place cells are more strongly controlled by landmark-associated sensory inputs in deeper regions of CA1 pyramidal layer (CA1d). Many cells in CA1d display several firing fields correlated with landmarks, mapping positions slightly before or within the landmarks. Supporting direct involvement of sensory inputs, their firing fields show instantaneous responses to landmark manipulations, persist through change of context, and encode landmark identity and saliency. In contrast, cells located superficially in the pyramidal layer have single firing fields, are context specific and respond with slow dynamics to landmark manipulations. These findings suggest parallel and anatomically segregated circuits within CA1 pyramidal layer, with variable ties to landmarks, allowing flexible representation of spatial and non-spatial information. PMID:28218283

  3. Feature-based telescope scheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghib, Elahesadat; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Stubbs, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Feature-based Scheduler offers a sequencing strategy for ground-based telescopes. This scheduler is designed in the framework of Markovian Decision Process (MDP), and consists of a sub-linear online controller, and an offline supervisory control-optimizer. Online control law is computed at the moment of decision for the next visit, and the supervisory optimizer trains the controller by simulation data. Choice of the Differential Evolution (DE) optimizer, and introducing a reduced state space of the telescope system, offer an efficient and parallelizable optimization algorithm. In this study, we applied the proposed scheduler to the problem of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Preliminary results for a simplified model of LSST is promising in terms of both optimality, and computational cost.

  4. 78 FR 13377 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... INFORMATION: The purpose of the meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board... Historic Landmarks to the National Park System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and...

  5. Return of feature-based cost modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Robert C.; Patrawala, Taher B.

    1998-10-01

    Feature Based Cost Modeling is thought of as a relative new approach to cost modeling, but feature based cost modeling had considerable development in the 1950's. Considerable work was published in the 1950's by Boeing on cost for various casting processes--sand casting, die casting, investment casting and permanent mold casting--as a function of a single casting feature, casting volume. Additional approaches to feature based cost modeling have been made, and this work is a review of previous works and a proposed integrated model to feature based cost modeling.

  6. Landmark Optimization Using Local Curvature for Point-Based Nonlinear Rodent Brain Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a technique to automate landmark selection for point-based interpolating transformations for nonlinear medical image registration. Materials and Methods. Interpolating transformations were calculated from homologous point landmarks on the source (image to be transformed and target (reference image. Point landmarks are placed at regular intervals on contours of anatomical features, and their positions are optimized along the contour surface by a function composed of curvature similarity and displacements of the homologous landmarks. The method was evaluated in two cases (=5 each. In one, MRI was registered to histological sections; in the second, geometric distortions in EPI MRI were corrected. Normalized mutual information and target registration error were calculated to compare the registration accuracy of the automatically and manually generated landmarks. Results. Statistical analyses demonstrated significant improvement (<0.05 in registration accuracy by landmark optimization in most data sets and trends towards improvement (<0.1 in others as compared to manual landmark selection.

  7. Features Based Text Similarity Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, Chow Kok

    2010-01-01

    As the Internet help us cross cultural border by providing different information, plagiarism issue is bound to arise. As a result, plagiarism detection becomes more demanding in overcoming this issue. Different plagiarism detection tools have been developed based on various detection techniques. Nowadays, fingerprint matching technique plays an important role in those detection tools. However, in handling some large content articles, there are some weaknesses in fingerprint matching technique especially in space and time consumption issue. In this paper, we propose a new approach to detect plagiarism which integrates the use of fingerprint matching technique with four key features to assist in the detection process. These proposed features are capable to choose the main point or key sentence in the articles to be compared. Those selected sentence will be undergo the fingerprint matching process in order to detect the similarity between the sentences. Hence, time and space usage for the comparison process is r...

  8. WIKIPEDIA ENTRIES AS A SOURCE OF CAR NAVIGATION LANDMARKS

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    N. Binski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Car navigation system devices provide today with an easy and simple solution to the basic concept of reaching a destination. Although these systems usually achieve this goal, they still deliver a limited and poor sequence of instructions that do not consider the human nature of using landmarks during wayfinding. This research paper addresses the concept of enriching navigation route instructions by adding supplementary route information in the form of landmarks. We aim at using a contributed source of landmarks information, which is easy to access, available, show high update rate, and have a large scale of information. For this, Wikipedia was chosen, since it represents the world’s largest free encyclopaedia that includes information about many spatial entities. A survey and classification of available landmarks is implemented, coupled with ranking algorithms based on the entries’ categories and attributes. These are aimed at retrieving the most relevant landmark information required that are valuable for the enrichment of a specific navigation route. The paper will present this methodology, together with examples and results, showing the feasibility of using this concept and its potential of enriching navigation processes.

  9. Landmark learning by juvenile salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuring, Whitney L; Mathis, Alicia

    2014-10-01

    Learning to use a landmark as a beacon to locate resources is one of the simplest forms of spatial learning. We tested whether landmark learning occurs in a semifossorial salamander that migrates annually to breeding ponds as adults. Juvenile spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) were tested in square containers with a plastic feeding dish in each corner, and a piece of earthworm was placed in one randomly-chosen dish. For landmark-trained salamanders, a rock was placed beside the dish containing the prey. For control salamanders, the rock was placed beside a randomly selected feeding dish. Each salamander was trained once every 2 days for 30 days. Significantly more landmark-trained salamanders than control salamanders entered the landmark area first, and landmark-trained individuals had faster latencies to enter the landmark area and longer stay-times. These results suggest that spotted salamanders are able to locate resources by associating their positions with landmarks.

  10. Hierarchical Geometric Constraint Model for Parametric Feature Based Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高曙明; 彭群生

    1997-01-01

    A new geometric constraint model is described,which is hierarchical and suitable for parametric feature based modeling.In this model,different levels of geometric information are repesented to support various stages of a design process.An efficient approach to parametric feature based modeling is also presented,adopting the high level geometric constraint model.The low level geometric model such as B-reps can be derived automatically from the hig level geometric constraint model,enabling designers to perform their task of detailed design.

  11. Multirobot FastSLAM Algorithm Based on Landmark Consistency Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ming Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the influence of uncertain map information on multirobot SLAM problem, a multirobot FastSLAM algorithm based on landmark consistency correction is proposed. Firstly, electromagnetism-like mechanism is introduced to the resampling procedure in single-robot FastSLAM, where we assume that each sampling particle is looked at as a charged electron and attraction-repulsion mechanism in electromagnetism field is used to simulate interactive force between the particles to improve the distribution of particles. Secondly, when multiple robots observe the same landmarks, every robot is regarded as one node and Kalman-Consensus Filter is proposed to update landmark information, which further improves the accuracy of localization and mapping. Finally, the simulation results show that the algorithm is suitable and effective.

  12. Reorienting with terrain slope and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Orientation (or reorientation) is the first step in navigation, because establishing a spatial frame of reference is essential for a sense of location and heading direction. Recent research on nonhuman animals has revealed that the vertical component of an environment provides an important source of spatial information, in both terrestrial and aquatic settings. Nonetheless, humans show large individual and sex differences in the ability to use terrain slope for reorientation. To understand why some participants--mainly women--exhibit a difficulty with slope, we tested reorientation in a richer environment than had been used previously, including both a tilted floor and a set of distinct objects that could be used as landmarks. This environment allowed for the use of two different strategies for solving the task, one based on directional cues (slope gradient) and one based on positional cues (landmarks). Overall, rather than using both cues, participants tended to focus on just one. Although men and women did not differ significantly in their encoding of or reliance on the two strategies, men showed greater confidence in solving the reorientation task. These facts suggest that one possible cause of the female difficulty with slope might be a generally lower spatial confidence during reorientation.

  13. Feature-based tolerancing for intelligent inspection process definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.W.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a feature-based tolerancing capability that complements a geometric solid model with an explicit representation of conventional and geometric tolerances. This capability is focused on supporting an intelligent inspection process definition system. The feature-based tolerance model`s benefits include advancing complete product definition initiatives (e.g., STEP -- Standard for Exchange of Product model dam), suppling computer-integrated manufacturing applications (e.g., generative process planning and automated part programming) with product definition information, and assisting in the solution of measurement performance issues. A feature-based tolerance information model was developed based upon the notion of a feature`s toleranceable aspects and describes an object-oriented scheme for representing and relating tolerance features, tolerances, and datum reference frames. For easy incorporation, the tolerance feature entities are interconnected with STEP solid model entities. This schema will explicitly represent the tolerance specification for mechanical products, support advanced dimensional measurement applications, and assist in tolerance-related methods divergence issues.

  14. Highly comparative, feature-based time-series classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fulcher, Ben D

    2014-01-01

    A highly comparative, feature-based approach to time series classification is introduced that uses an extensive database of algorithms to extract thousands of interpretable features from time series. These features are derived from across the scientific time-series analysis literature, and include summaries of time series in terms of their correlation structure, distribution, entropy, stationarity, scaling properties, and fits to a range of time-series models. After computing thousands of features for each time series in a training set, those that are most informative of the class structure are selected using greedy forward feature selection with a linear classifier. The resulting feature-based classifiers automatically learn the differences between classes using a reduced number of time-series properties, and circumvent the need to calculate distances between time series. Representing time series in this way results in orders of magnitude of dimensionality reduction, allowing the method to perform well on ve...

  15. Enhancing SAT Based Planning with Landmark Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, J.; Konijnenberg, D.; Walraven, E.M.P.; Spaan, M.T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches exist to solve Artificial Intelligence planning problems, but little attention has been given to the combination of using landmark knowledge and satisfiability (SAT). Landmark knowledge has been exploited successfully in the heuristics of classical planning. Recently it was also s

  16. An Efficient Multimodal 2D + 3D Feature-based Approach to Automatic Facial Expression Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2015-07-29

    We present a fully automatic multimodal 2D + 3D feature-based facial expression recognition approach and demonstrate its performance on the BU-3DFE database. Our approach combines multi-order gradient-based local texture and shape descriptors in order to achieve efficiency and robustness. First, a large set of fiducial facial landmarks of 2D face images along with their 3D face scans are localized using a novel algorithm namely incremental Parallel Cascade of Linear Regression (iPar-CLR). Then, a novel Histogram of Second Order Gradients (HSOG) based local image descriptor in conjunction with the widely used first-order gradient based SIFT descriptor are used to describe the local texture around each 2D landmark. Similarly, the local geometry around each 3D landmark is described by two novel local shape descriptors constructed using the first-order and the second-order surface differential geometry quantities, i.e., Histogram of mesh Gradients (meshHOG) and Histogram of mesh Shape index (curvature quantization, meshHOS). Finally, the Support Vector Machine (SVM) based recognition results of all 2D and 3D descriptors are fused at both feature-level and score-level to further improve the accuracy. Comprehensive experimental results demonstrate that there exist impressive complementary characteristics between the 2D and 3D descriptors. We use the BU-3DFE benchmark to compare our approach to the state-of-the-art ones. Our multimodal feature-based approach outperforms the others by achieving an average recognition accuracy of 86.32%. Moreover, a good generalization ability is shown on the Bosphorus database.

  17. Haptic Landmark Positioning and Automatic Landmark Transfer in 4D Lung CT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Matthias; Gawenda, Björn; Bohn, Christian-Arved; Handels, Heinz

    Manual landmark positioning in volumetric image data is a complex task and often results in erroneous landmark positions. The landmark positioning tool presented uses image curvature features to precompute suitable candidates for landmark positions on surface data of anatomical structures. A force-feedback I/O device is then used to haptically guide the user during the definition of the correct landmarks in the 3D data volume. Furthermore, existing landmarks in a time-point of a sequence of 3D volumes (4D data set) can iteratively be transferred to other time-points using a surface based registration technique. First results show significant time savings and small interobserver variability (IROV) compared to the IROV of manually defined landmark positions using orthogonal slices of the image data.

  18. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Othón Esparza-Jiménez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks; from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology.

  19. Visual EKF-SLAM from Heterogeneous Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Jiménez, Jorge Othón; Devy, Michel; Gordillo, José L

    2016-04-07

    Many applications require the localization of a moving object, e.g., a robot, using sensory data acquired from embedded devices. Simultaneous localization and mapping from vision performs both the spatial and temporal fusion of these data on a map when a camera moves in an unknown environment. Such a SLAM process executes two interleaved functions: the front-end detects and tracks features from images, while the back-end interprets features as landmark observations and estimates both the landmarks and the robot positions with respect to a selected reference frame. This paper describes a complete visual SLAM solution, combining both point and line landmarks on a single map. The proposed method has an impact on both the back-end and the front-end. The contributions comprehend the use of heterogeneous landmark-based EKF-SLAM (the management of a map composed of both point and line landmarks); from this perspective, the comparison between landmark parametrizations and the evaluation of how the heterogeneity improves the accuracy on the camera localization, the development of a front-end active-search process for linear landmarks integrated into SLAM and the experimentation methodology.

  20. Landmark and route knowledge in children’s spatial representation of a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eNys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the development of landmark and route knowledge in complex wayfinding situations. Our study focuses on how children (aged 6, 8 and 10 years and young adults (n=79 indicate, recognize, and bind landmarks and directions in both verbal and visuo-spatial tasks after learning a virtual route. Performance in these tasks is also related to general verbal and visuo-spatial abilities as assessed by independent standardized tests (attention, working memory, perception of direction, production and comprehension of spatial terms, sentences and stories. The results first show that the quantity and quality of landmarks and directions produced and recognized by participants in both verbal and visuo-spatial tasks increased with age. In addition, an increase with age was observed in participants’ selection of decisional landmarks (i.e. landmarks associated with a change of direction, as well as in their capacity to bind landmarks and directions. Our results confirm the view that children first acquire landmark knowledge, then route knowledge, as shown by their late developing ability to bind knowledge of directions and landmarks. Overall, the quality of verbal and visuo-spatial information in participants’ spatial representations was found to vary mostly with their visuo-spatial abilities (attention and perception of directions and not with their verbal abilities. Interestingly, however, when asked to recognize landmarks encountered during the route, participants show an increasing bias with age toward choosing a related landmark of the same category, regardless of its visual characteristics, i.e. they incorrectly choose the picture of another fountain. The discussion highlights the need for further studies to determine more precisely the role of verbal and visuo-spatial knowledge and the nature of how children learn to represent and memorize routes.

  1. Multi scale feature based matched filter processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HOU Chaohuan

    2004-01-01

    Using the extreme difference of self-similarity and kurtosis at large level scale of wavelet transform approximation between the PTFM (Pulse Trains of Frequency Modulated)signals and its reverberation, a feature-based matched filter method using the classify-beforedetect paragriam is proposed to improve the detection performance in reverberation and multipath environments. Processing the data of lake-trails showed that the processing gain of the proposed method is bigger than that of matched filter about 10 dB. In multipath environments, detection performance of matched filter become badly poorer, while that of the proposed method is improved better. It shows that the method is much more robust with the effect of multipath.

  2. A Distributed Feature-based Environment for Collaborative Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Li

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a client/server design environment based on 3D feature-based modelling and Java technologies to enable design information to be shared efficiently among members within a design team. In this environment, design tasks and clients are organised through working sessions generated and maintained by a collaborative server. The information from an individual design client during a design process is updated and broadcast to other clients in the same session through an event-driven and call-back mechanism. The downstream manufacturing analysis modules can be wrapped as agents and plugged into the open environment to support the design activities. At the server side, a feature-feature relationship is established and maintained to filter the varied information of a working part, so as to facilitate efficient information update during the design process.

  3. Landmark-Based Indoor Positioning for Visually Impaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yicheng; Jia, Wenyan; Zhang, Hong; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2014-10-01

    Position localization is essential for visually impaired individuals to live independently. Comparing with outdoor environment in which the global positioning system (GPS) can be utilized, indoor positioning is more difficult due to the absence of the GPS signal and complex or unfamiliar building structure. In this paper, a novel landmark-based assistive system is presented for indoor positioning. Our preliminary tests in several buildings indicate that this system can provide accurate indoor location information.

  4. Automatic computerized radiographic identification of cephalometric landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D J; Sinclair, P M; Coggins, J M

    1998-02-01

    Computerized cephalometric analysis currently requires manual identification of landmark locations. This process is time-consuming and limited in accuracy. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a novel method for automatic computer identification of cephalometric landmarks. Spatial spectroscopy (SS) is a computerized method that identifies image structure on the basis of a convolution of the image with a set of filters followed by a decision method using statistical pattern recognition techniques. By this method, characteristic features are used to recognize anatomic structures. This study compared manual identification on a computer monitor and the SS automatic method for landmark identification on minimum resolution images (0.16 cm2 per pixel). Minimum resolution (defined as the lowest resolution at which a cephalometric structure could be identified) was used to reduce computational time and memory requirements during this development stage of the SS method. Fifteen landmarks were selected on a set of 14 test images. The results showed no statistical difference (p > 0.05) in mean landmark identification errors between manual identification on the computer display and automatic identification using SS. We conclude that SS shows potential for the automatic detection of landmarks, which is an important step in the development of a completely automatic cephalometric analysis.

  5. Feature-based attention resolves depth ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Levinthal, B; Franconeri, S L

    2016-09-07

    Perceiving the world around us requires that we resolve ambiguity. This process is often studied in the lab using ambiguous figures whose structures can be interpreted in multiple ways. One class of figures contains ambiguity in its depth relations, such that either of two surfaces could be seen as being the "front" of an object. Previous research suggests that selectively attending to a given location on such objects can bias the perception of that region as the front. This study asks whether selectively attending to a distributed feature can also bias that region toward the front. Participants viewed a structure-from-motion display of a rotating cylinder that could be perceived as rotating clockwise or counterclockwise (as imagined viewing from the top), depending on whether a set of red or green moving dots were seen as being in the front. A secondary task encouraged observers to globally attend to either red or green. Results from both Experiment 1 and 2 showed that the dots on the cylinder that shared the attended feature, and its corresponding surface, were more likely to be seen as being in the front, as measured by participants' clockwise versus counterclockwise percept reports. Feature-based attention, like location-based attention, is capable of biasing competition among potential interpretations of figures with ambiguous structure in depth.

  6. Pterion: An anatomical variation and surgical landmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The frontal and the parietal bones superiorly and the greater wing of the sphenoid and the squamous temporal inferiorly of one side meet at an H-shaped sutural junction termed the pterion. This is an important anatomical and anthropological landmark as it overlies both the anterior branch of middle meningeal artery and the lateral fissure of the cerebral hemisphere. The knowledge of sutural joints between frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones at pterion is clinically, radiologically and surgically important during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries. Materials and Methods : Study performed on 150 dry temporal bones. The pterion, and its sutural articulations with frontal, parietal, sphenoid and temporal bones and also anatomical variations, if any, were studied. Results : Four types of pterion, i.e. sphenoparietal, frontotemporal, stellate and epipteric, were observed. Conclusions : The knowledge of the variations of pterion and its surgical anatomy, in Indian population are important for surgeons operating in the fieldThe present study will also contribute additional information of skull bone fractures in infancy and early childhood, which may be associated with large intersutural bones giving false appearance of fracture radiologically and also during surgical interventions involving burr hole surgeries, as their extensions may lead to continuation of fracture lines.

  7. Corrective surgery for canine patellar luxation in 75 cases (107 limbs): landmark for block recession

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuhiro Isaka; Masahiko Befu; Nami Matsubara; Mayuko Ishikawa; Yurie Arase; Toshiyuki Tsuyama; Akiko Doi; Shinichi Namba

    2014-01-01

    Canine medial patellar luxation (MPL) is a very common orthopedic disease in small animals. Because the pathophysiology of this disease involves various pathways, the surgical techniques and results vary according to the veterinarian. Further, the landmark for block recession is not completely clear. We retrospectively evaluated 75 dogs (107 limbs) with MPL in whom our landmark for block recession was used from July 2008 to May 2013. Information regarding the breed, age, sex, body weight, bod...

  8. Spatial reorientation decline in aging: the combination of geometry and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffò, Alessandro O; Lopez, Antonella; Spano, Giuseppina; Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Savino, Michelina; Lancioni, Giulio E; Riva, Giuseppe; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-07-20

    The study is focused on the assessment of reorientation skills in a sample of community-dwelling elderly people, manipulating landmarks and geometric (layout) information. A neuropsychological assessment was administered to 286 elderly participants, divided into six groups (healthy controls, HC; four subgroups of participants with mild cognitive impairment, MCI; participants with probable dementia, Prob_D) and tested with the Virtual Reorientation Test (VReoT). VReoT manipulated different spatial cues: geometry and landmarks (proximal and distal). Compared with HC, participants with MCI and Prob_D showed to be impaired in tasks involving geometry, landmarks and a combination of them. Both single and multiple domain impairment in MCI had an impact on reorientation performance. Moreover, VReoT was marginally able to discriminate between amnesic and non-amnesic MCI. The occurrence of getting lost events seemed to be associated to learning of geometric information. The associative strength between landmark and target plays an important role in affecting spatial orientation performance of cognitively impaired participants. Geometry significantly supports landmark information and becomes helpful with the increase of cognitive impairment which is linked to a decrement in landmark encoding. VReoT seems to represent a reliable evaluation supplement for spatial orientation deficits in prodromal stages of dementia.

  9. Sequential egocentric navigation and reliance on landmarks in Williams syndrome and typical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eBroadbent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Visuospatial difficulties in Williams syndrome (WS are well documented. Recently, research has shown that spatial difficulties in WS extend to large-scale space, particularly in coding space using an allocentric frame of reference. Typically developing (TD children and adults predominantly rely on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate a large-scale route (retracing a sequence of left-right body turns. The aim of this study was to examine whether individuals with WS are able to employ a sequential egocentric strategy to guide learning and the retracing of a route. Forty-eight TD children, aged 5, 7 and 9 years and 18 participants with WS were examined on their ability to learn and retrace routes in two (6-turn virtual environment mazes (with and without landmarks. The ability to successfully retrace a route following the removal of landmarks (use of sequential egocentric coding was also examined.Although in line with TD 5 year-olds when learning a route with landmarks, individuals with WS showed significantly greater detriment when these landmarks were removed, relative to all TD groups. Moreover, the WS group made significantly more errors than all TD groups when learning a route that never contained landmarks. On a perceptual view-matching task, results revealed a high level of performance across groups, indicative of an ability to use this visual information to potentially aid navigation. These findings suggest that individuals with WS rely on landmarks to a greater extent than TD children, both for learning a route and for retracing a recently learned route. TD children, but not individuals with WS, were able to fall back on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate when landmarks were not present. Only TD children therefore coded sequential route information simultaneously with landmark information. The results are discussed in relation to known atypical cortical development and perceptual-matching abilities

  10. Sequential egocentric navigation and reliance on landmarks in Williams syndrome and typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Hannah J; Farran, Emily K; Tolmie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial difficulties in Williams syndrome (WS) are well documented. Recently, research has shown that spatial difficulties in WS extend to large-scale space, particularly in coding space using an allocentric frame of reference. Typically developing (TD) children and adults predominantly rely on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate a large-scale route (retracing a sequence of left-right body turns). The aim of this study was to examine whether individuals with WS are able to employ a sequential egocentric strategy to guide learning and the retracing of a route. Forty-eight TD children, aged 5, 7, and 9 years and 18 participants with WS were examined on their ability to learn and retrace routes in two (6-turn) virtual environment mazes (with and without landmarks). The ability to successfully retrace a route following the removal of landmarks (use of sequential egocentric coding) was also examined. Although in line with TD 5-year-olds when learning a route with landmarks, individuals with WS showed significantly greater detriment when these landmarks were removed, relative to all TD groups. Moreover, the WS group made significantly more errors than all TD groups when learning a route that never contained landmarks. On a perceptual view-matching task, results revealed a high level of performance across groups, indicative of an ability to use this visual information to potentially aid navigation. These findings suggest that individuals with WS rely on landmarks to a greater extent than TD children, both for learning a route and for retracing a recently learned route. TD children, but not individuals with WS, were able to fall back on the use of a sequential egocentric strategy to navigate when landmarks were not present. Only TD children therefore coded sequential route information simultaneously with landmark information. The results are discussed in relation to known atypical cortical development and perceptual-matching abilities in WS.

  11. Feature-based MRI data fusion for cardiac arrhythmia studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magtibay, Karl; Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod Hosseyndoust; Massé, Stéphane; Lai, Patrick F H; Zamiri, Nima; Asta, John; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Jaffray, David; Krishnan, Sridhar; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2016-05-01

    Current practices in studying cardiac arrhythmias primarily use electrical or optical surface recordings of a heart, spatially limited transmural recordings, and mathematical models. However, given that such arrhythmias occur on a 3D myocardial tissue, information obtained from such practices lack in dimension, completeness, and are sometimes prone to oversimplification. The combination of complementary Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based techniques such as Current Density Imaging (CDI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) could provide more depth to current practices in assessing the cardiac arrhythmia dynamics in entire cross sections of myocardium. In this work, we present an approach utilizing feature-based data fusion methods to demonstrate that complimentary information obtained from electrical current distribution and structural properties within a heart could be quantified and enhanced. Twelve (12) pairs of CDI and DTI image data sets were gathered from porcine hearts perfused through a Langendorff setup. Images were fused together using feature-based data fusion techniques such as Joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA), Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), and their combination (CCA+jICA). The results suggest that the complimentary information of cardiac states from CDI and DTI are enhanced and are better classified with the use of data fusion methods. For each data set, an increase in mean correlations of fused images were observed with 38% increase from CCA+jICA compared to the original images while mean mutual information of the fused images from jICA and CCA+jICA increased by approximately three-fold. We conclude that MRI-based techniques present potential viable tools in furthering studies for cardiac arrhythmias especially Ventricular Fibrillation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feature-based tolerancing for advanced manufacturing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.W.; Kirk, W.J. III; Simons, W.R.; Ward, R.C.; Brooks, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    A primary requirement for the successful deployment of advanced manufacturing applications is the need for a complete and accessible definition of the product. This product definition must not only provide an unambiguous description of a product`s nominal shape but must also contain complete tolerance specification and general property attributes. Likewise, the product definition`s geometry, topology, tolerance data, and modeler manipulative routines must be fully accessible through a robust application programmer interface. This paper describes a tolerancing capability using features that complements a geometric solid model with a representation of conventional and geometric tolerances and non-shape property attributes. This capability guarantees a complete and unambiguous definition of tolerances for manufacturing applications. An object-oriented analysis and design of the feature-based tolerance domain was performed. The design represents and relates tolerance features, tolerances, and datum reference frames. The design also incorporates operations that verify correctness and check for the completeness of the overall tolerance definition. The checking algorithm is based upon the notion of satisfying all of a feature`s toleranceable aspects. Benefits from the feature-based tolerance modeler include: advancing complete product definition initiatives, incorporating tolerances in product data exchange, and supplying computer-integrated manufacturing applications with tolerance information.

  13. Automatic Dent-landmark detection in 3-D CBCT dental volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Erkang; Chen, Jinwu; Yang, Jie; Deng, Huiyang; Wu, Yi; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Gable, Bryce; Ling, Haibin

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic craniometric landmarks provide critical information in oral and maxillofacial imaging diagnosis and treatment planning. The Dent-landmark, defined as the odontoid process of the epistropheus, is one of the key landmarks to construct the midsagittal reference plane. In this paper, we propose a learning-based approach to automatically detect the Dent-landmark in the 3D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dental data. Specifically, a detector is learned using the random forest with sampled context features. Furthermore, we use spacial prior to build a constrained search space other than use the full three dimensional space. The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset containing 73 CBCT dental volumes and yields promising results.

  14. An Indoor Positioning Method for Smartphones Using Landmarks and PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Jiang, Mingxing; Guo, Zhongwen; Hu, Naijun; Sun, Zhongwei; Liu, Jing

    2016-12-15

    Recently location based services (LBS) have become increasingly popular in indoor environments. Among these indoor positioning techniques providing LBS, a fusion approach combining WiFi-based and pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) techniques is drawing more and more attention of researchers. Although this fusion method performs well in some cases, it still has some limitations, such as heavy computation and inconvenience for real-time use. In this work, we study map information of a given indoor environment, analyze variations of WiFi received signal strength (RSS), define several kinds of indoor landmarks, and then utilize these landmarks to correct accumulated errors derived from PDR. This fusion scheme, called Landmark-aided PDR (LaP), is proved to be light-weight and suitable for real-time implementation by running an Android application designed for the experiment. We compared LaP with other PDR-based fusion approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can achieve a significant improvement with an average accuracy of 2.17 m.

  15. An Indoor Positioning Method for Smartphones Using Landmarks and PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently location based services (LBS have become increasingly popular in indoor environments. Among these indoor positioning techniques providing LBS, a fusion approach combining WiFi-based and pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR techniques is drawing more and more attention of researchers. Although this fusion method performs well in some cases, it still has some limitations, such as heavy computation and inconvenience for real-time use. In this work, we study map information of a given indoor environment, analyze variations of WiFi received signal strength (RSS, define several kinds of indoor landmarks, and then utilize these landmarks to correct accumulated errors derived from PDR. This fusion scheme, called Landmark-aided PDR (LaP, is proved to be light-weight and suitable for real-time implementation by running an Android application designed for the experiment. We compared LaP with other PDR-based fusion approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can achieve a significant improvement with an average accuracy of 2.17 m.

  16. Simultaneously mapping and superimposing landmark configurations with parsimony as optimality criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, S A; Goloboff, P A

    2012-05-01

    All methods proposed to date for mapping landmark configurations on a phylogenetic tree start from an alignment generated by methods that make no use of phylogenetic information, usually by superimposing all configurations against a consensus configuration. In order to properly interpret differences between landmark configurations along the tree as changes in shape, the metric chosen to define the ancestral assignments should also form the basis to superimpose the configurations. Thus, we present here a method that merges both steps, map and align, into a single procedure that (for the given tree) produces a multiple alignment and ancestral assignments such that the sum of the Euclidean distances between the corresponding landmarks along tree nodes is minimized. This approach is an extension of the method proposed by Catalano et al. (2010. Phylogenetic morphometrics (I): the use of landmark data in a phylogenetic framework. Cladistics. 26:539-549) for mapping landmark data with parsimony as optimality criterion. In the context of phylogenetics, this method allows maximizing the degree to which similarity in landmark positions can be accounted for by common ancestry. In the context of morphometrics, this approach guarantees (heuristics aside) that all the transformations inferred on the tree represent changes in shape. The performance of the method was evaluated on different data sets, indicating that the method produces marked improvements in tree score (up to 5% compared with generalized superimpositions, up to 11% compared with ordinary superimpositions). These empirical results stress the importance of incorporating the phylogenetic information into the alignment step.

  17. Feature-based Ontology Mapping from an Information Receivers’ Viewpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Mørup, Morten

    2012-01-01

    optimally convey the original meaning of a culturally-specific Source Language (SL) concept to a TL audience by aligning two culturally-dependent domain-specific ontologies. The results indicate that the Bayesian Model of Generalization [1] performs best, not only for identifying candidate translation terms...

  18. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...... available environment features (natural landmarks). The goal is also to integrate techniques and algorithms (also related to other research field) in the same navigation system, in order to improve localization performance and system autonomy. The proposed localization strategy is based on a continuous...... update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores...

  19. Influence of Landmarks on Wayfinding and Brain Connectivity in Immersive Virtual Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Greeshma; Kaushal, Yash; Chandra, Sushil; Singh, Vijander; Mittal, Alok P; Dutt, Varun

    2017-01-01

    Spatial navigation is influenced by landmarks, which are prominent visual features in the environment. Although previous research has focused on finding advantages of landmarks on wayfinding via experimentation; however, less attention has been given to identifying the key attributes of landmarks that facilitate wayfinding, including the study of neural correlates (involving electroencephalogram, EEG analyses). In this paper, we combine behavioral measures, virtual environment, and EEG signal-processing to provide a holistic investigation about the influence of landmarks on performance during navigation in a maze-like environment. In an experiment, participants were randomly divided into two conditions, Landmark-enriched (LM+; N = 17) and Landmark-devoid (LM-; N = 18), and asked to navigate from an initial location to a goal location in a maze. In the LM+ condition, there were landmarks placed at certain locations, which participants could use for wayfinding in the maze. However, in the LM- condition, such landmarks were not present. Beyond behavioral analyses of data, analyses were carried out of the EEG data collected using a 64-channel device. Results revealed that participants took less time and committed fewer errors in navigating the maze in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition. EEG analyses of the data revealed that the left-hemispheric activation was more prominent in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) of the theta frequency band, revealed activation in the left posterior inferior and superior regions in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition, suggesting an occurrence of an object-location binding in the LM+ condition along with spatial transformation between representations. Moreover, directed transfer function method, which measures information flow between two regions, showed a higher number of active channels in the LM- condition compared to the LM+ condition

  20. CONSTRUCTION AND MODIFICATION OF FLEXIBLE FEATURE-BASED MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to generate flexible featrure-based models (FFBM), which can be modified dynamically. BRep/CSFG/FRG hybrid scheme is used to describe FFBM, in which BRep explicitly defines the model, CSFG (Constructive solid-feature geometry) tree records the feature-based modelling procedure and FRG (Feature relation graph) reflects different knids of relationship among features. Topological operators with local retrievability are designed to implement feature addition, which is traced by topological operation list (TOL) in detail. As a result, FFBM can be modified directly in the system database. Related features' chain reactions and variable topologies are supported in design modification, after which the product information adhering on features will not be lost. Further, a feature can be modified as rapidly as it was added.

  1. Guadalupe County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  2. Quay County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  3. Cibola County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  4. Guadalupe County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  5. Taos County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  6. Union County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  7. Eddy County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  8. Harding County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  9. Socorro County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  10. Colfax County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  11. Catron County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  12. Quay County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  13. Grant County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  14. Sierra County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  15. Valencia County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  16. Hidalgo County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  17. Lea County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  18. Colfax County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  19. Lincoln County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  20. Socorro County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  1. Chaves County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  2. Otero County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  3. Curry County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  4. Union County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  5. Roosevelt County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  6. Mora County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  7. Torrance County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  8. Grant County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  9. Bernalillo County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  10. Harding County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  11. Cibola County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  12. Mora County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  13. Hidalgo County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  14. Eddy County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  15. Feature Based Control of Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    Two servo control loops are used to keep the Optical Pick-up Unit focused and radially on the information track of the Compact Disc. These control servos have problems handling surface faults on the Compact Disc. In this Ph.D thesis a method is proposed to improve the handling of these surface...

  16. Using Local Symmetry for Landmark Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, Gert; de Jong, Sjoerd; Schomaker, Lambert R. B.; Fritz, M; Schiele, B; Piater, JH

    2009-01-01

    Most visual Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) methods use interest points as landmarks in their maps of the environment. Often the interest points are detected using contrast features, for instance those of the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). The SIFT interest points, however, h

  17. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  18. Remembered landmarks enhance the precision of path integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon O´Leary

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available When navigating by path integration, knowledge of one’s position becomes increasingly uncertain as one walks from a known location. This uncertainty decreases if one perceives a known landmark location nearby. We hypothesized that remembering landmarks might serve a similar purpose for path integration as directly perceiving them. If this is true, walking near a remembered landmark location should enhance response consistency in path integration tasks. To test this, we asked participants to view a target and then attempt to walk to it without vision. Some participants saw the target plus a landmark during the preview. Compared with no-landmark trials, response consistency nearly doubled when participants passed near the remembered landmark location. Similar results were obtained when participants could audibly perceive the landmark while walking. A control experiment ruled out perceptual context effects during the preview. We conclude that remembered landmarks can enhance path integration even though they are not directly perceived.

  19. 36 CFR 65.5 - Designation of National Historic Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program have been met. A simple majority is required to make a recommendation of designation. The Board's... OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 65.5 Designation of National Historic Landmarks... sources other than the regularly programmed funds of the National Historic Landmarks Program. (b) Special...

  20. Strategies in Landmark Use by Children, Adults, and Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Suzanne E.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Cheng, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Common marmosets ("Callithrix jacchus jacchus"), human children, and human adults learned to find a goal that was located in the center of a square array of four identical landmarks. The location of the landmark array and corresponding goal varied across trials, so the task could not be solved without using the landmark array. In Experiment 1, a…

  1. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiubin [College of Geographic and Biologic Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210015, China and IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Lab, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  2. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...... update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores...... of the proposed method is based on a system with a simple setup. The novelty and potentiality, are in combining algorithms for panoramic view-synthesis, attention selection, stereo reconstruction, triangulation, optimal triplet selection, and image-based rendering. Experiments demonstrate that the system can...

  3. Scripps building designated as national historic landmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    The George H. Scripps Memorial Marine Laboratory in La Jolla, Calif., has been designated a national historic landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Completed in 1910, the building is the oldest structure at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego, and is the oldest marine laboratory building in the western hemisphere.The laboratory, designed by notable San Diego architect Irving Gill, was designated San Diego National Landmark 119 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, the year it was scheduled to be demolished. (The building had been thought to be not sturdy enough to withstand earthquakes; a review of the original building plans showed that no major structural changes would be required to meet modern seismic safety standards. Demolition plans were canceled.)

  4. An Efficient Ceiling-view SLAM Using Relational Constraints Between Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyukdoo Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new indoor ‘simultaneous localization and mapping’ (SLAM technique based on an upward-looking ceiling camera. Adapted from our previous work [17], the proposed method employs sparsely-distributed line and point landmarks in an indoor environment to aid with data association and reduce extended Kalman filter computation as compared with earlier techniques. Further, the proposed method exploits geometric relationships between the two types of landmarks to provide added information about the environment. This geometric information is measured with an upward-looking ceiling camera and is used as a constraint in Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed ceiling-view (CV SLAM is demonstrated through simulations and experiments. The proposed method performs localization and mapping more accurately than those methods that use the two types of landmarks without taking into account their relative geometries.

  5. Facial landmark detection in real-time with correlation filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Viridiana; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    An algorithm for facial landmark detection based on template matched filtering is presented. The algorithm is able to detect and estimate the position of a set of prespecified landmarks by employing a bank of linear filters. Each filter in the bank is trained to detect a single landmark that is located in a small region of the input face image. The filter bank is implemented in parallel on a graphics processing unit to perform facial landmark detection in real-time. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed algorithm are presented and discussed in terms of detection rate, accuracy of landmark location estimation, and real-time efficiency.

  6. Mapped Landmark Algorithm for Precision Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew; Ansar, Adnan; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses a computer vision algorithm for position estimation to enable precision landing during planetary descent. The Descent Image Motion Estimation System for the Mars Exploration Rovers has been used as a starting point for creating code for precision, terrain-relative navigation during planetary landing. The algorithm is designed to be general because it handles images taken at different scales and resolutions relative to the map, and can produce mapped landmark matches for any planetary terrain of sufficient texture. These matches provide a measurement of horizontal position relative to a known landing site specified on the surface map. Multiple mapped landmarks generated per image allow for automatic detection and elimination of bad matches. Attitude and position can be generated from each image; this image-based attitude measurement can be used by the onboard navigation filter to improve the attitude estimate, which will improve the position estimates. The algorithm uses normalized correlation of grayscale images, producing precise, sub-pixel images. The algorithm has been broken into two sub-algorithms: (1) FFT Map Matching (see figure), which matches a single large template by correlation in the frequency domain, and (2) Mapped Landmark Refinement, which matches many small templates by correlation in the spatial domain. Each relies on feature selection, the homography transform, and 3D image correlation. The algorithm is implemented in C++ and is rated at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 4.

  7. The postrhinal cortex is not necessary for landmark control in rat head direction cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, James R; Taube, Jeffery S

    2017-02-01

    The rodent postrhinal cortex (POR), homologous to primate areas TH/TF and the human 'parahippocampal place area', has been implicated in processing visual landmark and contextual information about the environment. Head direction (HD) cells are neurons that encode allocentric head direction, independent of the animal's location or behavior, and are influenced by manipulations of visual landmarks. The present study determined whether the POR plays a role in processing environmental information within the HD circuit. Experiment 1 tested the role of the POR in processing visual landmark cues in the HD system during manipulation of a visual cue. HD cells from POR lesioned animals had similar firing properties, shifted their preferred firing direction following rotation of a salient visual cue, and in darkness had preferred firing directions that drifted at the same rate as controls. Experiment 2 tested the PORs involvement in contextual fear conditioning, where the animal learns to associate a shock with both a tone and a context in which the shock was given. In agreement with previous studies, POR lesioned animals were able to learn the tone-shock pairing, but displayed less freezing relative to controls when reintroduced into the environment previously paired with a shock. Therefore, HD cells from POR lesioned animals, with demonstrated impairments in contextual fear conditioning, were able to use a visual landmark to control their preferred direction. Thus, despite its importance in processing visual landmark information in primates, the POR in rats does not appear to play a pivotal role in controlling visual landmark information in the HD system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

    2011-11-18

    We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion

  9. Within-compound associations explain potentiation and failure to overshadow learning based on geometry by discrete landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Joe M; Kosaki, Yutaka; McGregor, Anthony

    2013-07-01

    In three experiments, rats were trained to locate a submerged platform in one of the base corners of a triangular arena above each of which was suspended one of two distinctive landmarks. In Experiment 1, it was established that these landmarks differed in their salience by the differential control they gained over behavior after training in compound with geometric cues. In Experiment 2, it was shown that locating the platform beneath the less salient landmark potentiated learning based on geometry compared with control rats for which landmarks provided ambiguous information about the location of the platform. The presence of the more salient landmark above the platform for another group of animals appeared to have no effect on learning based on geometry. Experiment 3 established that these landmark and geometry cues entered into within-compound associations during compound training. We argue that these within-compound associations can account for the potentiation seen in Experiment 2, as well as previous failures to demonstrate overshadowing of geometric cues. We also suggest that these within-compound associations need not be of different magnitudes, despite the different effects of each of the landmarks on learning based on geometry seen in Experiment 2. Instead, within-compound associations appear to mitigate the overshadowing effects that traditional theories of associative learning would predict.

  10. Role of Dentate Gyrus in Aligning Internal Spatial Map to External Landmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Woon Ryoung; Sun, Woong; Jung, Min Whan

    2009-01-01

    Humans and animals form internal representations of external space based on their own body movement (dead reckoning) as well as external landmarks. It is poorly understood, however, how different types of information are integrated to form a unified representation of external space. To examine the role of dentate gyrus (DG) in this process, we…

  11. Landmark experiments in twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Trigg, George L

    2011-01-01

    Physics is very much an experimental science, but too often, students at the undergraduate level are not exposed to the reality of experimental physics ― i.e., what was done in a given experiment, why it was done, the background of physics against which the experiment was carried out and the changes in theory and knowledge that resulted. In this hook, the author helps to remedy the situation by presenting a variety of ""landmark"" experiments that have brought about significant alterations in our ideas about some aspect of nature. Among these scientific milestones are discoveries about the wa

  12. Longwall automation - an ACARP Landmark Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, M.; Hainsworth, D.; Lever, P.; Gurgenci, H. [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, Kenmore, Qld. (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    A Landmark Longwall Automation project was commenced in July 2001. The major outcome of automation using on-face observation has been divided into ten outcome areas that have been fully scoped for a three-year initial project life. A major facilitating technology has been the implementation of inertial navigation system (INS) technology that can map the shearer position in 3D. A focus of the project is to deliver a system that is at least as productive as the current most productive manually controlled longwall face. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-08-10

    Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E). The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS) horizontal error is about 0.138 m.

  14. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyuck Im

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E. The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS horizontal error is about 0.138 m.

  15. Feature-based and spatial attentional selection in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Anna; Schubö, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The contents of visual working memory (VWM) can be modulated by spatial cues presented during the maintenance interval ("retrocues"). Here, we examined whether attentional selection of representations in VWM can also be based on features. In addition, we investigated whether the mechanisms of feature-based and spatial attention in VWM differ with respect to parallel access to noncontiguous locations. In two experiments, we tested the efficacy of valid retrocues relying on different kinds of information. Specifically, participants were presented with a typical spatial retrocue pointing to two locations, a symbolic spatial retrocue (numbers mapping onto two locations), and two feature-based retrocues: a color retrocue (a blob of the same color as two of the items) and a shape retrocue (an outline of the shape of two of the items). The two cued items were presented at either contiguous or noncontiguous locations. Overall retrocueing benefits, as compared to a neutral condition, were observed for all retrocue types. Whereas feature-based retrocues yielded benefits for cued items presented at both contiguous and noncontiguous locations, spatial retrocues were only effective when the cued items had been presented at contiguous locations. These findings demonstrate that attentional selection and updating in VWM can operate on different kinds of information, allowing for a flexible and efficient use of this limited system. The observation that the representations of items presented at noncontiguous locations could only be reliably selected with feature-based retrocues suggests that feature-based and spatial attentional selection in VWM rely on different mechanisms, as has been shown for attentional orienting in the external world.

  16. Feature-based attentional modulation of orientation perception in somatosensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Annika Schweisfurth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a reaction time study of human tactile orientation detection the effects of spatial attention and feature-based attention were investigated. Subjects had to give speeded responses to target orientations (parallel and orthogonal to the finger axis in a random stream of oblique tactile distractor orientations presented to their index and ring fingers. Before each block of trials, subjects received a tactile cue at one finger. By manipulating the validity of this cue with respect to its location and orientation (feature, we provided an incentive to subjects to attend spatially to the cued location and only there to the cued orientation. Subjects showed quicker responses to parallel compared to orthogonal targets, pointing to an orientation anisotropy in sensory processing. Also, faster reaction times were observed in location-matched trials, i.e. when targets appeared on the cued finger, representing a perceptual benefit of spatial attention. Most importantly, reaction times were shorter to orientations matching the cue, both at the cued and at the uncued location, documenting a global enhancement of tactile sensation by feature-based attention. This is the first report of a perceptual benefit of feature-based attention outside the spatial focus of attention in somatosensory perception. The similarity to effects of feature-based attention in visual perception supports the notion of matching attentional mechanisms across sensory domains.

  17. Adaptive Feature Based Control of Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Vidal, Enrique Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    of the Compact Disc. The problem is to design servo controllers which are well suited for handling surface faults which disturb the position measurement and still react sufficiently against normal disturbances like mechanical shocks. In previous work of the same authors a feature based control scheme for CD...

  18. Automated protein design: Landmarks and operational principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Ranbhor, Ranjit; Patel, Kirti; Ramakrishnan, Vibin; Durani, Susheel

    2017-05-01

    Protein design has an eventful history spanning over three decades, with handful of success stories reported, and numerous failures not reported. Design practices have benefited tremendously from improvements in computer hardware and advances in scientific algorithms. Though protein folding problem still remains unsolved, the possibility of having multiple sequence solutions for a single fold makes protein design a more tractable problem than protein folding. One of the most significant advancement in this area is the implementation of automated design algorithms on pre-defined templates or completely new folds, optimized through deterministic and heuristic search algorithms. This progress report provides a succinct presentation of important landmarks in automated design attempts, followed by brief account of operational principles in automated design methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Landmark-based autonomous navigation for pinpoint planetary landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Dayi; Huang, Xiangyu

    2016-12-01

    A landmark-based autonomous navigation scheme is presented for pinpoint planetary landing. The dynamic model is built on the basis of measurements from Inertial Measurement Unit. Measurement models of landmarks with known coordinates and landmarks with unknown coordinates extracted from sequential descent images are developed and used to calculated the state corrections in Extend Kalman Filter, respectively. Then, the corrections are fused by a covariance intersection fusion algorithm to perform state updates. The tight coupling of the two types of landmark observations yields accurate and robust state estimates. Extensive simulations are performed, which confirm the validity of the proposed navigation scheme and analyze the effects of factors, such as the horizonal position errors and the densities of landmarks with known coordinates and the roughness of the landing surface, on the navigation accuracy.

  20. Collaborative Tracking of Image Features Based on Projective Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinwei

    -mode sensors for improving the flexibility and robustness of the system. From the experimental results during three field tests for the LASOIS system, we observed that most of the errors in the image processing algorithm are caused by the incorrect feature tracking. This dissertation addresses the feature tracking problem in image sequences acquired from cameras. Despite many alternatives to feature tracking problem, iterative least squares solution solving the optical flow equation has been the most popular approach used by many in the field. This dissertation attempts to leverage the former efforts to enhance feature tracking methods by introducing a view geometric constraint to the tracking problem, which provides collaboration among features. In contrast to alternative geometry based methods, the proposed approach provides an online solution to optical flow estimation in a collaborative fashion by exploiting Horn and Schunck flow estimation regularized by view geometric constraints. Proposed collaborative tracker estimates the motion of a feature based on the geometry of the scene and how the other features are moving. Alternative to this approach, a new closed form solution to tracking that combines the image appearance with the view geometry is also introduced. We particularly use invariants in the projective coordinates and conjecture that the traditional appearance solution can be significantly improved using view geometry. The geometric constraint is introduced by defining a new optical flow equation which exploits the scene geometry from a set drawn from tracked features. At the end of each tracking loop the quality of the tracked features is judged using both appearance similarity and geometric consistency. Our experiments demonstrate robust tracking performance even when the features are occluded or they undergo appearance changes due to projective deformation of the template. The proposed collaborative tracking method is also tested in the visual navigation

  1. Feature-based multiresolution techniques for product design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Sang Hun; LEE Kunwoo

    2006-01-01

    3D computer-aided design (CAD) systems based on feature-based solid modelling technique have been widely spread and used for product design. However, when part models associated with features are used in various downstream applications,simplified models in various levels of detail (LODs) are frequently more desirable than the full details of the parts. In particular,the need for feature-based multiresolution representation of a solid model representing an object at multiple LODs in the feature unit is increasing for engineering tasks. One challenge is to generate valid models at various LODs after an arbitrary rearrangement of features using a certain LOD criterion, because composite Boolean operations consisting of union and subtraction are not commutative. The other challenges are to devise proper topological framework for multiresolution representation, to suggest more reasonable LOD criteria, and to extend applications. This paper surveys the recent research on these issues.

  2. Frequency feature based quantification of defect depth and thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shulin; Chen, Kai; Bai, Libing; Cheng, Yuhua; Tian, Lulu; Zhang, Hong

    2014-06-01

    This study develops a frequency feature based pulsed eddy current method. A frequency feature, termed frequency to zero, is proposed for subsurface defects and metal loss quantification in metallic specimens. A curve fitting method is also employed to generate extra frequency components and improve the accuracy of the proposed method. Experimental validation is carried out. Conclusions and further work are derived on the basis of the studies.

  3. A FEATURE BASED DESIGN SYSTEM FOR PRISMATIC PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdayim BAŞAK

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a feature based design program including manufacturing features which are used in machining of prismatic parts by chip removal methods has been developed. The aim of this study is to model the features such as a pocket, slot and hole that are used in machining operations by adding to prismatic parts and to save them in a database. With this developed system, prismatic parts that can be obtained by chip removal methods can be modelled easily.

  4. Syntactic and Sentence Feature Based Hybrid Approach for Text Summarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sakhare

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a significant research in automatic text summarization using feature-based techniques in which most of them utilized any one of the soft computing techniques. But, making use of syntactic structure of the sentences for text summarization has not widely applied due to its difficulty of handling it in summarization process. On the other hand, feature-based technique available in the literature showed efficient results in most of the techniques. So, combining syntactic structure into the feature-based techniques is surely smooth the summarization process in a way that the efficiency can be achieved. With the intention of combining two different techniques, we have presented an approach of text summarization that combines feature and syntactic structure of the sentences. Here, two neural networks are trained based on the feature score and the syntactic structure of sentences. Finally, the two neural networks are combined with weighted average to find the sentence score of the sentences. The experimentation is carried out using DUC 2002 dataset for various compression ratios. The results showed that the proposed approach achieved F-measure of 80% for the compression ratio 50 % that proved the better results compared with the existing techniques.

  5. Discovery of feature-based hot spots using supervised clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Parmar, Rachana; Jiang, Dan; Eick, Christoph F.

    2009-07-01

    Feature-based hot spots are localized regions where the attributes of objects attain high values. There is considerable interest in automatic identification of feature-based hot spots. This paper approaches the problem of finding feature-based hot spots from a data mining perspective, and describes a method that relies on supervised clustering to produce a list of hot spot regions. Supervised clustering uses a fitness function rewarding isolation of the hot spots to optimally subdivide the dataset. The clusters in the optimal division are ranked using the interestingness of clusters that encapsulate their utility for being hot spots. Hot spots are associated with the top ranked clusters. The effectiveness of supervised clustering as a hot spot identification method is evaluated for four conceptually different clustering algorithms using a dataset describing the spatial distribution of ground ice on Mars. Clustering solutions are visualized by specially developed raster approximations. Further assessment of the ability of different algorithms to yield hot spots is performed using raster approximations. Density-based clustering algorithm is found to be the most effective for hot spot identification. The results of the hot spot discovery by supervised clustering are comparable to those obtained using the G* statistic, but the new method offers a high degree of automation, making it an ideal tool for mining large datasets for the existence of potential hot spots.

  6. Landmark detection and coupled patch registration for cardiac motion tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Shi, Wenzhe; Zhuang, Xiahai; Wu, Xianliang; Tung, Kai-Pin; Ourselin, Sebastien; Edwards, Philip; Rueckert, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on the estimation of the deformation of the endocardium to aid the diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Landmark tracking can provide sparse, anatomically relevant constraints to help establish correspondences between images being tracked or registered. However, landmarks on the endocardium are often characterized by ambiguous appearance in cardiac MR images which makes the extraction and tracking of these landmarks problematic. In this paper we propose an automatic framework to select and track a sparse set of distinctive landmarks in the presence of relatively large deformations in order to capture the endocardial motion in cardiac MR sequences. To achieve this a sparse set of the landmarks is identified using an entropy-based approach. In particular we use singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the search space and localize the landmarks with relatively large deformation across the cardiac cycle. The tracking of the sparse set of landmarks is performed simultaneously by optimizing a two-stage Markov Random Field (MRF) model. The tracking result is further used to initialize registration based dense motion tracking. We have applied this framework to extract a set of landmarks at the endocardial border of the left ventricle in MR image sequences from 51 subjects. Although the left ventricle undergoes a number of different deformations, we show how the radial, longitudinal motion and twisting of the endocardial surface can be captured by the proposed approach. Our experiments demonstrate that motion tracking using sparse landmarks can outperform conventional motion tracking by a substantial amount, with improvements in terms of tracking accuracy of 20:8% and 19:4% respectively.

  7. TIBIAL LANDMARKS IN ACL ANATOMIC REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Demesсhenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify anatomical landmarks on tibial articular surface to serve as reference in preparing tibial canal with respect to the center of ACL footprint during single bundle arthroscopic repair.Materials and methods. Twelve frozen knee joint specimens and 68 unpaired macerated human tibia were studied using anatomical, morphometric, statistical methods as well as graphic simulation.Results. Center of the tibial ACL footprint was located 13,1±1,7 mm anteriorly from posterior border of intercondylar eminence, at 1/3 of the distance along the line connecting apexes of internal and external tubercles and 6,1±0,5 mm anteriorly along the perpendicular raised to this point.Conclusion. Internal and external tubercles, as well as posterior border of intercondylar eminence can be considered as anatomical references to determine the center of the tibial ACL footprint and to prepare bone canals for anatomic ligament repair.

  8. Different Cortical Mechanisms for Spatial vs. Feature-Based Attentional Selection in Visual Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Anna; Schubö, Anna; Crawford, J D

    2016-01-01

    The limited capacity of visual working memory (VWM) necessitates attentional mechanisms that selectively update and maintain only the most task-relevant content. Psychophysical experiments have shown that the retroactive selection of memory content can be based on visual properties such as location or shape, but the neural basis for such differential selection is unknown. For example, it is not known if there are different cortical modules specialized for spatial vs. feature-based mnemonic attention, in the same way that has been demonstrated for attention to perceptual input. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to identify areas in human parietal and occipital cortex involved in the selection of objects from memory based on cues to their location (spatial information) or their shape (featural information). We found that TMS over the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) selectively facilitated spatial selection, whereas TMS over the lateral occipital cortex (LO) selectively enhanced feature-based selection for remembered objects in the contralateral visual field. Thus, different cortical regions are responsible for spatial vs. feature-based selection of working memory representations. Since the same regions are involved in terms of attention to external events, these new findings indicate overlapping mechanisms for attentional control over perceptual input and mnemonic representations.

  9. Different Cortical Mechanisms for Spatial vs. Feature-Based Attentional Selection in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Anna; Schubö, Anna; Crawford, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    The limited capacity of visual working memory (VWM) necessitates attentional mechanisms that selectively update and maintain only the most task-relevant content. Psychophysical experiments have shown that the retroactive selection of memory content can be based on visual properties such as location or shape, but the neural basis for such differential selection is unknown. For example, it is not known if there are different cortical modules specialized for spatial vs. feature-based mnemonic attention, in the same way that has been demonstrated for attention to perceptual input. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to identify areas in human parietal and occipital cortex involved in the selection of objects from memory based on cues to their location (spatial information) or their shape (featural information). We found that TMS over the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) selectively facilitated spatial selection, whereas TMS over the lateral occipital cortex (LO) selectively enhanced feature-based selection for remembered objects in the contralateral visual field. Thus, different cortical regions are responsible for spatial vs. feature-based selection of working memory representations. Since the same regions are involved in terms of attention to external events, these new findings indicate overlapping mechanisms for attentional control over perceptual input and mnemonic representations. PMID:27582701

  10. Different cortical mechanisms for spatial vs. feature-based attentional selection in visual working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Heuer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The limited capacity of visual working memory necessitates attentional mechanisms that selectively update and maintain only the most task-relevant content. Psychophysical experiments have shown that the retroactive selection of memory content can be based on visual properties such as location or shape, but the neural basis for such differential selection is unknown. For example, it is not known if there are different cortical modules specialized for spatial versus feature-based mnemonic attention, in the same way that has been demonstrated for attention to perceptual input. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to identify areas in human parietal and occipital cortex involved in the selection of objects from memory based on cues to their location (spatial information or their shape (featural information. We found that TMS over the supramarginal gyrus (SMG selectively facilitated spatial selection, whereas TMS over the lateral occipital cortex selectively enhanced feature-based selection for remembered objects in the contralateral visual field. Thus, different cortical regions are responsible for spatial vs. feature-based selection of working memory representations. Since the same regions are involved in attention to external events, these new findings indicate overlapping mechanisms for attentional control over perceptual input and mnemonic representations.

  11. Automatic landmarks detection in breast reconstruction aesthetic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Benjumea, Francisco J; Serrano, Carmen; Acha, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses a fully automatic landmarks detection method for breast reconstruction aesthetic assessment. The set of landmarks detected are the supraesternal notch (SSN), armpits, nipples, and inframammary fold (IMF). These landmarks are commonly used in order to perform anthropometric measurements for aesthetic assessment. The methodological approach is based on both illumination and morphological analysis. The proposed method has been tested with 21 images. A good overall performance is observed, although several improvements must be achieved in order to refine the detection of nipples and SSNs.

  12. Comparative Study of Triangulation based and Feature based Image Morphing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Bhumika G. Bhatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Image Morphing is one of the most powerful Digital Image processing technique, which is used to enhancemany multimedia projects, presentations, education and computer based training. It is also used inmedical imaging field to recover features not visible in images by establishing correspondence of featuresamong successive pair of scanned images. This paper discuss what morphing is and implementation ofTriangulation based morphing Technique and Feature based Image Morphing. IT analyze both morphingtechniques in terms of different attributes such as computational complexity, Visual quality of morphobtained and complexity involved in selection of features.

  13. Facial landmark localization by curvature maps and profile analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lippold, Carsten; Liu, Xiang; Wangdo, Kim; Drerup, Burkhard; Schreiber, Kristina; Kirschneck, Christian; Moiseenko, Tatjana; Danesh, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    .... This study wants to evaluate and present an objective method for measuring selected facial landmarks based on an analysis of curvature maps and of sagittal profile obtained by a laser-scanning method...

  14. Indoor monocular mobile robot navigation based on color landmarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yuan; ZHANG Bai-sheng; ZHANG Yi; LI Ling

    2009-01-01

    A robot landmark navigation system based on monocular camera was researched theoretically and experimentally. First the landmark setting and its data structure in programming was given; then the coordinates of them getting by robot and global localization of the robot was described; finally experiments based on Pioneer III mobile robot show that this system can work well at different topographic situation without lose of signposts.

  15. Feature-Based Classification of Amino Acid Substitutions outside Conserved Functional Protein Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislava Gemovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are more than 500 amino acid substitutions in each human genome, and bioinformatics tools irreplaceably contribute to determination of their functional effects. We have developed feature-based algorithm for the detection of mutations outside conserved functional domains (CFDs and compared its classification efficacy with the most commonly used phylogeny-based tools, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. The new algorithm is based on the informational spectrum method (ISM, a feature-based technique, and statistical analysis. Our dataset contained neutral polymorphisms and mutations associated with myeloid malignancies from epigenetic regulators ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, and TET2. PolyPhen-2 and SIFT had significantly lower accuracies in predicting the effects of amino acid substitutions outside CFDs than expected, with especially low sensitivity. On the other hand, only ISM algorithm showed statistically significant classification of these sequences. It outperformed PolyPhen-2 and SIFT by 15% and 13%, respectively. These results suggest that feature-based methods, like ISM, are more suitable for the classification of amino acid substitutions outside CFDs than phylogeny-based tools.

  16. Feature-based and statistical methods for analyzing the Deepwater Horizon oil spill with AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R.S.; Clark, R.N.; Livo, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill covered a very large geographical area in the Gulf of Mexico creating potentially serious environmental impacts on both marine life and the coastal shorelines. Knowing the oil's areal extent and thickness as well as denoting different categories of the oil's physical state is important for assessing these impacts. High spectral resolution data in hyperspectral imagery (HSI) sensors such as Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) provide a valuable source of information that can be used for analysis by semi-automatic methods for tracking an oil spill's areal extent, oil thickness, and oil categories. However, the spectral behavior of oil in water is inherently a highly non-linear and variable phenomenon that changes depending on oil thickness and oil/water ratios. For certain oil thicknesses there are well-defined absorption features, whereas for very thin films sometimes there are almost no observable features. Feature-based imaging spectroscopy methods are particularly effective at classifying materials that exhibit specific well-defined spectral absorption features. Statistical methods are effective at classifying materials with spectra that exhibit a considerable amount of variability and that do not necessarily exhibit well-defined spectral absorption features. This study investigates feature-based and statistical methods for analyzing oil spills using hyperspectral imagery. The appropriate use of each approach is investigated and a combined feature-based and statistical method is proposed. ?? 2011 SPIE.

  17. Feature-based Alignment of Volumetric Multi-modal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Matthew; Zöllei, Lilla; Wells, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for aligning image volumes acquired from different imaging modalities (e.g. MR, CT) based on 3D scale-invariant image features. A novel method for encoding invariant feature geometry and appearance is developed, based on the assumption of locally linear intensity relationships, providing a solution to poor repeatability of feature detection in different image modalities. The encoding method is incorporated into a probabilistic feature-based model for multi-modal image alignment. The model parameters are estimated via a group-wise alignment algorithm, that iteratively alternates between estimating a feature-based model from feature data, then realigning feature data to the model, converging to a stable alignment solution with few pre-processing or pre-alignment requirements. The resulting model can be used to align multi-modal image data with the benefits of invariant feature correspondence: globally optimal solutions, high efficiency and low memory usage. The method is tested on the difficult RIRE data set of CT, T1, T2, PD and MP-RAGE brain images of subjects exhibiting significant inter-subject variability due to pathology. PMID:24683955

  18. Global Enhancement but Local Suppression in Feature-based Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forschack, Norman; Andersen, Søren K; Müller, Matthias M

    2017-04-01

    A key property of feature-based attention is global facilitation of the attended feature throughout the visual field. Previously, we presented superimposed red and blue randomly moving dot kinematograms (RDKs) flickering at a different frequency each to elicit frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) that allowed us to analyze neural dynamics in early visual cortex when participants shifted attention to one of the two colors. Results showed amplification of the attended and suppression of the unattended color as measured by SSVEP amplitudes. Here, we tested whether the suppression of the unattended color also operates globally. To this end, we presented superimposed flickering red and blue RDKs in the center of a screen and a red and blue RDK in the left and right periphery, respectively, also flickering at different frequencies. Participants shifted attention to one color of the superimposed RDKs in the center to discriminate coherent motion events in the attended from the unattended color RDK, whereas the peripheral RDKs were task irrelevant. SSVEP amplitudes elicited by the centrally presented RDKs confirmed the previous findings of amplification and suppression. For peripherally located RDKs, we found the expected SSVEP amplitude increase, relative to precue baseline when color matched the one of the centrally attended RDK. We found no reduction in SSVEP amplitude relative to precue baseline, when the peripheral color matched the unattended one of the central RDK, indicating that, while facilitation in feature-based attention operates globally, suppression seems to be linked to the location of focused attention.

  19. Semantic Feature Based Arabic Opinion Mining Using Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Alkadri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available with the increase of opinionated reviews on the web, automatically analyzing and extracting knowledge from those reviews is very important. However, it is a challenging task to be done manually. Opinion mining is a text mining discipline that automatically performs such a task. Most researches done in this field were focused on English texts with very limited researches on Arabic language. This scarcity is because there are a lot of obstacles in Arabic. The aim of this paper is to develop a novel semantic feature-based opinion mining framework for Arabic reviews. This framework utilizes the semantic of ontologies and lexicons in the identification of opinion features and their polarity. Experiments showed that the proposed framework achieved a good level of performance compared with manually collected test data.

  20. Landmark learning by the Ozark zigzag salamander Plethodon angusticlavius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. CRANE, Alicia MATHIS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although salamanders have been shown to respond to classical conditioning, spatial learning has been largely unstudied. We tested whether salamanders could learn to locate foraging areas by using landmarks. We trained 10 salamanders Plethodon angusticlavius to use landmarks (small rocks to locate patches within the arena containing food (blackworms Lumbriculus variegatus. At the corners of each square testing arena were four plastic dishes, one containing blackworms and the other three empty. A rock was placed in front of the dish containing blackworms, and the location of the food-dish was randomly chosen for each training trial. A control group was also trained to feed on blackworms in the presence of a rock, but the rock was positioned randomly among the four dish locations so that the rock was not a reliable landmark for the worms. Although the length of the training period for individual salamanders varied (22–38 trainings per individual, the mean number of trainings for salamanders in the control and experimental groups was equal (30 training trials. During testing, no blackworms were present to eliminate any visual or chemical cues emanating directly from the prey. Individuals trained with the rock landmarks spent significantly more time in the area of the landmark than did control salamanders [Current Zoology 57 (4: 485–490, 2011].

  1. The reliability of tablet computers in depicting maxillofacial radiographic landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadinada, Aditya; Mahdian, Mina; Sheth, Sonam; Chandhoke, Taranpreet K.; Gopalakrishna, Aadarsh; Potluri, Anitha; Yadav, Sumit [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the identification of anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs on a standard medical grade picture archiving communication system (PACS) monitor and a tablet computer (iPad 5). A total of 1000 radiographs, including 500 panoramic and 500 lateral cephalometric radiographs, were retrieved from the de-identified dataset of the archive of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of the University Of Connecticut School Of Dental Medicine. Major radiographic anatomical landmarks were independently reviewed by two examiners on both displays. The examiners initially reviewed ten panoramic and ten lateral cephalometric radiographs using each imaging system, in order to verify interoperator agreement in landmark identification. The images were scored on a four-point scale reflecting the diagnostic image quality and exposure level of the images. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two displays regarding the visibility and clarity of the landmarks in either the panoramic or cephalometric radiographs. Tablet computers can reliably show anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs.

  2. Precise visual navigation using multi-stereo vision and landmark matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Oskiper, Taragay; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-04-01

    Traditional vision-based navigation system often drifts over time during navigation. In this paper, we propose a set of techniques which greatly reduce the long term drift and also improve its robustness to many failure conditions. In our approach, two pairs of stereo cameras are integrated to form a forward/backward multi-stereo camera system. As a result, the Field-Of-View of the system is extended significantly to capture more natural landmarks from the scene. This helps to increase the pose estimation accuracy as well as reduce the failure situations. Secondly, a global landmark matching technique is used to recognize the previously visited locations during navigation. Using the matched landmarks, a pose correction technique is used to eliminate the accumulated navigation drift. Finally, in order to further improve the robustness of the system, measurements from low-cost Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors are integrated with the visual odometry in an extended Kalman Filtering framework. Our system is significantly more accurate and robust than previously published techniques (1~5% localization error) over long-distance navigation both indoors and outdoors. Real world experiments on a human worn system show that the location can be estimated within 1 meter over 500 meters (around 0.1% localization error averagely) without the use of GPS information.

  3. Quality-Aware Estimation of Facial Landmarks in Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    for facial landmark detection. If the face quality is low the proposed system corrects the facial landmarks that are detected by SDM. Depending upon the face velocity in consecutive video frames and face quality measure, two algorithms are proposed for correction of landmarks in low quality faces by using......Face alignment in video is a primitive step for facial image analysis. The accuracy of the alignment greatly depends on the quality of the face image in the video frames and low quality faces are proven to cause erroneous alignment. Thus, this paper proposes a system for quality aware face...... alignment by using a Supervised Decent Method (SDM) along with a motion based forward extrapolation method. The proposed system first extracts faces from video frames. Then, it employs a face quality assessment technique to measure the face quality. If the face quality is high, the proposed system uses SDM...

  4. Spatial Language and Children’s Spatial Landmark Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber A. Ankowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined how spatial language affected search behavior in a landmark spatial search task. In Experiment 1, two- to six-year-old children were trained to find a toy in the center of a square array of four identical landmarks. Children heard one of three spatial language cues once during the initial training trial (“here,” “in the middle,” “next to this one”. After search performance reached criterion, children received a probe test trial in which the landmark array was expanded. In Experiment 2, two- to four-year-old children participated in the search task and also completed a language comprehension task. Results revealed that children’s spatial language comprehension scores and spatial language cues heard during training trials were related to children’s performance in the search task.

  5. Robust facial landmark detection based on initializing multiple poses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For robot systems, robust facial landmark detection is the first and critical step for face-based human identification and facial expression recognition. In recent years, the cascaded-regression-based method has achieved excellent performance in facial landmark detection. Nevertheless, it still has certain weakness, such as high sensitivity to the initialization. To address this problem, regression based on multiple initializations is established in a unified model; face shapes are then estimated independently according to these initializations. With a ranking strategy, the best estimate is selected as the final output. Moreover, a face shape model based on restricted Boltzmann machines is built as a constraint to improve the robustness of ranking. Experiments on three challenging datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed facial landmark detection method against state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Does spatial locative comprehension predict landmark-based navigation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Piccardi

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the role of spatial locative comprehension in learning and retrieving pathways when landmarks were available and when they were absent in a sample of typically developing 6- to 11-year-old children. Our results show that the more proficient children are in understanding spatial locatives the more they are able to learn pathways, retrieve them after a delay and represent them on a map when landmarks are present in the environment. These findings suggest that spatial language is crucial when individuals rely on sequences of landmarks to drive their navigation towards a given goal but that it is not involved when navigational representations based on the geometrical shape of the environment or the coding of body movements are sufficient for memorizing and recalling short pathways.

  7. Does spatial locative comprehension predict landmark-based navigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Bocchi, Alessia; Guariglia, Cecilia; D'Amico, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the role of spatial locative comprehension in learning and retrieving pathways when landmarks were available and when they were absent in a sample of typically developing 6- to 11-year-old children. Our results show that the more proficient children are in understanding spatial locatives the more they are able to learn pathways, retrieve them after a delay and represent them on a map when landmarks are present in the environment. These findings suggest that spatial language is crucial when individuals rely on sequences of landmarks to drive their navigation towards a given goal but that it is not involved when navigational representations based on the geometrical shape of the environment or the coding of body movements are sufficient for memorizing and recalling short pathways.

  8. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  9. MICROSURGICAL LANDMARKS IN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Quillo-Olvera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsurgical landmarks of the facet joint complex were defined to provide guidance and security within the tubular retractor during transforaminal surgery. A retrospective observational study was performed in segments L4-L5 by the left side approach. Microsurgical relevant photos, anatomical models and drawing were used to expose the suggested landmarks. The MI-TLIF technique has advantages compared with conventional open TLIF technique, however minimally invasive technique implies lack of security for the surgeon due to the lack of defined microanatomical landmarks compared to open spine surgery, and disorientation within the tubular retractor, the reason why to have precise microsurgical references and its recognition within the surgical field provide speed and safety when performing minimally invasive technique.

  10. Registration now open for landmark CERN conference

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Journalist registration is now available for the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference, to be held at CERN on 8-9 December....RSIS will explore future contributions of science to the information society based on past and present practice (1 page).

  11. Pupil size reflects the focus of feature-based attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, Paola; Pereverzeva, Maria; Murray, Scott O

    2014-12-15

    We measured pupil size in adult human subjects while they selectively attended to one of two surfaces, bright and dark, defined by coherently moving dots. The two surfaces were presented at the same location; therefore, subjects could select the cued surface only on the basis of its features. With no luminance change in the stimulus, we find that pupil size was smaller when the bright surface was attended and larger when the dark surface was attended: an effect of feature-based (or surface-based) attention. With the same surfaces at nonoverlapping locations, we find a similar effect of spatial attention. The pupil size modulation cannot be accounted for by differences in eye position and by other variables known to affect pupil size such as task difficulty, accommodation, or the mere anticipation (imagery) of bright/dark stimuli. We conclude that pupil size reflects not just luminance or cognitive state, but the interaction between the two: it reflects which luminance level in the visual scene is relevant for the task at hand.

  12. Validation of Underwater Sensor Package Using Feature Based SLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Cain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vehicles working in new, unexplored environments must be able to locate themselves in the environment while constructing a picture of the objects in the environment that could act as obstacles that would prevent the vehicles from completing their desired tasks. In enclosed environments, underwater range sensors based off of acoustics suffer performance issues due to reflections. Additionally, their relatively high cost make them less than ideal for usage on low cost vehicles designed to be used underwater. In this paper we propose a sensor package composed of a downward facing camera, which is used to perform feature tracking based visual odometry, and a custom vision-based two dimensional rangefinder that can be used on low cost underwater unmanned vehicles. In order to examine the performance of this sensor package in a SLAM framework, experimental tests are performed using an unmanned ground vehicle and two feature based SLAM algorithms, the extended Kalman filter based approach and the Rao-Blackwellized, particle filter based approach, to validate the sensor package.

  13. Image Recommendation Algorithm Using Feature-Based Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Hwan

    As the multimedia contents market continues its rapid expansion, the amount of image contents used in mobile phone services, digital libraries, and catalog service is increasing remarkably. In spite of this rapid growth, users experience high levels of frustration when searching for the desired image. Even though new images are profitable to the service providers, traditional collaborative filtering methods cannot recommend them. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose feature-based collaborative filtering (FBCF) method to reflect the user's most recent preference by representing his purchase sequence in the visual feature space. The proposed approach represents the images that have been purchased in the past as the feature clusters in the multi-dimensional feature space and then selects neighbors by using an inter-cluster distance function between their feature clusters. Various experiments using real image data demonstrate that the proposed approach provides a higher quality recommendation and better performance than do typical collaborative filtering and content-based filtering techniques.

  14. Convolutional neural network features based change detection in satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed El Amin, Arabi; Liu, Qingjie; Wang, Yunhong

    2016-07-01

    With the popular use of high resolution remote sensing (HRRS) satellite images, a huge research efforts have been placed on change detection (CD) problem. An effective feature selection method can significantly boost the final result. While hand-designed features have proven difficulties to design features that effectively capture high and mid-level representations, the recent developments in machine learning (Deep Learning) omit this problem by learning hierarchical representation in an unsupervised manner directly from data without human intervention. In this letter, we propose approaching the change detection problem from a feature learning perspective. A novel deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) features based HR satellite images change detection method is proposed. The main guideline is to produce a change detection map directly from two images using a pretrained CNN. This method can omit the limited performance of hand-crafted features. Firstly, CNN features are extracted through different convolutional layers. Then, a concatenation step is evaluated after an normalization step, resulting in a unique higher dimensional feature map. Finally, a change map was computed using pixel-wise Euclidean distance. Our method has been validated on real bitemporal HRRS satellite images according to qualitative and quantitative analyses. The results obtained confirm the interest of the proposed method.

  15. Validation of Underwater Sensor Package Using Feature Based SLAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Christopher; Leonessa, Alexander

    2016-03-17

    Robotic vehicles working in new, unexplored environments must be able to locate themselves in the environment while constructing a picture of the objects in the environment that could act as obstacles that would prevent the vehicles from completing their desired tasks. In enclosed environments, underwater range sensors based off of acoustics suffer performance issues due to reflections. Additionally, their relatively high cost make them less than ideal for usage on low cost vehicles designed to be used underwater. In this paper we propose a sensor package composed of a downward facing camera, which is used to perform feature tracking based visual odometry, and a custom vision-based two dimensional rangefinder that can be used on low cost underwater unmanned vehicles. In order to examine the performance of this sensor package in a SLAM framework, experimental tests are performed using an unmanned ground vehicle and two feature based SLAM algorithms, the extended Kalman filter based approach and the Rao-Blackwellized, particle filter based approach, to validate the sensor package.

  16. Overshadowing in landmark learning: touch-screen studies with pigeons and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetch, M L

    1995-04-01

    Overshadowing in landmark learning was studied in pigeons and undergraduates using a touch-screen spatial search task. Ss searched for an unmarked goal presented in varied locations on a computer screen. Graphic stimuli served as landmarks. The effect of the presence of other landmarks on the control acquired by a given landmark was assessed using a design in which each S was trained with 2 sets of landmarks. Both pigeons (Experiment 1) and humans (Experiments 2-4) showed evidence of learning more about a landmark that was the closest landmark of its set to the goal than about a landmark that was of equal distance to the goal but was not the closest landmark of its set. That is, control by a landmark was overshadowed when it occurred together with a landmark that was closer to the goal. Landmark effectiveness appears to depend not only on the absolute properties of a landmark but on relative factors. The relevance of basic principles of associative learning to spatial landmark learning is discussed.

  17. The centroid paradigm: Quantifying feature-based attention in terms of attention filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Chubb, Charles; Wright, Charles E; Sperling, George

    2016-02-01

    This paper elaborates a recent conceptualization of feature-based attention in terms of attention filters (Drew et al., Journal of Vision, 10(10:20), 1-16, 2010) into a general purpose centroid-estimation paradigm for studying feature-based attention. An attention filter is a brain process, initiated by a participant in the context of a task requiring feature-based attention, which operates broadly across space to modulate the relative effectiveness with which different features in the retinal input influence performance. This paper describes an empirical method for quantitatively measuring attention filters. The method uses a "statistical summary representation" (SSR) task in which the participant strives to mouse-click the centroid of a briefly flashed cloud composed of items of different types (e.g., dots of different luminances or sizes), weighting some types of items more strongly than others. In different attention conditions, the target weights for different item types in the centroid task are varied. The actual weights exerted on the participant's responses by different item types in any given attention condition are derived by simple linear regression. Because, on each trial, the centroid paradigm obtains information about the relative effectiveness of all the features in the display, both target and distractor features, and because the participant's response is a continuous variable in each of two dimensions (versus a simple binary choice as in most previous paradigms), it is remarkably powerful. The number of trials required to estimate an attention filter is an order of magnitude fewer than the number required to investigate much simpler concepts in typical psychophysical attention paradigms.

  18. Dona Ana County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  19. McKinley County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  20. Rio Arriba County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  1. Los Alamos County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  2. Rio Arriba County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  3. San Miguel County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  4. De Baca County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  5. McKinley County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  6. San Juan County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  7. Los Alamos County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  8. San Juan County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  9. Santa Fe County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  10. A feature-based inference model of numerical estimation: the split-seed effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kyle B; Brown, Norman R

    2009-07-01

    Prior research has identified two modes of quantitative estimation: numerical retrieval and ordinal conversion. In this paper we introduce a third mode, which operates by a feature-based inference process. In contrast to prior research, the results of three experiments demonstrate that people estimate automobile prices by combining metric information associated with two critical features: product class and brand status. In addition, Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that when participants are seeded with the actual current base price of one of the to-be-estimated vehicles, they respond by revising the general metric and splitting the information carried by the seed between the two critical features. As a result, the degree of post-seeding revision is directly related to the number of these features that the seed and the transfer items have in common. The paper concludes with a general discussion of the practical and theoretical implications of our findings.

  11. DIMENSION VARIATION OF FEATURE-BASED MODEL BY OPERATING DIRECTLY ON B-REP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A new algorithm for dimension variation of feature-based models is developed.The algorithm is based on B-Rep/CSG hybrid scheme and operates directly on B-Rep.Product information (including the features locating dimensions and other data for manufacture) will not lose after model variation and modification.Furthermore, the definition and solution of features constraints are also supported.The scheme of directly operating on B-Rep overcomes many drawbacks of other proposed methods, most of which need to redo all of the previous work to implement dimension variation, so the computational cost is expensive and product information will lose.What is presented in this paper makes a new way in the area of parametric design.

  12. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronk Quentin CB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated setup in which the leaf must remain fixed and under tension. Furthermore, the resolution is limited to that of the natural landmarks, which are often difficult to find, particularly in young leaves. To study the fine scale expansion dynamics of the leaf lamina using artificial landmarks it is necessary to place small, noninvasive marks on a leaf surface and then recover the location of those marks after a period of time. Results To monitor leaf expansion in two dimensions, at very fine scales, we used a custom designed inkjet micropatterning system to print a grid composed of c. 0.19 mm2 cells on small developing leaves of ivy (Hedera helix using 40 μm dots at a spacing of c. 91 μm. The leaves in different growing stages were imaged under magnification to extract the coordinates of the marks which were then used in subsequent computer-assisted leaf expansion analyses. As an example we obtained quantified global and local expansion information and created expansion maps over the entire leaf surface. The results reveal a striking pattern of fine-scale expansion differences over short periods of time. In these experiments, the base of the leaf is a "cold spot" for expansion, while the leaf sinuses are "hot spots" for expansion. We have also measured a strong shading effect on leaf expansion. We discuss the features required to build an inkjet printing apparatus optimized for use in plant science, which will further maximize the range of tissues that can be

  13. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  14. Identifying landmark articles for advancing the practice of geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Camille P; Fowler, Rachel; Goodman, Richard A; Graves, Taylor R; Flacker, Jonathan M; Johnson, Theodore M

    2014-11-01

    Landmark articles from the peer-reviewed literature can be used to teach the fundamental principles of geriatric medicine. Three approaches were used in sequential combination to identify landmark articles as a resource for geriatricians and other healthcare practitioners. Candidate articles were identified first through a literature review and expert opinion survey of geriatric medicine faculty. Candidate articles in a winnowed list (n = 30) were then included in a bibliometric analysis that incorporated the journal impact factor and average monthly citation index. Finally, a consensus panel reviewed articles to assess each manuscript's clinical relevance. For each article, a final score was determined by averaging, with equal weight, the opinion survey, bibliometric analysis, and consensus panel review. This process ultimately resulted in the identification of 27 landmark articles. Overall, there was weak correlation between articles that the expert opinion survey and bibliometric analysis both rated highly. This process demonstrates a feasible method combining subjective and objective measures that can be used to identify landmark papers in geriatric medicine for the enhancement of geriatrics education and practice. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Career Landmarks in Science: Individual Differences and Interdisciplinary Contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    1991-01-01

    Examined the location of the first, best, and last contributions of creative careers. Hypotheses specified the ways in which these landmarks should vary according to individual differences and interdisciplinary contrasts. Hypotheses were confirmed for scientists and inventors. Results lead to further theoretical constraints, new predictions, and…

  16. Using Desktop Virtual Environments To Investigate the Role of Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Osmann, Petra

    2002-01-01

    Discusses research in spatial cognition that uses computer-simulated three dimensional environments and evaluates the use of virtual desktop environments by replicating an experiment which was formerly done in a laboratory or real world setting. Investigates the role of landmarks when acquiring route knowledge in a system of paths. (Author/LRW)

  17. Recreation in the United States. National Historic Landmark Theme Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleton, James H.

    This report examines a number of outstanding and illustrative examples of a broad range of properties representing recreational activities that suggest themselves for possible National Historic Landmark recognition. The properties described in the study have been selected to represent places and activities that have had a major impact on American…

  18. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shona E; Darling, Gail E

    2011-05-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of a thoracic surgeon's armamentarium to assist with the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of thoracic pathology. As reviewed in this article, the surface landmarks of the lungs, heart, great vessels, and mediastinum are critical for appropriate patient care and should be learned in conjunction with classic anatomy.

  19. Landmark Finding Algorithms for Indoor Autonomous Mobile Robot Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tóth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is oriented to ways of computer vision algorithms for mobile robot localization in internal and external agricultural environment. The main aim of this work was to design, create, verify and evaluate speed and functionality of computer vision localization algorithm. An input colour camera data and depth data were captured by MS® Kinect sensor that was mounted on 6-wheel-drive mobile robot chassis. The design of the localization algorithm was focused to the most significant blobs and points (landmarks on the colour picture. Actual coordinates of autonomous mobile robot were calculated out from measured distances (depth sensor and calculated angles (RGB camera with respect to landmark points. Time measurement script was used to compare the speed of landmark finding algorithm for localization in case of one and more landmarks on picture. The main source code was written in MS Visual studio C# programming language with Microsoft.Kinect.1.7.dll on Windows based PC. Algorithms described in this article were created for a future development of an autonomous agronomical m obile robot localization and control.

  20. Learning-based landmarks detection for osteoporosis analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Erkang; Zhu, Ling; Yang, Jie; Azhari, Azhari; Sitam, Suhardjo; Liang, Xin; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Ling, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the common cause for a broken bone among senior citizens. Early diagnosis of osteoporosis requires routine examination which may be costly for patients. A potential low cost diagnosis is to identify a senior citizen at high risk of osteoporosis by pre-screening during routine dental examination. Therefore, osteoporosis analysis using dental radiographs severs as a key step in routine dental examination. The aim of this study is to localize landmarks in dental radiographs which are helpful to assess the evidence of osteoporosis. We collect eight landmarks which are critical in osteoporosis analysis. Our goal is to localize these landmarks automatically for a given dental radiographic image. To address the challenges such as large variations of appearances in subjects, in this paper, we formulate the task into a multi-class classification problem. A hybrid feature pool is used to represent these landmarks. For the discriminative classification problem, we use a random forest to fuse the hybrid feature representation. In the experiments, we also evaluate the performances of individual feature component and the hybrid fused feature. Our proposed method achieves average detection error of 2:9mm.

  1. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  2. An Adaptive Algorithm for Finding Frequent Sets in Landmark Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Ong, Kok-Leong; Lee, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a CPU constrained environment for finding approximation of frequent sets in data streams using the landmark window. Our algorithm can detect overload situations, i.e., breaching the CPU capacity, and sheds data in the stream to “keep up”. This is done within a controlled error thresho...

  3. LANDMARK MATCHING ON THE SPHERE USING DISTANCE FUNCTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporé, Natasha; Leow, Alex; Thompson, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Nonlinear registration of 3D surfaces is important in many medical imaging applications, including the mapping of longitudinal changes in anatomy, or of multi-subject functional MRI data to a canonical surface for comparison and integration. To register 3D surfaces, such as the cortical surface of the brain, one approach is to transform them first to planar or spherical objects. Internal landmarks can then be matched on these simpler parameter domains. Here we study the diffeomorphic matching of landmarks on the sphere. Our method builds on the level set technique of Leow et al. [1] for the plane. Both forward and backward matching terms are included, thus ensuring the invertibility of the representation. We demonstrate our technique on a pair of lines on the sphere. The overall approach improves on earlier work in cortical matching by allowing the matching energy to be relaxed along sulcal landmarks, minimizing distortion, and also enables point and curve landmarks to be aligned in the same general framework as densely-defined scalar fields, such as curvature or cortical thickness maps.

  4. Adaptive Landmark-Based Navigation System Using Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidan, Bassel; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    The goal-directed navigational ability of animals is an essential prerequisite for them to survive. They can learn to navigate to a distal goal in a complex environment. During this long-distance navigation, they exploit environmental features, like landmarks, to guide them towards their goal...

  5. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the

  6. Landmark recognition using motion-derived scene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A.

    1991-05-01

    One of the most important tasks in computational vision is to determine the structure of a scene in terms of its three dimensional objects and their spatial relationships. Functions such as landmark recognition, scene analysis, context based target recognition, digital map to scene correlation, and motion path planning all depend on accurate determination of the three dimensional description of the scene. In this paper we investigate a technique for determining structure of a scene from motion, based on the analysis of planes that "slice" a spatio-temporal volume. This technique uses a sequence of two dimensional images and generates a set of lines (epipolar-planar lines) corresponding to the planar surfaces in the scene. This technique was then applied to a variety of simulated scenes, sensor position and sensor speeds and the feasibility of the technique was established. For the reacquisition of landmarks we used the outputs of the epipolar-planar lines and performed a matching between the stored landmarks and the observed scene in a joint two dimensional Hough transform domain. This method was shown to be robust and fast in deciding whether a landmark is reobserved by the sensor. The result of this approach have significance in many fields such as scene analysis, autonomous navigation and target tracking.

  7. 36 CFR 62.8 - Natural landmark designation removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the site did not meet the criteria for national significance at the time of designation; (ii) When the... whether the NPS considers the documentation sufficient to consider removal of the natural landmark... submits a recommendation for removal to the National Park System Advisory Board. The Advisory...

  8. Audiovisual navigation in virtual mazes : The benefits of audiovisual landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, Peter; Philippi, Tom; van Erp, J.B.F.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that multisensory presentation can improve perception, attention, and object memory compared with unisensory presentation. Consequently, we expect that multisensory presentation of landmarks can improve spatial memory and navigation. In this study we tested the effect of visual,

  9. Navigating virtual mazes : The benefits of audiovisual landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Philippi, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that multisensory presentation can improve perception, attention, and object memory compared with unisensory presentation. Consequently, we expect that multisensory presentation of landmarks can improve spatial memory and navigation. In this study we tested the effect of visual,

  10. The Role of Alpha Activity in Spatial and Feature-Based Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Modulations in alpha oscillations (∼10 Hz) are typically studied in the context of anticipating upcoming stimuli. Alpha power decreases in sensory regions processing upcoming targets compared to regions processing distracting input, thereby likely facilitating processing of relevant information while suppressing irrelevant. In this electroencephalography study using healthy human volunteers, we examined whether modulations in alpha power also occur after the onset of a bilaterally presented target and distractor. Spatial attention was manipulated through spatial cues and feature-based attention through adjusting the color-similarity of distractors to the target. Consistent with previous studies, we found that informative spatial cues induced a relative decrease of pretarget alpha power at occipital electrodes contralateral to the expected target location. Interestingly, this pattern reemerged relatively late (300–750 ms) after stimulus onset, suggesting that lateralized alpha reflects not only preparatory attention, but also ongoing attentive stimulus processing. Uninformative cues (i.e., conveying no information about the spatial location of the target) resulted in an interaction between spatial attention and feature-based attention in post-target alpha lateralization. When the target was paired with a low-similarity distractor, post-target alpha was lateralized (500–900 ms). Crucially, the lateralization was absent when target selection was ambiguous because the distractor was highly similar to the target. Instead, during this condition, midfrontal theta was increased, indicative of reactive conflict resolution. Behaviorally, the degree of alpha lateralization was negatively correlated with the reaction time distraction cost induced by target–distractor similarity. These results suggest a pivotal role for poststimulus alpha lateralization in protecting sensory processing of target information. PMID:27822505

  11. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Eason, Perri K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders.

  12. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zichun; Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun; Mao, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes.

  13. A Robust Linear Feature-Based Procedure for Automated Registration of Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Poreba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the variety of measurement techniques available on the market today, fusing multi-source complementary information into one dataset is a matter of great interest. Target-based, point-based and feature-based methods are some of the approaches used to place data in a common reference frame by estimating its corresponding transformation parameters. This paper proposes a new linear feature-based method to perform accurate registration of point clouds, either in 2D or 3D. A two-step fast algorithm called Robust Line Matching and Registration (RLMR, which combines coarse and fine registration, was developed. The initial estimate is found from a triplet of conjugate line pairs, selected by a RANSAC algorithm. Then, this transformation is refined using an iterative optimization algorithm. Conjugates of linear features are identified with respect to a similarity metric representing a line-to-line distance. The efficiency and robustness to noise of the proposed method are evaluated and discussed. The algorithm is valid and ensures valuable results when pre-aligned point clouds with the same scale are used. The studies show that the matching accuracy is at least 99.5%. The transformation parameters are also estimated correctly. The error in rotation is better than 2.8% full scale, while the translation error is less than 12.7%.

  14. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zichun Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes.

  15. Change Detection in Uav Video Mosaics Combining a Feature Based Approach and Extended Image Differencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Günter; Krüger, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Change detection is an important task when using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for video surveillance. We address changes of short time scale using observations in time distances of a few hours. Each observation (previous and current) is a short video sequence acquired by UAV in near-Nadir view. Relevant changes are, e.g., recently parked or moved vehicles. Examples for non-relevant changes are parallaxes caused by 3D structures of the scene, shadow and illumination changes, and compression or transmission artifacts. In this paper we present (1) a new feature based approach to change detection, (2) a combination with extended image differencing (Saur et al., 2014), and (3) the application to video sequences using temporal filtering. In the feature based approach, information about local image features, e.g., corners, is extracted in both images. The label "new object" is generated at image points, where features occur in the current image and no or weaker features are present in the previous image. The label "vanished object" corresponds to missing or weaker features in the current image and present features in the previous image. This leads to two "directed" change masks and differs from image differencing where only one "undirected" change mask is extracted which combines both label types to the single label "changed object". The combination of both algorithms is performed by merging the change masks of both approaches. A color mask showing the different contributions is used for visual inspection by a human image interpreter.

  16. A robust linear feature-based procedure for automated registration of point clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Martyna; Goulette, François

    2015-01-14

    With the variety of measurement techniques available on the market today, fusing multi-source complementary information into one dataset is a matter of great interest. Target-based, point-based and feature-based methods are some of the approaches used to place data in a common reference frame by estimating its corresponding transformation parameters. This paper proposes a new linear feature-based method to perform accurate registration of point clouds, either in 2D or 3D. A two-step fast algorithm called Robust Line Matching and Registration (RLMR), which combines coarse and fine registration, was developed. The initial estimate is found from a triplet of conjugate line pairs, selected by a RANSAC algorithm. Then, this transformation is refined using an iterative optimization algorithm. Conjugates of linear features are identified with respect to a similarity metric representing a line-to-line distance. The efficiency and robustness to noise of the proposed method are evaluated and discussed. The algorithm is valid and ensures valuable results when pre-aligned point clouds with the same scale are used. The studies show that the matching accuracy is at least 99.5%. The transformation parameters are also estimated correctly. The error in rotation is better than 2.8% full scale, while the translation error is less than 12.7%.

  17. Cephalometric landmark variability among orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim this study was to compare the accuracy of orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists in identifying 17 commonly used cephalometric landmarks, and to determine the extent of variability associated with each of those landmarks. Materials and Methods Twenty digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated by two groups of dental specialists, and 17 cephalometric landmarks were identified. The x and y coordinates of each landmark were recorded. The mean value for ea...

  18. Cephalometric landmark variability among orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durao, Ana Paula Reis; Ferreira, Afonso P. [Dept.of Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Morosolli, Aline [Dept.of Surgery, Dentistry School, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pittayapat, Pisha [Dept.of Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Bolstad, Napat [Dept.of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso (Norway); Jacobs, Reinhilde [Dept.of Oral Imaging Center, OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Dept. of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The aim this study was to compare the accuracy of orthodontists and dentomaxillofacial radiologists in identifying 17 commonly used cephalometric landmarks, and to determine the extent of variability associated with each of those landmarks. Twenty digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated by two groups of dental specialists, and 17 cephalometric landmarks were identified. The x and y coordinates of each landmark were recorded. The mean value for each landmark was considered the best estimate and used as the standard. Variation in measurements of the distance between landmarks and measurements of the angles associated with certain landmarks was also assessed by a subset of two observers, and intraobserver and interobserver agreement were evaluated. Intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent for intraobserver agreement, but only good for interobserver agreement. The least reliable landmark for orthodontists was the gnathion (Gn) point (standard deviation [SD], 5.92 mm), while the orbitale (Or) was the least reliable landmark (SD, 4.41 mm) for dentomaxillofacial radiologists. Furthermore, the condylion (Co)-Gn plane was the least consistent (SD, 4.43 mm). We established that some landmarks were not as reproducible as others, both horizontally and vertically. The most consistently identified landmark in both groups was the lower incisor border, while the least reliable points were Co, Gn, Or, and the anterior nasal spine. Overall, a lower level of reproducibility in the identification of cephalometric landmarks was observed among orthodontists.

  19. Combining Trigram-based and Feature-based Methods for Context-Sensitive Spelling Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, A R; Golding, Andrew R.; Schabes, Yves

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of correcting spelling errors that result in valid, though unintended words (such as ``peace'' and ``piece'', or ``quiet'' and ``quite'') and also the problem of correcting particular word usage errors (such as ``amount'' and ``number'', or ``among'' and ``between''). Such corrections require contextual information and are not handled by conventional spelling programs such as Unix `spell'. First, we introduce a method called Trigrams that uses part-of-speech trigrams to encode the context. This method uses a small number of parameters compared to previous methods based on word trigrams. However, it is effectively unable to distinguish among words that have the same part of speech. For this case, an alternative feature-based method called Bayes performs better; but Bayes is less effective than Trigrams when the distinction among words depends on syntactic constraints. A hybrid method called Tribayes is then introduced that combines the best of the previous two methods. The impr...

  20. Feature-based fusion of infrared and visible dynamic images using target detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congyi Liu; Zhongliang Jing; Gang Xiao; Bo Yang

    2007-01-01

    We employ the target detection to improve the performance of the feature-based fusion of infrared and visible dynamic images, which forms a novel fusion scheme. First, the target detection is used to segment the source image sequences into target and background regions. Then, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) is proposed to decompose all the source image sequences. Different fusion rules are applied respectively in target and background regions to preserve the target information as much as possible. Real world infrared and visible image sequences are used to validate the performance of the proposed novel scheme. Compared with the previous fusion approaches of image sequences, the improvements of shift invariance, temporal stability and consistency, and computation cost are all ensured.

  1. Line-feature-based SLAM Algorithm%一种基于线特征的SLAM算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩锐; 李文锋

    2006-01-01

    A line-feature based SLAM algorithm is presented in this paper to resolve the conflict between the requirements of computational complexity and information-richness within the pointfeature based SLAM algorithm, All operations required for building and maintaining the map, such as model-setting, data association, and state-updating, are described and formulated. This approach has been programmed and successfully tested in the simulation work, and results are shown at the end of this paper.

  2. Sacro-Iliac Joint Sensory Block and Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment of Bony Landmarks Relevant for Image-Guided Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shannon L.; Burnham, Robert S.; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided sensory block and radiofrequency ablation of the nerves innervating the sacro-iliac joint require readily identifiable bony landmarks for accurate needle/electrode placement. Understanding the relative locations of the transverse sacral tubercles along the lateral sacral crest is important for ultrasound guidance, as they demarcate the position of the posterior sacral network (S1–S3 ± L5/S4) innervating the posterior sacro-iliac joint. No studies were found that investigated the spatial relationships of these bony landmarks. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the interrelationships of the transverse sacral tubercles and posterior sacral foramina to inform image-guided block and radiofrequency ablation of the sacro-iliac joint. The posterior and lateral surfaces of 30 dry sacra (15 M/15 F) were digitized and modeled in 3D and the distances between bony landmarks quantified. The relationships of bony landmarks (S1–S4) were not uniform. The mean intertubercular and interforaminal distances decreased from S1 to S4, whereas the distance from the lateral margin of the posterior sacral foramina to the transverse sacral tubercles increased from S1 to S3. The mean intertubercular distance from S1 to S3 was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in males. The interrelationships of the sacral bony landmarks should be taken into consideration when estimating the site and length of an image-guided strip lesion targeting the posterior sacral network. PMID:27747222

  3. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, V; Gu, X; Chen, S; Jiang, L; Liu, H; Chiu, T; Yordy, J; Nedzi, L; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032.

  4. [Inferring landmark displacements from changes in cephalometric angles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Baumrind, S

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the appropriateness of using changes in angular measurements to reflect the actually profile changes. The sample consists of 48 growing malocclusion patients, contained 24 Class I and 24 Class II subjects, treated by an experienced orthodontist using Edgewise technique. Landmark and superimpositional data were extracted from the previously prepared numerical database. Three pairs of angular and linear measures were computed by the Craniofacial Software Package. Although the associations between all three angular measures and their corresponding linear measures are statistically significant at the 0.001 level, the disagreement between these three pairs of measures are 10.4%, 22.9% and 37.5% respectively in this sample. The direction of displacement of anterior facial landmarks during growth and treatment cannot reliably be inferred merely from changes in cephalometric Angles.

  5. Uav Visual Autolocalizaton Based on Automatic Landmark Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Filho, P.; Shiguemori, E. H.; Saotome, O.

    2017-08-01

    Deploying an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle in GPS-denied areas is a highly discussed problem in the scientific community. There are several approaches being developed, but the main strategies yet considered are computer vision based navigation systems. This work presents a new real-time computer-vision position estimator for UAV navigation. The estimator uses images captured during flight to recognize specific, well-known, landmarks in order to estimate the latitude and longitude of the aircraft. The method was tested in a simulated environment, using a dataset of real aerial images obtained in previous flights, with synchronized images, GPS and IMU data. The estimated position in each landmark recognition was compatible with the GPS data, stating that the developed method can be used as an alternative navigation system.

  6. [Lymphoscintigrams with anatomical landmarks obtained with vector graphics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Antonica, Filippo; Renna, Maria Antonia; Ferrari, Cristina; Iuele, Francesca; Stabile Ianora, Antonio Amato; Losco, Matteo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear medicine images are difficult to interpret because they do not include anatomical details. The aim of this study was to obtain lymphoscintigrams with anatomical landmarks that could be easily interpreted by General Physicians. Traditional lymphoscintigrams were processed with Adobe© Photoshop® CS6 and converted into vector images created by Illustrator®. The combination with a silhouette vector improved image interpretation, without resulting in longer radiation exposure or acquisition times.

  7. The reliability of tablet computers in depicting maxillofacial radiographic landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the reliability of the identification of anatomical landmarks in panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs on a standard medical grade picture archiving communication system (PACS) monitor and a tablet computer (iPad 5). Materials and Methods A total of 1000 radiographs, including 500 panoramic and 500 lateral cephalometric radiographs, were retrieved from the de-identified dataset of the archive of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radio...

  8. "Direct DICOM Slice Landmarking" A Novel Research Technique to Quantify Skeletal Changes in Orthognathic Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Almukhtar

    Full Text Available The limitations of the current methods of quantifying the surgical movements of facial bones inspired this study. The aim of this study was the assessment of the accuracy and reproducibility of directly landmarking of 3D DICOM images (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine to quantify the changes in the jaw bones following surgery. The study was carried out on plastic skull to simulate the surgical movements of the jaw bones. Cone beam CT scans were taken at 3mm, 6mm, and 9mm maxillary advancement; together with a 2mm, 4mm, 6mm and 8mm "down graft" which in total generated 12 different positions of the maxilla for the analysis. The movements of the maxilla were calculated using two methods, the standard approach where distances between surface landmarks on the jaw bones were measured and the novel approach where measurements were taken directly from the internal structures of the corresponding 3D DICOME slices. A one sample t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two methods of measurements for the y and z directions, however, the x direction showed a significant difference. The mean difference between the two absolute measurements were 0.34±0.20mm, 0.22±0.16mm, 0.18±0.13mm in the y, z and x directions respectively. In conclusion, the direct landmarking of 3D DICOM image slices is a reliable, reproducible and informative method for assessment of the 3D skeletal changes. The method has a clear clinical application which includes the analysis of the jaw movements "orthognathic surgery" for the correction of facial deformities.

  9. Surgical landmarks of the ureter in the cadaveric female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, P A; Brody, S P; Garely, A D; Elkins, T E; Nolan, T E; Gasser, R F

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to delineate the course of the ureter in the female pelvis in relationship to several important surgical landmarks. Ten female cadavers with undissected pelves were used. The ureter was identified at the pelvic brim and traced inferiorly to the bladder. Sets of measurements (+/- 0.1 cm) that help define the location of the ureter were obtained at the three landmarks; the ischial spine, the obturator canal and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone. The mean distances from the ureter to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 1.6 +/- 0.1 cm. The mean distances from the arcus tendineus to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 1.9 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 2.8 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm. This study defines the relationship of the ureter to the pelvic floor through measurements taken at three landmarks. The data should be useful to pelvic surgeons and are important for the development of future surgical techniques.

  10. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF RETINAL VASCULAR LANDMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper is introducing a method to distinguish between different landmarks of the retina: bifurcations and crossings. The methodology may help in differentiating between arteries and veins and is useful in identifying diseases and other special pathologies, too. The method does not need any special skills, thus it can be assimilated to an automatic way for pinpointing landmarks; moreover it gives good responses for very small vessels. A skeletonized representation, taken out from the segmented binary image (obtained through a preprocessing step, is used to identify pixels with three or more neighbors. Then, the junction points are classified into bifurcations or crossovers depending on their geometrical and topological properties such as width, direction and connectivity of the surrounding segments. The proposed approach is applied to the public-domain DRIVE and STARE datasets and compared with the state-of-the-art methods using proper validation parameters. The method was successful in identifying the majority of the landmarks; the average correctly identified bifurcations in both DRIVE and STARE datasets for the recall and precision values are: 95.4% and 87.1% respectively; also for the crossovers, the recall and precision values are: 87.6% and 90.5% respectively; thus outperforming other studies.

  11. Locating landmarks on high-dimensional free energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Yu, Tang-Qing; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2015-03-17

    Coarse graining of complex systems possessing many degrees of freedom can often be a useful approach for analyzing and understanding key features of these systems in terms of just a few variables. The relevant energy landscape in a coarse-grained description is the free energy surface as a function of the coarse-grained variables, which, despite the dimensional reduction, can still be an object of high dimension. Consequently, navigating and exploring this high-dimensional free energy surface is a nontrivial task. In this paper, we use techniques from multiscale modeling, stochastic optimization, and machine learning to devise a strategy for locating minima and saddle points (termed "landmarks") on a high-dimensional free energy surface "on the fly" and without requiring prior knowledge of or an explicit form for the surface. In addition, we propose a compact graph representation of the landmarks and connections between them, and we show that the graph nodes can be subsequently analyzed and clustered based on key attributes that elucidate important properties of the system. Finally, we show that knowledge of landmark locations allows for the efficient determination of their relative free energies via enhanced sampling techniques.

  12. Landmarks or panoramas: what do navigating ants attend to for guidance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnon Guy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects are known to rely on terrestrial landmarks for navigation. Landmarks are used to chart a route or pinpoint a goal. The distant panorama, however, is often thought not to guide navigation directly during a familiar journey, but to act as a contextual cue that primes the correct memory of the landmarks. Results We provided Melophorus bagoti ants with a huge artificial landmark located right near the nest entrance to find out whether navigating ants focus on such a prominent visual landmark for homing guidance. When the landmark was displaced by small or large distances, ant routes were affected differently. Certain behaviours appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that guidance was based on the landmark only. Instead, comparisons of panoramic images recorded on the field, encompassing both landmark and distal panorama, could explain most aspects of the ant behaviours. Conclusion Ants navigating along a familiar route do not focus on obvious landmarks or filter out distal panoramic cues, but appear to be guided by cues covering a large area of their panoramic visual field, including both landmarks and distal panorama. Using panoramic views seems an appropriate strategy to cope with the complexity of natural scenes and the poor resolution of insects' eyes. The ability to isolate landmarks from the rest of a scene may be beyond the capacity of animals that do not possess a dedicated object-perception visual stream like primates.

  13. Collaborative Filtering Fusing Label Features Based on SDAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huo, Huan; Liu, Xiufeng; Zheng, Deyuan

    2017-01-01

    problem, auxiliary information such as labels are utilized. Another approach of recommendation system is content-based model which can’t be directly integrated with CF-based model due to its inherent characteristics. Considering that deep learning algorithms are capable of extracting deep latent features......, this paper applies Stack Denoising Auto Encoder (SDAE) to content-based model and proposes LCF(Deep Learning for Collaborative Filtering) algorithm by combing CF-based model which fuses label features. Experiments on real-world data sets show that DLCF can largely overcome the sparsity problem...

  14. Visual Odometry through Appearance- and Feature-Based Method with Omnidirectional Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valiente García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of mobile autonomous robots, visual odometry entails the retrieval of a motion transformation between two consecutive poses of the robot by means of a camera sensor solely. A visual odometry provides an essential information for trajectory estimation in problems such as Localization and SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping. In this work we present a motion estimation based on a single omnidirectional camera. We exploited the maximized horizontal field of view provided by this camera, which allows us to encode large scene information into the same image. The estimation of the motion transformation between two poses is incrementally computed, since only the processing of two consecutive omnidirectional images is required. Particularly, we exploited the versatility of the information gathered by omnidirectional images to perform both an appearance-based and a feature-based method to obtain visual odometry results. We carried out a set of experiments in real indoor environments to test the validity and suitability of both methods. The data used in the experiments consists of a large sets of omnidirectional images captured along the robot's trajectory in three different real scenarios. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the estimations and the capability of both methods to work in real-time.

  15. Feature-Based TAG in place of multi-component adjunction Computational Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Hockey, B A

    1994-01-01

    Using feature-based Tree Adjoining Grammar (TAG), this paper presents linguistically motivated analyses of constructions claimed to require multi-component adjunction. These feature-based TAG analyses permit parsing of these constructions using an existing unification-based Earley-style TAG parser, thus obviating the need for a multi-component TAG parser without sacrificing linguistic coverage for English.

  16. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  17. Comparing the Effectiveness of GPS-Enhanced Voice Guidance for Pedestrians with Metric- and Landmark-Based Instruction Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehrl, Karl; Häusler, Elisabeth; Leitinger, Sven

    This paper reports on a field experiment comparing two different kinds of verbal turn instructions in the context of GPS-based pedestrian navigation. The experiment was conducted in the city of Salzburg with 20 participants. Both instruction sets were based on qualitative turn direction concepts. The first one was enhanced with metric distance information and the second one was enhanced with landmark-anchored directions gathered from participants of a previous field experiment. The results show that in context of GPS-enhanced pedestrian navigation both kinds of instruction sets lead to similar navigation performance. Results also demonstrate that effective voice-only guidance of pedestrians in unfamiliar environments at a minimal error rate and without stopping the walk is feasible. Although both kinds of instructions lead to similar navigation performance, participants clearly preferred landmark-enhanced instructions.

  18. Hybrid edge and feature-based single-image superresolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Islam, Mohammed Nazrul; Asari, Vijayan K.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2016-07-01

    A neighborhood-dependent component feature learning method for regression analysis in single-image superresolution is presented. Given a low-resolution input, the method uses a directional Fourier phase feature component to adaptively learn the regression kernel based on local covariance to estimate the high-resolution image. The unique feature of the proposed method is that it uses image features to learn about the local covariance from geometric similarity between the low-resolution image and its high-resolution counterpart. For each patch in the neighborhood, we estimate four directional variances to adapt the interpolated pixels. This gives us edge information and Fourier phase gives features, which are combined to interpolate using kernel regression. In order to compare quantitatively with other state-of-the-art techniques, root-mean-square error and measure mean-square similarity are computed for the example images, and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms similar techniques available in the literature, especially at higher resolution scales.

  19. Generalization decrement and not overshadowing by associative competition among pairs of landmarks in a navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Victoria D; Rodríguez, Clara A; Espinet, Alfredo; Mackintosh, N J

    2012-07-01

    When they are trained in a Morris water maze to find a hidden platform, whose location is defined by a number of equally spaced visual landmarks round the circumference of the pool, rats are equally able to find the platform when tested with any two of the landmarks (Prados, & Trobalon, 1998; Rodrigo, Chamizo, McLaren, & Mackintosh, 1997). This suggests that none of the landmarks was completely overshadowed by any of the others. In Experiment 1 one pair of groups was trained with four equally salient visual landmarks spaced at equal intervals around the edge of the pool, while a second pair was trained with two landmarks only, either relatively close to or far from the hidden platform. After extensive training, both male and female rats showed a reciprocal overshadowing effect: on a test with two landmarks only (either close to or far from the platform), rats trained with four landmarks spent less time in the platform quadrant than those trained with only two. Experiment 2 showed that animals trained with two landmarks and then tested with four also performed worse on test than those trained and tested with two landmarks only. This suggests that generalization decrement, rather than associative competition, provides a sufficient explanation for the overshadowing observed in Experiment 1. Experiment 3 provided a within-experiment replication of the results of Experiments 1 and 2. Finally, Experiment 4 showed that rats trained with a configuration of two landmarks learn their identity.

  20. The post-birthday world: consequences of temporal landmarks for temporal self-appraisal and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetz, Johanna; Wilson, Anne E

    2013-02-01

    Much as physical landmarks help structure our representation of space, temporal landmarks such as birthdays and significant calendar dates structure our perception of time, such that people may organize or categorize their lives into "chunks" separated by these markers. Categories on the temporal landscape may vary depending on what landmarks are salient at a given time. We suggest these landmarks have implications for identity and motivation. The present research examined consequences of salient temporal landmarks for perceptions of the self across time and motivation to pursue successful future selves. Studies 1 and 2 show that temporally extended selves are perceived as less connected to, and more dissimilar from, the current self when an intervening landmark event has been made salient. Study 3 addresses the proposed mechanism, demonstrating that intervening landmarks lead people to categorize pre- and postlandmark selves into separate categories more often than when the same time period contains no salient landmarks. Finally, we examined whether landmark-induced mental contrasting of present state and future desired state could increase goal-pursuit motivation (in an effort to bridge the gap between inferior present and better future states). Studies 4-6 demonstrate that landmark-induced discrepancies between current health and hoped-for future health increased participants' motivation to exercise and increased the likelihood that they acted in line with their future-oriented goals. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Automatic landmark generation for deformable image registration evaluation for 4D CT images of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickress, J.; Battista, J.; Barnett, R.; Morgan, J.; Yartsev, S.

    2016-10-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) has become a common tool in medical imaging across both diagnostic and treatment specialties, but the methods used offer varying levels of accuracy. Evaluation of DIR is commonly performed using manually selected landmarks, which is subjective, tedious and time consuming. We propose a semi-automated method that saves time and provides accuracy comparable to manual selection. Three landmarking methods including manual (with two independent observers), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), and SIFT with manual editing (SIFT-M) were tested on 10 thoracic 4DCT image studies corresponding to the 0% and 50% phases of respiration. Results of each method were evaluated against a gold standard (GS) landmark set comparing both mean and proximal landmark displacements. The proximal method compares the local deformation magnitude between a test landmark pair and the closest GS pair. Statistical analysis was done using an intra class correlation (ICC) between test and GS displacement values. The creation time per landmark pair was 22, 34, 2.3, and 4.3 s for observers 1 and 2, SIFT, and SIFT-M methods respectively. Across 20 lungs from the 10 CT studies, the ICC values between the GS and observer 1 and 2, SIFT, and SIFT-M methods were 0.85, 0.85, 0.84, and 0.82 for mean lung deformation, and 0.97, 0.98, 0.91, and 0.96 for proximal landmark deformation, respectively. SIFT and SIFT-M methods have an accuracy that is comparable to manual methods when tested against a GS landmark set while saving 90% of the time. The number and distribution of landmarks significantly affected the analysis as manifested by the different results for mean deformation and proximal landmark deformation methods. Automatic landmark methods offer a promising alternative to manual landmarking, if the quantity, quality and distribution of landmarks can be optimized for the intended application.

  2. Landmark-Based Drift Compensation Algorithm for Inertial Pedestrian Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania; Caamano, Maria; Fuentes Sánchez, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    The navigation of pedestrians based on inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, has experienced a great growth over the last years. However, the noise of medium- and low-cost sensors causes a high error in the orientation estimation, particularly in the yaw angle. This error, called drift, is due to the bias of the z-axis gyroscope and other slow changing errors, such as temperature variations. We propose a seamless landmark-based drift compensation algorithm that only uses inertial measurements. The proposed algorithm adds a great value to the state of the art, because the vast majority of the drift elimination algorithms apply corrections to the estimated position, but not to the yaw angle estimation. Instead, the presented algorithm computes the drift value and uses it to prevent yaw errors and therefore position errors. In order to achieve this goal, a detector of landmarks, i.e., corners and stairs, and an association algorithm have been developed. The results of the experiments show that it is possible to reliably detect corners and stairs using only inertial measurements eliminating the need that the user takes any action, e.g., pressing a button. Associations between re-visited landmarks are successfully made taking into account the uncertainty of the position. After that, the drift is computed out of all associations and used during a post-processing stage to obtain a low-drifted yaw angle estimation, that leads to successfully drift compensated trajectories. The proposed algorithm has been tested with quasi-error-free turn rate measurements introducing known biases and with medium-cost gyroscopes in 3D indoor and outdoor scenarios. PMID:28671622

  3. Landmark-Based Drift Compensation Algorithm for Inertial Pedestrian Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Estefania Munoz; Caamano, Maria; Sánchez, Francisco Javier Fuentes

    2017-07-03

    The navigation of pedestrians based on inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, has experienced a great growth over the last years. However, the noise of medium- and low-cost sensors causes a high error in the orientation estimation, particularly in the yaw angle. This error, called drift, is due to the bias of the z-axis gyroscope and other slow changing errors, such as temperature variations. We propose a seamless landmark-based drift compensation algorithm that only uses inertial measurements. The proposed algorithm adds a great value to the state of the art, because the vast majority of the drift elimination algorithms apply corrections to the estimated position, but not to the yaw angle estimation. Instead, the presented algorithm computes the drift value and uses it to prevent yaw errors and therefore position errors. In order to achieve this goal, a detector of landmarks, i.e., corners and stairs, and an association algorithm have been developed. The results of the experiments show that it is possible to reliably detect corners and stairs using only inertial measurements eliminating the need that the user takes any action, e.g., pressing a button. Associations between re-visited landmarks are successfully made taking into account the uncertainty of the position. After that, the drift is computed out of all associations and used during a post-processing stage to obtain a low-drifted yaw angle estimation, that leads to successfully drift compensated trajectories. The proposed algorithm has been tested with quasi-error-free turn rate measurements introducing known biases and with medium-cost gyroscopes in 3D indoor and outdoor scenarios.

  4. Automatic Registration and Error Detection of Multiple Slices Using Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Frimmel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. When analysing the 3D structure of tissue, serial sectioning and staining of the resulting slices is sometimes the preferred option. This leads to severe registration problems. In this paper, a method for automatic registration and error detection of slices using landmark needles has been developed. A cost function takes some parameters from the current state of the problem to be solved as input and gives a quality of the current solution as output. The cost function used in this paper, is based on a model of the slices and the landmark needles. The method has been used to register slices of prostates in order to create 3D computer models. Manual registration of the same prostates has been undertaken and compared with the results from the algorithm. Methods. Prostates from sixteen men who underwent radical prostatectomy were formalin fixed with landmark needles, sliced and the slices were computer reconstructed. The cost function takes rotation and translation for each prostate slice, as well as slope and offset for each landmark needle as input. The current quality of fit of the model, using the input parameters given, is returned. The function takes the built‐in instability of the model into account. The method uses a standard algorithm to optimize the prostate slice positions. To verify the result, s standard method in statistics was used. Results. The methods were evaluated for 16 prostates. When testing blindly, a physician could not determine whether the registration shown to him were created by the automated method described in this paper, or manually by an expert, except in one out of 16 cases. Visual inspection and analysis of the outlier confirmed that the input data had been deformed. The automatic detection of erroneous slices marked a few slices, including the outlier, as suspicious. Conclusions. The model based registration performs better than traditional simple slice‐wise registration. In the case of prostate

  5. Notes on the Landmark Development of CBR in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahong Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Community-based rehabilitation has a history of 22 years in China.In spite of the preliminary achievement and experiences obtained by the pioneering and trial projects,it was not until the beginning of the new century that CBR in China experienced a landmark development.This iS characterized by a number of favorable pohcy by the government for CBR;the mechanism facilitating primary health care with CBR,a new work-force system of CBR reorganized with better motivation and efficiency,99 demonstration projects of CBR bringing about benchmark promotion effect and the active involvement in CBR by social resources agents.

  6. Design, recognition, localization and application of a new artificial landmark%新型人工地标的设计、识别、定位及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜海涛; 田国会; 薛英花; 李荣宽

    2011-01-01

    The artificial landmark is an important auxiliary method for robot localization and navigation.A kind of new artificial landmark based on QR Code (quick response code) technology was proposed.This new landmark not only stores rich environment information, but also provides effective pose information to the robot.An algorithm based on shape and color of the landmark was presented in order that the landmark could be recognized by the robot in the far distance.The localization algorithm using the vanishing line principle was designed to locate the artificial landmark quickly and accurately in the camera coordinates of the robot.A control scheme including searching in the far distance, recognition, localization and reading landmarks was proposed, which laid a solid foundation for robot autonomous localization and navigation.Experiments demonstrated that the new landmark had far recognition distance, high recognition speed,high positioning precision, high decoding efficiency and stability even in a complex indoor environment.%人工地标是机器人定位与导航的重要辅助手段.设计了一种基于QR Code(quick response code)技术的新型人工地标,该地标不仅能存储丰富的环境信息,还能为机器人提供有效的方位信息.为了让机器人能够在远距离找到人工地标,设计了基于颜色和形状的快速识别算法.利用消影线原理设计了定位算法,可在机器人摄像机坐标系中快速、准确地定位人工地标.给出了机器人远距离搜寻、识别、定位及读取人工地标的控制方案,为机器人自主定位及导航奠定了基础.实验表明,该人工地标识别距离远、识别速度快、定位精度高,在复杂室内环境下仍能有很高的识读效率和很好的稳定性.

  7. Investigation of filter sets for supervised pixel classification of cephalometric landmarks by spatial spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D J; Coggins, J M; Moon, H

    1997-12-01

    The diagnostic process of orthodontics requires the analysis of a cephalometric radiograph. Image landmarks on this two-dimensional lateral projection image of the patient's head are manually identified and spatial relationships are evaluated. This method is very time consuming. A reliable method for automatic computer landmark identification does not exist. Spatial Spectroscopy is a proposed method of automatic landmark identification on cephalometric radiographs, that decomposes an image by convolving it with a set of filters followed by a statistical decision process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test appropriate filter sets for the application of Spatial Spectroscopy for automatic identification of cephalometric radiographic landmarks. This study evaluated two different filter sets with 15 landmarks on fourteen images. Spatial Spectroscopy was able to consistently locate landmarks on all 14 cephalometric radiographs tested. The mean landmark identification error of 0.841 +/- 1.253 pixels for a Multiscale Derivative filter set and 0.912 +/- 1.364 pixels for an Offset Gaussian filter set was not significantly different. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between identification of individual landmarks for the Multiscale Derivative and the Offset Gaussian filter set (P > 0.05). These results suggest that Spatial Spectroscopy may be useful in landmark identification tasks.

  8. Precision of cephalometric landmark identification: Cone-beam computed tomography vs conventional cephalometric views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, John B.; Gubler, Maritzabel; Cevidanes, Lucia; Mol, André

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we compared the precision of landmark identification using displays of multi-planar cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) volumes and conventional lateral cephalograms (Ceph). Methods Twenty presurgical orthodontic patients were radiographed with conventional Ceph and CBCT techniques. Five observers plotted 24 landmarks using computer displays of multi-planer reconstruction (MPR) CBCT and Ceph views during separate sessions. Absolute differences between each observer’s plot and the mean of all observers were averaged as 1 measure of variability (ODM). The absolute difference of each observer from any other observer was averaged as a second measure of variability (DEO). ANOVA and paired t tests were used to analyze variability differences. Results Radiographic modality and landmark were significant at P <0.0001 for DEO and ODM calculations. DEO calculations of observer variability were consistently greater than ODM. The overall correlation of 1920 paired ODM and DEO measurements was excellent at 0.972. All bilateral landmarks had increased precision when identified in the MPR views. Mediolateral variability was statistically greater than anteroposterior or caudal-cranial variability for 5 landmarks in the MPR views. Conclusions The MPR displays of CBCT volume images provide generally more precise identification of traditional cephalometric landmarks. More precise location of condylion, gonion, and orbitale overcomes the problem of superimposition of these bilateral landmarks seen in Ceph. Greater variability of certain landmarks in the mediolateral direction is probably related to inadequate definition of the landmarks in the third dimension. PMID:19732656

  9. Exploring Landmark Placement Strategies for Topology-Based Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Brandwajn

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In topology-based localization, each node in a network computes its hop-count distance to a finite number of reference nodes, or “landmarks”. This paper studies the impact of landmark placement on the accuracy of the resulting coordinate systems. The coordinates of each node are given by the hop-count distance to the landmarks. We show analytically that placing landmarks on the boundary of the topology yields more accurate coordinate systems than when landmarks are placed in the interior. Moreover, under some conditions, we show that uniform landmark deployment on the boundary is optimal. This work is also the first empirical study to consider not only uniform, synthetic topologies, but also nonuniform topologies resembling more concrete deployments. Our simulation results show that, in general, if enough landmarks are used, random landmark placement yields comparative performance to placing landmarks on the boundary randomly or equally spaced. This is an important result since boundary placement, especially at equal distances, may turn out to be infeasible and/or prohibitively expensive (in terms of communication, processing overhead, and power consumption in networks of nodes with limited capabilities.

  10. Handling of split-and-merge effects and occlusions using feature-based probabilistic data association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Michael; Ohr, Florian

    2010-01-01

    One of the big challenges in multi-target tracking is the track management and correct data association between measurements and tracks. Major reason for tracking errors are detection failures such as merged, split, incomplete or missed detections as well as clutter-based detections (phantom objects). Those effects combined with uncertainties in existence and number of objects in the scene as well as uncertainties in their observability and dynamic object state lead to gross tracking errors. In this contribution we present an algorithm for visual detection and tracking of multiple extended targets which is capable of coping with occlusions and split and merge effects. Unlike most of the state-of-the-art approaches we utilize information about the measurements' composition gained through tracking dedicated feature points in the image and in 3D space, which allows us to reconstruct the desired object characteristics from the data even in the case of detection errors due to above-mentioned reasons. The proposed Feature-Based Probabilistic Data Association approach resolves data association ambiguities in a soft threshold-free decision based not only on target state prediction but also on the existence and observability estimation modeled as two additional Markov chains. A novel measurement reconstruction scheme allows for a correct innovation in case of split, merged and incomplete measurements realizing thus a detection-by-tracking approach. This process is assisted by a grid based object representation which offers a lower abstraction level of targets extent and is used for detailed occlusion analysis.

  11. Computer-aided design–computer-aided engineering associative feature-based heterogeneous object modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikai Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, heterogeneous object modeling methods paid limited attention to the concurrent modeling of geometry design and material composition distribution. Procedural method was normally employed to generate the geometry first and then determine the heterogeneous material distribution, which ignores the mutual influence. Additionally, limited capability has been established about irregular material composition distribution modeling with strong local discontinuities. This article overcomes these limitations by developing the computer-aided design–computer-aided engineering associative feature-based heterogeneous object modeling method. Level set functions are applied to model the geometry within computer-aided design module, which enables complex geometry modeling. Finite element mesh is applied to store the local material compositions within computer-aided engineering module, which allows any local discontinuities. Then, the associative feature concept builds the correspondence relationship between these modules. Additionally, the level set geometry and material optimization method are developed to concurrently generate the geometry and material information which fills the contents of the computer-aided design–computer-aided engineering associative feature model. Micro-geometry is investigated as well, instead of only the local material composition. A few cases are studied to prove the effectiveness of this new heterogeneous object modeling method.

  12. Landmarks in nature to support wayfinding: the effects of seasons and experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Pyry; Irvankoski, Katja; Krause, Christina M; Sarjakoski, L Tiina

    2013-08-01

    Landmarks constitute an essential basis for a structural understanding of the spatial environment. Therefore, they are crucial factors in external spatial representations such as maps and verbal route descriptions, which are used to support wayfinding. However, selecting landmarks for these representations is a difficult task, for which an understanding of how people perceive and remember landmarks in the environment is needed. We investigated the ways in which people perceive and remember landmarks in nature using the thinking aloud and sketch map methods during both the summer and the winter seasons. We examined the differences between methods to identify those landmarks that should be selected for external spatial representations, such as maps or route descriptions, in varying conditions. We found differences in the use of landmarks both in terms of the methods and also between the different seasons. In particular, the participants used passage and tree-related landmarks at significantly different frequencies with the thinking aloud and sketch map methods. The results are likely to reflect the different roles of the landmark groups when using the two methods, but also the differences in counting landmarks when using both methods. Seasonal differences in the use of landmarks occurred only with the thinking aloud method. Sketch maps were drawn similarly in summertime and wintertime; the participants remembered and selected landmarks similarly independent of the differences in their perceptions of the environment due to the season. The achieved results may guide the planning of external spatial representations within the context of wayfinding as well as when planning further experimental studies.

  13. Corrective surgery for canine patellar luxation in 75 cases (107 limbs: landmark for block recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Isaka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine medial patellar luxation (MPL is a very common orthopedic disease in small animals. Because the pathophysiology of this disease involves various pathways, the surgical techniques and results vary according to the veterinarian. Further, the landmark for block recession is not completely clear. We retrospectively evaluated 75 dogs (107 limbs with MPL in whom our landmark for block recession was used from July 2008 to May 2013. Information regarding the breed, age, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS, lateral vs bilateral, pre-operative grading, surgical techniques, removal of implants, concomitance with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture, re-luxation, re-operation, and rehabilitation was obtained from the medical records. The breeds were as follows: Chihuahua (n=23, Pomeranian (n=12, Yorkshire Terrier (n=9, and so on. The study group consisted of 33 males (castrated n=13 and 42 females (spayed n=21. The median age was 53.3±35.9 months (32-146 months; 13 cases were less than 12 months of age (17.3%. The pre-surgical BCSs were as follows: 1 (n=0, 2 (n=20, 3 (n=24, 4 (n=24 and 5 (n=7. The body weight was 4.51±3.48 kg (1.34-23.0 kg; 71 cases (94.7% were less than 10 kg. The MPL grades (each limb were G1 (n=1, G2 (n=18, G3 (n=78, and G4 (n=10; 32 cases were bilateral and 43 cases were unilateral (right n=27; left n=16. The specific surgical procedure (distal femoral osteotomy was 3 stifles in Chihuahuas. Concurrent with ACL rupture was 16/107 stifles (15.0% corrected with the over-the-top method or the extracapsular method in Papillons (5/6, Chihuahuas (5/23, and so on. The occurrences of re-luxation and re-operation were 3 out of 107 stifles (2.8% and 0%, respectively. In this retrospective study, we present a potentially good surgical landmark for block recession of MPL in dogs.

  14. PROSPER: an integrated feature-based tool for predicting protease substrate cleavage sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangning Song

    Full Text Available The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s. Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate

  15. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  16. Elections and landmark policies in Tanzania and Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Much of the relevant literature on Africa downplays the salience of elections for policy-making and implementation. Instead, the importance of factors such as clientelism, ethnicity, organized interest group and donor influence, is emphasized. We argue that, in addition, elections now motivate...... political elites to focus on policies they perceive to be able to gain votes. This is based on analyses of six landmark decisions made during the last fifteen years in the social, productive and public finance sectors in Tanzania and Uganda. Such policies share a number of key characteristics......: they are clearly identifiable with the party in power; citizens country-wide are targeted; and policy implementation aim at immediate, visible results. The influence of elections on policy making and implementation could therefore be more significant in countries where elections are more competitive than...

  17. Chronic Pancreatitis: Landmark Papers, Management Decisions, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMagno, Eugene P; DiMagno, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    On May 16, 2015 at the invitation of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Council E.P.D. presented a state-of-the-art lecture at Digestive Disease Week 2015. The aims were to discuss a selection of landmark papers in chronic pancreatitis (CP) that influence modern management and to conclude by suggesting some future directions. This is based on that presentation. We will specifically review the following: duct anatomy and pancreas divisum, description of chronic relapsing pancreatitis and its differentiation from recurrent acute pancreatitis and established CP (ECP), natural histories and gene discoveries of alcoholic, idiopathic and hereditary pancreatitis, development of pancreatic cancer in CP, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and calculation of dose and delivery of enzymes, endoscopic ultrasonography, and autoimmune pancreatitis. With some exceptions, we exclude basic science and surgery.

  18. FACIAL LANDMARKING LOCALIZATION FOR EMOTION RECOGNITION USING BAYESIAN SHAPE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan F. Garcia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a framework for emotion recognition, based in facial expression analysis using Bayesian Shape Models (BSM for facial landmarking localization. The Facial Action Coding System (FACS compliant facial feature tracking based on Bayesian Shape Model. The BSM estimate the parameters of the model with an implementation of the EM algorithm. We describe the characterization methodology from parametric model and evaluated the accuracy for feature detection and estimation of the parameters associated with facial expressions, analyzing its robustness in pose and local variations. Then, a methodology for emotion characterization is introduced to perform the recognition. The experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively detect the different facial expressions. Outperforming conventional approaches for emotion recognition obtaining high performance results in the estimation of emotion present in a determined subject. The model used and characterization methodology showed efficient to detect the emotion type in 95.6% of the cases.

  19. Design and baseline characteristics of the LANDMARK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Hirakata, Hideki; Kaneda, Hideaki; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Akizawa, Tadao

    2017-06-01

    Calcium (Ca)-based phosphate (P) binders, compared to non-Ca-based P binders, contribute to vascular calcification, which is associated with cardiovascular events. The LANDMARK study is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel comparative study of lanthanum carbonate (LC) and calcium carbonate (CC) in hemodialysis patients. Stable hemodialysis patients with intact parathyroid hormone ≤240 pg/mL meeting ≥1 of the following criteria (age >65 years, postmenopause, diabetes mellitus) were randomized into the LC and CC groups. LC group patients initially received LC 750 mg/day or the previously used dose and were titrated up to a maximum 2250 mg/day to achieve serum P levels of 3.5-6.0 mg/dL. CC group patients received CC 3 g/day or the previously used dose and were titrated to achieve the same P range. If the target serum P level was not achieved, non-Ca-based P binders (other than LC) could also be added. The primary endpoint is survival time free of cardiovascular events, including cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke, and unstable angina. Overall, 2309 patients were allocated to the LC (N = 1154) or CC group (N = 1155). At baseline, the mean age was 68.4 years, 40.4 % were women, 55.9 % had diabetes, 18.3 % had a history of ischemic heart disease, and 13.9 % had cerebrovascular disease. A total of 184 patients (8.4 %) had undergone coronary intervention procedures. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between groups. The LANDMARK study will determine whether LC, a non-Ca-based P binder, reduces cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in chronic hemodialysis patients.

  20. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  1. An Evaluation of Cellular Neural Networks for the Automatic Identification of Cephalometric Landmarks on Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Leonardi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several efforts have been made to completely automate cephalometric analysis by automatic landmark search. However, accuracy obtained was worse than manual identification in every study. The analogue-to-digital conversion of X-ray has been claimed to be the main problem. Therefore the aim of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of the Cellular Neural Networks approach for automatic location of cephalometric landmarks on softcopy of direct digital cephalometric X-rays. Forty-one, direct-digital lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained by a Siemens Orthophos DS Ceph and were used in this study and 10 landmarks (N, A Point, Ba, Po, Pt, B Point, Pg, PM, UIE, LIE were the object of automatic landmark identification. The mean errors and standard deviations from the best estimate of cephalometric points were calculated for each landmark. Differences in the mean errors of automatic and manual landmarking were compared with a 1-way analysis of variance. The analyses indicated that the differences were very small, and they were found at most within 0.59 mm. Furthermore, only few of these differences were statistically significant, but differences were so small to be in most instances clinically meaningless. Therefore the use of X-ray files with respect to scanned X-ray improved landmark accuracy of automatic detection. Investigations on softcopy of digital cephalometric X-rays, to search more landmarks in order to enable a complete automatic cephalometric analysis, are strongly encouraged.

  2. A method for lunar roving vehicle position determination from three landmark observations with a sun compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blucker, T. J.; Stimmel, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    A simplified method is described for determining the position of the lunar roving vehicle on the lunar surface during Apollo 15. The method is based upon sun compass azimuth measurements of three lunar landmarks. The difference between the landmark azimuth and the sun azimuth is measured and the resulting data are voice relayed to the Mission Control Center for processing.

  3. STUDY ON COMPARISON BETWEEN LANDMARK GUIDED (BRINKMAN'S TECHNIQUE ) AND ULTRASOUND GUIDED INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN CANNULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod; Sashi Walling

    2015-01-01

    Technique of cannulating the central veins , until recently has been based on landmark guided technique . Recently ultrasound machines with high frequency probes are being used to increase success rate and reducing complications. OBJECTIVE: In our study we compare landmark guided technique ( Brinkman's technique ) ( 1 ) with ultrasound guided technique. STUDY DESIGN: outcome was evaluated in terms of 1 ) Number of attempts 2 ) ...

  4. Shape representation for efficient landmark-based segmentation in 3-d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to landmark-based shape representation that is based on transportation theory, where landmarks are considered as sources and destinations, all possible landmark connections as roads, and established landmark connections as goods transported via these roads. Landmark connections, which are selectively established, are identified through their statistical properties describing the shape of the object of interest, and indicate the least costly roads for transporting goods from sources to destinations. From such a perspective, we introduce three novel shape representations that are combined with an existing landmark detection algorithm based on game theory. To reduce computational complexity, which results from the extension from 2-D to 3-D segmentation, landmark detection is augmented by a concept known in game theory as strategy dominance. The novel shape representations, game-theoretic landmark detection and strategy dominance are combined into a segmentation framework that was evaluated on 3-D computed tomography images of lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads. The best shape representation yielded symmetric surface distance of 0.75 mm and 1.11 mm, and Dice coefficient of 93.6% and 96.2% for lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads, respectively. By applying strategy dominance, the computational costs were further reduced for up to three times.

  5. Interactions of visual odometry and landmark guidance during food search in honeybees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T; Hemmi, JM; Srinivasan, MV; Zeil, J

    2005-01-01

    How do honeybees use visual odometry and goal-defining landmarks to guide food search? In one experiment, bees were trained to forage in an optic-flow-rich tunnel with a landmark positioned directly above the feeder. Subsequent food-search tests indicated that bees searched much more accurately when

  6. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  7. Design and recognition of artificial landmarks for reliable indoor self-localization of mobile robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a self-localization scheme for indoor mobile robot navigation based on reliable design and recognition of artificial visual landmarks. Each landmark is patterned with a set of concentric circular rings in black and white, which reliably encodes the landmark’s identity under environmental illumination. A mobile robot in navigation uses an onboard camera to capture landmarks in the environment. The landmarks in an image are detected and identified using a bilayer recognition algorithm: A global recognition process initially extracts candidate landmark regions across the whole image and tries to identify enough landmarks; if necessary, a local recognition process locally enhances those unidentified regions of interest influenced by illumination and incompleteness and reidentifies them. The recognized landmarks are used to estimate the position and orientation of the onboard camera in the environment, based on the geometric relationship between the image and environmental frames. The experiments carried out in a real indoor environment show high robustness of the proposed landmark design and recognition scheme to the illumination condition, which leads to reliable and accurate mobile robot localization.

  8. 3D facial landmarks: Inter-operator variability of manual annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Harder, Stine; Rosengren, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    was randomly chosen. Six operators twice manually annotated 73 anatomical and pseudo-landmarks, using a three-step scheme producing a dense point correspondence map. We analyzed both the intra- and inter-operator variability, using mixed-model ANOVA. We then compared four sparse sets of landmarks in order...

  9. 78 FR 69437 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Federal Regulations, that a meeting of the Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board... National Park System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined....

  10. Feature-based handling of surface faults in compact disc players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a novel method called feature-based control is presented. The method is designed to improve compact disc players’ handling of surface faults on the discs. The method is based on a fault-tolerant control scheme, which uses extracted features of the surface faults to remove those from...... the detector signals used for control during the occurrence of surface faults. The extracted features are coefficients of Karhunen–Loève approximations of the surface faults. The performance of the feature-based control scheme controlling compact disc players playing discs with surface faults has been...

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN PROCESSING THE LANDMARK ”SUCTION CAP” WITH NX 7.5 SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANARU Viorel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to present the optimization processing of the landmark suction cap with NX software 7.5. It has been done the modeling CAD of the landmark 3D. It has been projected the technology to execution CAM of the landmark where they revealed aspects of processing sequence and technological parameters.

  12. Combination of automatic non-rigid and landmark based registration: the best of both worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernd; Modersitzki, Jan

    2003-05-01

    Automatic, parameter-free, and non-rigid registration schemes are known to be valuable tools in various (medical) image processing applications. Typically, these approaches aim to match intensity patterns in each scan by minimizing an appropriate distance measure. The outcome of an automatic registration procedure in general matches the target image quite good on the average. However, it may be inaccurate for specific, important locations as for example anatomical landmarks. On the other hand, landmark based registration techniques are designed to accurately match user specified landmarks. A drawback of landmark based registration is that the intensities of the images are completely neglected. Consequently, the registration result away from the landmarks may be very poor. Here we propose a framework for novel registration techniques which are capable to combine automatic and landmark driven approaches in order to benefit from the advantages of both strategies. We also propose a general, mathematical treatment of this framework and a particular implementation. The procedure computes a displacement field which is guaranteed to produce a one-to-one match between given landmarks and at the smae time minimizes an intensity based measure for the remaining parts of the images. The properties of the new scheme are demonstrated for a variety of numerical example. It is worthwhile noticing, that we not only present a new approach. Instead, we propose a general framework for a variety of different approaches. The choice of the main building blocks, the distance measure and the smoothness constraint, is essentially free.

  13. Is there consistency in cephalometric landmark identification amongst oral and maxillofacial surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloro, M; Borba, A M; Ribeiro-Junior, O; Naclério-Homem, M G; Jungner, M

    2014-04-01

    There may be significant variation amongst oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) in the identification and placement of cephalometric landmarks for orthognathic surgery, and this could impact upon the surgical plan and final treatment outcome. In an effort to assess this variability, 10 lateral cephalometric radiographs were selected for evaluation by 16 OMFS with different levels of surgical knowledge and experience, and the position of 21 commonly used cephalometric landmarks were identified on radiographs displayed on a computer screen using a computer mouse on a pen tablet. The database consisted of real position measurements (x, y) to determine the consistency of landmark identification between surgeons and within individual surgeons. Inter-examiner analysis demonstrated that most landmark points had excellent reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient >0.90). Regardless of the level of surgeon experience, certain landmarks presented consistently poor reliability, and intra-examiner reliability analysis demonstrated that some locations had a higher average difference for both x and y axes. In particular, porion, condylion, and gonion showed poor agreement and reliability between examiners. The identification of most landmarks showed some inconsistencies within different parameters of evaluation. Such variability among surgeons may be addressed by the consistent use of high-quality images, and also by periodic surgeon education of the definition of the specific landmarks. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Internal jugular vein cannulation: an ultrasound-guided technique versus a landmark-guided technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Turker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS: A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01. Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05. The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively. Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications.

  15. Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: An Ultrasound-Guided Technique Versus a Landmark-Guided Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Gurkan; Kaya, Fatma Nur; Gurbet, Alp; Aksu, Hale; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Atlas, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01). Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05). The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications. PMID:19841706

  16. Reproducibility of imaging skull anatomic landmarks utilizing three-dimensional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Yasushi; Harii, Kiyonori (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Hirabayashi, Shinichi

    1994-05-01

    The study investigated the reproducibility of locating specific anatomic landmarks, utilizing computed tomography (CT), for the purpose of assigning accurate coordinates on the skull. Three-dimensional (3-D) CT data, obtained by scanning a dry adult skull, were processed using a multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) system. Each landmark was identified five times by the same technician, and the average distances between points identifying the same landmark were calculated. The 15 landmarks studied were the infra-orbital foramina, the external auditory meatus, the foramina rotundum, the foramina ovale, the optic canals, anterior crinoid processes, anterior nasal spine, crista galli, and the sella turcica. Three additional artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints were also examined. The crinoid processes were identified with the highest degree of accuracy. The crista galli and optic canals were also located with reproducible results. The standard deviation calculated from the fine attempts to locate the artificial markers was smaller than that calculated from attempts to identify any of the landmarks. This implies that coordinates on the craniofacial bones should be defined using artificial markers rather than bony landmarks. Artificial markers placed in occlusal dental splints easily can be applied clinically. Complicated facial bone contours should be analyzed mathematically. In clinical setting, these points were found to be reproducible in 15 bony landmarks on the skull. (N.K.).

  17. CBCT Assessment of Mental Foramen Position Relative to Anatomical Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study was carried out on an Iranian population aiming to investigate mental foramen position relative to inferior border of mandible and skeletal midline and its gender and age differences on CBCT projections. Materials and Methods. A number of 180 CBCT images of patients were analyzed in different planes (tangential, cross-sectional, and axial). The distances from the superior border of mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible and from the anterior border of mental foramen to the midline were calculated. Results. The mean distance from mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible in the right side was 13.26 mm (SD ± 2.34) and in the left side was 13.37 mm (SD ± 2.19). There was a statistically significant difference between genders in terms of the distance between mental foramen and inferior border of mandible (P value = 0.000). The mean distances from mental foramen to midline were 25.86 mm (SD ± 0.27) and 25.53 mm (SD ± 0.31) in the right and left sides, respectively. Conclusions. The vertical and horizontal positions of mental foramen can be determined from stable anatomical landmarks such as mandibular inferior border and skeletal midline in both dentulous and edentulous patients. The distance from the superior border of mental foramen to the inferior border of mandible exhibited sexual dimorphism. PMID:27999594

  18. Hypoechoic media: a landmark for intravascular ultrasonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussenhoven, Elma J.; Bom, Nicolaas; Li, Wenguang; van Urk, Hero; Pietermann, Herman; van Suylen, Robert J.; Salem, H. K.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the in vitro (40 MHz) and in vivo (30 MHz) results of studies performed on human vessels using a mechanically rotated single element ultrasonic imaging system. The in vitro images were matched with the corresponding histologic cross-sections. Morphology of vessels and possibility to determine the extent of atherosclerosis were assessed by two blinded observers. Echographic images with an echolucent zone were seen to correspond with muscular type of arteries. The echographic images showing no echographic distinction between the various layers were seen to correspond with either elastic type of arteries, veins, veins used for bypass, or bypass Goretex grafts. The extent of atherosclerosis could only be assessed in the muscular type of artery. The data showed close correlation with histology (r = 0.89). In vivo studies (30 patients) revealed a characteristic three-layered appearance of the distal iliac and femoral artery. Normal cross-sections were readily differentiated from non- obstructive and obstructive lesions. In all these patients the hypoechoic muscular media served as an important landmark.

  19. Automated registration of partially defective surfaces by local landmark identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthan, Dirk; Ehrlich, Günther; Stallkamp, Jan; Dammann, Florian; Schwaderer, Erwin; Maassen, Marcus M

    2003-01-01

    In computer- and robot-assisted surgery, the term "registration" refers to the definition of the geometrical relationship between the coordinate system of a surgical planning system and that of the patient. Within the context of the development of a navigation and control system for computer- and robot-assisted surgery of the lateral skull base, it was desirable to realize an algorithm for automated registration of partially defective surfaces that is reliable and suitable for use in clinical practice. A registration algorithm based on the use of local fingerprints for specific points on a surface (so-called "spin images") was developed. Anatomical patient landmarks were identified automatically and assigned to CT data, performing a cross-correlation analysis and an investigation of the geometrical consistency. The algorithm was evaluated within the development of the navigation and robotic control system in a laboratory setting. Under laboratory conditions it could be shown that partially defective surfaces (simulated by, for example, adding white noise, or reducing or smoothing the polygon data) were correctly recognized and thereby registered. In particular, the algorithm proved its excellence in interpreting partially modified topologies. The proposed procedure can be used to accomplish dynamic intra-operative registration of the skull bone by the generation of point relations to the CT images.

  20. [The landmarks of the measurement of cerebral blood flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    István, Nyáry

    2008-01-30

    History of the measurement of local cerebral blood flow may cover a period of one and a half centuries. Parallel forthcoming of both theoretical and technical development were the key elements of ensuing progress resulting in the present state, when by the aid of in vivo blood flow and metabolic maps, we can visualize locales of brain functioning and their interconnections. Two theoretical landmarks should be mentioned in this historic process. First, the work of Adolf Fick, as the starter of quantitative measurements in this field, and Seymour Kety's model of a single, homogenously perfused tissue element. The solution of this model, in the form of Kety's equation is still fundamental to present day blood flow mapping techniques. Among the numerous investigators over the past years, two Hungarian scientist can be named as major contributors. Kálmán Sántha made substantial studies with continuous registration of local cerebral blood flow by the aid of thermocouples, while Emil P6sztor invented the hydrogen clearance method for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow both in human and in animal studies.

  1. Improving Feature-based Non-rigid Registration for Applications in Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Vásquez Osorio (Eliana)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the improvements of a feature-based non-rigid registration method that were essential for its application in radiotherapy. In addition, this thesis presents three practical applications of the improved method: 1) quantification of anatomical changes in 3D for head a

  2. Feature-Based versus Category-Based Induction with Uncertain Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Hayes, Brett K.; Newell, Ben R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that when feature inferences have to be made about an instance whose category membership is uncertain, feature-based inductive reasoning is used to the exclusion of category-based induction. These results contrast with the observation that people can and do use category-based induction when category membership is…

  3. Landmark matching based automatic retinal image registration with linear programming and self-similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Hunter, Allan A; Wu, Jue; Wang, Hongzhi; Gao, Jianbin; Maguire, Maureen G; Gee, James C

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of landmark matching based retinal image registration. Two major contributions render our registration algorithm distinguished from many previous methods. One is a novel landmark-matching formulation which enables not only a joint estimation of the correspondences and transformation model but also the optimization with linear programming. The other contribution lies in the introduction of a reinforced self-similarities descriptor in characterizing the local appearance of landmarks. Theoretical analysis and a series of preliminary experimental results show both the effectiveness of our optimization scheme and the high differentiating ability of our features.

  4. Automatic localization of landmark sets in head CT images with regression forests for image registration initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Liu, Yuan; Noble, Jack H.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear Implants (CIs) are electrode arrays that are surgically inserted into the cochlea. Individual contacts stimulate frequency-mapped nerve endings thus replacing the natural electro-mechanical transduction mechanism. CIs are programmed post-operatively by audiologists but this is currently done using behavioral tests without imaging information that permits relating electrode position to inner ear anatomy. We have recently developed a series of image processing steps that permit the segmentation of the inner ear anatomy and the localization of individual contacts. We have proposed a new programming strategy that uses this information and we have shown in a study with 68 participants that 78% of long term recipients preferred the programming parameters determined with this new strategy. A limiting factor to the large scale evaluation and deployment of our technique is the amount of user interaction still required in some of the steps used in our sequence of image processing algorithms. One such step is the rough registration of an atlas to target volumes prior to the use of automated intensity-based algorithms when the target volumes have very different fields of view and orientations. In this paper we propose a solution to this problem. It relies on a random forest-based approach to automatically localize a series of landmarks. Our results obtained from 83 images with 132 registration tasks show that automatic initialization of an intensity-based algorithm proves to be a reliable technique to replace the manual step.

  5. SU-E-J-237: Image Feature Based DRR and Portal Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X; Chang, J [NY Weill Cornell Medical Ctr, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Two-dimensional (2D) matching of the kV X-ray and digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) images is an important setup technique for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). In our clinics, mutual information based methods are used for this purpose on commercial linear accelerators, but with often needs for manual corrections. This work proved the feasibility that feature based image transform can be used to register kV and DRR images. Methods: The scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method was implemented to detect the matching image details (or key points) between the kV and DRR images. These key points represent high image intensity gradients, and thus the scale invariant features. Due to the poor image contrast from our kV image, direct application of the SIFT method yielded many detection errors. To assist the finding of key points, the center coordinates of the kV and DRR images were read from the DICOM header, and the two groups of key points with similar relative positions to their corresponding centers were paired up. Using these points, a rigid transform (with scaling, horizontal and vertical shifts) was estimated. We also artificially introduced vertical and horizontal shifts to test the accuracy of our registration method on anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral pelvic images. Results: The results provided a satisfactory overlay of the transformed kV onto the DRR image. The introduced vs. detected shifts were fit into a linear regression. In the AP image experiments, linear regression analysis showed a slope of 1.15 and 0.98 with an R2 of 0.89 and 0.99 for the horizontal and vertical shifts, respectively. The results are 1.2 and 1.3 with R2 of 0.72 and 0.82 for the lateral image shifts. Conclusion: This work provided an alternative technique for kV to DRR alignment. Further improvements in the estimation accuracy and image contrast tolerance are underway.

  6. Clinical application of anatomy landmarks for microscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Sen; Li, Jun-Feng; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Ru-Mi

    2013-01-01

    It is important to identify relevant anatomical landmarks on the route of endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for pituitary adenomas to improve the gross total resection and the remission of disease. We therefore retrospectively studied the clinical outcomes of 148 patients who underwent single nostril endonasal TSS for pituitary adenomas. The anatomic basis of these procedures was evaluated. The important landmarks included the mucosal sphenoid ostia, the sphenoid keel, the osseous ostia and the nutrient arteries nearby, the sellar bulge, and the carotid protuberance, which outlined a clear route to the sella turcica with the best view and less tissue damage. Based on these landmarks, 148 cases of endonasal TSS were successfully performed to achieve 70.3% of gross total resection and remission, respectively. The complications were controlled to the least. Therefore, the application of these landmarks will help to prevent complications and improve the long-term outcomes.

  7. 75 FR 16837 - Public Review of Draft United States Thoroughfare, Landmark, and Postal Address Data Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... public on the FGDC Web site. DATES: Comments on the draft United States Thoroughfare, Landmark, and... principles can be extended to all addresses. Dated: March 18, 2010. Ivan DeLoatch, FGDC Executive...

  8. The Comparison of learning radiographic extraoral landmarks through two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Razi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The long time interval between teaching anatomy courses to students and the courses on extraoral radiographs results in forgetting the location of radiographic anatomic landmarks without any retention; therefore, it is necessary to use other educational techniques due to short duration of educational courses. To this end, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of a combination of lectures and computer techniques on teaching extraoral radiographs to undergraduate dental students. Methods: In the present interventional study, dental students entering the university in the same year (referred to as one class were divided into two groups; one group received conventional teaching and one group received combinational teaching technique. Students entering the next year were taught using the same teaching techniques. The results were compared between groups and classes. Results: Comparison of the results of the first test between the two classes showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.001. Comparison of the results of the second test between the two classes revealed no significant differences in the conventional method (P=0.76; however, the combination technique exhibited significant differences (P=0.006. In the first test, comparison of the two techniques in the students entering the university in 2006 showed no significant differences (P=0.055; however, students entering the university in 2007 exhibited significant differences (P=0.03. In the second test, comparison of the two techniques in both classes revealed significant differences (P<0.001. Conclusion: If more time is allocated to the combination technique, learning improves even in a short time. This method can replace the conventional method to teach interpretation of extraoral radiographs after evaluation of academic level of the studies.

  9. Effects of image enhancement on reliability of landmark identification in digital cephalometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Oshagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although digital cephalometric radiography is gaining popularity in orthodontic practice, the most important source of error in its tracing is uncertainty in landmark identification. Therefore, efforts to improve accuracy in landmark identification were directed primarily toward the improvement in image quality. One of the more useful techniques of this process involves digital image enhancement which can increase overall visual quality of image, but this does not necessarily mean a better identification of landmarks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of digital image enhancements on reliability of landmark identification. Materials and Methods: Fifteen common landmarks including 10 skeletal and 5 soft tissues were selected on the cephalograms of 20 randomly selected patients, prepared in Natural Head Position (NHP. Two observers (orthodontists identified landmarks on the 20 original photostimulable phosphor (PSP digital cephalogram images and 20 enhanced digital images twice with an intervening time interval of at least 4 weeks. The x and y coordinates were further analyzed to evaluate the pattern of recording differences in horizontal and vertical directions. Reliability of landmarks identification was analyzed by paired t test. Results: There was a significant difference between original and enhanced digital images in terms of reliability of points Ar and N in vertical and horizontal dimensions, and enhanced images were significantly more reliable than original images. Identification of A point, Pogonion and Pronasal points, in vertical dimension of enhanced images was significantly more reliable than original ones. Reliability of Menton point identification in horizontal dimension was significantly more in enhanced images than original ones. Conclusion: Direct digital image enhancement by altering brightness and contrast can increase reliability of some landmark identification and this may lead to more

  10. Obstacles Facing Promoting Tourism for Islamic Landmarks from the Perspective of Tour Operators in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The UNESCO launched a campaign #unite4heritage in Egypt to defeat extremism and intolerance. The message of such campaigne is peace, dialogue and unity embedded in cultural heritage. As culture and tourism are linked together, such message could be delivered through improving culture heritage tourism in Egypt. Islamic landmarks  are considered as a part of human heritage. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify how much tour operators in Egypt include Islamic landmarks in their pr...

  11. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Landmark Reliability between Manual and Computerized Plotting Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Geetha; Kommi, Pradeep B; Kumar, Senthil M; Yashwant, Aniruddh; Arani, Nandakumar; Sabapathy, Senkutvan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of soft tissue landmark identification between manual and digital plot-tings in both X and Y axes. A total of 50 pretreatment lateral cephalograms were selected from patients who reported for orthodontic treatment. The digital images of each cephalogram were imported directly into Dolphin software for onscreen digi-talization, while for manual tracing, images were printed using a compatible X-ray printer. After the images were standardized, and 10 commonly used soft tissue landmarks were plotted on each cephalogram by six different professional observers, the values obtained were plotted in X and Y axes. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to determine the intrarater reliability for repeated landmark plotting obtained by both the methods. The evaluation for reliability of soft tissue landmark plottings in both manual and digital methods after subjecting it to interclass correlation showed a good reliability, which was nearing complete homogeneity in both X and Y axes, except for Y axis of throat point in manual plotting, which showed moderate reliability as a cephalometric variable. Intraclass correlation of soft tissue nasion had a moderate reliability along X axis. Soft tissue pogonion shows moderate reliability in Y axis. Throat point exhibited moderate reliability in X axis. The interclass correlation in X and Y axes shows high reliability in both hard tissue and soft tissue except for throat point in Y axis, when plotted manually. The intraclass correlation is more consistent and highly reliable for soft tissue landmarks and the hard tissue landmark identification is also consistent. The results obtained for manual and digital methods were almost similar, but the digital landmark plotting has an added advantage in archiving, retrieval, transmission, and can be enhanced during plotting of lateral cephalograms. Hence, the digital method of landmark plotting could be preferred for both daily use and

  12. Indirect building localization based on a prominent solid landmark from a forward-looking infrared imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Wang; Tianxu Zhang; Xiaoyu Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel indirect building localization technique based on a prominent solid landmark from a forwardlooking infrared imagery is proposed to localize low, deeply buried, or carefully camouflaged buildings in dense urban areas.First, the widely used effective methods are applied to detect and localize the solid landmark.The building target is then precisely indirectly localized by perspective transformation according to the imaging parameters and the space constraint relations between the building target and the solid landmark.Experimental results demonstrate this technique can indirectly localize buildings in dense urban areas effectively.%@@ A novel indirect building localization technique based on a prominent solid landmark from a forward-looking infrared imagery is proposed to localize low, deeply buried, or carefully camouflaged buildings in dense urban areas.First, the widely used effective methods are applied to detect and localize the solid landmark.The building target is then precisely indirectly localized by perspective transformation according to the imaging parameters and the space constraint relations between the building target and the solid landmark.Experimental results demonstrate this technique can indirectly localize buildings in dense urban areas effectively.

  13. Value of anatomical landmarks in single-nostril endonasal transnasal-sphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang-Feng; Zhang, Jinchao; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Rumi

    2013-04-01

    The sphenoid sinus occupies a central location in transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). It is important to identify relevant anatomical landmarks to enter the sphenoid sinus and sellar region properly. The aim of this study was to identify anatomical landmarks and their value in single-nostril endonasal TSS. A retrospective study was performed to review 148 cases of single-nostril endonasal TSS for pituitary lesions. The structure of the nasal cavities and sphenoid sinus, the position of apertures of the sphenoid sinus and relevant arteries and the morphological characteristics of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus and sellar floor were observed and recorded. The important anatomical landmarks included the mucosal aperture of the sphenoid sinus, a blunt longitudinal prominence on the posterior nasal septum, the osseocartilaginous junction of the nasal septum, the 'bow sign' of the anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, the osseous aperture and its relationship with the nutrient arteries, the bulge of the sellar floor and the carotid protuberance. These landmarks outlined a clear route to the sella turcica with an optimal view and lesser tissue damage. Although morphological variation may exist, the position of these landmarks was generally consistent. Locating the sphenoid sinus aperture is the gold standard to direct the surgical route of TSS. The 'bow sign' and the sellar bulge are critical landmarks for accurate entry into the sphenoid sinus and sella fossa, respectively.

  14. Cephalometric landmark detection in dental x-ray images using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansang; Park, Minseok; Kim, Junmo

    2017-03-01

    In dental X-ray images, an accurate detection of cephalometric landmarks plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgical decisions for dental problems. In this work, we propose an end-to-end deep learning system for cephalometric landmark detection in dental X-ray images, using convolutional neural networks (CNN). For detecting 19 cephalometric landmarks in dental X-ray images, we develop a detection system using CNN-based coordinate-wise regression systems. By viewing x- and y-coordinates of all landmarks as 38 independent variables, multiple CNN-based regression systems are constructed to predict the coordinate variables from input X-ray images. First, each coordinate variable is normalized by the length of either height or width of an image. For each normalized coordinate variable, a CNN-based regression system is trained on training images and corresponding coordinate variable, which is a variable to be regressed. We train 38 regression systems with the same CNN structure on coordinate variables, respectively. Finally, we compute 38 coordinate variables with these trained systems from unseen images and extract 19 landmarks by pairing the regressed coordinates. In experiments, the public database from the Grand Challenges in Dental X-ray Image Analysis in ISBI 2015 was used and the proposed system showed promising performance by successfully locating the cephalometric landmarks within considerable margins from the ground truths.

  15. Innovations in individual feature history management - The significance of feature-based temporal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Seong, J.C.; Kim, B.; Usery, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    A feature relies on three dimensions (space, theme, and time) for its representation. Even though spatiotemporal models have been proposed, they have principally focused on the spatial changes of a feature. In this paper, a feature-based temporal model is proposed to represent the changes of both space and theme independently. The proposed model modifies the ISO's temporal schema and adds new explicit temporal relationship structure that stores temporal topological relationship with the ISO's temporal primitives of a feature in order to keep track feature history. The explicit temporal relationship can enhance query performance on feature history by removing topological comparison during query process. Further, a prototype system has been developed to test a proposed feature-based temporal model by querying land parcel history in Athens, Georgia. The result of temporal query on individual feature history shows the efficiency of the explicit temporal relationship structure. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  16. Modeling multiple visual words assignment for bag-of-features based medical image retrieval

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bag-of-features based medical image retrieval methods, which represent an image as a collection of local features, such as image patch and key points with SIFT descriptor. To improve the bag-of-features method, we first model the assignment of local descriptor as contribution functions, and then propose a new multiple assignment strategy. By assuming the local feature can be reconstructed by its neighboring visual words in vocabulary, we solve the reconstruction weights as a QP problem and then use the solved weights as contribution functions, which results in a new assignment method called the QP assignment. We carry our experiments on ImageCLEFmed datasets. Experiments\\' results show that our proposed method exceeds the performances of traditional solutions and works well for the bag-of-features based medical image retrieval tasks.

  17. Feature-based watermarking for digital right management in content distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wensheng; Xie, Hua; Sagetong, Phoom

    2004-10-01

    More and more digital services provide capability of distributing digital content to end-users through high-band networks, such as satellite systems. In such systems, Digital Right Management has become more and more important and is encountering great challenges. Digital watermarking is proposed as a possible solution for the digital copyright tracking and enforcement. The nature of DRM systems puts high requirements on the watermark's robustness, uniqueness, easy detection, accurate retrieval and convenient management. We have developed a series of feature-based watermarking algorithms for digital video for satellite transmission. In this paper, we will first describe a general secure digital content distribution system model and the requirements of watermark as one mechanism of DRM in digital content distribution applications. Then we will present a few feature-based digital watermarking methods in detail which are integrated with a dynamic watermarking schema to protect the digital content in a dynamic environment. For example, a watermark which is embedded in the DFT feature domain is invariant to rotation, scale and translation. Our proposed DFT domain watermarking schemas in which exploit the magnitude property of the DFT feature domain will allow both robust and easy watermark tracking and detection in the case of copyright infringement using cameras or camcorders. This DFT feature-based watermarking algorithm is able to tolerate large angle rotation and there is no need to search for possible rotated angles, which reduces the complexity of the watermark detection process and allows fast retrieval and easy management. We will then present a wavelet feature-based watermark algorithm for dynamic watermark key updates and key management, and we will conclude the paper with the summary, pointing our future research directions.

  18. A Dynamic Feature-Based Method for Hybrid Blurred/Multiple Object Detection in Manufacturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsun-Kuo Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vision-based inspection has been applied for quality control and product sorting in manufacturing processes. Blurred or multiple objects are common causes of poor performance in conventional vision-based inspection systems. Detecting hybrid blurred/multiple objects has long been a challenge in manufacturing. For example, single-feature-based algorithms might fail to exactly extract features when concurrently detecting hybrid blurred/multiple objects. Therefore, to resolve this problem, this study proposes a novel vision-based inspection algorithm that entails selecting a dynamic feature-based method on the basis of a multiclassifier of support vector machines (SVMs for inspecting hybrid blurred/multiple object images. The proposed algorithm dynamically selects suitable inspection schemes for classifying the hybrid images. The inspection schemes include discrete wavelet transform, spherical wavelet transform, moment invariants, and edge-feature-descriptor-based classification methods. The classification methods for single and multiple objects are adaptive region growing- (ARG- based and local adaptive region growing- (LARG- based learning approaches, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can dynamically select suitable inspection schemes by applying a selection algorithm, which uses SVMs for classifying hybrid blurred/multiple object samples. Moreover, the method applies suitable feature-based schemes on the basis of the classification results for employing the ARG/LARG-based method to inspect the hybrid objects. The method improves conventional methods for inspecting hybrid blurred/multiple objects and achieves high recognition rates for that in manufacturing processes.

  19. Feature-based attentional tuning during biological motion detection measured with SSVEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Rakibul; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Grossman, Emily D

    2017-08-01

    Performance in detection tasks can be improved by directing attention to task-relevant features. In this study, we evaluate the direction tuning of selective attention to motion features when observers detect point-light biological motion in noise. Feature-based attention strategy is assessed by capitalizing on the sensitivity of unattended steady-state visual-evoked potential (SSVEP) to the spreading of feature-based attention to unattended regions of space. Participants monitored for the presence of a point-light walker embedded in uniform dynamic noise in the center of the screen. We analyzed the phase-locked electroencephalogram response to a flickering random-dot kinematogram (RDK) in an unattended peripheral annulus for the 1 s prior to the onset of the target. We found the highest SSVEP power to originate from electrodes over posterior parietal cortex (PPC), with power modulated by the direction of motion in the unattended annulus. The SSVEP was strongest on trials in which the unattended motion was opposite the facing direction of the walker, consistent with the backstroke of the feet and with the global direction of perceived background motion from a translating walker. Coherence between electrodes over PPC and other brain regions successfully predicted individual participant's d-prime, with the highest regression coefficients at electrodes over ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The findings are evidence that functional connectivity between frontal and parietal cortex promote perceptual feature-based attention, and subsequent perceptual sensitivity, when segregating point-light figures from masking surround.

  20. Eye- and feature-based modulation of onset rivalry caused by the preceding stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoru; Kimura, Eiji; Goryo, Ken

    2011-11-09

    Pre-exposure to a stimulus can modulate initial perceptual dominance experienced in binocular rivalry with brief test stimuli (onset rivalry). This study investigated this modulating effect using both color and pattern stimuli. We confirmed separate contributions of eye- and feature-based suppressions and showed that their relative strength varied with temporal parameters. Eye-based suppression was stronger with a short test duration (10 ms) and shorter ISIs between the preceding and test stimuli. On the other hand, feature-based suppression grew with ISI and was more pronounced with a longer test duration (200 ms). We also investigated the nature of the modulating effect associated with feature-based suppression using chromatic gratings of high luminance contrast. Results revealed that different features of the preceding stimulus (i.e., color and orientation) exerted nearly independent effects on onset rivalry. However, different features shared their fate in competitive interactions for perceptual dominance; when one feature became dominant, the other also dominated. These findings suggest that competitive interactions for perceptual dominance and the modulation of these interactions are mediated at least partially by different mechanisms. Overall, the present findings are consistent with a theoretical view that initial dominance is established through competitive interactions at multiple levels of processing.

  1. The fate of task-irrelevant visual motion: perceptual load versus feature-based attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, Shuichiro; Adams, Wendy J; Graf, Erich W; Lavie, Nilli

    2009-11-18

    We tested contrasting predictions derived from perceptual load theory and from recent feature-based selection accounts. Observers viewed moving, colored stimuli and performed low or high load tasks associated with one stimulus feature, either color or motion. The resultant motion aftereffect (MAE) was used to evaluate attentional allocation. We found that task-irrelevant visual features received less attention than co-localized task-relevant features of the same objects. Moreover, when color and motion features were co-localized yet perceived to belong to two distinct surfaces, feature-based selection was further increased at the expense of object-based co-selection. Load theory predicts that the MAE for task-irrelevant motion would be reduced with a higher load color task. However, this was not seen for co-localized features; perceptual load only modulated the MAE for task-irrelevant motion when this was spatially separated from the attended color location. Our results suggest that perceptual load effects are mediated by spatial selection and do not generalize to the feature domain. Feature-based selection operates to suppress processing of task-irrelevant, co-localized features, irrespective of perceptual load.

  2. Assessment of seasonal features based on Landsat time series for tree crown cover mapping in Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxiu; Heiskanen, Janne; Aynekuly, Ermias; Pellikka, Petri

    2016-04-01

    Tree crown cover (CC) is an important vegetation attribute for land cover characterization, and for mapping and monitoring forest cover. Free data from Landsat and Sentinel-2 allow construction of fine resolution satellite image time series and extraction of seasonal features for predicting vegetation attributes. In the savannas, surface reflectance vary distinctively according to the rainy and dry seasons, and seasonal features are useful information for CC mapping. However, it is unclear if it is better to use spectral bands or vegetation indices (VI) for computation of seasonal features, and how feasible different VI are for CC prediction in the savanna woodlands and agroforestry parklands of West Africa. In this study, the objective was to compare seasonal features based on spectral bands and VI for CC mapping in southern Burkina Faso. A total of 35 Landsat images from November 2013 to October 2014 were processed. Seasonal features were computed using a harmonic model with three parameters (mean, amplitude and phase), and spectral bands, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), green normalized difference vegetation index (GNDVI), normalized difference water index (NDWI), tasseled cap (TC) indices (brightness, greenness, wetness) as input data. The seasonal features were employed to predict field estimated CC (n = 160) using Random Forest algorithm. The most accurate results were achieved when using seasonal features based on TC indices (R2: 0.65; RMSE: 10.7%) and spectral bands (R2: 0.64; RMSE: 10.8%). GNDVI performed better than NDVI or NDWI, and NDWI resulted in the poorest results (R2: 0.56; RMSE: 11.9%). The results indicate that spectral features should be carefully selected for CC prediction as shown by relatively poor performance of commonly used NDVI. The seasonal features based on three TC indices and all the spectral bands provided superior accuracy in comparison to single VI. The method presented in this study provides a feasible method to map

  3. Surgery without consent or miscommunication? A new look at a landmark legal case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Judith; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-05-01

    Schloendorff v Society of New York Hospital is regarded widely as a landmark in the history of informed consent because it is thought to have established individual self-determination as the legal basis of consent and respect for patient autonomy as the ethical basis of consent. For a century, it has been understood as a laparotomy done without consent when a pelvic mass was discovered unexpectedly in an anesthetized patient after an examination. We believe it was a case of surgeons failing to communicate properly with each other and their patient. To support this reinterpretation, we present evidence from the original medical and surgical records, letters of key participants in the case, and the trial court record. We also consider the case from the perspective of the modern culture of safety in gynecologic surgery. Contrary to what is commonly assumed, Ms Schloendorff lost her legal case, and her surgery might not have been performed at all had her clinicians known, understood, communicated, documented, and reaffirmed what the patient actually wanted. This new perspective on Schloendorff is important for gynecologic surgeons because it vividly documents the perils of implicit consent, delegating the obtaining of consent, and miscommunication among clinicians. The Schloendorff case underscores the constant need for continuous quality improvement to reduce medical errors and the risk of litigation by improving communication among surgeons.

  4. Personal Landmarks from the Legacy of Arthur Phelps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowke, John

    2013-09-01

    I have been influenced for my whole life by Art Phelps, more than by anyone else - other than my wife! I first heard of Art Phelps in 1960 when, in the middle of doing my PhD in Adelaide, South Australia, Frost and Phelps published their land-mark paper, not only on drift velocities, the subject of my PhD, but on Boltzmann analyses, which were to deliver detailed cross sections for all common gases. Later I dared to suggest to my university that one of my two external PhD examiners be Phelps, a move that led to me being accepted for a position at Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh for 6 years, with Phelps as my direct supervisor. Throughout this period, Phelps refused to be a co-author of any of my papers, leaving me with severe doubts as to what he thought of their quality! I list areas where insights from Phelps inspired the growth of new fruit. (1) That transverse and longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients differ, typically by a factor of two. (2) That averaging radiation absorption coefficients in electric arcs, using common weightings involving Black Body radiation, can and usually do lead to errors of orders of magnitude. (3) That CO2 laser discharges are largely controlled by electron attachment rather than by diffusion or recombination. (4) That boundary conditions for electrons at metal electrodes in arc welding, are not zero, but from an astrophysical analogy, are zero when extrapolated to one mean free path beyond the surface. (5) That the metastable vibrational states of nitrogen become an energy gain rather than a loss process for low energy electrons as occur in electrical breakdown in air, resulting in increases of the ionisation coefficient by orders of magnitude. Coupled with the detachment of electrons from negative ions by singlet delta states of metastable oxygen molecules, sustaining discharge electric fields are reduced a factor of five. Phelps worked on this problem with me until a few months before he died.

  5. Localization of skeletal and aortic landmarks in trauma CT data based on the discriminative generalized Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Hansis, Eberhard; Weese, Jürgen; Carolus, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography is the modality of choice for poly-trauma patients to assess rapidly skeletal and vascular integrity of the whole body. Often several scans with and without contrast medium or with different spatial resolution are acquired. Efficient reading of the resulting extensive set of image data is vital, since it is often time critical to initiate the necessary therapeutic actions. A set of automatically found landmarks can facilitate navigation in the data and enables anatomy oriented viewing. Following this intention, we selected a comprehensive set of 17 skeletal and 5 aortic landmarks. Landmark localization models for the Discriminative Generalized Hough Transform (DGHT) were automatically created based on a set of about 20 training images with ground truth landmark positions. A hierarchical setup with 4 resolution levels was used. Localization results were evaluated on a separate test set, consisting of 50 to 128 images (depending on the landmark) with available ground truth landmark locations. The image data covers a large amount of variability caused by differences of field-of-view, resolution, contrast agent, patient gender and pathologies. The median localization error for the set of aortic landmarks was 14.4 mm and for the set of skeleton landmarks 5.5 mm. Median localization errors for individual landmarks ranged from 3.0 mm to 31.0 mm. The runtime performance for the whole landmark set is about 5s on a typical PC.

  6. Depth and Intensity Gabor Features Based 3D Face Recognition Using Symbolic LDA and AdaBoost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Hiremath

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the objective is to investigate what contributions depth and intensity information make to the solution of face recognition problem when expression and pose variations are taken into account, and a novel system is proposed for combining depth and intensity information in order to improve face recognition performance. In the proposed approach, local features based on Gabor wavelets are extracted from depth and intensity images, which are obtained from 3D data after fine alignment. Then a novel hierarchical selecting scheme embedded in symbolic linear discriminant analysis (Symbolic LDA with AdaBoost learning is proposed to select the most effective and robust features and to construct a strong classifier. Experiments are performed on the three datasets, namely, Texas 3D face database, Bhosphorus 3D face database and CASIA 3D face database, which contain face images with complex variations, including expressions, poses and longtime lapses between two scans. The experimental results demonstrate the enhanced effectiveness in the performance of the proposed method. Since most of the design processes are performed automatically, the proposed approach leads to a potential prototype design of an automatic face recognition system based on the combination of the depth and intensity information in face images.

  7. Near-Surface Crevasse Detection in Ice Sheets using Feature-Based Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L.; Walker, B.; Lever, J.; Arcone, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, a team of Dartmouth, CRREL, and University of Maine researchers conducted the first of three annual ground-penetrating radar surveys of the McMurdo Shear Zone using robot-towed instruments. This survey provides over 100 transects of a 5.7 km x 5.0 km grid spanning the width of the shear zone at spacing of approximately 50 m. Transect direction was orthogonal to ice flow. Additionally, a dense 200 m x 200 m grid was surveyed at 10 m spacing in both the N-S and W-E directions. Radar settings provided 20 traces/sec, which combined with an average robot speed of 1.52 m/s, provides a trace every 7.6 cm. The robot towed two antenna units at 400 MHz and 200 MHz center frequencies, with the former penetrating to approximately 19 m. We establish boundaries for the shear zone over the region surveyed using the 400 MHz antenna data, and we geo-locate crevasses using feature-based machine learning classification of GPR traces into one of three classes - 1) firn, 2) distinct crevasses, and 3) less distinct or deeper features originating within the 19 m penetration depth. Distinct crevasses feature wide, hyperbolic reflections with strike angles of 35-40° to transect direction and clear voids. Less distinct or deeper features range from broad diffraction patterns with no clear void to overlapping diffractions extending tens of meters in width with or without a clear void. The classification is derived from statistical features of unprocessed traces and thus provides a computationally efficient means for eventual real-time classification of GPR traces. Feature-based classification is shown to be insensitive to artifacts related to rolling or pitching motion of the instrument sled and also provides a means of assessing crevasse width and depth. In subsequent years, we will use feature-based classification to estimate ice flow and evolution of individual crevasses.

  8. Dendritic spine classification using shape and appearance features based on two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Mesadi, Fitsum; Kanık, Sümeyra Demir; Argunşah, Ali Özgür; Hobbiss, Anna Felicity; Israely, Inbal; Ünay, Devrim; Taşdizen, Tolga; Çetin, Müjdat

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal morphology and function are highly coupled. In particular, dendritic spine morphology is strongly governed by the incoming neuronal activity. The first step towards understanding the structure-function relationships is to classify spine shapes into the main spine types suggested in the literature. Due to the lack of reliable automated analysis tools, classification is mostly performed manually, which is a time-intensive task and prone to subjectivity. We propose an automated method to classify dendritic spines using shape and appearance features based on challenging two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) data. Disjunctive Normal Shape Models (DNSM) is a recently proposed parametric shape representation. We perform segmentation of spine images by applying DNSM and use the resulting representation as shape features. Furthermore, we use Histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) to extract appearance features. In this context, we propose a kernel density estimation (KDE) based framework for dendritic spine classification, which uses these shape and appearance features. Our shape and appearance features based approach combined with Neural Network (NN) correctly classifies 87.06% of spines on a dataset of 456 spines. Our proposed method outperforms standard morphological feature based approaches. Our KDE based framework also enables neuroscientists to analyze the separability of spine shape classes in the likelihood ratio space, which leads to further insights about nature of the spine shape analysis problem. Results validate that performance of our proposed approach is comparable to a human expert. It also enable neuroscientists to study shape statistics in the likelihood ratio space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Use of Quick Response (QR Codes in Landmark-Based Pedestrian Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahid Basiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle navigation systems usually simply function by calculating the shortest fastest route over a road network. In contrast, pedestrian navigation can have more diverse concerns. Pedestrians are not constrained to road/path networks; their route may involve going into buildings (where accurate satellite locational signals are not available and they have different priorities, for example, preferring routes that are quieter or more sheltered from the weather. In addition, there are differences in how people are best directed: pedestrians noticing landmarks such as buildings, doors, and steps rather than junctions and sign posts. Landmarks exist both indoors and outdoors. A system has been developed that uses quick response (QR codes affixed to registered landmarks allowing users to localise themselves with respect to their route and with navigational instructions given in terms of these landmarks. In addition, the system includes images of each landmark helping users to navigate visually in addition to through textual instructions and route maps. The system runs on a mobile device; the users use the device’s camera to register each landmark’s QR code and so update their position (particularly indoors and progress through the route itinerary.

  10. A reinforcement learning approach to model interactions between landmarks and geometric cues during spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheynikhovich, Denis; Arleo, Angelo

    2010-12-13

    In contrast to predictions derived from the associative learning theory, a number of behavioral studies suggested the absence of competition between geometric cues and landmarks in some experimental paradigms. In parallel to these studies, neurobiological experiments suggested the existence of separate independent memory systems which may not always interact according to classic associative principles. In this paper we attempt to combine these two lines of research by proposing a model of spatial learning that is based on the theory of multiple memory systems. In our model, a place-based locale strategy uses activities of modeled hippocampal place cells to drive navigation to a hidden goal, while a stimulus-response taxon strategy, presumably mediated by the dorso-lateral striatum, learns landmark-approaching behavior. A strategy selection network, proposed to reside in the prefrontal cortex, implements a simple reinforcement learning rule to switch behavioral strategies. The model is used to reproduce the results of a behavioral experiment in which an interaction between a landmark and geometric cues was studied. We show that this model, built on the basis of neurobiological data, can explain the lack of competition between the landmark and geometry, potentiation of geometry learning by the landmark, and blocking. Namely, we propose that the geometry potentiation is a consequence of cooperation between memory systems during learning, while blocking is due to competition between the memory systems during action selection.

  11. Feature-based Design of Welded Structure for Robotic Arc Welding Off-line Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Feature modeler of welded structure provides both 3D-geographical and non-geographical features for the off-line programming of arc welded robot. Welded structure is regarded as an assembly, the design of welded structure consists of three aspects: plane, joint, and groove design. Each aspect corresponds to a category of features. The plane features are defined by interactive feature definition. A method analogous to the “mating feature” is introduced to represent the joint features. Based on AutoCAD 2000, a B-rep solid modeler, a prototype system is implemented.

  12. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Selmi, Sonia,; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity...

  13. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Sonia Y; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity-based function. The results are encouraging and show acceptable errors with simulated transforms applied on ultrasound volumes from real patients.

  14. Feature Based Image Mosaic Using Steerable Filters and Harris Corner Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Image mosaic is to be combine several views of a scene in to single wide angle view. This paper proposes the feature based image mosaic approach. The mosaic image system includes feature point detection, feature point descriptor extraction and matching. A RANSAC algorithm is applied to eliminate number of mismatches and obtain transformation matrix between the images. The input image is transformed with the correct mapping model for image stitching and same is estimated. In this paper, feature points are detected using steerable filters and Harris, and compared with traditional Harris, KLT, and FAST corner detectors.

  15. Analysis to feature-based video stabilization/registration techniques within application of traffic data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Mojtaba T.; Viti, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Machine vision is rapidly gaining popularity in the field of Intelligent Transportation Systems. In particular, advantages are foreseen by the exploitation of Aerial Vehicles (AV) in delivering a superior view on traffic phenomena. However, vibration on AVs makes it difficult to extract moving objects on the ground. To partly overcome this issue, image stabilization/registration procedures are adopted to correct and stitch multiple frames taken of the same scene but from different positions, angles, or sensors. In this study, we examine the impact of multiple feature-based techniques for stabilization, and we show that SURF detector outperforms the others in terms of time efficiency and output similarity.

  16. Feature-based Analysis of Large-scale Spatio-Temporal Sensor Data on Hybrid Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltz, Joel; Teodoro, George; Pan, Tony; Cooper, Lee; Kong, Jun; Klasky, Scott; Kurc, Tahsin

    2013-08-01

    Analysis of large sensor datasets for structural and functional features has applications in many domains, including weather and climate modeling, characterization of subsurface reservoirs, and biomedicine. The vast amount of data obtained from state-of-the-art sensors and the computational cost of analysis operations create a barrier to such analyses. In this paper, we describe middleware system support to take advantage of large clusters of hybrid CPU-GPU nodes to address the data and compute-intensive requirements of feature-based analyses in large spatio-temporal datasets.

  17. Landmark recognition in Alzheimer's dementia: spared implicit memory for objects relevant for navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy P C Kessels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spatial navigation, landmark recognition is crucial. Specifically, memory for objects placed at decision points on a route is relevant. Previous fMRI research in healthy adults showed higher medial-temporal lobe (MTL activation for objects placed at decision points compared to non-decision points, even at an implicit level. Since there is evidence that implicit learning is intact in amnesic patients, the current study examined memory for objects relevant for navigation in patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 21 AD patients participated with MTL atrophy assessed on MRI (mean MMSE = 21.2, SD = 4.0, as well as 20 age- and education-matched non-demented controls. All participants watched a 5-min video showing a route through a virtual museum with 20 objects placed at intersections (decision points and 20 at simple turns (non-decision points. The instruction was to pay attention to the toys (half of the objects for which they were supposedly tested later. Subsequently, a recognition test followed with the 40 previously presented objects among 40 distracter items (both toys and non-toys. Results showed a better performance for the non-toy objects placed at decision points than non-decision points, both for AD patients and controls. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that AD patients with MTL damage have implicit memory for object information relevant for navigation. No decision point effect was found for the attended items. Possibly, focusing attention on the items occurred at the cost of the context information in AD, whereas the controls performed at an optimal level due to intact memory function.

  18. Boosting multi-features with prior knowledge for mini unmanned helicopter landmark detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Without sufficient real training data, the data driven classification algorithms based on boosting method cannot solely be utilized to applications such as the mini unmanned helicopter landmark image detection. In this paper, we propose an approach which uses a boosting algorithm with the prior knowledge for the mini unmanned helicopter landmark image detection. The stage forward stagewise additive model of boosting is analyzed, and the approach how to combine it with the prior knowledge model is presented. The approach is then applied to landmark image detection, where the multi-features are boosted to solve a series of problems, such as rotation, noises affected, etc. Results of real flight experiments demonstrate that for small training examples the boosted learning system using prior knowledge is dramatically better than the one driven by data only.

  19. The Architectural Features and Prevalence of Contemporary Landmarks in Kaunas City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almantas Bružas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on contemporary architectural accents and their architectural features in Kaunas city. The paper also analyses the prevalence of contemporary architectural accents in the city. Some tendencies towards creating Kaunas landmarks, relationship between them and the built environment and aesthetic measures are discussed on the basis of analyzing the most important and characteristic sacral, commercial, industrial and residential architecture patterns. It can be concluded that contemporary materials as well as a lightweight construction and the courage of architects helped with producing the image of modern architectural landmark, though the spread of Kaunas contemporary landmarks has a chaotic character and the cityscape has not been enriched by the powerful dominants of space structure.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Laplacian Eigenmaps manifold learning for landmark localization in brain MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ricardo; Wolz, Robin; Rueckert, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The identification of anatomical landmarks in medical images is an important task in registration and morphometry. Manual labeling is time consuming and prone to observer errors. We propose a manifold learning procedure, based on Laplacian Eigenmaps, that learns an embedding from patches drawn from multiple brain MR images. The position of the patches in the manifold can be used to predict the location of the landmarks via regression. New images are embedded in the manifold and the resulting coordinates are used to predict the landmark position in the new image. The output of multiple regressors is fused in a weighted fashion to boost the accuracy and robustness. We demonstrate this framework in 3D brain MR images from the ADNI database. We show an accuracy of -0.5mm, an increase of at least two fold when compared to traditional approaches such as registration or sliding windows.

  1. The language of landmarks: the role of background knowledge in indoor wayfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Julia; Brüssow, Sven; Ruzzoli, Felix; Hölscher, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    To effectively wayfind through unfamiliar buildings, humans infer their relative position to target locations not only by interpreting geometric layouts, especially length of line of sight, but also by using background knowledge to evaluate landmarks with respect to their probable spatial relation to a target. Questionnaire results revealed that participants have consistent background knowledge about the relative position of target locations. Landmarks were rated significantly differently with respect to their spatial relation to targets. In addition, results from a forced-choice task comparing snapshots of a virtual environment revealed that background knowledge influenced wayfinding decisions. We suggest that landmarks are interpreted semantically with respect to their function and spatial relation to the target location and thereby influence wayfinding decisions. This indicates that background knowledge plays a role in wayfinding.

  2. Contour Propagation Using Feature-Based Deformable Registration for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate target delineation of CT image is a critical step in radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper describes a novel strategy for automatic contour propagation, based on deformable registration, for CT images of lung cancer. The proposed strategy starts with a manual-delineated contour in one slice of a 3D CT image. By means of feature-based deformable registration, the initial contour in other slices of the image can be propagated automatically, and then refined by active contour approach. Three algorithms are employed in the strategy: the Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF, Thin-Plate Spline (TPS, and an adapted active contour (Snake, used to refine and modify the initial contours. Five pulmonary cancer cases with about 400 slices and 1000 contours have been used to verify the proposed strategy. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed strategy can improve the segmentation performance in the pulmonary CT images. Jaccard similarity (JS mean is about 0.88 and the maximum of Hausdorff distance (HD is about 90%. In addition, delineation time has been considerably reduced. The proposed feature-based deformable registration method in the automatic contour propagation improves the delineation efficiency significantly.

  3. EXPLOITING 3D ULTRASOUND FOR FETAL DIAGNOSTIC PURPOSE THROUGH FACIAL LANDMARKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Vezzetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, three-dimensional landmarking has gained attention for different applications, such as face recognition for both identification of suspects and authentication, facial expression recognition, corrective and aesthetic surgery, syndrome study and diagnosis. This work focuses on the last one by proposing a geometrically-based landmark extraction algorithm aimed at diagnosing syndromes on babies before their birth. Pivotal role in this activity is the support provided by physicians and 3D ultrasound tools for working on real faces. In particular, the landmarking algorithm here proposed only relies on descriptors coming from Differential Geometry (Gaussian, mean, and principal curvatures, derivatives, coefficients of first and second fundamental forms, Shape and Curvedness indexes and is tested on nine facial point clouds referred to nine babies taken by a three-dimensional ultrasound tool at different weeks' gestation. The results obtained, validated with the support of four practitioners, show that the localization is quite accurate. All errors lie in the range between 0 and 3.5 mm and the mean distance for each shell is in the range between 0.6 and 1.6 mm. The landmarks showing the highest errors are the ones belonging to the mouth region. Instead, the most precise landmark is the pronasal, on the nose tip, with a mean distance of 0.55 mm. Relying on current literature, this study is something missing in the state-of-the-art of the field, as present facial studies on 3D ultrasound do not work on automatic landmarking yet.

  4. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-11-27

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks' position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations.

  5. Application of a Fast Connected Components Labeling Algorithm in Processing Landmark Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Extracting geometric data of landmarks from fluoroscopic images plays an important role in camera calibration process of a fluoroscopic-image-based surgical navigation system. Connected components labeling is the essential technique for the extraction. A new fast connected components labeling algorithm was presented. The definition of upward concave set was introduced to explain the algorithm. Feasibility and efficiency of the algorithm were verified with experiments. This algorithm performs well in labeling non-upward concave set connected components and applies to landmarks labeling well. Moreover, the proposed algorithm possesses a desirable characteristic that will facilitate the subsequent processing of fluoroscopic images.

  6. Comparison of anatomic landmarks and ultrasound guidance for intercostal nerve injections in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anuj; Gofeld, Michael; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Hanlon, John; Johnson, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    Intercostal nerve (ICN) injections are routinely performed under anatomic landmark or fluoroscopic guidance for acute and chronic pain indications. Ultrasound (US) is being used increasingly to perform ICN injections, but there is lack of evidence to support categorically the benefits of US over conventional techniques. We compared guidance with US versus anatomic landmarks for accuracy and safety of ICN injections in cadavers in a 2-phase study that included evaluation of deposition of injected dye by dissection and spread of contrast on fluoroscopy. A cadaver experiment was performed to validate US as an imaging modality for ICN blocks. In the first phase of the study, 12 ICN injections with 2 different volumes of dye were performed in 1 cadaver using anatomic landmarks on one side and US-guidance on the other (6 injections on each side). The cadaver was then dissected to evaluate spread of the dye. The second phase of the study consisted of 74 ICN injections (37 US-guided and 37 using anatomic landmarks) of contrast dye in 6 non-embalmed cadavers followed by fluoroscopy to evaluate spread of the contrast dye. In the first phase of the study, the intercostal space was identified with US at all levels. Injection of 2 mL of dye was sufficient to ensure compete staining of the ICN for 5 of 6 US-guided injections but anatomic landmark guidance resulted in correct injection at only 2 of 6 intercostal spaces. No intravascular injection was found on dissection with either of the guidance techniques. In the second phase of the study, US-guidance was associated with a higher rate of intercostal spread of 1 mL of contrast dye on fluoroscopy compared with anatomic landmarks guidance (97% vs 70%; P = 0.017). Ultrasound confers higher accuracy and allows use of lower volumes of injectate compared with anatomic landmarks as a guidance method for ICN injections in cadavers. Ultrasound may be a viable alternative to anatomic landmarks as a guidance method for ICN injections.

  7. Landmark Points for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Landmark Polygons for Torrance County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Landmark Polygons for Taos County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Landmark Polygons for Union County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  11. Landmark Polygons for Bernalillo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  12. Landmark Polygons for Valencia County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  13. Landmark Polygons for Cibola County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  14. Landmark Points for Quay County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  15. Landmark Points for Sierra County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  16. Landmark Polygons for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  17. Fungal epoxide hydrolases: new landmarks in sequence-activity space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Martha S

    2004-03-01

    Epoxide hydrolases are useful catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epoxides, which are sought after intermediates for the synthesis of enantiopure fine chemicals. The epoxide hydrolases from Aspergillus niger and from the basidiomycetous yeasts Rhodotorula glutinis and Rhodosporidium toruloides have demonstrated potential as versatile, user friendly biocatalysts for organic synthesis. A recombinant A. niger epoxide hydrolase, produced by an overproducing A. niger strain, is already commercially available and recombinant yeast epoxide hydrolases expressed in Escherichia coli have shown excellent results. Within the vast body of activity information on the one hand and gene sequence information on the other hand, the epoxide hydrolases from the Rhodotorula spp. and A. niger stand out because we have sequence information as well as activity information for both the wild-type and recombinant forms of these enzymes.

  18. Landmark Points for Colfax County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  19. Landmark Points for Sandoval County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  20. Landmark Points for Curry County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  1. Landmark Points for Luna County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  2. Landmark Polygons for Guadalupe County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  3. Landmark Points for Lincoln County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  4. Landmark Polygons for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  5. Landmark Points for Hidalgo County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  6. Landmark Points for Chaves County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  7. Landmark Points for Lea County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  8. Landmark Points for Eddy County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  9. Landmark Polygons for Grant County, New Mexico, 2006se TIGER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The 2006 Second Edition TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census TIGER database. The geographic coverage...

  10. Feature-based coding system: a new way of characterizing hypnosis styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Katalin; Kekecs, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, the authors introduce a new system to assess hypnosis style. The Feature-Based Coding System (FBCS) comprises 24 standard individual hypnosis sessions, which were videotaped and coded according to both a previous and the new coding system. In addition, both subjects and hypnotists filled the Archaic Involvement Measure (AIM), the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (PCI), and the Dyadic Interactional Harmony Questionnaire (DIH). The interrater agreement of FBCS was good and the construct Maternal-Paternal Axis had a good internal consistency (α = .95). Construct validity was also supported by the findings. Based on these results, a larger scale study is warranted to further establish the reliability and usefulness of this tool.

  11. Contrasting effects of feature-based statistics on the categorisation and basic-level identification of visual objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kirsten I; Devereux, Barry J; Acres, Kadia; Randall, Billi; Tyler, Lorraine K

    2012-03-01

    Conceptual representations are at the heart of our mental lives, involved in every aspect of cognitive functioning. Despite their centrality, a long-standing debate persists as to how the meanings of concepts are represented and processed. Many accounts agree that the meanings of concrete concepts are represented by their individual features, but disagree about the importance of different feature-based variables: some views stress the importance of the information carried by distinctive features in conceptual processing, others the features which are shared over many concepts, and still others the extent to which features co-occur. We suggest that previously disparate theoretical positions and experimental findings can be unified by an account which claims that task demands determine how concepts are processed in addition to the effects of feature distinctiveness and co-occurrence. We tested these predictions in a basic-level naming task which relies on distinctive feature information (Experiment 1) and a domain decision task which relies on shared feature information (Experiment 2). Both used large-scale regression designs with the same visual objects, and mixed-effects models incorporating participant, session, stimulus-related and feature statistic variables to model the performance. We found that concepts with relatively more distinctive and more highly correlated distinctive relative to shared features facilitated basic-level naming latencies, while concepts with relatively more shared and more highly correlated shared relative to distinctive features speeded domain decisions. These findings demonstrate that the feature statistics of distinctiveness (shared vs. distinctive) and correlational strength, as well as the task demands, determine how concept meaning is processed in the conceptual system.

  12. Mining consumer reviews to generate ratings of different product attributes while producing feature-based review-summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangale, Akshay; Krishna Kumar, S.; Arshad Naeem, Mohd; Williams, Mark; Tiwari, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    With the massive growth of the internet, product reviews increasingly serve as an important source of information for customers to make choices online. Customers depend on these reviews to understand users' experience, and manufacturers rely on this user-generated content to capture user sentiments about their product. Therefore, it is in the best interest of both customers and manufacturers to have a portal where they can read a complete comprehensive summary of these reviews in minimum time. With this in mind, we arrived at our first objective which is to generate a feature-based review-summary. Our second objective is to develop a predictive model to know the next week's product sales based on numerical review ratings and textual features embedded in the reviews. When it comes to product features, every user has different priorities for different features. To capture this aspect of decision-making, we have designed a new mechanism to generate a numerical rating for every feature of the product individually. The data have been collected from a well-known commercial website for two different products. The validation of the model is carried out using a crowd-sourcing technique.

  13. Fast Rotation-Free Feature-Based Image Registration Using Improved N-SIFT and GMM-Based Parallel Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongdong; Yang, Feng; Yang, Caiyun; Leng, Chengcai; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yining; Tian, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Image registration is a key problem in a variety of applications, such as computer vision, medical image processing, pattern recognition, etc., while the application of registration is limited by time consumption and the accuracy in the case of large pose differences. Aimed at these two kinds of problems, we propose a fast rotation-free feature-based rigid registration method based on our proposed accelerated-NSIFT and GMM registration-based parallel optimization (PO-GMMREG). Our method is accelerated by using the GPU/CUDA programming and preserving only the location information without constructing the descriptor of each interest point, while its robustness to missing correspondences and outliers is improved by converting the interest point matching to Gaussian mixture model alignment. The accuracy in the case of large pose differences is settled by our proposed PO-GMMREG algorithm by constructing a set of initial transformations. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can fast rigidly register 3-D medical images and is reliable for aligning 3-D scans even when they exhibit a poor initialization.

  14. Quality-aware features-based noise level estimator for block matching and three-dimensional filtering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoping; Hu, Lingyan; Yang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The performance of conventional denoising algorithms is usually controlled by one or several parameters whose optimal settings depend on the contents of the processed images and the characteristics of the noises. Among these parameters, noise level is a fundamental parameter that is always assumed to be known by most of the existing denoising algorithms (so-called nonblind denoising algorithms), which largely limits the applicability of these nonblind denoising algorithms in many applications. Moreover, these nonblind algorithms do not always achieve the best denoised images in visual quality even when fed with the actual noise level parameter. To address these shortcomings, in this paper we propose a new quality-aware features-based noise level estimator (NLE), which consists of quality-aware features extraction and optimal noise level parameter prediction. First, considering that image local contrast features convey important structural information that is closely related to image perceptual quality, we utilize the marginal statistics of two local contrast operators, i.e., the gradient magnitude and the Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), to extract quality-aware features. The proposed quality-aware features have very low computational complexity, making them well suited for time-constrained applications. Then we propose a learning-based framework where the noise level parameter is estimated based on the quality-aware features. Based on the proposed NLE, we develop a blind block matching and three-dimensional filtering (BBM3D) denoising algorithm which is capable of effectively removing additive white Gaussian noise, even coupled with impulse noise. The noise level parameter of the BBM3D algorithm is automatically tuned according to the quality-aware features, guaranteeing the best performance. As such, the classical block matching and three-dimensional algorithm can be transformed into a blind one in an unsupervised manner. Experimental results demonstrate that the

  15. Route-external and route-internal landmarks in route descriptions : Effects of route length and map design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerbeek, Hans; Maes, Alfons

    2013-01-01

    Landmarks are basic ingredients in route descriptions. They often mark choice points: locations where travellers choose from different options how to continue the route. This study focuses on one of the loose ends in the taxonomy of landmarks. In a memory-based production experiment in which respond

  16. Obstacles Facing Promoting Tourism for Islamic Landmarks from the Perspective of Tour Operators in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bakri Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The UNESCO launched a campaign #unite4heritage in Egypt to defeat extremism and intolerance. The message of such campaigne is peace, dialogue and unity embedded in cultural heritage. As culture and tourism are linked together, such message could be delivered through improving culture heritage tourism in Egypt. Islamic landmarks  are considered as a part of human heritage. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify how much tour operators in Egypt include Islamic landmarks in their programs to determine the obstacles facing promoting cultural tourism in Islamic landmarks' areas. Additionally, the study would identify positive results in the case of developing heritage tourism in Egypt. To achieve a high result, a survey approach was employed to collect data from 100 tour operators, using a completed questionnaire technique as well as a Likert Scale and statistical models in order to test and interpret the research outcomes. The research findings indicated that although tour operators in Egypt are convinced of the significance of the Islamic landmarks, there is no contradiction between creating global understanding and at the same time achieving benefit to the local community. However, there is a range of obstacles facing promoting such type of tourism in Egypt. Keywords: Culture heritage tourism, community, Egypt, Islamic civilization.

  17. Landmark-based morphometrics of the normal adult brain using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, S L; O'Higgins, P; Maudgil, D D; Dryden, I L; Lemieux, L; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    2001-05-01

    We describe the application of statistical shape analysis to homologous landmarks on the cortical surface of the adult human brain. Statistical shape analysis has a sound theoretical basis. Landmarks are identified on the surface of a 3-D reconstruction of the segmented cortical surface from magnetic resonance image (MRI) data. Using publicly available software (morphologika) the location and size dependence of the landmarks are removed and the differences in landmark distribution across subjects are analysed using principal component analysis. These differences, representing shape differences between subjects, can be visually assessed using wireframe models and transformation grids. The MRI data of 58 adult brains (27 female and 15 left handed) were examined. Shape differences in the whole brain are described which concern the relative orientation of frontal lobe sulci. Analysis of all 116 hemispheres revealed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between left and right hemispheres. This finding was significant for right- but not left-handed subjects alone. No other significant age, gender, handedness, or brain-size correlations with shape differences were found.

  18. Undecidability and temporal logic: some landmarks from Turing to the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goranko, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    This is a selective survey and discussion of some of the landmark undecidability results in temporal logic, beginning with Turing's undecidability of the Halting problem which, in retrospect, can be regarded as the historically first undecidability result for a suitable temporal logic over config...

  19. Automatic recognition of surface landmarks of anatomical structures of back and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoński, Jakub; Glinkowski, Wojciech; Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Faulty postures, scoliosis and sagittal plane deformities should be detected as early as possible to apply preventive and treatment measures against major clinical consequences. To support documentation of the severity of deformity and diminish x-ray exposures, several solutions utilizing analysis of back surface topography data were introduced. A novel approach to automatic recognition and localization of anatomical landmarks of the human back is presented that may provide more repeatable results and speed up the whole procedure. The algorithm was designed as a two-step process involving a statistical model built upon expert knowledge and analysis of three-dimensional back surface shape data. Voronoi diagram is used to connect mean geometric relations, which provide a first approximation of the positions, with surface curvature distribution, which further guides the recognition process and gives final locations of landmarks. Positions obtained using the developed algorithms are validated with respect to accuracy of manual landmark indication by experts. Preliminary validation proved that the landmarks were localized correctly, with accuracy depending mostly on the characteristics of a given structure. It was concluded that recognition should mainly take into account the shape of the back surface, putting as little emphasis on the statistical approximation as possible.

  20. A Parisian Walk along the Landmarks of the Discovery of Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gablot, Ginette

    To see the landmarks associated with the discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel a century ago and the transfer of this new field of research from the most prestigious scientific institutions of the day to new scientific sites is worth a walk that will take most of a morning or afternoon to complete.

  1. Illusionary Inclusion--What Went Wrong with New Labour's Landmark Educational Policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the emergence and evolution of New Labour's landmark educational policy; namely that of inclusion. The author, Alan Hodkinson, associate professor at the Centre for Cultural and Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, illuminates his conceptual difficulties in attempting to define what inclusion was and what…

  2. The use of visual landmarks in a wayfinding system for elderly with beginning dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, D.; Hagethorn, F.; Kröse, B.; de Greef, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experiment carried out to study the design options of a GPS-based navigation aid for elderly with beginning dementia. Results suggest that landmark based instructions may yield higher performance of the system then left/right instructions.

  3. Influence of anatomic landmarks in the virtual environment on simulated angled laparoscope navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzink, S.N.; Christie, L.S.; Goossens, R.H.M.; De Ridder, H.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the presence of anatomic landmarks on the performance of angled laparoscope navigation on the SimSurgery SEP simulator. Methods - Twenty-eight experienced laparoscopic surgeons (familiar with 30º angled laparoscope, >100 basic lap

  4. The use of visual landmarks in a wayfinding system for elderly with beginning dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, D.; Hagethorn, F.; Kröse, B.; de Greef, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experiment carried out to study the design options of a GPS-based navigation aid for elderly with beginning dementia. Results suggest that landmark based instructions may yield higher performance of the system then left/right instructions.

  5. Observer Reliability of Three-Dimensional Cephalometric Landmark Identification on Cone-Beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ana Emilia F.; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena S.; Phillips, Ceib; Motta, Alexandre; Burke, Brandon; Tyndall, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reliability in 3D landmark identification using Cone-Beam CT. Study Design Twelve pre-surgery CBCTs were randomly selected from 159 orthognathic surgery patients. Three observers independently repeated three times the identification of 30 landmarks in the sagittal, coronal, and axial slices. A mixed effects ANOVA model estimated the Intraclass Correlations (ICC) and assessed systematic bias. Results The ICC was >0.9 for 86% of intra-observer assessments and 66% of inter-observer assessments. Only 1% of intra-observer and 3% of inter-observer coefficients were <0.45. The systematic difference among observers was greater in X and Z than in Y dimensions, but the maximum mean difference was quite small. Conclusion Overall, the intra- and inter-observer reliability was excellent. 3D landmark identification using CBCT can offer consistent and reproducible data, if a protocol for operator training and calibration is followed. This is particularly important for landmarks not easily specified in all three planes of space. PMID:18718796

  6. 77 FR 53230 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... EDMUND PETTUS BRIDGE, Dallas County Connecticut HARRIET BEECHER STOWE HOUSE, Hartford Illinois SECOND... the Landmarks Committee are: Mr. Ronald James, Chair Dr. James M. Allan Dr. Cary Carson Dr. Darlene Clark Hine Mr. Luis Hoyos, AIA Dr. Barbara J. Mills Dr. William J. Murtagh Dr. Franklin Odo Dr. William...

  7. Single Landmark Learning in Rats: Sex Differences in a Navigation Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcano, L.; Santamaria, J.; Mackintosh, N. J.; Chamizo, V. D.

    2009-01-01

    In Experiments 1 and 2, rats were trained in a Morris pool to find a hidden platform located some distance away from a single landmark. Males learned to swim to the platform faster than females, but on test trials without the platform, males, unlike females, spent less time in the platform quadrant of the pool in the second half of each test trial…

  8. 76 FR 60079 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Board will be held beginning at 1 p.m. on November 8, 2011, at the following location. The meeting... System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined. The Committee...

  9. 76 FR 55701 - Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... National Park Service Landmarks Committee of the National Park System Advisory Board Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Board will be held beginning at 1 p.m. on November 8, 2011, at the following location. The meeting... System Advisory Board at a subsequent meeting at a place and time to be determined. The Committee...

  10. 36 CFR 62.4 - Natural landmark designation and recognition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficient representation of the significant natural features. (g) National Park System Advisory Board. (1... qualifies for national natural landmark designation. (2) Notice of Advisory Board meetings to review... also attend the board meeting and upon request may address the board concerning an area's...

  11. Navigating in small-scale space: the role of landmarks and resource monitoring in understanding saddleback tamarin travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Paul A; Porter, Leila M

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies of spatial memory in wild nonhuman primates indicate that foragers may rely on a combination of navigational strategies to locate nearby and distant feeding sites. When traveling in large-scale space, tamarins are reported to encode spatial information in the form of a route-based map. However, little is known concerning how wild tamarins navigate in small-scale space (between feeding sites located at a distance of ≤60 m). Therefore, we collected data on range use, diet, and the angle and distance traveled to visit sequential feeding sites in the same group of habituated Bolivian saddleback tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis weddelli) in 2009 and 2011. For 7-8 hr a day for 54 observation days, we recorded the location of the study group at 10 min intervals using a GPS unit. We then used GIS software to map and analyze the monkeys' movements and travel paths taken between feeding sites. Our results indicate that in small-scale space the tamarins relied on multiple spatial strategies. In 31% of cases travel was route-based. In the remaining 69% of cases, however, the tamarins appeared to attend to the spatial positions of one or more near-to-site landmarks to relocate feeding sites. In doing so they approached the same feeding site from a mean of 4.5 different directions, frequently utilized different arboreal pathways, and traveled approximately 30% longer than then the straight-line distance. In addition, the monkeys' use of non-direct travel paths allowed them to monitor insect and fruit availability in areas within close proximity of currently used food patches. We conclude that the use of an integrated spatial strategy (route-based travel and attention to near-to-goal landmarks) provides tamarins with the opportunity to relocate productive feeding sites as well as monitor the availability of nearby resources in small-scale space.

  12. Protein landmarks for diversity assessment in wheat genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jai ganesha

    1Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, MPUAT Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. ... attributes exhibited the importance of seed storage as a marker system. .... were monomorphic for all genotypes. ..... bands, percent polymorphism Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's Information index (I), total genetic diversity.

  13. A method to detect landmark pairs accurately between intra-patient volumetric medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Zhang, Miao; Chang, Xiao; Fu, Yabo; Liu, Shi; Li, Harold H; Mutic, Sasa; Duan, Ye

    2017-08-23

    An image processing procedure was developed in this study to detect large quantity of landmark pairs accurately in pairs of volumetric medical images. The detected landmark pairs can be used to evaluate of deformable image registration (DIR) methods quantitatively. Landmark detection and pair matching were implemented in a Gaussian pyramid multi-resolution scheme. A 3D scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) feature detection method and a 3D Harris-Laplacian corner detection method were employed to detect feature points, i.e., landmarks. A novel feature matching algorithm, Multi-Resolution Inverse-Consistent Guided Matching or MRICGM, was developed to allow accurate feature pairs matching. MRICGM performs feature matching using guidance by the feature pairs detected at the lower resolution stage and the higher confidence feature pairs already detected at the same resolution stage, while enforces inverse consistency. The proposed feature detection and feature pair matching algorithms were optimized to process 3D CT and MRI images. They were successfully applied between the inter-phase abdomen 4DCT images of three patients, between the original and the re-scanned radiation therapy simulation CT images of two head-neck patients, and between inter-fractional treatment MRIs of two patients. The proposed procedure was able to successfully detect and match over 6300 feature pairs on average. The automatically detected landmark pairs were manually verified and the mismatched pairs were rejected. The automatic feature matching accuracy before manual error rejection was 99.4%. Performance of MRICGM was also evaluated using seven digital phantom datasets with known ground truth of tissue deformation. On average, 11855 feature pairs were detected per digital phantom dataset with TRE = 0.77 ± 0.72 mm. A procedure was developed in this study to detect large number of landmark pairs accurately between two volumetric medical images. It allows a semi-automatic way to generate the

  14. Reproducibility of the sella turcica landmark in three dimensions using a sella turcica-specific reference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittayapat, Pisha; Jacobs, Reinhilde [University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Odri, Guillaume A. [Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Centre Hospitalier Regional d' Orleans, Orleans Cedex2 (France); De Faria Vasconcelos, Karla [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Division of Oral Radiology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Willems, Guy [Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, Orthodontics, KU Leuven and Dentistry, University Hospitals Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Olszewski, Raphael [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to assess the reproducibility of identifying the sella turcica landmark in a three-dimensional (3D) model by using a new sella-specific landmark reference system. Thirty-two cone-beam computed tomographic scans (3D Accuitomo 170, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) were retrospectively collected. The 3D data were exported into the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine standard and then imported into the Maxilim software (Medicim NV, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium) to create 3D surface models. Five observers identified four osseous landmarks in order to create the reference frame and then identified two sella landmarks. The x, y, and z coordinates of each landmark were exported. The observations were repeated after four weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the multiple paired t-test with Bonferroni correction (intraobserver precision: p<0.005, interobserver precision: p<0.0011). The intraobserver mean precision of all landmarks was <1 mm. Significant differences were found when comparing the intraobserver precision of each observer (p<0.005). For the sella landmarks, the intraobserver mean precision ranged from 0.43±0.34 mm to 0.51±0.46 mm. The intraobserver reproducibility was generally good. The overall interobserver mean precision was <1 mm. Significant differences between each pair of observers for all anatomical landmarks were found (p<0.0011). The interobserver reproducibility of sella landmarks was good, with >50% precision in locating the landmark within 1 mm. A newly developed reference system offers high precision and reproducibility for sella turcica identification in a 3D model without being based on two-dimensional images derived from 3D data.

  15. Toward a model for lexical access based on acoustic landmarks and distinctive features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kenneth N.

    2002-04-01

    This article describes a model in which the acoustic speech signal is processed to yield a discrete representation of the speech stream in terms of a sequence of segments, each of which is described by a set (or bundle) of binary distinctive features. These distinctive features specify the phonemic contrasts that are used in the language, such that a change in the value of a feature can potentially generate a new word. This model is a part of a more general model that derives a word sequence from this feature representation, the words being represented in a lexicon by sequences of feature bundles. The processing of the signal proceeds in three steps: (1) Detection of peaks, valleys, and discontinuities in particular frequency ranges of the signal leads to identification of acoustic landmarks. The type of landmark provides evidence for a subset of distinctive features called articulator-free features (e.g., [vowel], [consonant], [continuant]). (2) Acoustic parameters are derived from the signal near the landmarks to provide evidence for the actions of particular articulators, and acoustic cues are extracted by sampling selected attributes of these parameters in these regions. The selection of cues that are extracted depends on the type of landmark and on the environment in which it occurs. (3) The cues obtained in step (2) are combined, taking context into account, to provide estimates of ``articulator-bound'' features associated with each landmark (e.g., [lips], [high], [nasal]). These articulator-bound features, combined with the articulator-free features in (1), constitute the sequence of feature bundles that forms the output of the model. Examples of cues that are used, and justification for this selection, are given, as well as examples of the process of inferring the underlying features for a segment when there is variability in the signal due to enhancement gestures (recruited by a speaker to make a contrast more salient) or due to overlap of gestures from

  16. Interventional guidance for cardiac resynchronization therapies: merging anatomic X-ray imaging with functional ultrasound imaging based on mutually-shared landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, R.; Shechter, G.; Gutierrez, L.; Chan, R.C. [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Tournoux, F.; Singh, J.; Picard, M. [Dept. of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States); Brink, B. v.d.; Boomen, R. v.d. [Philips Medical System, Best (Netherlands); Gerard, O. [Philips Medical Systems, Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    Detailed knowledge of cardiac anatomy and function is required for complex cardiac electrophysiology interventions. Cardiac resynchronization therapies (CRT), for example, requires information about coronary venous anatomy for left ventricular lead placement. In CRT, heart failure patients are equipped with dual-chamber pacemakers in order to improve cardiac output and heart failure symptoms. Cardiac function is mainly assessed with Ultrasound imaging. Fusion of complementary information from X-ray and ultrasound is an essential step towards fully utilizing all available information for CRT guidance. We present an approach for fusion of anatomical information (coronary vein structure) from X-ray with functional information (left ventricular deformation and dynamics) from ultrasound. We propose an image-based fusion approach based on mutually-shared landmarks which enable registration of both imaging spaces without the need for external tracking. (orig.)

  17. Face Recognition from Still Images to Video Sequences: A Local-Feature-Based Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shaokang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although automatic faces recognition has shown success for high-quality images under controlled conditions, for video-based recognition it is hard to attain similar levels of performance. We describe in this paper recent advances in a project being undertaken to trial and develop advanced surveillance systems for public safety. In this paper, we propose a local facial feature based framework for both still image and video-based face recognition. The evaluation is performed on a still image dataset LFW and a video sequence dataset MOBIO to compare 4 methods for operation on feature: feature averaging (Avg-Feature, Mutual Subspace Method (MSM, Manifold to Manifold Distance (MMS, and Affine Hull Method (AHM, and 4 methods for operation on distance on 3 different features. The experimental results show that Multi-region Histogram (MRH feature is more discriminative for face recognition compared to Local Binary Patterns (LBP and raw pixel intensity. Under the limitation on a small number of images available per person, feature averaging is more reliable than MSM, MMD, and AHM and is much faster. Thus, our proposed framework—averaging MRH feature is more suitable for CCTV surveillance systems with constraints on the number of images and the speed of processing.

  18. Tracking subtle stereotypes of children with trisomy 21: from facial-feature-based to implicit stereotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enea-Drapeau, Claire; Carlier, Michèle; Huguet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Stigmatization is one of the greatest obstacles to the successful integration of people with Trisomy 21 (T21 or Down syndrome), the most frequent genetic disorder associated with intellectual disability. Research on attitudes and stereotypes toward these people still focuses on explicit measures subjected to social-desirability biases, and neglects how variability in facial stigmata influences attitudes and stereotyping. The participants were 165 adults including 55 young adult students, 55 non-student adults, and 55 professional caregivers working with intellectually disabled persons. They were faced with implicit association tests (IAT), a well-known technique whereby response latency is used to capture the relative strength with which some groups of people--here photographed faces of typically developing children and children with T21--are automatically (without conscious awareness) associated with positive versus negative attributes in memory. Each participant also rated the same photographed faces (consciously accessible evaluations). We provide the first evidence that the positive bias typically found in explicit judgments of children with T21 is smaller for those whose facial features are highly characteristic of this disorder, compared to their counterparts with less distinctive features and to typically developing children. We also show that this bias can coexist with negative evaluations at the implicit level (with large effect sizes), even among professional caregivers. These findings support recent models of feature-based stereotyping, and more importantly show how crucial it is to go beyond explicit evaluations to estimate the true extent of stigmatization of intellectually disabled people.

  19. A Solitary Feature-based Lung Nodule Detection Approach for Chest X-Ray Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Shen, Linlin; Luo, Suhuai

    2017-01-31

    Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases. It has a high death rate and its incidence rate has been increasing all over the world. Lung cancer appears as a solitary nodule in chest x-ray radiograph (CXR). Therefore, lung nodule detection in CXR could have a significant impact on early detection of lung cancer. Radiologists define a lung nodule in chest x-ray radiographs as "solitary white nodule-like blob". However, the solitary feature has not been employed for lung nodule detection before. In this paper, a solitary feature-based lung nodule detection method was proposed. We employed stationary wavelet transform and convergence index filter to extract the texture features and used AdaBoost to generate white nodule-likeness map. A solitary feature was defined to evaluate the isolation degree of candidates. Both the isolation degree and the white nodule-likeness were used as final evaluation of lung nodule candidates. The proposed method shows better performance and robustness than those reported in previous research. More than 80% and 93% of lung nodules in the lung field in the JSRT database were detected when the false positives per image was two and five, respectively. The proposed approach has the potential of being used in clinical practice.

  20. Feature based Weld-Deposition for Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchagnula, Jayaprakash Sharma; Simhambhatla, Suryakumar

    2016-08-01

    Fabricating functional metal parts using Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a leading trend. However, realizing overhanging features has been a challenge due to the lack of support mechanism for metals. Powder-bed fusion techniques like, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) employ easily-breakable-scaffolds made of the same material to realize the overhangs. However, the same approach is not extendible to deposition processes like laser or arc based direct energy deposition processes. Although it is possible to realize small overhangs by exploiting the inherent overhanging capability of the process or by blinding some small features like holes, the same cannot be extended for more complex geometries. The current work presents a novel approach for realizing complex overhanging features without the need of support structures. This is possible by using higher order kinematics and suitably aligning the overhang with the deposition direction. Feature based non-uniform slicing and non-uniform area-filling are some vital concepts required in realizing the same and are briefly discussed here. This method can be used to fabricate and/or repair fully dense and functional components for various engineering applications. Although this approach has been implemented for weld-deposition based system, the same can be extended to any other direct energy deposition processes also.

  1. Microarray data classification using the spectral-feature-based TLS ensemble algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhan-Li; Wang, Han; Lau, Wai-Shing; Seet, Gerald; Wang, Danwei; Lam, Kin-Man

    2014-09-01

    The reliable and accurate identification of cancer categories is crucial to a successful diagnosis and a proper treatment of the disease. In most existing work, samples of gene expression data are treated as one-dimensional signals, and are analyzed by means of some statistical signal processing techniques or intelligent computation algorithms. In this paper, from an image-processing viewpoint, a spectral-feature-based Tikhonov-regularized least-squares (TLS) ensemble algorithm is proposed for cancer classification using gene expression data. In the TLS model, a test sample is represented as a linear combination of the atoms of a dictionary. Two types of dictionaries, namely singular value decomposition (SVD)-based eigenassays and independent component analysis (ICA)-based eigenassays, are proposed for the TLS model, and both are extracted via a two-stage approach. The proposed algorithm is inspired by our finding that, among these eigenassays, the categories of some of the testing samples can be assigned correctly by using the TLS models formed from some of the spectral features, but not for those formed from the original samples only. In order to retain the positive characteristics of these spectral features in making correct category assignments, a strategy of classifier committee learning (CCL) is designed to combine the results obtained from the different spectral features. Experimental results on standard databases demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. A Circular Polarizer with Beamforming Feature Based on Frequency Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Ren, Jian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a circular polarizer with beamforming features based on frequency selective surface (FSS), in which a modified anchor-shaped unit cell is used to reach the circular polarizer function. The beamforming characteristic is realized by a particular design of the unit-phase distribution, which is obtained by varying the scale of the unit cell. Instead of using plane waves, a horn antenna is designed to feed the phase-variant FSS. The proposed two-layer FSS is fabricated and measured to verify the design. The measured results show that the proposed structure can convert the linearly polarized waves to circularly polarized waves. Compared with the feeding horn antenna, the transmitted beam of the FSS-added horn is 14.43° broader in one direction, while 3.77° narrower in the orthogonal direction. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to realize circular polarizer with beamforming as the extra function based on FSS, which is promising in satellite and communication systems for potential applications due to its simple design and good performance.

  3. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  4. A Circular Polarizer with Beamforming Feature Based on Frequency Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Ren, Jian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a circular polarizer with beamforming features based on frequency selective surface (FSS), in which a modified anchor-shaped unit cell is used to reach the circular polarizer function. The beamforming characteristic is realized by a particular design of the unit-phase distribution, which is obtained by varying the scale of the unit cell. Instead of using plane waves, a horn antenna is designed to feed the phase-variant FSS. The proposed two-layer FSS is fabricated and measured to verify the design. The measured results show that the proposed structure can convert the linearly polarized waves to circularly polarized waves. Compared with the feeding horn antenna, the transmitted beam of the FSS-added horn is 14.43° broader in one direction, while 3.77° narrower in the orthogonal direction. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to realize circular polarizer with beamforming as the extra function based on FSS, which is promising in satellite and communication systems for potential applications due to its simple design and good performance. PMID:28128345

  5. A Feature-Based Structural Measure: An Image Similarity Measure for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Abdalrazak Shnain

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial recognition is one of the most challenging and interesting problems within the field of computer vision and pattern recognition. During the last few years, it has gained special attention due to its importance in relation to current issues such as security, surveillance systems and forensics analysis. Despite this high level of attention to facial recognition, the success is still limited by certain conditions; there is no method which gives reliable results in all situations. In this paper, we propose an efficient similarity index that resolves the shortcomings of the existing measures of feature and structural similarity. This measure, called the Feature-Based Structural Measure (FSM, combines the best features of the well-known SSIM (structural similarity index measure and FSIM (feature similarity index measure approaches, striking a balance between performance for similar and dissimilar images of human faces. In addition to the statistical structural properties provided by SSIM, edge detection is incorporated in FSM as a distinctive structural feature. Its performance is tested for a wide range of PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratio, using ORL (Olivetti Research Laboratory, now AT&T Laboratory Cambridge and FEI (Faculty of Industrial Engineering, São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil databases. The proposed measure is tested under conditions of Gaussian noise; simulation results show that the proposed FSM outperforms the well-known SSIM and FSIM approaches in its efficiency of similarity detection and recognition of human faces.

  6. PROSODIC FEATURE BASED TEXT DEPENDENT SPEAKER RECOGNITION USING MACHINE LEARNING ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Agrawal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of us are aware of the fact that voices of different individuals do not sound alike. The ability of recognizing a person solely from his voice is known as speaker recognition. Speaker recognition can not only assist in building better access control systems and security apparatus, it can be a useful tool in many other areas such as forensic speech analysis. The choice of features plays an important role in the performance of ML algorithm. Here we propose prosodic features based text dependent speaker recognition where the prosodic features can be extracted through linear predictive coding. Formants are efficient parameters to characterize a speaker’s voice. Formants are combined with their corresponding amplitudes, fundamental frequency, duration of speech utterance and energy ofthe windowed section. This feature vector is input to machine learning (ML algorithms for recognition. We investigate the performance of four ML algorithms namely MLP, RBFN, C4.5 decision tree, and BayesNet. Out of these ML algorithms, C4.5 decision tree performance is consistent. MLP performs better for gender recognition and experimental results show that RBFN gives better performance for increased population size.

  7. Feature-Based Analysis of Plasma-Based Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geddes, Cameron G. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Min [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cormier-Michel, Estelle [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  8. Localization from Visual Landmarks on a Free-Flying Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltin, Brian; Fusco, Jesse; Moratto, Zack; Alexandrov, Oleg; Nakamura, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present the localization approach for Astrobee,a new free-flying robot designed to navigate autonomously on board the International Space Station (ISS). Astrobee will conduct experiments in microgravity, as well as assisst astronauts and ground controllers. Astrobee replaces the SPHERES robots which currently operate on the ISS, which were limited to operating in a small cube since their localization system relied on triangulation from ultrasonic transmitters. Astrobee localizes with only monocular vision and an IMU, enabling it to traverse the entire US segment of the station. Features detected on a previously-built map, optical flow information,and IMU readings are all integrated into an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the robot pose. We introduce several modifications to the filter to make it more robust to noise.Finally, we extensively evaluate the behavior of the filter on atwo-dimensional testing surface.

  9. Hole detection and shape-free representation and double landmarks based geographic routing in wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Yang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks, an important issue of geographic routing is “local minimum” problem, which is caused by a “hole” that blocks the greedy forwarding process. Existing geographic routing algorithms use perimeter routing strategies to find a long detour path when such a situation occurs. To avoid the long detour path, recent research focuses on detecting the hole in advance, then the nodes located on the boundary of the hole advertise the hole information to the nodes near the hole. Hence the long detour path can be avoided in future routing. We propose a heuristic hole detecting algorithm which identifies the hole easily and quickly and then propose a representation of hole no matter what the shape of the hole is. In addition, we quantitatively figure out the areas in the vicinity of the hole that need to be announced the hole information. With such information, a new routing scheme with two landmarks was developed. Simulation results illustrate that our approach can achieve better performance in terms of the average length and number of hops in routing paths. Simulation also shows that our approach introduces very small computational complexity.

  10. Ultrasound Versus the Landmark Technique: A Prospective Randomized Comparative Study of Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B R Shrestha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to find out if an ultrasound technique has advantages over the conventional landmark technique. METHODS: This is a prospective randomized comparative study on 120 patients requiring central venous cannulation of the right internal jugular vein. The study comprised of two groups: ultrasound and landmark groups, each consisting of 60 patients. The outcome measures were compared between the groups. RESULTS: Cannulation of the internal jugular vein was successful in 58 patients in the ultrasound group and in 53 in the landmark group. The number of attempts was 1.5 (1 - 3 and 2 (1 - 3 in the ultrasound and landmark group respectively (p = 0.001. The time taken for the successful cannulation was 4.9 +/- 1.7 minutes in the ultrasound approach and 8.0 +/- 2.8 minutes in the landmark approach (p = 0.00. The internal jugular vein diameter in the supine position was 11.2 +/- 1.5 mm which increased to 15.04 +/- 1.5 mm with a 15 degrees head-down position in the USG group (p = 0.001. The first attempt success rate was 39/60 (63% in the ultrasound group and 19/60 (32% with the landmark technique. The seven (12% failure cases in the landmark group were rescued by the ultrasound technique. Inadvertent carotid artery puncture occurred in 2/60 (3% and 6/60 (10% of patients in the ultrasound and land mark group respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound improves success rate, minimizes cannulation time and complications during internal jugular vein cannulation. It can be employed as a rescue technique in cases of a failed landmark technique. Keywords:cannulation, central, landmark, technique, ultrasound.

  11. Millipixel scale landmark location in images: The optics, the imaging system, and the Cramer-Rao bound on performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jose Alejandro

    2005-11-01

    Landmark location uncertainty in digital images, which is extensively used in high precision photogrammetry and machine vision applications, consist of the error measurement when locating the position of a specific image feature. Landmark location uncertainty has been previously described in the literature for particular landmark designs within the scope of specific applications and using simplified models. For the first time, a general framework to determine landmark location uncertainty in presented in this work. The framework includes the determination of the performance floor by means of the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB). The methodology presented, considers the complete physical model of image formation, including 6 degree of freedom, landmark to camera geometry, diffraction, defocus, lens distortion, gray-scale, pixel geometry, and pixel sensitive area. With the framework developed, an analysis tool was created to model true engineering cases to allow the investigator to predict performance for any configuration of landmark, camera, imager and estimator used. This tool includes the determination of the CRLB performance floor for the configuration used. Additionally, this work also pioneers novel landmark location estimation algorithms with confidence intervals at tens of milli-pixel level, which not only perform more than 10 times better than existing estimation algorithms but also has been experimentally verified. The Cramer-Rao Lower Bound methodology introduced in the present work establishes a theoretical statistical minimum limit on the landmark location uncertainty. Knowledge of this bound provides the means to evaluate the actual performance of both existing and future landmark location estimators. The approach presented in this work includes a mix of analysis, where feasible, and numerical work where required, including numerically deriving the partial derivatives needed to compute statistical distributions and the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound.

  12. Software Designation to Assess the Proximity of Different Facial Anatomic Landmarks to Midlines of the Mouth and Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkelgosha V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recognition and determination of facial and dental midline is important in dentistry. Currently, there are no verifiable guidelines that direct the choice of specific anatomic landmarks to determine the midline of the face or mouth. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine which of facial anatomic landmarks is closest to the midline of the face as well as that of the mouth. Materials and Methods: Frontal full-face digital images of 92 subjects (men and women age range: 20-30 years in smile were taken under standardized conditions; commonly used anatomic landmarks, nasion, tip of the nose, and tip of the philtrum were digitized on the images of subjects and aesthetic analyzer software used for midline analysis using Esthetic Frame. Deviations from the midlines of the face and mouth were measured for the 3 clinical landmarks; the existing dental midline was considered as the fourth landmark. The entire process of midline analysis was done by a single observer and repeated twice. Reliability analysis and 1-sample t- tests were conducted. Results: The Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs for reliability analysis of RFV and RCV measures made two times revealed that the reliabilities were all acceptable. The results indicated that each of the 4 landmarks deviated uniquely and significantly (P<.001 from the midlines of the face as well as mouth in both males and females. Conclusions: There was a significant difference between the mean ratios of the chosen anatomic landmarks and the midlines of the face and mouth. The hierarchy of anatomic landmarks closest to the midline of the face is: (1 midline of the commissures, (2 nasion , (3 tip of philtrum,(4 dental midline, and (5 tip ofthe nose. The closest anatomic landmarks to the mouth midline are: (1 tip of philtrum, (2 dental midline, (3 tip of nose, and (4 nasion.

  13. Statistical power of intensity- and feature-based similarity measures for registration of multimodal remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uss, M.; Vozel, B.; Lukin, V.; Chehdi, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates performance characteristics of similarity measures (SM) used in image registration domain to discriminate between aligned and not-aligned reference and template image (RI and TI) fragments. The study emphasizes registration of multimodal remote sensing images including optical-to-radar, optical-to-DEM, and radar-to- DEM scenarios. We compare well-known area-based SMs such as Mutual Information, Normalized Correlation Coefficient, Phase Correlation, and feature-based SM using SIFT and SIFT-OCT descriptors. In addition, a new SM called logLR based on log-likelihood ratio test and parametric modeling of a pair of RI and TI fragments by the Fractional Brownian Motion model is proposed. While this new measure is restricted to linear intensity change between RI and TI (assumption somewhat restrictive for multimodal registration), it takes explicitly into account noise properties of RI and TI and multivariate mutual distribution of RI and TI pixels. Unlike other SMs, distribution of logLR measure for the null hypothesis does not depend on registration scenario or fragments size and follows closely chi-squared distribution according to Wilks's theorem. We demonstrate that a SM utility for image registration purpose can be naturally represented in (True Positive Rate, Positive Likelihood Rate) coordinates. Experiments on real images show that overall the logLR SM outperforms the other SMs in terms of area under the ROC curve, denoted AUC. It also provides the highest Positive Likelihood Rate for True Positive Rate values below 0.4-0.6. But for certain registration problem types, logLR can be second or third best after MI or SIFT SMs.

  14. Is radiographic measurement of bony landmarks reliable for lateral meniscal sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Kim, Taik-Seon; Lim, Hong-Chul; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy of meniscal measurement methods is still in debate. The authors' protocol for radiologic measurements will provide reproducible bony landmarks, and this measurement method of the lateral tibial plateau will correlate with the actual anatomic value. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five samples of fresh lateral meniscus with attached proximal tibia were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Each sample was obtained without damage to the meniscus and bony attachment sites. The inclusion criterion was mild to moderate osteoarthritis in patients with mechanical axis deviation of less than 15°. Knees with lateral compartment osteoarthritic change or injured or degenerated menisci were excluded. For the lateral tibial plateau length measurements, the radiographic beam was angled 10° caudally at neutral rotation, which allowed differentiation of the lateral plateau cortical margins from the medial plateau. The transition points were identified and used for length measurement. The values of length were then compared with the conventional Pollard method and the anatomic values. The width measurement was done according to Pollard's protocol. For each knee, the percentage deviation from the anatomic dimension was recorded. Intraobserver error and interobserver error were calculated. The deviation of the authors' radiographic length measurements from anatomic dimensions was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm. The deviation of Pollard's radiographic length measurements was 4.1 ± 2.0 mm. With respect to accuracy-which represents the frequency of measurements that fall within 10% of measurements-the accuracy of authors' length was 98%, whereas for Pollard's method it was 40%. There was a good correlation between anatomic meniscal dimensions and each radiologic plateau dimensions for lateral meniscal width (R(2) = .790) and the authors' lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .823) and fair correlation for Pollard's lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .660). The reliability of each

  15. Monocular vision for intelligent wheelchair indoor navigation based on natural landmark matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Luo, Yuan; Kong, Weixi

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a real-time navigation system in a behavior-based manner. We show that autonomous navigation is possible in different rooms with the use of a single camera and natural landmarks. Firstly the intelligent wheelchair is manually guided on a path passing through different rooms and a video sequence is recorded with a front-facing camera. A 3D structure map is then gotten from this learning sequence by calculating the natural landmarks. Finally, the intelligent wheelchair uses this map to compute its localization and it follows the learning path or a slightly different path to achieve the real-time navigation. Experimental results indicate that this method is effective even when the viewpoint and scale is changed.

  16. Bag-of-features based medical image retrieval via multiple assignment and visual words weighting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingyan

    2011-11-01

    Bag-of-features based approaches have become prominent for image retrieval and image classification tasks in the past decade. Such methods represent an image as a collection of local features, such as image patches and key points with scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptors. To improve the bag-of-features methods, we first model the assignments of local descriptors as contribution functions, and then propose a novel multiple assignment strategy. Assuming the local features can be reconstructed by their neighboring visual words in a vocabulary, reconstruction weights can be solved by quadratic programming. The weights are then used to build contribution functions, resulting in a novel assignment method, called quadratic programming (QP) assignment. We further propose a novel visual word weighting method. The discriminative power of each visual word is analyzed by the sub-similarity function in the bin that corresponds to the visual word. Each sub-similarity function is then treated as a weak classifier. A strong classifier is learned by boosting methods that combine those weak classifiers. The weighting factors of the visual words are learned accordingly. We evaluate the proposed methods on medical image retrieval tasks. The methods are tested on three well-known data sets, i.e., the ImageCLEFmed data set, the 304 CT Set, and the basal-cell carcinoma image set. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed QP assignment outperforms the traditional nearest neighbor assignment, the multiple assignment, and the soft assignment, whereas the proposed boosting based weighting strategy outperforms the state-of-the-art weighting methods, such as the term frequency weights and the term frequency-inverse document frequency weights. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Tracking subtle stereotypes of children with trisomy 21: from facial-feature-based to implicit stereotyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Enea-Drapeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stigmatization is one of the greatest obstacles to the successful integration of people with Trisomy 21 (T21 or Down syndrome, the most frequent genetic disorder associated with intellectual disability. Research on attitudes and stereotypes toward these people still focuses on explicit measures subjected to social-desirability biases, and neglects how variability in facial stigmata influences attitudes and stereotyping. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The participants were 165 adults including 55 young adult students, 55 non-student adults, and 55 professional caregivers working with intellectually disabled persons. They were faced with implicit association tests (IAT, a well-known technique whereby response latency is used to capture the relative strength with which some groups of people--here photographed faces of typically developing children and children with T21--are automatically (without conscious awareness associated with positive versus negative attributes in memory. Each participant also rated the same photographed faces (consciously accessible evaluations. We provide the first evidence that the positive bias typically found in explicit judgments of children with T21 is smaller for those whose facial features are highly characteristic of this disorder, compared to their counterparts with less distinctive features and to typically developing children. We also show that this bias can coexist with negative evaluations at the implicit level (with large effect sizes, even among professional caregivers. CONCLUSION: These findings support recent models of feature-based stereotyping, and more importantly show how crucial it is to go beyond explicit evaluations to estimate the true extent of stigmatization of intellectually disabled people.

  18. Spectral Skyline Separation: Extended Landmark Databases and Panoramic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Differt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from behavioral experiments suggests that insects use the skyline as a cue for visual navigation. However, changes of lighting conditions, over hours, days or possibly seasons, significantly affect the appearance of the sky and ground objects. One possible solution to this problem is to extract the “skyline” by an illumination-invariant classification of the environment into two classes, ground objects and sky. In a previous study (Insect models of illumination-invariant skyline extraction from UV (ultraviolet and green channels, we examined the idea of using two different color channels available for many insects (UV and green to perform this segmentation. We found out that for suburban scenes in temperate zones, where the skyline is dominated by trees and artificial objects like houses, a “local” UV segmentation with adaptive thresholds applied to individual images leads to the most reliable classification. Furthermore, a “global” segmentation with fixed thresholds (trained on an image dataset recorded over several days using UV-only information is only slightly worse compared to using both the UV and green channel. In this study, we address three issues: First, to enhance the limited range of environments covered by the dataset collected in the previous study, we gathered additional data samples of skylines consisting of minerals (stones, sand, earth as ground objects. We could show that also for mineral-rich environments, UV-only segmentation achieves a quality comparable to multi-spectral (UV and green segmentation. Second, we collected a wide variety of ground objects to examine their spectral characteristics under different lighting conditions. On the one hand, we found that the special case of diffusely-illuminated minerals increases the difficulty to reliably separate ground objects from the sky. On the other hand, the spectral characteristics of this collection of ground objects covers well with the data collected

  19. Single Robot Localisation Approach for Indoor Robotic Systems through Integration of Odometry and Artificial Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Ņikitenko, A; Liekna, A; Ekmanis, M.; Kuļikovskis, G; Andersone, I

    2013-01-01

    we present an integrated approach for robot localization that allows to integrate for the artificial landmark localization data with odometric sensors and signal transfer function data to provide means for different practical application scenarios. The sensor data fusion deals with asynchronous sensor data using inverse Laplace transform. We demonstrate a simulation software system that ensures smooth integration of the odometry-based and signal transfer – based localization into one approach.

  20. 世界著名地标%Some World-Famous Landmarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李媛媛

    2005-01-01

    1. The Eiffel Tower in Paris (巴黎埃菲尔铁塔) The Eiffel Tower is a metal tower in Paris, built for the 1889 Centennial Exposition. The most famous work of the French engineer Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel (1832-1923), the 300m high (984ft) tower was the highest building in the world until 1930. Although an outstanding engineering achievement, it was originally much disliked, but has become one of the great Parisian landmarks.

  1. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenghua Chen; Han Zou; Hao Jiang; Qingchang Zhu; Yeng Chai Soh; Lihua Xie

    2015-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified...

  2. The genial tubercle: A prospective novel landmark for the diagnosis of mandibular asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Youp; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Song, Geun-Su

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Identifying menton (Me) on posteroanterior cephalograms and three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images is difficult, because the midpoint of the symphyseal area is not identifiable after the mandibular symphysis fuses at an early age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the identification of the genial tubercle (GT) in patients with mandibular asymmetry and to compare it with that of the traditional landmark, Me. Methods The samples comprised 20 CBCT images of adults with mandibular asymmetry. Two examiners performed the identifications and measurements. Me and GT were marked, and the anteroposterior, vertical, and transverse distances to the three reference planes were measured on 3D-reconstructed CBCT images. The intra- and inter-examiner reliability of landmark identification of Me and GT were assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. Results The Me and GT landmarks showed excellent reliability (ICC ≥ 0.993) three-dimensionally. In the transverse evaluation, the ICC values of the GT (range, 0.997–0.999) tended to be slightly higher than those of Me (range, 0.993–0.996). In the Bland-Altman plots for the two separate assessments, Me showed a maximum error of 1.76 mm in the transverse direction, whereas the GT showed a maximum error of 0.96 mm in the 95% limit. Conclusions Our results suggest that both Me and GT are clinically reliable and equally useful landmarks for the evaluation of mandibular asymmetry on CBCT images. PMID:28127539

  3. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average +/- sd: gw 22 +/- 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p = 0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p < 0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided.

  4. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmook, Maria T.; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology/Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Integrative Morphology Group, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology / Division of Obstetrics and Feto-maternal Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average {+-}sd: gw 22 {+-} 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  5. Management of neovascular Age-related macular degeneration: A review on landmark randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Agarwal; Kanika Aggarwal; Vishali Gupta

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have...

  6. Knee joint secondary motion accuracy improved by quaternion-based optimizer with bony landmark constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Zheng, Naiqaun Nigel

    2010-12-01

    Skin marker-based motion analysis has been widely used in biomechanical studies and clinical applications. Unfortunately, the accuracy of knee joint secondary motions is largely limited by the nonrigidity nature of human body segments. Numerous studies have investigated the characteristics of soft tissue movement. Utilizing these characteristics, we may improve the accuracy of knee joint motion measurement. An optimizer was developed by incorporating the soft tissue movement patterns at special bony landmarks into constraint functions. Bony landmark constraints were assigned to the skin markers at femur epicondyles, tibial plateau edges, and tibial tuberosity in a motion analysis algorithm by limiting their allowed position space relative to the underlying bone. The rotation matrix was represented by quaternion, and the constrained optimization problem was solved by Fletcher's version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization technique. The algorithm was validated by using motion data from both skin-based markers and bone-mounted markers attached to fresh cadavers. By comparing the results with the ground truth bone motion generated from the bone-mounted markers, the new algorithm had a significantly higher accuracy (root-mean-square (RMS) error: 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in axial rotation and 0.4 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus) in estimating the knee joint secondary rotations than algorithms without bony landmark constraints (RMS error: 1.7 ± 0.4 deg in axial rotation and 0.7 ± 0.1 deg in varus-valgus). Also, it predicts a more accurate medial-lateral translation (RMS error: 0.4 ± 0.1 mm) than the conventional techniques (RMS error: 1.2 ± 0.2 mm). The new algorithm, using bony landmark constrains, estimates more accurate secondary rotations and medial-lateral translation of the underlying bone.

  7. Design of an enhanced visual odometry by building and matching compressive panoramic landmarks online

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LU; Zhi-yu XIANG; Ji-lin LIU

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and precise localization is a prerequisite for the intelligent navigation of mobile robots. Traditional visual localization systems, such as visual odometry (VO) and simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), suffer from two short-comings: a drift problem caused by accumulated localization error, and erroneous motion estimation due to illumination varia-tion and moving objects. In this paper, we propose an enhanced VO by introducing a panoramic camera into the traditional stereo-only VO system. Benefiting from the 360° field of view, the panoramic camera is responsible for three tasks: (1) detect-ing road junctions and building a landmark library online; (2) correcting the robot’s position when the landmarks are revisited with any orientation; (3) working as a panoramic compass when the stereo VO cannot provide reliable positioning results. To use the large-sized panoramic images efficiently, the concept of compressed sensing is introduced into the solution and an adap-tive compressive feature is presented. Combined with our previous two-stage local binocular bundle adjustment (TLBBA) stereo VO, the new system can obtain reliable positioning results in quasi-real time. Experimental results of challenging long-range tests show that our enhanced VO is much more accurate and robust than the traditional VO, thanks to the compressive panoramic landmarks built online.

  8. Cloud-Based Evaluation of Anatomical Structure Segmentation and Landmark Detection Algorithms: VISCERAL Anatomy Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Del-Toro, Oscar; Muller, Henning; Krenn, Markus; Gruenberg, Katharina; Taha, Abdel Aziz; Winterstein, Marianne; Eggel, Ivan; Foncubierta-Rodriguez, Antonio; Goksel, Orcun; Jakab, Andras; Kontokotsios, Georgios; Langs, Georg; Menze, Bjoern H; Salas Fernandez, Tomas; Schaer, Roger; Walleyo, Anna; Weber, Marc-Andre; Dicente Cid, Yashin; Gass, Tobias; Heinrich, Mattias; Jia, Fucang; Kahl, Fredrik; Kechichian, Razmig; Mai, Dominic; Spanier, Assaf B; Vincent, Graham; Wang, Chunliang; Wyeth, Daniel; Hanbury, Allan

    2016-11-01

    Variations in the shape and appearance of anatomical structures in medical images are often relevant radiological signs of disease. Automatic tools can help automate parts of this manual process. A cloud-based evaluation framework is presented in this paper including results of benchmarking current state-of-the-art medical imaging algorithms for anatomical structure segmentation and landmark detection: the VISCERAL Anatomy benchmarks. The algorithms are implemented in virtual machines in the cloud where participants can only access the training data and can be run privately by the benchmark administrators to objectively compare their performance in an unseen common test set. Overall, 120 computed tomography and magnetic resonance patient volumes were manually annotated to create a standard Gold Corpus containing a total of 1295 structures and 1760 landmarks. Ten participants contributed with automatic algorithms for the organ segmentation task, and three for the landmark localization task. Different algorithms obtained the best scores in the four available imaging modalities and for subsets of anatomical structures. The annotation framework, resulting data set, evaluation setup, results and performance analysis from the three VISCERAL Anatomy benchmarks are presented in this article. Both the VISCERAL data set and Silver Corpus generated with the fusion of the participant algorithms on a larger set of non-manually-annotated medical images are available to the research community.

  9. High-precision Detection of Facial Landmarks to Estimate Head Motions Based on Vision Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong W. Gao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach of determination of head movement is presented from the pictures recorded via digital cameras monitoring the scanning processing of PET. Two human vision models of CIECAMs and BMV are applied to segment the face region via skin colour and to detect local facial landmarks respectively. The developed algorithms are evaluated on the pictures (n=12 monitoring a subject’s head while simulating PET scanning captured by two calibrated cameras (located in the front and left side from a subject. It is shown that centers of chosen facial landmarks of eye corners and middle point of nose basement have been detected with very high precision (1 0.64 pixels. Three landmarks on pictures received by the front camera and two by the side camera have been identified. Preliminary results on 2D images with known moving parameters show that movement parameters of rotations and translations along X, Y, and Z directions can be obtained very accurately via the described methods.

  10. A low-cost test-bed for real-time landmark tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Ambrus; Hanan, Jay C.; Moreels, Pierre; Assad, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    A low-cost vehicle test-bed system was developed to iteratively test, refine and demonstrate navigation algorithms before attempting to transfer the algorithms to more advanced rover prototypes. The platform used here was a modified radio controlled (RC) car. A microcontroller board and onboard laptop computer allow for either autonomous or remote operation via a computer workstation. The sensors onboard the vehicle represent the types currently used on NASA-JPL rover prototypes. For dead-reckoning navigation, optical wheel encoders, a single axis gyroscope, and 2-axis accelerometer were used. An ultrasound ranger is available to calculate distance as a substitute for the stereo vision systems presently used on rovers. The prototype also carries a small laptop computer with a USB camera and wireless transmitter to send real time video to an off-board computer. A real-time user interface was implemented that combines an automatic image feature selector, tracking parameter controls, streaming video viewer, and user generated or autonomous driving commands. Using the test-bed, real-time landmark tracking was demonstrated by autonomously driving the vehicle through the JPL Mars yard. The algorithms tracked rocks as waypoints. This generated coordinates calculating relative motion and visually servoing to science targets. A limitation for the current system is serial computing-each additional landmark is tracked in order-but since each landmark is tracked independently, if transferred to appropriate parallel hardware, adding targets would not significantly diminish system speed.

  11. Automatic 2D-to-3D video conversion by monocular depth cues fusion and utilizing human face landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Mani B.; Bayazit, Ulug

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid 2D-to-3D video conversion system to recover the 3D structure of the scene. Depending on the scene characteristics, geometric or height depth information is adopted to form the initial depth map. This depth map is fused with color-based depth cues to construct the nal depth map of the scene background. The depths of the foreground objects are estimated after their classi cation into human and non-human regions. Speci cally, the depth of a non-human foreground object is directly calculated from the depth of the region behind it in the background. To acquire more accurate depth for the regions containing a human, the estimation of the distance between face landmarks is also taken into account. Finally, the computed depth information of the foreground regions is superimposed on the background depth map to generate the complete depth map of the scene which is the main goal in the process of converting 2D video to 3D.

  12. A computational psychiatry approach identifies how alpha-2A noradrenergic agonist Guanfacine affects feature-based reinforcement learning in the macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, S. A.; Oemisch, M.; Balcarras, M.; Westendorff, S.; Ardid, S.; van der Meer, M. A.; Tiesinga, P.; Womelsdorf, T.

    2017-01-01

    Noradrenaline is believed to support cognitive flexibility through the alpha 2A noradrenergic receptor (a2A-NAR) acting in prefrontal cortex. Enhanced flexibility has been inferred from improved working memory with the a2A-NA agonist Guanfacine. But it has been unclear whether Guanfacine improves specific attention and learning mechanisms beyond working memory, and whether the drug effects can be formalized computationally to allow single subject predictions. We tested and confirmed these suggestions in a case study with a healthy nonhuman primate performing a feature-based reversal learning task evaluating performance using Bayesian and Reinforcement learning models. In an initial dose-testing phase we found a Guanfacine dose that increased performance accuracy, decreased distractibility and improved learning. In a second experimental phase using only that dose we examined the faster feature-based reversal learning with Guanfacine with single-subject computational modeling. Parameter estimation suggested that improved learning is not accounted for by varying a single reinforcement learning mechanism, but by changing the set of parameter values to higher learning rates and stronger suppression of non-chosen over chosen feature information. These findings provide an important starting point for developing nonhuman primate models to discern the synaptic mechanisms of attention and learning functions within the context of a computational neuropsychiatry framework. PMID:28091572

  13. A computational psychiatry approach identifies how alpha-2A noradrenergic agonist Guanfacine affects feature-based reinforcement learning in the macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, S A; Oemisch, M; Balcarras, M; Westendorff, S; Ardid, S; van der Meer, M A; Tiesinga, P; Womelsdorf, T

    2017-01-16

    Noradrenaline is believed to support cognitive flexibility through the alpha 2A noradrenergic receptor (a2A-NAR) acting in prefrontal cortex. Enhanced flexibility has been inferred from improved working memory with the a2A-NA agonist Guanfacine. But it has been unclear whether Guanfacine improves specific attention and learning mechanisms beyond working memory, and whether the drug effects can be formalized computationally to allow single subject predictions. We tested and confirmed these suggestions in a case study with a healthy nonhuman primate performing a feature-based reversal learning task evaluating performance using Bayesian and Reinforcement learning models. In an initial dose-testing phase we found a Guanfacine dose that increased performance accuracy, decreased distractibility and improved learning. In a second experimental phase using only that dose we examined the faster feature-based reversal learning with Guanfacine with single-subject computational modeling. Parameter estimation suggested that improved learning is not accounted for by varying a single reinforcement learning mechanism, but by changing the set of parameter values to higher learning rates and stronger suppression of non-chosen over chosen feature information. These findings provide an important starting point for developing nonhuman primate models to discern the synaptic mechanisms of attention and learning functions within the context of a computational neuropsychiatry framework.

  14. Information

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, L David

    1991-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers the sub-field of information, and is one of the first in a series which synthesizes the research literature on major concepts in the field of communication. Each concise volume includes a research definition (concept explication) and presents a state-of-the-art analysis of theory and empirical findings related to the concept. After defining the word `information', the author contrasts non-linear and reflexive ideas about human communication with linear perspectives. Information is equated with uncertainty. The result presents a pattern for the process of conceptua

  15. Neural Network-Based Landmark Recognition and Navigation with IAMRs. Understanding the Principles of Thought and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    Research on neural networks and hippocampal function demonstrating how mammals construct mental maps and develop navigation strategies is being used to create Intelligent Autonomous Mobile Robots (IAMRs). Such robots are able to recognize landmarks and navigate without "vision." (SK)

  16. Assessment and feasibility of the four landmarks of the aortic root in a cohort of very preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Phillips

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion : We present reliability and reference values for all four anatomic landmarks of the aortic root in very preterm infants and demonstrated the importance of standardizing and reporting cardiac output measurements in preterm infants.

  17. Virtual skeletal complex model- and landmark-guided orthognathic surgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jeong; Woo, Sang-Yoon; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Han, Jeong Joon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Hwang, Soon Jung; Yi, Won-Jin

    2016-05-01

    In this study, correction of the maxillofacial deformities was performed by repositioning bone segments to an appropriate location according to the preoperative planning in orthognathic surgery. The surgery was planned using the patient's virtual skeletal models fused with optically scanned three-dimensional dentition. The virtual maxillomandibular complex (MMC) model of the patient's final occlusal relationship was generated by fusion of the maxillary and mandibular models with scanned occlusion. The final position of the MMC was simulated preoperatively by planning and was used as a goal model for guidance. During surgery, the intraoperative registration was finished immediately using only software processing. For accurate repositioning, the intraoperative MMC model was visualized on the monitor with respect to the simulated MMC model, and the intraoperative positions of multiple landmarks were also visualized on the MMC surface model. The deviation errors between the intraoperative and the final positions of each landmark were visualized quantitatively. As a result, the surgeon could easily recognize the three-dimensional deviation of the intraoperative MMC state from the final goal model without manually applying a pointing tool, and could also quickly determine the amount and direction of further MMC movements needed to reach the goal position. The surgeon could also perform various osteotomies and remove bone interference conveniently, as the maxillary tracking tool could be separated from the MMC. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the preoperative planning and the intraoperative guidance was 1.16 ± 0.34 mm immediately after repositioning. After surgery, the RMS differences between the planning and the postoperative computed tomographic model were 1.31 ± 0.28 mm and 1.74 ± 0.73 mm for the maxillary and mandibular landmarks, respectively. Our method provides accurate and flexible guidance for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery based on

  18. Deviation of landmarks in accordance with methods of establishing reference planes in three-dimensional facial CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kaeng Won; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol; Kook, Min Suk; Lee, Jae Seo [School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hee [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan Martin [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the deviation of landmarks from horizontal or midsagittal reference planes according to the methods of establishing reference planes. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 18 patients who received orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment were reviewed. Each CT scan was reconstructed by three methods for establishing three orthogonal reference planes (namely, the horizontal, midsagittal, and coronal reference planes). The horizontal (bilateral porions and bilateral orbitales) and midsagittal (crista galli, nasion, prechiasmatic point, opisthion, and anterior nasal spine) landmarks were identified on each CT scan. Vertical deviation of the horizontal landmarks and horizontal deviation of the midsagittal landmarks were measured. The porion and orbitale, which were not involved in establishing the horizontal reference plane, were found to deviate vertically from the horizontal reference plane in the three methods. The midsagittal landmarks, which were not used for the midsagittal reference plane, deviated horizontally from the midsagittal reference plane in the three methods. In a three-dimensional facial analysis, the vertical and horizontal deviations of the landmarks from the horizontal and midsagittal reference planes could vary depending on the methods of establishing reference planes.

  19. Carina as a useful and reliable radiological landmark for detection of accidental arterial placement of central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Ranjan, Shetty; Jasvinder, Kaur; Nanda, Shetty

    2010-12-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in the management of critically ill patients. Their insertion can be challenging in hemodynamically unstable patients and in those with altered thoracic anatomy. Although ultrasound guided insertion can reduce this problem, this facility may not be available in all locations and in all institutions. Accidental arterial puncture is one of the very serious complications that can occur during central venous catheter insertion. This is usually detected clinically by bright color and projectile/pulsatile flow of the returning blood. However, such means are known to be misleading especially in hypoxic and hemodynamically unstable patients. Other recognized measures used to identify arterial puncture would be blood gas analysis of the returning blood, use of pressure transducer to identify waveform pattern and the pressures. In this article, we propose that trachea and carina can be used as a reliable radiological landmark to identify accidental arterial placement of central venous catheters. We further conclude that this information could be useful especially when dealing with post-resuscitation victims and hemodynamically unstable critically ill patients.

  20. Ultrasonographic Validation of Anatomical Landmarks for Localization of the Tendon of the Long Head of Biceps Brachii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Saiyun; Harrell, John

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To establish anatomical landmarks for biceps tendon groove localization based on intrinsic anatomical relations and to validate the localization with ultrasonographic measurement. Design. Perspective, observational, single-blinded pilot study. Participants. 25 healthy male and female volunteers ages 24–50 years. Methods. We used two anatomical landmarks, the medial epicondyle vertical line related landmark and the coracoid process landmark. The distance from the groove skin mark to the medial epicondyle vertical line and the coracoid process was measured horizontally and was measured at 0° and 45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Results. Medial epicondyle vertical lines were 9.3 mm/21.5 mm medial to the groove at 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0.04/0.10, 0.32/0.42, and 0.26/0.37 for weight, height, and BMI in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. The distance between the coracoid process and the groove was 44.0 mm/62.2 mm in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0.36/0.41, 0.36/0.54, and 0.18/0.12 for weight, height, and BMI in 0°/45° of shoulder external rotation, respectively. Conclusions. The medial epicondyle vertical line and the coracoid process landmark are both useful anatomical landmarks to localize the biceps groove. The anatomical landmark based localization is essentially not correlated with subject's weight, height, or BMI.

  1. 100 years of Epilepsia: landmark papers and their influence in neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Bruce

    2010-07-01

    As part of the 2009 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Centenary Celebration, a special symposium was dedicated to Epilepsia (100 Years of Epilepsia: Landmark Papers and Their Influence). The Associate Editors were asked to identify a particularly salient and meaningful paper in their areas of expertise. From the content areas of neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry two very interesting papers were identified using quite different ascertainment techniques. One paper addressed the problem of psychosis in temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the other represents the first paper to appear in Epilepsia presenting quantitative assessment of cognitive status in epilepsy. These two papers are reviewed in detail and placed in historical context.

  2. Registration of cortical surfaces using sulcal landmarks for group analysis of MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A; Shattuck, David W; Thompson, Paul M; Leahy, Richard M

    2007-06-01

    We present a method to register individual cortical surfaces to a surface-based brain atlas or canonical template using labeled sulcal curves as landmark constraints. To map one cortex smoothly onto another, we minimize a thin-plate spline energy defined on the surface by solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs). By using covariant derivatives in solving these PDEs, we compute the bending energy with respect to the intrinsic geometry of the 3D surface rather than evaluating it in the flattened metric of the 2D parameter space. This covariant approach greatly reduces the confounding effects of the surface parameterization on the resulting registration.

  3. Loss of anatomical landmarks with eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Rebeca M; Kubiak, David W; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M; Lockman, Shahin

    2013-02-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare.

  4. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Karpenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks’ position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations.

  5. Energy edge post-occupancy evaluation project: The Landmark Office Building, Yalima, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    The Landmark Office Building Survey for the Energy Edge Post- Occupancy Project was administered to thirty of the building occupants. Eighteen respondents answered the questions which rated building features in the areas of (1) thermal factors; (2) air quality; (3) lighting; (4) acoustics; and, (5) overall workspace satisfaction. In addition to rating these ambient environmental features, these respondents also rated their satisfaction of various functional and aesthetic features and specific kinds of workplaces. Data was also collected on health characteristics and occupational demographics of the respondents. No analysis is made of the survey findings which are reported in graphic and tabular format. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Introduction to information science

    CERN Document Server

    Bawden, David

    2012-01-01

    This landmark textbook takes a whole subject approach to Information Science as a discipline. Introduced by leading international scholars and offering a global perspective on the discipline, this is designed to be the standard text for students worldwide. The authors' expert narrative guides you through each of the essential building blocks of information science offering a concise introduction and expertly chosen further reading and resources.Critical topics covered include:foundations: concepts, theories and historical perspectivesorganising and retrieving Information information behaviour,

  7. Toward Meaningful Manufacturing Variation Data in Design - Feature Based Description of Variation in Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eifler, Tobias; Boorla, Srinivasa Murthy; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    by the availability of sophisticated methods and tools alone, but does evidently also depend on the accuracy of the input information used. As existing approaches for the description of manufacturing variation focus however, almost exclusively, on monitoring and controlling production processes, there is frequently...

  8. Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    There are unstructured abstracts (no more than 256 words) and structured abstracts (no more than 480). The specific requirements for structured abstracts are as follows:An informative, structured abstracts of no more than 4-80 words should accompany each manuscript. Abstracts for original contributions should be structured into the following sections. AIM (no more than 20 words): Only the purpose should be included. Please write the aim as the form of "To investigate/ study/..."; MATERIALS AND METHODS (no more than 140 words); RESULTS (no more than 294 words): You should present P values where appropnate and must provide relevant data to illustrate how they were obtained, e.g. 6.92 ± 3.86 vs 3.61 ± 1.67, P< 0.001; CONCLUSION (no more than 26 words).

  9. Integration of tomato reproductive developmental landmarks and expression profiles, and the effect of SUN on fruit shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dongmei

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universally accepted landmark stages are necessary to highlight key events in plant reproductive development and to facilitate comparisons among species. Domestication and selection of tomato resulted in many varieties that differ in fruit shape and size. This diversity is useful to unravel underlying molecular and developmental mechanisms that control organ morphology and patterning. The tomato fruit shape gene SUN controls fruit elongation. The most dramatic effect of SUN on fruit shape occurs after pollination and fertilization although a detailed investigation into the timing of the fruit shape change as well as gene expression profiles during critical developmental stages has not been conducted. Results We provide a description of floral and fruit development in a red-fruited closely related wild relative of tomato, Solanum pimpinellifolium accession LA1589. We use established and propose new floral and fruit landmarks to present a framework for tomato developmental studies. In addition, gene expression profiles of three key stages in floral and fruit development are presented, namely floral buds 10 days before anthesis (floral landmark 7, anthesis-stage flowers (floral landmark 10 and fruit landmark 1, and 5 days post anthesis fruit (fruit landmark 3. To demonstrate the utility of the landmarks, we characterize the tomato shape gene SUN in fruit development. SUN controls fruit shape predominantly after fertilization and its effect reaches a maximum at 8 days post-anthesis coinciding with fruit landmark 4 representing the globular embryo stage of seed development. The expression profiles of the NILs that differ at sun show that only 34 genes were differentially expressed and most of them at a less than 2-fold difference. Conclusion The landmarks for flower and fruit development in tomato were outlined and integrated with the effect of SUN on fruit shape. Although we did not identify many genes differentially expressed in

  10. Integration of tomato reproductive developmental landmarks and expression profiles, and the effect of SUN on fruit shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Radovich, Cheryll; Welty, Nicholas; Hsu, Jason; Li, Dongmei; Meulia, Tea; van der Knaap, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Background Universally accepted landmark stages are necessary to highlight key events in plant reproductive development and to facilitate comparisons among species. Domestication and selection of tomato resulted in many varieties that differ in fruit shape and size. This diversity is useful to unravel underlying molecular and developmental mechanisms that control organ morphology and patterning. The tomato fruit shape gene SUN controls fruit elongation. The most dramatic effect of SUN on fruit shape occurs after pollination and fertilization although a detailed investigation into the timing of the fruit shape change as well as gene expression profiles during critical developmental stages has not been conducted. Results We provide a description of floral and fruit development in a red-fruited closely related wild relative of tomato, Solanum pimpinellifolium accession LA1589. We use established and propose new floral and fruit landmarks to present a framework for tomato developmental studies. In addition, gene expression profiles of three key stages in floral and fruit development are presented, namely floral buds 10 days before anthesis (floral landmark 7), anthesis-stage flowers (floral landmark 10 and fruit landmark 1), and 5 days post anthesis fruit (fruit landmark 3). To demonstrate the utility of the landmarks, we characterize the tomato shape gene SUN in fruit development. SUN controls fruit shape predominantly after fertilization and its effect reaches a maximum at 8 days post-anthesis coinciding with fruit landmark 4 representing the globular embryo stage of seed development. The expression profiles of the NILs that differ at sun show that only 34 genes were differentially expressed and most of them at a less than 2-fold difference. Conclusion The landmarks for flower and fruit development in tomato were outlined and integrated with the effect of SUN on fruit shape. Although we did not identify many genes differentially expressed in the NILs that differ at

  11. Gas Classification Using Combined Features Based on a Discriminant Analysis for an Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Il Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a gas classification method for an electronic nose (e-nose system, for which combined features that have been configured through discriminant analysis are used. First, each global feature is extracted from the entire measurement section of the data samples, while the same process is applied to the local features of the section that corresponds to the stabilization, exposure, and purge stages. The discriminative information amounts in the individual features are then measured based on the discriminant analysis, and the combined features are subsequently composed by selecting the features that have a large amount of discriminative information. Regarding a variety of volatile organic compound data, the results of the experiment show that, in a noisy environment, the proposed method exhibits classification performance that is relatively excellent compared to the other feature types.

  12. Optimizing map labeling of point features based on an onion peeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Wan D.; Shayma Alkobaisi; Sada Narayanappa; Petr Vojtechovsky; Kye Y. Bae

    2011-01-01

    Map labeling of point features is the problem of placing text labels to corresponding point features on a map in a way that minimizes overlaps while satisfying basic rules for the quality. This is a critical problem in the application of cartography and geographical information systems (GIS). In this paper we study the fundamental issues related to map labeling of point features and develop a new genetic algorithm to solve this problem. We adopt a method called convex onion peeling and utiliz...

  13. Image-guided transapical aortic valve implantation: sensorless tracking of stenotic valve landmarks in live fluoroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Denis R; Karar, Mohamed Esmail; Chalopin, Claire; Holzhey, David; Falk, Volkmar; Mohr, Friedrich W; Burgert, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is one of the most frequently acquired valvular heart diseases, accounting for almost 70% of valvular cardiac surgery. Transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation has recently become a suitable minimally invasive technique for high-risk and elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis. In this article, we aim to automatically define a target area of valve implantation, namely, the area between the coronary ostia and the lowest points of two aortic valve cusps. Therefore, we present a new image-based tracking method of these aortic landmarks to assist in the placement of aortic valve prosthesis under live 2D fluoroscopy guidance. We propose a rigid intensity-based image registration technique for tracking valve landmarks in 2D fluoroscopic image sequences, based on a real-time alignment of a contrast image including the initialized manual valve landmarks to each image of sequence. The contrast image is automatically detected to visualize aortic valve features when the aortic root is filled with a contrast agent. Our registration-based tracking method has been retrospectively applied to 10 fluoroscopic image sequences from routine transapical aortic valve implantation procedures. Most of all tested fluoroscopic images showed a successful tracking of valve landmarks, especially for the images without contrast agent injections. A new intraoperative image-based method has been developed for tracking aortic valve landmarks in live 2D fluoroscopic images to assist transapical aortic valve implantations and to increase the overall safety of surgery as well.

  14. Automatic Insall-Salvati ratio measurement on lateral knee x-ray images using model-guided landmark localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Wu, Chia-Hsing; Sun, Yung-Nien [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chii-Jeng [Department of Orthopedics, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Kuo, E-mail: ynsun@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: wale1212@gmail.co, E-mail: btmage@gmail.co, E-mail: mark@mail.ncku.edu.t, E-mail: n044206@mail.hosp.ncku.edu.t [Department of Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, 138 Sheng Li Road, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-21

    The Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) is important for detecting two common clinical signs of knee disease: patella alta and patella baja. Furthermore, large inter-operator differences in ISR measurement make an objective measurement system necessary for better clinical evaluation. In this paper, we define three specific bony landmarks for determining the ISR and then propose an x-ray image analysis system to localize these landmarks and measure the ISR. Due to inherent artifacts in x-ray images, such as unevenly distributed intensities, which make landmark localization difficult, we hence propose a registration-assisted active-shape model (RAASM) to localize these landmarks. We first construct a statistical model from a set of training images based on x-ray image intensity and patella shape. Since a knee x-ray image contains specific anatomical structures, we then design an algorithm, based on edge tracing, for patella feature extraction in order to automatically align the model to the patella image. We can estimate the landmark locations as well as the ISR after registration-assisted model fitting. Our proposed method successfully overcomes drawbacks caused by x-ray image artifacts. Experimental results show great agreement between the ISRs measured by the proposed method and by orthopedic clinicians.

  15. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning. PMID:27608019

  16. Visual navigation of the UAVs on the basis of 3D natural landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    This work considers the tracking of the UAV (unmanned aviation vehicle) on the basis of onboard observations of natural landmarks including azimuth and elevation angles. It is assumed that UAV's cameras are able to capture the angular position of reference points and to measure the angles of the sight line. Such measurements involve the real position of UAV in implicit form, and therefore some of nonlinear filters such as Extended Kalman filter (EKF) or others must be used in order to implement these measurements for UAV control. Recently it was shown that modified pseudomeasurement method may be used to control UAV on the basis of the observation of reference points assigned along the UAV path in advance. However, the use of such set of points needs the cumbersome recognition procedure with the huge volume of on-board memory. The natural landmarks serving as such reference points which may be determined on-line can significantly reduce the on-board memory and the computational difficulties. The principal difference of this work is the usage of the 3D reference points coordinates which permits to determine the position of the UAV more precisely and thereby to guide along the path with higher accuracy which is extremely important for successful performance of the autonomous missions. The article suggests the new RANSAC for ISOMETRY algorithm and the use of recently developed estimation and control algorithms for tracking of given reference path under external perturbation and noised angular measurements.

  17. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-09-05

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  18. Searching chromosomal landmarks in Indian lentils through EMA-based Giemsa staining method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Timir Baran; Halder, Mihir

    2016-09-01

    Lentil is one of the oldest protein-rich food crop with only one cultivated and six wild species. India is one important cultivator, producer and consumer of lentils and possesses a large number of germplasms. All species of lentil show 2n = 14 chromosomes. The primary objective of the present paper is to search chromosomal landmarks through enzymatic maceration and air drying (EMA)-based Giemsa staining method in five Indian lentil species not reported elsewhere at a time. Additionally, gametic chromosome analysis, tendril formation and seed morphology have been studied to ascertain interspecific relationships in lentils. Chromosome analysis in Lens culinaris, Lens orientalis and Lens odemensis revealed that they contain intercalary sat chromosome and similar karyotypic formula, while Lens nigricans and Lens lamottei showed presence of terminal sat chromosomes not reported earlier. This distinct morphological feature in L. nigricans and L. lamottei may be considered as chromosomal landmark. Meiotic analysis showed n = 7 bivalents in L. culinaris, L. nigricans and L. lamottei. No tendril formation was observed in L. culinaris, L. orientalis and L. odemensis while L. nigricans and L. lamottei developed very prominent tendrils. Based on chromosomal analysis, tendril formation and seed morphology, the five lentil species can be separated into two distinct groups. The outcome of this research may enrich conventional and biotechnological breeding programmes in lentil and may facilitate an easy and alternative method for identification of interspecific hybrids.

  19. Management of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration: A Review on Landmark Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Aggarwal, Kanika; Gupta, Vishali

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have led to substantial improvements in the outcome of these patients. The introduction of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents has resulted in improvement of visual outcomes and has had a positive impact on the quality of life among elderly population. While the contemporary management of neovascular AMD has been successful in tremendously reducing the visual morbidity, the financial burden of therapy has increased exponentially. To overcome these challenges, newer pharmacologic agents are evaluated for their efficacy and safety in AMD. Ground-breaking advances in bench to bedside research have led to discovery of new pathways that appear to be viable targets for preventing visual loss in AMD. In this review, study designs and results of landmark clinical trials in AMD from the past decade have been summarized.

  20. Management of neovascular Age-related macular degeneration: A review on landmark randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age.related macular degeneration (AMD. These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have led to substantial improvements in the outcome of these patients. The introduction of anti.vascular endothelial growth factor agents has resulted in improvement of visual outcomes and has had a positive impact on the quality of life among elderly population. While the contemporary management of neovascular AMD has been successful in tremendously reducing the visual morbidity, the financial burden of therapy has increased exponentially. To overcome these challenges, newer pharmacologic agents are evaluated for their efficacy and safety in AMD. Ground.breaking advances in bench to bedside research have led to discovery of new pathways that appear to be viable targets for preventing visual loss in AMD. In this review, study designs and results of landmark clinical trials in AMD from the past decade have been summarized.

  1. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-An Deng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR, and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF. For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  2. Fusion of WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks Using the Kalman Filter for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m.

  3. Fusion of WiFi, smartphone sensors and landmarks using the Kalman filter for indoor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghua; Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Qingchang; Soh, Yeng Chai; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-05

    Location-based services (LBS) have attracted a great deal of attention recently. Outdoor localization can be solved by the GPS technique, but how to accurately and efficiently localize pedestrians in indoor environments is still a challenging problem. Recent techniques based on WiFi or pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) have several limiting problems, such as the variation of WiFi signals and the drift of PDR. An auxiliary tool for indoor localization is landmarks, which can be easily identified based on specific sensor patterns in the environment, and this will be exploited in our proposed approach. In this work, we propose a sensor fusion framework for combining WiFi, PDR and landmarks. Since the whole system is running on a smartphone, which is resource limited, we formulate the sensor fusion problem in a linear perspective, then a Kalman filter is applied instead of a particle filter, which is widely used in the literature. Furthermore, novel techniques to enhance the accuracy of individual approaches are adopted. In the experiments, an Android app is developed for real-time indoor localization and navigation. A comparison has been made between our proposed approach and individual approaches. The results show significant improvement using our proposed framework. Our proposed system can provide an average localization accuracy of 1 m.

  4. Knowledge and knowing in library and information science a philosophical framework

    CERN Document Server

    Budd, John M

    2001-01-01

    This landmark work traces the heritage of thought, from the beginnings of modern science in the seventeenth century, until today, that has influenced the profession of library and information science.

  5. Independent component feature-based human activity recognition via Linear Discriminant Analysis and Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md; Lee, J J; Kim, T S

    2008-01-01

    In proactive computing, human activity recognition from image sequences is an active research area. This paper presents a novel approach of human activity recognition based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) of Independent Component (IC) features from shape information. With extracted features, Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is applied for training and recognition. The recognition performance using LDA of IC features has been compared to other approaches including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), LDA of PC, and ICA. The preliminary results show much improved performance in the recognition rate with our proposed method.

  6. Feature-Based Image Fusion with a Uniform Discrete Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The uniform discrete curvelet transform (UDCT is a novel tool for multiscale representations with several desirable properties compared to previous representation methods. A novel algorithm based on UDCT is proposed for the fusion of multi‐source images. A novel fusion rule for different subband coefficients obtained by UDCT decomposition is discussed in detail. Low‐pass subband coefficients are merged to develop a fusion rule based on a feature similarity (FSIM index. High‐pass directional subband coefficients are merged for a fusion rule based on a complex coefficients feature similarity (CCFSIM index. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm fuses all of the useful information from source images without introducing artefacts. Compared with several state‐of‐the‐art fusion methods, it yields a better performance and achieves higher efficiency.

  7. An Eye-tracking Study of Feature-based Choice in One-shot Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devetag, Giovanna; Di Guida, Sibilla; Polonio, Luca

    2016-01-01

    for a subset of game outcomes. We analyze subjects’ eye movements while playing a series of two-person, 3x3 one-shot games in normal form. Games within each class differ by a set of descriptive features (i.e., features that can be changed without altering the game equilibrium properties). Data show...... with the highest average payoff" or "choose the strategy leading to an attractive and symmetric outcome" without (optimally) incorporating knowledge on the opponent’s behavior. Lookup patterns resulted being feature and game invariant, heterogeneous across subjects, but stable within subjects. Using a cluster...... analysis, we find correlations between eye-movements and choices; however, applying the Cognitive Hierarchy model to our data, we show that only some of the subjects present both information search patterns and choices compatible with a specific cognitive level. We also find a series of correlations...

  8. Edge Feature Based Fast Mode Decision Algorithm for H.264 Intra Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wei; LI Hua; ZHANG Shufang; HOU Ling; ZHANG Shujun

    2006-01-01

    A fast intra mode decision algorithm is proposed in this paper to reduce the complexity of H. 264 encoder. The proposed algorithm adopted the pre-processing method based on edge feature in pictures to filter out some impossible prediction modes. Context information and pre-computed threshold are used to determine whether it is necessary to check the DC mode. This method is able to get rid of most of candidate modes so that only 66-150 modes are left for the final mode decision, instead of 592 modes in the case of full search(FS)method of H. 264. Simulation results demonstrate that the coding time of the proposed algorithm falls down 71.7% compared with FS method, while the performance loss is trivial compared with FS mode decision scheme.

  9. Toward Meaningful Manufacturing Variation Data in Design - Feature Based Description of Variation in Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eifler, Tobias; Boorla, Srinivasa Murthy; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    a lack of objective variation data in design. As a result, variation analyses and tolerancing activities rely on numerous assumptions made to fill the gaps of missing or incomplete data. To overcome this hidden subjectivity, a schema for a consistent and standardised description of manufacturing......The need to mitigate the effects of manufacturing variation already in design is nowadays commonly acknowledged and has led to a wide use of predictive modeling techniques, tolerancing approaches, etc. in industry. The trustworthiness of corresponding variation analyses is, however, not ensured...... variation is suggested. It extends existing ISO GPS annotation by information about influences on the manufacturability of a chosen design solution and in this way enables the systematic acquisition of variation data meaningful for design practice....

  10. Landmark Orientation and Map Design for Pedestrians: Prototype of a Selcuk University Campus Area Pedestrian Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahit Selvi, Huseyin; Oztug Bildirici, I.; Ulugtekin, Necla

    2016-10-01

    Orientation software produced today is generally designed for the navigation of cars. However, the navigation needs of pedestrians are different from those of drivers. The aim of this study is the design of a cartographic interface that supports the navigation of pedestrians in unfamiliar areas using landmarks and evaluation of this geo-mobile application by usability testing. In this study, an approach to landmark orientation based on the Voronoi diagram is proposed. Furthermore, the developed mobile application that uses this approach is explained in detail. The results of user tests are also given.

  11. A landmark-based method for the geometrical 3D calibration of scanning microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, M.

    2007-04-27

    This thesis presents a new strategy and a spatial method for the geometric calibration of 3D measurement devices at the micro-range, based on spatial reference structures with nanometersized landmarks (nanomarkers). The new method was successfully applied for the 3D calibration of scanning probe microscopes (SPM) and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). Moreover, the spatial method was also used for the photogrammetric self-calibration of scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In order to implement the calibration strategy to all scanning microscopes used, the landmark-based principle of reference points often applied at land survey or at close-range applications has been transferred to the nano- and micro-range in the form of nanomarker. In order to function as a support to the nanomarkers, slope-shaped step pyramids have been developed and fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) induced metal deposition. These FIB produced 3D microstructures have been sized to embrace most of the measurement volume of the scanning microscopes. Additionally, their special design allows the homogenous distribution of the nanomarkers. The nanomarkers were applied onto the support and the plateaus of the slope-step pyramids by FIB etching (milling) as landmarks with as little as several hundreds of nanometers in diameter. The nanomarkers are either of point-, or ring-shaped design. They are optimized so that they can be spatially measured by SPM and CLSM, and, imaged and photogrammetrically analyzed on the basis of SEM data. The centre of the each nanomarker serves as reference point in the measurement data or images. By applying image processing routines, the image (2D) or object (3D) coordinates of each nanomarker has been determined with subpixel accuracy. The correlative analysis of the SPM, CLSM and photogrammetric SEM measurement data after 3D calibration resulted in mean residues in the measured coordinates of as little as 13 nm. Without the coupling factors the mean

  12. Feature-based registration of historical aerial images by Area Minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Schenk, Toni

    2016-06-01

    The registration of historical images plays a significant role in assessing changes in land topography over time. By comparing historical aerial images with recent data, geometric changes that have taken place over the years can be quantified. However, the lack of ground control information and precise camera parameters has limited scientists' ability to reliably incorporate historical images into change detection studies. Other limitations include the methods of determining identical points between recent and historical images, which has proven to be a cumbersome task due to continuous land cover changes. Our research demonstrates a method of registering historical images using Time Invariant Line (TIL) features. TIL features are different representations of the same line features in multi-temporal data without explicit point-to-point or straight line-to-straight line correspondence. We successfully determined the exterior orientation of historical images by minimizing the area formed between corresponding TIL features in recent and historical images. We then tested the feasibility of the approach with synthetic and real data and analyzed the results. Based on our analysis, this method shows promise for long-term 3D change detection studies.

  13. The extraction of motion-onset VEP BCI features based on deep learning and compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) can provide a softer stimulus with reduced fatigue, and it has potential applications for brain computer interface(BCI)systems. However, the mVEP waveform is seriously masked in the strong background EEG activities, and an effective approach is needed to extract the corresponding mVEP features to perform task recognition for BCI control. In the current study, we combine deep learning with compressed sensing to mine discriminative mVEP information to improve the mVEP BCI performance. The deep learning and compressed sensing approach can generate the multi-modality features which can effectively improve the BCI performance with approximately 3.5% accuracy incensement over all 11 subjects and is more effective for those subjects with relatively poor performance when using the conventional features. Compared with the conventional amplitude-based mVEP feature extraction approach, the deep learning and compressed sensing approach has a higher classification accuracy and is more effective for subjects with relatively poor performance. According to the results, the deep learning and compressed sensing approach is more effective for extracting the mVEP feature to construct the corresponding BCI system, and the proposed feature extraction framework is easy to extend to other types of BCIs, such as motor imagery (MI), steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)and P300. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prior-knowledge treatment planning for volumetric arc therapy using feature-based database mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Fox, Tim

    2014-03-06

    Treatment planning for volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) is a lengthy process that requires many rounds of optimizations to obtain the best treatment settings and optimization constraints for a given patient's geometry. We propose a feature-selection search engine that explores previously treated cases of similar anatomy, returning the optimal plan configurations and attainable DVH constraints. Using an institutional database of 83 previously treated cases of prostate carcinoma treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy, the search procedure first finds the optimal isocenter position with an optimization procedure, then ranks the anatomical similarity as the mean distance between targets. For the best matching plan, the planning information is reformatted to the DICOM format and imported into the treatment planning system to suggest isocenter, arc directions, MLC patterns, and optimization constraints that can be used as starting points in the optimization process. The approach was tested to create prospective treatment plans based on anatomical features that match previously treated cases from the institution database. By starting from a near-optimal solution and using previous optimization constraints, the best matching test only required simple optimization steps to further decrease target inhomogeneity, ultimately reducing time spend by the therapist in planning arcs' directions and lengths.

  15. Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Maria I.; Ulusoy, Ali O.; Mundy, Joseph L.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic estimation of the world surfaces from aerial images has seen much attention and progress in recent years. Among current modeling technologies, probabilistic volumetric models (PVMs) have evolved as an alternative representation that can learn geometry and appearance in a dense and probabilistic manner. Recent progress, in terms of storage and speed, achieved in the area of volumetric modeling, opens the opportunity to develop new frameworks that make use of the PVM to pursue the ultimate goal of creating an entire map of the earth, where one can reason about the semantics and dynamics of the 3-d world. Aligning 3-d models collected at different time-instances constitutes an important step for successful fusion of large spatio-temporal information. This paper evaluates how effectively probabilistic volumetric models can be aligned using robust feature-matching techniques, while considering different scenarios that reflect the kind of variability observed across aerial video collections from different time instances. More precisely, this work investigates variability in terms of discretization, resolution and sampling density, errors in the camera orientation, and changes in illumination and geographic characteristics. All results are given for large-scale, outdoor sites. In order to facilitate the comparison of the registration performance of PVMs to that of other 3-d reconstruction techniques, the registration pipeline is also carried out using Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS) algorithm. Registration performance is similar for scenes that have favorable geometry and the appearance characteristics necessary for high quality reconstruction. In scenes containing trees, such as a park, or many buildings, such as a city center, registration performance is significantly more accurate when using the PVM.

  16. Feature-based alert correlation in security systems using self organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munesh; Siddique, Shoaib; Noor, Humera

    2009-04-01

    The security of the networks has been an important concern for any organization. This is especially important for the defense sector as to get unauthorized access to the sensitive information of an organization has been the prime desire for cyber criminals. Many network security techniques like Firewall, VPN Concentrator etc. are deployed at the perimeter of network to deal with attack(s) that occur(s) from exterior of network. But any vulnerability that causes to penetrate the network's perimeter of defense, can exploit the entire network. To deal with such vulnerabilities a system has been evolved with the purpose of generating an alert for any malicious activity triggered against the network and its resources, termed as Intrusion Detection System (IDS). The traditional IDS have still some deficiencies like generating large number of alerts, containing both true and false one etc. By automatically classifying (correlating) various alerts, the high-level analysis of the security status of network can be identified and the job of network security administrator becomes much easier. In this paper we propose to utilize Self Organizing Maps (SOM); an Artificial Neural Network for correlating large amount of logged intrusion alerts based on generic features such as Source/Destination IP Addresses, Port No, Signature ID etc. The different ways in which alerts can be correlated by Artificial Intelligence techniques are also discussed. . We've shown that the strategy described in the paper improves the efficiency of IDS by better correlating the alerts, leading to reduced false positives and increased competence of network administrator.

  17. Sentiment Mining on Products Features based on Part of Speech Tagging Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadese Abedi Shahkhali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In today's competitive business, paying attention to the feedback fromcustomers has become a valuable factor for organizations.Organizations have found that satisfied customers are not only a repeated buyer, they are also propaganda arm of the organization.Therefore, the correct analysis of their feedback by relying on information technology tools is a key element in the success of the organizations in trade. People generally share their opinions about purchased goods on the Web sites or in social networks. Extraction of these opinions is known as a special branch of text mining under the term of sentiment mining. Although this category is brand new, but in recent years, extensive researches have been done on sentiment analysis and classification of intentions. Therefore, in this paper a model is suggested about sentiment mining with the ability to extract users opinion and product features. So dataset of customer comments has been made in a way that the comments are taken from a Website about some specific digital products. Then the paragraphed opinions are converted into sentences and the sentences are separated into two categories of subjective and objective. Next, user's opinion and product features are taken from subjective sentences by using StanfordPOStagger and relying on Tf-idf factor for product features and finding opinion polarity by using SentiWordNet tools. In this way, user satisfaction of specific features of the product can be detected. As a means of evaluation, three factors of Recall, Precision and F-Measureprovide an indication of the accuracy of each part of this research.

  18. An acoustic feature-based similarity scoring system for speech rehabilitation assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syauqy, Dahnial; Wu, Chao-Min; Setyawati, Onny

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which focused on automatic scoring based on the comparison of the patient's speech with another normal speech on several aspects including pitch, vowel, voiced-unvoiced segments, strident fricative and sound intensity. The pitch estimation employed the use of cepstrum-based algorithm for its robustness; the vowel classification used multilayer perceptron (MLP) to classify vowel from pitch and formants; and the strident fricative detection was based on the major peak spectral intensity, location and the pitch existence in the segment. In order to evaluate the performance of the system, this study analyzed eight patient's speech recordings (four males, four females; 4-58-years-old), which had been recorded in previous study in cooperation with Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Taoyuan General Hospital. The experiment result on pitch algorithm showed that the cepstrum method had 5.3% of gross pitch error from a total of 2086 frames. On the vowel classification algorithm, MLP method provided 93% accuracy (men), 87% (women) and 84% (children). In total, the overall results showed that 156 tool's grading results (81%) were consistent compared to 192 audio and visual observations done by four experienced respondents. Implication for Rehabilitation Difficulties in communication may limit the ability of a person to transfer and exchange information. The fact that speech is one of the primary means of communication has encouraged the needs of speech diagnosis and rehabilitation. The advances of technology in computer-assisted speech therapy (CAST) improve the quality, time efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of the disorders. The present study attempted to develop tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which provided simple interface to let the assessment be done even by the patient himself without the need of particular knowledge of speech processing while at the

  19. Maximized Posteriori Attributes Selection from Facial Salient Landmarks for Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Phalguni; Sing, Jamuna Kanta; Tistarelli, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and dynamic face recognition technique based on the extraction and matching of devised probabilistic graphs drawn on SIFT features related to independent face areas. The face matching strategy is based on matching individual salient facial graph characterized by SIFT features as connected to facial landmarks such as the eyes and the mouth. In order to reduce the face matching errors, the Dempster-Shafer decision theory is applied to fuse the individual matching scores obtained from each pair of salient facial features. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with the ORL and the IITK face databases. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of the proposed face recognition technique also in case of partially occluded faces.

  20. Intensity and sulci landmark combined brain atlas construction for Chinese pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yishan; Shi, Lin; Weng, Jian; He, Hongjian; Chu, Winnie C W; Chen, Feiyan; Wang, Defeng

    2014-08-01

    Constructing an atlas from a population of brain images is of vital importance to medical image analysis. Especially in neuroscience study, creating a brain atlas is useful for intra- and inter-population comparison. Research on brain atlas construction has attracted great attention in recent years, but the research on pediatric population is still limited, mainly due to the limited availability and the relatively low quality of pediatric magnetic resonance brain images. This article is targeted at creating a high quality representative brain atlas for Chinese pediatric population. To achieve this goal, we have designed a set of preprocessing procedures to improve the image quality and developed an intensity and sulci landmark combined groupwise registration method to align the population of images for atlas construction. As demonstrated in experiments, the newly constructed atlas can better represent the size and shape of brains of Chinese pediatric population, and show better performance in Chinese pediatric brain image analysis compared with other standard atlases.

  1. Semi-Automatic Anatomical Tree Matching for Landmark-Based Elastic Registration of Liver Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Drechsler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One promising approach to register liver volume acquisitions is based on the branching points of the vessel trees as anatomical landmarks inherently available in the liver. Automated tree matching algorithms were proposed to automatically find pair-wise correspondences between two vessel trees. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of the existing automatic methods are completely error free. After a review of current literature and methodologies on the topic, we propose an efficient interaction method that can be employed to support tree matching algorithms with important pre-selected correspondences or after an automatic matching to manually correct wrongly matched nodes. We used this method in combination with a promising automatic tree matching algorithm also presented in this work. The proposed method was evaluated by 4 participants and a CT dataset that we used to derive multiple artificial datasets.

  2. Germ band retraction as a landmark in glucose metabolism during Aedes aegypti embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logullo Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito A. aegypti is vector of dengue and other viruses. New methods of vector control are needed and can be achieved by a better understanding of the life cycle of this insect. Embryogenesis is a part of A. aegypty life cycle that is poorly understood. In insects in general and in mosquitoes in particular energetic metabolism is well studied during oogenesis, when the oocyte exhibits fast growth, accumulating carbohydrates, lipids and proteins that will meet the regulatory and metabolic needs of the developing embryo. On the other hand, events related with energetic metabolism during A. aegypti embryogenesis are unknown. Results Glucose metabolism was investigated throughout Aedes aegypti (Diptera embryonic development. Both cellular blastoderm formation (CBf, 5 h after egg laying - HAE and germ band retraction (GBr, 24 HAE may be considered landmarks regarding glucose 6-phosphate (G6P destination. We observed high levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH activity at the very beginning of embryogenesis, which nevertheless decreased up to 5 HAE. This activity is correlated with the need for nucleotide precursors generated by the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, of which G6PDH is the key enzyme. We suggest the synchronism of egg metabolism with carbohydrate distribution based on the decreasing levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK activity and on the elevation observed in protein content up to 24 HAE. Concomitantly, increasing levels of hexokinase (HK and pyruvate kinase (PK activity were observed, and PEPCK reached a peak around 48 HAE. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3 activity was also monitored and shown to be inversely correlated with glycogen distribution during embryogenesis. Conclusions The results herein support the hypothesis that glucose metabolic fate changes according to developmental embryonic stages. Germ band retraction is a moment that was characterized as a landmark in glucose

  3. Evaluation of facial nerve and its landmarks in adult temporal bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Soheilipour

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify variations of different segments of facial nerve in temporal bone. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study that conducted on drilled bones in the temporal bone center of the Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, the landmarks of facial nerve in temporal bone were identified as separate variables and their distances from outer cortex of temporal bone and Henles spine and distances between different segments of nerve were recorded. Results: In the 50 temporal bones dissected, the distance between the tip of incus short process to the cortex was 14.2±1.96 mm, the distance between the facial recess from the facial nerve to the cortex was 14.5±2.58 mm, the distance between the stylomastoid foramen to the cortex was 20.6±2.49 mm, the distance between the lateral semicircular canal to the cortex was 15.9±2.31 mm and the distance between the sigmoid sinus dome to the cortex was 14.08±2.83 mm. The mean length of tympanic and mastoid segments (2nd and 3rd segments of facial nerve were 11.35±0.68 mm and 13.28±1.11mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean lengths of segment of facial nerve and distant of landmarks from outer cortex of temporal bone are partially similar compared to those described in the western literature and text books, but different compared to eastern researches.

  4. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bezjak@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors {>=}5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  5. A computational model of the integration of landmarks and motion in the insect central complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Chelsea; Vasilaki, Eleni; Barron, Andrew B.; Marshall, James A. R.

    2017-01-01

    The insect central complex (CX) is an enigmatic structure whose computational function has evaded inquiry, but has been implicated in a wide range of behaviours. Recent experimental evidence from the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and the cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis) has demonstrated the existence of neural activity corresponding to the animal’s orientation within a virtual arena (a neural ‘compass’), and this provides an insight into one component of the CX structure. There are two key features of the compass activity: an offset between the angle represented by the compass and the true angular position of visual features in the arena, and the remapping of the 270° visual arena onto an entire circle of neurons in the compass. Here we present a computational model which can reproduce this experimental evidence in detail, and predicts the computational mechanisms that underlie the data. We predict that both the offset and remapping of the fly’s orientation onto the neural compass can be explained by plasticity in the synaptic weights between segments of the visual field and the neurons representing orientation. Furthermore, we predict that this learning is reliant on the existence of neural pathways that detect rotational motion across the whole visual field and uses this rotation signal to drive the rotation of activity in a neural ring attractor. Our model also reproduces the ‘transitioning’ between visual landmarks seen when rotationally symmetric landmarks are presented. This model can provide the basis for further investigation into the role of the central complex, which promises to be a key structure for understanding insect behaviour, as well as suggesting approaches towards creating fully autonomous robotic agents. PMID:28241061

  6. Feature-based decision rules for control charts pattern recognition: A comparison between CART and QUEST algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Control chart pattern (CCP recognition can act as a problem identification tool in any manufacturing organization. Feature-based rules in the form of decision trees have become quite popular in recent years for CCP recognition. This is because the practitioners can clearly understand how a particular pattern has been identified by the use of relevant shape features. Moreover, since the extracted features represent the main characteristics of the original data in a condensed form, it can also facilitate efficient pattern recognition. The reported feature-based decision trees can recognize eight types of CCPs using extracted values of seven shape features. In this paper, a different set of seven most useful features is presented that can recognize nine main CCPs, including mixture pattern. Based on these features, decision trees are developed using CART (classification and regression tree and QUEST (quick unbiased efficient statistical tree algorithms. The relative performance of the CART and QUEST-based decision trees are extensively studied using simulated pattern data. The results show that the CART-based decision trees result in better recognition performance but lesser consistency, whereas, the QUEST-based decision trees give better consistency but lesser recognition performance.

  7. Effects of Spatial Ability, Gender Differences, and Pictorial Training on Children Using 2-D and 3-D Environments to Recall Landmark Locations from Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Otumfuor, Beryl A.; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial ability, gender differences, and pictorial training on fourth grade students' ability to recall landmark locations from memory. Ninety-six students used Google Earth over a 3-week period to locate landmarks (3-D) and mark their location on a 2-D topographical map. Analysis of covariance on posttest scores…

  8. Geometric Feature-Based Facial Expression Recognition in Image Sequences Using Multi-Class AdaBoost and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonwhoan Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions are widely used in the behavioral interpretation of emotions, cognitive science, and social interactions. In this paper, we present a novel method for fully automatic facial expression recognition in facial image sequences. As the facial expression evolves over time facial landmarks are automatically tracked in consecutive video frames, using displacements based on elastic bunch graph matching displacement estimation. Feature vectors from individual landmarks, as well as pairs of landmarks tracking results are extracted, and normalized, with respect to the first frame in the sequence. The prototypical expression sequence for each class of facial expression is formed, by taking the median of the landmark tracking results from the training facial expression sequences. Multi-class AdaBoost with dynamic time warping similarity distance between the feature vector of input facial expression and prototypical facial expression, is used as a weak classifier to select the subset of discriminative feature vectors. Finally, two methods for facial expression recognition are presented, either by using multi-class AdaBoost with dynamic time warping, or by using support vector machine on the boosted feature vectors. The results on the Cohn-Kanade (CK+ facial expression database show a recognition accuracy of 95.17% and 97.35% using multi-class AdaBoost and support vector machines, respectively.

  9. Evaluation and Comparison of Anatomical Landmark Detection Methods for Cephalometric X-Ray Images: A Grand Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Hsieh, Meng-Che; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Li, Wei-Cheng; Vandaele, Rémy; Marée, Raphaël; Jodogne, Sébastien; Geurts, Pierre; Chen, Cheng; Zheng, Guoyan; Chu, Chengwen; Mirzaalian, Hengameh; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Vrtovec, Tomaz; Ibragimov, Bulat

    2015-09-01

    Cephalometric analysis is an essential clinical and research tool in orthodontics for the orthodontic analysis and treatment planning. This paper presents the evaluation of the methods submitted to the Automatic Cephalometric X-Ray Landmark Detection Challenge, held at the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2014 with an on-site competition. The challenge was set to explore and compare automatic landmark detection methods in application to cephalometric X-ray images. Methods were evaluated on a common database including cephalograms of 300 patients aged six to 60 years, collected from the Dental Department, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, and manually marked anatomical landmarks as the ground truth data, generated by two experienced medical doctors. Quantitative evaluation was performed to compare the results of a representative selection of current methods submitted to the challenge. Experimental results show that three methods are able to achieve detection rates greater than 80% using the 4 mm precision range, but only one method achieves a detection rate greater than 70% using the 2 mm precision range, which is the acceptable precision range in clinical practice. The study provides insights into the performance of different landmark detection approaches under real-world conditions and highlights achievements and limitations of current image analysis techniques.

  10. Automated Extraction of Cranial Landmarks from Computed Tomography Data using a Combined Method of Knowledge and Pattern Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan N. RAJAPAKSE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of anatomical structures from medical imaging data is a significant and critical function in the medical domain. Past studies in this context have mainly utilized two main approaches, the knowledge and learning methodologies based methods. Further, most of previous reported studies have focused on identification of landmarks from lateral X-ray Computed Tomography (CT data, particularly in the field of orthodontics. However, this study focused on extracting cranial landmarks from large sets of cross sectional CT slices using a combined method of the two aforementioned approaches. The proposed method of this study is centered mainly on template data sets, which were created using the actual contour patterns extracted from CT cases for each of the landmarks in consideration. Firstly, these templates were used to devise rules which are a characteristic of the knowledge based method. Secondly, the same template sets were employed to perform template matching related to the learning methodologies approach. The proposed method was tested on two landmarks, the Dorsum sellae and the Pterygoid plate, using CT cases of 5 subjects. The results indicate that, out of the 10 tests, the output images were within the expected range (desired accuracy in 7 instances and acceptable range (near accuracy for 2 instances, thus verifying the effectiveness of the combined template sets centric approach proposed in this study.

  11. Towards High-Definition 3D Urban Mapping: Road Feature-Based Registration of Mobile Mapping Systems and Aerial Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Javanmardi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Various applications have utilized a mobile mapping system (MMS as the main 3D urban remote sensing platform. However, the accuracy and precision of the three-dimensional data acquired by an MMS is highly dependent on the performance of the vehicle’s self-localization, which is generally performed by high-end global navigation satellite system (GNSS/inertial measurement unit (IMU integration. However, GNSS/IMU positioning quality degrades significantly in dense urban areas with high-rise buildings, which block and reflect the satellite signals. Traditional landmark updating methods, which improve MMS accuracy by measuring ground control points (GCPs and manually identifying those points in the data, are both labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a novel and comprehensive framework for automatically georeferencing MMS data by capitalizing on road features extracted from high-resolution aerial surveillance data. The proposed framework has three key steps: (1 extracting road features from the MMS and aerial data; (2 obtaining Gaussian mixture models from the extracted aerial road features; and (3 performing registration of the MMS data to the aerial map using a dynamic sliding window and the normal distribution transform (NDT. The accuracy of the proposed framework is verified using field data, demonstrating that it is a reliable solution for high-precision urban mapping.

  12. Three-dimensional nonrigid landmark-based magnetic resonance to transrectal ultrasound registration for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Registration of three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR) to 3-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate images is an important step in the planning and guidance of 3-D TRUS guided prostate biopsy. In order to accurately and efficiently perform the registration, a nonrigid landmark-based registration method is required to account for the different deformations of the prostate when using these two modalities. We describe a nonrigid landmark-based method for registration of 3-D TRUS to MR prostate images. The landmark-based registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3-D MR to 3-D TRUS images using six manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following manual initialization, the two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3-D MR and TRUS images and then nonrigidly registered using the following steps: (1) rotationally reslicing corresponding segmented prostate surfaces from both 3-D MR and TRUS images around a specified axis, (2) an approach to find point correspondences on the surfaces of the segmented surfaces, and (3) deformation of the surface of the prostate in the MR image to match the surface of the prostate in the 3-D TRUS image and the interior using a thin-plate spline algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 17 patient prostate MR and 3-D TRUS images by measuring the target registration error (TRE). Experimental results showed that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of [Formula: see text] for the rigid registration and [Formula: see text] for the nonrigid registration, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm. A landmark-based nonrigid 3-D MR-TRUS registration approach is proposed, which takes into account the correspondences on the prostate surface, inside the prostate, as well as the centroid of the prostate. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method yields clinically sufficient accuracy.

  13. Anatomical landmarks and skin markers are not reliable for accurate labeling of thoracic vertebrae on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabshin, Nogah (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel)), e-mail: shabshin@gmail.com; Schweitzer, Mark E. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital and Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)); Carrino, John A. (Dept. of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Numbering of the thoracic spine on MRI can be tedious if C2 and L5-S1 are not included and may lead to errors in lesion level. Purpose: To determine whether anatomic landmarks or external markers are reliable as an aid for accurate numbering of thoracic vertebrae on MRI. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven thoracic spine MR studies of 67 patients (30 males, 37 females, age range 18-83 years) were studied, composed of 52 consecutive MR studies and an additional 15 MRI in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin. In the 52 thoracic MR examinations potential numbering aids such as the level of the sternal apex, pulmonary artery, aortic arch, and osseous or disc abnormalities were numbered on both cervical localizer (standard of reference) and thoracic sagittal images. The additional 15 examinations in which vitamin E markers were placed over the skin were evaluated for consistency in the level of the markers on different sequences in the same exam. Results: The sternal apex level ranged from T2 to T5 [T3 in 28/51 patients (55%), T2 in 10/51 (20%)]. The aortic arch level ranged from T2 to T4 [T4 in 18/48 (38%) and T3 in 17 (35%)]. Pulmonary artery level ranged from T4 to T6-7 disc [T5 in 20/52 patients (38%) and T6 in 14/52 (27%)]. In 3 of 12 patients who had abnormalities in a vertebral body or disc as definite point reference, the non-localizer image mislabelled the level. In 11/15 (73%) patients with vitamin E markers that were placed over the upper thoracic spine, the results showed consistency in the level of the markers in relation to the reference points or consistent inter-marker gap between the sequences. Conclusion: There are only two reliable ways to accurately define the levels if no landmarking feature is available on the magnet. The first is by including C2 in the thoracic sequence of a diagnostic quality, and the second is by using an abnormality in the discs or vertebral bodies as a point of reference

  14. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  15. Transitioning from anatomic landmarks to ultrasound guided central venous catheterizations: guidelines applied to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oom, Rodrigo; Casaca, Rui; Barroca, Rita; Carvalhal, Sara; Santos, Catarina; Abecasis, Nuno

    2017-07-14

    Centrally inserted central catheter (CICC) insertion is a commonly performed procedure that may give rise to different complications. Despite the suggestion of guidelines to use ultrasound guidance (USG) for vascular access, not all centers use it systematically. The aim of this study is to illustrate the experience with ultrasound in CICC placement at a high-volume oncological center, in a country where the landmark technique is standard. Retrospective analysis of a prospective database was performed on CICC placement under USG in the Central Venous Catheter Unit of Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, from 2012 to 2015. Three thousand five hundred and seventy-two procedures were recorded. From 2728 CICC placements, 1187 (43.5%) were done using USG. The majority of CICC placements were successful without immediate complications (96.1%). In 55 cases (4.6%), more than three attempts were necessary to puncture the vein. Pneumothorax occurred in 5 cases (0.4%) and arterial puncture was registered in 41 cases (3.5%). An increasing use of USG for placing CICCs was planned and observed over the years and, in the last year of the study, 67.3% of the CICC placements were with USG. CICC placement with USG is a safe and effective technique. Despite some resistance that is observed, these results support that it is worth following the guidelines that advocate the use of the USG in the placement of CICC.

  16. Effect of anatomical landmark perturbation on mean helical axis parameters of in vivo upper costovertebral joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Benoît; Sholukha, Victor; Salvia, Patrick; Rooze, Marcel; Feipel, Véronique; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2015-02-05

    The literature concerning quantification of costovertebral joint (CVJ) motion under in vivo conditions is scarce. Most papers concerning this topic are related to ex vivo loading conditions. In vivo protocols are available from the literature to determine rib and vertebra kinematics but new developments are needed to improve data processing concerning CVJ behaviour obtained from discrete breathing positions showing limiting ranges-of-motion and sensitive to noise. Data from previous work were used to implement a method analyzing mean helical axis (MHA) and pivot point parameters of the CVJ complexes. Several levels of noises were estimated within Monte-Carlo simulations to optimize MHA results. MHA parameters were then used to transform and define a CVJ-specific local coordinate system. This study proposes an improvement for CVJ kinematics processing and description from in vivo data obtained from computed tomography. This methodology emphasizes the possibility to work with variability of MHA parameters using Monte-Carlo procedures on anatomical landmark coordinates and to define a local coordinate system from this particular joint behaviour. Results from the CVJ joint model are closer to a hinge joint (secondary motions inferior to 3°) when anatomical frames are expressed from MHA orientation. MHA orientation and position data obtained from the proposed method are relevant according to angular dispersion obtained (from 7.5° to 13.9°) and therefore relevant to define behaviour of CVJ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A protocol for clinical evaluation of the carrying angle of the elbow by anatomic landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampagni, Maria Luisa; Casino, Daniela; Martelli, Sandra; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to present an in vivo protocol to estimate the carrying angle of the elbow in full extension. Forty-four arms were measured by using an electrogoniometer to acquire 3-dimensional coordinates of the landmarks. An algorithm based on the Cardan decomposition method was used to compute the carrying angle and the flexion and pronation angles of the elbow. The mean carrying angle was 12.42 degrees +/- 4.06 degrees , in agreement with the literature and with values obtained by a standard goniometer (r = 0.46; P = .000). Our protocol provided excellent repeatability (interclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.85), greater than a goniometer (ICC = 0.76), and a standard error of measurement of only 1.62 degrees . Flexion was a significant factor (P = .01) in carrying angle estimation. This study suggests that the carrying angle cannot be estimated independently by the flexion angle, even when measured in apparently full extension, and it could be useful in elbow disorders, such as fractures or epicondylar disease management and evaluation of elbow reconstruction.

  18. Robert Boyle's landmark book of 1660 with the first experiments on rarified air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2005-01-01

    In 1660, Robert Boyle (1627-1691) published his landmark book New Experiments Physico-Mechanicall, Touching the Spring of the Air, and its Effects... in which he described the first controlled experiments of the effects of reducing the pressure of the air. Critical to this work was the development of an air pump by Boyle with Robert Hooke (1635-1703). For the first time, it was possible to observe physical and physiological processes at both normal and reduced barometric pressures. The air pump was described in detail, although the exact design of the critical piston is unclear. Boyle reported 43 separate experiments, which can conveniently be divided into 7 groups. The first experiments were on the "spring of the air," that is the pressure developed by the air when its volume was changed. Several experiments described the behavior of the barometer invented by Torricelli just 16 years before when it was introduced into the low-pressure chamber. The behavior of burning candles was discussed, although this emphasized early misunderstandings of the nature of combustion. There were some physiological observations, although these were later extended by Boyle and Hooke. The effects of the low pressure on such diverse physical phenomena as magnetism, sound propagation, behavior of a pendulum, evolution of gases from liquids, and the behavior of smoke were described. This classic book is brimming with enthusiasm and fresh ideas even for today and deserves to be better known.

  19. Prediction of the mid-tracheal level using surface anatomical landmarks in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young-Eun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ryu, Ho-Geoul; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Endotracheal tube (ETT) should be placed at the optimal level to avoid single lung ventilation or accidental extubation. This study was performed to estimate the mid-tracheal level by using surface anatomical landmarks in adult patients. Neck computed tomography images of 329 adult patients between the ages of 16 and 79 years were reviewed. In the midline sagittal plane, the levels corresponding to the vocal cords, cricoid cartilage, suprasternal notch, manubriosternal junction, and carina were identified. The surface distances from the cricoid cartilage to the suprasternal notch (extCC-SSN) and that from the suprasternal notch to the manubriosternal junction (extSSN-MSJ) were measured. The relationship between mid-tracheal level and the surface distances was analyzed using Bland–Altman plot. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was −6.6 (12.5) mm, and the difference between the extSSN-MSJ and the mid-tracheal level was −19.2 (6.1) mm. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was smaller in females compared with males [−1.7 (11.7) mm vs −12.8 (10.7) mm; P < 0.001]. The mid-tracheal level, which is helpful in planning the insertion depth of an ETT, can be predicted by the surface distance between the cricoid cartilage and suprasternal notch in adults, especially in females. PMID:28328810

  20. Detection of exudates in fundus photographs using deep neural networks and anatomical landmark detection fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentašić, Pavle; Lončarić, Sven

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading disabling chronic diseases and one of the leading causes of preventable blindness in developed world. Early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy enables timely treatment and in order to achieve it a major effort will have to be invested into automated population screening programs. Detection of exudates in color fundus photographs is very important for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. We use deep convolutional neural networks for exudate detection. In order to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge about potential exudate locations, output of the convolutional neural network is combined with the output of the optic disc detection and vessel detection procedures. In the validation step using a manually segmented image database we obtain a maximum F1 measure of 0.78. As manually segmenting and counting exudate areas is a tedious task, having a reliable automated output, such as automated segmentation using convolutional neural networks in combination with other landmark detectors, is an important step in creating automated screening programs for early detection of diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frigeri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Method The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. Conclusion The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  2. 特征设计的形式化描述%A Formal Scheme for Describing Feature-Based Design Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙知信

    2001-01-01

    Benefiting from advances in feature-based design in design can not be expected before a formal methodology is established.This paper makes attempt to establish a domain-independent description formalism for feature-based design from two aspects:formalized definition and design process description. A formal definition and implementation scheme of feature-based design including feature taxonomy,feature operator,feature model validation and feature transformation are presented in the paper. The operational and processive representations of feature-based design process are described respectively. A framework of feature-based design algorithm is outlined correspondingly. The proposed scheme contributes to several aspects of feature-based design research,especially to provides elementarily a formal methodology for feature-based design system development and operation in a structural way.%特征设计方法在设计中的成功应用取决于其形式化设计理论的建立。文章从形式化定义和设计过程描述这两个方面研究了特征设计的形式化描述方法。文中提出了特征定义、特征表示的形式化方法,探讨了特征设计过程的操作性和过程性描述,并给出了相应的设计算法。为解决特征设计系统开发和运行缺乏统一方法学这一课题作了有益的尝试。

  3. A Support Model for Students with Learning Disabilities in Higher Education : A Study at Landmark College in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    片岡, 美華; KATAOKA, Mika

    2008-01-01

    Landmark College specializes in students with learning disabilities and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. The college provides support for students both in their academic learning and social life by specialist staff. This support includes help with reading and learning and guidance on how to complete assignments, choose themes, plan research and review literature. This support is structured and run by the Academic advisors and Coaching staff in the college. In addition, the Reside...

  4. The Many Flavors of Model-Based Meta-Analysis: Part I-Introduction and Landmark Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, M; Bennetts, M

    2016-02-01

    Meta-analysis is an increasingly important aspect of drug development as companies look to benchmark their own compounds with the competition. There is scope to carry out a wide range of analyses addressing key research questions from preclinical through to postregistration. This set of tutorials will take the reader through key model-based meta-analysis (MBMA) methods with this first installment providing a general introduction before concentrating on classical and Bayesian methods for landmark data.

  5. Landmark-based robust navigation for tactical UGV control in GPS-denied communication-degraded environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yoichiro; Balloch, Jonathan C.; Grushin, Alexander; Lee, Mun Wai; Handelman, David

    2016-05-01

    Control of current tactical unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) is typically accomplished through two alternative modes of operation, namely, low-level manual control using joysticks and high-level planning-based autonomous control. Each mode has its own merits as well as inherent mission-critical disadvantages. Low-level joystick control is vulnerable to communication delay and degradation, and high-level navigation often depends on uninterrupted GPS signals and/or energy-emissive (non-stealth) range sensors such as LIDAR for localization and mapping. To address these problems, we have developed a mid-level control technique where the operator semi-autonomously drives the robot relative to visible landmarks that are commonly recognizable by both humans and machines such as closed contours and structured lines. Our novel solution relies solely on optical and non-optical passive sensors and can be operated under GPS-denied, communication-degraded environments. To control the robot using these landmarks, we developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) that allows the operator to select landmarks in the robot's view and direct the robot relative to one or more of the landmarks. The integrated UGV control system was evaluated based on its ability to robustly navigate through indoor environments. The system was successfully field tested with QinetiQ North America's TALON UGV and Tactical Robot Controller (TRC), a ruggedized operator control unit (OCU). We found that the proposed system is indeed robust against communication delay and degradation, and provides the operator with steady and reliable control of the UGV in realistic tactical scenarios.

  6. Multimedia Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Rueger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    At its very core multimedia information retrieval means the process of searching for and finding multimedia documents; the corresponding research field is concerned with building the best possible multimedia search engines. The intriguing bit here is that the query itself can be a multimedia excerpt: For example, when you walk around in an unknown place and stumble across an interesting landmark, would it not be great if you could just take a picture with your mobile phone and send it to a service that finds a similar picture in a database and tells you more about the building -- and about its

  7. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  8. Development and staging of the water flea Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820; Cladocera, Daphniidae) based on morphological landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Beate; Ungerer, Petra; Klann, Marleen; Stollewerk, Angelika; Wolff, Carsten

    2014-03-18

    Crustaceans of the genus Daphnia are one of the oldest model organisms in ecotoxicology, ecology and evolutionary biology. The publication of the Daphnia pulex genome has facilitated the development of genetic tools to answer long-standing questions in these research fields (Science 331: 555-561, 2011). A particular focus is laid on understanding the genetic basis of the striking ability of daphnids to change their phenotype in response to environmental stressors. Furthermore, Daphnia have recently been developed into crustacean model organisms for EvoDevo research, contributing to the ongoing attempt to resolve arthropod phylogeny. These problems require the comparative analyses of gene expression and functional data, which in turn require a standardized developmental staging system for Daphnia. Here we provide a detailed staging system of the embryonic development of Daphnia magna based on morphological landmarks. The staging system does not rely on developmental hours and is therefore suitable for functional and ecological experiments, which often cause developmental delays in affected embryos and thus shifts in time reference points. We provide a detailed description of each stage and include schematic drawings of all stages showing relevant morphological landmarks in order to facilitate the application of this staging scheme. We present here a staging system for Daphnia magna, which is based on morphological landmarks. The staging system can be adopted for other daphnids with minor variations since the sequence of development is highly conserved during early stages and only minor heterochronic shifts occur in late embryonic stages.

  9. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  10. Resources or landmarks: which factors drive homing success in Tetragonula carbonaria foraging in natural and disturbed landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Kaluza, Benjamin F; Wallace, Helen; Heard, Tim A

    2016-10-01

    To date, no study has investigated how landscape structural (visual) alterations affect navigation and thus homing success in stingless bees. We addressed this question in the Australian stingless bee Tetragonula carbonaria by performing marking, release and re-capture experiments in landscapes differing in habitat homogeneity (i.e., the proportion of elongated ground features typically considered prominent visual landmarks). We investigated how landscape affected the proportion of bees and nectar foragers returning to their hives as well as the earliest time bees and foragers returned. Undisturbed landscapes with few landmarks (that are conspicuous to the human eye) and large proportions of vegetation cover (natural forests) were classified visually/structurally homogeneous, and disturbed landscapes with many landmarks and fragmented or no extensive vegetation cover (gardens and plantations) visually/structurally heterogeneous. We found that proportions of successfully returning nectar foragers and earliest times first bees and foragers returned did not differ between landscapes. However, most bees returned in the visually/structurally most (forest) and least (garden) homogeneous landscape, suggesting that they use other than elongated ground features for navigation and that return speed is primarily driven by resource availability in a landscape.

  11. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in C-arm CT: application to aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Liao, Rui; Boese, Jan; Kirschstein, Uwe; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, S Kevin; Kempfert, Jörg; Walther, Thomas; Brockmann, Gernot; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-01-01

    C-arm CT is an emerging imaging technique in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) surgery. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in a C-arm CT volume has important applications in TAVI by providing valuable 3D measurements for surgery planning. Overlaying 3D segmentation onto 2D real time fluoroscopic images also provides critical visual guidance during the surgery. In this paper, we present a part-based aorta segmentation approach, which can handle aorta structure variation in case that the aortic arch and descending aorta are missing in the volume. The whole aorta model is split into four parts: aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Discriminative learning is applied to train a detector for each part separately to exploit the rich domain knowledge embedded in an expert-annotated dataset. Eight important aortic valve landmarks (three aortic hinge points, three commissure points, and two coronary ostia) are also detected automatically in our system. Under the guidance of the detected landmarks, the physicians can deploy the prosthetic valve properly. Our approach is robust under variations of contrast agent. Taking about 1.4 seconds to process one volume, it is also computationally efficient.

  12. Role of Rouviere′s sulcus as anatomical landmark in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a report of 750 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shoujun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore the role of Rouviere′s sulcus as the anatomical landmark for the cystic duct in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. MethodsThe clinical data of 750 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy operated by one beginner from October 2012 to March 2014 in the Affiliated Santai Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College were analyzed. The frequency of appearance of Rouviere′s sulcus was recorded during operation, and the Rouviere′s sulcus was used as the anatomical landmark for the cystic duct in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ResultsOf the 750 patients, 705 had Rouviere′s sulcus. There was no mortality during operation. Bile duct injury occurred in one case (0.13%, whose Rouviere′s sulcus was not seen during operation. Among the first 300 cases, the three-hole method was used in 35 cases, and 30 cases (10% were converted to open surgery. Among the succeeding 450 cases, the three-hole method was used in 387 cases, and 15 cases (3.3% were converted to open surgery. ConclusionRouviere′s sulcus is an important anatomical landmark for the cystic duct. Its identification before Calot′s triangle dissection may help in preventing the bile duct injury in laparoscopic cholecystectomy for beginners. It has great clinical significance and should be applied widely.

  13. A Featured-Based Strategy for Stereovision Matching in Sensors with Fish-Eye Lenses for Forest Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Pedro Javier; Pajares, Gonzalo; Guijarro, Maria; Ruz, José J.; Cruz, Jesús M.; Montes, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel feature-based stereovision matching process based on a pair of omnidirectional images in forest stands acquired with a stereovision sensor equipped with fish-eye lenses. The stereo analysis problem consists of the following steps: image acquisition, camera modelling, feature extraction, image matching and depth determination. Once the depths of significant points on the trees are obtained, the growing stock volume can be estimated by considering the geometrical camera modelling, which is the final goal. The key steps are feature extraction and image matching. This paper is devoted solely to these two steps. At a first stage a segmentation process extracts the trunks, which are the regions used as features, where each feature is identified through a set of attributes of properties useful for matching. In the second step the features are matched based on the application of the following four well known matching constraints, epipolar, similarity, ordering and uniqueness. The combination of the segmentation and matching processes for this specific kind of sensors make the main contribution of the paper. The method is tested with satisfactory results and compared against the human expert criterion. PMID:22303134

  14. Three-dimensional measurement of small inner surface profiles using feature-based 3-D panoramic registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Seibel, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid development in the performance of sophisticated optical components, digital image sensors, and computer abilities along with decreasing costs has enabled three-dimensional (3-D) optical measurement to replace more traditional methods in manufacturing and quality control. The advantages of 3-D optical measurement, such as noncontact, high accuracy, rapid operation, and the ability for automation, are extremely valuable for inline manufacturing. However, most of the current optical approaches are eligible for exterior instead of internal surfaces of machined parts. A 3-D optical measurement approach is proposed based on machine vision for the 3-D profile measurement of tiny complex internal surfaces, such as internally threaded holes. To capture the full topographic extent (peak to valley) of threads, a side-view commercial rigid scope is used to collect images at known camera positions and orientations. A 3-D point cloud is generated with multiview stereo vision using linear motion of the test piece, which is repeated by a rotation to form additional point clouds. Registration of these point clouds into a complete reconstruction uses a proposed automated feature-based 3-D registration algorithm. The resulting 3-D reconstruction is compared with x-ray computed tomography to validate the feasibility of our proposed method for future robotically driven industrial 3-D inspection.

  15. [Therapy for systemic metabolic disorders based on the detection of basic corneal landmarks in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisch, W; Pitz, S; Geerling, G

    2013-06-01

    Many systemic lysosomal storage disorders show basic corneal opacities already in childhood. The lysosome is a cell organelle, produced by Golgi's apparatus, that is surrounded by a membrane and contains hydrolytic enzymes that break down food molecules, especially proteins and other complex molecules. The ophthalmologist's precise diagnosis of corneal clouding at the slit-lamp may reveal the correct interpretation of the specific lysosomal storage disorder. It is very important to diagnose such diseases as soon as possible because today the development of systemic enzymatic therapies has broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for the current standard of care. The following corneal landmarks of systemic storage diseases and of the modern systemic therapy are presented: cornea verticillata in Fabry's disease, periodic infusion of alpha-galactosidase a; Kayser-Fleischer's ring in Wilson's disease, zinc, trienetin, low copper diet; multiple, punctiform crystals in cystinosis, cysteamine, Raptor RP 103(DR cysteamine) that reduces the cytotoxity in form of continous dissolving of cystine from lysosome, renal transplantation, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation; peripheral ring, but not true lipid arc, and moderate stromal haze in LCAT-deficiency, injection of recombinant enzyme or of encapsulated LCAT-secreting cells; diffuse stromal haze in mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Enzyme replacement therapy is currently indicated for MPS I, MPS II, and MPS VI, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation; painful, bilateral pseudo-dendritic opacities in tyrosinemia type II (eponym: Richner-Hanhart syndrome), low phenylalanine and tyrosine diet result in complete disappearance of corneal alterations with a consecutive painfree period. Strict diet during the whole life is necessary to prevent corneal recurrences and the occurrence of palmo-plantar keratoses. Such therapies can enable the patient to lead an otherwise normal life for decades.

  16. The orbit: A re-appraisal of the surgical landmarks of the medial and lateral walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jisoo; Pather, Nalini

    2016-11-01

    The anterior ethmoidal foramen (AEF) and posterior ethmoidal foramina (AEF and PEF, respectively) on the medial wall and the cranio-orbital foramen (COF) on the lateral wall are used as landmarks in orbital surgeries. In surgery these foramina, the neurovascular structures they transmit and other orbital structures in close proximity need to be identified to minimise their risk of damage. Despite the clinical importance, the current understandings lack consistency in the precise location, microanatomy and morphology of the foramina. This study therefore aimed to document and analyze the microanatomy, location, and morphometric relations of the EF and COF to determine a standardized guideline to accessing the foramina. One hundred dry orbits were morphometrically analyzed, and a further six orbits were micro-dissected to determine the locations of the EF and COF. The orbital size dimensions were measured for each dry orbit and correlated with the morphometric distances. A complete morphometric and quantitative analysis showed the distances of the EF and COF to be variable, with greater variations observed in the incidence of the accessory EF and PEF distances in the medial wall, and in the presence of the COF and the accessory COF in the lateral orbital wall. Significant correlations were observed between the length of the medial orbital wall and some EF distances. This study is the first to suggest a standardized method of locating these foramina in the orbit irrespective of population and sex differences, in order to help improve clinical applications in crucial orbital surgeries. Clin. Anat. 29:998-1010, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Landmarks of physiological development of the voice in childhood and adolescense (Part 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M

    2008-01-01

    The area of the functioning of the voice is a fundamental element of human communication apart from language, speaking, hearing and perceiving. Detailed knowledge of normal vocal development is a prerequisite for the diagnosis and therapy of vocal dysfunctions among children and adolescents by means of methods suitable for their age and their stages of development. In an overview, the landmarks of physiological development with normal value ranges relevant to practice are presented--from the newborn baby's first cry up to the age of young adults. The effects of various degrees of vocal activity on the part of children and adolescents on the parameters of vocal capacity and quality are taken into account, as well as the relationship between physical and vocal development. Furthermore, an overview of diagnostic methods suitable for this age group is given. Specialists for ENT and for Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology should be able to assess suitability for increased vocal activity and to care for vocal development during the vulnerable phase of the voice change. Manifold socio-cultural and pedagogical influences are already possible in early childhood and throughout the phase of the "voice in growth". They should be taken advantage of prophylactically--also with regard to the learning of physiological vocal behavior as a prerequisite for dealing with possible subsequent strain in vocally intensive professions. In the following second part of this publication, the fundamentals described here are applied to diagnostics and therapy of vocal dysfunctions in this age group by means of methods suitable for this stage of development.

  18. Looking for landmarks: the role of expert review and bibliometric analysis in evaluating scientific publication outputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Allen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare expert assessment with bibliometric indicators as tools to assess the quality and importance of scientific research papers. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Shortly after their publication in 2005, the quality and importance of a cohort of nearly 700 Wellcome Trust (WT associated research papers were assessed by expert reviewers; each paper was reviewed by two WT expert reviewers. After 3 years, we compared this initial assessment with other measures of paper impact. RESULTS: Shortly after publication, 62 (9% of the 687 research papers were determined to describe at least a 'major addition to knowledge' -6 were thought to be 'landmark' papers. At an aggregate level, after 3 years, there was a strong positive association between expert assessment and impact as measured by number of citations and F1000 rating. However, there were some important exceptions indicating that bibliometric measures may not be sufficient in isolation as measures of research quality and importance, and especially not for assessing single papers or small groups of research publications. CONCLUSION: When attempting to assess the quality and importance of research papers, we found that sole reliance on bibliometric indicators would have led us to miss papers containing important results as judged by expert review. In particular, some papers that were highly rated by experts were not highly cited during the first three years after publication. Tools that link expert peer reviews of research paper quality and importance to more quantitative indicators, such as citation analysis would be valuable additions to the field of research assessment and evaluation.

  19. Institutional landmarks in Brazilian research on soil erosion: a historical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santos Telles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of soil erosion in Brazil has been a focus of agricultural scientific research since the 19th century. The aim of this study was to provide a historical overview of the institutional landmarks which gave rise to the first studies in soil erosion and established the foundations of agricultural research in Brazil. The 19th century and beginning of the 20th century saw the founding of a series of institutions in Brazil, such as Botanical Gardens, executive institutions, research institutes, experimental stations, educational institutions of agricultural sciences, as well as the creation and diversification of scientific journals. These entities, each in its own way, served to foster soil erosion research in Brazil. During the Imperial period (1808-1889, discussions focused on soil degradation and conserving the fertility of agricultural land. During the First Republic (1889-1930, with the founding of various educational institutions and consolidation of research on soil degradation conducted by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas in the State of São Paulo, studies focused on soil depletion, identification of the major factors causing soil erosion and the measures necessary to control it. During the New State period (1930-1945, many soil conservation practices were developed and disseminated to combat erosion and field trials were set up, mainly to measure soil and water losses induced by hydric erosion. During the Brazilian New Republic (1945-1964, experiments were conducted throughout Brazil, consolidating soil and water conservation as one of the main areas of Soil Science in Brazil. This was followed by scientific conferences on erosion and the institutionalization of post-graduate studies. During the Military Regime (1964-1985, many research and educational institutions were founded, experimental studies intensified, and coincidently, soil erosion reached alarming levels which led to the development of the no-tillage system.

  20. Congenital short QT syndrome: landmarks of the newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Riera, Andrés Ricardo; Paixão-Almeida, Adail; Barbosa-Barros, Raimundo; Yanowitz, Frank G; Baranchuk, Adrian; Dubner, Sergio; Palandri Chagas, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Congenital or familial short QT syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous cardiac channelopathy without structural heart disease that has a dominant autosomal or sporadic pattern of transmission affecting the electric system of the heart. Patients present clinically with a spectrum of signs and symptoms including irregular palpitations due to episodes of paroxysmal atrialfibrillation, dizziness and fainting (syncope) and/or sudden cardiac death due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Electrocardiographic (ECG) findings include extremely short QTc intervals (QTc interval ≤330 ms) not significantly modified with heart rate changes and T waves of great voltage witha narrow base. Electrophysiologic studies are characterized by significant shortening of atrial and ventricular refractory periods and arrhythmias induced by programmed stimulation. A few families have been identified with specific genotypes: 3 with mutations in potassium channels called SQT1 (Iks), SQT2 (Ikr) and SQT3 (Ik1). These 3 potassium channel variants are the "genetic mirror image" of long QT syndrome type 2, type 1 and Andersen-Tawil syndrome respectively because they exert opposite gain-of-function effects on the potassium channels in contrast to the loss-of-function of the potassium channels in the long QT syndromes. Three new variants with overlapping phenotypes affecting the slow inward calcium channels havealso been described. Finally, another variant with mixed phenotype affecting the sodium channel was reported. This review focuses the landmarks of this newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy on the main clinical, genetic, and proposed ECG mechanisms. In addition therapeutic options and the molecular autopsy of this fascinating primary electrical heart disease are discussed.

  1. An investigation on the facial midline distance to some anatomic landmarks of the jaws among people with natural dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharraf R

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the dental midline is necessary in most dental procedures."nOne of the methods to fulfill this goal is to determine the facial midline based on the midpoints of the"nforehead, nose, upper lip and chin. However, for various reasons, this method has not always been"nproved successful. In such cases, different techniques, based on the investigations in the edentulous"npatients, have been suggested."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the conformity of some landmarks such as labial"nfrenum, incisive papilla and mid palatal suture with dental and facial midlines among people with natural"ndentition in order to obtain accurate anatomic landmarks for denture replacement."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 96 dental students, having all their permanent teeth"nand without any orthognathic problem, were chosen. For each subject, Alginate impressions and dental"ncasts were prepared. Then, centric occlusion was recorded with a biting wax and the facial mid line was"ndetermined on the anterior part of it. The distances from the facial midline to the upper teeth midline,"nincisive papilla, labial frenum and mid palatal suture were determined with a special tool and were"nmeasured by a VERNIEH two times. In order to analyze the results, Chi- Square and t-student tests were"nused."nResults: The average of facial midline distance to the upper teeth midline, the labial frenum, the incisive"npapilla and the mid palatal suture were 0.83±0.60, 0.67±G.54, 0.83±00.63 and 0.81±0.62 mm,"nrespectively. There was no significant difference between males and females. Labial frenum showed the"nminimum distance to the facial midline, while the incisive papilla had the maximum. There was no"nsignificant difference between these anatomic landmarks, in conformity or unconformity with the facial"nmidline"nConclusion: Considering the low percentage of the subjects with complete conformity and the lack of

  2. Iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block in inguinal hernia repair for postoperative pain management: comparison of the anatomical landmark and ultrasound guided techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Demirci; Esra Mercanoglu Efe; Gürkan Türker; Alp Gurbet; Fatma Nur Kaya; Ali Anil; İlker Çimen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve blocks performed with the ultrasound guided and the anatomical landmark techniques for postoperative pain management in cases of adult inguinal herniorrhaphy. Methods: 40 patients, ASA I-II status were randomized into two groups equally: in Group AN (anatomical landmark technique) and in Group ultrasound (ultrasound guided technique), iliohypogastric/ilioinguinal nerve block was performed w...

  3. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-07

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  4. Responses in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus show a feature-based response to facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Tessa R; Andrews, Timothy J; Hymers, Mark; Al-Mosaiwi, Mohammed; Marsden, Samuel P; Strachan, James W A; Trakulpipat, Chayanit; Wang, Liang; Wu, Tian; Young, Andrew W

    2015-08-01

    The face-selective region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) plays an important role in analysing facial expressions. However, it is less clear how facial expressions are represented in this region. In this study, we used the face composite effect to explore whether the pSTS contains a holistic or feature-based representation of facial expression. Aligned and misaligned composite images were created from the top and bottom halves of faces posing different expressions. In Experiment 1, participants performed a behavioural matching task in which they judged whether the top half of two images was the same or different. The ability to discriminate the top half of the face was affected by changes in the bottom half of the face when the images were aligned, but not when they were misaligned. This shows a holistic behavioural response to expression. In Experiment 2, we used fMR-adaptation to ask whether the pSTS has a corresponding holistic neural representation of expression. Aligned or misaligned images were presented in blocks that involved repeating the same image or in which the top or bottom half of the images changed. Increased neural responses were found in the right pSTS regardless of whether the change occurred in the top or bottom of the image, showing that changes in expression were detected across all parts of the face. However, in contrast to the behavioural data, the pattern did not differ between aligned and misaligned stimuli. This suggests that the pSTS does not encode facial expressions holistically. In contrast to the pSTS, a holistic pattern of response to facial expression was found in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Together, these results suggest that pSTS reflects an early stage in the processing of facial expression in which facial features are represented independently.

  5. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedhelm, Philipp; Krishna, B Suresh; Treue, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA) can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain) rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain). This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively.

  6. 基于概念特征的语义文本分类%Concept-features-based semantic text classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林伟; 孟凡荣; 王志晓

    2011-01-01

    文本分类是组织和处理海量文本信息的关键方法.目前的文本分类模型多用关键词特征向量描述文本资源,造成向量的高维性和稀疏性.引入文本资源的概念特征,将文本资源描述由关键词级提升至概念级,提高文本资源描述的准确性,并提出了基于概念特征的语义文本分类模型.仿真实验的结果表明,该模型能有效克服资源特征向量空间的高维性和稀疏性,确保向量空间的正交性,在语义文本分类的效率和正确性上都有良好的表现.%Text classification is the key method of mass text messages organizing and processing.Most current text classification models use keywords eigenvector to describe the text resources which makes the vector high dimensional and sparse. This paper introduces the concept-features instead of keywords to describe the text resources, which improves the accuracy of text resources description.A concept-features-based semantic text classification model is put forward in this paper.The results of simulation experiments show that the model can overcome the vector space's high-dimensionality and sparsity,and ensure the orthogonality of the vector space.The semantic text classification presents a fine performance both in efficiency and accuracy.

  7. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schwedhelm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain. This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively.

  8. Transabdominal ultrasound for detection of pregnancy, fetal and placental landmarks, and fetal age before Day 45 of gestation in the sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda K; Gately, Rachael E; McFadden, Katelyn K; Zinn, Steven A; Govoni, Kristen E; Reed, Sarah A

    2016-03-15

    Detection of pregnancy during early gestation is advantageous for flock breeding management. Transabdominal ultrasound is a practical and efficient approach for monitoring pregnancy and fetal growth in small ruminants. However, there is limited information using the transabdominal technique before Day 45 of gestation in sheep. Therefore, our objective was to determine how accurately transabdominal ultrasound could be used to detect pregnancy, to identify pregnancy landmarks, and to quantify fetal length before Day 45 in ewes. Multiparous Western White-faced ewes (n = 99) were estrus synchronized and exposed to one of four Dorset rams. The day a ewe was marked by a ram was considered Day 0 of gestation. Ewes not remarked by Day 20 were separated for ultrasonography. To detect pregnancy and landmarks, ewes were scanned three times per week between Day 26.0 ± 0.3 (mean ± standard error) and Day 40.0 ± 0.2. A single technician performed all scans in the right nonhaired abdominal pit using a real-time portable Eazi-Scan machine and a 5-MHz linear rectal transducer. All data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS (with repeated measures where appropriate). Because of rebreeding activity, 113 ultrasound periods were initiated. The specificity and positive predictive value were 100% during the entire study. The accuracy, sensitivity, and negative predictive value of ultrasound scanning were greater than 90% beginning at Day 33 ± 1. On average, pregnancy (n = 85) was detected at Day 28.7 ± 0.4 and nonpregnancy (n = 28) at Day 25.5 ± 0.6. Three early fetal losses were identified at Day 39.7 ± 0.7. In pregnant ewes (n = 82), the overall accuracy of fetal counting was 78%. The first observance of an enlarged uterus (P = 0.05) and pregnancy (P = 0.03) was detected earlier when multiple fetuses were developing compared with singletons. Placentome evagination was first observed earlier in triplets compared with twins and singletons (P = 0.02). Fetal length

  9. 一种基于全局位置估计误差的路标探索策略%Landmark exploration strategy using estimated global localization error

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马健; 俞扬

    2014-01-01

    自主移动机器人在未知环境中探索和估计路标的方法主要基于SLAM技术。提出一种以全局定位误差最小化为指导的基于SLAM的探索策略。以全局定位误差的估计为准则,采用Monte Carlo采样来贪心地优化每一步的行走路径。考虑到SLAM估计的惯性,文中对较大转弯角度进行惩罚,使机器人更倾向于平滑的行走轨迹,从而进一步提高路标位置的估计精度。文中还将全局定位信息引入SLAM的机器人自身位置估计中,由于全局定位信息历史运动轨迹,该方法能够有效地校正当机器人移动变化过大时SLAM估计的误差。实验显示了文中方法的有效性。%Exploration and estimation of landmarks in an unknown environment is an important skill for autonomous robots , most of which are based on the SLAM technique .This paper presents an SLAM based exploration strategy to minimize the global localization error , via greedily optimizing every step by Monte Carlo sampling .Due to the inertia of the SLAM method , we then penalize a large change of direction for a smoother trajectory , which may result in a more accurate estimation of landmarks .To further calibrate the estimation error for a large range of movement , the global localization information is introduced to the procedure of the estimation of the robot , since it depends less on the historical movement trajectory .Experiments verified the effectiveness of the proposed method .

  10. Introducing a new age-and-cognition-sensitive measurement for assessing spatial orientation using a landmark-less virtual reality navigational task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar Pouya, Omid; Byagowi, Ahmad; Kelly, Debbie M; Moussavi, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    Age-related impairments during spatial navigation have been widely reported in egocentric and allocentric paradigms. However, the effect of age on more specific navigational components such as the ability to drive or update directional information has not received enough attention. In this study we investigated the effect of age on spatial updating of a visual target after a series of whole-body rotations and transitions using a novel landmark-less virtual reality (VR) environment. Moreover, a significant number of previous studies focused on measures susceptible to a general decline in motor skills such as the spent time navigating, the distance traversed. The current paper proposes a new compound spatial measure to assess navigational performance, examines its reliability and compares its power with those of the measures of duration and traversed distance in predicting participants' age and cognitive groups assessed by Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores. Using data from 319 adults (20-83 years), our results confirm the reliability, the age sensitivity, and the cognitive validity of the designed spatial measure as well as its superiority to the measures of duration and traversed distance in predicting age and MoCA score. In addition, the results show the significant effect of age cognitive status on spatial updating.

  11. 基于空间特征的谱聚类含噪图像分割%Space Feature Based Spectral Clustering for Noisy Image Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉强; 赵凤

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the problem thai the traditional spectral clustering is easily influenced by image noise while applied to noisy image segmentation, a space feature based spectral clustering algorithm for noise image segmentation is proposed. In this method, gray value, local spatial information and non-local spatial information of each pixel are utilized to construct a 3-dimensional feature dataset. Then, the space compactness function is introduced to compute the similarity between each feature point and its K nearest neighbors. Finally, the final image segmentation result is obtained by spectral clustering algorithm. Some noisy artificial images, nature images and synthetic aperture radar images are utilized and normalized. Cut, FCM_s and Nystrom method are compared with the proposed method in the experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed method is robustness and obtains the satisfying segmentation result.%为克服传统谱聚类算法应用到含噪图像分割时易受到图像中噪声影响的问题,提出一种基于空间特征的谱聚类含噪图像分割算法.该方法利用图像各个像素的灰度信息、局部空间邻接信息及非局部空间信息设计像素的三维特征,通过引入空间紧致性函数建立像素特征点与其K个最近邻之间的相似性,进而利用谱聚类算法得到图像的最终分割结果.实验中采用含噪的人工图像、自然图像及合成孔径雷达图像与空间模糊聚类、规范切谱聚类和Nystr(o)m方法3种算法进行对比实验,实验结果验证文中方法能克服图像中噪声影响并取得较满意的分割效果.

  12. Reliability of lower limb alignment measures using an established landmark-based method with a customized computer software program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sled, Elizabeth A; Sheehy, Lisa M; Felson, David T; Costigan, Patrick A; Lam, Miu; Cooke, T Derek V

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability of frontal plane lower limb alignment measures using a landmark-based method by (1) comparing inter- and intra-reader reliability between measurements of alignment obtained manually with those using a computer program, and (2) determining inter- and intra-reader reliability of computer-assisted alignment measures from full-limb radiographs. An established method for measuring alignment was used, involving selection of 10 femoral and tibial bone landmarks. (1) To compare manual and computer methods, we used digital images and matching paper copies of five alignment patterns simulating healthy and malaligned limbs drawn using AutoCAD. Seven readers were trained in each system. Paper copies were measured manually and repeat measurements were performed daily for 3 days, followed by a similar routine with the digital images using the computer. (2) To examine the reliability of computer-assisted measures from full-limb radiographs, 100 images (200 limbs) were selected as a random sample from 1,500 full-limb digital radiographs which were part of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Three trained readers used the software program to measure alignment twice from the batch of 100 images, with two or more weeks between batch handling. Manual and computer measures of alignment showed excellent agreement (intraclass correlations [ICCs] 0.977-0.999 for computer analysis; 0.820-0.995 for manual measures). The computer program applied to full-limb radiographs produced alignment measurements with high inter- and intra-reader reliability (ICCs 0.839-0.998). In conclusion, alignment measures using a bone landmark-based approach and a computer program were highly reliable between multiple readers.

  13. Estimating the age of Calliphora vicina eggs (Diptera: Calliphoridae): determination of embryonic morphological landmarks and preservation of egg samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Vega, Daniel; Hall, Martin J R

    2016-05-01

    Blow fly eggs may sometimes be the only entomological evidence recovered in a forensic case, especially in cooler weather when hatching might take several days: hence, a method for estimating their age is greatly needed. However, developmental data on blow fly eggs are mainly limited to records of the time to larval hatching. The current paper describes the morphological changes occurring during embryogenesis of the blow fly Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and their timing in relation to temperature, in order to determine those characters which can be used for simple egg age estimation using light microscopy. At 7.3 and 25 °C, 15 easily visualised morphological landmarks were determined in C. vicina living embryos, allowing for their age estimation with a resolution of 10-20% of total egg developmental time. The observed age intervals were compared to the embryonic stages described for the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, which are used as reference data in multiple developmental studies. Moreover, current guidelines for preservation of egg samples, which recommend the placement of living eggs directly into 80% ethanol, were tested against the hot water killing (HWK) method prior to preservation in 80% ethanol, recommended for larval and pupal specimens. Direct placement of eggs into 80% ethanol caused marked decomposition of samples, and no morphological landmarks were discernible. On the other hand, HWK fixation prior to preservation in 80% ethanol enabled visualisation of 11 of the 15 age-specific morphological landmarks that were discernible in living embryos. Therefore, HWK fixation prior to preservation in 80% ethanol is recommended for egg samples, thus unifying the protocols for collecting entomological evidence.

  14. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark. After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001. Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056. Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group.

  15. Factors influencing superimposition error of 3D cephalometric landmarks by plane orientation method using 4 reference points: 4 point superimposition error regression model.

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    Jae Joon Hwang

    Full Text Available Superimposition has been used as a method to evaluate the changes of orthodontic or orthopedic treatment in the dental field. With the introduction of cone beam CT (CBCT, evaluating 3 dimensional changes after treatment became possible by superimposition. 4 point plane orientation is one of the simplest ways to achieve superimposition of 3 dimensional images. To find factors influencing superimposition error of cephalometric landmarks by 4 point plane orientation method and to evaluate the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks for analyzing superimposition error, 20 patients were analyzed who had normal skeletal and occlusal relationship and took CBCT for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. The nasion, sella turcica, basion and midpoint between the left and the right most posterior point of the lesser wing of sphenoidal bone were used to define a three-dimensional (3D anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Another 15 reference cephalometric points were also determined three times in the same image. Reorientation error of each landmark could be explained substantially (23% by linear regression model, which consists of 3 factors describing position of each landmark towards reference axes and locating error. 4 point plane orientation system may produce an amount of reorientation error that may vary according to the perpendicular distance between the landmark and the x-axis; the reorientation error also increases as the locating error and shift of reference axes viewed from each landmark increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the reorientation error, accuracy of all landmarks including the reference points is important. Construction of the regression model using reference points of greater precision is required for the clinical application of this model.

  16. Three-dimensional spatial cognition: information in the vertical dimension overrides information from the horizontal.

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    Holbrook, Robert I; Burt de Perera, Theresa

    2011-07-01

    Fish live in three-dimensional environments, through which they swim with three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. Navigating through such environments is recognised as a difficult problem, yet fish, and other animals that swim and fly, achieve this regularly. Despite this, the vast majority of research has considered how animals navigate horizontally from place to place and has ignored the vertical component. Here, we test the importance of the vertical axis of space for fish solving a three-dimensional spatial cognition task. We trained banded tetras (Astyanax fasciatus) to learn the route towards a goal in a rotating Y-maze in which the arms led either up and left or down and right in an environment that allowed access to visual landmarks providing horizontal and vertical information. Our results revealed that the landmarks increased navigational efficiency during training. However, these landmarks were ignored when the horizontal and vertical components were placed in conflict with each other by rotating the maze 90° during testing. From this surprising result, we conclude that the cues that are present in the vertical axis (presumably hydrostatic pressure) override landmark cues that have been shown to be salient in experiments that only consider the horizontal component of space.

  17. The location of midfacial landmarks according to the method of establishing the midsagittal reference plane in three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of facial asymmetry

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    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheock; Yoon, Suk Ja [Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Song, In Ja [Dept. of Nursing, Kwangju Women' s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of methods of establishing the midsagittal reference plane (MRP) on the locations of midfacial landmarks in the three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis of facial asymmetry. A total of 24 patients (12 male and 12 female; mean age, 22.5 years; age range, 18.2-29.7 years) with facial asymmetry were included in this study. The MRP was established using two different methods on each patient's CT image. The x-coordinates of four midfacial landmarks (the menton, nasion, upper incisor, and lower incisor) were obtained by measuring the distance and direction of the landmarks from the MRP, and the two methods were compared statistically. The direction of deviation and the severity of asymmetry found using each method were also compared. The x-coordinates of the four anatomic landmarks all showed a statistically significant difference between the two methods of establishing the MRP. For the nasion and lower incisor, six patients (25.0%) showed a change in the direction of deviation. The severity of asymmetry also changed in 16 patients (66.7%). The results of this study suggest that the locations of midfacial landmarks change significantly according to the method used to establish the MRP.

  18. Adiponectin is associated with cardiovascular disease in male renal transplant recipients: baseline results from the LANDMARK 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudge David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is a major adipocyte-derived protein with insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. Adiponectin levels correlate inversely with renal function and higher levels are predictive of lower cardiovascular disease (CVD in patients with normal renal function and chronic kidney disease. No data exists on the association between adiponectin and CVD in renal transplant recipients (RTR. Methods Standard biochemistry, clinical data and adiponectin were collected from 137 RTR recruited to the LANDMARK 2 study at baseline. The LANDMARK 2 study is an ongoing randomized controlled study that compares the outcome of aggressive risk factor modification for cardiovascular disease versus standard post-transplant care in renal transplant recipients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus. Results Mean patient age was 53.4 ± 12 years and the median post-transplantation period was 5 (0.5-31.9 years. Mean serum adiponectin level was 12.3 ± 7.1 μg/mL. On univariate analysis, adiponectin was positively associated with female gender (P = 0.01 and serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL concentration (P Conclusion In conclusion, adiponectin is positively correlated with inflammation, dyslipidemia and abnormal glucose tolerance in RTR. Furthermore, hypoadiponectinemia correlated with increased baseline CVD in male RTR.

  19. The Inframammary Fold (IMF): A Poorly Appreciated Landmark in Prosthetic/Alloplastic Breast Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery-Personal Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara; Ibrahim, Amir; Saba, Salim; Karamanoukian, Raffy; Chahine, Fadl; Papazian, Nazareth

    2017-08-01

    The inframammary fold (IMF) is the most critical visual landmark that affects final aesthetic outcome of augmentation mammoplasty and even post-mastectomy alloplastic breast reconstruction. Unfortunately, structural integrity of this landmark is greatly overlooked and very often neglected. Excessive undermining of the lower breast pole with aggressive disruption/lowering and subsequent poor reconstitution of the IMF scaffold combined with imbalanced implant-tissue dynamics may result in downward implant displacement with creep bottoming and upward tilt of the nipples. The current report reviews the experience of the senior author (BA) over 30 years in breast aesthetic and reconstructive surgery with IMF reconstruction and fixation to the chest wall at the inferior border of the implant. Illustrative cases are presented. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. A New Filtering and Smoothing Algorithm for Railway Track Surveying Based on Landmark and IMU/Odometer.

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    Jiang, Qingan; Wu, Wenqi; Jiang, Mingming; Li, Yun

    2017-06-19

    High-accuracy railway track surveying is essential for railway construction and maintenance. The traditional approaches based on total station equipment are not efficient enough since high precision surveying frequently needs static measurements. This paper proposes a new filtering and smoothing algorithm based on the IMU/odometer and landmarks integration for the railway track surveying. In order to overcome the difficulty of estimating too many error parameters with too few landmark observations, a new model with completely observable error states is established by combining error terms of the system. Based on covariance analysis, the analytical relationship between the railway track surveying accuracy requirements and equivalent gyro drifts including bias instability and random walk noise are established. Experiment results show that the accuracy of the new filtering and smoothing algorithm for railway track surveying can reach 1 mm (1σ) when using a Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG)-based Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) with gyro bias instability of 0.03°/h and random walk noise of 0.005 °h while control points of the track control network (CPIII) position observations are provided by the optical total station in about every 60 m interval. The proposed approach can satisfy at the same time the demands of high accuracy and work efficiency for railway track surveying.