WorldWideScience

Sample records for feature size influences

  1. Morphological Features of Regurgitate and Defecatory Stains Deposited by Five Species of Necrophagous Flies are Influenced by Adult Diets and Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, David B; McGregor, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of artifacts from five species of necrophagous flies were examined following feeding on several types of diets. Four types of insect stains were produced by each species: regurgitate, defecatory, translocation, and tarsal tracks. Regurgitate was the most frequent type deposited (70.9 ± 2.4%), followed by defecatory (19.8 ± 4.0%), tarsal tracks (8.6 ± 1.2%), and translocation (0.7 ± 0.1%). Artifact shapes, sizes, and color were highly variable and species and diet specific. Calliphora vicina and Sarcophaga bullata consistently deposited the largest artifacts after feeding, whereas Chrysomya rufifacies and Ch. megacephala produced more tarsal tracks than the other species examined. Artifacts with tails were infrequently observed (4.1 ± 0.6% of all stains) but occurred as either defecatory or regurgitate stains. The widely variable morphologies of all types of fly artifacts underscores the view that insect stains cannot be distinguished from human bloodstains based on morphology alone. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Andrew M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density, but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarray platform. The barcodes used in this study are the well-characterized set derived from the Yeast KnockOut (YKO collection used for screens of pooled yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants. We treated these pools with the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin as a test compound. Three generations of barcode microarrays at 30, 8 and 5 μm features sizes independently identified the primary target of tunicamycin to be ALG7. Conclusion We show that the data obtained with 5 μm feature size is of comparable quality to the 30 μm size and propose that further shrinking of features could yield barcode microarrays with equal or greater resolving power and, more importantly, higher density.

  3. Chromospheric rotation. II. Dependence on the size of chromospheric features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarelli, L; Casalini, P; Cerri, S; Denoth, F [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Ist. di Elaborazione della Informazione

    1979-08-01

    The dependence of solar rotation on the size of the chromospheric tracers is considered. On the basis of an analysis of Ca II K/sub 3/ daily filtergrams taken in the period 8 May-14 August, 1972, chromospheric features can be divided into two classes according to their size. Features with size falling into the range 24 000-110 000 km can be identified with network elements, while those falling into the range 120 000-300 000 km with active regions, or brightness features of comparable size present at high latitudes. The rotation rate is determined separately for the two families of chromospheric features by means of a cross-correlation technique directly yields the average daily displacement of tracers due to rotation. Before computing the cross-correlation functions, chromospheric brightness data have been filtered with appropriate bandpass and highpass filters for separating spatial periodicities whose wavelengths fall into the two ranges of size, characteristic of the network pattern and of the activity centers. A difference less than 1% of the rotation rate of the two families of chromospheric features has been found. This is an indication for a substantial corotation at chromospheric levels of different short-lived features, both related to solar activity and controlled by the convective supergranular motions.

  4. Pupil size reflects the focus of feature-based attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, Paola; Pereverzeva, Maria; Murray, Scott O

    2014-12-15

    We measured pupil size in adult human subjects while they selectively attended to one of two surfaces, bright and dark, defined by coherently moving dots. The two surfaces were presented at the same location; therefore, subjects could select the cued surface only on the basis of its features. With no luminance change in the stimulus, we find that pupil size was smaller when the bright surface was attended and larger when the dark surface was attended: an effect of feature-based (or surface-based) attention. With the same surfaces at nonoverlapping locations, we find a similar effect of spatial attention. The pupil size modulation cannot be accounted for by differences in eye position and by other variables known to affect pupil size such as task difficulty, accommodation, or the mere anticipation (imagery) of bright/dark stimuli. We conclude that pupil size reflects not just luminance or cognitive state, but the interaction between the two: it reflects which luminance level in the visual scene is relevant for the task at hand. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects

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    Ian David Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers’ point of subjective normality (PSN for bodies shifts towards narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect.

  6. No Effect of Featural Attention on Body Size Aftereffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Ian D; Bickersteth, Chloe; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J; Brooks, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to images of narrow bodies has been shown to induce a perceptual aftereffect, such that observers' point of subjective normality (PSN) for bodies shifts toward narrower bodies. The converse effect is shown for adaptation to wide bodies. In low-level stimuli, object attention (attention directed to the object) and spatial attention (attention directed to the location of the object) have been shown to increase the magnitude of visual aftereffects, while object-based attention enhances the adaptation effect in faces. It is not known whether featural attention (attention directed to a specific aspect of the object) affects the magnitude of adaptation effects in body stimuli. Here, we manipulate the attention of Caucasian observers to different featural information in body images, by asking them to rate the fatness or sex typicality of male and female bodies manipulated to appear fatter or thinner than average. PSNs for body fatness were taken at baseline and after adaptation, and a change in PSN (ΔPSN) was calculated. A body size adaptation effect was found, with observers who viewed fat bodies showing an increased PSN, and those exposed to thin bodies showing a reduced PSN. However, manipulations of featural attention to body fatness or sex typicality produced equivalent results, suggesting that featural attention may not affect the strength of the body size aftereffect.

  7. Size-effect features on the magnetothermopower of bismuth nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, E.; Nicorici, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In this work we have studied the magnetic field dependence of the thermopower (TEP) and resistance of glass-coated Bi wires with diameter (d) from 100 nm to at 1.5 μm below 80 K. Nanowires have anomalously large values of the thermopower (+100 μV K.1) and relatively high effective resistivities, but their frequencies of SdH oscillations remain those of bulk Bi. The TEP stays positive in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 15 T, where the surface scattering of charge carriers is negligible. Our analysis shows that the anomalous thermopower has a diffusion origin and is a consequence of the microstructure rather than the result of the strong scattering of electrons by the wire walls. The intensities of field at which the size-effect features appear on the magnetothermopower curves correspond to a value at which the diameter of the hole cyclotron orbit equals d. Size-effect features were observed only for set of nanowires with d = 100-350 nm, where diffusion TEP is dominant. The contribution of the phonon-drag effect was observed in a wire with diameter larger than 400 nm and becomes dominant at diameter of 1 μm. (authors)

  8. [Influence of slot size on torque control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Liu, Zhong-Hao; Zhang, Ding; Wu, Chuan-Jun

    2009-12-01

    To study the influence of two slot size brackets on torque control when teeth interacted in the same arch. After the upper arch was aligned and leveled in Typodont study, the inclinations of upper teeth 5 +/- 5 were measured when 0.457 2 mm x 0.635 0 mm OPA-K brackets and 0.558 8 mmx0.711 2 mm OPA-K brackets were filled with 0.431 8 mm x 0.635 0 mm stainless steel wire. This experiment was duplicated 10 times. The inclin of each tooth were transformed to the absolute values of the torque play angle psi by computing program, and paired-t test was used. The two kinds of slot size brackets were different with statistical significance on torque control. When the brackets were filled with 0.431 8 mm x 0.635 0 mm stainless steel wire, the absolute values of the angle psi in 0.558 8 mm x 0.711 2 mm and 0.457 2 mm x 0.635 0 mm slot size brackets were 6.140 degrees +/- 3.758 degrees and 2.608 degrees +/- 1.479 degrees respectively, and the average difference of that between the two slot size brackets was 3.532 degrees. The absolute values of the angle psi in the upper left and right canine brackets were 2.560 degrees +/- 2.605 degrees, 4.230 degrees +/- 2.817 degrees, 1.260 degrees +/- 0.747 degrees and 2.070 degrees +/- 0.663 degrees respectively, and average differences between them were smaller than that in the other teeth. There was difference between the two kinds of slot size brackets on torque control, and 0.457 2 mm x 0.635 0 mm slot size bracket controls torque better when filled with the same size wire. In this study, the teeth interaction in the same arch probably caused the result that the difference of two slot size brackets on torque control was less than the study results of the theory calculations and material studys before.

  9. Influence of particle size in silo discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gella Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently Janda et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 248001 (2012] reported an experimental study where it was measured the velocity and volume fraction fields of 1 mm diameter stainless steel beads in the exit of a two-dimensional silo. In that work, they proposed a new expression to predict the flow of granular media in silos which does not explicitly include the particle size as a parameter. Here, we study if effectively, there is not such influence of the particle size in the flux equations as well as investigate any possible effect in the velocity and volume fraction fields. To this end, we have performed high speed motion measurements of these magnitudes in a two-dimensional silo filled with 4 mm diameter beads of stainless steel, the same material than the previous works. A developed tracking program has been implemented to obtain at the same time both, the velocity and volume fraction. The final objective of this work has been to extend and generalize the theoretical framework of Janda et al. for all sizes of particles. We have found that the obtained functionalities are the same than in the 1 mm case, but the exponents and other fitting parameters are different.

  10. Feature Size Effect on Formability of Multilayer Metal Composite Sheets under Microscale Laser Flexible Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixia Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer metal composite sheets possess superior properties to monolithic metal sheets, and formability is different from monolithic metal sheets. In this research, the feature size effect on formability of multilayer metal composite sheets under microscale laser flexible forming was studied by experiment. Two-layer copper/nickel composite sheets were selected as experimental materials. Five types of micro molds with different diameters were utilized. The formability of materials was evaluated by forming depth, thickness thinning, surface quality, and micro-hardness distribution. The research results showed that the formability of two-layer copper/nickel composite sheets was strongly influenced by feature size. With feature size increasing, the effect of layer stacking sequence on forming depth, thickness thinning ratio, and surface roughness became increasingly larger. However, the normalized forming depth, thickness thinning ratio, surface roughness, and micro-hardness of the formed components under the same layer stacking sequence first increased and then decreased with increasing feature size. The deformation behavior of copper/nickel composite sheets was determined by the external layer. The deformation extent was larger when the copper layer was set as the external layer.

  11. Does filler database size influence identification accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergold, Amanda N; Heaton, Paul

    2018-06-01

    Police departments increasingly use large photo databases to select lineup fillers using facial recognition software, but this technological shift's implications have been largely unexplored in eyewitness research. Database use, particularly if coupled with facial matching software, could enable lineup constructors to increase filler-suspect similarity and thus enhance eyewitness accuracy (Fitzgerald, Oriet, Price, & Charman, 2013). However, with a large pool of potential fillers, such technologies might theoretically produce lineup fillers too similar to the suspect (Fitzgerald, Oriet, & Price, 2015; Luus & Wells, 1991; Wells, Rydell, & Seelau, 1993). This research proposes a new factor-filler database size-as a lineup feature affecting eyewitness accuracy. In a facial recognition experiment, we select lineup fillers in a legally realistic manner using facial matching software applied to filler databases of 5,000, 25,000, and 125,000 photos, and find that larger databases are associated with a higher objective similarity rating between suspects and fillers and lower overall identification accuracy. In target present lineups, witnesses viewing lineups created from the larger databases were less likely to make correct identifications and more likely to select known innocent fillers. When the target was absent, database size was associated with a lower rate of correct rejections and a higher rate of filler identifications. Higher algorithmic similarity ratings were also associated with decreases in eyewitness identification accuracy. The results suggest that using facial matching software to select fillers from large photograph databases may reduce identification accuracy, and provides support for filler database size as a meaningful system variable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Container size influences snack food intake independently of portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, David; Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    While larger containers have been found to increase food intake, it is unclear whether this effect is driven by container size, portion size, or their combination, as these variables are usually confounded. The study was advertised as examining the effects of snack food consumption on information processing and participants were served M&M's for free consumption in individual cubicles while watching a TV show. Participants were served (1) a medium portion of M&M's in a small (n=30) or (2) in a large container (n=29), or (3) a large portion in a large container (n=29). The larger container increased intake by 129% (199 kcal) despite holding portion size constant, while controlling for different confounding variables. This research suggests that larger containers stimulate food intake over and above their impact on portion size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fine-tuning the feature size of nanoporous silver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Vukovic, Zorica; Punzhin, Sergey; Bronsveld, Paul M.; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.

    2012-01-01

    We show that the characteristic ligament size of nanoporous Ag synthesized by chemical dissolution of Al from Ag-Al alloys can be tuned from the current submicrometer size (similar to 100-500 nm) down to a much smaller length scale (similar to 30-60 nm). This is achieved by suppressing the formation

  14. Mid-level perceptual features distinguish objects of different real-world sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bria; Konkle, Talia; Cohen, Michael A; Alvarez, George A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how perceptual and conceptual representations are connected is a fundamental goal of cognitive science. Here, we focus on a broad conceptual distinction that constrains how we interact with objects--real-world size. Although there appear to be clear perceptual correlates for basic-level categories (apples look like other apples, oranges look like other oranges), the perceptual correlates of broader categorical distinctions are largely unexplored, i.e., do small objects look like other small objects? Because there are many kinds of small objects (e.g., cups, keys), there may be no reliable perceptual features that distinguish them from big objects (e.g., cars, tables). Contrary to this intuition, we demonstrated that big and small objects have reliable perceptual differences that can be extracted by early stages of visual processing. In a series of visual search studies, participants found target objects faster when the distractor objects differed in real-world size. These results held when we broadly sampled big and small objects, when we controlled for low-level features and image statistics, and when we reduced objects to texforms--unrecognizable textures that loosely preserve an object's form. However, this effect was absent when we used more basic textures. These results demonstrate that big and small objects have reliably different mid-level perceptual features, and suggest that early perceptual information about broad-category membership may influence downstream object perception, recognition, and categorization processes. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Processes influencing rainfall features in the Amazonian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Manzi, A. O.; Nascimento dos Santos, R. M.; von Randow, C.; Stoy, P. C.; Tota, J.; Trowbridge, A.; Schumacher, C.; Machado, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon is globally unique as it experiences the deepest atmospheric convection with important teleconnections to other parts of the Earth's climate system. In the Amazon Basin a large fraction of the local evapotranspiration is recycled through the formation of deep convective precipitating storms. Deep convection occurs due to moist thermodynamic conditions associated with elevated amounts of convective available potential energy. Aerosols invigorate the formation of convective storms in the Amazon via their unique concentrations, physical size, and chemical composition to activate into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but important aspects of aerosol/precipitation feedbacks remain unresolved. During the wet season, low atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevail in the pristine tropical air masses. These conditions have led to the Green Ocean hypothesis, which compares the clean tropical air to maritime air-masses and emphasizes biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks, to explain the features of the convective-type rainfall events in the Amazon. Field studies have been designed to investigate these relationships and the development of mesoscale convective systems through the Green Ocean Amazon project and the GOAmazon Boundary Layer Experiment. From March to October 2014 a field experiment was conducted at the Cuieiras Biological Reserve (2°51' S, 54°58' W), 80 km north of the city of Manaus, Brazil. This investigation spans the biological, chemical, and physical conditions influencing emissions and reactions of precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs), formation of aerosols and CCNs and transport out of the ABL, and their role in cloud formation and precipitation triggers. In this presentation we will show results on the magnitude turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat, CCN concentrations, and rain droplet size distribution for both the wet and dry season. Such influencing factors on precipitation, will be contrasted with the

  16. Acoustic Features Influence Musical Choices Across Multiple Genres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Michael D; Bansal, Jotthi; Woolhouse, Matthew H

    2017-01-01

    Based on a large behavioral dataset of music downloads, two analyses investigate whether the acoustic features of listeners' preferred musical genres influence their choice of tracks within non-preferred, secondary musical styles. Analysis 1 identifies feature distributions for pairs of genre-defined subgroups that are distinct. Using correlation analysis, these distributions are used to test the degree of similarity between subgroups' main genres and the other music within their download collections. Analysis 2 explores the issue of main-to-secondary genre influence through the production of 10 feature-influence matrices, one per acoustic feature, in which cell values indicate the percentage change in features for genres and subgroups compared to overall population averages. In total, 10 acoustic features and 10 genre-defined subgroups are explored within the two analyses. Results strongly indicate that the acoustic features of people's main genres influence the tracks they download within non-preferred, secondary musical styles. The nature of this influence and its possible actuating mechanisms are discussed with respect to research on musical preference, personality, and statistical learning.

  17. Selective axonal growth of embryonic hippocampal neurons according to topographic features of various sizes and shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E Schmidt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available David Y Fozdar1*, Jae Y Lee2*, Christine E Schmidt2–6, Shaochen Chen1,3–5,7,1Departments of Mechanical Engineering, 2Chemical Engineering, 3Biomedical Engineering; 4Center for Nano Molecular Science and Technology; 5Texas Materials Institute; 6Institute of Neuroscience; 7Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA *Contributed equally to this workPurpose: Understanding how surface features influence the establishment and outgrowth of the axon of developing neurons at the single cell level may aid in designing implantable scaffolds for the regeneration of damaged nerves. Past studies have shown that micropatterned ridge-groove structures not only instigate axon polarization, alignment, and extension, but are also preferred over smooth surfaces and even neurotrophic ligands.Methods: Here, we performed axonal-outgrowth competition assays using a proprietary four-quadrant topography grid to determine the capacity of various micropatterned topographies to act as stimuli sequestering axon extension. Each topography in the grid consisted of an array of microscale (approximately 2 µm or submicroscale (approximately 300 nm holes or lines with variable dimensions. Individual rat embryonic hippocampal cells were positioned either between two juxtaposing topographies or at the borders of individual topographies juxtaposing unpatterned smooth surface, cultured for 24 hours, and analyzed with respect to axonal selection using conventional imaging techniques.Results: Topography was found to influence axon formation and extension relative to smooth surface, and the distance of neurons relative to topography was found to impact whether the topography could serve as an effective cue. Neurons were also found to prefer submicroscale over microscale features and holes over lines for a given feature size.Conclusion: The results suggest that implementing physical cues of various shapes and sizes on nerve guidance conduits

  18. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  19. Study on Relation between Hydrodynamic Feature Size of HPAM and Pore Size of Reservoir Rock in Daqing Oilfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow mechanism of the injected fluid was studied by the constant pressure core displacement experiments in the paper. It is assumed under condition of the constant pressure gradient in deep formation based on the characteristic of pressure gradient distribution between the injection and production wells and the mobility of different polymer systems in deep reservoir. Moreover, the flow rate of steady stream was quantitatively analyzed and the critical flow pressure gradient of different injection parameters polymer solutions in different permeability cores was measured. The result showed that polymer hydrodynamic feature size increases with the increasing molecular weight. If the concentration of polymer solutions overlaps beyond critical concentration, then molecular chains entanglement will be occur and cause the augment of its hydrodynamic feature size. The polymer hydrodynamic feature size decreased as the salinity of the dilution water increased. When the median radius of the core pore and throat was 5–10 times of the polymer system hydrodynamic feature size, the polymer solution had a better compatibility with the microscopic pore structure of the reservoir. The estimation of polymer solutions mobility in the porous media can be used to guide the polymer displacement plan and select the optimum injection parameters.

  20. Nanopatterned surface with adjustable area coverage and feature size fabricated by photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Yang; Zhang Yan; Li Wei; Zhou Xuefeng; Wang Changsong; Feng Xin [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Zhang Luzheng [Petroleum Research Recovery Center, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Lu Xiaohua, E-mail: xhlu@njut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)

    2009-08-30

    We report an effective approach to fabricate nanopatterns of alkylsilane self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) with desirable coverage and feature size by gradient photocatalysis in TiO{sub 2} aqueous suspension. Growth and photocatalytic degradation of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) were combined to fabricate adjustable monolayered nanopatterns on mica sheet in this work. Systematic atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that OTS-SAMs that have similar area coverage with different feature sizes and similar feature size with different area coverages can be fabricated by this approach. Contact angle measurement was applied to confirm the gradually varied nanopatterns contributed to the gradient of UV light illumination. Since this approach is feasible for various organic SAMs and substrates, a versatile method was presented to prepare tunable nanopatterns with desirable area coverage and feature size in many applications, such as molecular and biomolecular recognition, sensor and electrode modification.

  1. Nanopatterned surface with adjustable area coverage and feature size fabricated by photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yang; Zhang Yan; Li Wei; Zhou Xuefeng; Wang Changsong; Feng Xin; Zhang Luzheng; Lu Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    We report an effective approach to fabricate nanopatterns of alkylsilane self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) with desirable coverage and feature size by gradient photocatalysis in TiO 2 aqueous suspension. Growth and photocatalytic degradation of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) were combined to fabricate adjustable monolayered nanopatterns on mica sheet in this work. Systematic atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that OTS-SAMs that have similar area coverage with different feature sizes and similar feature size with different area coverages can be fabricated by this approach. Contact angle measurement was applied to confirm the gradually varied nanopatterns contributed to the gradient of UV light illumination. Since this approach is feasible for various organic SAMs and substrates, a versatile method was presented to prepare tunable nanopatterns with desirable area coverage and feature size in many applications, such as molecular and biomolecular recognition, sensor and electrode modification.

  2. How does particle size influence caking in lactose powder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpin, Melanie Anne; Bertelsen, H.; Dalberg, A.

    2017-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) is known to influence product properties such as flowability and compressibility. When producing crystalline lactose, different steps can affect the PSD of the final powder. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PSD on caking and the mechanisms...

  3. Features influencing Islamic websites use: A Muslim user perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Aliyu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muslim scholars and organisations use the Internet through various websites to spread Islam globally. The presence of many websites providing Islamic contents online makes it necessary to examine their Islamic features and the factors that influence Muslims to use Islamic websites. This paper empirically investigates the Islamic features that influence the use of Islamic websites by Muslim users. The identified Islamic factors were grouped under five factors: beliefs, ethics, services, symbols, and values. A survey of 246 Muslim Islamic website users was conducted between November and December  2012 at the International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM. The study develops and tests a path measurement model to confirm the psychometric properties of the five identified factors. The study found that Islamic features significantly influence Muslims to use Islamic websites. The measurement model and empirical results provide valuable indicators for the direction of future research and also suggest guidelines for developing Islamic websites that will easily influence many Internet users to visit them in order to learn about Islamic teachings and practices. The findings are also of considerable importance as they contribute to the present body of knowledge on Islamic websites’ evaluation and for practice in designing and developing quality Islamic websites.

  4. Compressive behavior of pervious concretes and a quantification of the influence of random pore structure features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Omkar; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Identified the relevant pore structure features of pervious concretes, provided methodologies to extract those, and quantified the influence of these features on compressive response. → A model for stress-strain relationship of pervious concretes, and relationship between model parameters and parameters of the stress-strain relationship developed. → Statistical model for compressive strength as a function of pore structure features; and a stochastic model for the sensitivity of pore structure features in strength prediction. - Abstract: Properties of a random porous material such as pervious concrete are strongly dependent on its pore structure features, porosity being an important one among them. This study deals with developing an understanding of the material structure-compressive response relationships in pervious concretes. Several pervious concrete mixtures with different pore structure features are proportioned and subjected to static compression tests. The pore structure features such as pore area fractions, pore sizes, mean free spacing of the pores, specific surface area, and the three-dimensional pore distribution density are extracted using image analysis methods. The compressive stress-strain response of pervious concretes, a model to predict the stress-strain response, and its relationship to several of the pore structure features are outlined. Larger aggregate sizes and increase in paste volume fractions are observed to result in increased compressive strengths. The compressive response is found to be influenced by the pore sizes, their distributions and spacing. A statistical model is used to relate the compressive strength to the relevant pore structure features, which is then used as a base model in a Monte-Carlo simulation to evaluate the sensitivity of the predicted compressive strength to the model terms.

  5. The Influence of Auditory Information on Visual Size Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Alessia; Cuturi, Luigi F; Gori, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Size perception can be influenced by several visual cues, such as spatial (e.g., depth or vergence) and temporal contextual cues (e.g., adaptation to steady visual stimulation). Nevertheless, perception is generally multisensory and other sensory modalities, such as auditory, can contribute to the functional estimation of the size of objects. In this study, we investigate whether auditory stimuli at different sound pitches can influence visual size perception after visual adaptation. To this aim, we used an adaptation paradigm (Pooresmaeili et al., 2013) in three experimental conditions: visual-only, visual-sound at 100 Hz and visual-sound at 9,000 Hz. We asked participants to judge the size of a test stimulus in a size discrimination task. First, we obtained a baseline for all conditions. In the visual-sound conditions, the auditory stimulus was concurrent to the test stimulus. Secondly, we repeated the task by presenting an adapter (twice as big as the reference stimulus) before the test stimulus. We replicated the size aftereffect in the visual-only condition: the test stimulus was perceived smaller than its physical size. The new finding is that we found the auditory stimuli have an effect on the perceived size of the test stimulus after visual adaptation: low frequency sound decreased the effect of visual adaptation, making the stimulus perceived bigger compared to the visual-only condition, and contrarily, the high frequency sound had the opposite effect, making the test size perceived even smaller.

  6. Design features to achieve defence-in-depth in small and medium sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Broader incorporation of inherent and passive safety design features has become a 'trademark' of many advanced reactor concepts, including several evolutionary designs and nearly all innovative small and medium sized design concepts. Ensuring adequate defence-in-depth is important for reactors of smaller output because many of them are being designed to allow more proximity to the user, specifically, when non-electrical energy products are targeted. Based on the activities recently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the paper provides a summary description of the design features used to achieve defence in depth in the eleven representative concepts of small and medium sized reactors. (author)

  7. Influence of horizontal resolution and ensemble size on model performance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dalton, A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conference of South African Society for Atmospheric Sciences (SASAS), Potchefstroom, 1-2 October 2014 Influence of horizontal resolution and ensemble size on model performance Amaris Dalton*¹, Willem A. Landman ¹ʾ² ¹Departmen of Geography, Geo...

  8. Influence of microparticle size on cavitation noise during ultrasonic vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cavitation noise in the ultrasonic vibration system was found to be influenced by the size of microparticles added in water. The SiO2 microparticles with the diameter smaller than 100 μm reduced the cavitation noise, and the reason was attributed to the constrained oscillation of the cavitation bubbles, which were stabilized by the microparticles.

  9. Human Occipital and Parietal GABA Selectively Influence Visual Perception of Orientation and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen; Sandberg, Kristian; Andersen, Lau Møller; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Rees, Geraint

    2017-09-13

    GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain. The level of GABA varies substantially across individuals, and this variability is associated with interindividual differences in visual perception. However, it remains unclear whether the association between GABA level and visual perception reflects a general influence of visual inhibition or whether the GABA levels of different cortical regions selectively influence perception of different visual features. To address this, we studied how the GABA levels of parietal and occipital cortices related to interindividual differences in size, orientation, and brightness perception. We used visual contextual illusion as a perceptual assay since the illusion dissociates perceptual content from stimulus content and the magnitude of the illusion reflects the effect of visual inhibition. Across individuals, we observed selective correlations between the level of GABA and the magnitude of contextual illusion. Specifically, parietal GABA level correlated with size illusion magnitude but not with orientation or brightness illusion magnitude; in contrast, occipital GABA level correlated with orientation illusion magnitude but not with size or brightness illusion magnitude. Our findings reveal a region- and feature-dependent influence of GABA level on human visual perception. Parietal and occipital cortices contain, respectively, topographic maps of size and orientation preference in which neural responses to stimulus sizes and stimulus orientations are modulated by intraregional lateral connections. We propose that these lateral connections may underlie the selective influence of GABA on visual perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human visual system, varies substantially across individuals. This interindividual variability in GABA level is linked to interindividual differences in many aspects of visual perception. However, the widespread influence of GABA raises the

  10. Human Occipital and Parietal GABA Selectively Influence Visual Perception of Orientation and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lau Møller; Blicher, Jakob Udby

    2017-01-01

    GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain. The level of GABA varies substantially across individuals, and this variability is associated with interindividual differences in visual perception. However, it remains unclear whether the association between GABA level and visual perception reflects a general influence of visual inhibition or whether the GABA levels of different cortical regions selectively influence perception of different visual features. To address this, we studied how the GABA levels of parietal and occipital cortices related to interindividual differences in size, orientation, and brightness perception. We used visual contextual illusion as a perceptual assay since the illusion dissociates perceptual content from stimulus content and the magnitude of the illusion reflects the effect of visual inhibition. Across individuals, we observed selective correlations between the level of GABA and the magnitude of contextual illusion. Specifically, parietal GABA level correlated with size illusion magnitude but not with orientation or brightness illusion magnitude; in contrast, occipital GABA level correlated with orientation illusion magnitude but not with size or brightness illusion magnitude. Our findings reveal a region- and feature-dependent influence of GABA level on human visual perception. Parietal and occipital cortices contain, respectively, topographic maps of size and orientation preference in which neural responses to stimulus sizes and stimulus orientations are modulated by intraregional lateral connections. We propose that these lateral connections may underlie the selective influence of GABA on visual perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human visual system, varies substantially across individuals. This interindividual variability in GABA level is linked to interindividual differences in many aspects of visual perception. However, the widespread influence of GABA raises the

  11. Influence of particle size distributions on magnetorheological fluid performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, H; Stoian, G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence that size distributions of the magnetic particles might have on the magnetorheological fluid performances. In our study, several size distributions have been tailored first by sieving a micrometric Fe powder in order to obtain narrow distribution powders and then by recomposing the new size distributions (different from Gaussian). We used spherical Fe particles (mesh -325) commercially available. The powder was sieved by means of a sieve shaker using a series of sieves with the following mesh size: 20, 32, 40, 50, 63, 80 micrometers. All magnetic powders were characterized through Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements, particle size analysis and also Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were taken. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on the resulted magnetic powders were prepared and studied by means of a rheometer with a magnetorheological module. The MR fluids were measured in magnetic field and in zero magnetic field as well. As we noticed in our previous experiments particles size distribution can also influence the MR fluids performances.

  12. Microfiltration of distillery stillage: Influence of membrane pore size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Vesna M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stillage is one of the most polluted waste products of the food industry. Beside large volume, the stillage contains high amount of suspended solids, high values of chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand, so it should not be discharged in the nature before previous purification. In this work, three ceramic membranes for microfiltration with different pore sizes were tested for stillage purification in order to find the most suitable membrane for the filtration process. Ceramic membranes with a nominal pore size of 200 nm, 450 nm and 800 nm were used for filtration. The influence of pore size on permeate flux and removal efficiency was investigated. A membrane with the pore size of 200 nm showed the best filtration performance so it was chosen for the microfiltration process.

  13. Haptic exploration of fingertip-sized geometric features using a multimodal tactile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D.; Hellman, Randall B.; Santos, Veronica J.

    2014-06-01

    Haptic perception remains a grand challenge for artificial hands. Dexterous manipulators could be enhanced by "haptic intelligence" that enables identification of objects and their features via touch alone. Haptic perception of local shape would be useful when vision is obstructed or when proprioceptive feedback is inadequate, as observed in this study. In this work, a robot hand outfitted with a deformable, bladder-type, multimodal tactile sensor was used to replay four human-inspired haptic "exploratory procedures" on fingertip-sized geometric features. The geometric features varied by type (bump, pit), curvature (planar, conical, spherical), and footprint dimension (1.25 - 20 mm). Tactile signals generated by active fingertip motions were used to extract key parameters for use as inputs to supervised learning models. A support vector classifier estimated order of curvature while support vector regression models estimated footprint dimension once curvature had been estimated. A distal-proximal stroke (along the long axis of the finger) enabled estimation of order of curvature with an accuracy of 97%. Best-performing, curvature-specific, support vector regression models yielded R2 values of at least 0.95. While a radial-ulnar stroke (along the short axis of the finger) was most helpful for estimating feature type and size for planar features, a rolling motion was most helpful for conical and spherical features. The ability to haptically perceive local shape could be used to advance robot autonomy and provide haptic feedback to human teleoperators of devices ranging from bomb defusal robots to neuroprostheses.

  14. INFLUENCE OF FIRM SIZE ON ITS BUSINESS SUCCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Pervan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A firm may use different methods and diverse (nonfinancial analysis/indicators in order to evaluate its business success. However, one of the most widely applied methods refers to financial analyses that use profitability ratios as the key measures of firm’s overall efficiency and performance. In this research we focused our attention on firm size and evaluated its influence on firm profitability. Other than by the size of a firm, a firm performance is affected by a variety of internal and external variables. Therefore, apart from mere investigating the relationship between firm size and performance, we also explored the impact of some other variables crucial in determining firm profitability. The analysis was conducted for the 2002-2010 period and the results revealed that firm size has a significant positive (although weak influence on firm profitability. Additionally, results showed that assets turnover and debt ratio also statistically significantly influence firms’ performance while current ratio didn’t prove to be an important explanatory variable of firms’ profitability.

  15. Influence of Compositional Variations on Floc Size and Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H.; Tan, X.; Reed, A. H.; Furukawa, Y.; Zhang, G.

    2010-12-01

    Clay-biopolymer micro aggregates or flocs are abundant in waters, including rivers, lakes, and oceans. Owing to their small size and charged surfaces, fine-grained inorganic sediment particles, mainly clays, interact actively with organic substances, such as organic matter and biogenic polymers, to form aggregates or flocs, typically in the size of 10-1000 μm. The flocs in ocean waters are also termed “marine snow”. These flocs are typically porous, tenuous, and soft in nature. During transport in suspension, they may breakdown and decrease in size if the turbulent shear stress exceeds their strength. They may also collide and form larger ones if the shear stress is relatively small. Since flocs of different size and structure settle at different velocities, understanding their strength is also of essential importance for sediment hydrodynamics, transport, and management. Our study focuses on investigating the influence of compositional variations on floc size and strength so that a better understanding of floc dynamics can be achieved. A laser diffraction-based Cilas® particle size and shape analyzer with controllable fluid circulation velocity was employed to conduct floc size measurements and shape imaging, the latter achieved by a high resolution inverted optical microscope, which is also installed with the size analyzer. Totally two clay minerals, kaolinite and illite, were tested as the model inorganic solid skeleton minerals for floc formation, and two biopolymers, anionic xanthan gum and neutral guar gum, were chosen as analogs of naturally occurring organic matter or biopolymers to simulate clay-biopolymer floc formation. Moreover, the concentration of both organic and inorganic phases was varied. The floc breakage or tensile strength was indirectly estimated by the varied fluid flow velocity in the particle size analyzer’s circulation system. For each individual composition, stable flocs were formed by three different fluid circulating velocities

  16. INFLUENCING OF FRICTION IN HINGES FORCE SIZE OF BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOHOMAZ V. N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. The size of critical force of bar on the traditional method of calculation is determined in supposition of ideal hinge in the place of fixing of bar. There are both a hinge resistance at the turn of bar ends and their moving in the real hinges. Thus, there is the necessity of influencing character determination of these hinge imperfections on the size of critical force. In the existent scientific labours is devoted the alike problems, influencing of friction in the hinges of bar fastening on the size of critical force was not taken into account. At determination of bars stability with no ideality of hinges friction in them it is possible to take into account by the eccentric appendix of loading or appendix of moment. However at such approach it is difficult enough to define the size of attached force or moment. Purpose. To set influencing of friction in the hinge of bar fastening on of his critical force size in sense of Euler, and also build dependences for determination of bar critical force taking into account mechanical descriptions of hinges materials. Conclusion. For the task of determination the size of bar critical force with the joint fastening on ends are got the dependences which take into account mechanical descriptions of material hinge. The received dependences allow to define more exact meaning of critical force for bars. The examples of calculation of whole bar and bar with undercuting in the middle are resulted that values of critical force, certain on a traditional method are overpriced.

  17. Surface phase separation, dewetting feature size, and crystal morphology in thin films of polystyrene/poly(ε-caprolactone) blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; He, Zhoukun; Li, Yuhan; Chen, Feng; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qing; Deng, Hua; Fu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Thin films of polystyrene (PS)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends were prepared by spin-coating and characterized by tapping mode force microscopy (AFM). Effects of the relative concentration of PS in polymer solution on the surface phase separation and dewetting feature size of the blend films were systematically studied. Due to the coupling of phase separation, dewetting, and crystallization of the blend films with the evaporation of solvent during spin-coating, different size of PS islands decorated with various PCL crystal structures including spherulite-like, flat-on individual lamellae, and flat-on dendritic crystal were obtained in the blend films by changing the film composition. The average distance of PS islands was shown to increase with the relative concentration of PS in casting solution. For a given ratio of PS/PCL, the feature size of PS appeared to increase linearly with the square of PS concentration while the PCL concentration only determined the crystal morphology of the blend films with no influence on the upper PS domain features. This is explained in terms of vertical phase separation and spinodal dewetting of the PS rich layer from the underlying PCL rich layer, leading to the upper PS dewetting process and the underlying PCL crystalline process to be mutually independent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vertical visual features have a strong influence on cuttlefish camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, K M; Buresch, K C; Kossodo, M M; Mäthger, L M; Siemann, L A; Hanlon, R T

    2013-04-01

    Cuttlefish and other cephalopods use visual cues from their surroundings to adaptively change their body pattern for camouflage. Numerous previous experiments have demonstrated the influence of two-dimensional (2D) substrates (e.g., sand and gravel habitats) on camouflage, yet many marine habitats have varied three-dimensional (3D) structures among which cuttlefish camouflage from predators, including benthic predators that view cuttlefish horizontally against such 3D backgrounds. We conducted laboratory experiments, using Sepia officinalis, to test the relative influence of horizontal versus vertical visual cues on cuttlefish camouflage: 2D patterns on benthic substrates were tested versus 2D wall patterns and 3D objects with patterns. Specifically, we investigated the influence of (i) quantity and (ii) placement of high-contrast elements on a 3D object or a 2D wall, as well as (iii) the diameter and (iv) number of 3D objects with high-contrast elements on cuttlefish body pattern expression. Additionally, we tested the influence of high-contrast visual stimuli covering the entire 2D benthic substrate versus the entire 2D wall. In all experiments, visual cues presented in the vertical plane evoked the strongest body pattern response in cuttlefish. These experiments support field observations that, in some marine habitats, cuttlefish will respond to vertically oriented background features even when the preponderance of visual information in their field of view seems to be from the 2D surrounding substrate. Such choices highlight the selective decision-making that occurs in cephalopods with their adaptive camouflage capability.

  19. Microhabitat features influencing habitat use by Florida black bears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Karelus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fine-scale habitat needs of species and the factors influencing heterogeneous use of habitat within home range would help identify limiting resources and inform habitat management practices. This information is especially important for large mammals living in fragmented habitats where resources may be scarcer and more patchily distributed than in contiguous habitats. Using bihourly Global Position System (GPS location data collected from 10 individuals during 2011–2014, we investigated microhabitat features of areas within home ranges that received high vs. low intensity of use by Florida black bears (Ursus americanus floridanus in north-central, Florida. We identified areas receiving high and low levels of use by bears based on their utilization distributions estimated with the dynamic Brownian bridge movement model, and performed vegetation sampling at bear locations within high- and low-use areas. Using univariate analyses and generalized linear mixed models, we found that (1 canopy cover, visual obstruction, and hardwood density were important in defining high-use sites; (2 the probability of high use was positively associated with principal components that represented habitat closer to creeks and with high canopy and shrub cover and higher hardwood densities, likely characteristic of forested wetlands; and (3 the probability of high use was, to a lesser extent, associated with principal components that represented habitat with high canopy cover, high pine density, and low visual obstruction and hardwood density; likely representing sand pine and pine plantations. Our results indicate that the high bear-use sites were in forested wetlands, where cover and food resources for bears are likely to occur in higher abundance. Habitat management plans whereby bears are a focal species should aim to increase the availability and quality of forested wetlands. Keywords: Habitat selection, Heterogeneous habitat use, Forest management

  20. Grandparental investment: The influence of reproductive timing and family size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coall, David A; Meier, Marc; Hertwig, Ralph; Wänke, Michaela; Höpflinger, François

    2009-01-01

    The influence that grandparents have on the life history traits of their descendants has been studied extensively. However, no attention has been paid to the potential influence a grandparent's own reproductive history has on the investment they make in their grandchildren. We use data from 658 Swiss grandchildren and 591 of their grandparents to investigate whether grandparents' reproductive scheduling and family size influence the amount of investment grandparents make in a focal grandchild (shared contacts, occasions to meet, activities, discussions, interests, and important roles the grandparent plays). Grandparents who were younger when they had their first child had more children and grandchildren; this relationship strengthened after controlling for grandparental age, sex, lineage, and education (all P children or grandchildren was associated with reduced levels of grandparental investment. After adjustment for a wide range of factors known to influence investment, having more children or grandchildren and having a first child or grandchild at a younger age were associated with reduced investment in 14 of 24 analyses (all P family size. Interestingly, these relationships were only present in data reported from the grandchild's point of view, not the grandparent's. This analysis provides preliminary evidence that grandparents' reproductive strategies have consequences for the amount of investment they make in their grandchildren. These results are examined in terms of the trade-offs between current and future reproduction and offspring quality and quantity. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Fabrication of Pt nanowires with a diffraction-unlimited feature size by high-threshold lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Ziang; Yu, Miao; Song, Zhengxun; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin; Li, Wenjun; Wang, Dapeng; Zhao, Le; Peng, Kuiqing

    2015-01-01

    Although the nanoscale world can already be observed at a diffraction-unlimited resolution using far-field optical microscopy, to make the step from microscopy to lithography still requires a suitable photoresist material system. In this letter, we consider the threshold to be a region with a width characterized by the extreme feature size obtained using a Gaussian beam spot. By narrowing such a region through improvement of the threshold sensitization to intensity in a high-threshold material system, the minimal feature size becomes smaller. By using platinum as the negative photoresist, we demonstrate that high-threshold lithography can be used to fabricate nanowire arrays with a scalable resolution along the axial direction of the linewidth from the micro- to the nanoscale using a nanosecond-pulsed laser source with a wavelength λ 0  = 1064 nm. The minimal feature size is only several nanometers (sub λ 0 /100). Compared with conventional polymer resist lithography, the advantages of high-threshold lithography are sharper pinpoints of laser intensity triggering the threshold response and also higher robustness allowing for large area exposure by a less-expensive nanosecond-pulsed laser

  2. Communication target object recognition for D2D connection with feature size limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Jiheon; Kim, Soochang; Kim, Young-hoon; Lee, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a new concept of device-to-device (D2D) communication, which is called "point-and-link communication" has attracted great attentions due to its intuitive and simple operation. This approach enables user to communicate with target devices without any pre-identification information such as SSIDs, MAC addresses by selecting the target image displayed on the user's own device. In this paper, we present an efficient object matching algorithm that can be applied to look(point)-and-link communications for mobile services. Due to the limited channel bandwidth and low computational power of mobile terminals, the matching algorithm should satisfy low-complexity, low-memory and realtime requirements. To meet these requirements, we propose fast and robust feature extraction by considering the descriptor size and processing time. The proposed algorithm utilizes a HSV color histogram, SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features and object aspect ratios. To reduce the descriptor size under 300 bytes, a limited number of SIFT key points were chosen as feature points and histograms were binarized while maintaining required performance. Experimental results show the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Influences of population size and density on birthplace effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, David J; Coutinho, Patrícia; Côté, Jean; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Contextual influences on talent development (e.g., birthplace effects) have become a topic of interest for sport scientists. Birthplace effects occur when being born in a certain city size leads to participation or performance advantages, typically for those born in smaller or mid-sized cities. The purpose of this study was to investigate birthplace effects in Portuguese volleyball players by analysing city size, as well as population density - an important but infrequently used variable. Participants included 4062 volleyball players (M age  = 33), 53.2% of whom were men. Using Portuguese national census data from 1981, we compared participants (within each sex) across five population categories. In addition, we used ANOVAs to study expertise and population density. Results indicated that men and women athletes born in districts of 200,000-399,999 were 2.4 times more likely to attain elite volleyball status, while all other districts decreased the odds of expert development. For men, being born in high-density areas resulted in less chance of achieving expertise, whereas there were no differences for women. The results suggest that athletes' infrastructure and social structure play an important role in talent development, and that these structures are influenced by total population and population density, respectively.

  4. Vascularity and grey-scale sonographic features of normal cervical lymph nodes: variations with nodal size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Michael; Ahuja, Anil; Brook, Fiona; Metreweli, Constantine

    2001-01-01

    AIM: This study was undertaken to investigate variations in the vascularity and grey-scale sonographic features of cervical lymph nodes with their size. MATERIALS AND METHODS: High resolution grey-scale sonography and power Doppler sonography were performed in 1133 cervical nodes in 109 volunteers who had a sonographic examination of the neck. Standardized parameters were used in power Doppler sonography. RESULTS: About 90% of lymph nodes with a maximum transverse diameter greater than 5 mm showed vascularity and an echogenic hilus. Smaller nodes were less likely to show vascularity and an echogenic hilus. As the size of the lymph nodes increased, the intranodal blood flow velocity increased significantly (P 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide a baseline for grey-scale and power Doppler sonography of normal cervical lymph nodes. Sonologists will find varying vascularity and grey-scale appearances when encountering nodes of different sizes. Ying, M. et al. (2001)

  5. Classification Influence of Features on Given Emotions and Its Application in Feature Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yin; Chen, Chuang; Liu, Li-Long

    2018-04-01

    In order to solve the problem that there is a large amount of redundant data in high-dimensional speech emotion features, we analyze deeply the extracted speech emotion features and select better features. Firstly, a given emotion is classified by each feature. Secondly, the recognition rate is ranked in descending order. Then, the optimal threshold of features is determined by rate criterion. Finally, the better features are obtained. When applied in Berlin and Chinese emotional data set, the experimental results show that the feature selection method outperforms the other traditional methods.

  6. Layout Determining Features, their Influence Zones and Respect Distances at the Olkiluoto Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pere, T.; Ahokas, H.; Vaittinen, T.; Wikstroem, L.

    2012-12-01

    Fault zones located at the site of an underground nuclear waste repository may pose a risk to the repository by acting as potential hosts for earthquakes during the present day or future stress fields and having the possibility to induce secondary displacements on nearby large fractures, which may damage the nuclear waste canisters, if being intersected by such fractures. The fault zones may additionally provide possible flow routes, important for the transport of radionuclides and the chemical stability of the repository. It is therefore important to identify such structures, defined as layout determining features (LDF), and to assess their influence on the surrounding host rock and to determine respect volumes to the structures, which are avoided in the layout planning in order to mitigate the possible harmful effects to the repository. Fault zones with a trace length of 3 km or more are considered as layout determining features as these can potentially host an earthquake of a magnitude of 5.5 or more and may thus induce secondary displacements larger than 5 cm on nearby fractures, which is held as the current canister damage threshold premise. Fault zones with a size less than 3 km are considered unlikely candidates to induce secondary displacements of 5 cm or larger. In addition to the earthquake potential, hydrogeological zones with high T -value (geometrical mean T ≤ 10 -6 m 2 /s) and large dimensions (at least several hundred metres) are also defined as layout determining features. For each layout determining feature an influence zone is defined, depicting a volume around a fault zone or a hydrogeological zone with increased fracture density and permeability, often also called as damage zones in the scientific literature. Influence zones are therefore considered as mechanically weak and/or transmissive parts of the host rock, which may cause harmful effects to the performance of the repository if intersecting deposition tunnels or deposition holes. In

  7. Influence of specimen size on the creep of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senseny, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Triaxial compression creep data for Avery Island dome salt are analyzed to determine the influence of specimen size on creep deformation. Laboratory experiments were performed on 50- and 100-mm-diameter specimens in the temperature range from 25 to 200 0 C and the axial stress difference range from 2.5 to 31.0 MPa. The strain-vs-time data from each test are divided into transient and steady-state components. Results of statistical analysis of these data show that transient creep of the small specimens is a stronger function of stress, temperature, and time than is transient creep of the larger specimens. Analysis of the steady-state data show no size effect, however. 14 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  8. Influence of cervical preflaring on apical file size determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, J D; Capelli, A; Guerisoli, D M Z; Spanó, J C E; Estrela, C

    2005-07-01

    To investigate the influence of cervical preflaring with different instruments (Gates-Glidden drills, Quantec Flare series instruments and LA Axxess burs) on the first file that binds at working length (WL) in maxillary central incisors. Forty human maxillary central incisors with complete root formation were used. After standard access cavities, a size 06 K-file was inserted into each canal until the apical foramen was reached. The WL was set 1 mm short of the apical foramen. Group 1 received the initial apical instrument without previous preflaring of the cervical and middle thirds of the root canal. Group 2 had the cervical and middle portion of the root canals enlarged with Gates-Glidden drills sizes 90, 110 and 130. Group 3 had the cervical and middle thirds of the root canals enlarged with nickel-titanium Quantec Flare series instruments. Titanium-nitrite treated, stainless steel LA Axxess burs were used for preflaring the cervical and middle portions of root canals from group 4. Each canal was sized using manual K-files, starting with size 08 files with passive movements until the WL was reached. File sizes were increased until a binding sensation was felt at the WL, and the instrument size was recorded for each tooth. The apical region was then observed under a stereoscopic magnifier, images were recorded digitally and the differences between root canal and maximum file diameters were evaluated for each sample. Significant differences were found between experimental groups regarding anatomical diameter at the WL and the first file to bind in the canal (P Flare instruments were ranked in an intermediary position, with no statistically significant differences between them (0.093 mm average). The instrument binding technique for determining anatomical diameter at WL is not precise. Preflaring of the cervical and middle thirds of the root canal improved anatomical diameter determination; the instrument used for preflaring played a major role in determining the

  9. Spatial reorientation in rats (Rattus norvegicus): Use of geometric and featural information as a function of arena size and feature location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, J.H.R.; Fontanari, L.; Regolin, L.

    2009-01-01

    Rats were used in a spatial reorientation task to assess their ability to use geometric and non-geometric, featural, information. Experimental conditions differed in the size of the arena (small, medium, or large) and whether the food-baited corner was near or far from a visual feature. The main

  10. Feature-size dependent selective edge enhancement of x-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, S.

    1988-01-01

    Morphological filters are nonlinear signal transformations that operate on a picture directly in the space domain. Such filters are based on the theory of mathematical morphology previously formulated. The filt4er being presented here features a ''mask'' operator (called a ''structuring element'' in some of the literature) which is a function of the two spatial coordinates x and y. The two basic mathematical operations are called ''masked erosion'' and ''masked dilation''. In the case of masked erosion the mask is passed over the input image in a raster pattern. At each position of the mask, the pixel values under the mask are multiplied by the mask pixel values. Then the output pixel value, located at the center position of the mask,is set equal to the minimum of the product of the mask and input values. Similarity, for masked dilation, the output pixel value is the maximum of the product of the input and the mask pixel values. The two basic processes of dilation and erosion can be used to construct the next level of operations the ''positive sieve'' (also called ''opening'') and the ''negative sieve'' (''closing''). The positive sieve modifies the peaks in the image whereas the negative sieve works on image valleys. The positive sieve is implemented by passing the output of the masked erosion step through the masked dilation function. The negative sieve reverses this procedure, using a dilation followed by an erosion. Each such sifting operator is characterized by a ''hole size''. It will be shown that the choice of hole size will select the range of pixel detail sizes which are to be enhanced. The shape of the mask will govern the shape of the enhancement. Finally positive sifting is used to enhance positive-going (peak) features, whereas negative enhances the negative-going (valley) landmarks

  11. Influence of ion size and charge on osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, James; Kim, Daejoong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2012-04-12

    Osmosis is fundamental to many processes, such as in the function of biological cells and in industrial desalination to obtain clean drinking water. The choice of solute in industrial applications of osmosis is highly important in maximizing efficiency and minimizing costs. The macroscale process of osmosis originates from the nanoscale properties of the solvent, and therefore an understanding of the mechanisms of how these properties determine osmotic strength can be highly useful. For this reason, we have undertaken molecular dynamics simulations to systematically study the influence of ion size and charge on the strength of osmosis of water through carbon nanotube membranes. Our results show that strong osmosis occurs under optimum conditions of ion placement near the region of high water density near the membrane wall and of maintenance of a strong water hydration shell around the ions. The results in turn allow greater insight into the origin of the strong osmotic strength of real ions such as NaCl. Finally, in terms of practical simulation, we highlight the importance of avoiding size effects that can occur if the simulation cell is too small.

  12. Set size and culture influence children's attention to number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lisa; Kuwabara, Megumi; Smith, Linda B

    2015-03-01

    Much research evidences a system in adults and young children for approximately representing quantity. Here we provide evidence that the bias to attend to discrete quantity versus other dimensions may be mediated by set size and culture. Preschool-age English-speaking children in the United States and Japanese-speaking children in Japan were tested in a match-to-sample task where number was pitted against cumulative surface area in both large and small numerical set comparisons. Results showed that children from both cultures were biased to attend to the number of items for small sets. Large set responses also showed a general attention to number when ratio difficulty was easy. However, relative to the responses for small sets, attention to number decreased for both groups; moreover, both U.S. and Japanese children showed a significant bias to attend to total amount for difficult numerical ratio distances, although Japanese children shifted attention to total area at relatively smaller set sizes than U.S. children. These results add to our growing understanding of how quantity is represented and how such representation is influenced by context--both cultural and perceptual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of nutrition labelling on food portion size consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Mary T; Wallace, Julie M W; Robson, Paula J; Rennie, Kirsten L; McCaffrey, Tracy A; Welch, Robert W; Livingstone, M Barbara E

    2013-06-01

    Nutrition labelling is an important strategic approach for encouraging consumers to make healthier food choices. The availability of highly palatable foods labelled as 'low fat or reduced calorie' may encourage the over-consumption of these products. This study aimed to determine whether the manipulation of nutrition labelling information can influence food portion size consumption. Normal and overweight men (n=24) and women (n=23) were served an identical lunch meal on three separate days, but the information they received prior to consuming the lunch meal was manipulated as follows: "baseline", "high fat/energy" and "low fat/energy". Food and energy intake was significantly increased in the low fat/energy condition compared with both baseline and the high fat/energy condition. An additional 3% (162 kJ) energy was consumed by subjects under the low fat/energy condition compared to baseline. No differences were observed between the baseline and high fat/energy condition. Subjects who consumed most in the low fat/energy condition were found to be mostly men, to have a higher BMI and to be overweight. Low fat/energy information can positively influence food and energy intake, suggesting that foods labelled as 'low fat' or 'low calorie' may be one factor promoting the consumption of large food portions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of advanced mid-sized reactors regarding passive features, core damage frequencies and core melt retention features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wider, H.

    2005-01-01

    New Light Water Reactors, whose regular safety systems are complemented by passive safety systems, are ready for the market. The special aspect of passive safety features is their actuation and functioning independent of the operator. They add significantly to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF) since the operator continues to play its independent role in actuating the regular safety devices based on modern instrumentation and control (I and C). The latter also has passive features regarding the prevention of accidents. Two reactors with significant passive features that are presently offered on the market are the AP1000 PWR and the SWR 1000 BWR. Their passive features are compared and also their core damage frequencies (CDF). The latter are also compared with those of a VVER-1000. A further discussion about the two passive plants concerns their mitigating features for severe accidents. Regarding core-melt retention both rely on in-vessel cooling of the melt. The new VVER-1000 reactor, on the other hand features a validated ex-vessel concept. (author)

  15. Features of deep cave sediments: their influence on fossil preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobo, R.

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse how physical and chemical deep-cave sediment features preserve the morphological and geochemical characteristics of paleontological materials. Detrital sediment chemistry and clast size are fundamental because they provide a soft, impervious and plastic environment in which fossil remains are transported with minimal erosion. Sediment mineralogy provides a carbonate- and phosphate-buffered environment in which molecules of biological origin hydrolyze slower than in open-air environments or even at cave entrance sites. Because permafrost did not develop in the Iberian Peninsula (at least at the altitudes of inhabited caves, sediment desiccation never took place. In addition, sediment -pores were not aerated, which protected fossil remains from air (oxygen-linked weathering. The annual-temperature variation inside sediment was negligible, which contributed to amino acid racemization dating. Collagen amino acid and amino acid racemization analysis of cave bear and man samples from cave sediments dated from different Oxygen Isotope Stages (4": Sidrón, Amutxate, Troskaeta, El Toll, Coro Tracito, Ekain, Lezetxiki, La Pasada, Eirós; 5": Reguerillo and Arrikrutz; 6"-7": Sima de los Huesos demonstrate that important amounts of almost intact collagen still remain in teeth dentine. Fossil DNA search seems to be very promising.En este trabajo se analiza el papel que juegan las características físicas y químicas de los sedimentos de galerías profundas de cuevas en la preservación de los caracteres morfológicos y paleobiomoleculares del material paleontológico incluido en dichos sedimentos. Los aspectos geoquímicos y de tamaño de grano del sedimento son críticos: las características generan un medio blando, plástico e impermeable que permite el transporte -mecánico sin grave deterioro del material (en coladas de barro; las características químicas mineralogía del sediment* proporcionan un ambiente con tampón fosfatado

  16. Digging deeper into platform game level design: session size and sequential features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Noor; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2012-01-01

    A recent trend within computational intelligence and games research is to investigate how to affect video game players’ in-game experience by designing and/or modifying aspects of game content. Analysing the relationship between game content, player behaviour and self-reported affective states...... constitutes an important step towards understanding game experience and constructing effective game adaptation mechanisms. This papers reports on further refinement of a method to understand this relationship by analysing data collected from players, building models that predict player experience...... and analysing what features of game and player data predict player affect best. We analyse data from players playing 780 pairs of short game sessions of the platform game Super Mario Bros, investigate the impact of the session size and what part of the level that has the major affect on player experience...

  17. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  18. A review of factors influencing litter size in Irish sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Peadar G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many factors influence litter size. These include genetics, gilt management, lactation length, parity distribution, disease, stress and boar fertility. In the past 20 years, litter size in Irish sows has increased by only one pig. Born alive figures now average at 11.2 pigs per litter. In this regard, Ireland is falling behind our European competitors who have made significant advances over this time. Denmark, for example, has an average figure of 12.7 pigs born alive per litter and France an average of 12.5. The single area that could be improved immediately is sow feeding. It is important that sows are fed correctly throughout pregnancy. If over-fed during pregnancy, sows will have depressed appetite during lactation. If underfed in pregnancy, sows will be too thin at farrowing. The correct way to feed a pregnant sow is to match her feed allocation to her requirement for maintenance, body growth and growth of her developing foetuses. During lactation, sows should be given as much feed as they can eat to prevent excessive loss of body condition. Liquid-feed curves should be such that lactating sows are provided with a minimum mean daily feed supply of 6.2 kg. A small proportion of sows will eat more and this could be given as supplementary dry feed. Where dry feeding is practised in the farrowing house, it is difficult to hand-feed sows to match their appetite. Ideally ad libitum wet/dry feeders should be used. From weaning to service, sows should once again be fed ad libitum. If liquid feeding, this means giving at least 60 MJ DE (digestible energy per day during this period. If dry feeding, at least 4 kg of lactation diet should be fed daily. The effort spent perfecting sow feeding management on units should yield high dividends in the form of increased pigs born alive per litter.

  19. Prostate size and adverse pathologic features in men undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kyu; Poon, Bing Ying; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between prostate volume measured from preoperative imaging and adverse pathologic features at the time of radical prostatectomy and evaluate the potential effect of clinical stage on such relationship. In 1756 men who underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and radical prostatectomy from 2000 to 2010, we examined associations of magnetic resonance imaging-measured prostate volume with pathologic outcomes using univariate logistic regression and with postoperative biochemical recurrence using Cox proportional hazards models. We also analyzed the effects of clinical stage on the relationship between prostate volume and adverse pathologic features via interaction analyses. In univariate analyses, smaller prostate volume was significantly associated with high pathologic Gleason score (P.05). The association between prostate volume and recurrence was significant in a multivariable analysis adjusting for postoperative variables (P=.031) but missed statistical significance in the preoperative model (P=.053). Addition of prostate volume did not change C-Indices (0.78 and 0.83) of either model. Although prostate size did not enhance the prediction of recurrence, it is associated with aggressiveness of prostate cancer. There is no evidence that this association differs depending on clinical stage. Prospective studies are warranted assessing the effect of initial method of detection on the relationship between volume and outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the influence of product perception and geometric features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez Mata, Marta; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema; Brockhoff, Per B.

    2017-01-01

    . Surveys were conducted with 71 participants to gather their perceptions of 11 vase concepts. Advanced statistical analyses, including mixed models, were applied to allow generalisation of the results beyond the data sample. Significant relations between the desire to own a product and how the product......Research in emotional design and Kansei Engineering has shown that aesthetics play a significant role in the appeal of a product. This paper contributes to establishing a methodology to identify the relationships between perceptions, aesthetic features, desire to own and background of consumers...... and was simple and tall). An automated mixed model analysis was conducted and revealed that general rules can be found between aesthetic features, perceptions and ownership, which can apply across gender and culture. The findings include design rules that link aesthetic features with perceptions...

  1. Influence of semantic consistency and perceptual features on visual attention during scene viewing in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helo, Andrea; van Ommen, Sandrien; Pannasch, Sebastian; Danteny-Dordoigne, Lucile; Rämä, Pia

    2017-11-01

    Conceptual representations of everyday scenes are built in interaction with visual environment and these representations guide our visual attention. Perceptual features and object-scene semantic consistency have been found to attract our attention during scene exploration. The present study examined how visual attention in 24-month-old toddlers is attracted by semantic violations and how perceptual features (i. e. saliency, centre distance, clutter and object size) and linguistic properties (i. e. object label frequency and label length) affect gaze distribution. We compared eye movements of 24-month-old toddlers and adults while exploring everyday scenes which either contained an inconsistent (e.g., soap on a breakfast table) or consistent (e.g., soap in a bathroom) object. Perceptual features such as saliency, centre distance and clutter of the scene affected looking times in the toddler group during the whole viewing time whereas looking times in adults were affected only by centre distance during the early viewing time. Adults looked longer to inconsistent than consistent objects either if the objects had a high or a low saliency. In contrast, toddlers presented semantic consistency effect only when objects were highly salient. Additionally, toddlers with lower vocabulary skills looked longer to inconsistent objects while toddlers with higher vocabulary skills look equally long to both consistent and inconsistent objects. Our results indicate that 24-month-old children use scene context to guide visual attention when exploring the visual environment. However, perceptual features have a stronger influence in eye movement guidance in toddlers than in adults. Our results also indicate that language skills influence cognitive but not perceptual guidance of eye movements during scene perception in toddlers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Familiar Features on Diagnosis: Instantiated Features in an Applied Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Kelly L.; Brooks, Lee R.; Weaver, Bruce; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Medical diagnosis can be viewed as a categorization task. There are two mechanisms whereby humans make categorical judgments: "analytical reasoning," based on explicit consideration of features and "nonanalytical reasoning," an unconscious holistic process of matching against prior exemplars. However, there is evidence that prior experience can…

  3. Season, molt, and body size influence mercury concentrations in grebes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C Alex; Ackerman, Joshua T; Herzog, Mark P; Eagles-Smith, Collin A

    2017-10-01

    We studied seasonal and physiological influences on mercury concentrations in western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark's grebes (A. occidentalis) across 29 lakes and reservoirs in California, USA. Additionally, at three of these lakes, we conducted a time series study, in which we repeatedly sampled grebe blood mercury concentrations during the spring, summer, and early fall. Grebe blood mercury concentrations were higher among males (0.61 ± 0.12 μg/g ww) than females (0.52 ± 0.10 μg/g ww), higher among Clark's grebes (0.58 ± 0.12 μg/g ww) than western grebes (0.51 ± 0.10 μg/g ww), and exhibited a strong seasonal pattern (decreasing by 60% from spring to fall). Grebe blood THg concentrations exhibited a shallow, inverse U-shaped pattern with body size, and was lowest among the smallest and largest grebes. Further, the relationship between grebe blood mercury concentrations and wing primary feather molt exhibited a shallow U-shaped pattern, where mercury concentrations were highest among birds that had not yet begun molting, decreased approximately 24% between pre-molt and late molt, and increased approximately 19% from late molt to post-molt. Because grebes did not begin molting until mid-summer, lower grebe blood mercury concentrations observed in late summer and early fall were consistent with the onset of primary feather molt. However, because sampling date was a much stronger predictor of grebe mercury concentrations than molt, other seasonally changing environmental factors likely played a larger role than molt in the seasonal variation in grebe mercury concentrations. In the time series study, we found that seasonal trends in grebe mercury concentrations were not consistent among lakes, indicating that lake-specific variation in mercury dynamics influence the overall seasonal decline in grebe blood mercury concentrations. These results highlight the importance of accounting for sampling date, as well as ecological processes

  4. Season, molt, and body size influence mercury concentrations in grebes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied seasonal and physiological influences on mercury concentrations in western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark's grebes (A. occidentalis) across 29 lakes and reservoirs in California, USA. Additionally, at three of these lakes, we conducted a time series study, in which we repeatedly sampled grebe blood mercury concentrations during the spring, summer, and early fall. Grebe blood mercury concentrations were higher among males (0.61 ± 0.12 μg/g ww) than females (0.52 ± 0.10 μg/g ww), higher among Clark's grebes (0.58 ± 0.12 μg/g ww) than western grebes (0.51 ± 0.10 μg/g ww), and exhibited a strong seasonal pattern (decreasing by 60% from spring to fall). Grebe blood THg concentrations exhibited a shallow, inverse U-shaped pattern with body size, and was lowest among the smallest and largest grebes. Further, the relationship between grebe blood mercury concentrations and wing primary feather molt exhibited a shallow U-shaped pattern, where mercury concentrations were highest among birds that had not yet begun molting, decreased approximately 24% between pre-molt and late molt, and increased approximately 19% from late molt to post-molt. Because grebes did not begin molting until mid-summer, lower grebe blood mercury concentrations observed in late summer and early fall were consistent with the onset of primary feather molt. However, because sampling date was a much stronger predictor of grebe mercury concentrations than molt, other seasonally changing environmental factors likely played a larger role than molt in the seasonal variation in grebe mercury concentrations. In the time series study, we found that seasonal trends in grebe mercury concentrations were not consistent among lakes, indicating that lake-specific variation in mercury dynamics influence the overall seasonal decline in grebe blood mercury concentrations. These results highlight the importance of accounting for sampling date, as well as ecological processes that may

  5. Prenatal influences on size, velocity and tempo of infant growth: findings from three contemporary cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Pizzi

    Full Text Available Studying prenatal influences of early life growth is relevant to life-course epidemiology as some of its features have been linked to the onset of later diseases.We studied the association between prenatal maternal characteristics (height, age, parity, education, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI, smoking, gestational diabetes and hypertension and offspring weight trajectories in infancy using SuperImposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR models, which parameterize growth in terms of three biologically interpretable parameters: size, velocity and tempo. We used data from three contemporary cohorts based in Portugal (GXXI, n=738, Italy (NINFEA, n=2,925, and Chile (GOCS, n=959.Estimates were generally consistent across the cohorts for maternal height, age, parity and pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity. Some exposures only affected one growth parameter (e.g. maternal height (per cm: 0.4% increase in size (95% confidence interval (CI:0.3; 0.5, others were either found to affect size and velocity (e.g. pre-pregnancy underweight vs normal weight: smaller size (-4.9%, 95% CI:-6.5; -3.3, greater velocity (5.9%, 95% CI:1.9;10.0, or to additionally influence tempo (e.g. pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity vs normal weight: increased size (7.9%, 95% CI:4.9;10.8, delayed tempo (0.26 months, 95% CI:0.11;0.41, decreased velocity (-4.9%, 95% CI: -10.8;0.9.By disentangling the growth parameters of size, velocity and tempo, we found that prenatal maternal characteristics, especially maternal smoking, pre-pregnancy overweight and underweight, parity and gestational hypertension, are associated with different aspects of infant weight growth. These results may offer insights into the mechanisms governing infant growth.

  6. Do detailed simulations with size-resolved microphysics reproduce basic features of observed cirrus ice size distributions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Atlas, R.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Ackerman, A. S.; Rind, D. H.; Harrington, J. Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Um, J.; Jackson, R.; Lawson, P.

    2017-12-01

    It has recently been suggested that seeding synoptic cirrus could have desirable characteristics as a geoengineering approach, but surprisingly large uncertainties remain in the fundamental parameters that govern cirrus properties, such as mass accommodation coefficient, ice crystal physical properties, aggregation efficiency, and ice nucleation rate from typical upper tropospheric aerosol. Only one synoptic cirrus model intercomparison study has been published to date, and studies that compare the shapes of observed and simulated ice size distributions remain sparse. Here we amend a recent model intercomparison setup using observations during two 2010 SPARTICUS campaign flights. We take a quasi-Lagrangian column approach and introduce an ensemble of gravity wave scenarios derived from collocated Doppler cloud radar retrievals of vertical wind speed. We use ice crystal properties derived from in situ cloud particle images, for the first time allowing smoothly varying and internally consistent treatments of nonspherical ice capacitance, fall speed, gravitational collection, and optical properties over all particle sizes in our model. We test two new parameterizations for mass accommodation coefficient as a function of size, temperature and water vapor supersaturation, and several ice nucleation scenarios. Comparison of results with in situ ice particle size distribution data, corrected using state-of-the-art algorithms to remove shattering artifacts, indicate that poorly constrained uncertainties in the number concentration of crystals smaller than 100 µm in maximum dimension still prohibit distinguishing which parameter combinations are more realistic. When projected area is concentrated at such sizes, the only parameter combination that reproduces observed size distribution properties uses a fixed mass accommodation coefficient of 0.01, on the low end of recently reported values. No simulations reproduce the observed abundance of such small crystals when the

  7. The influence of personal BMI on body size estimations and sensitivity to body size change in anorexia spectrum disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Katri; Bester, Andre; Cairns, Paul; Tovee, Martin; Cornelissen, Piers

    2015-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the influence of personal BMI on body size estimation in 42 women who have symptoms of anorexia (referred to henceforth as anorexia spectrum disorders, ANSD), and 100 healthy controls. Low BMI control participants over-estimate their size and high BMI controls under-estimate, a pattern which is predicted by a perceptual phenomenon called contraction bias. In addition, control participants' sensitivity to size change declines as their BMI increase...

  8. Influence of size of emboli on extravascular lung water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, C.A.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the influence of the size of emboli on the vascular volume (QL) and extravascular volume (Qev) accessible to 3 HOH during a single pass through an isolated dog lung lobe using the double indicator-dilution method with 125I-human serum albumin as the vascular indicator. As successively more beads of a given diameter (58, 548, or 3,175 microns) were introduced into a lung lobe, a linear relationship between QL and Qev was obtained as they both decreased. The slope of the graph of QL vs. Qev with progressive embolism was directly proportional to the bead diameter. This suggested an approach for estimating the total vascular volume in vessels smaller than the diameter of the beads before embolization, referred to as Qm. If it is assumed that most of the transvascular diffusional exchange of 3 HOH occurs in vessels smaller than the smallest beads (mainly capillaries) and that vessel obstruction does not change the ratio of Qev to the perfused capillary volume, the slope of the plot of QL vs. Qev is an estimate of the fraction, Qm/QL, of the total vascular volume in vessels smaller than the bead diameter. In the dog lung lobes studied, Qm/QL was approximately 0.64 for 58-microns vessels, 0.75 for 548-microns vessels, and 0.82 for 3,175-microns vessels. The results suggest that, with occlusion of vessels greater than or equal to 58 microns, 3 HOH does not diffuse significantly into unperfused regions

  9. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While

  10. The influence of attention toward facial expressions on size perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Kim, Kiho; Lee, Jang-Han

    2016-01-01

    According to the New Look theory, size perception is affected by emotional factors. Although previous studies have attempted to explain the effects of both emotion and motivation on size perception, they have failed to identify the underlying mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of size perception by applying attention toward facial expressions using the Ebbinghaus illusion as a measurement tool. The participants, female university students, were asked to judge the size of a target stimulus relative to the size of facial expressions (i.e., happy, angry, and neutral) surrounding the target. The results revealed that the participants perceived angry and neutral faces to be larger than happy faces. This finding indicates that individuals pay closer attention to neutral and angry faces than happy ones. These results suggest that the mechanisms underlying size perception involve cognitive processes that focus attention toward relevant stimuli and block out irrelevant stimuli.

  11. Influence of body size on coexistence of bird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyequien Abarca, E.; Boer, de W.F.; Cleef, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Theory suggests that body size is an important factor in determining interspecific competition and, ultimately, in structuring ecological communities. However, there is a lack of pragmatic studies linking body size and interspecific competition to patterns in ecological communities. The objective of

  12. Nutrition warnings as front-of-pack labels: influence of design features on healthfulness perception and attentional capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Manuel; Machín, Leandro; Arrúa, Alejandra; Antúnez, Lucía; Curutchet, María Rosa; Giménez, Ana; Ares, Gastón

    2017-12-01

    Warnings are a new directive front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition labelling scheme that highlights products with high content of key nutrients. The design of warnings influences their ability to catch consumers' attention and to clearly communicate their intended meaning, which are key determinants of their effectiveness. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of design features of warnings as a FOP nutrition labelling scheme on perceived healthfulness and attentional capture. Five studies with a total of 496 people were carried out. In the first study, the association of colour and perceived healthfulness was evaluated in an online survey in which participants had to rate their perceived healthfulness of eight colours. In the second study, the influence of colour, shape and textual information on perceived healthfulness was evaluated using choice-conjoint analysis. The third study focused on implicit associations between two design features (shape and colour) on perceived healthfulness. The fourth and fifth studies used visual search to evaluate the influence of colour, size and position of the warnings on attentional capture. Perceived healthfulness was significantly influenced by shape, colour and textual information. Colour was the variable with the largest contribution to perceived healthfulness. Colour, size and position of the warnings on the labels affected attentional capture. Results from the experiments provide recommendations for the design of warnings to identify products with unfavourable nutrient profile.

  13. Layout Optimization of Structures with Finite-size Features using Multiresolution Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellappa, S.; Diaz, A. R.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for layout optimization in structures with multiple finite-sized heterogeneities is presented. Multiresolution analysis is used to compute reduced operators (stiffness matrices) representing the elastic behavior of material distributions with heterogeneities of sizes that are comparable...

  14. Influence of bioregion and environmental factors on the growth, size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of bioregion and important environmental factors in South Africa ... the production efficiency of cows through the implementation of management ... genetic component was not separated from the environmental components.

  15. Predicting social influence with faction sizes and relative status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, David; Savage, Scott V

    2013-09-01

    Building on a recent theoretical development in the field of sociological social psychology, we develop a formal mathematical model of social influence processes. The extant theoretical literature implies that factions and status should have non-linear effects on social influence, and yet these theories have been evaluated using standard linear statistical models. Our formal model of influence includes these non-linearities, as specified by the theories. We evaluate the fit of the formal model using experimental data. Our results indicate that a one-parameter mathematical model fits the experimental data. We conclude with the implications of our research and a discussion of how it may be used as an impetus for further work on social influence processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of distribution characteristics and associated seabed features on exploitation of cobalt-rich manganese deposits

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.; Tsurusaki, K.

    Method of exploitation, selection of mine site and desing of mining system of cobalt-rich manganese deposits on seamounts would be greatly influenced by the distribution characteristics as well as the associated seabed features, wuch as the seabed...

  17. The influence of boundary features on grassland-edge communities of Alta Murgia

    OpenAIRE

    Cassano, Stefania; Alignier, Audrey; Forte, Luigi; Labadessa, Rocco; Mairota, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest the importance of boundary features on plant community dynamics. Our aim was to investigate the influence of boundary features on edge plant assemblages in semi-natural dry grasslands. For this purpose we selected 16 grassland edges in the central portion of the Natura 2000 site Murgia Alta, in southeastern Italy. These sites were selected according to a combination of boundary features, i.e. the adjoining land use type (road or cereal crop), slope (grassland tilted towar...

  18. Influence of Family Size, Household Food Security Status, and Child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Fertility pattern and reproductive behaviours affect infant death in Nigeria. ... Keywords: Family size, food insecurity, stunting, breastfeeding, U5 children ... for young children and women in their childbearing years. Food security ... Two in five children are short for their ages; half of .... At the time of data analysis, the child's.

  19. Neighborhood size of training data influences soil map disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil class mapping relies on the ability of sample locations to represent portions of the landscape with similar soil types; however, most digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches intersect sample locations with one raster pixel per covariate layer regardless of pixel size. This approach does not take ...

  20. Deformation and wear of pyramidal, silicon-nitride AFM tips scanning micrometre-size features in contact mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloo, M.; Haitjema, H.; Pril, W.O.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out, in order to investigate the deformation and wear taking place on pyramidal silicon-nitride AFM tips. The study focuses on the contact mode scanning of silicon features of micrometre-size. First the deformation and the mechanisms of wear of the tip during

  1. The influence of size on the toxicity of an encapsulated pesticide: a comparison of micron- and nano-sized capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Alicea N; Harper, Bryan; Harper, Stacey L

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation technology involves entrapping a chemical active ingredient (a.i.) inside a hollow polymeric shell and has been applied to commercial pesticide manufacturing for years to produce capsule suspension (CS) formulations with average particle sizes in the micron-scale. The few literature sources that investigate the environmental fate and toxicity to non-target organisms of encapsulated commercially available pesticide products with regard to capsule size report on average sizes between 20 and 50 μm. Here, we have identified a CS formulation with an average capsule size of approximately 2 μm with some capsules extending into the nanometer scale (~200 nm). Determining how carrier size influences toxicity is important to understanding if current pesticide risk assessments are sufficient to protect against products that incorporate encapsulation technology. Here, a commercial pyrethroid CS pesticide with lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-Cy) as the a.i. was separated into two suspensions, a fraction consisting of nano-sized capsules (~250 nm) and a fraction of micron-sized capsules (~2200 nm) in order to investigate the influence of capsule size on toxicity to embryonic zebrafish, Danio rerio. Toxicity was evaluated 24h after exposure to equivalent amounts of a.i. by the presence and severity of pyrethroid-specific tremors, 14 sublethal developmental impacts and mortality. Fish exposed to greater than 20 μg a.i. L(-1) technical λ-Cy or formulated product experienced curvature of the body axis, pericardial edema, craniofacial malformations, and mortality. Exposure to the unfractionated formulation, micro fraction, nano fraction and technical a.i. resulted in no significant differences in the occurrence of sublethal impacts or mortality; however, the technical a.i. exposure resulted in significantly less fish experiencing tremors and shorter tremors compared to any of the formulated product exposures. This suggests that the capsule size does not influence the toxic

  2. Eye size and visual acuity influence vestibular anatomy in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Addison D; Christopher Kirk, E

    2014-04-01

    The semicircular canals of the inner ear detect head rotations and trigger compensatory movements that stabilize gaze and help maintain visual fixation. Mammals with large eyes and high visual acuity require precise gaze stabilization mechanisms because they experience diminished visual functionality at low thresholds of uncompensated motion. Because semicircular canal radius of curvature is a primary determinant of canal sensitivity, species with large canal radii are expected to be capable of more precise gaze stabilization than species with small canal radii. Here, we examine the relationship between mean semicircular canal radius of curvature, eye size, and visual acuity in a large sample of mammals. Our results demonstrate that eye size and visual acuity both explain a significant proportion of the variance in mean canal radius of curvature after statistically controlling for the effects of body mass and phylogeny. These findings suggest that variation in mean semicircular canal radius of curvature among mammals is partly the result of selection for improved gaze stabilization in species with large eyes and acute vision. Our results also provide a possible functional explanation for the small semicircular canal radii of fossorial mammals and plesiadapiforms. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of habitat features on size-biased predation on salmon by bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Luke C; Reynolds, John D

    2017-05-01

    Predators can drive trait divergence among populations of prey by imposing differential selection on prey traits. Habitat characteristics can mediate predator selectivity by providing refuge for prey. We quantified the effects of stream characteristics on biases in the sizes of spawning salmon caught by bears (Ursus arctos and U. americanus) on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada by measuring size-biased predation on spawning chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon in 12 streams with varying habitat characteristics. We tested the hypotheses that bears would catch larger than average salmon (size-biased predation) and that this bias toward larger fish would be higher in streams that provide less protection to spawning salmon from predation (e.g., less pools, wood, undercut banks). We then we tested for how such size biases in turn translate into differences among populations in the sizes of the fish. Bears caught larger-than-average salmon as the spawning season progressed and as predicted, this was most pronounced in streams with fewer refugia for the fish (i.e., wood and undercut banks). Salmon were marginally smaller in streams with more pronounced size-biased predation but this predictor was less reliable than physical characteristics of streams, with larger fish in wider, deeper streams. These results support the hypothesis that selective forces imposed by predators can be mediated by habitat characteristics, with potential consequences for physical traits of prey.

  4. Fabrication of ordered arrays of micro- and nanoscale features with control over their shape and size via templated solid-state dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jongpil

    2015-05-08

    Templated solid-state dewetting of single-crystal films has been shown to be used to produce regular patterns of various shapes. However, the materials for which this patterning method is applicable, and the size range of the patterns produced are still limited. Here, it is shown that ordered arrays of micro- and nanoscale features can be produced with control over their shape and size via solid-state dewetting of patches patterned from single-crystal palladium and nickel films of different thicknesses and orientations. The shape and size characteristics of the patterns are found to be widely controllable with varying the shape, width, thickness, and orientation of the initial patches. The morphological evolution of the patches is also dependent on the film material, with different dewetting behaviors observed in palladium and nickel films. The mechanisms underlying the pattern formation are explained in terms of the influence on Rayleigh-like instability of the patch geometry and the surface energy anisotropy of the film material. This mechanistic understanding of pattern formation can be used to design patches for the precise fabrication of micro- and nanoscale structures with the desired shapes and feature sizes.

  5. Environmental influences on egg and clutch sizes in lentic- and lotic-breeding salamanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M. Davenport

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that social and environmental factors influence egg and clutch sizes in amphibians. However, most of this work is based on the reproductively diverse order Anura (frogs and toads, whereas less research has been conducted on Caudata (salamanders and Gymnophiona (caecilians. Researchers have suggested that a relationship exists between social and environmental factors and egg and clutch sizes in salamanders, but studies controlling for phylogenetic context are lacking. We could not identify a sufficient number of comparisons for social influences on egg and clutch sizes; therefore, we focused on environmental influences for this study. Data on egg size, clutch size, environmental factors, and phylogenies for salamanders were assembled from the scientific literature. We used independent, pair-wise comparisons to investigate the association of larval salamander habitat and egg size and the association of larval salamander habitat with clutch sizes within a phylogenetic framework. There is a significant association between larval habitat and egg size; specifically, stream-breeding species produce larger eggs. There is no significant association between larval habitat and clutchsize. Our study confirms earlier reports that salamander egg size is associated with larval environments, but is the first to use phylogenetically independent contrasts to account for the lack of phylogenetic independence of the traits measured (egg size and clutch size associated with many of the diverse lineages. Our study shows that environmental selection pressure can be quite strong on one aspect of salamander reproduction—egg size.

  6. Influence of austenite grain size on recrystallisation-precipitation interaction in a V-microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quispe, A.; Medina, S.F.; Gomez, M.; Chaves, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    By means of torsion tests using small specimens, the influence of austenite grain size on strain induced precipitation kinetics has been determined in a vanadium microalloyed steel. Determination of recrystallisation-precipitation-time-temperature (RPTT) diagrams for two austenite grain sizes allows values of the aforementioned magnitudes to be determined. An ample discussion is made of the quantitative influence found and its relation with nucleation and growth mechanisms of precipitates. The results are compared with the quantitative influence exerted by the other variables, reaching the conclusion that the austenite grain size has a notable influence on strain induced precipitation kinetics which should not be underestimated. Finally, the influence of austenite grain size is included in a strain induced precipitation model constructed by the authors of this work and which also takes into account the other aforementioned variables

  7. Size and Ultrasound Features Affecting Results of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, YiJie; Mao, MinJing; Zhan, WeiWei; Zhou, JianQiao; Zhou, Wei; Yao, JieJie; Hu, YunYun; Wang, Yan; Ye, TingJun

    2017-11-09

    Our goal was to assess the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules according to size and US features. A retrospective correlation was made with 1745 whole thyroidectomy and hemithyroidectomy specimens with preoperative US-guided FNA results. All cases were divided into 5 groups according to nodule size (≤5, 5.1-10, 10.1-15, 15.1-20, and >20 mm). For target nodules, static images and cine clips of conventional US and color Doppler were obtained. Ultrasound images were reviewed and evaluated by two radiologists with at least 5 years US working experience without knowing the results of pathology, and then agreement was achieved. The Bethesda category I rate was higher in nodules larger than 15 mm (P 20 mm) with several US features tended to yield false-negative FNA results. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Features of digital photogrammetry methods application and image processing in small and medium-sized enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsonova N. V.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available the paper discusses the methods of survey enterprises employees effective training to use modern measurement systems and the need for further photogrammetric processing of the results obtained. Attention is also paid to integrated learning, based primarily on web content, the introduction of a social component in the development and familiarization with new photogrammetric equipment and technologies in order to increase the competitiveness of engineering and research small and medium-sized enterprises.

  9. Distinct features of intraspecific and intrapopulation variability of the skull size in the red fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gos'kov, A M; Bol'shakov, V N; Korytin, N S

    2017-05-01

    The range of chronographic variability of the average size of the skull in the red fox (data collected by the authors) from a compact area in the Middle Urals has been assessed for a 30-year period, and the results obtained have been compared with the published data on the geographical variability within the vast species range. The range of changes of the average dimensions of the skull over time spanned almost the entire range of geographical variability. Therefore, the problem of search for factors that determine the morphological diversity arises.

  10. Efficient perovskite light-emitting diodes featuring nanometre-sized crystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Kerner, Ross A.; Zhao, Lianfeng; Tran, Nhu L.; Lee, Kyung Min; Koh, Tae-Wook; Scholes, Gregory D.; Rand, Barry P.

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are emerging as highly attractive semiconductors for use in optoelectronics. In addition to their use in photovoltaics, perovskites are promising for realizing light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to their high colour purity, low non-radiative recombination rates and tunable bandgap. Here, we report highly efficient perovskite LEDs enabled through the formation of self-assembled, nanometre-sized crystallites. Large-group ammonium halides added to the perovskite precursor solution act as a surfactant that dramatically constrains the growth of 3D perovskite grains during film forming, producing crystallites with dimensions as small as 10 nm and film roughness of less than 1 nm. Coating these nanometre-sized perovskite grains with longer-chain organic cations yields highly efficient emitters, resulting in LEDs that operate with external quantum efficiencies of 10.4% for the methylammonium lead iodide system and 9.3% for the methylammonium lead bromide system, with significantly improved shelf and operational stability.

  11. Evaluation of physical structural features on influencing enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of micronized wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinxue Jiang; Jinwu Wang; Xiao Zhang; Michael Wolcott

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is highly dependent on the changes in structural features after pretreatment. Mechanical milling pretreatment is an effective approach to alter the physical structure of biomass and thus improve enzymatic hydrolysis. This study examined the influence of structural characteristics on the enzymatic hydrolysis of micronized...

  12. The Influence of Universities' Organizational Features on Professorial Intellectual Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Baris; Welch, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    This research examines the intellectual leadership behaviours of senior academics at professoriate level, and the influences of institutional support practices, climate and communication in universities as main organizational features on these behaviours. To explore relations among research variables, qualitative data were collected by interviews…

  13. The Influence of Selected Personality and Workplace Features on Burnout among Nurse Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilci, Sevgi; Erdogan, Vesile; Sozen, Emine

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of selected individual and situational features on burnout among nurse academics. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to assess the burnout levels of academics. The sample population comprised 94 female participant. The emotion exhaustion (EE) score of the nurse academics was 16.43[plus or minus]5.97,…

  14. How the Size of Our Social Network Influences Our Semantic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ari, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    People differ in the size of their social network, and thus in the properties of the linguistic input they receive. This article examines whether differences in social network size influence individuals' linguistic skills in their native language, focusing on global comprehension of evaluative language. Study 1 exploits the natural variation in…

  15. Copper Root Pruning and Container Cavity Size Influence Longleaf Pine Growth through Five Growing Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Haywood; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Mary Anne Sword Sayer

    2012-01-01

    However, type and size of container can influence field performance. In this study, longleaf pine seedlings were grown in Beaver Plastics Styroblocks either without a copper treatment (Superblock) or with a copper oxychloride coating (Copperblock) and with three sizes of cavities that were 60, 108, and 164 ml. Seedlings from the six container types (two types of...

  16. Influence of grain size on the extraordinary Hall effect in magnetic granular alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, Alexander B.; Kalitsov, Alan V.; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    A quantum statistical theory of the influence of grain size on the residual extraordinary Hall effect (EHE) in magnetic metal-insulator granular alloys is presented. It is shown that under certain conditions the quasi-classical size-effect (QSE) can lead to similar behaviors of EHE in metal-metal and metal-insulator alloys. The possible dependences of EHE coefficient on the grain size and the role of the QSE in the giant EHE in nanocomposites are discussed

  17. Influence of grain size on the extraordinary Hall effect in magnetic granular alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, Alexander B. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Kalitsov, Alan V.; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    A quantum statistical theory of the influence of grain size on the residual extraordinary Hall effect (EHE) in magnetic metal-insulator granular alloys is presented. It is shown that under certain conditions the quasi-classical size-effect (QSE) can lead to similar behaviors of EHE in metal-metal and metal-insulator alloys. The possible dependences of EHE coefficient on the grain size and the role of the QSE in the giant EHE in nanocomposites are discussed.

  18. Instrument Identification in Polyphonic Music: Feature Weighting to Minimize Influence of Sound Overlaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Masataka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a new solution to the problem of feature variations caused by the overlapping of sounds in instrument identification in polyphonic music. When multiple instruments simultaneously play, partials (harmonic components of their sounds overlap and interfere, which makes the acoustic features different from those of monophonic sounds. To cope with this, we weight features based on how much they are affected by overlapping. First, we quantitatively evaluate the influence of overlapping on each feature as the ratio of the within-class variance to the between-class variance in the distribution of training data obtained from polyphonic sounds. Then, we generate feature axes using a weighted mixture that minimizes the influence via linear discriminant analysis. In addition, we improve instrument identification using musical context. Experimental results showed that the recognition rates using both feature weighting and musical context were 84.1 for duo, 77.6 for trio, and 72.3 for quartet; those without using either were 53.4, 49.6, and 46.5 , respectively.

  19. Stamp design effect on 100 nm feature size for 8 inch NanoImprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, S; Chaix, N; Gourgon, C; Perret, C; Leveder, T

    2006-01-01

    Sub-100 nm resolution on a 200 mm silicon stamp has been hot embossed into commercial Sumitomo NEB 22 resist. A single pattern, exposed with electron beam lithography, has been considered to define the stamp and thus make it possible to point out the impact of stamp design on the printing. These results may be considered as a first attempt to define rules to solve the proximity printing effects (PPEs). Moreover, a large range of initial resist thickness, from 56 to 506 nm, has been spin coated to assess the effect of polymer flow properties for the stamp cavity filling and the printed defects. A detailed analysis of the printed resist in dense hole patterns showed that the application volume conservation is enough to calculate the residual layer thickness as the height of the printed resist feature. Good accordance has been obtained between the theoretical approach and experimental results. Moreover, the impact of the pattern symmetry breakdown on mould deformation is clearly shown in this paper in the printed areas as well as in the unprinted areas

  20. Does size matter? An investigation of how department size and other organizational variables influence on publication productivity and citation impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksnes, D.W.; Rørstad, K.; Piro, F.N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigate whether university department size is important in determining publication productivity and citation impact. Drawing on a unique dataset containing a variety of different variables at department levels, we are able to provide a richer picture of the research performance than what typically has been the case in many previous studies. In addition to analyzing the basic question of how size relates to scientific performance, we address whether the funding profile of the departments plays a role, whether the scientific performance is influenced by the composition of the academic personnel (in terms of gender, academic positions, recruiting personnel and the share of doctoral degree holders). The study shows that virtually no size effect can be identified and highly productive and highly cited units are found among both small, medium and large departments. For none of the organizational variables we are able to identify statistically significant relationships in respect to research performance at an overall level. We conclude that the productivity and citation differences at the level of departments cannot generally be explained by the selected variables for department size, funding structure and the composition of scientific personnel. (Author)

  1. Prospective MRI assessment for invasive lobular breast cancer. Correlation with tumour size at histopathology and influence on surgical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttalib, M.; Ibrahem, R.; Khashan, A.S.; Hajaj, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the size of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) compared to histopathology, and its influence on breast surgical management. Materials and methods: Prospective evaluation was undertaken of standardized contrast-enhanced MRI images of 51 consecutive women over an 18 month period with pure ILC or with lobular features as the dominant subtype on breast core biopsy. Image interpretation was performed by one consultant radiologist (M.H.). The lesion size at MRI was compared with the size at final histopathology after surgical excision using a Bland–Altman agreement plot. Results: Of the 51 prospectively imaged consecutive women, seven were excluded as they had diffuse ILC. The remaining 44 patients had a mean histological tumour size of 34.9 mm (range 4–77 mm). MRI underestimated tumour size in 26 (59.1%) cases. In 21 (47.7%) patients, this discrepancy was small, ranging up to 16 mm. The largest underestimation occurred in five (11.4%) cases with a difference ranging between 31 and 48 mm. Fifteen (34.1%) tumours were overestimated by MRI where the discrepancy ranged up to 22 mm. In three (6.8%) patients MRI and histological size matched. The Bland–Altman agreement plot demonstrated that in 95% of cases the size at histopathology will be between 0.36 and 2.31 times the MRI size at extremes. MRI correlated better with histopathology in tumours up to T2 (<5 cm) size leading to a change in surgical management for nine of the 44 (20.5%) patients. Conclusion: MRI enables surgical management decisions to be made with increased confidence in patients with ILC up to T2 size

  2. Can interface features affect aggression resulting from violent video game play? An examination of realistic controller and large screen size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2013-05-01

    Aggressiveness attributed to violent video game play is typically studied as a function of the content features of the game. However, can interface features of the game also affect aggression? Guided by the General Aggression Model (GAM), we examine the controller type (gun replica vs. mouse) and screen size (large vs. small) as key technological aspects that may affect the state aggression of gamers, with spatial presence and arousal as potential mediators. Results from a between-subjects experiment showed that a realistic controller and a large screen display induced greater aggression, presence, and arousal than a conventional mouse and a small screen display, respectively, and confirmed that trait aggression was a significant predictor of gamers' state aggression. Contrary to GAM, however, arousal showed no effects on aggression; instead, presence emerged as a significant mediator.

  3. Landscape features influence postrelease predation on endangered black-footed ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poessel, S.A.; Breck, S.W.; Biggins, D.E.; Livieri, T.M.; Crooks, K.R.; Angeloni, L.

    2011-01-01

    Predation can be a critical factor influencing recovery of endangered species. In most recovery efforts lethal and nonlethal influences of predators are not sufficiently understood to allow prediction of predation risk, despite its importance. We investigated whether landscape features could be used to model predation risk from coyotes (Canis latrans) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) on the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes). We used location data of reintroduced ferrets from 3 sites in South Dakota to determine whether exposure to landscape features typically associated with predators affected survival of ferrets, and whether ferrets considered predation risk when choosing habitat near perches potentially used by owls or near linear features predicted to be used by coyotes. Exposure to areas near likely owl perches reduced ferret survival, but landscape features potentially associated with coyote movements had no appreciable effect on survival. Ferrets were located within 90 m of perches more than expected in 2 study sites that also had higher ferret mortality due to owl predation. Densities of potential coyote travel routes near ferret locations were no different than expected in all 3 sites. Repatriated ferrets might have selected resources based on factors other than predator avoidance. Considering an easily quantified landscape feature (i.e., owl perches) can enhance success of reintroduction efforts for ferrets. Nonetheless, development of predictive models of predation risk and management strategies to mitigate that risk is not necessarily straightforward for more generalist predators such as coyotes. ?? 2011 American Society of Mammalogists.

  4. Influence of size-corrected bound-electron contribution on nanometric silver dielectric function. Sizing through optical extinction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santillán, J M J; Videla, F A; Scaffardi, L B; Schinca, D C; Fernández van Raap, M B; Muraca, D

    2013-01-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is of great interest due to their ability to enhance optical fields on the nanometric scale, which makes them interesting for various applications in several fields of science and technology. In particular, their optical properties depend on the dielectric function of the metal, its size, shape and surrounding environment. This work analyses the contributions of free and bound electrons to the complex dielectric function of spherical silver NPs and their influence on the optical extinction spectra. The contribution of free electrons is usually corrected for particle size under 10 nm, introducing a modification of the damping constant to account for the extra collisions with the particle's boundary. For the contribution of bound electrons, we considered the interband transitions from the d-band to the conduction band including the size dependence of the electronic density states for radii below 2 nm. Bearing in mind these specific modifications, it was possible to determine optical and band energy parameters by fitting the bulk complex dielectric function. The results obtained from the optimum fit are: K bulk = 2 × 10 24 (coefficient for bound-electron contribution), E g = 1.91 eV (gap energy), E F = 4.12 eV (Fermi energy), and γ b = 1.5 × 10 14 Hz (damping constant for bound electrons). Based on this size-dependent dielectric function, extinction spectra of silver particles in the nanometric–subnanometric radius range can be calculated using Mie's theory, and its size behaviour analysed. These studies are applied to fit experimental extinction spectrum of very small spherical particles fabricated by fs laser ablation of a solid target in water. From the fitting, the structure and size distribution of core radius and shell thickness of the colloidal suspension could be determined. The spectroscopic results suggest that the colloidal suspension is composed by two types of structures: bare core and core–shell. The former

  5. The influence of neighbors' family size preference on progression to high parity births in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elyse A; Barber, Jennifer S

    2013-03-01

    Large families can have a negative impact on the health and well-being of women, children, and their communities. Seventy-three percent of the individuals in our rural Nepalese sample report that two children is their ideal number, yet about half of the married women continue childbearing after their second child. Using longitudinal data from the Chitwan Valley Family Study, we explore the influence of women's and neighbors' family size preferences on women's progression to high parity births, comparing this influence across two cohorts. We find that neighbors' family size preferences influence women's fertility, that older cohorts of women are more influenced by their neighbors' preferences than are younger cohorts of women, and that the influence of neighbors' preferences is independent of women's own preferences. © 2013 The Population Council, Inc.

  6. Variations in leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis skull morphology and body size: sexual and geographic influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L. Sicuro

    2015-10-01

    , the longer hind foot of male leopard cats is the main feature of sexual dimorphism among P. b. bengalensis (and probably among P. b. horsfieldii too. External body measurements also indicated the absence of sexual dimorphism among individuals of P. b. borneoensis. Inter-subspecific skull comparisons provided a morphometric basis for differentiating some subspecies. Prionailurus b. horsfieldii and P. b. bengalensis were distinguished only by a subtle difference in PM4 size, indicating that overall skull morphology does not appear to support their separate taxonomical status, in spite of the marked differences reported in their coat patterns. Geological events affecting the Sunda Shelf connection between the Sunda Islands and the mainland during the Last Glacial Maximum seem to have influenced directly the morphological pattern shown by leopard cat subspecies nowadays.

  7. Influence of grain size in the near-micrometre regime on the deformation microstructure in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, G.M.; Godfrey, A.; Hansen, N.; Liu, W.; Winther, G.; Huang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain size on deformation microstructure formation in the near-micrometre grain size regime has been studied using samples of aluminium prepared using a spark plasma sintering technique. Samples in a fully recrystallized grain condition with average grain sizes ranging from 5.2 to 0.8 μm have been prepared using this technique. Examination in the transmission electron microscope of these samples after compression at room temperature to approximately 20% reduction reveals that grains larger than 7 μm are subdivided by cell block boundaries similar to those observed in coarse-grained samples, with a similar dependency on the crystallographic orientation of the grains. With decreasing grain size down to approx. 1 μm there is a gradual transition from cell block structures to cell structures. At even smaller grain sizes of down to approx. 0.5 μm the dominant features are dislocation bundles and random dislocations, although at a larger compressive strain of 30% dislocation rotation boundaries may also be found in the interior of grains of this size. A standard 〈1 1 0〉 fibre texture is found for all grain sizes, with a decreasing sharpness with decreasing grain size. The structural transitions with decreasing grain size are discussed based on the general principles of grain subdivision by deformation-induced dislocation boundaries and of low-energy dislocation structures as applied to the not hitherto explored near-micrometre grain size regime

  8. Planning Ahead: Influence of Figure Orientation on Size of Head in Children's Drawings of a Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willatts, Peter; Dougal, Shonagh

    In an investigation of causes of the disproportionate relation between head and body in children's drawings of the human figure, 160 children of 3-10 years of age produced drawings of a man viewed from the front and from the back. It was expected that if planning to include facial features increased the size of the head children drew, then heads…

  9. Cuff size influences blood pressure measurement in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhamed, P. K.; Olsen, M. H.; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we established that a group ofobese children and adolescents had a higher blood pressure(BP) than a healthy control group. In the present study, weinvestigate whether the higher BP in the obese group wasinfluenced by BP cuff sizes.Methods: A total of 104 obese patients aged...... sizes had a significant impact on BP measurements.Despite the influence of cuff size, multiple regressionanalyses revealed that systolic BP was 68 mmHg higherand diastolic BP 32 mmHg higher in the obese groupthan in the control group. A step function, i.e. a sudden fallin BP, was seen at the point...... of switching from small to mediumcuff size in the control group, which suggests that systolicBP was overestimated when using small cuff size andunderestimated when using medium cuff size in subjectswith an AC near 23 cm.Conclusions: BP was higher in the obese group than inthe control group although BP...

  10. The influence of object relative size on priming and explicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttl, Bob; Graf, Peter; Siegenthaler, Amy L

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of object relative size on priming and explicit memory for color photos of common objects. Participants were presented with color photos of pairs of objects displayed in either appropriate or inappropriate relative sizes. Implicit memory was assessed by speed of object size ratings whereas explicit memory was assessed by an old/new recognition test. Study-to-test changes in relative size reduced both priming and explicit memory and had large effects for objects displayed in large vs. small size at test. Our findings of substantial size-specific influences on priming with common objects under some but not other conditions are consistent with instance views of object perception and priming but inconsistent with structural description views.

  11. The influence of object relative size on priming and explicit memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Uttl

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of object relative size on priming and explicit memory for color photos of common objects. Participants were presented with color photos of pairs of objects displayed in either appropriate or inappropriate relative sizes. Implicit memory was assessed by speed of object size ratings whereas explicit memory was assessed by an old/new recognition test. Study-to-test changes in relative size reduced both priming and explicit memory and had large effects for objects displayed in large vs. small size at test. Our findings of substantial size-specific influences on priming with common objects under some but not other conditions are consistent with instance views of object perception and priming but inconsistent with structural description views.

  12. A model of how features of construction projects influence accident occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Manu, P.

    2017-01-01

    This book chapter in "Valuing People in Construction" (edited by Emuze, F. and Smallwood, J.) presents a study which sought empirical verification of a model of how construction project features (CPFs) influence accident occurrence. A qualitative strategy, in particular phenomenology, involving a range of in-depth interviews with practitioners was used and the findings were subsequently validated using a credibility check involving a survey. Altogether, the findings of the interviews and cred...

  13. Zone-size nonuniformity of 18F-FDG PET regional textural features predicts survival in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Lee, Li-yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yang, Lan-Yan; Hsu, Ching-Han; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-03-01

    The question as to whether the regional textural features extracted from PET images predict prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) remains open. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of regional heterogeneity in patients with T3/T4 OPSCC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 88 patients with T3 or T4 OPSCC who had completed primary therapy. Progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were the main outcome measures. In an exploratory analysis, a standardized uptake value of 2.5 (SUV 2.5) was taken as the cut-off value for the detection of tumour boundaries. A fixed threshold at 42 % of the maximum SUV (SUVmax 42 %) and an adaptive threshold method were then used for validation. Regional textural features were extracted from pretreatment (18)F-FDG PET/CT images using the grey-level run length encoding method and grey-level size zone matrix. The prognostic significance of PET textural features was examined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox regression analysis. Zone-size nonuniformity (ZSNU) was identified as an independent predictor of PFS and DSS. Its prognostic impact was confirmed using both the SUVmax 42 % and the adaptive threshold segmentation methods. Based on (1) total lesion glycolysis, (2) uniformity (a local scale texture parameter), and (3) ZSNU, we devised a prognostic stratification system that allowed the identification of four distinct risk groups. The model combining the three prognostic parameters showed a higher predictive value than each variable alone. ZSNU is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with advanced T-stage OPSCC, and may improve their prognostic stratification.

  14. Computational Identification of Genomic Features That Influence 3D Chromatin Domain Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Raphaël; Cuvier, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in long-range Hi-C contact mapping have revealed the importance of the 3D structure of chromosomes in gene expression. A current challenge is to identify the key molecular drivers of this 3D structure. Several genomic features, such as architectural proteins and functional elements, were shown to be enriched at topological domain borders using classical enrichment tests. Here we propose multiple logistic regression to identify those genomic features that positively or negatively influence domain border establishment or maintenance. The model is flexible, and can account for statistical interactions among multiple genomic features. Using both simulated and real data, we show that our model outperforms enrichment test and non-parametric models, such as random forests, for the identification of genomic features that influence domain borders. Using Drosophila Hi-C data at a very high resolution of 1 kb, our model suggests that, among architectural proteins, BEAF-32 and CP190 are the main positive drivers of 3D domain borders. In humans, our model identifies well-known architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, as well as ZNF143 and Polycomb group proteins as positive drivers of domain borders. The model also reveals the existence of several negative drivers that counteract the presence of domain borders including P300, RXRA, BCL11A and ELK1.

  15. Does wine glass size influence sales for on-site consumption? A multiple treatment reversal design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pechey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wine glass size can influence both perceptions of portion size and the amount poured, but its impact upon purchasing and consumption is unknown. This study aimed to examine the impact of wine glass size on wine sales for on-site consumption, keeping portion size constant. Methods In one establishment (with separate bar and restaurant areas in Cambridge, England, wine glass size (Standard; Larger; Smaller was changed over eight fortnightly periods. The bar and restaurant differ in wine sales by the glass vs. by the bottle (93 % vs. 63 % by the glass respectively. Results Daily wine volume purchased was 9.4 % (95 % CI: 1.9, 17.5 higher when sold in larger compared to standard-sized glasses. This effect seemed principally driven by sales in the bar area (bar: 14.4 % [3.3, 26.7]; restaurant: 8.2 % [−2.5, 20.1]. Findings were inconclusive as to whether sales were different with smaller vs. standard-sized glasses. Conclusions The size of glasses in which wine is sold, keeping the portion size constant, can affect consumption, with larger glasses increasing consumption. The hypothesised mechanisms for these differential effects need to be tested in a replication study. If replicated, policy implications could include considering glass size amongst alcohol licensing requirements. Trial registration ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN12018175 . Registered 12th May 2015.

  16. Influences of Social and Style Variables on Adult Usage of African American English Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Holly K.; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the influences of selected social (gender, employment status, educational achievement level) and style variables (race of examiner, interview topic) on the production of African American English (AAE) by adults. Method Participants were 50 African American men and women, ages 20–30 years. The authors used Rapid and Anonymous Survey (RAS) methods to collect responses to questions on informal situational and formal message-oriented topics in a short interview with an unacquainted interlocutor. Results Results revealed strong systematic effects for academic achievement, but not gender or employment status. Most features were used less frequently by participants with higher educational levels, but sharp declines in the usage of 5 specific features distinguished the participants differing in educational achievement. Strong systematic style effects were found for the 2 types of questions, but not race of addressee. The features that were most commonly used across participants—copula absence, variable subject–verb agreement, and appositive pronouns—were also the features that showed the greatest style shifting. Conclusions The findings lay a foundation with mature speakers for rate-based and feature inventory methods recently shown to be informative for the study of child AAE and demonstrate the benefits of the RAS. PMID:22361105

  17. Influence of cellulose ether particle size on water retention of freshly-mixed mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Patural , Laetitia; Govin , Alexandre; Grosseau , Philippe; Ruot , Bertrand; Deves , Olivier

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Cellulose ethers are polymers frequently introduced into mortar formulations in order to improve water retention capacity and workability of the freshly-mixed materials. Physico-chemical parameters of these admixtures (molecular weight, granulometry, substitution degrees, etc) seem to have a strong influence on mortar water retention capacity. In this paper, the influence of cellulose ether particle size was studied. Two behaviors were highlighted regarding the particl...

  18. Catalytic activity of metallic nanoisland coatings. The influence of size effects on the recombination properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomilina, O A; Berzhansky, V N; Shaposhnikov, A N; Tomilin, S V

    2016-01-01

    The results of investigations of the quantum-size effects influence on selective properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts are presents. As etalon exothermic reaction was used the reaction of atomic hydrogen recombination. The nanostructured Pd and Pt films on Teflon substrate were used as a samples of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. It was shown that for nanoparticles with various sizes the catalytic activity has the periodic dependence. It has been found that for certain sizes of nanoparticles their catalytic activity is less than that of Teflon substrate. (paper)

  19. Influence of the section size and holding time on the graphite parameters of ductile iron production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bockus

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to establish the conditions required to produce a desirable structure of the castings of various section sizes. This investigation was focused on the study of the influence of cooling rate or section size and holding time on graphite parameters of the ductile iron. Plates having thickness between 3 and 50mm were cast in sand molds using the same melt. The present investigation has shown that the section size of ductile iron castings and holding time had strong effect on the graphite parameters of the castings.

  20. Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Vamosi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous variation in species richness observed among related clades across the tree of life has long caught the imagination of biologists. Recently, there has been growing attention paid to the possible contribution of range size variation, either alone or in combination with putative key innovations, to these patterns. Here, we review three related topics relevant to range size evolution, speciation, and extinction. First, we provide a brief overview of the debate surrounding patterns and mechanisms for phylogenetic signal in range size. Second, we discuss some recent findings regarding the joint influence of traits and range size on diversification. Finally, we present the preliminary results of a study investigating whether range size is negatively correlated with contemporary extinction risk in flowering plants.

  1. Influence of Software on the Features of Laser-printed Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verifying the authenticity or otherwise of printed documents is one of the most important aspects of questioned document examination and plays a vital role in the field of forensic science. In recent years, continued developments in the quality of impression combined with ever-cheaper toner printers have allowed this technology to spread. It is now used in an increasing number of homes for all types of documents, including for criminal aims. Here, the factors that influence the printed features in text files are studied in relation to the operating system and the word processing software. The Net Application report in October 2014 showed that the market shares of Windows 7 and Windows XP were 53.05% and 17.18%, respectively. The Forrester report in October 2013 showed that the market share of Microsoft Office was more than 85%, the top three word processors being Microsoft Word 2003, 2007, and 2010. In this study, Windows XP (shortened to XP, Windows 7 (shortened to Win7, Microsoft Word 2003/2007/2010, WPS Office 2013, and the PDF format are chosen as the most common operating systems and word processing software. WPS Office was developed by the Chinese company Kingsoft Co., Ltd. and is widely used in China. A particular text file was designed and edited and was printed on a laser printer. The features of the printed characters were captured using an Anyty 3R digital microscope, Printer Expert, and X-printer devices. Coincidence comparison and outline feature extraction were used to evaluate the differences. It is shown that XP and Win7 have no effect on the printed features of text files. However, the printed features do depend to a certain extent on the word-processing software, with the PDF format having the greatest influence.

  2. The influence of front-of-pack nutrition information on consumers' portion size perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah May; de Vlieger, Nienke; Collins, Clare; Bucher, Tamara

    2017-08-01

    Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels could influence consumers' portion-size decisions. However, this has not been investigated to date. This study aims to evaluate whether presenting energy content information and HSRs influences portion size self-selection of specific foods and meals. Methods Adults were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups in this randomised controlled experiment. Each participant was given either a kJ/100g food label or a HSR label, or was given no information on nutrient composition. They were then asked to serve themselves an adequate portion of breakfast cereal (Kellogg's Nutri-Grain), fruit salad and chocolate, plus a three-component meal (chicken, fries and mixed vegetables). Portion serves and meal weights were compared between each experimental group using ANOVA and the discretionary foods were also compared with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Results Neither the kilojoule nor HSR information influenced the self-served portion size of foods or meal components. Mean self-served portion size of the discretionary foods were significantly greater than the standard serving sizes as specified in the AGHE. Conclusion Although food labels have the potential to assist consumers in making product choices, this study indicates that presenting nutrition information does not affect portion size decisions in young adults. So what? Strategies that assist consumers to choose appropriate portion sizes should be developed as a weight management tool.

  3. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouth- and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 ml (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  4. The influence of ‘outsiders’ on innovative behavior by medium-sized firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, E.; Montfort, van K.; Masurel, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper attention is paid to the influence that ‘outsiders’ exert on the innovative behavior by medium-sized firms. We see ‘outsiders’ as people who are independently involved in the firm. From our empirical research it appeared that, in comparison with firms which do not employ ‘outsiders’,

  5. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.A. de; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouthfeel and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 mL (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  6. Influence of measuring temperature in size dependence of coercivity in nanostructured alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.; Marin, P.; Kulik, T.; Hernando, A.

    2005-01-01

    An increase of coercive field with decreasing particle size has been observed in ball milled nanocomposite of Fe-rich nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. Previous works (J. Appl. Phys. 64 (1998) 6044) have concluded that for high lattice strain, , the increase of coercivity is due to the magnetoelastic anisotropy generated by . Even though other effects can also be involved, the experimental results seem to indicate that the influence of the particle size on the average structural anisotropy noticeably contributes to the hardening observed for low . The influence of measuring temperature in size dependence of coercivity in nanostructured alloys has been analyzed. Some analogies and differences in respect of that observed in partially nanocrystallized samples have been found

  7. Features of influence of sports activities on the identity of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutula Vasilij

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the definition of features of influence of sports activities on the identity of sportsmen. Material & Methods: the special surveys of students and teachers of KhSAPC, and also students, who train in sports club "Politekhnik", and the students who are engaged in sports sections NLA were conducted for the solution of purposes. Results: the most important qualities of the personality which sports activities influence are: formation of "confidence", "emotional stability", and "orientation to achievement" at sportsmen. According to most of the interviewed sportsmen and experts, the authority of the coach is not significant factor which influences the identity of sportsmen. Conclusions: it is established as a result of the conducted researches that sports activities most of all influence the formation of confidence, emotional stability and orientation to achievement at sportsmen. Results of the research demonstrate also that the identity of the sportsman is most influenced by the competitive relationship which develops in the course of competitive activity. Results of the research also indicate disturbing tendency which is shown that most of sportsmen connect the end of their sports career with injuries.

  8. Influence of Particle Size in Talc Suppression by a Galactomannan Depressant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Flotation behavior of different sizes of particles may follow different trends. The influence of particle size in talc suppression by a depressant galactomannan was studied in this research. The flotation response and mechanism were examined by flotation tests, modified flotation rate constant and entrainment recovery calculation, laser particle size experiments, adsorption tests, and advancing contact angle measurement as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS. The maximum recovery increased with particle size increases in the absence of galactomannan FPY (Fenugreek polysaccharide. The obviously suppressed effect was observed for the size fraction of −74 + 38 μm after reacting with FPY, but low efficiency was received for −38 μm and −10 μm, respectively. Laser particle size analysis indicated that the FPY has a certain function for the flocculation of fine particles. It is beneficial for reducing recovery by entrainment. EDS and advancing contact angle test results showed that the difference in contact angles probably is a result of genuine differences in the quantity of O and Mg bearing surface species, while the contact angle varied with particle size fraction in the absence of FPY. Adsorption and SEM test results demonstrated that in the case of −74 + 38 μm, the depressant adsorption density on the mineral surface is higher than the other two size fractions. On the whole, FPY probably is not enough of a depressant for talc suppression.

  9. Influence of different sizes of composite femora on the biomechanical behavior of cementless hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidutz, Florian; Woiczinski, Mathias; Kistler, Manuel; Schröder, Christian; Jansson, Volkmar; Fottner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    For the biomechanical evaluation of cementless stems different sizes of composite femurs have been used in the literature. However, the impact of different specimen sizes on test results is unknown. To determine the potential effect of femur size the biomechanical properties of a conventional stem (CLS Spotorno) were examined in 3 different sizes (small, medium and large composite Sawbones®). Primary stability was tested under physiologically adapted dynamic loading conditions measuring 3-dimensional micromotions. For the small composite femur the dynamic load needed to be adapted since fractures occurred when reaching 1700N. Additionally, surface strain distribution was recorded before and after implantation to draw conclusions about the tendency for stress shielding. All tested sizes revealed similar micromotions only reaching a significant different level at one measurement point. The highest micromotions were observed at the tip of the stems exceeding the limit for osseous integration of 150μm. Regarding strain distribution the highest strain reduction after implantation was registered in all sizes at the level of the lesser trochanter. Specimen size seems to be a minor influence factor for biomechanical evaluation of cementless stems. However, the small composite femur is less suitable for biomechanical testing since this size failed under physiological adapted loads. For the CLS Spotorno osseous integration is unlikely at the tip of the stem and the tendency for stress shielding is the highest at the level of the lesser trochanter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Influence of Social Comparison and Peer Group Size on Risky Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Zhu, Liping; Maguire, Phil; Liu, Yixin; Pang, Kaiyuan; Li, Zhenying; Hu, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the influence of different social reference points and different comparison group sizes on risky decision-making. Participants were presented with a scenario describing an exam, and presented with the opportunity of making a risky decision in the context of different information provided about the performance of their peers. We found that behavior was influenced, not only by comparison with peers, but also by the size of the comparison group. Specifically, the larger the reference group, the more polarized the behavior it prompted. In situations describing social loss, participants were led to make riskier decisions after comparing themselves against larger groups, while in situations describing social gain, they become more risk averse. These results indicate that decision making is influenced both by social comparison and the number of people making up the social reference group.

  11. Influence of ion size asymmetry on the properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresme, Fernando [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gonzalez-Melchor, Minerva [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Avenida San Rafael Atlixco 186, Colonia Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alejandre, Jose [Departamento de QuImica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Avenida San Rafael Atlixco 186, Colonia Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-11-16

    The influence of ion size asymmetry on the properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of the soft primitive model. Ion size asymmetry results in charge separation at the liquid-vapour interface and therefore in a local violation of the electroneutrality condition. For moderate size asymmetries the electrostatic potential at the interface can reach values of the order of 0.1 V. Size asymmetry plays a very important role in determining ion adsorption at the liquid-vapour interface of ionic mixtures. The interfacial adsorption of the bigger component results in an increase of the electrostatic potential, and a reduction of the interfacial surface tension. Our results show that ionic mixtures provide a very efficient way to tune the electrostatics and surface properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces.

  12. Influence of ion size asymmetry on the properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresme, Fernando; Gonzalez-Melchor, Minerva; Alejandre, Jose

    2005-01-01

    The influence of ion size asymmetry on the properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of the soft primitive model. Ion size asymmetry results in charge separation at the liquid-vapour interface and therefore in a local violation of the electroneutrality condition. For moderate size asymmetries the electrostatic potential at the interface can reach values of the order of 0.1 V. Size asymmetry plays a very important role in determining ion adsorption at the liquid-vapour interface of ionic mixtures. The interfacial adsorption of the bigger component results in an increase of the electrostatic potential, and a reduction of the interfacial surface tension. Our results show that ionic mixtures provide a very efficient way to tune the electrostatics and surface properties of ionic liquid-vapour interfaces

  13. Big bees do a better job: intraspecific size variation influences pollination effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Willmer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 1. Bumblebees (Bombus spp. are efficient pollinators of many flowering plants, yet the pollen deposition performance of individual bees has not been investigated. Worker bumblebees exhibit large intraspecific and intra-nest size variation, in contrast with other eusocial bees; and their size influences collection and deposition of pollen grains. 2. Laboratory studies with B. terrestris workers and Vinca minor flowers showed that pollination effectiveness PE, as measured from pollen grains deposited on stigmas in single visits (SVD, was significantly positively related to bee size; larger bees deposited more grains, while the smallest individuals, with proportionally shorter tongues, were unable to collect or deposit pollen in these flowers. Individuals did not increase their pollen deposition over time, so handling experience does not influence SVD in Vinca minor. 3. Field studies using Geranium sanguineum and Echium vulgare, and multiple visiting species, confirmed that individual size affects SVD. All bumblebee species showed positive SVD/size effects, though even the smallest individuals did deposit pollen. Apis with its limited size variation showed no such detectable effect when visiting Geranium flowers. Two abundant hoverfly species also showed size effects, particularly when feeding for nectar on Echium. 4. Mean size of foragers also varied diurnally, with larger individuals active earlier and later, so that pollination effectiveness varies through a day; flowers routinely pollinated by bees may best be served by early morning dehiscence and visits from larger individuals. 5. Thus, while there are well-documented species-level variations in pollination effectiveness, the fine-scale individual differences between foragers should also be taken into account when assessing the reproductive outputs of biotically-pollinated plants.

  14. Influence of scale-dependent fracture intensity on block size distribution and rock slope failure mechanisms in a DFN framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Riva, Federico; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2017-04-01

    An accurate characterization of the geometry and intensity of discontinuities in a rock mass is key to assess block size distribution and degree of freedom. These are the main controls on the magnitude and mechanisms of rock slope instabilities (structurally-controlled, step-path or mass failures) and rock mass strength and deformability. Nevertheless, the use of over-simplified discontinuity characterization approaches, unable to capture the stochastic nature of discontinuity features, often hampers a correct identification of dominant rock mass behaviour. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling tools have provided new opportunities to overcome these caveats. Nevertheless, their ability to provide a representative picture of reality strongly depends on the quality and scale of field data collection. Here we used DFN modelling with FracmanTM to investigate the influence of fracture intensity, characterized on different scales and with different techniques, on the geometry and size distribution of generated blocks, in a rock slope stability perspective. We focused on a test site near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where 600 m high cliffs in thickly-bedded limestones folded at the slope scale impend on the Lake Como. We characterized the 3D slope geometry by Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry (range: 150-1500m; point cloud density > 50 pts/m2). Since the nature and attributes of discontinuities are controlled by brittle failure processes associated to large-scale folding, we performed a field characterization of meso-structural features (faults and related kinematics, vein and joint associations) in different fold domains. We characterized the discontinuity populations identified by structural geology on different spatial scales ranging from outcrops (field surveys and photo-mapping) to large slope sectors (point cloud and photo-mapping). For each sampling domain, we characterized discontinuity orientation statistics and performed fracture mapping and circular

  15. Influence of size and depth on accuracy of electrical impedance scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malich, Ansgar; Facius, Mirjam; Boettcher, Joachim; Sauner, Dieter; Hansch, Andreas; Marx, Christiane; Petrovitch, Alexander; Pfleiderer, Stefan; Kaiser, Werner [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller University, Bachstrasse 18, 07740, Jena (Germany); Anderson, Roselle [Siemens Medical Systems, Oncology Care Systems Group, 4040 Nelson Ave., CA 94520, Concorde (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered local dielectric properties which can be assessed using electrical impedance scanning (EIS). The study was aimed at clarifying influence of lesion size and depth on EIS performance. From a series of 387 lesions (129 malignant and 258 benign) from 363 patients being sonographically and/or mammographically evaluated, size and depth information was not available in 112 lesions, size was available in 86 lesions and additional depth information was available in 189 lesions, respectively, while performing EIS. Lesions were either histologically verified or had a follow-up of at least 2 years. One hundred three of 129 malignant lesions and 165 of 258 benign lesions were correctly detected (sensitivity 79.8%, specificity 64.0%, accuracy 71.9%). Sensitivity without knowledge of size and depth was 64.6% (10 of 16 malignant lesions detected). This value increased to 76.2% (32 of 42) with knowledge of the size and further increased to 85.9% with knowledge of size and depth (61 of 71). Specificity values in the three subgroups were almost similar: 64.6 (62 of 96), 65.9 (29 of 44), and 62.7% (74 of 118), respectively. Accuracy rises from 63.6% (without knowledge of size/depth) to 71.1 and 74.3% (with size knowledge and with size and depth knowledge, respectively). Accuracy of EIS improved significantly by including sonographical information about depth and size into the analysis. Ultrasound examination should be performed prior to EIS. (orig.)

  16. Influence of size and depth on accuracy of electrical impedance scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malich, Ansgar; Facius, Mirjam; Boettcher, Joachim; Sauner, Dieter; Hansch, Andreas; Marx, Christiane; Petrovitch, Alexander; Pfleiderer, Stefan; Kaiser, Werner; Anderson, Roselle

    2003-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered local dielectric properties which can be assessed using electrical impedance scanning (EIS). The study was aimed at clarifying influence of lesion size and depth on EIS performance. From a series of 387 lesions (129 malignant and 258 benign) from 363 patients being sonographically and/or mammographically evaluated, size and depth information was not available in 112 lesions, size was available in 86 lesions and additional depth information was available in 189 lesions, respectively, while performing EIS. Lesions were either histologically verified or had a follow-up of at least 2 years. One hundred three of 129 malignant lesions and 165 of 258 benign lesions were correctly detected (sensitivity 79.8%, specificity 64.0%, accuracy 71.9%). Sensitivity without knowledge of size and depth was 64.6% (10 of 16 malignant lesions detected). This value increased to 76.2% (32 of 42) with knowledge of the size and further increased to 85.9% with knowledge of size and depth (61 of 71). Specificity values in the three subgroups were almost similar: 64.6 (62 of 96), 65.9 (29 of 44), and 62.7% (74 of 118), respectively. Accuracy rises from 63.6% (without knowledge of size/depth) to 71.1 and 74.3% (with size knowledge and with size and depth knowledge, respectively). Accuracy of EIS improved significantly by including sonographical information about depth and size into the analysis. Ultrasound examination should be performed prior to EIS. (orig.)

  17. Space use of wintering waterbirds in India: Influence of trophic ecology on home-range size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgail, Tsewang; Takekawa, John Y.; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Sathiyaselvam, Ponnusamy; Mundkur, Taej; Newman, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between species' home range and their other biological traits remains poorly understood, especially in migratory birds due to the difficulty associated with tracking them. Advances in satellite telemetry and remote sensing techniques have proved instrumental in overcoming such challenges. We studied the space use of migratory ducks through satellite telemetry with an objective of understanding the influence of body mass and feeding habits on their home-range sizes. We marked 26 individuals, representing five species of migratory ducks, with satellite transmitters during two consecutive winters in three Indian states. We used kernel methods to estimate home ranges and core use areas of these waterfowl, and assessed the influence of body mass and feeding habits on home-range size. Feeding habits influenced the home-range size of the migratory ducks. Carnivorous ducks had the largest home ranges, herbivorous ducks the smallest, while omnivorous species had intermediate home-ranges. Body mass did not explain variation in home-range size. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on migratory ducks, and it has important implications for their conservation and management.

  18. Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Oviposition Preference as Influenced by Container Size and Buddleja davidii Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy J; Kline, Daniel L; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is a container-breeding mosquito commonly found in residential areas of its range in the United States. Mosquitoes are known to utilize flowering plants for sugar acquisition. Limited information is known about the influences on oviposition site selection, outside of container size. Residential areas are often landscaped with a variety of flowering plants and are known to provide numerous sizes of potential larval developmental sites for container-breeding mosqutioes. Through screened enclosure and field studies, the oviposition preference of Ae. albopictus for containers of three selected sizes (473, 946 and 1,892 ml) and the influence of flowering butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii Franchett cultivar 'Guinevere') plants were examined. Our results document that significantly more eggs were oviposited in the largest containers. Additionally, significantly more eggs were oviposited in containers adjacent to flowering butterfly bushes than in those without a flowering butterfly bush. Finally, our results document that flowering butterfly bushes exerted greater influence over Ae. albopictus oviposition decisions than did container size. Our findings can be applied to several aspects of Ae. albopictus surveillance and control.

  19. The Influence of Sensor Size on Acoustic Emission Waveforms—A Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Tsangouri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Acoustic Emission technique is governed by the measuring efficiency of the piezoelectric sensors usually mounted on the structure surface. In the case of damage of bulk materials or plates, the sensors receive the acoustic waveforms of which the frequency and shape are correlated to the damage mode. This numerical study measures the waveforms received by point, medium and large size sensors and evaluates the effect of sensor size on the acoustic emission signals. Simulations are the only way to quantify the effect of sensor size ensuring that the frequency response of the different sensors is uniform. The cases of horizontal (on the same surface, vertical and diagonal excitation are numerically simulated, and the corresponding elastic wave displacement is measured for different sizes of sensors. It is shown that large size sensors significantly affect the wave magnitude and content in both time and frequency domains and especially in the case of surface wave excitation. The coherence between the original and received waveform is quantified and the numerical findings are experimentally supported. It is concluded that sensors with a size larger than half the size of the excitation wavelength start to seriously influence the accuracy of the AE waveform.

  20. Anomalous or regular capacitance? The influence of pore size dispersity on double-layer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, N.; Rodner, M.; Schreiber, A.; Jeongwook, J.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Presser, V.

    2016-09-01

    The energy storage mechanism of electric double-layer capacitors is governed by ion electrosorption at the electrode surface. This process requires high surface area electrodes, typically highly porous carbons. In common organic electrolytes, bare ion sizes are below one nanometer but they are larger when we consider their solvation shell. In contrast, ionic liquid electrolytes are free of solvent molecules, but cation-anion coordination requires special consideration. By matching pore size and ion size, two seemingly conflicting views have emerged: either an increase in specific capacitance with smaller pore size or a constant capacitance contribution of all micro- and mesopores. In our work, we revisit this issue by using a comprehensive set of electrochemical data and a pore size incremental analysis to identify the influence of certain ranges in the pore size distribution to the ion electrosorption capacity. We see a difference in solvation of ions in organic electrolytes depending on the applied voltage and a cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids in nanometer sized pores.

  1. Experimental investigation of particle size distribution influence on diffusion controlled coarsening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhigang; Patterson, B.R.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of initial particle size distribution on coarsening during liquid phase sintering has been experimentally investigated using W-14Ni-6Fe alloy as a model system. It was found that initially wider size distribution particles coarsened more rapidly than those of an initially narrow distribution. The well known linear relationship between the cube of the average particle radius bar r -3 , and time was observed for most of the coarsening process, although the early stage coarsening rate constant changed with time, as expected with concomitant early changes in the tungsten particle size distribution. The instantaneous transient rate constant was shown to be related to the geometric standard deviation, 1nσ, of the instantaneous size distributions, with higher rate constants corresponding to larger 1nσ values. The form of the particle size distributions changed rapidly during early coarsening and reached a quasi-stable state, different from the theoretical asymptotic distribution, after some time. A linear relationship was found between the experimentally observed instantaneous rate constant and that computed from an earlier model incorporating the effect of particle size distribution. The above results compare favorably with those from prior theoretical modeling and computer simulation studies of the effect of particle size distribution on coarsening, based on the DeHoff communicating neighbor model

  2. Investigation of features in radon soil dynamics and search for influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Grigorii; Cherepnev, Maxim; Nagorskiy, Petr; Yakovleva, Valentina

    2018-03-01

    The features in radon soil dynamics at two depths were investigated and the main influencing factors were revealed. The monitoring of radon volumetric activity in soil air was performed at experimental site of Tomsk Observatory of Radioactivity and Ionizing Radiation with using radon radiometers and scintillation detectors of alpha-radiation with 10 min sampling frequency. The detectors were installed into boreholes of 0.5 and 1 m depths. The analysis of the soil radon monitoring data has allowed revealing some dependencies at daily and annual scales and main influencing factors. In periods with clearly defined daily radon variations in the soil were revealed the next: 1) amplitude of the daily variations of the soil radon volumetric activity damps with the depth, that is related with the influence of convective fluxes in the soil; 2) temporal shift between times of occurrence of radon volumetric activity maximum (or minimum) values at 0.5 m and 1 m depths can reach 3 hours. In seasonal dynamics of the soil radon the following dependences were found: 1) maximal values are observed in winter, but minimal - in summer; 2) spring periods of snow melting are accompanied by anomaly increasing of radon volumetric activity in the soil up to about 3 times. The main influencing factors are atmospheric precipitations, temperature gradient in the soil and the state of upper soil layer.

  3. Predictors of Citation Rate in Psychology: Inconclusive Influence of Effect and Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, Paul H P; Haase, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we investigate predictors of how often a scientific article is cited. Specifically, we focus on the influence of two often neglected predictors of citation rate: effect size and sample size, using samples from two psychological topical areas. Both can be considered as indicators of the importance of an article and post hoc (or observed) statistical power, and should, especially in applied fields, predict citation rates. In Study 1, effect size did not have an influence on citation rates across a topical area, both with and without controlling for numerous variables that have been previously linked to citation rates. In contrast, sample size predicted citation rates, but only while controlling for other variables. In Study 2, sample and partly effect sizes predicted citation rates, indicating that the relations vary even between scientific topical areas. Statistically significant results had more citations in Study 2 but not in Study 1. The results indicate that the importance (or power) of scientific findings may not be as strongly related to citation rate as is generally assumed.

  4. Body size and symbiotic status influence gonad development in Aiptasia pallida anemones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Judith F; Murphy, Grant K; Roark, Alison M

    2017-01-01

    Pale anemones ( Aiptasia pallida ) coexist with dinoflagellates (primarily Symbiodinium minutum ) in a mutualistic relationship. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of these symbionts in gonad development of anemone hosts. Symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones were subjected to light cycles that induced gametogenesis. These anemones were then sampled weekly for nine weeks, and gonad development was analyzed histologically. Anemone size was measured as mean body column diameter, and oocytes or sperm follicles were counted for each anemone. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the influence of body size and symbiotic status on whether gonads were present and on the number of oocytes or sperm follicles produced. Body size predicted whether gonads were present, with larger anemones being more likely than smaller anemones to develop gonads. Both body size and symbiotic status predicted gonad size, such that larger and symbiotic anemones produced more oocytes and sperm follicles than smaller and aposymbiotic anemones. Overall, only 22 % of aposymbiotic females produced oocytes, whereas 63 % of symbiotic females produced oocytes. Similarly, 6 % of aposymbiotic males produced sperm follicles, whereas 60 % of symbiotic males produced sperm follicles. Thus, while gonads were present in 62 % of symbiotic anemones, they were present in only 11 % of aposymbiotic anemones. These results indicate that dinoflagellate symbionts influence gonad development and thus sexual maturation in both female and male Aiptasia pallida anemones. This finding substantiates and expands our current understanding of the importance of symbionts in the development and physiology of cnidarian hosts.

  5. Introducing Meta-Partition, a Useful Methodology to Explore Factors That Influence Ecological Effect Sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Ortega

    Full Text Available The study of the heterogeneity of effect sizes is a key aspect of ecological meta-analyses. Here we propose a meta-analytic methodology to study the influence of moderators in effect sizes by splitting heterogeneity: meta-partition. To introduce this methodology, we performed a meta-partition of published data about the traits that influence species sensitivity to habitat loss, that have been previously analyzed through meta-regression. Thus, here we aim to introduce meta-partition and to make an initial comparison with meta-regression. Meta-partition algorithm consists of three steps. Step 1 is to study the heterogeneity of effect sizes under the assumption of fixed effect model. If heterogeneity is found, we perform step 2, that is, to partition the heterogeneity by the moderator that minimizes heterogeneity within a subset while maximizing heterogeneity between subsets. Then, if effect sizes of the subset are still heterogeneous, we repeat step 1 and 2 until we reach final subsets. Finally, step 3 is to integrate effect sizes of final subsets, with fixed effect model if there is homogeneity, and with random effects model if there is heterogeneity. Results show that meta-partition is valuable to assess the importance of moderators in explaining heterogeneity of effect sizes, as well as to assess the directions of these relations and to detect possible interactions between moderators. With meta-partition we have been able to evaluate the importance of moderators in a more objective way than with meta-regression, and to visualize the complex relations that may exist between them. As ecological issues are often influenced by several factors interacting in complex ways, ranking the importance of possible moderators and detecting possible interactions would make meta-partition a useful exploration tool for ecological meta-analyses.

  6. How histological features of basal cell carcinomas influence image quality in optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Nürnberg, Birgit M.; Thrane, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to diagnose and measure the depth of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in skin, but some lesions appear blurred in OCT images. The aim of this study is to identify histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) that correlate with good...... quality OCT images of the same lesions. A total of 34 patients with BCC were OCT scanned. The influence of histology parameters (e.g. inflammation, sun damage of skin, carcinoma cell size) on OCT image quality was studied by comparing 15 BCC lesions easily identified compared to 19 BCC lesions...

  7. Influence of the relative rotational speed on component features in micro rotary swaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishkina Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro rotary swaging is a cold forming process for production of micro components with determined geometry and surface. It is also possible to change the microstructure of wires and hence the material properties. Swaging dies revolve around the work piece with an overlaid radial oscillation. Newly developed tools (Flat Surface Dies, FSD feature plain surfaces and do not represent the geometry of the formed part as in conventional swaging. Using these tools allows for producing wires with triangle geometry (cross section as well as a circular shape. To test the influence of FSD on material properties by micro swaging a new method is investigated: the variation of the relative speed between the specimen and dies in infeed rotary swaging. During this specific process copper (C11000 and steel (304 Alloy wires with diameter d0 = 1 mm are formed. It is noticed that the mechanical characteristics such as ductility and strength differ from the characteristics after conventional swaging. Moreover this approach enables new possibilities to influence the geometry and the surface quality of wires. The impact of the relative speed on the processed wire features is described in this paper.

  8. Influence of High Level Features of HVS on Performance of FSIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dostal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of information about high level features of Human Visual System (HVS on objective quality assessment is studied. This was done by extending the existing full-reference objective image quality metric – FSIM – where the different importance of certain areas of image is considered using Phase Congruency (PC algorithm. Here, the estimation of Region of Interest (ROI based on this algorithm is complemented by Fixation Density Maps (FDM containing the information about high level features of HVS. Use of another low level features based algorithm (Phase Spectrum of Fourier Transform was also considered and compared to the PC algorithm. The performance was evaluated qualitatively on images reconstructed according to ROI and quantitatively on images from LIVE database. The correlation between subjective and objective tests was calculated using Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient and Spearman’s Rank Order Coefficient. The statistical significance of the difference between correlation coefficients was assessed by Fisher r-to-z transformation. The performance of the metric was also compared to other state-of-the-art image quality metrics (SSIM, MS-SSIM, and FSIM.

  9. Judging a book by its cover: the unconscious influence of pupil size on consumer choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Richard; Watt, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Past research suggests that men perceive women with large pupils as especially attractive. We employed an innovative methodology to examine whether this effect influences consumer decision-making. A popular psychology book was published with two slightly different front covers. Both covers contained the same photograph of a woman; however, the woman's pupils on one cover were digitally enlarged. Readers indicated whether they were male or female, and whether they possessed the cover with small or large pupils. A significantly greater percentage of men than women had chosen the cover with the large pupils. None of the participants who attempted to guess the nature of the experiment was correct, suggesting that the influence exerted by pupil size was unconscious. These findings provide further support for the notion that people's judgments are unconsciously swayed by pupil size, and demonstrate that this effect operates in a real world setting.

  10. Influence Factors of Sports Bra Evaluation and Design Based on Large Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lingxi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to find the main influence factors of sports bra evaluation by the subjective assessment of different styles commercial sports bra, and to summarize the design elements of sports bra for large size. 10 women in large size (>C80 were chosen to evaluate 9 different sports bras. The main influence factors were extracted by factor analysis and all the product samples were classified by Q-cluster analysis. The conclusions show that breast stability, wearing comfort and bust modelling are the three key factors for sports bra evaluation. And a classification-positioning model of sports bra products was established. The findings can provide theoretical basis and guidance for the research and design of sports bras both for academic and sports or underwear enterprises, and also provide reference value for women customers.

  11. Size, physiological quality, and green seed occurrence influenced by seeding rate in soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Sampaio Ferreira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The seeding rate influences the intraspecific competition, which might affect the development and quality of seeds in soybean. However, the impact of seeding rate on the physical and physiological qualities of soybean seeds needs to be better elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of soybean plant density on the seed size as well as the effects of the interaction between the plant density and seed size on the seed mass, green seed occurence, and physiological seed quality. The experiments were carried out in the growing seasons of the years 2013/14 and 2014/15 in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, under a randomized complete block design, using the NK 7059 RR cultivar with six replications. Four plant densities (150, 300, 440, and 560 thousand viable seeds ha–1 were evaluated. After the classification of seeds into four sizes, using a set of sieves, a 4 ×4 factorial scheme was used for the statistical analysis of the four plant densities and four seed sizes. The seed samples were evaluated for the seed mass, green seed percentage, germination, and vigor. Under thermal and water stress during seed development, an increase in the seeding rate led to a reduction in the green seed occurrence and an increase in the seed size and mass. However, in the absence of thermal and water stress, the seed size and mass were not altered by the seeding rate and, there was no occurrence of green seeds.

  12. Influence of particle size and preparation methods on the physical and chemical stability of amorphous simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fang; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Tian, Fang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the stability of amorphous simvastatin. Quench-cooled amorphous simvastatin in two particle size ranges, 150-180 microm (QC-big) and ... compared to the crystalline form. The rank of solubility was found to be QC-big=QC-small>CM>crystalline. For the physical stability, the highest crystallization rate was observed for CM, and the slowest rate was detected for QC-big, with an intermediate rate occurring for QC-small. QC exhibited lower...

  13. Even Giants Need A Club: Domestic Institutions, Market Size, And Regulatory Influence

    OpenAIRE

    DAVID BACH

    2005-01-01

    This paper show that work on international market regulation has paid insufficient attention to the critical role played by domestic political and regulatory institutions. Existing literature emphasizes the role of market power, determined by market size, in analyzing international regulatory influence. While we do not contest the importance of market power, we introduce the notion of domestic regulatory capacity to capture the domestic institutional side of international market regulation th...

  14. Epitaxially influenced boundary layer model for size effect in thin metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Zdenek P.; Guo Zaoyang; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Zhu Yong; Peng Bei

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the size effect recently observed by Espinosa et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids51, 47 (2003)] in pure tension tests on free thin metallic films can be explained by the existence of a boundary layer of fixed thickness, located at the surface of the film that was attached onto the substrate during deposition. The boundary layer is influenced by the epitaxial effects of crystal growth on the dislocation density and texture (manifested by prevalent crystal plane orientations). This influence is assumed to cause significantly elevated yield strength. Furthermore, the observed gradual postpeak softening, along with its size independence, which is observed in short film strips subjected to pure tension, is explained by slip localization, originating at notch-like defects, and by damage, which can propagate in a stable manner when the film strip under pure tension is sufficiently thin and short. For general applications, the present epitaxially influenced boundary layer model may be combined with the classical strain-gradient plasticity proposed by Gao et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 1239 (1999)], and it is shown that this combination is necessary to fit the test data on both pure tension and bending of thin films by one and the same theory. To deal with films having different crystal grain sizes, the Hall-Petch relation for the yield strength dependence on the grain size needs to be incorporated into the combined theory. For very thin films, in which a flattened grain fills the whole film thickness, the Hall-Petch relation needs a cutoff, and the asymptotic increase of yield strength with diminishing film thickness is then described by the extension of Nix's model of misfit dislocations by Zhang and Zhou [J. Adv. Mater. 38, 51 (2002)]. The final result is a proposal of a general theory for strength, size effect, hardening, and softening of thin metallic films

  15. Epitaxially influenced boundary layer model for size effect in thin metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Guo, Zaoyang; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Zhu, Yong; Peng, Bei

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that the size effect recently observed by Espinosa et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids51, 47 (2003)] in pure tension tests on free thin metallic films can be explained by the existence of a boundary layer of fixed thickness, located at the surface of the film that was attached onto the substrate during deposition. The boundary layer is influenced by the epitaxial effects of crystal growth on the dislocation density and texture (manifested by prevalent crystal plane orientations). This influence is assumed to cause significantly elevated yield strength. Furthermore, the observed gradual postpeak softening, along with its size independence, which is observed in short film strips subjected to pure tension, is explained by slip localization, originating at notch-like defects, and by damage, which can propagate in a stable manner when the film strip under pure tension is sufficiently thin and short. For general applications, the present epitaxially influenced boundary layer model may be combined with the classical strain-gradient plasticity proposed by Gao et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 1239 (1999)], and it is shown that this combination is necessary to fit the test data on both pure tension and bending of thin films by one and the same theory. To deal with films having different crystal grain sizes, the Hall-Petch relation for the yield strength dependence on the grain size needs to be incorporated into the combined theory. For very thin films, in which a flattened grain fills the whole film thickness, the Hall-Petch relation needs a cutoff, and the asymptotic increase of yield strength with diminishing film thickness is then described by the extension of Nix's model of misfit dislocations by Zhang and Zhou [J. Adv. Mater. 38, 51 (2002)]. The final result is a proposal of a general theory for strength, size effect, hardening, and softening of thin metallic films.

  16. The influence of tungsten powder grain size on the properties of small bars and thick wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesionek, B.; Ludynski, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the investigations was, if possible, to determine the exact significance of the influence of the pressing parameters on the properties of tungsten bars and larger diameter wires, with special reference to the size of the tungsten grains. Tungsten powders, reduced under different conditions and with different grain sizes, were used for the investigations. These powders were pressed in steel dies at three different pressures, 72.5, 108, and 176 MPa, and the pressings were sintered. After sintering, the following properties of the bars were examined: ability to sinter, strength, and grain size. The bars were then worked down to 1.02 mm diameter wire and the following properties measured: tensile strength, plastic properties and the occurence of internal flaws (cracks). Finally, the optimum pressing parameters of the tungsten powder were determined. (Auth.)

  17. Influence of Li-ion Battery Models in the Sizing of Hybrid Storage Systems with Supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Claudio; Barreras, Jorge Varela; de Castro, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the influence of different aggregated electrical circuit battery models in the sizing process of a hybrid energy storage system (ESS), composed by Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors (SCs). The aim is to find the number of cells required to propel...... a certain vehicle over a predefined driving cycle. During this process, three battery models will be considered. The first consists in a linear static zeroeth order battery model over a restricted operating window. The second is a non-linear static model, while the third takes into account first......-order dynamics of the battery. Simulation results demonstrate that the adoption of a more accurate battery model in the sizing of hybrid ESSs prevents over-sizing, leading to a reduction in the number of cells of up to 29%, and a cost decrease of up to 10%....

  18. The influence of chest tube size and position in primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Sara S.; Riber, Lars P S; Olesen, Winnie H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Optimal chest tube position in the pleural cavity is largely unexplored for the treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). We investigated whether type, size and position of chest tubes influenced duration of treatment for PSP. Methods: A retrospective follow-up study of all...... patients admitted with PSP over a 5-year period. Traumatic, iatrogenic and secondary pneumothoraxes were excluded. Gender, age, smoking habits, type and size of chest tube used (pigtail catheter or surgical chest tube) were recorded from the patients' charts. All chest X-rays upon admittance...... and immediately following chest tube placement were retrieved and re-evaluated for size of pneumothorax (categorized into five groups) and location of the chest tube tip (categorized as upper, middle or lower third of the pleural cavity). All data were analysed in a Cox proportional hazards regression model...

  19. The influence of particle size on intermediate and final stages of molybdenum sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskokovic, D.; Novakovic, B.; Petrovic, V.; Ristic, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of initial particle size on kinetics of molybdenum sintering was investigated. Three fractions of monodispersed molybdenum powder (2, 5 and 10 μm) were used as well as a polydispersed powder with mean particle size of 12 μm. Decrease in particle size accelerates to a great extent densification and grain growth processes. During sintering of 10 μm powder and to a smaller extent in the case of polydispersed powder, Zeners's relation was confirmed. Quantitative equations for the intermediate sintering stages could not be fitted to the investigated particulate systems, even though the grain growth process could be described by cubic law and though the volume diffusion coefficient and the surface energy were known with great reliability. (Auth.)

  20. Influence of maize flour particle size on gluten-free breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hera, Esther; Talegón, María; Caballero, Pedro; Gómez, Manuel

    2013-03-15

    Maize, one of the suitable grains for coeliac consumption, is, together with rice, the most cultivated cereal in the world. However, the inclusion of maize flour in gluten-free bread is a minority and studies are scarce. This paper analyses the influence of different maize flour types and their particle sizes on the quality of two types of bread without gluten (80% and 110% water in the formulation) obtained from them. We also analysed the microstructure of the dough and its behaviour during the fermentation. Finer flours had a lower dough development during fermentation in all cases. Among the different types of flour, those whose microstructure revealed compact particles were those which had higher specific bread volume, especially when the particle size was greater. Among the formulations, the dough with more water gave breads with higher specific volume, an effect that was more important in more compact flours. The higher volume breads had lower values of hardness and resilience. The type of corn flour and mainly its particle size influence significantly the dough development of gluten-free bread during fermentation and therefore the final volume and texture of the breads obtained. The flours having coarser particle size are the most suitable for making gluten-free maize bread. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Robotic stereotactic radioablation of breast tumors: Influence of beam size on the absorbed dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnica-Garza, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) therapy for breast tumors has been shown to be an effective treatment strategy when applied concomitantly with chemotherapy, with the purpose of reducing the tumor volume thus making it more amenable for breast conserving surgery. In this paper we used Monte Carlo simulation within a realistic patient model to determine the influence that the variation in beam collimation radius has on the resultant absorbed dose distributions for this type of treatment. Separate optimized plans were obtained for treatments using 300 circular beams with radii of 0.5 cm, 0.75 cm, 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. Cumulative dose volume histograms were obtained for the gross, clinical and planning target volumes as well as for eight organs and structures at risk. Target coverage improves as the collimator size is increased, at the expense of increasing the volume of healthy tissue receiving mid-level absorbed doses. Interestingly, it is found that the maximum dose imparted to the skin is highly dependent on collimator size, while the dosimetry of other structures, such as both the ipsilateral and contralateral lung tissue are basically unaffected by a change in beam size. - Highlights: • Stereotactic body radiation therapy of breast tumors is analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation. • The influence of beam collimation on the absorbed dose distributions is determined. • Large field sizes increase target dose uniformity and midlevel doses to healthy structures. • Skin dose is greatly affected by changes in beam collimation.

  2. Influence of grain size on the tensile and creep properties of a type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    The influence of grain size, on the tensile deformation behaviour in the temperature range 300-1223 K and on the creep rate at 873 and 973 K over a wide range of applied stresses, in a type 316 stainless steel has been investigated. For the tensile results, the Hall-Petch relation was found to be valid up to 1023 K. The variations of flow stress and work hardening rate with temperature and grain size have been found to be influenced by dynamic strain aging which occurs in the temperature range 523-923 K. The creep experiments revealed that grain boundaries contribute to strengthening at high stresses (180-260 MPa) at 873 K but this strengthening does not correlate with the available models which attempt to incorporate the Hall-Petch strengthening effect into creep rate equations. At 973 K the creep rate was generally constant but increased at small grain sizes and at lower stresses due to increased contribution from grain boundary sliding. The difference in the grain size effects on creep at the two temperatures is attributed to the difference in the substructures developed during creep. (author)

  3. Influence of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the phase transition features in chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belemuk, A. M.; Stishov, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Using the classical Monte Carlo calculations, we investigate the effects of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the helimagnetic transition in a Heisenberg magnet with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We use variable spin amplitudes in the framework of the spin-lattice Hamiltonian. It is this kind of fluctuations that naturally occur in an itinerant system. We show that the basic features of the helical phase transition are not changed much by the longitudinal spin fluctuations though the transition temperature Tc and the fluctuation hump seen in specific heat at T >Tc is significantly affected. We report thermodynamic and structural effects of these fluctuations. By increasing the system size in the Monte Carlo modeling, we are able to reproduce the ring shape scattering intensity above the helimagnetic transition temperature Tc, which transforms into the spiral spots seen below Tc in the neutron scattering experiments.

  4. Influence of region of interest size and ultrasound lesion size on the performance of 2D shear wave elastography (SWE) in solid breast masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skerl, K.; Vinnicombe, S.; Giannotti, E.; Thomson, K.; Evans, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of the region of interest (ROI) size and lesion diameter on the diagnostic performance of 2D shear wave elastography (SWE) of solid breast lesions. Materials and methods: A study group of 206 consecutive patients (age range 21–92 years) with 210 solid breast lesions (70 benign, 140 malignant) who underwent core biopsy or surgical excision was evaluated. Lesions were divided into small (diameter <15 mm, n=112) and large lesions (diameter ≥15 mm, n=98). An ROI with a diameter of 1, 2, and 3 mm was positioned over the stiffest part of the lesion. The maximum elasticity (E_m_a_x), mean elasticity (E_m_e_a_n) and standard deviation (SD) for each ROI size were compared to the pathological outcome. Statistical analysis was undertaken using the chi-square test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The ROI size used has a significant impact on the performance of E_m_e_a_n and SD but not on E_m_a_x. Youden's indices show a correlation with the ROI size and lesion size: generally, the benign/malignant threshold is lower with increasing ROI size but higher with increasing lesion size. Conclusions: No single SWE parameter has superior performance. Lesion size and ROI size influence diagnostic performance. - Highlights: • Optimal cut-off for benign/malignant differentiation depends on lesion size. • Region of interest size influences measurements of mean elasticity and standard deviation. • Large lesions are stiffer than small lesions. • Optimal cut-off for benign/malignant differentiation should increase with increasing lesion size. • Region of interest of 2 mm achieved best compromise of the diagnostic performance for all SWE parameter.

  5. Influence of information systems on stock management in little and middle sized supermarkets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Luis Pick

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting a multiple case study in which was analyzed the influence of information systems usage on the stock management processes in medium and little-sized retailers. We assessed four supermarkets from the inner land of Rio Grande do Sul, with different status in information systems development. The performance in stock management was appraised with the aid of five numerical indicators, defined in focus group sections with experts, led by researcher. The main observed influences were: average inventory, stock cycle, percentage of shortages and GM-ROI. WE observed high negative correlations between these variables and the level of usage of information systems: the more the company uses it, the less the variables grew, what is a desirable behavior. We do not found influence of the information system on sales volumes.

  6. Influence of crystallite size and temperature on the antiferromagnetic helices of terbium and holmium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Jens-Peter; Michels, Andreas [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Ferdinand, Adrian; Birringer, Rainer [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Baller, Joerg; Sanctuary, Roland [University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Philippi, Stefan [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Lott, Dieter [GKSS Research Center, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Balog, Sandor [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rotenberg, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Kaindl, Guenter [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Doebrich, Kristian M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We report on the results of grain-size and temperature-dependent magnetization, specific-heat, neutron-scattering, and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments on the heavy rare-earth metals terbium and holmium, with particular emphasis on the temperature regions where the helical antiferromagnetic phases exist. In contrast to Ho, we find that the helical structure in Tb is relative strongly affected by microstructural disorder, specifically, it can no longer be detected for the smallest studied grain size of D=18 nm. Moreover, in coarse-grained Tb a helical structure persists even in the ferromagnetic regime, down to about T=215 K, in agreement with the ARPES data, which reveal a nesting feature of the Fermi surface at the L point of the Brillouin zone at T=210 K.

  7. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundquist Jan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. Methods We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Results Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer.

  8. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevier, Melanie; Weires, Marianne; Thomsen, Hauke; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2011-05-09

    Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer.

  9. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevier, Melanie; Weires, Marianne; Thomsen, Hauke; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer

  10. Crop size influences pre-dispersal seed predation in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Christianini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Many pre-dispersal seed predators are specialized insects that rely on seeds for larval development. These insects may respond to the amount of seeds produced by a plant (i.e. crop size, increasing the proportion of seeds damaged with increases in seed numbers. Large seeds have more resources and spend more time in plants to complete their development and are probably more prone to be preyed on by those insects than small seeds. Here I tested how crop size and seed mass influence pre-dispersal seed predation in plants from the Cerrado savannas of Brazil. I related plant crop size to pre-dispersal seed predation for Xylopia aromatica and Erythroxylum pelleterianum. A literature review was performed to test if seed mass may explain among-species differences in pre-dispersal seed predation. Pre-dispersal losses increased proportionally to crop size in the two species investigated, but some species show positive or no density-dependent seed predation in literature, indicating that seed losses are not a simple function of crop sizes. Seed mass did not explain pre-dispersal seed loss differences among 14 species with data available. Pre-dispersal losses are often small and probably less important than seed dispersal and establishment limitation for plant recruitment in Cerrado savannas.

  11. Influence of Sample Size on Automatic Positional Accuracy Assessment Methods for Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ariza-López

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, new approaches aimed to increase the automation level of positional accuracy assessment processes for spatial data have been developed. However, in such cases, an aspect as significant as sample size has not yet been addressed. In this paper, we study the influence of sample size when estimating the planimetric positional accuracy of urban databases by means of an automatic assessment using polygon-based methodology. Our study is based on a simulation process, which extracts pairs of homologous polygons from the assessed and reference data sources and applies two buffer-based methods. The parameter used for determining the different sizes (which range from 5 km up to 100 km has been the length of the polygons’ perimeter, and for each sample size 1000 simulations were run. After completing the simulation process, the comparisons between the estimated distribution functions for each sample and population distribution function were carried out by means of the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Results show a significant reduction in the variability of estimations when sample size increased from 5 km to 100 km.

  12. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  13. Dual influences of ecosystem size and disturbance on food chain length in streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Peter A; McIntosh, Angus R; Jellyman, Phillip G

    2010-07-01

    The number of trophic transfers occurring between basal resources and top predators, food chain length (FCL), varies widely in the world's ecosystems for reasons that are poorly understood, particularly for stream ecosystems. Available evidence indicates that FCL is set by energetic constraints, environmental stochasticity, or ecosystem size effects, although no single explanation has yet accounted for FCL patterns in a broad sense. Further, whether environmental disturbance can influence FCL has been debated on both theoretical and empirical grounds for quite some time. Using data from sixteen South Island, New Zealand streams, we determined whether the so-called ecosystem size, disturbance, or resource availability hypotheses could account for FCL variation in high country fluvial environments. Stable isotope-based estimates of maximum trophic position ranged from 2.6 to 4.2 and averaged 3.5, a value on par with the global FCL average for streams. Model-selection results indicated that stream size and disturbance regime best explained across-site patterns in FCL, although resource availability was negatively correlated with our measure of disturbance; FCL approached its maximum in large, stable springs and was disturbed streams. Community data indicate that size influenced FCL, primarily through its influence on local fish species richness (i.e., via trophic level additions and/or insertions), whereas disturbance did so via an effect on the relative availability of intermediate predators (i.e., predatory invertebrates) as prey for fishes. Overall, our results demonstrate that disturbance can have an important food web-structuring role in stream ecosystems, and further imply that pluralistic explanations are needed to fully understand the range of structural variation observed for real food webs.

  14. Gold nanoparticle size and shape influence on osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingchao; Li, Jia'en Jasmine; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the differentiation response of stem cells has not been elucidated. In this work, a series of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au nanospheres, Au nanostars and Au nanorods with different diameters of 40, 70 and 110 nm were synthesized and their effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated. All the AuNPs showed good cytocompatibility and did not influence proliferation of hMSCs at the studied concentrations. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was dependent on the size and shape of AuNPs. Sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition of cells while rod-40 reduced the ALP activity and calcium deposition. Gene profiling revealed that the expression of osteogenic marker genes was down-regulated after incubation with rod-40. However, up-regulation of these genes was found in the sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 treatment. Moreover, it was found that the size and shape of AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs through regulating the activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that the size and shape of AuNPs had an influence on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, which should provide useful guidance for the preparation of AuNPs with defined size and shape for their biomedical applications.Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the

  15. The changes of macroscopic features and microscopic structures of water under influence of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Xiaofeng; Deng Bo

    2008-01-01

    Influences of magnetic field on microscopic structures and macroscopic properties of water are studied by the spectrum techniques of infrared, Raman, visible, ultraviolet lights and X-ray. From these investigations, we know that the magnetic fields change the distribution of molecules and electrons, cause displacements and polarization of molecules and atoms, result in changes of dipole-moment transition and vibrational states of molecules and variation of transition probability of electrons, but does not alter the constitution of molecules and atoms. These are helpful in seeking the mechanism of magnetization of water. Meanwhile, we also measure the changed rules of the surface tension force, soaking effect or angle of contact, viscosity, rheology features, refraction index, dielectric constant and electric conductivity of magnetized water relative to that of pure water. The results show that the magnetic fields increase the soaking degree and hydrophobicity of water to materials, depress its surface-tension force, diminish the viscosity of war, enhance the feature of plastic flowing of water, and increase the refraction index, dielectric constant and electric conductivity of water after magnetization. These changes are caused by the above changes of microscopic structures under the action of magnetic field. Therefore, our studies are significant in science and has practical value of applications

  16. Do attitudes of families concerned influence features of children who claim to remember previous lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Satwant K

    2011-01-01

    Reported cases of nearly 2600 children (subjects) who claim to remember previous lives have been investigated in cultures with and without belief in reincarnation. The authenticity in most cases has been established. To study the influence of attitudes of parents of the subjects, families of the deceased person with whom they are identified and attention paid by others on the features of the cases. The study is based on field investigations. Data is derived from analysis of a larger series of an ongoing project. Information on initial and subsequent attitudes of subjects' mothers was available for 292 and 136 cases, respectively; attitudes of 227 families of deceased person (previous personality) with whom he is identified, and the extent of attention received from outsiders for 252 cases. Observations and interviews with multiple firsthand informants on both sides of the case as well as some neutral informants supplemented by examination of objective data were the chief methods of investigation. The initial attitude of mothers varied from encouragement (21%) to neutral or tolerance (51%) to discouragement (28%). However, it changed significantly from neutrality to taking measures to induce amnesia in their children for previous life memories due to various psychosocial pressures and prevalent beliefs. Families of the previous personalities, once convinced, showed complete acceptance in a majority of cases. Outside attention was received in 58% cases. The positive attitude of parents might facilitate expression of memories but subsequently attitudes of persons concerned do not seem to alter features of the cases.

  17. Influence of region of interest size and ultrasound lesion size on the performance of 2D shear wave elastography (SWE) in solid breast masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerl, K; Vinnicombe, S; Giannotti, E; Thomson, K; Evans, A

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of the region of interest (ROI) size and lesion diameter on the diagnostic performance of 2D shear wave elastography (SWE) of solid breast lesions. A study group of 206 consecutive patients (age range 21-92 years) with 210 solid breast lesions (70 benign, 140 malignant) who underwent core biopsy or surgical excision was evaluated. Lesions were divided into small (diameter <15 mm, n=112) and large lesions (diameter ≥15 mm, n=98). An ROI with a diameter of 1, 2, and 3 mm was positioned over the stiffest part of the lesion. The maximum elasticity (Emax), mean elasticity (Emean) and standard deviation (SD) for each ROI size were compared to the pathological outcome. Statistical analysis was undertaken using the chi-square test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The ROI size used has a significant impact on the performance of Emean and SD but not on Emax. Youden's indices show a correlation with the ROI size and lesion size: generally, the benign/malignant threshold is lower with increasing ROI size but higher with increasing lesion size. No single SWE parameter has superior performance. Lesion size and ROI size influence diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [Influences of composition on brush wear of composite resins. Influences of particle size and content of filler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, S

    1990-07-01

    The influences of the composition on abrasion resistance of composite resins were examined using various experimental composite resins which had various matrix resin, filler size and content. The abrasion test was conducted by the experimental toothbrush abrasion testing machine developed in our laboratory. Three series of heat-curing composite resins were tested. One series was made from a Bis-MPEPP or UDMA monomer, and a silica filler with an average particle size of 0.04, 1.9, 3.8, 4.3, 7.5, 13.8 and 14.1 microns. The filler content of this series was constant at 45 wt%. The second series contained a silica filler of 4.3 microns in a content ranging from 35 to 75 wt%. The third series contained a microfiller (0.04 microns) and macrofiller (4.3 microns) in total content of 45 wt%. In this series, the microfiller was gradually replaced by 5, 15, 25 and 45 wt% of the macrofiller. The results obtained for these three series indicated that the abrasion resistance of composite resins was controlled by the inorganic filler, mainly filler size and content. The abrasion loss did not vary with the difference of matrix resin. When the particle size of the filler was below about 5 microns, the abrasion resistance decreased markedly with the decrease in filler size. The composite resin which contained a 0.04 or 1.9 micron filler was less resistant to toothbrush wear than the unfilled matrix resin. However, the microfiller also contributed to abrasion resistance when used in combination with the macrofiller, although abrasion resistance decreased with the increase in the microfiller concentration. The increase of filler content clearly improved the abrasion resistance when used the macrofiller. The analysis of these results and SEM observations of the brushed surfaces of samples suggested that the toothbrush abrasion was three-body abrasion caused by the abrasive in the toothpaste, and affected by the difference in the particle size between abrasive and filler, and between

  19. Influence of shielding gas on fume formation rate and particle size distribution for optimised GMAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.R.; Monaghan, B.J.; Nicholson, A.; Cuiuri, D.; Norrish, J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of shielding gas on fume formation rate (FFR) and particle size distribution has been investigated by using a technique developed for automatic control of the welding voltage in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The results for automatic control are compared with the use of a fixed voltage. Significant reductions in FFR and a general decrease in average particle size were observed using the automatic control technique. This reduction in FFR was attributed to improved metal transfer stability, via a reduction in the occurrence of repelled globular transfer, by promoting the 'drop-spray' transfer condition, together with a reduction in the arc length. FFR and particle size were strongly related to the C O2 content of the shielding gas, where FFR increased as percent C 02 increased, due mainly to the dominant influence of C O2 on weld transfer and arc characteristics. The results indicate that FFR for GMAW in the spray regime should be determined by using optimised welding conditions for each shielding gas composition.

  20. Influence of preservative and mounting media on the size and shape of monogenean sclerites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankoua, Severin-Oscar; Bitja Nyom, Arnold R; Bahanak, Dieu Ne Dort; Bilong Bilong, Charles F; Pariselle, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Based on Cichlidogyrus sp. (Monogenea, Ancyrocephalidae) specimens from Hemichromis sp. hosts, we tested the influence of different methods to fix/preserve samples/specimens [frozen material, alcohol or formalin preserved, museum process for fish preservation (fixed in formalin and preserved in alcohol)] and different media used to mount the slides [tap water, glycerin ammonium picrate (GAP), Hoyer's one (HM)] on the size/shape of sclerotized parts of monogenean specimens. The results show that the use of HM significantly increases the size of haptoral sclerites [marginal hooks I, II, IV, V, and VI; dorsal bar length, width, distance between auricles and auricle length, ventral bar length and width], and changes their shape [angle opening between shaft and guard (outer and inner roots) in both ventral and dorsal anchors, ventral bar much wider, dorsal one less curved]. This influence seems to be reduced when specimens/samples are fixed in formalin. The systematics of Monogenea being based on the size and shape of their sclerotized parts, to prevent misidentifications or description of invalid new species, we recommend the use of GAP as mounting medium; Hoyer's one should be restricted to monogenean specimens fixed for a long time which are more shrunken.

  1. Image Size Variation Influence on Corrupted and Non-viewable BMP Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Tengku Norsuhaila T.; Azma Abdullah, Nurul; Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Ab; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi A.; Chai Wen, Chuah

    2017-08-01

    Image is one of the evidence component seek in digital forensics. Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format is most popular used in the Internet because JPEG files are very lossy and easy to compress that can speed up Internet transmitting processes. However, corrupted JPEG images are hard to recover due to the complexities of determining corruption point. Nowadays Bitmap (BMP) images are preferred in image processing compared to another formats because BMP image contain all the image information in a simple format. Therefore, in order to investigate the corruption point in JPEG, the file is required to be converted into BMP format. Nevertheless, there are many things that can influence the corrupting of BMP image such as the changes of image size that make the file non-viewable. In this paper, the experiment indicates that the size of BMP file influences the changes in the image itself through three conditions, deleting, replacing and insertion. From the experiment, we learnt by correcting the file size, it can able to produce a viewable file though partially. Then, it can be investigated further to identify the corruption point.

  2. Cross-species correlation between queen mating numbers and worker ovary sizes suggests kin conflict may influence ovary size evolution in honeybees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueppell, Olav; Phaincharoen, Mananya; Kuster, Ryan; Tingek, Salim

    2011-09-01

    During social evolution, the ovary size of reproductively specialized honey bee queens has dramatically increased while their workers have evolved much smaller ovaries. However, worker division of labor and reproductive competition under queenless conditions are influenced by worker ovary size. Little comparative information on ovary size exists in the different honey bee species. Here, we report ovariole numbers of freshly dissected workers from six Apis species from two locations in Southeast Asia. The average number of worker ovarioles differs significantly among species. It is strongly correlated with the average mating number of queens, irrespective of body size. Apis dorsata, in particular, is characterized by numerous matings and very large worker ovaries. The relation between queen mating number and ovary size across the six species suggests that individual selection via reproductive competition plays a role in worker ovary size evolution. This indicates that genetic diversity, generated by multiple mating, may bear a fitness cost at the colony level.

  3. Built Environment Influences of Children’s Physical Activity: Examining Differences by Neighbourhood Size and Sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neighbourhoods can facilitate or constrain moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA among children by providing or restricting opportunities for MVPA. However, there is no consensus on how to define a child’s neighbourhood. This study examines the influence of the neighbourhood built environment on objectively measured MVPA among 435 children (aged 9–14 years in London (ON, Canada. As there is no consensus on how to delineate a child’s neighbourhood, a geographic information system was used to generate measures of the neighbourhood built environment at two buffer sizes (500 m and 800 m around each child’s home. Linear regression models with robust standard errors (cluster were used to analyze the relationship between built environment characteristics and average daily MVPA during non-school hours on weekdays. Sex-stratified models assessed sex-specific relationships. When accounting for individual and neighbourhood socio-demographic variables, park space and multi-use path space were found to influence children’s MVPA. Sex-stratified models found significant associations between MVPA and park space, with the 800 m buffer best explaining boys’ MVPA and the 500 m buffer best explaining girls’ MVPA. Findings emphasize that, when designing built environments, programs, and policies to facilitate physical activity, it is important to consider that the size of the neighbourhood influencing a child’s physical activity may differ according to sex.

  4. Evolution of students’ friendship networks: Examining the influence of group size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Sokolovska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available  The main aim of this study was to examine the effect of the network size on formation and evolution of students’ friendship relations. Data was collected from two groups of sociology freshmen: a group from the University of Belgrade, which represents a larger group, and a group from the University of Novi Sad, which represents a smaller group. The data was collected in three periods of one academic year. We analyzed the structural features of students’ networks and constructed a stochastic model of network evolution in order to explore how friendships form and change during one year. The results showed that structural features of the larger and the smaller group differ in each stage of friendship formation. At the beginning of group forming, small world structure was noticeable in the larger group, although full small world structure was not confirmed in both groups. Furthermore, transitivity of triads had effect on the evolution of the larger network, while balance or structural equivalence had effect on the evolution of the smaller network. Results of the structural analysis are in line with findings of the network evolution model and together they provide an insight into how friendship evolves in groups of different sizes.

  5. GBA Variants Influence Motor and Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesús, Silvia; Huertas, Ismael; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Gómez-Llamas, Myriam; Carrillo, Fátima; Calderón, Enrique; Carballo, Manuel; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene is a known factor increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Mutations carriers have earlier disease onset and are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric symptoms than other sporadic PD cases. These symptoms have primarily been observed in Parkinson's patients carrying the most common pathogenic mutations L444P and N370S. However, recent findings suggest that other variants across the gene may have a different impact on the phenotype as well as on the disease progression. We aimed to explore the influence of variants across GBA gene on the clinical features and treatment related complications in PD. In this study, we screened the GBA gene in a cohort of 532 well-characterised PD patients and 542 controls from southern Spain. The potential pathogeniticy of the identified variants was assessed using in-silico analysis and subsequently classified as benign or deleterious. As a result, we observed a higher frequency of GBA variants in PD patients (12.2% vs. 7.9% in controls, p = 0.021), earlier mean age at disease onset in GBA variant carriers (50.6 vs. 56.6 years; p = 0.013), as well as more prevalent motor and non-motor symptoms in patients carrying deleterious variants. In addition, we found that dopaminergic motor complications are influenced by both benign and deleterious variants. Our results highlight the fact that the impact on the phenotype highly depends on the potential pathogenicity of the carried variants. Therefore, the course of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatment-related motor complications could be influenced by GBA variants.

  6. GBA Variants Influence Motor and Non-Motor Features of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesús, Silvia; Huertas, Ismael; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Gómez-Llamas, Myriam; Carrillo, Fátima; Calderón, Enrique; Carballo, Manuel; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene is a known factor increasing the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). Mutations carriers have earlier disease onset and are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric symptoms than other sporadic PD cases. These symptoms have primarily been observed in Parkinson’s patients carrying the most common pathogenic mutations L444P and N370S. However, recent findings suggest that other variants across the gene may have a different impact on the phenotype as well as on the disease progression. We aimed to explore the influence of variants across GBA gene on the clinical features and treatment related complications in PD. In this study, we screened the GBA gene in a cohort of 532 well-characterised PD patients and 542 controls from southern Spain. The potential pathogeniticy of the identified variants was assessed using in-silico analysis and subsequently classified as benign or deleterious. As a result, we observed a higher frequency of GBA variants in PD patients (12.2% vs. 7.9% in controls, p = 0.021), earlier mean age at disease onset in GBA variant carriers (50.6 vs. 56.6 years; p = 0.013), as well as more prevalent motor and non-motor symptoms in patients carrying deleterious variants. In addition, we found that dopaminergic motor complications are influenced by both benign and deleterious variants. Our results highlight the fact that the impact on the phenotype highly depends on the potential pathogenicity of the carried variants. Therefore, the course of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatment-related motor complications could be influenced by GBA variants. PMID:28030538

  7. GBA Variants Influence Motor and Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Jesús

    Full Text Available The presence of mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA gene is a known factor increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD. Mutations carriers have earlier disease onset and are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric symptoms than other sporadic PD cases. These symptoms have primarily been observed in Parkinson's patients carrying the most common pathogenic mutations L444P and N370S. However, recent findings suggest that other variants across the gene may have a different impact on the phenotype as well as on the disease progression. We aimed to explore the influence of variants across GBA gene on the clinical features and treatment related complications in PD. In this study, we screened the GBA gene in a cohort of 532 well-characterised PD patients and 542 controls from southern Spain. The potential pathogeniticy of the identified variants was assessed using in-silico analysis and subsequently classified as benign or deleterious. As a result, we observed a higher frequency of GBA variants in PD patients (12.2% vs. 7.9% in controls, p = 0.021, earlier mean age at disease onset in GBA variant carriers (50.6 vs. 56.6 years; p = 0.013, as well as more prevalent motor and non-motor symptoms in patients carrying deleterious variants. In addition, we found that dopaminergic motor complications are influenced by both benign and deleterious variants. Our results highlight the fact that the impact on the phenotype highly depends on the potential pathogenicity of the carried variants. Therefore, the course of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatment-related motor complications could be influenced by GBA variants.

  8. Clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm and influencing factors for its malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Liyan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinicopathological features of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN and influencing factors for benign and malignant MCN. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 43 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic MCN who were treated from January 2013 to December 2015, and according to the results of pathological diagnosis, the patients were divided into benign group (mucinous cystadenoma and pancreatic MCN with low/middle-grade dysplasia and malignant group (MCN with high-grade dysplasia and MCN with invasive carcinoma. The clinicopathological features and radiological features were summarized, and the risk factors for malignant transformation of pancreatic MCN were analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. ResultsThere were 14 male and 29 female patients aged 22-81 years (median 58.53 years. Of all patients, 30 (69.8% had clinical symptoms. The maximum tumor diameter was 4.8 cm (range 1.2-16 cm. Of all patients, 18 (41.9% had MCN in the head of the pancreas, 3 (7.0% had MCN in the neck of the pancreas, 20 (46.5% had MCN in the body and tail of the pancreas, and 2 (4.6% had multiple MCNs. There were significant differences between the two groups in age, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement of solid components, and cyst wall thickness >0.2 cm. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age and increased tumor markers were independent predictive factors for malignant pancreatic MCN (P <0.05. ConclusionAge, tumor nature, tumor location, texture, increased tumor markers, heterogeneous enhancement of the cyst wall, heterogeneous enhancement

  9. Influence of surface features of hydroxyapatite on the adsorption of proteins relevant to bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montes Moraleda, Belén; San Román, Julio; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Luís M

    2013-08-01

    Protein-surface interaction may determine the success or failure of an implanted device. Not much attention have been paid to the specific surface parametes of hydroxyapatite (OHAp) that modulates and determines the formation and potential activity of the layer of proteins that is first formed when the material get in contact with the host tissue. the influence of specific surface area (SSA), crystallite size (CS) and particle size (PS) of OHAp on the adsorption of proteins relevant for bone regeneration is evaluated in this article. OHAp have been prepared by a wet chemical reaction of Ca(OH)2 with H3PO4. One set of reactions included poly acrylic acid in the reactant solution to modify the properties of the powder. Fibrinogen (Fg) Fraction I, type I: from Human plasma, (67% Protein), and Fibronectin (Fn) from Human plasma were selected to perform the adsorption experiments. The analysis of protein adsorption was carried out by UV/Vis spectrometry. A lower SSA and a different aspect ratio are obtained when the acrylic acid is included in the reaction badge. The deconvolution of the amide I band on the Raman spectra of free and adsorbed proteins reveals that the interaction apatite-protein happens through the carboxylate groups of the proteins. The combined analysis of CS, SSA and PS should be considered on the design of OHAp materials intended to interact with proteins. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Study of the deposition features of the organic dye Rhodamine B on the porous surface of silicon with different pore sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenshin, A. S., E-mail: lenshinas@phys.vsu.ru; Seredin, P. V.; Kavetskaya, I. V.; Minakov, D. A.; Kashkarov, V. M. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The deposition features of the organic dye Rhodamine B on the porous surface of silicon with average pore sizes of 50–100 and 100–250 nm are studied. Features of the composition and optical properties of the obtained systems are studied using infrared and photoluminescence spectroscopy. It is found that Rhodamine-B adsorption on the surface of por-Si with various porosities is preferentially physical. The optimal technological parameters of its deposition are determined.

  11. Influence of temperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of tmeperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel has been examined in the temperature range 300-1223 K for specimens with grain sizes varying from 0.025 to 0.650 mm at a nominal strain rate of 3 X 10 -4 s -1 . The percentage total elongation and reduction in area at fracture show minimum ductility at an intermediate temperature, and the temperature corresponding to this ductility minimum has been found to increase with increase in grain size. The total elongation is found to decrease with increase in grain size at high temperatures where failures are essentially intergranular in nature. At 300 K, both uniform and total elongation increase with increase in grain size and then show a small decrease for a very coarse grain size. The high ductility observed at low temperatures (300 K) is consistent with the observation of characteristic dimples associated with transgranular ductile fracture. The ductility minimum with respect to temperature is associated with the occurrence of intergranular fracture, as evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The present results support the suggestion that the ductility minimum coincides with the maximum amount of grain boundary sliding; at temperatures beyond the ductility minimum, grain boundary separation by cavitation is retarded by the occurrence of grain boundary migration, as evidenced by the grain boundary cusps. In tests conducted at various strain rates in the range 10 -3 -10 -6 s -1 at 873 K the ductility was found to decrease with decreasing strain rate, emphasizing the increased importance of grain boundary sliding at lower strain rates. (Auth.)

  12. Organizational contextual features that influence the implementation of evidence-based practices across healthcare settings: a systematic integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly-Anne; Jeffs, Lianne; Barwick, Melanie; Stevens, Bonnie

    2018-05-05

    Organizational contextual features have been recognized as important determinants for implementing evidence-based practices across healthcare settings for over a decade. However, implementation scientists have not reached consensus on which features are most important for implementing evidence-based practices. The aims of this review were to identify the most commonly reported organizational contextual features that influence the implementation of evidence-based practices across healthcare settings, and to describe how these features affect implementation. An integrative review was undertaken following literature searches in CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from January 2005 to June 2017. English language, peer-reviewed empirical studies exploring organizational context in at least one implementation initiative within a healthcare setting were included. Quality appraisal of the included studies was performed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Inductive content analysis informed data extraction and reduction. The search generated 5152 citations. After removing duplicates and applying eligibility criteria, 36 journal articles were included. The majority (n = 20) of the study designs were qualitative, 11 were quantitative, and 5 used a mixed methods approach. Six main organizational contextual features (organizational culture; leadership; networks and communication; resources; evaluation, monitoring and feedback; and champions) were most commonly reported to influence implementation outcomes in the selected studies across a wide range of healthcare settings. We identified six organizational contextual features that appear to be interrelated and work synergistically to influence the implementation of evidence-based practices within an organization. Organizational contextual features did not influence implementation efforts independently from other features. Rather, features were interrelated and often influenced each

  13. Nitrogen mineralization and denitrification as influenced by crop residue particle size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    1: N-15-labelled ground (less than or equal to 3 mm) and cut (25 mm) barley residue, and microcrystalline cellulose+glucose were mixed into a sandy loam soil with additional inorganic N. Experiment 2: inorganic N-15 and C2H2 were added to soils with barley and pea material after 3, 26, and 109 days......Managing the crop residue particle size has the potential to affect N conservation in agricultural systems. We investigated the influence of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and pea (Pisum sativum) crop residue particle size on N mineralization and denitrification in two laboratory experiments. Experiment...... for measuring gross N mineralization and denitrification. Net N immobilization over 60 days in Experiment 1 cumulated to 63 mg N kg(-1) soil (ground barley), 42 (cut barley), and 122 (cellulose+glucose). More N was seemingly net mineralized from ground barley (3.3 mg N kg(-1) soil) than from cut barley (2.7 mg...

  14. The Influence of Portion Size and Timing of Meals on Weight Balance and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christina; Forslund, Heléne Bertéus

    2015-03-01

    This review focuses on the influence of portion size and temporal distribution of food intake on weight balance and obesity in adults. The inconsistency of definitions in the area of meal patterns is also discussed. The conclusion is that regular eating habits might facilitate weight balance, while unplanned snacking as well as consuming the major part of the energy intake at the end of the day seem to be unfavourable. Altogether, the research suggests that large portions promote over-consumption and, therefore, limiting portion size of energy dense foods and drinks with added sugar could be recommended. Even if more research is needed, these factors should be taken into consideration in recommendations for obesity prevention.

  15. Thermodynamic model of social influence on two-dimensional square lattice: Case for two features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzor, Jozef; Bužek, Vladimír; Gendiar, Andrej

    2015-02-01

    We propose a thermodynamic multi-state spin model in order to describe equilibrial behavior of a society. Our model is inspired by the Axelrod model used in social network studies. In the framework of the statistical mechanics language, we analyze phase transitions of our model, in which the spin interaction J is interpreted as a mutual communication among individuals forming a society. The thermal fluctuations introduce a noise T into the communication, which suppresses long-range correlations. Below a certain phase transition point Tt, large-scale clusters of the individuals, who share a specific dominant property, are formed. The measure of the cluster sizes is an order parameter after spontaneous symmetry breaking. By means of the Corner transfer matrix renormalization group algorithm, we treat our model in the thermodynamic limit and classify the phase transitions with respect to inherent degrees of freedom. Each individual is chosen to possess two independent features f = 2 and each feature can assume one of q traits (e.g. interests). Hence, each individual is described by q2 degrees of freedom. A single first-order phase transition is detected in our model if q > 2, whereas two distinct continuous phase transitions are found if q = 2 only. Evaluating the free energy, order parameters, specific heat, and the entanglement von Neumann entropy, we classify the phase transitions Tt(q) in detail. The permanent existence of the ordered phase (the large-scale cluster formation with a non-zero order parameter) is conjectured below a non-zero transition point Tt(q) ≈ 0.5 in the asymptotic regime q → ∞.

  16. SIZE AND FIELD OF ACTIVITY INFLUENCE ON WEB SITES FUNCTIONALITY FOR ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarca Ioan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The internet became an important part of the company’s informational system. In order to take advantage on the Internet’s interactive nature, a lot of companies have created their own websites. Companies use the website for numerous applications: to promote themselves, online shopping, and communication with targeted clients. This study reveals the fact that the company’s size and field of activity have influence on website’s functionality and interactivity. Small companies use the website to successfully compete corporations which do not have yet necessary stimulants to fully exploit the internet capacities.

  17. Influence of the size of garlic propagules on radiosensitivity of clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Talavera, S.; Acevedo, A.M.; Perez, A.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of the size of garlic propagules selected to be irradiated on the results of radiosensitivity was studied so as to determine the useful radiation doses for improvement. This was done using radio inhibition of the plant height index as criteria and the mahalanobis distance stadigrapher calculated among defined groups for the behaviour of cloves in reference to six radiation doses. Significative differences were found among dose-effect curves obtained when using big cloves and small cloves, in five garlic clones, as well as different behaviours of clone radiosensitivity when it was investigated using the two proposed variants

  18. ANATOMIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL FEATURES OF DISTAL LOWER LEG AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON THE PROCESS OF OSTEOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desimir Mladenović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis is the process of bone tissue forming, i.e. bone or callus regeneration. This process is influenced by many factors, and the degree of bone fragments’ stability and vascularization in the fracture area are the basic local factors which determine the nature of reparative process. Regenerative process of all bone structures increases with increasing of blood supply.The distal lower leg has its specific biomechanical features, and plays an important role in the transfer of body weight to foot. The distal part of tibia has a small diameter, which as a consequence has reduced diameter in medullar cave. Through this anatomic feature, the medullar network in the lower tibia part is also reduced.As for anatomic aspect, vascularization in the lower end of tibia is poor. It primarily depends on periosteal vascularization, because medullar vascularization is reduced. Fasciae, tendons and skin cover the lower part of the leg, and there is no muscle mass. These tissues have poor vascular network and that is why the extraosseous blood circulation in tibia is poor, and does not participate in the osteogenesis process. For these reasons, distal lower leg represents a predelection site for delayed osteogenesis and pseudoarthrosys development.Osteosynthesis causes secondary damage to bone and soft tissue circulation. The screw plate damages the periosteal circulation – in the lower part of tibia it is the main source of vascularization, and for this reason, this method of osteosynthesis should not be applied. The external fixator has a sparing role regarding vascularization, and that is the reason why this method is recommended for fracture stabilization at the level of distal lower leg.

  19. The bold and the beautiful. Influence of body size of televised media models on body dissatisfaction and actual food intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E; Becker, Eni S; van Strien, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    The effects of exposure to televised thin and average size models on body dissatisfaction and actual food intake were examined. Normal weight female students (N=104) were exposed to a 30-min movie clip featuring beautiful girls. Half of them viewed the movie clip in normal screen size (4:3) and the

  20. Influence of gold nanoparticles of varying size in improving the lipase activity within cationic reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Subhabrata; Das, Dibyendu; Shome, Anshupriya; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2010-02-08

    Herein, we report the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in enhancing lipase activity in reverse micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/water/isooctane/n-hexanol. The size and concentration of the nanoparticles were varied and their specific roles were assessed in detail. An overall enhancement of activity was observed in the GNP-doped CTAB reverse micelles. The improvement in activity becomes more prominent with increasing concentration and size of the GNPs (0-52 microM and ca. 3-30 nm, respectively). The observed highest lipase activity (k(2)=1070+/-12 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1)) in GNP-doped CTAB reverse micelles ([GNP]: 52 microm, ca. 20 nm) is 2.5-fold higher than in CTAB reverse micelles without GNPs. Improvement in the lipase activity is only specific to the GNP-doped reverse micellar media, whereas GNP deactivates and structurally deforms the enzyme in aqueous media. The reason for this activation is probably due to the formation of larger-sized reverse micelles in which the GNP acts as a polar core and the surfactants aggregate around the nanoparticle ('GNP pool') instead of only water. Lipase at the augmented interface of the GNP-doped reverse micelle showed improved activity because of enhancement in both the substrate and enzyme concentrations and increased flexibility in the lipase conformation. The extent of the activation is greater in the case of the larger-sized GNPs. A correlation has been established between the activity of lipase and its secondary structure by using circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The generalized influence of GNP is verified in the reverse micelles of another surfactant, namely, cetyltripropylammonium bromide (CTPAB). TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis were utilized to characterize the GNPs and the organized aggregates. For the first time, CTAB-based reverse micelles have been found to be an excellent host for lipase simply by doping with appropriately sized GNPs.

  1. The influence of visual and phonological features on the hemispheric processing of hierarchical Navon letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Marilena; Merola, Sheila; Lasaponara, Stefano; Pinto, Mario; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Doricchi, Fabrizio

    2018-01-31

    The possibility of allocating attentional resources to the "global" shape or to the "local" details of pictorial stimuli helps visual processing. Investigations with hierarchical Navon letters, that are large "global" letters made up of small "local" ones, consistently demonstrate a right hemisphere advantage for global processing and a left hemisphere advantage for local processing. Here we investigated how the visual and phonological features of the global and local components of Navon letters influence these hemispheric advantages. In a first study in healthy participants, we contrasted the hemispheric processing of hierarchical letters with global and local items competing for response selection, to the processing of hierarchical letters in which a letter, a false-letter conveying no phonological information or a geometrical shape presented at the unattended level did not compete for response selection. In a second study, we investigated the hemispheric processing of hierarchical stimuli in which global and local letters were both visually and phonologically congruent (e.g. large uppercase G made of smaller uppercase G), visually incongruent and phonologically congruent (e.g. large uppercase G made of small lowercase g) or visually incongruent and phonologically incongruent (e.g. large uppercase G made of small lowercase or uppercase M). In a third study, we administered the same tasks to a right brain damaged patient with a lesion involving pre-striate areas engaged by global processing. The results of the first two experiments showed that the global abilities of the left hemisphere are limited because of its strong susceptibility to interference from local letters even when these are irrelevant to the task. Phonological features played a crucial role in this interference because the interference was entirely maintained also when letters at the global and local level were presented in different uppercase vs. lowercase formats. In contrast, when local features

  2. Normative influence and desired family size among young people in rural Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    Research has identified the lack of acceptance of a two-child-family norm as the biggest obstacle to achieving replacement-level fertility in Egypt. This analysis examines norms about desired family size for 1,366 males and 1,367 females aged 15-24 in 2004 in rural Minya governorate. Two-level random-effects multivariate logistic regression models, stratified by sex and grouped by neighborhood, are used to assess normative influence at the household and neighborhood levels, controlling for individual- and household-level covariates. In the final model, young males in neighborhoods where more people desire a small family are 33 percent more likely to desire a small family than are young males in other neighborhoods. Young females in households with one or more adults preferring a small family are 78 percent more likely to desire a small family, and young females in households with one or more young people who prefer a small family are 37 percent more likely to desire a small family themselves, compared with those living with adults or with young people, respectively, who do not prefer a small family. Programs aiming to reduce fertility should be aware of gender differences in the sources of normative influence on desired family size.

  3. PATERNAL GENOTYPE INFLUENCES INCUBATION PERIOD, OFFSPRING SIZE, AND OFFSPRING SHAPE IN AN OVIPAROUS REPTILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats; Gullberg, Annica; Shine, Richard; Madsen, Thomas; Tegelström, Håkan

    1996-06-01

    Theoretical models for the evolution of life-history traits assume a genetic basis for a significant proportion of the phenotypic variance observed in characteristics such as hatching date and offspring size. However, recent experimental work has shown that much of the phenotypic variance in hatchling reptiles is induced by nongenetic factors, such as maternal nutrition and thermoregulation, and the physical conditions experienced during embryogenesis. Thus, there is no unambiguous evidence for strictly genetic (intraspecific) influences on the phenotypes of hatchling reptiles. We report results from a technique that uses a genetic marker trait and DNA fingerprinting to determine paternity of offspring from multiply sired clutches of European sand lizards, Lacerta agilis. By focusing on paternal rather than maternal effects, we show that hatchling genotypes exert a direct influence on the duration of incubation, the size (mass, snout-vent length) and shape (relative tail length) of the hatchling, and subsequent growth rates of the lizard during the first 3 mo of life. Embryos with genes that code for a few days' delay in hatching are thereby larger when they hatch, having undergone further differentiation (and hence, have changed in bodily proportions), and are able to grow faster after hatching. Our data thus provide empirical support for a crucial but rarely tested assumption of life-history theory, and illuminate some of the proximate mechanisms that produce intraspecific variation in offspring phenotypes. © 1996 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Influence of the particle size of activated mineral carbon on the phenol and chlorophenol adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, A.

    2001-01-01

    Water pollution by phenolic compounds is a problem that requires a solution since these phenolic compounds are not completely biodegradable, they accumulate through the food chains and they are quite toxic when enter in contact with living organisms. In human beings, ingestion or contact of the skin with this type of compounds produces irritation and damages mainly to the liver and kidneys. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA assigned nine phenolic compounds among the 275 most toxic substances in 1991. Phenols are found in wastewater from agriculture and industry, because phenolic compounds are used as pesticides and in diverse industrial activities. The treatment of this type of water is not simple because they are generally composed of a mixture of residuals with different chemical nature A useful method for the removal of phenols is the adsorption by activated carbon, since this material has a great surface area and it can be regenerated. The adsorption process depends, among other factors, on the activated carbon characteristics. When they are modified, their capacity to remove pollutants from the water changes. The effect of activated carbon particle size on the removal of phenolic compounds has not been completely studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the influence of the mineral activated carbon particle size on the phenol and 4-chloro phenol adsorption in aqueous solution, on adsorption column system. The results of the present work indicate that the mineral activated carbon particle size has a very important influence on the adsorption of phenol and 4-chloro phenol. When the particles were smaller, the retention quantities of phenol and 4-chloro phenol increased. This behavior was related to the particle characteristics of the mineral activated carbon such as surface area and pore volume, while other factors such as elementary composition of the activated carbon did not influence the adsorption process

  5. The influences of ambient particle composition and size on particle infiltration in Los Angeles, CA, residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Coull, Brent A; Ruiz, Pablo A; Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H

    2006-02-01

    Particle infiltration is a key determinant of the indoor concentrations of ambient particles. Few studies have examined the influence of particle composition on infiltration, particularly in areas with high concentrations of volatile particles, such as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3). A comprehensive indoor monitoring study was conducted in 17 Los Angeles-area homes. As part of this study, indoor/outdoor concentration ratios during overnight (nonindoor source) periods were used to estimate the fraction of ambient particles remaining airborne indoors, or the particle infiltration factor (FINF), for fine particles (PM2.5), its nonvolatile (i.e., black carbon [BC]) and volatile (i.e., nitrate [NO3-]) components, and particle sizes ranging between 0.02 and 10 microm. FINF was highest for BC (median = 0.84) and lowest for NO3- (median = 0.18). The low FINF for NO3- was likely because of volatilization of NO3- particles once indoors, in addition to depositional losses upon building entry. The FINF for PM2.5 (median = 0.48) fell between those for BC and NO3-, reflecting the contributions of both particle components to PM25. FINF varied with particle size, air-exchange rate, and outdoor NO3- concentrations. The FINF for particles between 0.7 and 2 microm in size was considerably lower during periods of high as compared with low outdoor NO3- concentrations, suggesting that outdoor NO3- particles were of this size. This study demonstrates that infiltration of PM2.5 varies by particle component and is lowest for volatile species, such as NH4NO3. Our results suggest that volatile particle components may influence the ability for outdoor PM concentrations to represent indoor and, thus, personal exposures to particles of ambient origin, because volatilization of these particles causes the composition of PM2.5 to differ indoors and outdoors. Consequently, particle composition likely influences observed epidemiologic relationships based on outdoor PM concentrations, especially in areas

  6. Design features of offshore oil production platforms influence their susceptibility to biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kathleen E; Davidova, Irene A; Nunn, Heather S; Stamps, Blake W; Stevenson, Bradley S; Souquet, Pierre J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2017-08-01

    Offshore oil-producing platforms are designed for efficient and cost-effective separation of oil from water. However, design features and operating practices may create conditions that promote the proliferation and spread of biocorrosive microorganisms. The microbial communities and their potential for metal corrosion were characterized for three oil production platforms that varied in their oil-water separation processes, fluid recycling practices, and history of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC). Microbial diversity was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and numbers of total bacteria, archaea, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were estimated by qPCR. The rates of 35 S sulfate reduction assay (SRA) were measured as a proxy for metal biocorrosion potential. A variety of microorganisms common to oil production facilities were found, but distinct communities were associated with the design of the platform and varied with different locations in the processing stream. Stagnant, lower temperature (production platforms can be used to identify operational practices that inadvertently promote the proliferation, distribution, and activity of biocorrosive microorganisms.

  7. Glazed ceramic roof tiles: influence of surface features in the solar reflectance index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoli, Leitcia Silva de; Stapait, Camila Cristina; Marinoski, Deivis Luis; Fredel, Marcio Celso; Schabbach, Luciana M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the influence of surface features of ceramic roof tiles in the solar reflectance index were evaluated. Two glazed ceramic roof tiles (type stoneware) with the same color (ivory) but with different appearance (matte and brilliant) were the focus of the analysis. The Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of the roofs tiles were determined by the solar reflectance values (UV-VIS-NIR) and emittance, measured in laboratory. The samples showed SRI> 39 in accordance with LEED certification criteria (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), contributing to minimizing the Heat Island Effects. Although the matte roof tile shows a slightly higher SRI value (82) than the brilliant one (78), the results for the variables that composes the SRI value (reflectance and emittance) were very similar. Analysis of XRD, SEM and EDS performed on the surfaces of the two roofs indicated for the matte glaze the presence of microcrystals (with barium and zinc) that can contribute to the slightly highest value of SRI. The roughness (optical interferometer white light) and the brightness (brightness meter) of the samples were also measured. (author)

  8. Influence of risk area size and location on native collateral resistance and ischemic zone perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumm, D.C.; Cooper, S.M.; Thompson, S.B.; Marcus, M.L.; Harrison, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    To examine the effect of risk area size on collateral resistance and ichemic region perfusion, the authors produced different sized risk areas by occluding either the left anterior descending (LAD) or the circumflex (Cx) coronary artery at different sites. The most proximal occlusion of the LAD and Cx produced risk areas of 43 ± 5 and 36 ± 2% of left ventricular (LV) mass, respectively, whereas distal LAD and Cx occlusions produced risk areas of 13 ± 2 and 17 ± 2% of LV weight, respectively. Although total collateral flow was highest to the largest risk areas, collateral flow per 100 g of ischemic myocardium was 80% higher to the small LAD risk area compared with the large LAD risk area and 43% higher to the small Cx risk area compared with the large Cx risk area. Collateral resistance, calculated from the transcollateral pressure and perfusion per 100 g of myocardium was significantly lower in the small risk areas than in the large ones. They examined the effect of risk area location on collateral perfusion and resistance. These experiments show that collateral resistance is influenced both by ischemic region size and location. Small risk areas receive more collateral flow per mass of tissue than large risk areas, and apical risk areas receive greater quantities of collateral flow than those located at the base. These data may explain why small risk areas often do not develop infarction after coronary occlusion

  9. Investigation of influence of falling rock size and shape on traveling distance due to earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochigi, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    In evaluation of seismic stability of surrounding slope in a nuclear power plant, as a part of residual risk evaluation, it is essential to confirm the effects of surrounding slope failure on a important structure, when slope failure probability is not sufficiently small for extremely large earthquake. So evaluation of slope failure potential based on a falling rocks analyses considering slope failure using discontinuous model such as distinct element method(DEM) will be employed in near future. But, these slope collapse analysis by discontinuous model needs determination of input data of falling rock size and shape, and some problems about determination method of these size and shape condition and analysis accuracy are remained. In this study, the results of slope collapse experiment by shaking table and numerical simulation of this experiment by DEM is conducted to clarify the influence of falling rock size and shape on traveling distance. As a results, it is indicated that more massive and larger rock model gives safety side evaluation for traveling distance. (author)

  10. Influence sample sizing of citrus hystrix essential oil from hydrodistillation extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, A.; Amadi, I.; Hashib, S. A.; Mustapha, F. A.

    2018-03-01

    Essential oil extracted from kaffir lime leaves through hydrodistillation. The objective of this study is to quantify the oil production rate by identify the significant influence of particle size on kaffir lime leaves. Kaffir lime leaves were ground and separated by using siever into 90, 150, 300 μm and other kaffir lime leaves. The mean essential oil yield of 0.87, 0.52, 0.41 and 0.3% was obtained. 90 μm of ground gives the highest yield compared to other sizes. Thus, it can be concluded that in quantifying oil production rate, the relevance of different size of particle is clearly affects the amount of oil yield. In analysing the composition of kaffir lime essential oil using GC-MS, there were 38 compounds found in the essential oil. Some of the major compounds of the kaffir lime leave oils were detected while some are not, may due to oil experience thermal degradation which consequently losing some significant compounds in controlled temperature.

  11. Influence of shear stress and size on viability of endothelial cells exposed to gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fede, C.; Albertin, Giovanna; Petrelli, L.; De Caro, R.; Fortunati, I.; Weber, V.; Ferrante, Camilla

    2017-09-01

    Screening nanoparticle toxicity directly on cell culture can be a fast and cheap technique. Nevertheless, to obtain results in accordance with those observed in live animals, the conditions in which cells are cultivated should resemble the one encountered in live systems. Microfluidic devices offer the possibility to satisfy this requirement, in particular with endothelial cell lines, because they are capable to reproduce the flowing media and shear stress experienced by these cell lines in vivo. In this work, we exploit a microfluidic device to observe how human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) viability changes when subject to a continuous flow of culture medium, in which spherical citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles of different sizes and at varying doses are investigated. For comparison, the same experiments are also run in multiwells where the cells do not experience the shear stress induced by the flowing medium. We discuss the results considering the influence of mode of exposure and nanoparticle size (24 and 13 nm). We observed that gold nanoparticles show a lower toxicity under flow conditions with respect to static and the HUVEC viability decreases as the nanoparticle surface area per unit volume increases, regardless of size.

  12. Set size influences the relationship between ANS acuity and math performance: a result of different strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Julia Felicitas; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Huber, Stefan

    2017-08-29

    Previous research has proposed that the approximate number system (ANS) constitutes a building block for later mathematical abilities. Therefore, numerous studies investigated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical performance, but results are inconsistent. Properties of the experimental design have been discussed as a potential explanation of these inconsistencies. In the present study, we investigated the influence of set size and presentation duration on the association between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance. Moreover, we focused on strategies reported as an explanation for these inconsistencies. In particular, we employed a non-symbolic magnitude comparison task and asked participants how they solved the task. We observed that set size was a significant moderator of the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance, whereas presentation duration of the stimuli did not moderate this relationship. This supports the notion that specific design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent results. Moreover, participants reported different strategies including numerosity-based, visual, counting, calculation-based, and subitizing strategies. Frequencies of these strategies differed between different set sizes and presentation durations. However, we found no specific strategy, which alone predicted arithmetic performance, but when considering the frequency of all reported strategies, arithmetic performance could be predicted. Visual strategies made the largest contribution to this prediction. To conclude, the present findings suggest that different design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and mathematical performance by inducing different strategies and additional processes.

  13. Influence of grain size distribution on dynamic shear modulus of sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyka Ireneusz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of laboratory tests, that verify the correlation between the grain-size characteristics of non-cohesive soils and the value of the dynamic shear modulus. The problem is a continuation of the research performed at the Institute of Soil Mechanics and Rock Mechanics in Karlsruhe, by T. Wichtmann and T. Triantafyllidis, who derived the extension of the applicability of the Hardin’s equation describing the explicite dependence between the grain size distribution of sands and the values of dynamic shear modulus. For this purpose, piezo-ceramic bender elements generating elastic waves were used to investigate the mechanical properties of the specimens with artificially generated particle distribution. The obtained results confirmed the hypothesis that grain size distribution of non-cohesive soils has a significant influence on the dynamic shear modulus, but at the same time they have shown that obtaining unambiguous results from bender element tests is a difficult task in practical applications.

  14. Assessment of the facial features and chin development of fetuses with use of serial three-dimensional sonography and the mandibular size monogram in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Chung; Ou, Chia-Yo; Chen, Jen-Huang; Chang, Shiuh-Young; Hsu, Te-Yao

    2004-02-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate whether the application of serial three-dimensional (3D) sonography and the mandibular size monogram can allow observation of dynamic changes in facial features, as well as chin development in utero. The mandibular size monogram has been established through a cross-sectional study involving 183 fetal images. The serial changes of facial features and chin development are assessed in a cohort study involving 40 patients. The monogram reveals that the Biparietal distance (BPD)/Mandibular body length (MBL) ratio is gradually decreased with the advance of gestational age. The cohort study conducted with serial 3D sonography shows the same tendency. Both the images and the results of paired-samples t test (Pmonogram display disproportionate growth of the fetal head and chin that leads to changes in facial features in late gestation. This fact must be considered when we evaluate fetuses at risk for development of micrognathia.

  15. Influences of landscape heterogeneity on home-range sizes of brown bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangipane, Lindsey S.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Hiller, Tim L.; Colvin, Michael E.; Gustine, David; Mangipane, Buck A.; Hilderbrand, Grant V.

    2018-01-01

    Animal space use is influenced by many factors and can affect individual survival and fitness. Under optimal foraging theory, individuals use landscapes to optimize high-quality resources while minimizing the amount of energy used to acquire them. The spatial resource variability hypothesis states that as patchiness of resources increases, individuals use larger areas to obtain the resources necessary to meet energetic requirements. Additionally, under the temporal resource variability hypothesis, seasonal variation in available resources can reduce distances moved while providing a variety of food sources. Our objective was to determine if seasonal home ranges of brown bears (Ursus arctos) were influenced by temporal availability and spatial distribution of resources and whether individual reproductive status, sex, or size (i.e., body mass) mediated space use. To test our hypotheses, we radio collared brown bears (n = 32 [9 male, 23 female]) in 2014–2016 and used 18 a prioriselected linear models to evaluate seasonal utilization distributions (UD) in relation to our hypotheses. Our top-ranked model by AICc, supported the spatial resource variability hypothesis and included percentage of like adjacency (PLADJ) of all cover types (P  0.17 for males, solitary females, and females with dependent young), and body mass (kg; P = 0.66). Based on this model, for every percentage increase in PLADJ, UD area was predicted to increase 1.16 times for all sex and reproductive classes. Our results suggest that landscape heterogeneity influences brown bear space use; however, we found that bears used larger areas when landscape homogeneity increased, presumably to gain a diversity of food resources. Our results did not support the temporal resource variability hypothesis, suggesting that the spatial distribution of food was more important than seasonal availability in relation to brown bear home range size.

  16. Sustainable Corporate Social Media Marketing Based on Message Structural Features: Firm Size Plays a Significant Role as a Moderator

    OpenAIRE

    Moon Young Kang; Byungho Park

    2018-01-01

    Social media has been receiving attention as a cost-effective tool to build corporate brand image and to enrich customer relationships. This phenomenon calls for more attention to developing a model that measures the impact of structural features, used in corporate social media messages. Based on communication science, this study proposes a model to measure the impact of three essential message structural features (interactivity, formality, and immediacy) in corporate social media on customer...

  17. The influence of the fractal particle size distribution on the mobility of dry granular materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallejo Luis E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental analysis on the influence of the particle size distribution (psd on the mobility of dry granular materials. The psd obeys a power law of the form: N(L>d=kd-Df, where N is the number of particles with diameter L greater than a given diameter d, k is a proportionality constant, and Df is the fractal dimension of the psd. No laboratory or numerical study has been conducted to date analysing how a fractal psd influences the mobility of granular flows as in the case of rock avalanches. In this study, the flow characteristics of poly-dispersed granular materials that have a fractal psd were investigated in the laboratory. Granular mixtures having different fractal psd values were placed in a hollow cylinder. The cylinder was lifted and the distance of flow of the mixture was measured with respect to the original position of the cylinder. It was determined that the distance of flow of the mixtures was directly related to their fractal psd values. That is, the larger the distance of flow of the mixture, the larger is the fractal psd of the granular mixture tested. Thus, the fractal psd in dry granular mixtures seems to have a large influence on the easiness by which dry granular mixtures move in the field.

  18. Body size and condition influence migration timing of juvenile Arctic grayling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Kurt C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Seitz, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater fishes utilising seasonally available habitats within annual migratory circuits time movements out of such habitats with changing hydrology, although individual attributes of fish may also mediate the behavioural response to environmental conditions. We tagged juvenile Arctic grayling in a seasonally flowing stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain in Alaska and recorded migration timing towards overwintering habitat. We examined the relationship between individual migration date, and fork length (FL) and body condition index (BCI) for fish tagged in June, July and August in three separate models. Larger fish migrated earlier; however, only the August model suggested a significant relationship with BCI. In this model, 42% of variability in migration timing was explained by FL and BCI, and fish in better condition were predicted to migrate earlier than those in poor condition. Here, the majority (33%) of variability was captured by FL with an additional 9% attributable to BCI. We also noted strong seasonal trends in BCI reflecting overwinter mass loss and subsequent growth within the study area. These results are interpreted in the context of size and energetic state-specific risks of overwinter starvation and mortality (which can be very high in the Arctic), which may influence individuals at greater risk to extend summer foraging in a risky, yet prey rich, habitat. Our research provides further evidence that heterogeneity among individuals within a population can influence migratory behaviour and identifies potential risks to late season migrants in Arctic beaded stream habitats influenced by climate change and petroleum development.

  19. The Influence of the Size, Age and Sex on the Computed Tomographic Measured Size of the Pituitary Gland in Normal Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crijns, C P; Van Bree, H J; Broeckx, B J G; Schauvliege, S; Van Loon, G; Martens, A; Vanderperren, K; Dingemanse, W B; Gielen, I M

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of the size, age and sex of the horse on the size of the pituitary gland and determine the possibility of using the pituitary gland height-to-brain area ratio (P:B ratio) to allow comparison of different sized and aged horses. Thirty-two horses without pituitary pars inter-media dysfunction that underwent a contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) examination were included in a cross-sectional study. On the CT images, the pituitary gland height was measured and the P:B ratio was calculated. These measurements were correlated to the size, age and sex of the horses. The pituitary gland height was significantly associated with the size (P horses. No significant association was found between the P:B ratio and the size (P = 0.25), the age (P = 0.06) or the sex (P = 0.25) of the horses. In conclusion, the pituitary gland size varies between different sized and aged horses. The use of the P:B ratio is a valuable metric for making comparisons between the pituitary glands of these horses. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Welcome to wonderland: the influence of the size and shape of a virtual hand on the perceived size and shape of virtual objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkenauger, Sally A; Leyrer, Markus; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty J

    2013-01-01

    The notion of body-based scaling suggests that our body and its action capabilities are used to scale the spatial layout of the environment. Here we present four studies supporting this perspective by showing that the hand acts as a metric which individuals use to scale the apparent sizes of objects in the environment. However to test this, one must be able to manipulate the size and/or dimensions of the perceiver's hand which is difficult in the real world due to impliability of hand dimensions. To overcome this limitation, we used virtual reality to manipulate dimensions of participants' fully-tracked, virtual hands to investigate its influence on the perceived size and shape of virtual objects. In a series of experiments, using several measures, we show that individuals' estimations of the sizes of virtual objects differ depending on the size of their virtual hand in the direction consistent with the body-based scaling hypothesis. Additionally, we found that these effects were specific to participants' virtual hands rather than another avatar's hands or a salient familiar-sized object. While these studies provide support for a body-based approach to the scaling of the spatial layout, they also demonstrate the influence of virtual bodies on perception of virtual environments.

  1. Welcome to wonderland: the influence of the size and shape of a virtual hand on the perceived size and shape of virtual objects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Linkenauger

    Full Text Available The notion of body-based scaling suggests that our body and its action capabilities are used to scale the spatial layout of the environment. Here we present four studies supporting this perspective by showing that the hand acts as a metric which individuals use to scale the apparent sizes of objects in the environment. However to test this, one must be able to manipulate the size and/or dimensions of the perceiver's hand which is difficult in the real world due to impliability of hand dimensions. To overcome this limitation, we used virtual reality to manipulate dimensions of participants' fully-tracked, virtual hands to investigate its influence on the perceived size and shape of virtual objects. In a series of experiments, using several measures, we show that individuals' estimations of the sizes of virtual objects differ depending on the size of their virtual hand in the direction consistent with the body-based scaling hypothesis. Additionally, we found that these effects were specific to participants' virtual hands rather than another avatar's hands or a salient familiar-sized object. While these studies provide support for a body-based approach to the scaling of the spatial layout, they also demonstrate the influence of virtual bodies on perception of virtual environments.

  2. Influence of palmitoyl pentapeptide and Ceramide III B on the droplet size of nanoemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondari, Dewi; Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Randy, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    The influence of the Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPp) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm III B) as active ingredients on the droplet size of nano-emulsion was studied using different kinds of oil (avocado oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, mineral oil and squalene). The formation of nano-emulsions were prepared in water mixed non ionic surfactant/oils system using the spontaneous emulsification mechanism. The aqueous solution, which consist of water and Tween® 20 as a hydrophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously. The organic solution, which consist of oil and Span® 80 as a lipophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously in ethanol. Ethanol was used as a water miscible solvent, which can help the formation of nano-emulsion. The oil phase (containing the blend of surfactant Span® 80, ethanol, oil and active ingredient) and the aqueous phase (containing water and Tween® 20) were separately prepared at room temperatures. The oil phase was slowly added into aqueous phase under continuous mechanical agitation (18000 rpm). All samples were subsequently homogenized with Ultra-Turrax for 30 minutes. The characterizations of nano-emulsion were carried out using photo-microscope and particle size analyzer. Addition of active ingredients on the formation of nano-emulsion gave smallest droplet size compared without active ingredients addition on the formation of nano-emulsion. Squalene oil with Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPm) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm IIIB) gave smallest droplet size (184.0 nm) compared without Palmitoyl Pentapeptide and Ceramide IIIB (214.9 nm), however the droplets size of the emulsion prepared by the other oils still in the range of nano-emulsion (below 500 nm). The stability of nano-emulsion was observed using two methods. In one method, the stability of nano-emulsion was observed for three months at temperature of 5°C and 50°C, while in the other method, the stability nano-emulsion was observed by centrifuged at 12000 rpm for 30 minutes. Nanoemulsion with active ingredient

  3. Size matters: influence of the size of nanoparticles on their interactions with ligands immobilized on the solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2010-03-16

    The correlation between the size of biotinylated nanoparticles and their affinity in relation to interactions with the solid surface was investigated. The silica particles with a diameter of 50-200 nm containing amino groups on the surface were labeled with different quantities of biotin. The affinity properties of biotinylated nanoparticles were studied using a Biacore 3000 instrument equipped with a streptavidin-coated sensor chip (SA chip). It was shown that the increase in the particle size from 50 to 200 nm reduced the affinity (K(D)) of biotin-streptavidin interactions from 1.2 x 10(-12) to 1.2 x 10(-10) M. It was found that the particles with higher concentrations of immobilized biotin on particle surfaces demonstrated stronger binding with streptavidin.

  4. Influence of Feature Selection Methods on Classification Sensitivity Based on the Example of A Study of Polish Voivodship Tourist Attractiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąk Iwona

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to determine the influence of various methods of selection of diagnostic features on the sensitivity of classification. Three options of feature selection are presented: a parametric feature selection method with a sum (option I, a median of the correlation coefficients matrix column elements (option II and the method of a reversed matrix (option III. Efficiency of the groupings was verified by the indicators of homogeneity, heterogeneity and the correctness of grouping. In the assessment of group efficiency the approach with the Weber median was used. The undertaken problem was illustrated with a research into the tourist attractiveness of voivodships in Poland in 2011.

  5. Influence of habitat quality, population size, patch size, and connectivity on patch-occupancy dynamics of the middle spotted woodpecker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Hugo; Ciudad, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Despite extensive research on the effects of habitat fragmentation, the ecological mechanisms underlying colonization and extinction processes are poorly known, but knowledge of these mechanisms is essential to understanding the distribution and persistence of populations in fragmented habitats. We examined these mechanisms through multiseason occupancy models that elucidated patch-occupancy dynamics of Middle Spotted Woodpeckers (Dendrocopos medius) in northwestern Spain. The number of occupied patches was relatively stable from 2000 to 2010 (15-24% of 101 patches occupied every year) because extinction was balanced by recolonization. Larger and higher quality patches (i.e., higher density of oaks >37 cm dbh [diameter at breast height]) were more likely to be occupied. Habitat quality (i.e., density of large oaks) explained more variation in patch colonization and extinction than did patch size and connectivity, which were both weakly associated with probabilities of turnover. Patches of higher quality were more likely to be colonized than patches of lower quality. Populations in high-quality patches were less likely to become extinct. In addition, extinction in a patch was strongly associated with local population size but not with patch size, which means the latter may not be a good surrogate of population size in assessments of extinction probability. Our results suggest that habitat quality may be a primary driver of patch-occupancy dynamics and may increase the accuracy of models of population survival. We encourage comparisons of competing models that assess occupancy, colonization, and extinction probabilities in a single analytical framework (e.g., dynamic occupancy models) so as to shed light on the association of habitat quality and patch geometry with colonization and extinction processes in different settings and species. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. Endothermy in African platypleurine cicadas: the influence of body size and habitat (Hemiptera: Cicadidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Allen F; Villet, Martin H; Phillips, Polly K

    2004-01-01

    The platypleurine cicadas have a wide distribution across Africa and southern Asia. We investigate endothermy as a thermoregulatory strategy in 11 South African species from five genera, with comparisons to the lone ectothermic platypleurine we found, in an attempt to ascertain any influence that habitat and/or body size have on the expression of endothermy in the platypleurine cicadas. Field measurements of body temperature (T(b)) show that these animals regulate T(b) through endogenous heat production. Heat production in the laboratory elevated T(b) to the same range as in animals active in the field. Maximum T(b) measured during calling activity when there was no access to solar radiation ranged from 13.2 degrees to 22.3 degrees C above ambient temperature in the five species measured. The mean T(b) during activity without access to solar radiation did not differ from the mean T(b) during diurnal activity. All platypleurines exhibit a unique behavior for cicadas while warming endogenously, a temperature-dependent telescoping pulsation of the abdomen that probably functions in ventilation. Platypleurines generally call from trunks and branches within the canopy and appear to rely on endothermy even when the sun is available to elevate T(b), in contrast to the facultative endothermy exhibited by New World endothermic species. The two exceptions to this generalization we found within the platypleurines are Platypleura wahlbergi and Albanycada albigera, which were the smallest species studied. The small size of P. wahlbergi appears to have altered their thermoregulatory strategy to one of facultative endothermy, whereby they use the sun when it is available to facilitate increases in T(b). Albanycada albigera is the only ectothermic platypleurine we found. The habitat and host plant association of A. albigera appear to have influenced the choice of ectothermy as a thermoregulatory strategy, as the species possesses the metabolic machinery to elevate to the T

  7. Concentration Measurements of Suspended Load using ADV with Influence of the Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula

    2017-04-01

    ADV backscatter data can be used under certain conditions to gain information about the concentrations of suspended loads. This was shown in many studies before (Fugate and Friedrichs 2002; Chanson et al 2008; Ha et al. 2009). This paper reports on a pre-study to investigate the influence of particle size on concentration measurements for suspended sediment load with ADV. The study was conducted in a flume in the Oskar-von-Miller-Institute using fresh water from a river including the natural suspended load. The ADV used in the experiments was a Vectrino Profiler (Nortek). In addition water samples were taken for TSS and TOC. For the measurements a surge was generated in the flume to ensure that also particles of larger size will be present in the water phase. The measurements and samples were taken during the whole surge event. Therefore we were able to find a good correlation between the backscatter data of the ADV and the TSS as well as TOC results. For the decreasing part of the flow event the concentration of TOC in the suspended load of the water phase is decreasing much slower than the TSS and results in a damped decrease of the backscatter values. This means that the results for concentration measurements might be slightly influenced by the size of the particles. Further evaluations of measurements conducted with a LISST SL (Sequoia) will be investigated to show the trend of the particle sizes during this process and fortify this result. David C. Fugate, Carl T. Friedrichs, Determining concentration and fall velocity of estuarine particle populations using ADV, OBS and LISST, Continental Shelf Research, Volume 22, Issues 11-13, 2002 H.K. Ha, W.-Y. Hsu, J.P.-Y. Maa, Y.Y. Shao, C.W. Holland, Using ADV backscatter strength for measuring suspended cohesive sediment concentration, Continental Shelf Research, Volume 29, Issue 10, 2009 Hubert Chanson, Maiko Takeuchi, Mark Trevethan, Using turbidity and acoustic backscatter intensity as surrogate measures of

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF THE ENTERPRISE SIZE ON THE EFFECT OF EU GRANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei-Alexandru MOROŞAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union there are important differences between the GDP per capita of various regions. The biggest differences are found between regions in Western Europe and those in Central and Eastern Europe. To reduce these disparities, special funds were allocated to less developed countries, in order to finance various public and private investments. The funds allocated to Romania were included in the seven operational programs addressing various issues. This research examines the efficiency with which the funds addressed to business were used. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the influence that the size of the company has on the indicators of return on investments (referring to investments financed with EU funds. Following the analyzes, we found that at micro-level, the allocated EU funds generated effects, but their intensity is very low.

  9. The Influence of Reference Corpus Size on Wordsmith Tools Keywords Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Berber Sardinha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A KeyWords analysis (using WordSmith Tools enables the discovery of lexical items which reveal the main lexical sets in a text or corpus. Such an analysis requires that a reference corpus be compared to the corpus the researcher intends to describe (the study corpus. This paper presents a mathematical method for finding out the influence of reference corpus size on the number of key words extracted by the program. The results reveal that a reference corpus that is at least five times as large as the study corpus allows for drawing an amount of key words that is statistically equivalent to larger reference corpora, thus suggesting five times (as larger as the study corpora as the minimum order of magnitude for reference corpora.

  10. Influence of vernalization and bulb size on the production of lily cut flowers and lily bulbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Brito de Almeida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of bulbs to cold, a physiological phenomenon called vernalization, and bulb size are important factors in the production of lily bulbs and flowers. This study aimed to verify the influence of vernalization of bulbs on flowering cut lily plants, as well as the impact of size and shape of harvest on the production and quality of flowers and bulbs. In turn, the way the stems of the plants used for cut-flower production are cropped is of higher importance for the production of new flower bulbs. In this sense, the experiment was conducted in Viçosa, MG, in a greenhouse in a randomized block design, in split splot scheme with three replications, in which the vernalization periods (25, 35 and 45 days at 4 ± 1 C constituted the plots; bulb sizes (diameters of 3.2-3.8 cm; 2.5-3.2 cm 1.9- and 2.5 cm, subplots and ways to harvest (full harvest of the stem at the required length for the commercial harvest of the flower, commercial stem harvest at the commercial length, maintaining 10cm of stem in the soil; removal of the floral buds as soon as their appearance is observed and harvest at the end of the season, the sub subplots. The bulbs were planted in beds, with 15 x 20 cm spacing. It was evaluated the number of plants that flowered and the number of flowers, the length and the diameter of the floral buds, fresh and dry weights, diameter and plant height as well as number, perimeter and amount of fresh and dry bulbs. There was a decrease in the plant height with the increase of the vernalization period and a reduction of the diameter of the planted bulbs, as well as of the number and the fresh and dry weights of the produced buds. The production of flowers and buds in number, size and weight was directly proportional to the size of the planted bulbs, while the form of harvest with removal of flower buds increased the number, the perimeter and the fresh and dry weights of the buds. Bulbs with diameter between 3.2 - 3.8 cm, stored for 25 days in

  11. The influence of body size on adult skeletal age estimation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate age estimations are essential to archaeological and forensic analyses. However, reliability for adult skeletal age estimations is poor, especially for individuals over the age of 40 years. This is the first study to show that body size influences skeletal age estimation. The İşcan et al., Lovejoy et al., Buckberry and Chamberlain, and Suchey-Brooks age methods were tested on 764 adult skeletons from the Hamann-Todd and William Bass Collections. Statures ranged from 1.30 to 1.93 m and body masses ranged from 24.0 to 99.8 kg. Transition analysis was used to evaluate the differences in the age estimations. For all four methods, the smallest individuals have the lowest ages at transition and the largest individuals have the highest ages at transition. Short and light individuals are consistently underaged, while tall and heavy individuals are consistently overaged. When femoral length and femoral head diameter are compared with the log-age model, results show the same trend as the known stature and body mass measurements. The skeletal remains of underweight individuals have fewer age markers while those of obese individuals have increased surface degeneration and osteophytic lipping. Tissue type and mechanical loading have been shown to affect bone turnover rates, and may explain the differing patterns of skeletal aging. From an archaeological perspective, the underaging of light, short individuals suggests the need to revisit the current research consensus on the young mortality rates of past populations. From a forensic perspective, understanding the influence of body size will impact efforts to identify victims of mass disasters, genocides, and homicides. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The influence of tested body size upon longitudinal ultrasonic pulse velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-01-01

    Low ultrasonic frequencies are used in nondestructive testing of heterogeneous materials,such as concrete,rocks and timber.When frequencies are low enough,size and shape of tested bodies may influence measured longitudinal pulse velocities(geometric dispersion).A simplified mathematical model is developed from known experimental and theoretical results obtained for elastic wave propagation in rods of uniform circular cross section.Wave propagation is described by a spatial averaged dilatational field in an approach which is named quasi fluid.A formula is obtained which relates group velocity with an effective lateral size of the body,with transducers a frequency,with a non-dimensional parameter and with asymptotic P-wave velocity.In principle it can be applied to bars of any uniform cross section.The limitations of this formula are discussed in relation to path length,threshold of detection,patterns of radiation and reception and other variables.A more general formula is proposed.Practical application of this formula is briefly exemplified using some experimental data obtained by the author.The problem of longitudinal pulse propagation in reinforcing steel bars embedded in concrete is briefly considered

  13. Do stone size and impaction influence therapeutic approach to proximal ureteral stones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Primary therapeutic approach to lumbar ureteral stones is still contraversial. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of stone impaction and size on the effectiveness of proximal ureteral stone lithotripsy. Methods. A total of 123 patients with proximal ureteral stones were investigated in this prospective study performed in a 10- month period. The patients were divided into the group I - 86 patients treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL and the group II - 37 patients treated with 'Swiss' Lithoclast. In the group I, 49 stones (57% were classified as impacted, while 20 stones (23.3% were larger than 100 mm2. In the group II, 26 stones (70.3% were impacted, and 11 stones (29.7% were larger than 100 mm2. Stones were defined as impacted by the radiographic, echosonographic as well as endoscopic findings in the group II of patients. Stone size was presented in mm2. Chemical composition of stones were almost the same in both groups of the patients. Results. Generally, there was no statistically significant difference in the treatment success between the groups. However, stones larger than 100 mm2 were statistically more successfully treated endoscopically, while there was no statistical difference in the treatment success of impacted stones between these two groups. Conclusion. ESWL can by considered as primary first therapeutic approach in treatment of all proximal ureteral stones except for stones larger than 100 mm2 that should primarily be treated endoscopically.

  14. On the influence of crystal size and wavelength on native SAD phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Senda, Miki; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    Native SAD is an emerging phasing technique that uses the anomalous signal of native heavy atoms to obtain crystallographic phases. The method does not require specific sample preparation to add anomalous scatterers, as the light atoms contained in the native sample are used as marker atoms. The most abundant anomalous scatterer used for native SAD, which is present in almost all proteins, is sulfur. However, the absorption edge of sulfur is at low energy (2.472 keV = 5.016 Å), which makes it challenging to carry out native SAD phasing experiments as most synchrotron beamlines are optimized for shorter wavelength ranges where the anomalous signal of sulfur is weak; for longer wavelengths, which produce larger anomalous differences, the absorption of X-rays by the sample, solvent, loop and surrounding medium (e.g. air) increases tremendously. Therefore, a compromise has to be found between measuring strong anomalous signal and minimizing absorption. It was thus hypothesized that shorter wavelengths should be used for large crystals and longer wavelengths for small crystals, but no thorough experimental analyses have been reported to date. To study the influence of crystal size and wavelength, native SAD experiments were carried out at different wavelengths (1.9 and 2.7 Å with a helium cone; 3.0 and 3.3 Å with a helium chamber) using lysozyme and ferredoxin reductase crystals of various sizes. For the tested crystals, the results suggest that larger sample sizes do not have a detrimental effect on native SAD data and that long wavelengths give a clear advantage with small samples compared with short wavelengths. The resolution dependency of substructure determination was analyzed and showed that high-symmetry crystals with small unit cells require higher resolution for the successful placement of heavy atoms.

  15. Influence of shape and size of the particles on jigging separation of plastics mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Plastics are popular for numerous applications due to their high versatility and favourable properties such as endurance, lightness and cheapness. Therefore the generation of plastic waste is constantly increasing, becoming one of the larger categories in municipal solid waste. Almost all plastic materials are recyclable, but for the recycling to be possible it is necessary to separate the different types of plastics. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the jig separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. For this study six granulated plastics had been used: Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D). Plastics mixtures were subjected to jigging in a laboratorial Denver mineral jig. The results showed that the quality of the jigging separation varies with the mixture, the density differences and with the size and shape of the particles. In the case of particles with more regular shapes the quality of separation of bi-component plastic mixtures improved with the increase of the particle size. For lamellar particles the influence of particle size was minimal. In general, the beneficiation of plastics with similar densities was not effective, since the separation efficiency was lower than 25%. However, in bi-component plastic mixtures that join a low density plastic (PS) with a high density one (PMMA, PET-S, PET-D, PVC-M and PVC-D), the quality of the jigging separation was greatly improved. The PS grade in the sunk was less than 1% for all the plastic mixtures. Jigging proved to be an effective method for the separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. Jigging separation will be enhanced if the less dense plastic, that overflows, has a lamellar shape and if the denser plastic, that sinks, has a regular one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal Epithelial Cell Injury Induced by Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Depends on their Structural Features: Size, Surface, and Crystalline Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Liu, Ai-Jie

    2016-11-01

    Urinary crystals in normal and kidney stone patients often differ in crystal sizes and surface structures, but the effects of different crystal properties on renal tubular epithelial cells remain unclear. This study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of micron/nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with sizes of 50 nm, 200 nm, 1 μm, 3 μm, and 10 μm to African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells, to reveal the effect of crystal size and surface structure on cell injury, and to investigate the pathological mechanism of calcium oxalate kidney stones. Cell viability, cellular biochemical parameters, and internalized crystal amount in Vero cells were closely associated with the size of COM crystals. At the same concentration (200 μg/mL), COM-1 μm induced the most serious injury to Vero cells and caused the most significant change to cellular biochemical parameters, which were related to the specific porous structure and highest internalized amount in Vero cells. By contrast, COM-50 nm and COM-200 nm crystals lost their small size effect because of serious aggregation and weakened their toxicity to cells. COM-3 μm and COM-10 μm crystals were too large for cells to completely internalize; these crystals also exhibited a low specific surface area and thus weakened their toxicity. The excessive expression of intracellular ROS and reduction of the free-radical scavenger SOD were the main reasons for cell injury and eventually caused necrotic cell death. Crystal size, surface structure, aggregation, and internalization amount were closely related to the cytotoxicity of COM crystals.

  17. Influence of salinity stress on the height and productivity features of durum wheat samples in different phases of vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Sikhmuradov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of salinity stress on the morphological features of durum wheat in different phases of vegetation is studied in the work. It is revealed that in earlier phases the samples have weak stability, but further salt-stability increases.

  18. An Exploration of the Examination Script Features that Most Influence Expert Judgements in Three Methods of Evaluating Script Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Irenka; Novakovic, Nadezda

    2012-01-01

    Some methods of determining grade boundaries within examinations, such as awarding, paired comparisons, and rank ordering, entail expert judgements of script quality. We aimed to identify the features of examinees' scripts that most influence judgements in the three methods. For contrasting examinations in biology and English, a Latin square…

  19. Calcium availability influences litter size and sex ratio in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Schmidt

    Full Text Available The production of offspring typically requires investment of resources derived from both the environment and maternal somatic reserves. As such, the availability of either of these types of resources has the potential to limit the degree to which resources are allocated to reproduction. Theory and empirical studies have argued that mothers modify reproductive performance relative to exogenous resource availability and maternal condition by adjusting size, number or sex of offspring produced. These relationships have classically been defined relative to availability of energy sources; however, in vertebrates, calcium also plays a critical role in offspring production, as a considerable amount of calcium is required to support the development of offspring skeleton(s. We tested whether the availability of calcium influences reproductive output by providing female white-footed mice with a low-calcium or standard diet from reproductive maturity to senescence. We then compared maternal skeletal condition and reproductive output, based on offspring mass, offspring number and litter sex ratio, between dietary treatments. Mothers on the low-calcium diet exhibited diminished skeletal condition at senescence and produced smaller and strongly female-biased litters. We show that skeletal condition and calcium intake can influence sex ratio and reproductive output following general theoretical models of resource partitioning during reproduction.

  20. Influence of Production System, Sex and Litter Size on Growth Rates in Turcana Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Gavojdian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat production has become the main source of income in the Romanian sheep farming industry, representing over 66% of the total returns. Turcana breed represents over 70% of the national flock, and 92% of the sheep bred in western Romania. However, meat production potential and growth rates of the breed are low, and thus strategies to improve performance of the Turcana lambs need to be identified. Aim of the current research was to evaluate the effects that sex and litter size have on the growth rates of lambs from Turcana breed under extensive and semi-intensive production systems. Weaning weight was significantly (p≤0.001 influenced by the production system, with lambs reared extensively registering a average body weights of 18.23±0.094 kg at the age of 90 days, while the semi-intensively reared lambs registered an average weight of 20.19±0.082 kg. It was concluded that all three factors taken into study significantly influence growth rates in Turcana lambs and that weight of the lamb(s at the age of 28 days should be included as a selection trait within the Turcana breed genetic improvement plan.

  1. On the Influence of Collector Size on the Solar Chimneys Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Azawiey Sundus S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of solar chimney power plant system is highly influenced by the design geometries. The collector size is logically enhances the solar chimney performance, but the trend of enhancement is not yet investigated. In the present work, experimental and numerical investigations have been carried out to ascertain, in terms of qualitative and quantitative evaluation, the effect of the collector diameter. Daily thermal efficiency has been determined at four different collector diameter. Two different collector diameters, 3.0 and 6.0 m, have been investigated experimentally, and then scaled up, to 9.0 and 12.0 m, by numerical simulation using ANSYS-FLUENT®15 software. Results demonstrated that collector diameter has effectively influenced the system performance. Larger collector diameter imposed increase in the velocity, temperature and the daily average thermal efficiency of the system. From the experimental results, increasing the collector diameter from 3.0 to 6.0 m has increased the daily average thermal efficiency of the collector from 9.81 to 12.8. Simulation results at 800 W/m2 irradiation revealed that the velocity in the chimney have increased from 1.66 m/s at 3.0 m collector diameter to 2.34, 2.47 and 2.63 m/s for 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 m collector diameters, respectively.

  2. The influence of negative training set size on machine learning-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczab, Rafał; Smusz, Sabina; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a thorough analysis of the influence of the number of negative training examples on the performance of machine learning methods. The impact of this rather neglected aspect of machine learning methods application was examined for sets containing a fixed number of positive and a varying number of negative examples randomly selected from the ZINC database. An increase in the ratio of positive to negative training instances was found to greatly influence most of the investigated evaluating parameters of ML methods in simulated virtual screening experiments. In a majority of cases, substantial increases in precision and MCC were observed in conjunction with some decreases in hit recall. The analysis of dynamics of those variations let us recommend an optimal composition of training data. The study was performed on several protein targets, 5 machine learning algorithms (SMO, Naïve Bayes, Ibk, J48 and Random Forest) and 2 types of molecular fingerprints (MACCS and CDK FP). The most effective classification was provided by the combination of CDK FP with SMO or Random Forest algorithms. The Naïve Bayes models appeared to be hardly sensitive to changes in the number of negative instances in the training set. In conclusion, the ratio of positive to negative training instances should be taken into account during the preparation of machine learning experiments, as it might significantly influence the performance of particular classifier. What is more, the optimization of negative training set size can be applied as a boosting-like approach in machine learning-based virtual screening.

  3. Do Surface Porosity and Pore Size Influence Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response to PEEK?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Evans, Nathan T; Stevens, Hazel Y; Gall, Ken; Guldberg, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Despite its widespread use in orthopaedic implants such as soft tissue fasteners and spinal intervertebral implants, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) often suffers from poor osseointegration. Introducing porosity can overcome this limitation by encouraging bone ingrowth; however, the corresponding decrease in implant strength can potentially reduce the implant's ability to bear physiologic loads. We have previously shown, using a single pore size, that limiting porosity to the surface of PEEK implants preserves strength while supporting in vivo osseointegration. However, additional work is needed to investigate the effect of pore size on both the mechanical properties and cellular response to PEEK. (1) Can surface porous PEEK (PEEK-SP) microstructure be reliably controlled? (2) What is the effect of pore size on the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP? (3) Do surface porosity and pore size influence the cellular response to PEEK? PEEK-SP was created by extruding PEEK through NaCl crystals of three controlled ranges: 200 to 312, 312 to 425, and 425 to 508 µm. Micro-CT was used to characterize the microstructure of PEEK-SP. Tensile, fatigue, and interfacial shear tests were performed to compare the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP with injection-molded PEEK (PEEK-IM). The cellular response to PEEK-SP, assessed by proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, vascular endothelial growth factor production, and calcium content of osteoblast, mesenchymal stem cell, and preosteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cultures, was compared with that of machined smooth PEEK and Ti6Al4V. Micro-CT analysis showed that PEEK-SP layers possessed pores that were 284 ± 35 µm, 341 ± 49 µm, and 416 ± 54 µm for each pore size group. Porosity and pore layer depth ranged from 61% to 69% and 303 to 391 µm, respectively. Mechanical testing revealed tensile strengths > 67 MPa and interfacial shear strengths > 20 MPa for all three pore size groups. All PEEK-SP groups exhibited > 50% decrease

  4. Cross-sensory mapping of feature values in the size-brightness correspondence can be more relative than absolute

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Laura; Walker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A role for conceptual representations in cross-sensory correspondences has been linked to the relative (context-sensitive) mapping of feature values, whereas a role for sensory-perceptual representations has been linked to their absolute (context-insensitive) mapping. Demonstrating the relative nature of the automatic mapping underlying a cross-sensory correspondence therefore offers one way of confirming its conceptual basis. After identifying several prerequisites for relative and absolute ...

  5. Defatted wheat germ application: Influence on cookies' properties with regard to its particle size and dough moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Jovana; Rakić, Dušan; Fišteš, Aleksandar; Pajin, Biljana; Lončarević, Ivana; Tomović, Vladimir; Zarić, Danica

    2017-10-01

    The introduction of agro-food industry by-products rich in bioactive compounds represents major challenge in food industry sector. The influence of wheat germ particle size (Box-Behnken experimental design. The substitution of wheat flour with wheat germ increased the protein, fat, mineral, and fiber content of the cookies. The particle size of wheat germ affected the textural properties of cookies. As the particle size of wheat germ increased, the hardness of cookies decreased. The color of the cookie was most influenced by the interaction of dough moisture content and wheat germ particle size. Wheat germ level up to 15% had no significant effect on the sensory characteristics of cookies. A suitable combination of defatted wheat germ level, its particle size, and dough moisture content can improve the nutritional value of cookies, without causing a negative effect on the cookies' sensory characteristics.

  6. Influence of Lower Extremity Muscle Size and Quality on Stair-Climb Performance in Career Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Craig R; Ryan, Eric D; Tweedell, Andrew J; Barnette, Timothy J; Wagoner, Chad W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of lower extremity muscular size and quality on stair-climb performance (SCP) in career firefighters. Forty-six male career firefighters (age = 37.0 ± 7.2 years; stature = 180.2 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 108.0 ± 19.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Panoramic ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were obtained to determine cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (EI) of each muscle. The CSA of each muscle was then summed together and normalized to body mass (CSA/BM [QCSA]). Additionally, EI was averaged across both muscles (QEI). Participants then performed a timed and weighted SCP assessment where they ascended and descended 26 stairs 4 times as quickly as possible while wearing a weighted vest (22.73 kg) to simulate the weight of their self-contained breathing apparatus and turnout gear. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among variables and the relative contributions of QCSA and QEI to SCP. Partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between QCSA and SCP and QEI and SCP while controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). The results indicated that QCSA and QEI were significantly related to SCP before (r = -0.492, p = 0.001; r = 0.363, p = 0.013, respectively) and after accounting for age and BMI (r = -0.324, p = 0.032; r = 0.413, p = 0.005, respectively). Both QCSA and QEI contributed significantly to the prediction of SCP (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that lower extremity muscle size and quality are important contributors to critical firefighting tasks, which have been shown to be improved with resistance training.

  7. Interactions between fluvial forces and vegetation size, density and morphology influence plant mortality during experimental floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, J. C.; Kui, L.; Manners, R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Lightbody, A.; Sklar, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction and methods Fluvial disturbance is a key driver of riparian vegetation dynamics in river corridors. Despite an increasing understanding of ecohydraulic interactions between plants and fluvial forces, the interactive influences of plant morphology and sediment supply on plant mortality, a key demographic factor, are largely unknown. To better understand these processes, we designed and conducted a series of flume experiments to: (1) quantify effects of plant traits that interact with flow and sediment transport on plant loss to scour during floods; and (2) predict plant dislodgement for different species across a range of plant sizes, patch densities, and sediment condition (equilibrium transport versus sediment deficit). We ran ten experimental floods in a 28 m long × 0.6 m wide × 0.71 m tall flume, using live, 1-3 year-old tamarisk and cottonwood seedlings with contrasting morphologies with varied combinations of size and density. Results and discussion Both sediment supply and plant traits (morphology and composition) have significant impacts on plant vulnerability during floods. Sediment deficit resulted in bed degradation and a 35% greater risk of plant loss compared to equilibrium sediment conditions. The probability of plant dislodgement in sparse patches was 4.5 times greater than in dense patches. Tamarisk plants and patches had greater frontal area, basal diameter and longer roots compared to cottonwood across all seedling heights. These traits, as well as its lower crown position reduced tamarisk's vulnerability to scour by 75%. Compared with cottonwood, tamarisk exhibits better resistance to floods, due to its greater root biomass and longer roots that stabilize soil, and its greater frontal area and lower crown that effectively trap sediment. These traits likely contribute to riverscape-scale changes in channel morphology that are evident where tamarisk has invaded native riparian communities, and explain the persistence of tamarisk

  8. On the functional form of particle number size distributions: influence of particle source and meteorological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianelle, Vorne; Gilardoni, Stefania

    2018-04-01

    Particle number size distributions (PNSDs) have been collected periodically in the urban area of Milan, Italy, during 2011 and 2012 in winter and summer months. Moreover, comparable PNSD measurements were carried out in the rural mountain site of Oga-San Colombano (2250 m a.s.l.), Italy, during February 2005 and August 2011. The aerosol data have been measured through the use of optical particle counters in the size range 0.3-25 µm, with a time resolution of 1 min. The comparison of the PNSDs collected in the two sites has been done in terms of total number concentration, showing higher numbers in Milan (often exceeding 103 cm-3 in winter season) compared to Oga-San Colombano (not greater than 2×102 cm-3), as expected. The skewness-kurtosis plane has been used in order to provide a synoptic view, and select the best distribution family describing the empirical PNSD pattern. The four-parameter Johnson system-bounded distribution (called Johnson SB or JSB) has been tested for this aim, due to its great flexibility and ability to assume different shapes. The PNSD pattern has been found to be generally invariant under site and season changes. Nevertheless, several PNSDs belonging to the Milan winter season (generally more than 30 %) clearly deviate from the standard empirical pattern. The seasonal increase in the concentration of primary aerosols due to combustion processes in winter and the influence of weather variables throughout the year, such as precipitation and wind speed, could be considered plausible explanations of PNSD dynamics.

  9. The influence of target structure on topographical features produced by ion beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitton, J.L.; Grant, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ion beam erosion of solid surfaces often results in the development of distinctive topographical features. The relationship between the type of features formed by ion erosion and target structure has been investigated. Single crystals of copper and nickel and the amorphous alloy Metglas have been bombarded to high doses (approx. >=10 19 ions cm -2 ) with 40 keV Ar + and P + . Topography changes were monitored using SEM and structural changes by TEM. Targets that retain their long range crystallinity show sharply defined, regular features that are related to the target structure. Targets that are highly disordered, either intrinsically or as a result of the ion bombardment, produce diffuse, smaller features. Those differences are observed at all stages in topographical evolution. (orig.)

  10. Migrant pupils’ scientific performance: the influence of educational system features of origin and destination countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dronkers, J.; Levels, M.; de Heus, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Earlier studies using a double perspective (destination & origin) indicate that several macro-characteristics of both destination and origin countries affect the educational performance of migrant children. This paper explores the extent to which educational system features of destination

  11. Speeded induction under uncertainty: the influence of multiple categories and feature conjunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ben R; Paton, Helen; Hayes, Brett K; Griffiths, Oren

    2010-12-01

    When people are uncertain about the category membership of an item (e.g., Is it a dog or a dingo?), research shows that they tend to rely only on the dominant or most likely category when making inductions (e.g., How likely is it to befriend me?). An exception has been reported using speeded induction judgments where participants appeared to use information from multiple categories to make inductions (Verde, Murphy, & Ross, 2005). In two speeded induction studies, we found that participants tended to rely on the frequency with which features co-occurred when making feature predictions, independently of category membership. This pattern held whether categories were considered implicitly (Experiment 1) or explicitly (Experiment 2) prior to feature induction. The results converge with other recent work suggesting that people often rely on feature conjunction information, rather than category boundaries, when making inductions under uncertainty.

  12. The Influence of Garden Size and Floral Cover on Pollen Deposition in Urban Community Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Matteson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cucurbits, such as cucumbers, squashes and pumpkins, depend on pollinating bees in order to set fruit. However, fruit yield and progeny vigor in these plants generally decreases as heterospecific pollen deposition increases. We studied how the spatial area dedicated to cucumbers (Cucumis sativis, versus other flowering plants, influenced the deposition of conspecific and heterospecific pollen on cucumber plants in New York City community gardens. We also examined the effect of garden size on conspecific and heterospecific pollen deposition on cucumber plants. Female flowers were collected from potted cucumber plants that had been experimentally placed into the gardens, specifically for this study, or that were established in raised beds by members of the community garden. In the laboratory, pollen grains were isolated from the flower by acetolysis, and the number of heterospecific and conspecific cucumber pollen grains were quantified. Conspecific pollen deposition was positively and significantly associated with the size of a community garden, as well as with the area of each garden dedicated to non-cucumber, flowering plants (i.e. floral cover and the area of each garden dedicated to cucumber plants (i.e. cucumber cover. Although floral cover explained a greater proportion of the variance, cucumber cover had the strongest effect on conspecific pollen deposition. Heterospecific pollen deposition was positively and significantly related to garden area. However, no significant relationship was found between heterospecific pollen deposition and floral cover, or cucumber cover. Based upon these results, we hypothesize that floral cover positively impacts conspecific pollen deposition by attracting a greater number of pollinators into an urban garden, and that total cucumber area positively impacts conspecific pollen deposition when pollinators are locally foraging within a garden. We suggest that the arrangement of plants within a garden can

  13. Sustainable Corporate Social Media Marketing Based on Message Structural Features: Firm Size Plays a Significant Role as a Moderator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Young Kang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Social media has been receiving attention as a cost-effective tool to build corporate brand image and to enrich customer relationships. This phenomenon calls for more attention to developing a model that measures the impact of structural features, used in corporate social media messages. Based on communication science, this study proposes a model to measure the impact of three essential message structural features (interactivity, formality, and immediacy in corporate social media on customers’ purchase intentions, mediated by brand attitude and corporate trust. Especially, social media platforms are believed to provide a good marketing platform for small and medium enterprises (SMEs by providing access to huge audiences at a very low cost. The findings from this study based on a structural equation model suggest that brand attitude and corporate trust have larger impacts on purchase intention for SMEs than large firms. This implies that SMEs with little to no presence in the market should pay more attention to building corporate trust and brand attitude for their sustainable growth.

  14. The influence of photoreceptor size and distribution on optical sensitivity in the eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    Busserolles, Fanny de

    2014-06-13

    The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m) is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae). We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s) of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density), indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter) and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence), potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns). Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most of the

  15. The influence of photoreceptor size and distribution on optical sensitivity in the eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    Busserolles, Fanny de; Fitzpatrick, John L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Collin, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m) is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae). We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s) of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density), indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter) and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence), potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns). Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most of the

  16. [Fractal features of soil particle size in the process of desertification in desert grassland of Ningxia, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; An, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The variation of soil properties, the fractal dimension of soil particle size, and the relationships between fractal dimension of soil particle size and soil properties in the process of desertification in desert grassland of Ningxia were discussed. The results showed that the fractal dimension (D) at different desertification stages in desert grassland varied greatly, the value of D was between 1.69 and 2.62. Except for the 10-20 cm soil layer, the value of D gradually declined with increa sing desertification of desert grassland at 0-30 cm soil layer. In the process of desertification in de-sert grassland, the grassland had the highest values of D , the volume percentage of clay and silt, and the lowest values of the volume percentage of very fine sand and fine sand. However, the mobile dunes had the lowest value of D , the volume percentage of clay and silt, and the highest value of the volume percentage of very fine sand and fine sand. There was a significant positive correlation between the soil fractal dimension value and the volume percentage of soil particles 50 μm. The grain size of 50 μm was the critical value for deciding the relationship between the soil particle fractal dimension and the volume percentage. Soil organic matter (SOM) and total nitrogen (TN) decreased gradually with increasing desertification of desert grassland, but soil bulk density increased gradually. Qualitative change from fixed dunes to semi fixed dunes with the rapid decrease of the volume percentage of clay and silt, SOM, TN and the rapid increase of volume percentage of very fine sand and fine sand, soil bulk density. Fractal dimension was significantly correlated to SOM, TN and soil bulk density. Fractal dimension 2.58 was a critical value of fixed dunes and semi fixed dunes. So, the fractal dimension of 2.58 could be taken as the desertification indicator of desert grassland.

  17. Influence of test capacitor features on piezoelectric and dielectric measurement of ferroelectric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihong; Lau, Gih Keong; Zhu, Weiguang; Chao, Chen

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and numerical analyses of the piezoelectric and dielectric responses of a highly idealized film-on-substrate system, namely, a polarized ferroelectric film perfectly bonded to an elastic silicon substrate. It shows that both effective dielectric and piezoelectric properties of the films change with the size and configuration of the test capacitor. There exists a critical electrode size that is smaller than the diameter of the commonly used substrate. The effective film properties converge to their respective constrained values as capacitor size increases to the critical size. If capacitor size is smaller than the critical size, the surface displacement at the top electrode deviates from the net thickness change in response to an applied voltage because the film is deformable at the film/substrate interface. The constrained properties of the films depend only on those of bulk ferroelectrics but are independent of film thickness and substrate properties. The finding of the critical capacitor size together with analytical expressions of the constrained properties makes it possible to realize consistent measurement of piezoelectric and dielectric properties of films. A surface scanning technique is recommended to measure the profile of piezoresponses of the film so that the constrained properties of the film can be identified accurately.

  18. The influence of some factors on the electrical conductivity and particle size of core/shell polystyrene/polyaniline composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA D. NESTOROVIC

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrically conductive, micron-sized, core/shell polystyrene (PS/polyaniline (PANI composite particles were synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of micron-sized PS particles in 1 M HCl. The conditions of the dispersion polymerization of styrene were optimized. The influence of the initiator type employed for the chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline and the aniline (ANI concentration on the PS/PANI particle size and size distribution and their conductivity was investigated. The obtained results show that the conductivity of the samples increased with increasing ANI concentration. The conductivity of the PS/PANI composite particles obtained with the highest ANI concentration was of the same order of magnitude as that for PANI powder. The particle size did not depend on the concentration of ANI, while the particle size distribution was narrower at higher concentrations of ANI.

  19. Influence of Emulsion Polymerization Techniques to Particle Size of Copoly(styrene/butyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresye Utari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of applications, particle size and particle size distribution are highly significant factors that determine the properties of a polymer dispersion, such as its flow behavior or its stability. For example, a coating material with small particle size will give smooth coating result, good adhesive strength, good water resistance and latex stability. This article describes influence of various emulsion polymerization techniques to particle size of copoly(styrene/butyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate with mix surfactant SDBS linear chain and nonyl fenol (EO10 and initiator ammonium persulphate. DSC data, solid content and IR spectrum showed that copoly(styrene/butyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate was produced. Batch emulsion polymerization technique gave the highest particle size i.e. 615 nm and also the highest % conversion of monomer i.e. 97%. The more concentration of monomer was seeded to initial charge gave greater particle size and greater poly dispersity index.

  20. Clinical Features of Ground Glass Opacity-Dominant Lung Cancer Exceeding 3.0 cm in the Whole Tumor Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Yotsukura, Masaya; Masai, Kyohei; Asakura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Kazuo; Motoi, Noriko; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi

    2018-05-01

    Ground glass opacity (GGO)-dominant lung adenocarcinoma sized 3.0 cm or less in the whole tumor size is widely known to have an excellent prognosis and is regarded as early lung cancer. However, the characteristics and prognosis of lung cancer showing GGO exceeding 3.0 cm remains unclear. From 2002 through 2012, we reviewed 3,735 lung cancers that underwent complete resection at our institution. We identified 160 lung cancers (4.3%) showing GGO exceeding 3.0 cm on thin-section computed tomography and divided them into three types by the consolidation/tumor ratio (CTR) using cutoff values of 0.25 and 0.5. We compared the characteristics and prognosis among these types. Type A (CTR, 0 to ≤0.25), type B (CTR, >0.25 to ≤0.5), and type C (CTR, >0.5 to 3.0 cm can be considered to be in a group of patients with nodal-negative disease and an excellent prognosis. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of landscape features influencing gene flow: How useful are habitat selection models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen H. Roffler; Michael K. Schwartz; Kristine Pilgrim; Sandra L. Talbot; George K. Sage; Layne G. Adams; Gordon Luikart

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dispersal patterns are influenced by landscape heterogeneity is critical for modeling species connectivity. Resource selection function (RSF) models are increasingly used in landscape genetics approaches. However, because the ecological factors that drive habitat selection may be different from those influencing dispersal and gene flow, it is...

  2. Group size and group income as influences on marriage patterns in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R C

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyzes the association of ethnic group size and median ethnic group income with the percentages of cross-ethnic marriages and combinations of marriages of each of the 5 major racial/ethnic groups in Hawaii. The data cover marriages that took place from 1975-1977 in Hawaii's 5 major ethnic groups: 1) Caucasian, 2) Chinese, 3) Filipino, 4) Japanese, and 5) Hawaiian or part-Hawaiian. The number of Caucasians marrying in Hawaii are severely inflated by military and tourist marriages. Chinese (highest median income) and Hawaiians or part-Hawaiians (lowest median income) show the highest percentages of outmarriage. The number of persons making up given groups appears to play a role; larger groups have lower outmarriage rates. Since 19 of 20 potential marriage partners a Chinese person meets are of another racial group, as compared to 2 of 3 for Caucasians or Japanese, it is hardly surprising that the Chinese outmarry more often than other groups. Data show a tendency to an East-West split; Chinese-Japanese marriages are overrepresented, and marriages of Japanese men to Caucasian women are underrepresented. However, marriages of Caucasian males to Chinese women are also overrepresented. Also, Puerto Ricans and Filipinos tend to be more representative of the West than Caucasians are. The authors conclude that cultural attributes likely to lead to a given level of income, rather than income per se, influence the probability of persons marrying a member of a given racial/ethnic group other than their own.

  3. On the optimal sizing of batteries for electric vehicles and the influence of fast charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Mark W.; Wampler, Charles W.

    2018-04-01

    We provide a brief summary of advanced battery technologies and a framework (i.e., a simple model) for assessing electric-vehicle (EV) architectures and associated costs to the customer. The end result is a qualitative model that can be used to calculate the optimal EV range (which maps back to the battery size and performance), including the influence of fast charge. We are seeing two technological pathways emerging: fast-charge-capable batteries versus batteries with much higher energy densities (and specific energies) but without the capability to fast charge. How do we compare and contrast the two alternatives? This work seeks to shed light on the question. We consider costs associated with the cells, added mass due to the use of larger batteries, and charging, three factors common in such analyses. In addition, we consider a new cost input, namely, the cost of adaption, corresponding to the days a customer would need an alternative form of transportation, as the EV would not have sufficient range on those days.

  4. Fat-tailed fluctuations in the size of organizations: the role of social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondani, Hernan; Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Organizational growth processes have consistently been shown to exhibit a fatter-than-Gaussian growth-rate distribution in a variety of settings. Long periods of relatively small changes are interrupted by sudden changes in all size scales. This kind of extreme events can have important consequences for the development of biological and socio-economic systems. Existing models do not derive this aggregated pattern from agent actions at the micro level. We develop an agent-based simulation model on a social network. We take our departure in a model by a Schwarzkopf et al. on a scale-free network. We reproduce the fat-tailed pattern out of internal dynamics alone, and also find that it is robust with respect to network topology. Thus, the social network and the local interactions are a prerequisite for generating the pattern, but not the network topology itself. We further extend the model with a parameter δ that weights the relative fraction of an individual's neighbours belonging to a given organization, representing a contextual aspect of social influence. In the lower limit of this parameter, the fraction is irrelevant and choice of organization is random. In the upper limit of the parameter, the largest fraction quickly dominates, leading to a winner-takes-all situation. We recover the real pattern as an intermediate case between these two extremes.

  5. Influences of rhythm- and timbre-related musical features on characteristics of music-induced movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Birgitta; Thompson, Marc R; Luck, Geoff; Saarikallio, Suvi; Toiviainen, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Music makes us move. Several factors can affect the characteristics of such movements, including individual factors or musical features. For this study, we investigated the effect of rhythm- and timbre-related musical features as well as tempo on movement characteristics. Sixty participants were presented with 30 musical stimuli representing different styles of popular music, and instructed to move along with the music. Optical motion capture was used to record participants' movements. Subsequently, eight movement features and four rhythm- and timbre-related musical features were computationally extracted from the data, while the tempo was assessed in a perceptual experiment. A subsequent correlational analysis revealed that, for instance, clear pulses seemed to be embodied with the whole body, i.e., by using various movement types of different body parts, whereas spectral flux and percussiveness were found to be more distinctly related to certain body parts, such as head and hand movement. A series of ANOVAs with the stimuli being divided into three groups of five stimuli each based on the tempo revealed no significant differences between the groups, suggesting that the tempo of our stimuli set failed to have an effect on the movement features. In general, the results can be linked to the framework of embodied music cognition, as they show that body movements are used to reflect, imitate, and predict musical characteristics.

  6. Influences of rhythm- and timbre-related musical features on characteristics of music-induced movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta eBurger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Music makes us move. Several factors can affect the characteristics of such movements, including individual factors or musical features. For this study, we investigated the effect of rhythm- and timbre-related musical features as well as tempo on movement characteristics. Sixty participants were presented with 30 musical stimuli representing different styles of popular music, and instructed to move along with the music. Optical motion capture was used to record participants’ movements. Subsequently, eight movement features and four rhythm- and timbre-related musical features were computationally extracted from the data, while the tempo was assessed in a perceptual experiment. A subsequent correlational analysis revealed that, for instance, clear pulses seemed to be embodied with the whole body, i.e., by using various movement types of different body parts, whereas spectral flux and percussiveness were found to be more distinctly related to certain body parts, such as head and hand movement. A series of ANOVAs with the stimuli being divided into three groups of five stimuli each based on the tempo revealed no significant differences between the groups, suggesting that the tempo of our stimuli set failed to have an effect on the movement features. In general, the results can be linked to the framework of embodied music cognition, as they show that body movements are used to reflect, imitate, and predict musical characteristics.

  7. The influence of the laser spot size and the pulse number on laser-induced backside wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, R.; Zimmer, K.

    2005-01-01

    The laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) of transparent solids at the interface to absorbing liquid is a new promising method for laser microstructuring. The influence of the laser spot size and the applied pulse number to the etch rate were investigated in detail for fused silica and two different liquids. Additional to the significant rise of the etch rate with increasing spot size considerable incubation effects have been observed at low laser fluences and pulse numbers. Based on the bubble formation during LIBWE processing, a relation between the bubble collapse time and the etch rate was ascertained. This relation fits the etch rate dependence on the spot size well. It is assumed that the deposition of decomposition products from the bubble accounts for the spot size influence the etch rate

  8. E-recruiting Platforms: Features that Influence the Efficiency of Online Recruitment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ondina ROSOIU; Cristian POPESCU

    2016-01-01

    Twenty active e-recruitment platform users took part in this study for discovering the most asked for features in a web based hiring process. The respondents were chosen based on their history on such recruitment platforms. With the help of our Internet users we narrowed down the number of platforms, to research for outstanding features and tool efficiency, to five most impressive ones (e-jobs, hipo, bestjobs, LinkedIn, Freelancer). The results were as useful as we expected when we proposed a...

  9. Influence of tritium aging on kinetics feature of LaNi4.9Al0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Yifu; Luo Deli; Li Rong

    2001-01-01

    Kinetics parameters were measured at different aging time on LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy. The influence of tritium aging on kinetics feature of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy was assessed. The results show that tritium aging does not change deuterating-dedeuterating reaction order. Reaction rate decrease with aging time. Activation energy (E) increases with aging time

  10. Influence of the initial grain size of silicon on microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the initial grain size of the silicon powder on the microstructure and the resulting mechanical properties are studied. The smaller the grain size of the silicon powders used, the higher will be the degree of reaction at the beginning of the nitridation reaction and the higher the amount of α-modification in the fully nitridated samples. Moreover, the nitrification time can be considerably shortened when fine-grained silicon powders ( [de

  11. Experimental investigation on the influence of instrument settings on pixel size and nonlinearity in SEM image formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carli, Lorenzo; Genta, Gianfranco; Cantatore, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The work deals with an experimental investigation on the influence of three Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) instrument settings, accelerating voltage, spot size and magnification, on the image formation process. Pixel size and nonlinearity were chosen as output parameters related to image...... quality and resolution. A silicon grating calibrated artifact was employed to investigate qualitatively and quantitatively, through a designed experiment approach, the parameters relevance. SEM magnification was found to account by far for the largest contribution on both parameters under consideration...

  12. Influence of patterned topographic features on the formation of cardiac cell clusters and their rhythmic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Liu, L; Magome, N; Agladze, K; Chen, Y

    2013-01-01

    In conventional primary cultures, cardiac cells prepared from a newborn rat undergo spontaneous formation of cell clusters after several days. These cell clusters may be non-homogeneously distributed on a flat surface and show irregular beating which can be recorded by calcium ion imaging. In order to improve the cell cluster homogeneity and the beating regularity, patterned topographic features were used to guide the cellular growth and the cell layer formation. On the substrate with an array of broadly spaced cross features made of photoresist, cells grew on the places that were not occupied by the crosses and thus formed a cell layer with interconnected cell clusters. Accordingly, spatially coordinated regular beating could be recorded over the whole patterned area. In contrast, when cultured on the substrate with broadly spaced but inter-connected cross features, the cardiac cell layer showed beatings which were neither coordinated in space nor regular in time. Finally, when cultured on the substrate with narrowly spaced features, the cell beating became spatially coordinated but still remained irregular. Our results suggest a way to improve the rhythmic property of cultured cardiac cell layers which might be useful for further investigations. (paper)

  13. Affect influences feature binding in memory: Trading between richness and strength of memory representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spachtholz, Philipp; Kuhbandner, Christof; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Research has shown that long-term memory representations of objects are formed as a natural product of perception even without any intentional memorization. It is not known, however, how rich these representations are in terms of the number of bound object features. In particular, because feature binding rests on resource-limited processes, there may be a context-dependent trade-off between the quantity of stored features and their memory strength. The authors examined whether affective state may bring about such a trade-off. Participants incidentally encoded pictures of real-world objects while experiencing positive or negative affect, and the authors later measured memory for 2 features. Results showed that participants traded between richness and strength of memory representations as a function of affect, with positive affect tuning memory formation toward richness and negative affect tuning memory formation toward strength. These findings demonstrate that memory binding is a flexible process that is modulated by affective state. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Chronic anger as a precursor to adult antisocial personality features: The moderating influence of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Samuel W; Perlman, Susan B; Byrd, Amy L; Raine, Adrian; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A

    2016-01-01

    Anger is among the earliest occurring symptoms of mental health, yet we know little about its developmental course. Further, no studies have examined whether youth with persistent anger are at an increased risk of exhibiting antisocial personality features in adulthood, or how cognitive control abilities may protect these individuals from developing such maladaptive outcomes. Trajectories of anger were delineated among 503 boys using annual assessments from childhood to middle adolescence (ages ∼7-14). Associations between these trajectories and features of antisocial personality in young adulthood (age ∼28) were examined, including whether cognitive control moderates this association. Five trajectories of anger were identified (i.e., childhood-onset, childhood-limited, adolescent-onset, moderate, and low). Boys in the childhood-onset group exhibited the highest adulthood antisocial personality features (e.g., psychopathy, aggression, criminal charges). However, boys in this group were buffered from these problems if they had higher levels of cognitive control during adolescence. Findings were consistent across measures from multiple informants, replicated across distinct time periods, and remained when controlling for general intelligence and prior antisocial behavior. This is the first study to document the considerable heterogeneity in the developmental course of anger from childhood to adolescence. As hypothesized, good cognitive control abilities protected youth with persistent anger problems from developing antisocial personality features in adulthood. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Recovering Faces from Memory: The Distracting Influence of External Facial Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frowd, Charlie D.; Skelton, Faye; Atherton, Chris; Pitchford, Melanie; Hepton, Gemma; Holden, Laura; McIntyre, Alex H.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition memory for unfamiliar faces is facilitated when contextual cues (e.g., head pose, background environment, hair and clothing) are consistent between study and test. By contrast, inconsistencies in external features, especially hair, promote errors in unfamiliar face-matching tasks. For the construction of facial composites, as carried…

  16. Influence of anchor block size on the thickness of adsorbed block copolymer layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belder, G.F; ten Brinke, G.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    We present surface force data on three different polystyrene/poly(2-vinylpyridine) block copolymers (PS/P2VP) with a fixed size of the nonadsorbing PS block but widely varying sizes of the adsorbing P2VP block. With respect to the sizes of the two blocks, they range from moderately to highly

  17. The influence of thin film grain size on the size of nanoparticles generated during UV femtosecond laser ablation of thin gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haustrup, N., E-mail: natalie.haustrup@nuigalway.ie [National Centre for Laser Applications, School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); O’Connor, G.M. [National Centre for Laser Applications, School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-08-01

    The upsurge in the number of thin film products has encouraged studies into every aspect of their fabrication and application. An additional source of industrial interest is the laser ablation of thin films to generate nanoparticles. This technique offers advantages over other fabrication methods, as no chemical pre-cursers are required, thereby giving rise to a pure product. The main disadvantage lies in the difficulty with controlling the size of the nanoparticles. This study aims to clarify the influence of the microstructure of a thin film on its optical properties and also to establish the size relationship between the film grain and the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation. A comprehensive sample set of Gold (Au) films with different grain sizes was achieved using different deposition rates, temperatures, film thicknesses (<100 nm) and substrates: Silica, Quartz and Sapphire. The microstructure of each film was analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Single femtosecond laser pulses, above the ablation threshold fluence of each film, were applied to generate nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to image the re-deposited nanoparticles, from which the nanoparticle size distribution was established. Results confirm that the film microstructure is directly linked to the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation.

  18. The influence of thin film grain size on the size of nanoparticles generated during UV femtosecond laser ablation of thin gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustrup, N.; O’Connor, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The upsurge in the number of thin film products has encouraged studies into every aspect of their fabrication and application. An additional source of industrial interest is the laser ablation of thin films to generate nanoparticles. This technique offers advantages over other fabrication methods, as no chemical pre-cursers are required, thereby giving rise to a pure product. The main disadvantage lies in the difficulty with controlling the size of the nanoparticles. This study aims to clarify the influence of the microstructure of a thin film on its optical properties and also to establish the size relationship between the film grain and the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation. A comprehensive sample set of Gold (Au) films with different grain sizes was achieved using different deposition rates, temperatures, film thicknesses (<100 nm) and substrates: Silica, Quartz and Sapphire. The microstructure of each film was analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Single femtosecond laser pulses, above the ablation threshold fluence of each film, were applied to generate nanoparticles. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to image the re-deposited nanoparticles, from which the nanoparticle size distribution was established. Results confirm that the film microstructure is directly linked to the nanoparticles generated during laser ablation.

  19. Comparative effects of macro-sized aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on erythrocyte hemolysis: influence of cell source, temperature, and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinardell, M. P., E-mail: mpvinardellmh@ub.edu; Sordé, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain); Díaz, J. [Universitat de Barcelona CCiT, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Baccarin, T.; Mitjans, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmàcia (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most abundantly produced nanomaterial and has been used in diverse fields, including the medical, military, and industrial sectors. As there are concerns about the health effects of nanoparticles, it is important to understand how they interact with cells, and specifically with red blood cells. The hemolysis induced by three commercial nano-sized aluminum oxide particles (nanopowder 13 nm, nanopowder <50 nm, and nanowire 2–6 × 200–400 nm) was compared to aluminum oxide and has been studied on erythrocytes from humans, rats, and rabbits, in order to elucidate the mechanism of action and the influence of size and shape on hemolytic behavior. The concentrations inducing 50 % hemolysis (HC{sub 50}) were calculated for each compound studied. The most hemolytic aluminum oxide particles were of nanopowder 13, followed by nanowire and nanopowder 50. The addition of albumin to PBS induced a protective effect on hemolysis in all the nano-forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The drop in HC{sub 50} correlated to a decrease in nanomaterial size, which was induced by a reduction of aggregation. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles are less hemolytic than other oxide nanoparticles and behave differently depending on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. The hemolytic behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles differs from that of aluminum oxide.

  20. Landscape features influence gene flow as measured by cost-distance and genetic analyses: a case study for giant pandas in the Daxiangling and Xiaoxiangling Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fuwen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene flow maintains genetic diversity within a species and is influenced by individual behavior and the geographical features of the species' habitat. Here, we have characterized the geographical distribution of genetic patterns in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca living in four isolated patches of the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling Mountains. Three geographic distance definitions were used with the "isolation by distance theory": Euclidean distance (EUD, least-cost path distance (LCD defined by food resources, and LCD defined by habitat suitability. Results A total of 136 genotypes were obtained from 192 fecal samples and one blood sample, corresponding to 53 unique genotypes. Geographical maps plotted at high resolution using smaller neighborhood radius definitions produced large cost distances, because smaller radii include a finer level of detail in considering each pixel. Mantel tests showed that most correlation indices, particularly bamboo resources defined for different sizes of raster cell, were slightly larger than the correlations calculated for the Euclidean distance, with the exception of Patch C. We found that natural barriers might have decreased gene flow between the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling regions. Conclusions Landscape features were found to partially influence gene flow in the giant panda population. This result is closely linked to the biological character and behavior of giant pandas because, as bamboo feeders, individuals spend most of their lives eating bamboo or moving within the bamboo forest. Landscape-based genetic analysis suggests that gene flow will be enhanced if the connectivity between currently fragmented bamboo forests is increased.

  1. Influence of the austenitizing temperature in the cleavage facet size of Niocor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, F.A.I.; Teixeira, J.C.G.; Fernandes, R.A.; Juer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Convetional Charpy specimens of Niocor 2 steel cooled in air from various austenitizing temperatures were fractured at -196 0 C so as to insure failure by cleavage. The cleavage facet size distribution was determined and then correlated with the grain size and other aspects of the microstructure. The results that the average facet size can be increased through a coarsening of the microstructure. For the case where the γ→α transformation products are predominantely acicular, the facet size is shown to depend on substructural aspects primarily the lath packet size. (Author) [pt

  2. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-01-01

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  3. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  4. On the constitutive criteria for the fault: influence of size and tensile cracks generation during rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, J.D.; Miguel, L.F.F.; Gudiel, L.A.D.

    2005-01-01

    In recent studies the authors consider the possibility of occurrence of tensile crack generation near the free surface during faulting. The main assumption is that the dynamic tensile stress created during the shear rupture process would be dominant over the background stress near the free-surface. The proposed model was able to simulate the mechanism of cracks developed as a flower like-structure surrounding the shear fault in the vicinity of the free surface and explain some aspects of the fracture zones found after the 2000 Tottori earthquake. The applicability of various constitutive laws for the fault employed in numerical analysis of the near source motion, such as the slip-weakening, velocity-weakening or rate- and state-dependent friction laws, were also recently discussed by the authors in connection with results of laboratory experiments on friction. In this paper, the most important conclusions of the studies outlined above are summarized by way of introduction to the numerical modeling of the region adjacent to the fault surface, which includes material nonhomogeneities as well as the possibility of generation of new tensile cracks. In the presence of fracture, both factors exert important influence on the macro constitutive laws for the fault, which relate the static (mean normal and shear stresses) with kinetic (displacements) variables, as well as with their time derivatives. By means of simulation, it is shown that the coefficients in the equation that relate the relevant variables depend on size, that is, they vary with the contact area over which stresses, displacements and velocities are averaged. Any variability in Young's modulus or mass density of the surround rock may however be neglected, the only significant random fields being those that describe friction at the interface and the specific fracture energy. (authors)

  5. E-recruiting Platforms: Features that Influence the Efficiency of Online Recruitment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondina ROSOIU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty active e-recruitment platform users took part in this study for discovering the most asked for features in a web based hiring process. The respondents were chosen based on their history on such recruitment platforms. With the help of our Internet users we narrowed down the number of platforms, to research for outstanding features and tool efficiency, to five most impressive ones (e-jobs, hipo, bestjobs, LinkedIn, Freelancer. The results were as useful as we expected when we proposed an investigation related to the future of web recruiting platforms. They underlined in a specific manner that most of such web platform users need to have a professional and fully functional environment where they can list their accomplishments and experience and receive direct feedback from employers or employees. The study also shows in detail how much and why do users like to have certain functionalities when they are searching for a new job.

  6. Influence of minor geometric features on Stirling pulse tube cryocooler performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Spoor, P. S.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Perrella, M.

    2017-12-01

    Minor geometric features and imperfections are commonly introduced into the basic design of multi-component systems to simplify or reduce the manufacturing expense. In this work, the cooling performance of a Stirling type cryocooler was tested in different driving powers, cold-end temperatures and inclination angles. A series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations based on a prototypical cold tip was carried out. Detailed CFD model predictions were compared with the experiment and were used to investigate the impact of such apparently minor geometric imperfections on the performance of Stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers. Predictions of cooling performance and gravity orientation sensitivity were compared with experimental results obtained with the cryocooler prototypes. The results indicate that minor geometry features in the cold tip assembly can have considerable negative effects on the gravity orientation sensitivity of a pulse tube cryocooler.

  7. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  8. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCING FAMILY SIZE AMONG RURAL POPULATION OF DISTRICT NAINITAL, UTTARAKHAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is the second most populous country in the world. A decline in its population growth rate has been shown amounting to during the last decades. The decline in the family size is important step towards population stabilization for our country. The status of family size is related to various demographic, socio-economic, cultural factors and attitude towards use of family planning methods. Objective: To assess the relationship of family size with socio-economic factors and effect of contraceptive use. Methodology: A cross sectional house to house survey to know the family size and socio-demographic was conducted in the adopted villages of field practice area. The study subjects are the married women of reproductive age group (15-49 years. Results: About half (44.9% of respondents were aged more than 35 years and only (0.9% were < 19 years. The family size in our study was 2.55. About 54.5% of respondents have family size d" 2. About two-third of families (65% with size less than or equals to two were of nuclear type. Education level of family has significant relationship with small family size. About 90% of the respondents and their spouse of family size two or less were literate. A significant association was found between occupation of the spouse and family size. The spouses of the respondents with family size more than two were mainly engaged in agriculture (29.7% and as labourer (38.5%. Among the families with family size of more than two, majority were from middle (81% and lower (14.9% class. There is no significant effect of use of contraceptives on the family size.

  9. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCING FAMILY SIZE AMONG RURAL POPULATION OF DISTRICT NAINITAL, UTTARAKHAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is the second most populous country in the world. A decline in its population growth rate has been shown amounting to during the last decades. The decline in the family size is important step towards population stabilization for our country. The status of family size is related to various demographic, socio-economic, cultural factors and attitude towards use of family planning methods. Objective: To assess the relationship of family size with socio-economic factors and effect of contraceptive use. Methodology: A cross sectional house to house survey to know the family size and socio-demographic was conducted in the adopted villages of field practice area. The study subjects are the married women of reproductive age group (15-49 years. Results: About half (44.9% of respondents were aged more than 35 years and only (0.9% were < 19 years. The family size in our study was 2.55. About 54.5% of respondents have family size d" 2. About two-third of families (65% with size less than or equals to two were of nuclear type. Education level of family has significant relationship with small family size. About 90% of the respondents and their spouse of family size two or less were literate. A significant association was found between occupation of the spouse and family size. The spouses of the respondents with family size more than two were mainly engaged in agriculture (29.7% and as labourer (38.5%. Among the families with family size of more than two, majority were from middle (81% and lower (14.9% class. There is no significant effect of use of contraceptives on the family size.

  10. Relating Local to Global Spatial Knowledge: Heuristic Influence of Local Features on Direction Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Daniel W.; Montello, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has examined heuristics--simplified decision-making rules-of-thumb--for geospatial reasoning. This study examined at two locations the influence of beliefs about local coastline orientation on estimated directions to local and distant places; estimates were made immediately or after fifteen seconds. This study goes beyond…

  11. Influence of adult nutrition on the relationship between body size and reproductive parameters in a parasitoid wasp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Harvey, J.A.; Mills, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    1. An important constraint upon life-history evolution in parasitoids is the limit imposed by body size on allocation of limited metabolic resources to different fitness-related physiological functions such as reproduction and survival. 2. The influence of adult nutrition on reproductive and

  12. Influence of the cavity-size on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemoli, A.M.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Aim.  To evaluate the influence of the size of proximal cavities on the survival rate of the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations. Design.  A total of 804 children, aged 6-8 years, from a low socio-economic community, with an ART restorable proximal carious lesion in their primary

  13. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  14. The influence of spatial grain size on the suitability of the higher-taxon approach in continental priority-setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Rahbek, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    The higher-taxon approach may provide a pragmatic surrogate for the rapid identification of priority areas for conservation. To date, no continent-wide study has examined the use of higher-taxon data to identify complementarity-based networks of priority areas, nor has the influence of spatial gr...... grain size been assessed. We used data obtained from 939 sub-Saharan mammals to analyse the performance of higher-taxon data for continental priority-setting and to assess the influence of spatial grain sizes in terms of the size of selection units (1°× 1°, 2°× 2° and 4°× 4° latitudinal...... as effectively as species-based priority areas, genus-based areas perform considerably less effectively than species-based areas for the 1° and 2° grain size. Thus, our results favour the higher-taxon approach for continental priority-setting only when large grain sizes (= 4°) are used.......The higher-taxon approach may provide a pragmatic surrogate for the rapid identification of priority areas for conservation. To date, no continent-wide study has examined the use of higher-taxon data to identify complementarity-based networks of priority areas, nor has the influence of spatial...

  15. The influence of ration size on energetics and nitrogen retention in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Duodu, Collins Prah; Adjei-Boateng, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    with ration size, feed conversion and protein retention were most efficient at ration sizes of 3%. Although the magnitude of the SDA response following feeding also increased with ration size, this was not proportionate to meal size. Therefore the metabolic cost of meal processing (SDA coefficient) was found......Proper nutrient management is essential for the environmental sustainability of aquaculture. While increasing daily rations generally may lead to improved growth rates, this does not necessarily mean that nutrients are utilized more efficiently. To investigate how ration size affects partitioning...... of dietary nutrient intake, the effects of meal size on growth and metabolism were examined in triplicate groups of adult Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) receiving daily rations corresponding to 1, 2, 3, or 4% of their biomass. While biomass gain and specific growth rates were positively correlated...

  16. The reported availability of general practitioners and the influence of practice list size.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J L

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined practice list sizes have increased, but larger practice size may be associated with disadvantage to patients. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the availability of general practitioners as reported by their patients and the relationship between reported availability and practice list size. METHOD: A one-week questionnaire survey of 8315 patients attending participating practices in West Lothian, Scotland, was conducted. Patients were asked about the arrangement...

  17. Influence of the molecular structure on indentation size effect in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chung-Souk

    2010-01-01

    Size dependent deformation of polymers has been observed by various researchers in various experimental settings including micro beam bending, foams and indentation testing. Here in this article the indentation size effect in polymers is examined which manifests itself in increased hardness at decreasing indentation depths. Based on previously suggested rationale of size dependent deformation and depth dependent hardness model the depth dependent hardness of various polymers are analyzed. It is found that polymers containing aromatic rings in their molecular structure exhibit depth dependent hardness above the micron length scale. For polymers not containing aromatic rings polymers the indentation size effect starts at smaller indentation depths if they are present at all.

  18. Study on the combined influence of battery models and sizing strategy for hybrid and battery-based electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Cláudio; Barreras, Jorge V.; de Castro, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the combined influence of battery models and sizing strategy for hybrid and battery-based electric vehicles. In particular, the aim is to find the number of battery (and supercapacitor) cells to propel a light vehicle to run two different standard driving cycles....... Despite the same tendency, when a hybrid vehicle is taken into account, the influence of the battery models is dependent on the sizing strategy. In this work, two sizing strategies are evaluated: dynamic programming and filter-based. For the latter, the complexity of the battery model has a clear....... Three equivalent circuit models are considered to simulate the battery electrical performance: linear static, non-linear static and non-linear with first-order dynamics. When dimensioning a battery-based vehicle, less complex models may lead to a solution with more battery cells and higher costs...

  19. Influence of the particle size of activated charcoal on labeling efficiency with 67Ga-citrate for colonic transit study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-Yu Lin; Shih-Chuan Tsai; Kai-Yuan Cheng; Bor-Tsung Hsieh

    2008-01-01

    Indium-111 and 99m Tc have been proposed for colonic transit study, but 111 In is expensive and the half-life of 99m Tc is too short for the study. Gallium-67 citrate is inexpensive and has a suitable half-life. In our previous study, we successfully labeled 67 Ga-citrate activated charcoal, and the labeling efficiency exceeded 91% after a 96 hour incubation period. In this work, we evaluated the influence of the size of activated charcoal particles on the labeling efficiency with 67 Ga-citrate. The data showed that the influence of particle size on the labeling efficiency of activated charcoal with 67 Ga was insignificant. Both sizes of activated charcoal particles can be used for labeling with 67 Ga in colonic transit study. (author)

  20. Influence of mesoscale features on micronekton and large pelagic fish communities in the Mozambique Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, Michel; Bach, Pascal; Ménard, Frédéric; Marsac, Francis

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the diversity and distribution of two communities, micronekton organisms and large predatory fishes, sampled in mesoscale features of the Mozambique Channel from 2003 to 2009, by combining mid-water trawls, stomach contents of fish predators and instrumented longline fishing surveys. The highest species richness for assemblages was found in divergences and fronts rather than in the core of eddies. Despite an unbalanced scheme, diversity indices did not differ significantly between cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies, divergences and fronts. We found that eddies and associated physical cues did not substantially affect the distribution of micronektonic species which are mainly driven by the diel vertical migration pattern. Top predators exhibited a more complex response. Swordfish (Xiphias gladius) associated better with mesoscale features than tunas, with a clear preference for divergences which is consistent with the diel vertical migrations and occurrence of its main prey, the flying squids Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis (Ommastrephidae). On the other hand, the probability of presence of yellowfin tuna was not tied to any specific eddy structure. However, the highest values of positive yellowfin CPUEs were associated with low horizontal gradients of sea-level anomalies. We also showed a non-linear response of positive yellowfin CPUEs with respect to the depth of the minimal oxygen content. The larger the distance between the hooks and the minimal oxygen layer, towards the surface or at greater depths, the higher the CPUE, highlighting that yellowfin congregated in well-oxygenated waters. Micronekton sampled by mid-water trawls and stomach contents exhibited different species composition. The highly mobile organisms were not caught by trawling whereas they remain accessible to predators. The combination of stomach contents and mid-water trawls undoubtedly improved our understanding of the micronekton assemblage distribution. Our results provide some

  1. Ecological and evolutionary influences on body size and shape in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Ylenia; Glaberman, Scott; Tarroso, Pedro; Caccone, Adalgisa; Claude, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Oceanic islands are often inhabited by endemic species that have undergone substantial morphological evolutionary change due to processes of multiple colonizations from various source populations, dispersal, and local adaptation. Galápagos marine iguanas are an example of an island endemic exhibiting high morphological diversity, including substantial body size variation among populations and sexes, but the causes and magnitude of this variation are not well understood. We obtained morphological measurements from marine iguanas throughout their distribution range. These data were combined with genetic and local environmental data from each population to investigate the effects of evolutionary history and environmental conditions on body size and shape variation and sexual dimorphism. Our results indicate that body size and shape are highly variable among populations. Sea surface temperature and island perimeter, but not evolutionary history as depicted by phylogeographic patterns in this species, explain variation in body size among populations. Conversely, evolutionary history, but not environmental parameters or island size, was found to influence variation in body shape among populations. Finally, in all populations except one, we found strong sexual dimorphism in body size and shape in which males are larger, with higher heads than females, while females have longer heads than males. Differences among populations suggest that plasticity and/or genetic adaptation may shape body size and shape variation in marine iguanas. This study will help target future investigations to address the contribution of plasticity versus genetic adaptation on size and shape variation in marine iguanas.

  2. Surface chemistry and size influence the release of model therapeutic nanoparticles from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have emerged as promising therapeutic and diagnostic tools, due to their unique physicochemical properties. The specific core and surface chemistries, as well as nanoparticle size, play critical roles in particle transport and interaction with biological tissue. Localized delivery of therapeutics from hydrogels is well established, but these systems generally release molecules with hydrodynamic radii less than ∼5 nm. Here, model nanoparticles with biologically relevant surface chemistries and diameters between 10 and 35 nm are analyzed for their release from well-characterized hydrogels. Functionalized gold nanoparticles or quantum dots were encapsulated in three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with varying mesh size. Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry, and hydrogel mesh size all influenced the release of particles from the hydrogel matrix. Size influenced nanoparticle release as expected, with larger particles releasing at a slower rate. However, citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were not released from hydrogels. Negatively charged carboxyl or positively charged amine-functionalized quantum dots were released from hydrogels at slower rates than neutrally charged PEGylated nanoparticles of similar size. Transmission electron microscopy images of gold nanoparticles embedded within hydrogel sections demonstrated uniform particle distribution and negligible aggregation, independent of surface chemistry. The nanoparticle-hydrogel interactions observed in this work will aid in the development of localized nanoparticle delivery systems.

  3. Quantitative analysis of composition, structure and features of hemoglobin under the influence of radiation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, F.F.; Mamedov, T.G.; Abdullaev, Kh.D.; Akhmedov, N.A.; Manojlov, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The literature data on the changes in composition, structure and properties of hemoglobin under the influence of ionizing radiation in vivo are reviewed. The algorithm of calculation of damaged hemoglobin molecule percentage is proposed. Four main realizations of radiation-chemical damage are considered. By the algorithm the estimation of the damaged molecules percentage resulted from the exposure to 10 Gy is given. Hemoglobin radiation damage is considered as one of the most important mechanisms triggering radiation sickness. 11 refs

  4. Influence of design features on decommissioning of a large fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournie, J.-L.; Alary, C.; Maire, D.; Seroux, N. de; Peyrard, G.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of FBR design in Europe shows that pool-type design will become the reference design for future FBR and the projected European Fast Reactor (EFR) is based on this concept. The identification of design features shows that the main contributors of the sodium and structures activity are the Co60 for gamma radiation source and low decay, Ni63, Nb94 and Ni59 for long time decay. So, the technical benefits of a Co content reduction are interesting for the high activated structures and for diagrid thimbles coating and we made proposals to lower Co content in steels or alloys and to substitute coatings. We identify measures which must facilitate both the sodium draining and the reactor block and internal cleaning: all which improve the gravity draining and the downing of the sodium flow make easier the penetration of cleaning products. The features, connected with the dismantling of the very activated internal structures, of the roof and of the lay-out, are mentioned. (author)

  5. Design and marketing features influencing choice of e-cigarettes and tobacco in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Anthony A; Vardavas, Constantine I; Filippidis, Filippos T

    2016-10-01

    Data were analysed from the 2014 Special Eurobarometer for Tobacco survey. We estimated self-rated importance of various factors in the choice of both tobacco and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among tobacco smokers who had ever used an e-cigarette. Among ever users of tobacco and e-cigarettes (N = 2430), taste (39.4%), price (39.2%) and amount of nicotine (27.3%) were the most commonly cited reasons for choosing their brand of e-cigarettes. Those aged 15-24 were more likely to cite external packaging [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.23)] and design features (aPR = 1.99, 1.20-3.29) as important. As further legislation is debated and enacted enhanced regulation of price, design and marketing features of e-cigarettes may help to reduce the appeal of e-cigarettes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  6. A review of factors influencing underground construction quality and the performance of engineered features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, R.; Moy, D.; Breeds, C.D.; Kostelec, C.M.; Emsley, S.J.; Shuttle, D.; Cutler, J.; Hedman, T.; Carlsson, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes research to identify and rank the factors that should be considered for an assessment of the radioactive containment capability of repository engineered features. Containment is to be achieved through the use of multiple barriers to radionuclide movement, including the waste, waste container, repository structures and backfill, and repository seals. A review of the literature is used to identify radionuclide mobilisation and transport processes for the anticipated environmental conditions, and to compile a data base of repository design features, functional requirements, and design objectives. For selected design components, the report identifies alternative designs and factors contributing to design, focusing on the requirements for a design process, design specifications, construction requirements, and quality assurance requirements for the both design and construction. Existing practice in large, underground civil construction projects is used as a part of comparison, in conjunction with reported performance assessments, to determine those areas in which the repository developer will need to provide additional data, justification, and documentation prior to construction to ensure that performance requirements can be achieved. (Author)

  7. Influences of Herbivory and Canopy Opening Size on Forest Regeneration in a Southern Bottomland Hardwood Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven B. Castleberry; W. Mark Ford; Carl V. Miller; Winston P. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) browsing and canopy opening size on relative abundance and diversity of woody and herbaceous regeneration in various sized forest openings in a southern, bottomland hardwood forest over three growing seasons (1995-1997). We created 36 canopy openings (gaps), ranging from 7 to 40m...

  8. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautz, Brian S; Wong, Bob B M; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D

    2013-04-23

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male's relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. Here we show, based upon female assessment of digitally projected life-size, computer-generated images, that penis size interacts with body shape and height to determine male sexual attractiveness. Positive linear selection was detected for penis size, but the marginal increase in attractiveness eventually declined with greater penis size (i.e., quadratic selection). Penis size had a stronger effect on attractiveness in taller men than in shorter men. There was a similar increase in the positive effect of penis size on attractiveness with a more masculine body shape (i.e., greater shoulder-to-hip ratio). Surprisingly, larger penis size and greater height had almost equivalent positive effects on male attractiveness. Our results support the hypothesis that female mate choice could have driven the evolution of larger penises in humans. More broadly, our results show that precopulatory sexual selection can play a role in the evolution of genital traits.

  9. Encouraging vegetable intake as a snack among children: the influence of portion and unit size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Bruggers, I.; Vet, de E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: People eat more unhealthy foods when served more (portion size effect) and when the food is served in larger units (unit size effect). The present study aimed to examine whether these effects can be used for the good: to increase vegetable consumption among children. DESIGN: A 2×2

  10. influence of delta ferrite on the flow stress grain size relationship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    SIZE RELATIONSHIP OF AN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL by ... The effect of delta ferrite on the flow stress-grain size relation is investigated. ... some of these deviations, new models have .... J. N. Petch, J of Iron and Steel Inst., 174 25,.

  11. Influence of synthesis parameters on iron nanoparticle size and zeta potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nikki; Greenlee, Lauren F.

    2012-03-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles are of increasing interest in clean water treatment applications due to their reactivity toward organic contaminants and their potential to degrade a variety of compounds. This study focuses on the effect of organophosphate stabilizers on nanoparticle characteristics, including particle size distribution and zeta potential, when the stabilizer is present during nanoparticle synthesis. Particle size distributions from DLS were obtained as a function of stabilizer type and iron precursor (FeSO4·7H2O or FeCl3), and nanoparticles from 2 to 200 nm were produced. Three different organophosphate stabilizer compounds were compared in their ability to control nanoparticle size, and the size distributions obtained for particle volume demonstrated differences caused by the three stabilizers. A range of stabilizer-to-iron (0.05-0.9) and borohydride-to-iron (0.5-8) molar ratios were tested to determine the effect of concentration on nanoparticle size distribution and zeta potential. The combination of ferrous sulfate and ATMP or DTPMP phosphonate stabilizer produced stabilized nanoparticle suspensions, and the stabilizers tested resulted in varying particle size distributions. In general, higher stabilizer concentrations resulted in smaller nanoparticles, and excess borohydride did not decrease nanoparticle size. Zeta potential measurements were largely consistent with particle size distribution data and indicated the stability of the suspensions. Probe sonication, as a nanoparticle resuspension method, was minimally successful in several different organic solvents.

  12. Influence of synthesis parameters on iron nanoparticle size and zeta potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Nikki; Greenlee, Lauren F., E-mail: lauren.greenlee@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Materials Reliability Division (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles are of increasing interest in clean water treatment applications due to their reactivity toward organic contaminants and their potential to degrade a variety of compounds. This study focuses on the effect of organophosphate stabilizers on nanoparticle characteristics, including particle size distribution and zeta potential, when the stabilizer is present during nanoparticle synthesis. Particle size distributions from DLS were obtained as a function of stabilizer type and iron precursor (FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O or FeCl{sub 3}), and nanoparticles from 2 to 200 nm were produced. Three different organophosphate stabilizer compounds were compared in their ability to control nanoparticle size, and the size distributions obtained for particle volume demonstrated differences caused by the three stabilizers. A range of stabilizer-to-iron (0.05-0.9) and borohydride-to-iron (0.5-8) molar ratios were tested to determine the effect of concentration on nanoparticle size distribution and zeta potential. The combination of ferrous sulfate and ATMP or DTPMP phosphonate stabilizer produced stabilized nanoparticle suspensions, and the stabilizers tested resulted in varying particle size distributions. In general, higher stabilizer concentrations resulted in smaller nanoparticles, and excess borohydride did not decrease nanoparticle size. Zeta potential measurements were largely consistent with particle size distribution data and indicated the stability of the suspensions. Probe sonication, as a nanoparticle resuspension method, was minimally successful in several different organic solvents.

  13. Influence of synthesis parameters on iron nanoparticle size and zeta potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Nikki; Greenlee, Lauren F.

    2012-01-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles are of increasing interest in clean water treatment applications due to their reactivity toward organic contaminants and their potential to degrade a variety of compounds. This study focuses on the effect of organophosphate stabilizers on nanoparticle characteristics, including particle size distribution and zeta potential, when the stabilizer is present during nanoparticle synthesis. Particle size distributions from DLS were obtained as a function of stabilizer type and iron precursor (FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O or FeCl 3 ), and nanoparticles from 2 to 200 nm were produced. Three different organophosphate stabilizer compounds were compared in their ability to control nanoparticle size, and the size distributions obtained for particle volume demonstrated differences caused by the three stabilizers. A range of stabilizer-to-iron (0.05–0.9) and borohydride-to-iron (0.5–8) molar ratios were tested to determine the effect of concentration on nanoparticle size distribution and zeta potential. The combination of ferrous sulfate and ATMP or DTPMP phosphonate stabilizer produced stabilized nanoparticle suspensions, and the stabilizers tested resulted in varying particle size distributions. In general, higher stabilizer concentrations resulted in smaller nanoparticles, and excess borohydride did not decrease nanoparticle size. Zeta potential measurements were largely consistent with particle size distribution data and indicated the stability of the suspensions. Probe sonication, as a nanoparticle resuspension method, was minimally successful in several different organic solvents.

  14. The influence of fine-scale habitat features on regional variation in population performance of alpine White-tailed Ptarmigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedy, B.; Martin, K.

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed (explicitly or implicitly) that animals select habitat features to maximize fitness. However, there is often a mismatch between preferred habitats and indices of individual and population measures of performance. We examined the influence of fine-scale habitat selection on the overall population performance of the White-tailed Ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura), an alpine specialist, in two subdivided populations whose habitat patches are configured differently. The central region of Vancouver Island, Canada, has more continuous and larger habitat patches than the southern region. In 2003 and 2004, using paired logistic regression between used (n = 176) and available (n = 324) sites, we identified food availability, distance to standing water, and predator cover as preferred habitat components . We then quantified variation in population performance in the two regions in terms of sex ratio, age structure (n = 182 adults and yearlings), and reproductive success (n = 98 females) on the basis of 8 years of data (1995-1999, 2002-2004). Region strongly influenced females' breeding success, which, unsuccessful hens included, was consistently higher in the central region (n = 77 females) of the island than in the south (n = 21 females, P = 0.01). The central region also had a much higher proportion of successful hens (87%) than did the south (55%, P < 0.001). In light of our findings, we suggest that population performance is influenced by a combination of fine-scale habitat features and coarse-scale habitat configuration. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  15. Successful Bullying Prevention Programs: Influence of Research Design, Implementation Features, and Program Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryanna Hahn Fox

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bullying prevention programs have been shown to be generally effective in reducing bullying and victimization. However, the effects are relatively small in randomized experiments and greater in quasi-experimental and age-cohort designs. Programs that are more intensive and of longer duration (for both children and teachers are more effective, as are programs containing more components. Several program components are associated with large effect sizes, including parent training or meetings and teacher training. These results should inform the design and evaluation of anti-bullying programs in the future, and a system ofaccreditation of effective programs.

  16. Smaller food item sizes of snack foods influence reduced portions and caloric intake in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, David; Waroquier, Laurent; Klein, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Studies considering the impact of food-size variations on consumption have predominantly focused on portion size, whereas very little research has investigated variations in food-item size, especially at snacking occasions, and results have been contradictory. This study evaluated the effect of altering the size of food items (ie, small vs large candies) of equal-size food portions on short-term energy intake while snacking. The study used a between-subjects design (n=33) in a randomized experiment conducted in spring 2008. In a psychology laboratory (separate cubicles), participants (undergraduate psychology students, 29 of 33 female, mean age 20.3±2 years, mean body mass index 21.7±3.7) were offered unlimited consumption of candies while participating in an unrelated computerized experiment. For half of the subjects, items were cut in two to make the small food-item size. Food intake (weight in grams, kilocalories, and number of food items) was examined using analysis of variance. Results showed that decreasing the item size of candies led participants to decrease by half their gram weight intake, resulting in an energy intake decrease of 60 kcal compared to the other group. Appetite ratings and subject and food characteristics had no moderating effect. A cognitive bias could explain why people tend to consider that one unit of food (eg, 10 candies) is the appropriate amount to consume, regardless of the size of the food items in the unit. This study suggests a simple dietary strategy, decreasing food-item size without having to alter the portion size offered, may reduce energy intake at snacking occasions. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Zone-size nonuniformity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET regional textural features predicts survival in patients with oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Keelung (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Fang, Yu-Hua Dean [Chang Gung University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taiyuan (China); Lee, Li-yu [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Biostatistics Unit, Clinical Trial Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Ching-Han [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan (China); Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2014-10-23

    The question as to whether the regional textural features extracted from PET images predict prognosis in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) remains open. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of regional heterogeneity in patients with T3/T4 OPSCC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 88 patients with T3 or T4 OPSCC who had completed primary therapy. Progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were the main outcome measures. In an exploratory analysis, a standardized uptake value of 2.5 (SUV 2.5) was taken as the cut-off value for the detection of tumour boundaries. A fixed threshold at 42 % of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub max} 42 %) and an adaptive threshold method were then used for validation. Regional textural features were extracted from pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images using the grey-level run length encoding method and grey-level size zone matrix. The prognostic significance of PET textural features was examined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox regression analysis. Zone-size nonuniformity (ZSNU) was identified as an independent predictor of PFS and DSS. Its prognostic impact was confirmed using both the SUV{sub max} 42 % and the adaptive threshold segmentation methods. Based on (1) total lesion glycolysis, (2) uniformity (a local scale texture parameter), and (3) ZSNU, we devised a prognostic stratification system that allowed the identification of four distinct risk groups. The model combining the three prognostic parameters showed a higher predictive value than each variable alone. ZSNU is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with advanced T-stage OPSCC, and may improve their prognostic stratification. (orig.)

  18. Surface Observation and Pore Size Analyses of Polypropylene/Low-Melting Point Polyester Filter Materials: Influences of Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jia-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes making filter materials with polypropylene (PP and low-melting point (LPET fibers. The influences of temperatures and times of heat treatment on the morphology of thermal bonding points and average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. The test results indicate that the morphology of thermal bonding points is highly correlated with the average pore size. When the temperature of heat treatment is increased, the fibers are joined first with the thermal bonding points, and then with the large thermal bonding areas, thereby decreasing the average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. A heat treatment of 110 °C for 60 seconds can decrease the pore size from 39.6 μm to 12.0 μm.

  19. Influence Of Initiator Types And Emulsion Polymerization Techniques To Particle Size Of Copolymerization Styrene-Butyl Acrylate-Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyanti Sarwono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of initiator types and emulsion polymerization techniques to particle size of copolymerization styrene-butyl acrylate-methyl methacrylate. Copoly(styrene/butyl acrylic/methyl methacrylic was prepared by emulsion polymerization method. This paper describes effect of insiator types i.e. ammonium persulfate (APS, hydrogen peroxide, ters-butyl peroxide (TBHP, initiator redox (H2O2/ascorbic acid and polymerization techniques i.e. batch and semicontinue to particle size distribution of copoly(styrene/butyl acrylic/methyl methacrylic. Initiator TBHP and H2O2 could not initiate copolymerization properly, but initiator APS and redox initiate copolymerization with batch and semi continue techniques could well perform. The higher concentration of APS, the greater particle size of the copolymer, but the copolymer is polymodal. Initiator redox (H2O2/ascorbic acid produced greater particle size than initiator redox (ascorbic acid/ H2O2.

  20. Seasonal resource value and male size influence male aggressive interactions in the leaf footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Zachary J; Allen, Pablo E; Miller, Christine W

    2017-05-01

    In animal contests, resource value (the quality of a given resource) and resource holding potential (a male's absolute fighting ability) are two important factors determining the level of engagement and outcome of contests. Few studies have tested these factors simultaneously. Here, we investigated whether natural, seasonal differences in cactus phenology (fruit quality) influence interactions between males in the leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae). We also considered whether males were more likely to interact when they were similar in size, as predicted by theory. Finally, we examined if male size relative to the size of an opponent predicted competitive success. We found that males have more interactions on cactus with high value ripe fruit, as we predicted. Further, we found that males that were closer in size were more likely to interact, and larger males were more likely to become dominant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Is one enough? The case for non-additive influences of visual features on crossmodal Stroop interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available When different perceptual signals arising from the same physical entity are integrated, they form a more reliable sensory estimate. When such repetitive sensory signals are pitted against other competing stimuli, such as in a Stroop Task, this redundancy may lead to stronger processing that biases behavior towards reporting the redundant stimuli. This bias would therefore be expected to evoke greater incongruency effects than if these stimuli did not contain redundant sensory features. In the present paper we report that this is not the case for a set of three crossmodal, auditory-visual Stroop tasks. In these tasks participants attended to, and reported, either the visual or the auditory stimulus (in separate blocks while ignoring the other, unattended modality. The visual component of these stimuli could be purely semantic (words, purely perceptual (colors, or the combination of both. Based on previous work showing enhanced crossmodal integration and visual search gains for redundantly coded stimuli, we had expected that relative to the single features, redundant visual features would have induced both greater visual distracter incongruency effects for attended auditory targets, and been less influenced by auditory distracters for attended visual targets. Overall, reaction time were faster for visual targets and were dominated by behavioral facilitation for the cross-modal interactions (relative to interference, but showed surprisingly little influence of visual feature redundancy. Post hoc analyses revealed modest and trending evidence for possible increases in behavioral interference for redundant visual distracters on auditory targets, however, these effects were substantially smaller than anticipated and were not accompanied by redundancy effect for behavioral facilitation or for attended visual targets.

  2. The influence of negative stimulus features on conflict adaption:Evidence from fluency of processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eFritz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive control enables adaptive behavior in a dynamically changing environment. In this context, one prominent adaptation effect is the sequential conflict adjustment, i.e. the observation of reduced response interference on trials following conflict trials. Increasing evidence suggests that such response conflicts are registered as aversive signals. So far, however, the functional role of this aversive signal for conflict adaptation to occur has not been put to test directly. In two experiments, the affective valence of conflict stimuli was manipulated by fluency of processing (stimulus contrast. Experiment 1 used a flanker interference task, Experiment 2 a color-word Stroop task. In both experiments, conflict adaptation effects were only present in fluent, but absent in disfluent trials. Results thus speak against the simple idea that any aversive stimulus feature is suited to promote specific conflict adjustments. Two alternative but not mutually exclusive accounts, namely resource competition and adaptation-by-motivation, will be discussed.

  3. Biogeochemical features technogenic pollution of soils under the influence chemical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuraeva I.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The physico-chemical properties of soil (pH, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity. The regularities of the distribution of total and mobile forms of heavy metals in soil sediments in the territory of Shostka Sumy region under the influence of the chemical industry and in the background areas. Biogeochemical indicators obtained content of microscopic fungi and their species, the most characteristic of the study of soils, which can be used as an additional criterion for ecological and geochemical studies.

  4. Influence of mictrostructure features on the corrosion behaviourof AZ91 alloy in chloride media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Bukovinová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the microstructure of as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy, which applied to solution annealing treatment and ageing treatment respectively, was evaluated in terms of its corrosion behaviour in 0.1 M NaCl solution at room temperature. The corrosion process was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and the surface was characterized by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM. The extent of corrosion damage was dependent on the microstructure. Surface potential maps indicated that, the surface potential of α-matrix is more positive than surface potential of β phase.

  5. The features of bile acids exchange in rats under the influence of corvitin

    OpenAIRE

    T. V. Vovkun; P. I. Yanchuk; L. Ya. Shtanova; S. P. Veselskiy; N. B. Filimonova; A. S. Shalamay; V. G. Vedmid

    2017-01-01

    Corvitin is a soluble form of quercetin (QUE) and its effects are based on the ability to inhibit the activity of 5-lipoxygenase and to block the formation of leukotrienes. Corvitin increases bloodflow in the stomach­, pancreas and liver, but its influence on the excretory liver function has not been studied. We investigated the effect of corvitin (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg intraportally) on bile formation, determined the biliary content of total, free and conjugated bile acids (BAs). Free and conjuga...

  6. The influence of powder particle size on properties of Cu-Al2O3 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inert gas atomized prealloyed copper powder containing 2 wt.% Al (average particle size ≈ 30 μm and a mixture consisting of copper (average particle sizes ≈ 15 μm and 30 μm and 4 wt.% of commercial Al2O3 powder particles (average particle size ≈ 0.75 μm were milled separately in a high-energy planetary ball mill up to 20 h in air. Milling was performed in order to strengthen the copper matrix by grain size refinement and Al2O3 particles. Milling in air of prealloyed copper powder promoted formation of finely dispersed nano-sized Al2O3 particles by internal oxidation. On the other side, composite powders with commercial micro-sized Al2O3 particles were obtained by mechanical alloying. Following milling, powders were treated in hydrogen at 400 0C for 1h in order to eliminate copper oxides formed on their surface during milling. Hot-pressing (800 0C for 3 h in argon at pressure of 35 MPa was used for compaction of milled powders. Hot-pressed composite compacts processed from 5 and 20 h milled powders were additionally subjected to high temperature exposure (800°C for 1 and 5h in argon in order to examine their thermal stability. The results were discussed in terms of the effects of different size of starting powders, the grain size refinement and different size of Al2O3 particles on strengthening, thermal stability and electrical conductivity of copper-based composites.

  7. Volume-of-fluid simulations in microfluidic T-junction devices: Influence of viscosity ratio on droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-03-01

    We used volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of droplet formation of Newtonian fluids in microfluidic T-junction devices. To evaluate the performance of the VOF method we examined the regimes of drop formation and determined droplet size as a function of system parameters. Comparison of the simulation results with four sets of experimental data from the literature showed good agreement, validating the VOF method. Motivated by the lack of adequate studies investigating the influence of viscosity ratio (λ) on the generated droplet size, we mapped the dependence of drop volume on capillary number (0.001 1. In addition, we find that at a given capillary number, the size of droplets does not vary appreciably when λ 1. We develop an analytical model for predicting the droplet size that includes a viscosity-dependent breakup time for the dispersed phase. This improved model successfully predicts the effects of the viscosity ratio observed in simulations. Results from this study are useful for the design of lab-on-chip technologies and manufacture of microfluidic emulsions, where there is a need to know how system parameters influence the droplet size.

  8. Influence of transverse mode on retinal spot size and retinal injury effect: A theoretical analysis on 532-nm laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rui Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental transverse mode (TEM00 is preferable for experimental and theoretical study on the laser-induced retinal injury effect, for it can produce the minimal retinal image and establish the most strict laser safety standards. But actually lasers with higher order mode were frequently used in both earlier and recent studies. Generally higher order mode leads to larger retinal spot size and so higher damage threshold, but there are few quantitative analyses on this problem. In this paper, a four-surface schematic eye model is established for human and macaque. The propagation of 532-nm laser in schematic eye is analyzed by the ABCD law of Gaussian optics. It is shown that retinal spot size increases with laser transverse mode order. For relative lower mode order, the retinal spot diameter will not exceed the minimum laser-induced retinal lesion (25 ~ 30 μm in diameter, and so has little effect on retinal damage threshold. While for higher order mode, the larger retinal spot requires more energy to induce injury and so the damage threshold increases. When beam divergence is lowered, the retinal spot size decreases correspondingly, so the effect of mode order can be compensated. The retinal spot size of macaque is slightly smaller than that of human and the ratio between them is independent of mode order. We conclude that the laser mode order has significant influence on retinal spot size but limited influence on the retinal injury effect.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles: the Influence of synthesis method and size on composition and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.D.; Henriques, F.; Ferreira, L.P.; Godinho, M.; Cruz, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with mean diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm were synthesized using two routes: the precipitation method in controlled atmosphere and a reduction–precipitation method under air, in some cases followed by a hydrothermal treatment. The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by the reduction–precipitation method. In order to establish the composition of the iron oxide nanoparticles and its relation with size, the morphological, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The results allow to conclude that the nanoparticles can be essentially described as Fe 3−x O 4 , x decreasing with the particle size increase. The composition and magnetic behavior of the synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are directly related with their size. The overall results are compatible with a core@shell structure model, where a magnetite core is surrounded by an oxidized magnetite layer (labeled as maghemite), the magnetite core dimension depending on the average particle size. - Graphical abstract: TEM images and Mössbauer spectroscopy spectra of Fe 3−x O 4 samples with different sizes. Highlights: ► Fe 3−x O 4 nanoparticles with a mean size between 7 and 20 nm were synthesized. ► The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by a reduction precipitation method, under air. ► The increase of particles size was succeeded using a hydrothermal treatment at 150 °C. ► The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are directly related with their size

  10. The influence of family-related factors on the succession process in small and medium-sized family businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Venter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study family-related factors that can influence the succession process in small and medium-sized family businesses are empirically investigated.  The dependent variable in this study is measured by two underlying dimensions, namely satisfaction with the process and continued profitability of the business.  The empirical results indicate that the family-related factors that influence both the aforementioned dimensions are the mutual acceptance of roles, the relationship between the owner-manager and successor, and family harmony.  The continued profitability of the business is also influenced by the agreement to continue the business. The existence of family harmony in itself influences the relationship between the owner-manager and successor, the agreement to continue the business, as well as the mutual acceptance of roles.  The managerial implications of these empirical findings are discussed and recommendations offered.

  11. Ontogenetic niche shifts in dinosaurs influenced size, diversity and extinction in terrestrial vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, Daryl; Carbone, Chris; Müller, Dennis W H; Clauss, Marcus

    2012-08-23

    Given the physiological limits to egg size, large-bodied non-avian dinosaurs experienced some of the most extreme shifts in size during postnatal ontogeny found in terrestrial vertebrate systems. In contrast, mammals--the other dominant vertebrate group since the Mesozoic--have less complex ontogenies. Here, we develop a model that quantifies the impact of size-specific interspecies competition on abundances of differently sized dinosaurs and mammals, taking into account the extended niche breadth realized during ontogeny among large oviparous species. Our model predicts low diversity at intermediate size classes (between approx. 1 and 1000 kg), consistent with observed diversity distributions of dinosaurs, and of Mesozoic land vertebrates in general. It also provides a mechanism--based on an understanding of different ecological and evolutionary constraints across vertebrate groups--that explains how mammals and birds, but not dinosaurs, were able to persist beyond the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, and how post-K-T mammals were able to diversify into larger size categories.

  12. Influences of sex, ontogeny and body size on the thermal ecology of Liolaemus lutzae (Squamata, Liolaemidae) in a restinga remnant in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia-Carneiro, Thiago; Rocha, Carlos Frederico Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Variations in body temperature (Tb) of lizards can be partially explained by intrinsic factors such as sex, ontogeny and body size. Liolaemus lutzae is a lizard species restricted to restingas in the Brazilian coast in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Herein, we studied sexual dimorphism and influences of sex, ontogeny, and body size to the Tb of L. lutzae. Adult males were larger than adult females, probably due to both intersexual selection and intra-sexual selection. There was intersexual difference in lizards' Tb (males hotter than females), but Tb did not differ after factored out for the effects of body size. The mean Tb of juvenile lizards was higher than that of adults after factored out for the effect of body mass. It is possible that adults may have excluded juveniles from microhabitats with better thermal regimes. Also, this might have occurred due to requirements of juveniles to maintain high growth rates. Forage searching for prey by juveniles also exposes them to high environmental temperatures. Juveniles also may have higher Tb than co-specific adults (relative to body mass) to favor prey capture. In absolute values, adult lizards tended to use microhabitats with lower temperatures than that used by juveniles, possibly to avoid risks of overheating and death. Body temperature and snout-vent length were positively related, as well as body temperature and body mass, presumably caused by the thermal inertia of the bodies (trend of a body to resist to changes in its temperature). Intrinsic factors such as sex, ontogeny and body size can affect the thermal ecology of L. lutzae, despite coastal habitat features to which they are exposed also influences the body temperature of active lizards in restinga habitats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How do changes in suspended sediment concentration alone influence the size of mud flocs under steady turbulent shearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duc; Kuprenas, Rachel; Strom, Kyle

    2018-04-01

    Modeling the size and settling velocity of sediment under the influence of flocculation is crucial for the accurate prediction of mud movement and deposition in sediment transport modeling of environments such as agricultural streams, large coastal rivers, estuaries, river plumes, and turbidity currents. Yet, collecting accurate and high resolution data on mud flocs is difficult. As a result, models that account for the influence of flocculation on mud settling velocity are based on sparse data that often present non-congruent relationship in floc properties with basic influencers of flocculations such as suspended sediment concentration. This study examines the influence of suspended sediment concentration on floc size populations within a turbulent suspension. Specifically, the work investigates: (1) the relationship between the equilibrium floc size and suspended sediment concentration under conditions of steady concentration and turbulent shearing; and (2) the speed at which mature flocs adapt to an unsteady drop in the concentration when turbulent shear is constant. Two sets of experiments were used to investigate the target processes. All work was conducted in laboratory mixing tanks using a floc camera and a newly developed image acquisition method. The new method allows for direct imaging and sizing of flocs within turbulent suspensions of clay in concentrations ranging from 15 to 400 mg/L, so that no transfer of the sample to another settling column or imaging tank is needed. The primary conclusions from the two sets of experiments are: (1) that the equilibrium floc size in an energetic turbulent suspension is linearly and positively related to concentration over the range of C = 50 to 400 mg/L, yet with a smaller-than-expected slope based on previous data and models from low-energy environments; and (2) that floc sizes decrease quickly (with a time lag on the order of 1-15 min) to time-varying decreases in concentration at turbulent shearing of G = 50s-1

  14. Influence of laser cladding regimes on structural features and mechanical properties of coatings on titanium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyutina, Yulia N.; Lazurenko, Daria V.; Bataev, Ivan A.; Movtchan, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an influence of the tantalum content on the structure and properties of surface layers of the titanium alloy doped using a laser treatment technology was investigated. It was found that an increase of a quantity of filler powder per one millimeter of a track length contributed to a rise of the content of undissolved particles in coatings. The maximum thickness of a cladded layer was reached at the mass of powder per the length unit equaled to 5.5 g/cm. Coatings were characterized by the formation of a dendrite structure with attributes of segregation. The width of a quenched fusion zone grew with an increase in the rate of powder feed to the treated area. Significant strengthening of the titanium surface layer alloyed with tantalum was not observed; however, the presence of undissolved tantalum particles can decrease the hardness of titanium surface layers

  15. Influence of laser cladding regimes on structural features and mechanical properties of coatings on titanium substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Yulia N.; Lazurenko, Daria V.; Bataev, Ivan A.; Movtchan, Igor A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper an influence of the tantalum content on the structure and properties of surface layers of the titanium alloy doped using a laser treatment technology was investigated. It was found that an increase of a quantity of filler powder per one millimeter of a track length contributed to a rise of the content of undissolved particles in coatings. The maximum thickness of a cladded layer was reached at the mass of powder per the length unit equaled to 5.5 g/cm. Coatings were characterized by the formation of a dendrite structure with attributes of segregation. The width of a quenched fusion zone grew with an increase in the rate of powder feed to the treated area. Significant strengthening of the titanium surface layer alloyed with tantalum was not observed; however, the presence of undissolved tantalum particles can decrease the hardness of titanium surface layers.

  16. Influence of laser cladding regimes on structural features and mechanical properties of coatings on titanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyutina, Yulia N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.ru; Lazurenko, Daria V., E-mail: pavlyukova-87@mail.ru; Bataev, Ivan A., E-mail: ivanbataev@ngs.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation); Movtchan, Igor A., E-mail: igor.movtchan@enise.fr [National Engineering School in Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, 42000 France (France)

    2015-10-27

    In this paper an influence of the tantalum content on the structure and properties of surface layers of the titanium alloy doped using a laser treatment technology was investigated. It was found that an increase of a quantity of filler powder per one millimeter of a track length contributed to a rise of the content of undissolved particles in coatings. The maximum thickness of a cladded layer was reached at the mass of powder per the length unit equaled to 5.5 g/cm. Coatings were characterized by the formation of a dendrite structure with attributes of segregation. The width of a quenched fusion zone grew with an increase in the rate of powder feed to the treated area. Significant strengthening of the titanium surface layer alloyed with tantalum was not observed; however, the presence of undissolved tantalum particles can decrease the hardness of titanium surface layers.

  17. The influence of united psychosomatic factors on clinical features of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejanović Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceal unit. Dermatological disorders are often associated with a variety of psychological problems which the patient have. Psichodermatologic disorders (acne are associated with skin problems that are not directly connected to the mind, but that react to emotional states, such as stress. The aim of this article is to show if there is any psychological characteristic which are common for the whole group of ill-patients from acne, as well as whether there is correlation between any type of acne and psychological parameters. Own exploration consist at thirty patients with three clinical type of acne. Personality test-Kornel index were used for identification and diagnostic psychosomatic disorders. The results are: neurastenic parameters, parameters of conversion and parameters of psychopathy in different percent at both sex, and different clinical features. We show correlation united 2-6 psichosomatic disorders in male sex with softly type of acne. In female sex with any type of acne are responsible 7-12 united findings. The association of several psychosomatic factors could possibly be responsible for the onset of acne at any type.

  18. Inherent structure features of beryllium and their influence on the performance polycrystalline metal under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomutov, A.M.; Mikhailov, V.S.; Pronin, V.N.; Pakhomov, Ya.D. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation `A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM)`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The anisotropy of physical properties of beryllium single crystals resulting from covalent bonds in crystal lattice leads to significant residual thermal microstresses (RTM) in the polycrystalline metal. It is demonstrated experimentally that there is a simple linear dependence between the magnitude of RTM and the ultimate tensile strength. The factors controlling RTM are analysed and in the framework of powder metallurgy process the technological methods of producing beryllium with the needed properties are recommended. Primarily it is necessary to control the quantity and extent of dispersity of intergranular oxide inclusions and mean grain size in combination with the high degree of macro- and microhomogenity of the structure. The requirements to beryllium microstructure for different operating conditions including neutron fluxes and transient temperature fields are formulated. In the framework of the concept under development one can explain formerly not fully understandable effects, which are characteristic of polycrystalline beryllium such as unexpected Petch-Stro curve, the role of twinning etc., and predict new ones. In particular, it can be possible to expect the growth of ductility of high strength beryllium grades as neutron irradiated. (author)

  19. Influence of pore size distributions on decomposition of maize leaf residue: evidence from X-ray computed micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negassa, Wakene; Guber, Andrey; Kravchenko, Alexandra; Rivers, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Soil's potential to sequester carbon (C) depends not only on quality and quantity of organic inputs to soil but also on the residence time of the applied organic inputs within the soil. Soil pore structure is one of the main factors that influence residence time of soil organic matter by controlling gas exchange, soil moisture and microbial activities, thereby soil C sequestration capacity. Previous attempts to investigate the fate of organic inputs added to soil did not allow examining their decomposition in situ; the drawback that can now be remediated by application of X-ray computed micro-tomography (µ-CT). The non-destructive and non-invasive nature of µ-CT gives an opportunity to investigate the effect of soil pore size distributions on decomposition of plant residues at a new quantitative level. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of pore size distributions on the decomposition of plant residue added to soil. Samples with contrasting pore size distributions were created using aggregate fractions of five different sizes (pieces of maize leaves 2.5 mg in size (equivalent to 1.71 mg C g-1 soil) were added to half of the studied samples. Samples with and without maize leaves were incubated for 120 days. CO2 emission from the samples was measured at regular time intervals. In order to ensure that the observed differences are due to differences in pore structure and not due to differences in inherent properties of the studied aggregate fractions, we repeated the whole experiment using soil from the same aggregate size fractions but ground to six replicated samples were used for intact and ground samples of all sizes with and without leaves. Two replications of the intact aggregate fractions of all sizes with leaves were subjected to µ-CT scanning before and after incubation, whereas all the remaining replications of both intact and ground aggregate fractions of <0.05, 0.05-0.1, and 1.0-2.0 mm sizes with leaves were scanned with µ-CT after

  20. Cleft Lip and Palate in CHARGE Syndrome: Phenotypic Features That Influence Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathryn V; Ganske, Ingrid M; Rottgers, Stephen A; Lim, So Young; Mulliken, John B

    2018-03-01

    Infants with syndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P) often require more complex care than their nonsyndromic counterparts. Our purpose was to (1) determine the prevalence of CL/P in patients with CHARGE syndrome and (2) highlight factors that affect management in this subset of children. This is a retrospective review from 1998 to 2016. Patients with CHARGE syndrome were diagnosed clinically and genetically. Prevalence of CL/P was determined and clinical details tabulated: phenotypic anomalies, cleft types, operative treatment, and results of repair. CHARGE syndrome was confirmed in 44 patients: 11 (25%) had cleft lip and palate and 1 had cleft palate only. Surgical treatment followed our usual protocols. Two patients with cardiac anomalies had prolonged recovery following surgical correction, necessitating palatal closure prior to nasolabial repair. One of these patients was too old for dentofacial orthopedics and underwent combined premaxillary setback and palatoplasty, prior to labial closure. Velopharyngeal insufficiency was frequent (n = 3/7). All patients had feeding difficulty and required a gastrostomy tube. All patients had neurosensory hearing loss; anomalies of the semicircular canals were frequent (n = 3/4). External auricular anomalies, colobomas, and cardiovascular anomalies were also common (n = 8/11). Other associated anomalies were choanal atresia (n = 4/11) and tracheoesophageal fistula (n = 2/11). CHARGE syndrome is an under-recognized genetic cause of cleft lip and palate. Hearing loss and speech and feeding difficulties often occur in these infants. Diagnosis can be delayed if the child presents with covert phenotypic features, such as chorioretinal colobomas, semicircular canal hypoplasia, and unilateral choanal atresia.

  1. Influence of phosphorous and sulphur as well as grain size on creep in pure copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Henrik; Seitisleam, Facredin; Sandstroem, Rolf

    1999-12-01

    Uniaxial creep tests have been performed at 175 deg C for extruded oxygen-free copper. The effect of different contents of phosphorous and sulphur as well as different grain sizes have been studied. The copper with < 1 ppm phosphorous and with a 6 ppm sulphur content showed significantly lower creep life and ductility than batches with higher P content. An increase of the P content to 29 ppm increased the creep life and ductility, but a further increase did not affect the properties further. A similar drop in the creep properties was found in the material with a grain size of about 2000 μm. A reduction of the mean grain size to 800 μm had a beneficial effect on the creep ductility. A further reduction of the grain size did not give any further improvements. All tests except those with a phosphorous content of less than 1 ppm P and those with a mean grain size of about 2000 μm failed at an elongation greater than 20%, most of them at 30-40%. The variation in sulphur content from 6 to 12 ppm did not affect the creep properties. The main creep rupture mechanisms were found to be cavitation and microcracking at the grain boundaries. Master curves for extrapolation are provided for creep rupture as well as for 5% and 10% creep strain

  2. Influence of particle size on appearance and in vitro efficacy of sunscreens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Granemann e Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology applies to diverse sectors of science. In cosmetic area, investments have strengthened the idea that nanoproducts provide innumerable benefits to consumers. Extreme exposition to solar light can cause undesirable effects, thus, adding UV filters in cosmetic products are often used as prevention. Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and benzophenone-3 are UV filters widely used in sunscreen formulations, this UV filters absorb UVB and UVA radiation, respectively. In this study, sunscreen formulations were developed as nano and macroemulsion, but composed by the same raw material. Nanoemulsion was obtained by phase inversion temperature method (PIT. Physical and functional properties were evaluated by visual analysis, particle size distribution and by diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry. Achieved nanoemulsion showed bluish brightness aspect, less apparent consistency than macroemulsion, stability longer than 48 hours (22.0 ± 2.0 °C and bimodal particle size distribution with average (mean sizes around 10 nm (61% and 4.5 µm (39%. Macroemulsion showed milky aspect, higher consistency than nanoemulsion, instability after 48 hours (22.0 ± 2.0 °C and bimodal particle size distribution with average (mean size around 202 nm (9% and 10.4 µm (91%. Effectiveness profile of sunscreen formulations remained apparently similar, based on achieved results of in vitro SPF, UVA/UVB ratio and critical wavelength assays.

  3. Encouraging vegetable intake as a snack among children: the influence of portion and unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Bruggers, Ilse; de Vet, Emely

    2015-10-01

    People eat more unhealthy foods when served more (portion size effect) and when the food is served in larger units (unit size effect). The present study aimed to examine whether these effects can be used for the good: to increase vegetable consumption among children. A 2×2 between-subjects experiment was conducted at two schools. Pupils were presented in class with cucumber that varied both in unit size (one piece v. pre-sliced) and portion size (one-third v. two-thirds of a cucumber). Children ate ad libitum during the morning break and filled in a survey. Primary schools in the centre of the Netherlands. Primary-school pupils (n 255) aged 8-13 years. Children ate 54 % more cucumber when served a large compared with a smaller portion (difference of 49 g; P<0·001). Large units did not impact consumption (P=0·58), but were considered as less convenient to eat than small units (P=0·001). Findings suggest that children's vegetable intake can be improved by serving larger portions in smaller-sized pieces.

  4. Influence of Fe(Cr) miscibility on thin film grain size and stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuyang; Kaub, Tyler; Martens, Richard L.; Thompson, Gregory B., E-mail: gthompson@eng.ua.edu

    2016-08-01

    During the post coalescence portion of thin film deposition, thin film stress is related to the grain size and adatom mobility of the depositing material. Using a Fe(Cr) alloy thin film, the manipulation of the tensile stress for thick films was studied as a function of Cr solute content up to 8 at.%. Solute concentrations up to 4 at.% resulted in an approximate 50% increase in grain size that resulted in a reduction of the tensile stress to be lower than either elemental film. Upon increasing the Cr content, the grain size refined and the tensile stress of the films increased. Atom probe characterization of the grain boundaries confirmed Cr chemical partitioning which refined the grain size and altered the film's texture, both of which contributed to the change in film stress. The use of intrinsic segregation, rather than deposition processing parameters, appears to be another viable option for regulating film stress. - Highlights: • Solute segregation to regulate grain size in controlling film stress • Quantification of Cr interfacial excess as a function of alloy content • Quantification of texture fiber alignment as a function of Cr content.

  5. Effect of size of lymph node metastases on the radiation response: influence of misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Malaise, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Metastatic lymph nodes of EMT6 tumors growing in athymic nude mice were used at different sizes and their radiosensitivity was tested with the in vitro colony method. Following the administration of 1250 rad, the surviving fraction in air-breathing animals was found to be dependent on the size of these metastases, expressed either in weight or in cell yield per lymph node. The increasing radioresistance with increase in size was probably due to the presence of higher hypoxic fraction in big nodes (0.43 in nodes weighing more than 320 mg vs 0.10 in nodes less than 80 mg). The surviving fraction after irradiation in acutely hypoxic conditions (asphyxiated animals) or in fully oxygenated ones (in vitro) was not size dependent. Great variations were observed in the radiosensitivity of small metastatic nodes, whereas bigger metastases had a more homogeneous response. The effect of the radiosensitizer misonidazole at a dose of 0.3 mg/g was assessed on lymph node metastases of different sizes. In the presence of the drug, the survival level of big and small metastases differed by a factor of 2.2, as opposed to 4.3 in untreated metastases. This suggests that the radiosensitization is less pronounced in metastases containing a smaller hypoxic fraction

  6. Design and formulation of nano-sized spray dried efavirenz-part I: influence of formulation parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katata, Lebogang, E-mail: lebzakate@yahoo.com; Tshweu, Lesego; Naidoo, Saloshnee; Kalombo, Lonji; Swai, Hulda [Materials Science and Manufacturing, Centre of Polymers and Composites, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (South Africa)

    2012-11-15

    Efavirenz (EFV) is one of the first-line antiretroviral drugs recommended by the World Health Organisation for treating HIV. It is a hydrophobic drug that suffers from low aqueous solubility (4 {mu}g/mL), which leads to a limited oral absorption and low bioavailability. In order to improve its oral bioavailability, nano-sized polymeric delivery systems are suggested. Spray dried polycaprolactone-efavirenz (PCL-EFV) nanoparticles were prepared by the double emulsion method. The Taguchi method, a statistical design with an L{sub 8} orthogonal array, was implemented to optimise the formulation parameters of PCL-EFV nanoparticles. The types of sugar (lactose or trehalose), surfactant concentration and solvent (dichloromethane and ethyl acetate) were chosen as significant parameters affecting the particle size and polydispersity index (PDI). Small nanoparticles with an average particle size of less than 254 {+-} 0.95 nm in the case of ethyl acetate as organic solvent were obtained as compared to more than 360 {+-} 19.96 nm for dichloromethane. In this study, the type of solvent and sugar were the most influencing parameters of the particle size and PDI. Taguchi method proved to be a quick, valuable tool in optimising the particle size and PDI of PCL-EFV nanoparticles. The optimised experimental values for the nanoparticle size and PDI were 217 {+-} 2.48 nm and 0.093 {+-} 0.02.

  7. Design and formulation of nano-sized spray dried efavirenz-part I: influence of formulation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Lebogang; Tshweu, Lesego; Naidoo, Saloshnee; Kalombo, Lonji; Swai, Hulda

    2012-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is one of the first-line antiretroviral drugs recommended by the World Health Organisation for treating HIV. It is a hydrophobic drug that suffers from low aqueous solubility (4 μg/mL), which leads to a limited oral absorption and low bioavailability. In order to improve its oral bioavailability, nano-sized polymeric delivery systems are suggested. Spray dried polycaprolactone-efavirenz (PCL-EFV) nanoparticles were prepared by the double emulsion method. The Taguchi method, a statistical design with an L 8 orthogonal array, was implemented to optimise the formulation parameters of PCL-EFV nanoparticles. The types of sugar (lactose or trehalose), surfactant concentration and solvent (dichloromethane and ethyl acetate) were chosen as significant parameters affecting the particle size and polydispersity index (PDI). Small nanoparticles with an average particle size of less than 254 ± 0.95 nm in the case of ethyl acetate as organic solvent were obtained as compared to more than 360 ± 19.96 nm for dichloromethane. In this study, the type of solvent and sugar were the most influencing parameters of the particle size and PDI. Taguchi method proved to be a quick, valuable tool in optimising the particle size and PDI of PCL-EFV nanoparticles. The optimised experimental values for the nanoparticle size and PDI were 217 ± 2.48 nm and 0.093 ± 0.02.

  8. The features of bile acids exchange in rats under the influence of corvitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Vovkun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corvitin is a soluble form of quercetin (QUE and its effects are based on the ability to inhibit the activity of 5-lipoxygenase and to block the formation of leukotrienes. Corvitin increases bloodflow in the stomach­, pancreas and liver, but its influence on the excretory liver function has not been studied. We investigated the effect of corvitin (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg intraportally on bile formation, determined the biliary content of total, free and conjugated bile acids (BAs. Free and conjugated BAs were separated by thin layer chromatography method. It was shown that corvitin increased the content of total BAs in the bile of rats in all tested groups. At a dose of 2.5 mg/kg flavonoid did not сhange free BAs secretion, but while elevated the content of conjugated BAs. Both free and conjugated BAs secretion was increased in rats treated with corvitin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Increasing of corvitin dose to 10 mg/kg resulted in enhanced secretion of free BAs. Consequently, inhibition of leukotrienes synthesis by corvitin is followed by modulation of total, free and conjugated BAs formation and secretion into the bile.

  9. The influence of the perinatal environment on the heart: morphological, electrocardiographic, and multimodality imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mercuro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review the studies performed to evaluate the influence of perinatal environment on neonatal heart, detected by electrocardiography, echocardiography, and other imaging techniques. Prenatal conditions (such as intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity at birth and some post-natal events (such as perinatal asphyxia and corticosteroids administration, may have early and late detrimental effects on the heart may predispose to a number of future cardiovascular adverse events. For example, subjects born preterm may be at potentially higher risk of developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias as well. Moreover, in individuals born with an extremely low birthweight atrial septal aneurysms are present in about one third of the subjects in the study. Thus, a long-life follow up is suggested in these subjects.Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  10. Influence of structural features of carrageenan on the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volod'ko, A V; Davydova, V N; Glazunov, V P; Likhatskaya, G N; Yermak, I M

    2016-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) of carrageenans (CG)-κ-, κ/β-, λ-and x-CG with chitosan were obtained. The formation of PEC was detected by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and by centrifugation in a Percoll gradient. The influence of the structural peculiarities of CG on its interaction with chitosan was studied. The results of centrifugation showed that x-CG with a high degree of sulphation (SD) was completely bound to chitosan, unlike low SD κ-CG and κ/β-CG. Binding constant values showed there was a high affinity of CG for chitosan. CG with flexible macromolecule conformation and high SD exhibited the greatest binding affinity for chitosan. The full-atomic 3D-structures of the PEC κ-CG: chitosan in solution have been obtained by the experiments in silico for the first time. The amino groups of chitosan make the largest contribution to the energy of the complex formation by means of hydrogen and ionic bonds. The most probable complexes have stoichiometries of 1:1 and 1:1.5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of the grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardal, J.M.; Tavares, S.S.M.; Fonseca, M. Cindra; Souza, J.A. de; Corte, R.R.A.; Abreu, H.F.G. de

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in a superduplex stainless steel was investigated. The materials studied were heat treated isothermally at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for times up to 120 min. Hardness tests, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were carried out to detect sigma and other harmful precipitate phases. The ferritic and austenitic grain sizes in the solution treated condition of the two steels analyzed were measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Cyclic polarization corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance. The results presented show that the precipitation of deleterious phases such as χ, σ and γ 2 , which can occur during welding and forming operations, is retarded by grain growth

  12. Variability of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes with quantitative gated SPECT: influence of algorithm, pixel size and reconstruction parameters in small and normal-sized hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambye, Anne-Sophie; Vervaet, Ann; Dobbeleir, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Several software packages are commercially available for quantification of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes from myocardial gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), all of which display a high reproducibility. However, their accuracy has been questioned in patients with a small heart. This study aimed to evaluate the performances of different software and the influence of modifications in acquisition or reconstruction parameters on LVEF and volume measurements, depending on the heart size. In 31 patients referred for gated SPECT, 64 2 and 128 2 matrix acquisitions were consecutively obtained. After reconstruction by filtered back-projection (Butterworth, 0.4, 0.5 or 0.6 cycles/cm cut-off, order 6), LVEF and volumes were computed with different software [three versions of Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), the Emory Cardiac Toolbox (ECT) and the Stanford University (SU-Segami) Medical School algorithm] and processing workstations. Depending upon their end-systolic volume (ESV), patients were classified into two groups: group I (ESV>30 ml, n=14) and group II (ESV 2 to 128 2 were associated with significantly larger volumes as well as lower LVEF values. Increasing the filter cut-off frequency had the same effect. With SU-Segami, a larger matrix was associated with larger end-diastolic volumes and smaller ESVs, resulting in a highly significant increase in LVEF. Increasing the filter sharpness, on the other hand, had no influence on LVEF though the measured volumes were significantly larger. (orig.)

  13. The influence of micropore size on the mechanical properties of bulk hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Jacqueline M; Vogl, Michelle L; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J

    2009-10-01

    While recognized as a promising bone substitute material, hydroxyapatite (HA) has had limited use in clinical settings because of its inherent brittle behavior. It is well established that macropores ( approximately 100 microm) in a HA implant, or scaffold, are required for bone ingrowth, but recent research has shown that ingrowth is enhanced when scaffolds also contain microporosity. HA is sensitive to synthesis and processing parameters and therefore characterization for specific applications is necessary for transition to the clinic. To that end, the mechanical behavior of bulk microporous HA and HA scaffolds with multi-scale porosity (macropores between rods in the range of 250-350 microm and micropores within the rods with average size of either 5.96 microm or 16.2 microm) was investigated in order to determine how strength and reliability were affected by micropore size (5.96 microm versus 16.2 microm). For the bulk microporous HA, strength increased with decreasing micropore size in both bending (19 MPa to 22 MPa) and compression (71 MPa to 110 MPa). To determine strength reliability, the Weibull moduli for the bulk microporous HA were determined. The Weibull moduli for bending increased (became more reliable) with decreasing pore size (7 to 10) while the Weibull moduli for compression decreased (became less reliable) with decreasing pore size (9 to 6). Furthermore, the elastic properties of the bulk microporous HA (elastic modulus of 30 GPa) and the compressive strengths of the HA scaffolds with multi-scale porosity (8 MPa) did not vary with pore size. The mechanisms responsible for the trends observed were discussed.

  14. Influence of seed size and ecological factors on the germination and emergence of field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Tanveer,A; Tasneem,M; Khaliq,A; Javaid,M.M; Chaudhry,M.N

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of seed germination ecology of weeds can assist in predicting their potential distribution and developing effective management strategies. Influence of environmental factors and seed size on germination and seedling emergence of Convolvulus arvensis (field bindweed) was studied in laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Germination occurred over a wide range of constant temperatures, between 15 and 40 ºC, with optimum germination between 20 and 25 ºC. Time to start germination,...

  15. Beyond the genetic basis of sensation seeking: The influence of birth order, family size and parenting styles

    OpenAIRE

    Feij, Jan A,; Taris, Toon W.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic analyses of sensation seeking have shown fairly high heritabilities for measures of this trait. However, 40 to 60% of the variance remains unexplained by genetic factors. This longitudinal study examines the influence of characteristics of the family environment -- birth order, family size, socio-economic status and parenting styles -- on two dimensions of sensation seeking: disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Previous research has shown that these dimensions load on the same fa...

  16. The Sample Size Influence in the Accuracy of the Image Classification of the Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomaz C. e C. da Costa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Landuse/landcover maps produced by classification of remote sensing images incorporate uncertainty. This uncertainty is measured by accuracy indices using reference samples. The size of the reference sample is defined by approximation by a binomial function without the use of a pilot sample. This way the accuracy are not estimated, but fixed a priori. In case of divergency between the estimated and a priori accuracy the error of the sampling will deviate from the expected error. The size using pilot sample (theorically correct procedure justify when haven´t estimate of accuracy for work area, referent the product remote sensing utility.

  17. Influence of Architectural Features and Styles on Various Acoustical Measures in Churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Antonio Pedro Oliveira De.

    This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverberation Time and Loudness rm (BR_-RT and rm BR_-L), Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI), and the binaural Coherence (COH). The scope of this research is to investigate how the acoustical performance of Catholic churches relates to their architectural features and to determine simple formulas to predict acoustical measures by the use of elementary architectural parameters. Prediction equations were defined among the acoustical measures to estimate values at individual locations within each room as well as the mean values in each church. Best fits with rm R^2~0.9 were not uncommon among many of the measures. Within and interchurch differences in the data for the acoustical measures were also analyzed. The variations of RT and EDT were identified as much smaller than the variations of the other measures. The churches tested were grouped in eight architectural styles, and the effect of their evolution through time on these acoustical measures was investigated. Statistically significant differences were found regarding some architectural styles that can be traced to historical changes in Church history, especially to the Reformation period. Prediction equations were defined to estimate mean acoustical measures by the use of fifteen simple architectural parameters. The use of the Sabine and Eyring reverberation time equations was tested. The effect of coupled spaces was analyzed, and a new algorithm for the application of the Sabine equation was developed, achieving an average of

  18. Influence of hydroxyapatite granule size, porosity, and crystallinity on tissue reaction in vivo. Part A: synthesis, characterization of the materials, and SEM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté Sánchez de Val, José E; Calvo-Guirado, José L; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Mazón, Patricia; De Aza, Piedad N

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was the synthesis and analysis of the tissue reaction to three different Hydroxyapatite (HA)-based bone substitute materials differing only in granule size, porosity, and crystallinity through an animal experimental model at 60 days. Three different HA-based biomaterials were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and EDS analysis, the resultant product was ground in three particle sizes: Group I (2000-4000 μm), Group II (1000-2000 μm), and Group III (600-1000 μm). Critical size defects were created in both tibias of 15 rabbits. Four defects per rabbit for a total of 60 defects were grafted with the synthesized materials as follows: Group I (15 defects), Group II (15 defects), Group III (15 defects), and empty (15 defects control). After animals sacrifice at 60 days samples were obtained and processed for SEM and EDS evaluation of Ca/P ratios, elemental mapping was performed to determine the chemical degradation process and changes to medullary composition in all the four study groups. The tendency for the density was to increase with the increasing annealing temperature; in this way it was possible to observe that the sample that shows highest crystallinity and crystal size corresponding to that of group I. The SEM morphological examination showed that group III implant showed numerous resorption regions, group II implant presented an average resorption rate of all the implants. The group I displayed smoother surface features, in comparison with the other two implants. The data from this study show that changing the size, porosity, and crystallinity of one HA-based bone substitute material can influence the integration of the biomaterials within the implantation site and the new bone formation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subcatchment deltas and upland features influence multiscale aquatic ecosystem recovery in damaged landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielstra, Brian W; Arnott, Shelley E; Gunn, John M

    2017-12-01

    Assessing biological recovery in damaged aquatic environments requires the consideration of multiple spatial and temporal scales. Past research has focused on assessing lake recovery from atmospheric or catchment disturbance at regional or catchment levels. Studies have also rarely considered the influences of adjacent terrestrial characteristics on within-lake habitats, such as subcatchment delta confluences. We used Hyalella azteca, a ubiquitous freshwater amphipod, as a sensitive indicator to assess the importance of local subcatchment scale factors in the context of multiscale lake recovery within the metal mining region of Sudbury, Canada following a period of major reductions in atmospheric pollution. At the regional scale, data from repeated surveys of 40 lakes showed higher probabilities of H. azteca occurrence with higher lake water conductivity, alkalinity, and pH and lower metal concentrations. The importance of metals decreased through time and the importance of higher conductivity, alkalinity, and pH increased. At the subcatchment scale, a subset of six lakes sampled across a colonization gradient revealed higher H. azteca abundances at subcatchment delta sites than non-delta sites in early colonization stages, and that abundance at delta sites was correlated with both within-lake habitat and terrestrial subcatchment characteristics. For example, wetland cover reduced the strength of positive associations between H. azteca abundance and macrophyte density. A single lake from this subset also revealed higher abundances at delta sites associated with higher concentrations of terrestrial organic matter and larger subcatchments. Our results demonstrate that factors affecting recovery can change with the scale of study, and that managing terrestrial-aquatic linkages is important for facilitating recovery processes within damaged lake ecosystems. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  20. Habitat features influencing jaguar Panthera onca (Carnivora: Felidae occupancy in Tortuguero National Park, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanny Arroyo-Arce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Habitat characteristics and human activities are known to play a major role in the occupancy of jaguars Panthera onca across their range, however the key variables influencing jaguar distribution in Tortuguero National Park, Costa Rica, have yet to be identified. This study evaluated jaguar occupancy in Tortuguero National Park and the surrounding area. Jaguar detection/non-detection data was collected using digital camera traps distributed within the boundaries of the protected area. Local community members were also interviewed to determine jaguar occurrence in the Park’s buffer zone. Occupancy models were then applied to identify the habitat characteristics that may better explain jaguar distribution across the study area. From June 2012 to June 2013, a total of 4 339 camera trap days were used to identify 18 individual jaguars inside the protected area; 17 of these jaguars were exclusively detected within the coastal habitat, whilst the remaining individual was detected solely within the interior of the Park. Interviewees reported 61 occasions of jaguar presence inside the buffer zone, between 1995 and 2013, with 80% of these described by the communities of Lomas de Sierpe, Barra de Parismina and La Aurora. These communities also reported the highest levels of livestock predation by jaguars (85% of attacks. In the study area, jaguar occurrence was positively correlated with the seasonal presence of nesting green turtles Chelonia mydas, and negatively correlated with distance to the Park boundary. Our findings suggested that the current occupancy of the jaguar in the study area may be a response to: 1 the vast availability of prey (marine turtles on Tortuguero beach, 2 the decline of its primary prey species as a result of illegal hunting inside the Park, and 3 the increase in anthropogenic pressures in the Park boundaries. Rev. Biol. Trop. 62 (4: 1449-1458. Epub 2014 December 01.

  1. Influence of the particle size of zeolite HZSM-5 on the catalytic performance in the ethene-to-propene reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follmann, S.; Ernst, S. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry; Vetter, A.; Ripperger, S. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mechanical and Process Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In this study, HZSM-5-type zeolites with comparable nSi/nAl-ratios but different crystallite sizes (6 {mu}m, 27 {mu}m, 40 {mu}m and 62 {mu}m) were synthesized and their physicochemical properties characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen physisorption. Their catalytic properties were explored in the acid-catalyzed conversion of ethene to propene (and higher hydrocarbons). The results show that there is a significant influence of the crystallite size of the zeolite catalyst on the activity and time-on-steam stability. While the yields of short-chain olefins do not significantly differ for all materials investigated, the formation of aromatics is significantly suppressed over the catalyst with the largest crystallite size. (orig.)

  2. Influence of content and particle size of waste pet bottles on concrete behavior at different w/c ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, C.; Camacho, N.; Hernandez, M.; Matheus, A.; Gutierrez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the mechanical behavior of concrete with recycled Polyethylene Therephtalate (PET), varying the water/cement ratio (0.50 and 0.60), PET content (10 and 20 vol%) and the particle size. Also, the influence of the thermal degradation of PET in the concrete was studied, when the blends were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 o C). Results indicate that PET-filled concrete, when volume proportion and particle size of PET increased, showed a decrease in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity; however, the water absorption increased. On the other hand, the flexural strength of concrete-PET when exposed to a heat source was strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as on the PET content and particle size. Moreover, the activation energy was affected by the temperature, PET particles location on the slabs and water/cement ratio.

  3. Influence of content and particle size of waste pet bottles on concrete behavior at different w/c ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, C; Camacho, N; Hernández, M; Matheus, A; Gutiérrez, A

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this work was to study the mechanical behavior of concrete with recycled Polyethylene Therephtalate (PET), varying the water/cement ratio (0.50 and 0.60), PET content (10 and 20 vol%) and the particle size. Also, the influence of the thermal degradation of PET in the concrete was studied, when the blends were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 degrees C). Results indicate that PET-filled concrete, when volume proportion and particle size of PET increased, showed a decrease in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity; however, the water absorption increased. On the other hand, the flexural strength of concrete-PET when exposed to a heat source was strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as on the PET content and particle size. Moreover, the activation energy was affected by the temperature, PET particles location on the slabs and water/cement ratio.

  4. The influence of sampling unit size and spatial arrangement patterns on neighborhood-based spatial structure analyses of forest stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Zhang, G.; Hui, G.; Li, Y.; Hu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: Neighborhood-based stand spatial structure parameters can quantify and characterize forest spatial structure effectively. How these neighborhood-based structure parameters are influenced by the selection of different numbers of nearest-neighbor trees is unclear, and there is some disagreement in the literature regarding the appropriate number of nearest-neighbor trees to sample around reference trees. Understanding how to efficiently characterize forest structure is critical for forest management. Area of study: Multi-species uneven-aged forests of Northern China. Material and methods: We simulated stands with different spatial structural characteristics and systematically compared their structure parameters when two to eight neighboring trees were selected. Main results: Results showed that values of uniform angle index calculated in the same stand were different with different sizes of structure unit. When tree species and sizes were completely randomly interspersed, different numbers of neighbors had little influence on mingling and dominance indices. Changes of mingling or dominance indices caused by different numbers of neighbors occurred when the tree species or size classes were not randomly interspersed and their changing characteristics can be detected according to the spatial arrangement patterns of tree species and sizes. Research highlights: The number of neighboring trees selected for analyzing stand spatial structure parameters should be fixed. We proposed that the four-tree structure unit is the best compromise between sampling accuracy and costs for practical forest management. (Author)

  5. Influence of grain size on lithium storage performance of germanium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, J.K.; Lai, M.O.; Lu, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deposited GeO 2 thin films at different temperatures to form different grain sizes. ► Li storage of GeO 2 as anode was studied, which shows that the GeO 2 with grain size of about 10 nm reveals high capacity retention. ► Nanograined GeO 2 also shows better rate capability and cyclability. - Abstract: Germanium oxide (GeO 2 ) films with two different grain sizes of 10 nm (GeO 2 (10 nm)) and 100 nm (GeO 2 (100 nm)) were grown via reactive radio frequency sputtering at different temperatures. Electrochemical measurements of the GeO 2 (10 nm) thin film used as an anode in Li ion rechargeable batteries show superior capacity retention and rate capability compared to those of GeO 2 (100 nm). The GeO 2 (10 nm) thin film possesses an initial capacity of 930 mAh g −1 with 89% capacity retention after 100 cycles, compared with 455 mAh g −1 with 53% of GeO 2 (100 nm) and 225 mAh g −1 , 30% (10 cycles) of common macro-size GeO 2 . Microstructural studies reveal that the GeO 2 (10 nm) thin film can better accommodate volume changes during Li–Ge alloying and de-alloying processes.

  6. Influence of Size Effect and Foreign Gases on Formation of Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2006), s. 56-60 ISSN 0735-1933 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2076203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoparticles * condensation coefficient * size effect Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.708, year: 2006

  7. Influence of sett size and spacing on yield and multiplication ratio of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... and three spacings 12 cm W12 cm, 15 cm W 15 cm, and 15 cm W 23 cm) were studied for their ... greenhouse conditions was highest for the 10 g sett class and decreased with reduction in sett size.

  8. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  9. Influence of antral follicle size on oocyte characteristics and embryo development in the bovine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lequarre, Anne Sophie; Vigneron, Céline; Ribaucour, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    The developmental competence of bovine oocytes isolated from antral follicles of different sizes was assessed in three European laboratories (Belgium, UCL; Denmark, DIAS; France, INRA). Using the same protocol for in vitro production of embryos, the oocytes isolated from follicles with a diameter...

  10. Do ornaments, arrival date, and sperm size influence mating and paternity success in the collared flycatcher?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Edme, A.; Zobač, P.; Opatová, Pavlína; Šplíchalová, P.; Munclinger, P.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Krist, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 3. ISSN 0340-5443 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/2472 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Mating success * Extra-pair paternity * Differential allocation * Sexual ornament * Sperm size Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.185, year: 2016

  11. Flow rate through microfilters: Influence of the pore size distribution, hydrodynamic interactions, wall slip, and inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Valente, Andre X. C. N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the fluid mechanics of viscous flow through filters consisting of perforated thin plates. We classify the effects that contribute to the hydraulic resistance of the filter. Classical analyses assume a single pore size and account only for filter thickness. We extend these results to ob...

  12. Exploring the influence of technology size on the duration of production technology transfer implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between technology size and installation time in technology transfer projects. A literature study revealed that the installation time has so far not received much attention. Current studies address the effectiveness of technology transfer rather than efficiency.

  13. Modelling Visual Quality of Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana: Influence of Cultivar and Pot Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, S.M.P.; Almeida, J.; Eveleens-Clark, B.A.; Bakker, M.J.; Heuvelink, E.

    2008-01-01

    An explanatory model for predicting kalanchoe plant height and cropping duration has been developed for one cultivar and one pot size, as described in earlier papers. In two experiments (winter and summer) seven contrasting cultivars (`Anatole¿, `Debbie¿, `Delia¿, `Mie¿, `Pandora¿, `Tenorio¿ and

  14. Cyclohexane selective photocatalytic oxidation by anatase TiO2: influence of particle size and crystallinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, J.T.; Carneiro, Joana T.; Almeida, A.R.; Almeida, Ana R.; Moulijn, Jacob A.; Mul, Guido

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study is presented on the effect of crystallite size of Anatase (Hombikat, Sachtleben), varied by calcination at different temperatures up to 800 °C, on photocatalytic activity in cyclohexane selective oxidation. Two different reactors were used to test the materials: a top illumination

  15. Influence of Number Size, Problem Structure and Response Mode on Children's Solutions of Multiplication Word Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, E.; And Others

    One important finding from recent research on multiplication word problems is that children's performances are strongly affected by the nature of the multiplier (whether it is an integer, decimal larger than 1 or a decimal smaller than 1). On the other hand, the size of the multiplicand has little or no effect on problem difficulty. The aim of the…

  16. Influence of container size on Wyoming big sagebrush seedling morphology and cold hardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayla R. Herriman; Anthony S. Davis; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is a key component of sagebrush steppe ecosystems and is a dominant shrub throughout the western United States. Our objective was to identify the effect of container size on plant morphology of Wyoming big sagebrush. We used three different stocktypes (45/340 ml [20 in3], 60/250 ml [15 in3], 112/105 ml [6....

  17. The neural basis of the bystander effect--the influence of group size on neural activity when witnessing an emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2014-06-01

    Naturalistic observation and experimental studies in humans and other primates show that observing an individual in need automatically triggers helping behavior. The aim of the present study is to clarify the neurofunctional basis of social influences on individual helping behavior. We investigate whether when participants witness an emergency, while performing an unrelated color-naming task in an fMRI scanner, the number of bystanders present at the emergency influences neural activity in regions related to action preparation. The results show a decrease in activity with the increase in group size in the left pre- and postcentral gyri and left medial frontal gyrus. In contrast, regions related to visual perception and attention show an increase in activity. These results demonstrate the neural mechanisms of social influence on automatic action preparation that is at the core of helping behavior when witnessing an emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: a synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marlene S; Muir, Derek C G; Keating, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaowa

    2015-03-15

    This study was conducted to confirm sporadic measurements made over the late 1970s to the early 1990 s which determined that mercury (Hg) concentrations were low in anadromous char across Arctic and subarctic Canada including northern Québec and Labrador. Over 2004-2013, anadromous char populations across northern Canada were investigated at 20 sites for Hg concentrations and life history characteristics. Hg concentrations were extremely low in anadromous char muscle, typically Hg concentrations over the study area; longitude and latitude also were significant influencing variables. Char length, weight, age, condition factor and lipid content explained additional variance. A tendency towards higher Hg concentrations with increasing latitude may be partially related to decreasing growth of char towards the north. However, Hg concentrations in char were positively correlated with growth rates suggesting that Hg concentrations in char also were higher in the more productive study areas, including to the west where mainland riverine inputs of terrestrial carbon, nutrients, and Hg were greater. The data base for assessing time trends in char was limited by the small number of years investigated at most locations, variable fish size across years, small sample size, etc. Where temporal trends were detected, they were of increase on the long term (1970s, 1980s or early 1990 s to the present) but of decrease on the short term (early 2000s to present) with Nain (Labrador) showing the converse pattern. Higher Hg concentrations were also related to lower condition factor and cooler springs. Hg concentrations in anadromous char are compared with other terrestrial, aquatic and marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. Crown

  19. Match or mismatch: the influence of phenology on size-dependent life history and divergence in population structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherding, Jost; Beeck, Peter; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Scharf, Werner R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary 1. In gape-limited predators, body size asymmetries determine the outcome of predator-prey interactions. Due to ontogenetic changes in body size, the intensity of intra- and interspecific interactions may change rapidly between the match situation of a predator-prey system and the mismatch situation in which competition, including competition with the prey, dominates. 2. Based on a physiologically structured population model using the European perch (Perca fluviatilis), analysis was performed on how prey density (bream, Abramis brama), initial size differences in the young-of-the-year (YOY) age cohort of the predator, and phenology (time-gap in hatching of predator and prey) influence the size structure of the predator cohort. 3. In relation to the seasonality of reproduction, the match situation of the predator-prey system occurred when perch hatched earlier than bream and when no gape-size limitations existed, leading to decreased size divergence in the predator age cohort. Decreased size divergence was also found when bream hatched much earlier than perch, preventing perch predation on bream occurring, which, in turn, increased the competitive interaction of the perch with bream for the common prey, zooplankton; i.e. the mismatch situation in which also the mean size of the age cohort of the predator decreased. 4. In between the total match and the mismatch, however, only the largest individuals of the perch age cohort were able to prey on the bream, while smaller conspecifics got trapped in competition with each other and with bream for zooplankton, leading to enlarged differences in growth that increased size divergence. 5. The modelling results were combined with 7 years of field data in a lake, where large differences in the length-frequency distribution of YOY perch were observed after their first summer. These field data corroborate that phenology and prey density per predator are important mechanisms in determining size differences within the YOY

  20. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: A synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Marlene S., E-mail: marlene.evans@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Muir, Derek C.G. [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Keating, Jonathan [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 11 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon SK S7N 3H5 (Canada); Wang, Xiaowa [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    and marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. - Highlights: • Mercury concentrations were very low (0.05 ± 0.02 µg/g) in anadromous char across northern Canada. • Hg concentrations increased with fish size, decreasing condition factor and cooler springs. • Hg concentrations seemed to increase on the long-term but decrease in recent times. • Char are a good food choice for those who want to maintain traditional diets while reducing Hg intake. • Anadromous char often are habitat-limited and most abundant in large lakes with ready sea access.

  1. Anadromous char as an alternate food choice to marine animals: A synthesis of Hg concentrations, population features and other influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Marlene S.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Keating, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaowa

    2015-01-01

    marine vertebrates in traditional diets. The known information on anadromous char is reviewed including population features, habitat, and harvests. Future Hg trend monitoring should focus on specific locations and harvest areas within these areas to better assess trends and influencing factors. - Highlights: • Mercury concentrations were very low (0.05 ± 0.02 µg/g) in anadromous char across northern Canada. • Hg concentrations increased with fish size, decreasing condition factor and cooler springs. • Hg concentrations seemed to increase on the long-term but decrease in recent times. • Char are a good food choice for those who want to maintain traditional diets while reducing Hg intake. • Anadromous char often are habitat-limited and most abundant in large lakes with ready sea access

  2. Influence of the in-plane artefact in chest tomosynthesis on pulmonary nodule size measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederman, Christina; Allansdotter Johnsson, Aase; Vikgren, Jenny; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Molnar, David; Svalkvist, Angelica; Maansson, Lars Gunnar; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how the in-plane artefact present in the scan direction around structures in tomosynthesis images should be managed when measuring the size of nodules in chest tomosynthesis images in order to achieve acceptable measurement accuracy. Data from measurements, performed by radiologists, of the longest diameter of artificial nodules inserted in chest tomosynthesis images were used. The association between the measurement error and the direction of the longest nodule diameter, relative to the scan direction, was evaluated using the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. All of the radiologists had chosen to not include the artefact in the measurements. Significant association between measurement error and the direction of the longest diameter was found for nodules larger than 12 mm, which indicates that, for these nodules, there is a risk of underestimating the nodule size if the in-plane artefact is omitted from manual diameter measurements. (authors)

  3. Influence of the size of facets on point focus solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Rosas, David [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Col. Copilco, Coyoacan, CP 04510 DF (Mexico); Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcelino [Centro Nacional de Energias Renovables, c/Somera 7-9, CP 28026 Madrid (Spain); Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo A.; Estrada, Claudio A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/n, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    It is a common practice in the development of point focus solar concentrators to use multiple identical reflecting facets, as a practical and economic alternative for the design and construction of large systems. This kind of systems behaves in a different manner than continuous paraboloidal concentrators. A theoretical study is carried out to understand the effect of the size of facets and of their optical errors in multiple facet point focus solar concentrating systems. For this purpose, a ray tracing program was developed based on the convolution technique, in which the brightness distribution of the sun and the optical errors of the reflecting surfaces are considered. The study shows that both the peak of concentration and the optimal focal distance of the system strongly depend on the size of the facets, and on their optical errors. These results are useful to help concentrator developers to have a better understanding of the relationship between manufacturing design restrictions and final optical behavior. (author)

  4. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Justice, Anne E; Graff, Mariaelisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially...... (G x AGE), sex-specific effects (G x SEX) or age-specific effects that differed between men and women (G x AGE x SEX). For BMI, we identified 15 loci (11 previously established for main effects, four novel) that showed significant (FDR... effects on WHRadjBMI. These results may provide further insights into the biology that underlies weight change with age or the sexually dimorphism of body shape....

  5. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  6. Influence of particle size distribution on the blast pressure profile from explosives buried in saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, S. E.; Fay, S. D.; Tyas, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Reay, J. J.; Warren, J. A.; Gant, M.; Elgy, I.

    2018-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pressure and impulse from explosives buried in saturated cohesive and cohesionless soils has been measured experimentally for the first time. Ten experiments have been conducted at quarter-scale, where localised pressure loading was measured using an array of 17 Hopkinson pressure bars. The blast pressure measurements are used in conjunction with high-speed video filmed at 140,000 fps to investigate in detail the physical processes occurring at the loaded face. Two coarse cohesionless soils and one fine cohesive soil were tested: a relatively uniform sand, a well-graded sandy gravel, and a fine-grained clay. The results show that there is a single fundamental loading mechanism when explosives are detonated in saturated soil, invariant of particle size and soil cohesion. It is also shown that variability in localised loading is intrinsically linked to the particle size distribution of the surrounding soil.

  7. Influence of the Collection Season on Production, Size, and Chemical Composition of Bee Pollen Produced by Apis Mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrão Adriana F.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate how the collection period affects and influences the production, chemical composition, and size of bee pollen loads (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, greater than 2.0 mm. The results showed there was a predominance of pollen loads with a diameter greater than 2.0 mm in all the production seasons. For all the seasons, there were no differences in protein content between the particle sizes. But when comparing 0.5 mm during the different periods, there were significant differences; the highest value was found during the winter (24.39 ± 3.7%. As far as lipids and crude fiber are concerned, we obtained differences between the same granulometry sizes for the spring and summer seasons. As for ashes, the results showed differences between different particle sizes for the summer and autumn seasons. Our results have shown that regardless of pollen particle size, its quality was not altered, suggesting that smaller loads can be commercially used by containing nutritional quality or else be used by beekeepers as a supplement during periods of food scarcity.

  8. Mathematical modeling of influence of ion size effects in an electrolyte in a nanoslit with overlapped EDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajni, Kumar, Prashant

    2017-10-01

    Many nanofluidic systems are being used in a wide range of applications due to advances in nanotechnology. Due to nanoscale size of the system, the physics involved in the electric double layer and consequently the different phenomena related to it are different than those at microscale. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation governing the electric double layer in the system has many shortcomings such as point sized ions. The inclusion of finite size of ions give rise to various electrokinetic phenomena. Electrocapillarity is one such phenomena where the size effect plays an important role. Theeffect of asymmetric finite ion sizes in nano-confinement in the view of osmotic pressure and electrocapillarity is analyzed. As the confinement width of the system becomes comparable with the Debye length, the overlapped electric double layer (EDL) is influenced and significantly deformed by the steric effects. The osmotic pressure from the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation in nanoslit is obtained. Due to nonlinear nature of the modified PB equation, the solution is obtained through numerical method. Afterwards, the electrocapillarity due to the steric effect is analyzed under constant surface potential condition at the walls of the nanoslit along with the flat interface assumption.

  9. Influence of the particle size dispersion on gamma-raidation absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, Ts.; Amin, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependence of the value of the Moessbauer absorption on the patricle size of the absorbing material was investigated. It was assumed that: a) the investigated substance is with homogenious composition and that it consists of spherical particles; b) the particles are considered to be uniformly distributed in a matter practically negligible mass-absorption coefficient. The experiment was performed by using X-rays of Ni and Cu generated by the 14,4125 KeV resonance radiation of 57 Co

  10. The Influence of Size on Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness in the Nigerian Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Edwinah Amah; C. A. Nwuche

    2013-01-01

    The paper examined the effect of size on corporate culture and organizational effectiveness in the Nigerian banking industry. A total of 388 managers were randomly drawn from a population of 13,339 managers of all the 24 banks in Nigeria. The instruments used for data collection were questionnaire and oral interview. A total of 320 copies of the questionnaire were retrieved and analyzed. Spearman¡¯s Rank Correlation Statistical tool was used to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that ...

  11. The FANTASTIC FOUR proteins influence shoot meristem size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Vanessa; Brand, Luise H; Guo, Ya-Long; Schmid, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Throughout their lives plants produce new organs from groups of pluripotent cells called meristems, located at the tips of the shoot and the root. The size of the shoot meristem is tightly controlled by a feedback loop, which involves the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) and the CLAVATA (CLV) proteins. This regulatory circuit is further fine-tuned by morphogenic signals such as hormones and sugars. Results Here we show that a family of four plant-specific pro...

  12. Influence of the glass particle size on the foaming process and physical characteristics of foam glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. The effect of the glass particle size on the foaming process, the apparent density and the pore morphology is revealed. The results show that the foaming is mainly caused...... by the reduction of manganese. Foam glasses with a density of

  13. Productivity, Disturbance and Ecosystem Size Have No Influence on Food Chain Length in Seasonally Connected Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Warfe, Danielle M.; Jardine, Timothy D.; Pettit, Neil E.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Pusey, Bradley J.; Bunn, Stuart E.; Davies, Peter M.; Douglas, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The food web is one of the oldest and most central organising concepts in ecology and for decades, food chain length has been hypothesised to be controlled by productivity, disturbance, and/or ecosystem size; each of which may be mediated by the functional trophic role of the top predator. We characterised aquatic food webs using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from 66 river and floodplain sites across the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia to determine the relative importance of produ...

  14. Size influences the effect of hydrophobic nanoparticles on lung surfactant model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Mridula V; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-07

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ~12 nm and ~136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ~136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ~12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retail Productivity: Investigating the Influence of Market Size and Regional Hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Öner, Özge

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of the productivity of independent retail stores in Sweden by focusing on the impact of market size and regional hierarchy while controlling for several store and employee characteristics over time. The analysis utilizes Swedish store-level data for the years 2002–2008. To capture the urban-periphery interaction in retail markets, the analysis (i) uses an accessible market potential measure, which captures the impact of the potential demand both in clo...

  16. The Influence of Aggregate Size and Binder Material on the Properties of Pervious Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun Chi Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimens were prepared by altering parameters such as aggregate sizes, binder materials, and the amounts of binder used and were subsequently tested by using permeability, porosity, mechanical strength, and soundness tests. The results indicated that the water permeability coefficient and connected porosity decreased as the amount of binder used increased and increased with increasing aggregate size. In the mechanical strength test, the compressive, splitting tensile, and flexural strengths increased as the amount of binder used increased and decreased with the increase of aggregate size. Highly viscous binder enhanced compressive strength, water permeability, and the resistance to sulfate attacks. In the mechanics and sulfate soundness tests, the mix proportion of alkali-activated slag paste used in this study exhibited a superior performance than the Portland cement pervious concrete (the control did, but the difference in water permeability between the two types of concrete was insignificant. The mix proportions of cement paste containing 20% and 30% silica fume exhibited less mechanical strength than the control did. Moreover, compared with the control, the cement paste containing silica fume demonstrated poor resistance to sulfate attacks, and the difference in the water permeability between such specimen and the control was not noticeable.

  17. Factors influencing the cytotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles: particle size and surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, M; Kim, M K; Cho, H J; Lee, J A; Yu, J; Chung, H E; Choi, S J

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle is one of the most important materials in diverse applications, since it has UV light absorption, antimicrobial, catalytic, semi-conducting, and magnetic properties. However, there is little information about the toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles with respect to physicochemical properties. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the relationships between cytotoxicity and physicochemical properties of ZnO nanoparticle such as particle size and surface charge in human lung cells. Two different sizes of ZnO nanoparticles (20 and 70 nm) were prepared with positive (+) or negative (-) charge, and then, cytotoxicity of different ZnO nanoparticles was evaluated by measuring cell proliferation in short-term and long-term, membrane integrity, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results demonstrated that smaller particles exhibited high cytotoxic effects compared to larger particles in terms of inhibition of cell proliferation, membrane damage, and ROS generation. In addition, positively charged ZnO showed greater ROS production than ZnO with negative charge. These findings suggest that the cytoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles are strongly affected by their particle size and surface charge, highlighting the role of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles to understand and predict their potential adverse effects on human.

  18. The FANTASTIC FOUR proteins influence shoot meristem size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Luise H

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout their lives plants produce new organs from groups of pluripotent cells called meristems, located at the tips of the shoot and the root. The size of the shoot meristem is tightly controlled by a feedback loop, which involves the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS and the CLAVATA (CLV proteins. This regulatory circuit is further fine-tuned by morphogenic signals such as hormones and sugars. Results Here we show that a family of four plant-specific proteins, encoded by the FANTASTIC FOUR (FAF genes, has the potential to regulate shoot meristem size in Arabidopsis thaliana. FAF2 and FAF4 are expressed in the centre of the shoot meristem, overlapping with the site of WUS expression. Consistent with a regulatory interaction between the FAF gene family and WUS, our experiments indicate that the FAFs can repress WUS, which ultimately leads to an arrest of meristem activity in FAF overexpressing lines. The finding that meristematic expression of FAF2 and FAF4 is under negative control by CLV3 further supports the hypothesis that the FAFs are modulators of the genetic circuit that regulates the meristem. Conclusion This study reports the initial characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana FAF gene family. Our data indicate that the FAF genes form a plant specific gene family, the members of which have the potential to regulate the size of the shoot meristem by modulating the CLV3-WUS feedback loop.

  19. The FANTASTIC FOUR proteins influence shoot meristem size in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Vanessa; Brand, Luise H; Guo, Ya-Long; Schmid, Markus

    2010-12-22

    Throughout their lives plants produce new organs from groups of pluripotent cells called meristems, located at the tips of the shoot and the root. The size of the shoot meristem is tightly controlled by a feedback loop, which involves the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) and the CLAVATA (CLV) proteins. This regulatory circuit is further fine-tuned by morphogenic signals such as hormones and sugars. Here we show that a family of four plant-specific proteins, encoded by the FANTASTIC FOUR (FAF) genes, has the potential to regulate shoot meristem size in Arabidopsis thaliana. FAF2 and FAF4 are expressed in the centre of the shoot meristem, overlapping with the site of WUS expression. Consistent with a regulatory interaction between the FAF gene family and WUS, our experiments indicate that the FAFs can repress WUS, which ultimately leads to an arrest of meristem activity in FAF overexpressing lines. The finding that meristematic expression of FAF2 and FAF4 is under negative control by CLV3 further supports the hypothesis that the FAFs are modulators of the genetic circuit that regulates the meristem. This study reports the initial characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana FAF gene family. Our data indicate that the FAF genes form a plant specific gene family, the members of which have the potential to regulate the size of the shoot meristem by modulating the CLV3-WUS feedback loop.

  20. Factors influencing the cytotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles: particle size and surface charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, M; Kim, M K; Cho, H J; Lee, J A; Yu, J; Chung, H E; Choi, S J, E-mail: sjchoi@swu.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women' s University, 126 Gongneung 2-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-06

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle is one of the most important materials in diverse applications, since it has UV light absorption, antimicrobial, catalytic, semi-conducting, and magnetic properties. However, there is little information about the toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles with respect to physicochemical properties. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the relationships between cytotoxicity and physicochemical properties of ZnO nanoparticle such as particle size and surface charge in human lung cells. Two different sizes of ZnO nanoparticles (20 and 70 nm) were prepared with positive (+) or negative (-) charge, and then, cytotoxicity of different ZnO nanoparticles was evaluated by measuring cell proliferation in short-term and long-term, membrane integrity, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results demonstrated that smaller particles exhibited high cytotoxic effects compared to larger particles in terms of inhibition of cell proliferation, membrane damage, and ROS generation. In addition, positively charged ZnO showed greater ROS production than ZnO with negative charge. These findings suggest that the cytoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles are strongly affected by their particle size and surface charge, highlighting the role of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles to understand and predict their potential adverse effects on human.

  1. Productivity, disturbance and ecosystem size have no influence on food chain length in seasonally connected rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfe, Danielle M; Jardine, Timothy D; Pettit, Neil E; Hamilton, Stephen K; Pusey, Bradley J; Bunn, Stuart E; Davies, Peter M; Douglas, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    The food web is one of the oldest and most central organising concepts in ecology and for decades, food chain length has been hypothesised to be controlled by productivity, disturbance, and/or ecosystem size; each of which may be mediated by the functional trophic role of the top predator. We characterised aquatic food webs using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from 66 river and floodplain sites across the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia to determine the relative importance of productivity (indicated by nutrient concentrations), disturbance (indicated by hydrological isolation) and ecosystem size, and how they may be affected by food web architecture. We show that variation in food chain length was unrelated to these classic environmental determinants, and unrelated to the trophic role of the top predator. This finding is a striking exception to the literature and is the first published example of food chain length being unaffected by any of these determinants. We suggest the distinctive seasonal hydrology of northern Australia allows the movement of fish predators, linking isolated food webs and potentially creating a regional food web that overrides local effects of productivity, disturbance and ecosystem size. This finding supports ecological theory suggesting that mobile consumers promote more stable food webs. It also illustrates how food webs, and energy transfer, may function in the absence of the human modifications to landscape hydrological connectivity that are ubiquitous in more populated regions.

  2. Litter size influences milk composition and energy expenditure of rat pups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorotto, M.L.; Burrin, D.G.; Perez, M.; Reeds, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors wished to determine whether differences in milk intake were solely responsible for differences in the weight gain of rat pups suckled in litters of varying sizes (S = 4, C = 10, L = 16 pups/litter; 9 litters/group). Milk intake was measured (by 3 H 2 O dilution) at 4-6, 8-10, and 14-16 d of age (3 litters of each size/time point). Pup (water, protein, and fat) and milk composition (water, fat, protein and lactose) were analyzed at 6, 10, and 16 d. Dam milk output was positively correlated with litter size and duration of lactation. Milk fat concentration was inversely related to dam milk output (r 2 = 0.79). Weight gain was highest in S litters and lowest in L litters. Weight gain was highly correlated to the volume of milk consumed in S and C pups (r 2 = 81%), but was poorly correlated among L pups (r 2 = 23%). The different correlations may have resulted from (1) the disparate relationship between volume and energy intake of L pups compared to S and C pups, or (2) a higher maintenance energy expenditure in L pups up to 10 d of age determined by a comparison of the composition of weight gain and energy intake. Thus, the reduced weight gain of pups suckled in large litters resulted from changes in both milk energy intake and the efficiency of its utilization

  3. Speciation and leachability of copper in mine tailings from porphyry copper mining: influence of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik K; Yianatos, Juan B; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2005-09-01

    Mine tailing from the El Teniente-Codelco copper mine situated in VI Region of Chile was analysed in order to evaluate the mobility and speciation of copper in the solid material. Mine tailing was sampled after the rougher flotation circuits, and the copper content was measured to 1150 mg kg (-1) dry matter. This tailing was segmented into fractions of different size intervals: 0-38, 38-45, 45-53, 53-75, 75-106, 106-150, 150-212, and >212 microm, respectively. Copper content determination, sequential chemical extraction, and desorption experiments were carried out for each size interval in order to evaluate the speciation of copper. It was found that the particles of smallest size contained 50-60% weak acid leachable copper, whereas only 32% of the copper found in largest particles could be leached in weak acid. Copper oxides and carbonates were the dominating species in the smaller particles, and the larger particles contained considerable amounts of sulphides.

  4. The size effect in corrosion greatly influences the predicted life span of concrete infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Ueli M; Elsener, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    Forecasting the life of concrete infrastructures in corrosive environments presents a long-standing and socially relevant challenge in science and engineering. Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is the main cause for premature degradation of concrete infrastructures worldwide. Since the middle of the past century, this challenge has been tackled by using a conceptual approach relying on a threshold chloride concentration for corrosion initiation ( C crit ). All state-of-the-art models for forecasting chloride-induced steel corrosion in concrete are based on this concept. We present an experiment that shows that C crit depends strongly on the exposed steel surface area. The smaller the tested specimen is, the higher and the more variable C crit becomes. This size effect in the ability of reinforced concrete to withstand corrosion can be explained by the local conditions at the steel-concrete interface, which exhibit pronounced spatial variability. The size effect has major implications for the future use of the common concept of C crit . It questions the applicability of laboratory results to engineering structures and the reproducibility of typically small-scale laboratory testing. Finally, we show that the weakest link theory is suitable to transform C crit from small to large dimensions, which lays the basis for taking the size effect into account in the science and engineering of forecasting the durability of infrastructures.

  5. Productivity, disturbance and ecosystem size have no influence on food chain length in seasonally connected rivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M Warfe

    Full Text Available The food web is one of the oldest and most central organising concepts in ecology and for decades, food chain length has been hypothesised to be controlled by productivity, disturbance, and/or ecosystem size; each of which may be mediated by the functional trophic role of the top predator. We characterised aquatic food webs using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from 66 river and floodplain sites across the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia to determine the relative importance of productivity (indicated by nutrient concentrations, disturbance (indicated by hydrological isolation and ecosystem size, and how they may be affected by food web architecture. We show that variation in food chain length was unrelated to these classic environmental determinants, and unrelated to the trophic role of the top predator. This finding is a striking exception to the literature and is the first published example of food chain length being unaffected by any of these determinants. We suggest the distinctive seasonal hydrology of northern Australia allows the movement of fish predators, linking isolated food webs and potentially creating a regional food web that overrides local effects of productivity, disturbance and ecosystem size. This finding supports ecological theory suggesting that mobile consumers promote more stable food webs. It also illustrates how food webs, and energy transfer, may function in the absence of the human modifications to landscape hydrological connectivity that are ubiquitous in more populated regions.

  6. Influence of wind energy forecast in deterministic and probabilistic sizing of reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, A.; Torre, M. de la; Dominguez, T.; Rivas, R. [Red Electrica de Espana (REE), Madrid (Spain). Dept. Centro de Control Electrico

    2010-07-01

    One of the challenges in large-scale wind energy integration in electrical systems is coping with wind forecast uncertainties at the time of sizing generation reserves. These reserves must be sized large enough so that they don't compromise security of supply or the balance of the system, but economic efficiency must be also kept in mind. This paper describes two methods of sizing spinning reserves taking into account wind forecast uncertainties, deterministic using a probabilistic wind forecast and probabilistic using stochastic variables. The deterministic method calculates the spinning reserve needed by adding components each of them in order to overcome one single uncertainty: demand errors, the biggest thermal generation loss and wind forecast errors. The probabilistic method assumes that demand forecast errors, short-term thermal group unavailability and wind forecast errors are independent stochastic variables and calculates the probability density function of the three variables combined. These methods are being used in the case of the Spanish peninsular system, in which wind energy accounted for 14% of the total electrical energy produced in the year 2009 and is one of the systems in the world with the highest wind penetration levels. (orig.)

  7. Factors influencing on the bioaccessibility of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in size-specific dust from air conditioner filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Yang, Dan; Wang, Xinxin; Huang, Ningbao; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhang, Dongping; Fu, Jiamo

    2013-11-01

    Size-specific concentrations and bioaccessibility of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust from air conditioner filters were measured, and the factors influencing the PBDE bioaccessibility were determined. Generally, the PBDE concentrations increased with decreasing dust particle size, and BDE209 (deca-BDE) was generally the predominant congener. The bioaccessibility ranged from 20.3% to 50.8% for tri- to hepta-BDEs, and from 5.1% to 13.9% for BDE209 in dust fractions of varied particle size. The bioaccessibility of most PBDE congeners decreased with increasing dust particle size. The way of being of PBDE (adsorbed to dust surface or incorporated into polymers) in dust significantly influenced the bioaccessibility. There was a significant negative correlation between the tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility and organic matter (OM) contents in dust. Furthermore, tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility increased with increasing polarity of OMs, while with decreasing aromaticity of OMs. The tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility significantly positively correlated with the surface areas and pore volumes of dust. Using multiple linear regression analysis, it was found that the OM contents and pore volumes of dust were the most important factors to influence the tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility and they could be used to estimate the bioaccessibility of tri- to hepta-BDEs according to the following equation: bioaccessibility (%)=45.05-0.49 × OM%+1.79 × pore volume. However, BDE209 bioaccessibility did not correlate to any of these factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulsed electrodeposition of cobalt nanoparticles on copper: influence of the operating parameters on size distribution and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnanelli, Francesca; Altimari, Pietro; Bellagamba, Marco; Granata, Giuseppe; Moscardini, Emanuela; Schiavi, Pier Giorgio; Toro, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition on copper substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to determine morphology and particle size distribution of nanoparticle populations obtained in different operating conditions. After preliminary tests, t on and t off were set at 50 and 300 ms respectively to obtain distinct nanoparticles and avoid dendritic structures. Experimental tests were performed according to two partially superimposed factorial designs with two factors at two levels. First factorial design investigated the effect of current density (I = 10 and 50 mA/cm 2 ) and discharged cobalt (Q = 2.5 × 10 −3 and 1.0 × 10 −2 C); second factorial design investigated the effect of cobalt concentration (C 0 = 0.01 and 0.1 M) for the same two levels of Q. For optimized value of t on /t off , square and hexagonal shaped nanoparticles were obtained. Statistical analysis evidenced that, for C 0 = 0.1 mol/L, current density is the most influencing factor on mean size: increasing I from 10 to 50 mA/cm 2 determined a diminution of mean size of 240 nm. For the same cobalt concentration, increasing the deposition time (Q) determined an increase of mean size of 60 nm. Diminishing the initial cobalt concentration from 0.1 to 0.01 mol/L determined an increase of mean size from 10 nm to 36 nm. For C 0 = 0.01 mol/L nanoparticles grow reaching an optimal size (36 nm) and then, increasing the time of deposition, optimal sized subunits tend to aggregate. As for polydispersity of nanoparticles, statistical tests denoted that increasing I determined significant reduction of variance, while increasing the time of deposition determined a significant increase of variance

  9. Influence of the Encapsulation Efficiency and Size of Liposome on the Oral Bioavailability of Griseofulvin-Loaded Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Gim Ming Ong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the encapsulation efficiency and size of liposome on the oral bioavailability of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes. Griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with desired characteristics were prepared from pro-liposome using various techniques. To study the effect of encapsulation efficiency, three preparations of griseofulvin, namely, griseofulvin aqueous suspension and two griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with different amounts of griseofulvin encapsulated [i.e., F1 (32% and F2(98%], were administered to rats. On the other hand, to study the effect of liposome size, the rats were given three different griseofulvin-loaded liposomes of various sizes, generated via different mechanical dispersion techniques [i.e., FTS (142 nm, MS (357 nm and NS (813 nm], but with essentially similar encapsulation efficiencies (about 93%. Results indicated that the extent of bioavailability of griseofulvin was improved 1.7–2.0 times when given in the form of liposomes (F1 compared to griseofulvin suspension. Besides that, there was an approximately two-fold enhancement of the extent of bioavailability following administration of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with higher encapsulation efficiency (F2, compared to those of F1. Also, the results showed that the extent of bioavailability of liposomal formulations with smaller sizes were higher by approximately three times compared to liposomal formulation of a larger size. Nevertheless, a further size reduction of griseofulvin-loaded liposome (≤400 nm did not promote the uptake or bioavailability of griseofulvin. In conclusion, high drug encapsulation efficiency and small liposome size could enhance the oral bioavailability of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes and therefore these two parameters deserve careful consideration during formulation.

  10. Influence of defect size and localization on the engagement of reverse Hill-Sachs lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroder, Philipp; Runer, Armin; Kraemer, Manuel; Fierlbeck, Johann; Niederberger, Alfred; Cotofana, Sebastian; Vasvari, Imre; Hettegger, Bernhard; Tauber, Mark; Hurschler, Christof; Resch, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Reverse Hill-Sachs (RHS) lesions can cause recurrent posterior shoulder instability because of engagement with the posterior glenoid rim; however, the effect of defect size and localization have yet to be determined. Both size and localization are critical for the engagement of an RHS defect with the posterior glenoid rim. Controlled laboratory study. Ten RHS defects with predefined extent and localization were created through an anterolateral rotator cuff sparing approach in 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens using a custom-made saw guide. Computed tomography scans of all specimens were completed, and standardized measurements were performed to determine the size (alpha angle) and localization (beta angle) of the defect as well as a combination of both parameters (gamma angle). Internal rotation motions were imposed on the shoulder joint in different arm positions and with varying amount of posterior translation by means of a robot-assisted shoulder simulator. The association between engagement of the defects and the defined parameters (alpha, beta, and gamma angles) was analyzed. In 0° of abduction, a cutoff value between engaging and nonengaging defects of 37.5° for the alpha angle (100% sensitivity; 75% specificity; area under the curve [AUC], 0.875; P = .055) and 36.5° for the beta angle (100% sensitivity; 25% specificity; AUC, 0.708; P = .286) was determined. The gamma angle showed the highest discriminatory power (AUC, 0.938; P = .025) with a cutoff value of 85.5° rendering 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity in the prediction of engagement. An increase in the applied posterior translation force decreased the degrees of internal rotation necessary before engagement occurred. No engagement occurred during internal rotation with the arm in 60° of abduction or 60° of flexion. The size and localization of RHS defects are both critical factors for engagement. The combination of both parameters in terms of the gamma angle measurement might be a

  11. An actor-based model of social network influence on adolescent body size, screen time, and playing sports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Shoham

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that obesity may be "contagious" between individuals in social networks. Social contagion (influence, however, may not be identifiable using traditional statistical approaches because they cannot distinguish contagion from homophily (the propensity for individuals to select friends who are similar to themselves or from shared environmental influences. In this paper, we apply the stochastic actor-based model (SABM framework developed by Snijders and colleagues to data on adolescent body mass index (BMI, screen time, and playing active sports. Our primary hypothesis was that social influences on adolescent body size and related behaviors are independent of friend selection. Employing the SABM, we simultaneously modeled network dynamics (friendship selection based on homophily and structural characteristics of the network and social influence. We focused on the 2 largest schools in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health and held the school environment constant by examining the 2 school networks separately (N = 624 and 1151. Results show support in both schools for homophily on BMI, but also for social influence on BMI. There was no evidence of homophily on screen time in either school, while only one of the schools showed homophily on playing active sports. There was, however, evidence of social influence on screen time in one of the schools, and playing active sports in both schools. These results suggest that both homophily and social influence are important in understanding patterns of adolescent obesity. Intervention efforts should take into consideration peers' influence on one another, rather than treating "high risk" adolescents in isolation.

  12. Do tumor size or patient age influence the accuracy of sentinel lymph node (Sn) detection in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, M.; Fernandez, A.; Benito, E.; Azpeitia, D.; Ricart, Y.; Escobedo, A.; Martin-Comin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim was to analyze the influence of the age of the patient and tumor size on the accuracy to identify SN in patients with breast cancer. The whole population are 250 patients with breast cancer. In 236 data on size and age were available. Mean age was 53.6 years, range 28-87 years. Patients were classified 1) depending an age: 40 60 years: 73 p and 2) depending on tumor size (mm): 30: 46 p. Examination protocol: All patients received a peritumoral injection of 111 MBq (3mCi) of 99mTc-HSA-nanocolloid in 1 - 3 ml. 2 h later 300 seconds anterior and lateral thoracic scans were obtained. A 57-Co flood phantom was positioned back to the patient to outline the anatomical contour and help to localize SN. SN was marked on the skin with permanent ink. Intraoperative SN localization was performed using a gamma probe. Histopathologic analysis of SN was done with haematoxylin/eosin, immunohistochemistry and PCR. Histopathology of the SN was compared to the histopathology of all the other lymph nodes drawn out by the surgeon. SN were identified by lymphoscintigraphy in 227 cases of 250 (91 %). 221 of them (97 %) were localized in axyla. In 210 of 221 SN could be localized and drawn out at surgery. The no detection and false negative rate were much higher in patients aged > 60 (29 and 33 %) and in tumors > 30 mm (32 and 19 %) than in patients 60 y and tumors > 30 mm (46 %) and the highest false negative rate appears in patients >60 and tumors > 30 mm (33 %) 1) No FN were found in patients with tumor size <10 mm. 2) No FN were found in patients aged under 40 years. 3) FN rate seems to be higher in older patients. 4) The age of patients and the size of tumor seem to influence an the SN detection rates. (author)

  13. "Who can you tell?" Features of Arab culture that influence conceptualization and treatment of childhood sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboush, Karen L; Alyan, Hala

    2013-01-01

    The literature on child sexual abuse reflects growing recognition of the manner in which culture impacts the conceptualization, experience, and treatment of such cases. Despite heightened visibility of Arab Americans within the United States, population due to recent media attention, little empirical research exists on the occurrence of child sexual abuse within this population. Arab culture is often characterized by an emphasis on collectivism and familial obligations, and such features may prove to either facilitate or impede assessment and treatment of child sexual abuse, depending on how they are manifested. In terms of reporting child sexual abuse, cultural values pertaining to shame and honor as well as the stigma attached to mental health problems may influence the response to abuse. As such, enhancing the cultural competence of the therapist is key to facilitating effective cultural practice. Empirical research is required to investigate and substantiate these concepts as they relate to child sexual abuse in Arab-American populations.

  14. Influence of removal time and particle size on the particle substrate adhesion force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Felicetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted on influence of removal time on the particle substrate adhesive force. The centrifuge technique was used to determine the adhesion force at different compression and removal rates. A microcentrifuge with a maximum rotation of 14000 rpm was used to both compress upon particles and remove them from the surface of the substrate. An image analysis program (Image-Pro Plus 4.5 was employed to monitor the number of particles adhering to and removed from the surface of the substrate after each increase in angular speed. The influence of removal time on the adhesion force was investigated, using removal times of 1, 3 and 5 minutes, which indicated that removal time does not interfere with the adhesion force within the diameter range analyzed here.

  15. Influence of major structural features of tocopherols and tocotrienols on their omega-oxidation by tocopherol-omega-hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, Timothy J; Parker, Robert S

    2007-05-01

    Human cytochrome P450 4F2 (CYP4F2) catalyzes the initial omega-hydroxylation reaction in the metabolism of tocopherols and tocotrienols to carboxychromanols and is, to date, the only enzyme shown to metabolize vitamin E. The objective of this study was to characterize this activity, particularly the influence of key features of tocochromanol substrate structure. The influence of the number and positions of methyl groups on the chromanol ring, and of stereochemistry and saturation of the side chain, were explored using HepG2 cultures and microsomal reaction systems. Human liver microsomes and microsomes selectively expressing recombinant human CYP4F2 exhibited substrate activity patterns similar to those of HepG2 cells. Although activity was strongly associated with substrate accumulation by cells or microsomes, substantial differences in specific activities between substrates remained under conditions of similar microsomal membrane substrate concentration. Methylation at C5 of the chromanol ring was associated with markedly low activity. Tocotrienols exhibited much higher Vmax values than their tocopherol counterparts. Side chain stereochemistry had no effect on omega-hydroxylation of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH) by any system. Kinetic analysis of microsomal CYP4F2 activity revealed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for alpha-TOH but allosteric cooperativity for other vitamers, especially tocotrienols. Additionally, alpha-TOH was a positive effector of omega-hydroxylation of other vitamers. These results indicate that CYP4F2-mediated tocopherol-omega-hydroxylation is a central feature underlying the different biological half-lives, and therefore biopotencies, of the tocopherols and tocotrienols.

  16. Mesoscale spatiotemporal variability in a complex host-parasite system influenced by intermediate host body size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Rodríguez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Parasites are essential components of natural communities, but the factors that generate skewed distributions of parasite occurrences and abundances across host populations are not well understood. Methods Here, we analyse at a seascape scale the spatiotemporal relationships of parasite exposure and host body-size with the proportion of infected hosts (i.e., prevalence and aggregation of parasite burden across ca. 150 km of the coast and over 22 months. We predicted that the effects of parasite exposure on prevalence and aggregation are dependent on host body-sizes. We used an indirect host-parasite interaction in which migratory seagulls, sandy-shore molecrabs, and an acanthocephalan worm constitute the definitive hosts, intermediate hosts, and endoparasite, respectively. In such complex systems, increments in the abundance of definitive hosts imply increments in intermediate hosts’ exposure to the parasite’s dispersive stages. Results Linear mixed-effects models showed a significant, albeit highly variable, positive relationship between seagull density and prevalence. This relationship was stronger for small (cephalothorax length >15 mm than large molecrabs (<15 mm. Independently of seagull density, large molecrabs carried significantly more parasites than small molecrabs. The analysis of the variance-to-mean ratio of per capita parasite burden showed no relationship between seagull density and mean parasite aggregation across host populations. However, the amount of unexplained variability in aggregation was strikingly higher in larger than smaller intermediate hosts. This unexplained variability was driven by a decrease in the mean-variance scaling in heavily infected large molecrabs. Conclusions These results show complex interdependencies between extrinsic and intrinsic population attributes on the structure of host-parasite interactions. We suggest that parasite accumulation—a characteristic of indirect host

  17. Casein polymorphism heterogeneity influences casein micelle size in milk of individual cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, L; Williams, R P W; Otter, D; Augustin, M A

    2015-06-01

    Milk samples from individual cows producing small (148-155 nm) or large (177-222 nm) casein micelles were selected to investigate the relationship between the individual casein proteins, specifically κ- and β-casein phenotypes, and casein micelle size. Only κ-casein AA and β-casein A1A1, A1A2 and A2A2 phenotypes were found in the large casein micelle group. Among the small micelle group, both κ-casein and β-casein phenotypes were more diverse. κ-Casein AB was the dominant phenotype, and 3 combinations (AA, AB, and BB) were present in the small casein micelle group. A considerable mix of β-casein phenotypes was found, including B and I variants, which were only found in the small casein micelle group. The relative amount of κ-casein to total casein was significantly higher in the small micelle group, and the nonglycosylated and glycosylated κ-casein contents were higher in the milks with small casein micelles (primarily with κ-casein AB and BB variants) compared with the large micelle group. The ratio of glycosylated to nonglycosylated κ-casein was higher in the milks with small casein micelles compared with the milks with large casein micelles. This suggests that although the amount of κ-casein (both glycosylated and nonglycosylated) is associated with micelle size, an increased proportion of glycosylated κ-casein could be a more important and favorable factor for small micelle size. This suggests that the increased spatial requirement due to addition of the glycosyl group with increasing extent of glycosylation of κ-casein is one mechanism that controls casein micelle assembly and growth. In addition, increased electrostatic repulsion due to the sialyl residues on the glycosyl group could be a contributory factor. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mesoscale spatiotemporal variability in a complex host-parasite system influenced by intermediate host body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sara M; Valdivia, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Parasites are essential components of natural communities, but the factors that generate skewed distributions of parasite occurrences and abundances across host populations are not well understood. Here, we analyse at a seascape scale the spatiotemporal relationships of parasite exposure and host body-size with the proportion of infected hosts (i.e., prevalence) and aggregation of parasite burden across ca. 150 km of the coast and over 22 months. We predicted that the effects of parasite exposure on prevalence and aggregation are dependent on host body-sizes. We used an indirect host-parasite interaction in which migratory seagulls, sandy-shore molecrabs, and an acanthocephalan worm constitute the definitive hosts, intermediate hosts, and endoparasite, respectively. In such complex systems, increments in the abundance of definitive hosts imply increments in intermediate hosts' exposure to the parasite's dispersive stages. Linear mixed-effects models showed a significant, albeit highly variable, positive relationship between seagull density and prevalence. This relationship was stronger for small (cephalothorax length >15 mm) than large molecrabs (analysis of the variance-to-mean ratio of per capita parasite burden showed no relationship between seagull density and mean parasite aggregation across host populations. However, the amount of unexplained variability in aggregation was strikingly higher in larger than smaller intermediate hosts. This unexplained variability was driven by a decrease in the mean-variance scaling in heavily infected large molecrabs. These results show complex interdependencies between extrinsic and intrinsic population attributes on the structure of host-parasite interactions. We suggest that parasite accumulation-a characteristic of indirect host-parasite interactions-and subsequent increasing mortality rates over ontogeny underpin size-dependent host-parasite dynamics.

  19. Influence of particle size and chemistry on the cloud nucleating properties of aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Quinn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of an aerosol particle to act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN is a function of the size of the particle, its composition and mixing state, and the supersaturation of the cloud. In-situ data from field studies provide a means to assess the relative importance of these parameters. During the 2006 Texas Air Quality – Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS, the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown encountered a wide variety of aerosol types ranging from marine near the Florida panhandle to urban and industrial in the Houston-Galveston area. These varied sources provided an opportunity to investigate the role of aerosol sources and chemistry in the potential activation of particles to form cloud droplets. Measurements were made of CCN concentrations, aerosol chemical composition in the size range relevant for particle activation in warm clouds, and aerosol size distributions. Variability in aerosol composition was parameterized by the mass fraction of Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA for particle diameters less than 200 nm (vacuum aerodynamic. The HOA mass fraction in this size range was lowest for marine aerosol and highest for aerosol sampled close to anthropogenic sources. Combining all data from the experiment reveals that composition (defined by HOA mass fraction explains 40% of the variance in the critical diameter for particle activation at the instrumental supersaturation (S of 0.44%. Correlations between HOA mass fraction and aerosol mean diameter show that these two parameters are essentially independent of one another for this data set. We conclude that, based on the variability of the HOA mass fraction observed during TexAQS-GoMACCS, variability in particle composition played a significant role in determining the fraction of particles that could activate to form cloud droplets. Using a simple model based on Köhler theory and the assumption that HOA is insoluble, we estimate the

  20. Twin study of genetic and environmental influences on adult body size, shape and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, K.; Visscher, P.M.; Erbas, B.

    2004-01-01

    ), we determined zygosity by DNA similarity, and performed anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. The contribution to the total phenotypic variance of genetic, common environment, and individual environment was estimated in multivariate analysis using the FISHER program...... effects under the assumptions of no nonadditive effect. The pattern of age trends was inconsistent. However, when significant there was a decrease in heritability with advancing age. DISCUSSION: These findings suggest that adult body size, shape, and composition are highly heritable in both women and men...

  1. Influence of size effects on the radiation stability of nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I., E-mail: rmta@miee.ru [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation); Medetov, N. A. [Kostanai Social and Technical University (Kazakhstan); Zaporozhan, O. A. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The data reported in publications are analyzed, and on this basis, problems arising in studies of the radiation stability of nanostructures and nanomaterials are formulated. A phenomenological model of the radiation stability of such objects is considered. The model is based on the concept of the behavior of close Frenkel pairs. To test the model proposed in the study, the effect of the size factor on the degree of structural degradation in nanoporous silicon samples when irradiated with phosphorus ions is studied. The effect of elastic strains on the radiation stability of the structures is established.

  2. Influence of detector pixel size, TOF resolution and DOI on image quality in MR-compatible whole-body PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoen, Hendrik; Keereman, Vincent; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2013-09-21

    The optimization of a whole-body PET system remains a challenging task, as the imaging performance is influenced by a complex interaction of different design parameters. However, it is not always clear which parameters have the largest impact on image quality and are most eligible for optimization. To determine this, we need to be able to assess their influence on image quality. We performed Monte-Carlo simulations of a whole-body PET scanner to predict the influence on image quality of three detector parameters: the TOF resolution, the transverse pixel size and depth-of-interaction (DOI)-correction. The inner diameter of the PET scanner was 65 cm, small enough to allow physical integration into a simultaneous PET-MR system. Point sources were used to evaluate the influence of transverse pixel size and DOI-correction on spatial resolution as function of radial distance. To evaluate the influence on contrast recovery and pixel noise a cylindrical phantom of 35 cm diameter was used, representing a large patient. The phantom contained multiple hot lesions with 5 mm diameter. These lesions were placed at radial distances of 50, 100 and 150 mm from the center of the field-of-view, to be able to study the effects at different radial positions. The non-prewhitening (NPW) observer was used for objective analysis of the detectability of the hot lesions in the cylindrical phantom. Based on this analysis the NPW-SNR was used to quantify the relative improvements in image quality due to changes of the variable detector parameters. The image quality of a whole-body PET scanner can be improved significantly by reducing the transverse pixel size from 4 to 2.6 mm and improving the TOF resolution from 600 to 400 ps and further from 400 to 200 ps. Compared to pixel size, the TOF resolution has the larger potential to increase image quality for the simulated phantom. The introduction of two layer DOI-correction only leads to a modest improvement for the spheres at radial

  3. Influence of detector pixel size, TOF resolution and DOI on image quality in MR-compatible whole-body PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoen, Hendrik; Keereman, Vincent; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of a whole-body PET system remains a challenging task, as the imaging performance is influenced by a complex interaction of different design parameters. However, it is not always clear which parameters have the largest impact on image quality and are most eligible for optimization. To determine this, we need to be able to assess their influence on image quality. We performed Monte-Carlo simulations of a whole-body PET scanner to predict the influence on image quality of three detector parameters: the TOF resolution, the transverse pixel size and depth-of-interaction (DOI)-correction. The inner diameter of the PET scanner was 65 cm, small enough to allow physical integration into a simultaneous PET-MR system. Point sources were used to evaluate the influence of transverse pixel size and DOI-correction on spatial resolution as function of radial distance. To evaluate the influence on contrast recovery and pixel noise a cylindrical phantom of 35 cm diameter was used, representing a large patient. The phantom contained multiple hot lesions with 5 mm diameter. These lesions were placed at radial distances of 50, 100 and 150 mm from the center of the field-of-view, to be able to study the effects at different radial positions. The non-prewhitening (NPW) observer was used for objective analysis of the detectability of the hot lesions in the cylindrical phantom. Based on this analysis the NPW-SNR was used to quantify the relative improvements in image quality due to changes of the variable detector parameters. The image quality of a whole-body PET scanner can be improved significantly by reducing the transverse pixel size from 4 to 2.6 mm and improving the TOF resolution from 600 to 400 ps and further from 400 to 200 ps. Compared to pixel size, the TOF resolution has the larger potential to increase image quality for the simulated phantom. The introduction of two layer DOI-correction only leads to a modest improvement for the spheres at radial distance of

  4. The Influence Of Profitability, Firm Size, Productivity And Reputation Of The Auditor On The Rating Of Sukuk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Estu Pranoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to find out the effect between the profitability, firm size, productivity, and auditor reputation toward rating sukuk. Rating sukuk is the dependent variables in this research were measured by scoring technique based on Pefindo’s rating. For the independent variables in this research, using profitability were measured by return of equity ratio, firm size were measured by natural logarithm of total asset, productivity were measured by comparison sales with employees, auditor reputation using dummy method. This research using secondary data which is non bank companies from Indonesian Stock Exchange Listed Company and rated by Pefindo in 2009-2013. While the sampling method used was purposive method which is overall 35 sample choose. This research uses logistic ordinal regression to test the hypothesis with SPSS computer program. The research result show that produktivity and auditor reputation partially have a significant negative influence toward rating sukuk, while profitability and firm size have no significant influence toward rating sukuk.

  5. Influence of the Grain Size on the Properties of CH3NH3PbI3 Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargaieva, Oleksandra; Lang, Felix; Rappich, Jörg; Dittrich, Thomas; Klaus, Manuela; Meixner, Matthias; Genzel, Christoph; Nickel, Norbert H

    2017-11-08

    Hybrid perovskites have already shown a huge success as an absorber in solar cells, resulting in the skyrocketing rise in the power conversion efficiency to more than η = 22%. Recently, it has been established that the crystal quality is one of the most important parameters to obtain devices with high efficiencies. However, the influence of the crystal quality on the material properties is not fully understood. Here, the influence of the morphology on electronic properties of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 thin films is investigated. Postannealing was used to vary the average grain size continuously from ≈150 to ≈1000 nm. Secondary grain growth is thermally activated with an activation energy of E a = 0.16 eV. The increase in the grain size leads to an enhancement of the photoluminescence, indicating an improvement in the material quality. According to surface photovoltage measurements, the charge-carrier transport length exhibits a linear increase with increasing grain size. The charge-carrier diffusion length is limited by grain boundaries. Moreover, an improved morphology leads to a drastic increase in power conversion efficiency of the devices.

  6. Influences of body size and environmental factors on autumn downstream migration of bull trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnot, L.; Dunham, J.B.; Hoem, T.; Koetsier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fishes migrate extensively through stream networks, yet patterns are commonly described only in terms of the origin and destination of migration (e.g., between natal and feeding habitats). To better understand patterns of migration in bull trout,Salvelinus confluentus we studied the influences of body size (total length [TL]) and environmental factors (stream temperature and discharge) on migrations in the Boise River basin, Idaho. During the autumns of 2001-2003, we tracked the downstream migrations of 174 radio-tagged bull trout ranging in size from 21 to 73 cm TL. The results indicated that large bull trout (>30 cm) were more likely than small fish to migrate rapidly downstream after spawning in headwater streams in early autumn. Large bull trout also had a higher probability of arriving at the current terminus of migration in the system, Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of migration by small bull trout was more variable and individuals were less likely to move into Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of downstream migration by all fish was slower when stream discharge was greater. Temperature was not associated with the rate of migration. These findings indicate that fish size and environmentally related changes in behavior have important influences on patterns of migration. In a broader context, these results and other recent work suggest, at least in some cases, that commonly used classifications of migratory behavior may not accurately reflect the full range of behaviors and variability among individuals (or life stages) and environmental conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  7. Influence of Nano sized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of Zn O Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvalagin, V.; Grodziuk, G.; Kurmach, M.; Granchak, V.; Sarapulova, O.; Sherstiuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    For practical use of nano sized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of Zn O nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent Zn O/SiO 2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nano crystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of Zn O nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained Zn O/SiO 2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of Zn O nano crystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photo generated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of Zn O nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-Zn O luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  8. Gastropod shell size and architecture influence the applicability of methods used to estimate internal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragagnin, Marilia Nagata; Gorman, Daniel; McCarthy, Ian Donald; Sant'Anna, Bruno Sampaio; de Castro, Cláudio Campi; Turra, Alexander

    2018-01-11

    Obtaining accurate and reproducible estimates of internal shell volume is a vital requirement for studies into the ecology of a range of shell-occupying organisms, including hermit crabs. Shell internal volume is usually estimated by filling the shell cavity with water or sand, however, there has been no systematic assessment of the reliability of these methods and moreover no comparison with modern alternatives, e.g., computed tomography (CT). This study undertakes the first assessment of the measurement reproducibility of three contrasting approaches across a spectrum of shell architectures and sizes. While our results suggested a certain level of variability inherent for all methods, we conclude that a single measure using sand/water is likely to be sufficient for the majority of studies. However, care must be taken as precision may decline with increasing shell size and structural complexity. CT provided less variation between repeat measures but volume estimates were consistently lower compared to sand/water and will need methodological improvements before it can be used as an alternative. CT indicated volume may be also underestimated using sand/water due to the presence of air spaces visible in filled shells scanned by CT. Lastly, we encourage authors to clearly describe how volume estimates were obtained.

  9. Whistle rates of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): influences of group size and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Nicola J; Janik, Vincent M

    2008-08-01

    In large social groups acoustic communication signals are prone to signal masking by conspecific sounds. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use highly distinctive signature whistles that counter masking effects. However, they can be found in very large groups where masking by conspecific sounds may become unavoidable. In this study we used passive acoustic localization to investigate how whistle rates of wild bottlenose dolphins change in relation to group size and behavioral context. We found that individual whistle rates decreased when group sizes got larger. Dolphins displayed higher whistle rates in contexts when group members were more dispersed as in socializing and in nonpolarized movement than during coordinated surface travel. Using acoustic localization showed that many whistles were produced by groups nearby and not by our focal group. Thus, previous studies based on single hydrophone recordings may have been overestimating whistle rates. Our results show that although bottlenose dolphins whistle more in social situations they also decrease vocal output in large groups where the potential for signal masking by other dolphin whistles increases.

  10. Influence of dose on particle size of colloidal silver nanoparticles synthesized by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghavi, Kazem, E-mail: Kazem.naghavi@gmail.co [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia); Saion, Elias [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia); Rezaee, Khadijeh [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Modern Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Physics Department, 43400 UPM SERDANG, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by {gamma}-irradiation-induced reduction method of an aqueous solution containing silver nitrate as a precursor in various concentrations between 7.40x10{sup -4} and 1.84x10{sup -3} M, polyvinyl pyrrolidone for capping colloidal nanoparticles, isopropanol as radical scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and deionised water as a solvent. The irradiations were carried out in a {sup 60}Co {gamma} source chamber at doses up to 70 kGy. The optical absorption spectra were measured using UV-vis spectrophotometer and used to study the particle distribution and electronic structure of silver nanoparticles. As the radiation dose increases from 10 to 70 kGy, the absorption intensity increases with increasing dose. The absorption peak {lambda}{sub max} blue shifted from 410 to 403 nm correspond to the increase of absorption conduction electron energy from 3.02 to 3.08 eV, indicating the particle size decreases with increasing dose. The particle size was determined by photon cross correlation spectroscopy and the results showed that the particle diameter decreases exponentially with the increase of dose. The transmission electron microscopy images were taken at doses of 20 and 60 kGy and the results confirmed that as the dose increases the diameter of colloidal silver nanoparticle decreases and the particle distribution increases.

  11. Influence of secular trends and sample size on reference equations for lung function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjer, P H; Stocks, J; Cole, T J; Hall, G L; Stanojevic, S

    2011-03-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the contribution of secular trends and sample size to lung function reference equations, and establish the number of local subjects required to validate published reference values. 30 spirometry datasets collected between 1978 and 2009 provided data on healthy, white subjects: 19,291 males and 23,741 females aged 2.5-95 yrs. The best fit for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV(1)/FVC as functions of age, height and sex were derived from the entire dataset using GAMLSS. Mean z-scores were calculated for individual datasets to determine inter-centre differences. This was repeated by subdividing one large dataset (3,683 males and 4,759 females) into 36 smaller subsets (comprising 18-227 individuals) to preclude differences due to population/technique. No secular trends were observed and differences between datasets comprising >1,000 subjects were small (maximum difference in FEV(1) and FVC from overall mean: 0.30- -0.22 z-scores). Subdividing one large dataset into smaller subsets reproduced the above sample size-related differences and revealed that at least 150 males and 150 females would be necessary to validate reference values to avoid spurious differences due to sampling error. Use of local controls to validate reference equations will rarely be practical due to the numbers required. Reference equations derived from large or collated datasets are recommended.

  12. Influence of grain size and exchange interaction on the LLB modeling procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Reliably predicting bit-error rates in realistic heat-assisted magnetic recording simulations is a challenging task. Integrating the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch (LLB) equation, within a coarse graining approach, can reduce the computational effort to determine the magnetization dynamics in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, compared to solving the atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. If the aim is that the dynamics of both approaches coincide, temperature dependent material functions, such as the zero-field equilibrium magnetization as well as the parallel and normal susceptibilities, must be modeled carefully in order to use them as input in the LLB equation. We present an extensive study on how these functions depend on grain size and exchange interactions. We show that, if the size or the exchange constant of a reference grain is modified, the material functions can be scaled, according to the changed Curie temperature, yielding negligible errors. This is shown to be valid for volume changes of up to ±40% and variations of the exchange constant of up to ±10%. Besides the temperature dependent material curves, computed switching probabilities also agree well with probabilities separately determined for each system. Our study suggests that there is no need to recalculate the required LLB input functions for each particle. Within the presented limits, it is sufficient to scale them to the Curie temperature of the altered system.

  13. Influence of dose on particle size of colloidal silver nanoparticles synthesized by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghavi, Kazem; Saion, Elias; Rezaee, Khadijeh; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by γ-irradiation-induced reduction method of an aqueous solution containing silver nitrate as a precursor in various concentrations between 7.40x10 -4 and 1.84x10 -3 M, polyvinyl pyrrolidone for capping colloidal nanoparticles, isopropanol as radical scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and deionised water as a solvent. The irradiations were carried out in a 60 Co γ source chamber at doses up to 70 kGy. The optical absorption spectra were measured using UV-vis spectrophotometer and used to study the particle distribution and electronic structure of silver nanoparticles. As the radiation dose increases from 10 to 70 kGy, the absorption intensity increases with increasing dose. The absorption peak λ max blue shifted from 410 to 403 nm correspond to the increase of absorption conduction electron energy from 3.02 to 3.08 eV, indicating the particle size decreases with increasing dose. The particle size was determined by photon cross correlation spectroscopy and the results showed that the particle diameter decreases exponentially with the increase of dose. The transmission electron microscopy images were taken at doses of 20 and 60 kGy and the results confirmed that as the dose increases the diameter of colloidal silver nanoparticle decreases and the particle distribution increases.

  14. Influence of nano-size inclusions on spall fracture of copper single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razorenov, S. V.; Ivanchihina, G. E.; Kanel, G. I.; Herrmann, B.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Spall experiments have been carried out for copper in different structural states. The samples were copper single crystals, crystals of Cu+0.1% Si, copper crystals with silica particles of 180 nm average size, and polycrystalline copper. In experiments, the free surface velocity histories were recorded with the VISAR. The recovered samples were studied using optical microscopy and SEM. Solid solution Cu+0.1% Si demonstrates slower spall process than pure copper crystals. At longer pulse durations its spall strength is slightly less than that of pure crystals but approaches the latter with decreasing pulse duration. Fracture of copper with silica inclusions is completed much faster. The spall strength of this material is close to that of Cu+0.1% Si crystals at longer pulse duration and approaches the strength of polycrystalline copper with decreasing the load duration. Fractography of the spall surfaces correlates with the free surface velocity histories. The main fracture surface of the Cu+0.1% Si grains consists of net of dimples ∼4 μm to 40 μm mean diameter. The fracture surfaces of copper with silica inclusions is covered by a net of dimples of 1 μm to 5 μm size

  15. Factors that influence planning for physical activity among workers in small- and medium-sized enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawako Kawahara

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA is necessary for improving the health of workers in small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. However, behavioral changes conducive to PA are often difficult to achieve despite intentions. Because intention to perform PA does not always translate to action, proper planning may be critical for achieving PA. In this study, we aimed to identify factors related to planning for PA among workers in SMEs because this is one population that has been identified as being at higher risk for lifestyle-related diseases in Japan. Participants completed a series of validated questionnaires. Of 353 valid responses, 226 individuals (149 men; aged 47.5 ± 8.7 years stated their intention to perform PA. Multiple regression analysis indicated that a higher PA planning score was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy for PA (p < 0.001, higher risk perception regarding inactivity (p = 0.012, and greater knowledge of information about PA community services (p = 0.019. Therefore, we recommend that self-efficacy, risk perception, and information regarding PA community services are enhanced in the daily working lives of workers at their workplaces. In this manner, they can promote their planning of health behavioral changes in a supportive environment, drawing upon available services, supports, and other resources. Keywords: Workers, Planning, Intention, Physical activity, Small- and medium-sized enterprises

  16. Corneal aberrations in keratoconic eyes: influence of pupil size and centering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comastri, S A; Perez, G D; Martin, G; Bianchetti, A; Perez, L I

    2011-01-01

    Ocular aberrations vary among subjects and under different conditions and are commonly analyzed expanding the wavefront aberration function in Zernike polynomials. In previous articles, explicit analytical formulas to transform Zernike coefficients of up to 7th order corresponding to an original pupil into those related to a contracted displaced new pupil are obtained. In the present paper these formulas are applied to 20 keratoconic corneas of varying severity. Employing the SN CT1000 topographer, aberrations of the anterior corneal surface for a pupil of semi-diameter 3 mm centered on the keratometric axis are evaluated, the relation between the higher-order root mean square wavefront error and the index KISA% characterizing keratoconus is studied and the size and centering of the ocular photopic natural pupil are determined. Using these data and the transformation formulas, new coefficients associated to the photopic pupil size are computed and their variation when coordinates origin is shifted from the keratometric axis to the ocular pupil centre is analyzed.

  17. Quantitative assessment of similarity between randomly acquired characteristics on high quality exemplars and crime scene impressions via analysis of feature size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richetelli, Nicole; Nobel, Madonna; Bodziak, William J; Speir, Jacqueline A

    2017-01-01

    Forensic footwear evidence can prove invaluable to the resolution of a criminal investigation. Naturally, the value of a comparison varies with the rarity of the evidence, which is a function of both manufactured as well as randomly acquired characteristics (RACs). When focused specifically on the latter of these two types of features, empirical evidence demonstrates high discriminating power for the differentiation of known match and known non-match samples when presented with exemplars of high quality and exhibiting a sufficient number of clear and complex RACs. However, given the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the media, substrate, and deposition process encountered during the commission of a crime, RACs on crime scene prints are expected to exhibit a large range of variability in terms of reproducibility, clarity, and quality. Although the pattern recognition skill of the expert examiner is adept at recognizing and evaluating this type of natural variation, there is little research to suggest that objective and numerical metrics can globally process this variation when presented with RACs from degraded crime scene quality prints. As such, the goal of this study was to mathematically compare the loss and similarity of RACs in high quality exemplars versus crime-scene-like quality impressions as a function of RAC shape, perimeter, area, and common source. Results indicate that the unpredictable conditions associated with crime scene print production promotes RAC loss that varies between 33% and 100% with an average of 85%, and that when the entire outsole is taken as a constellation of features (or a RAC map), 64% of the crime-scene-like impressions exhibited 10 or fewer RACs, resulting in a 0.72 probability of stochastic dominance. Given this, individual RAC description and correspondence were further explored using five simple, but objective, numerical metrics of similarity. Statistically significant differences in similarity scores for RAC shape and size

  18. Influence of fragment size and postoperative joint congruency on long-term outcome of posterior malleolar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijfhout van Hooff, Cornelis Christiaan; Verhage, Samuel Marinus; Hoogendoorn, Jochem Maarten

    2015-06-01

    One of the factors contributing to long-term outcome of posterior malleolar fractures is the development of osteoarthritis. Based on biomechanical, cadaveric, and small population studies, fixation of posterior malleolar fracture fragments (PMFFs) is usually performed when fragment size exceeds 25-33%. However, the influence of fragment size on long-term clinical and radiological outcome size remains unclear. A retrospective cohort study of 131 patients treated for an isolated ankle fracture with involvement of the posterior malleolus was performed. Mean follow-up was 6.9 (range, 2.5-15.9) years. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of the fragment, small (25%, n = 25), and presence of step-off after operative treatment. We have compared functional outcome measures (AOFAS, AAOS), pain (VAS), and dorsiflexion restriction compared to the contralateral ankle and the incidence of osteoarthritis on X-ray. There were no nonunions, 56% of patients had no radiographic osteoarthritis, VAS was 10 of 100, and median clinical score was 90 of 100. More osteoarthritis occurred in ankle fractures with medium and large PMFFs compared to small fragments (small 16%, medium 48%, large 54%; P = .006). Also when comparing small with medium-sized fragments (P = .02), larger fragment size did not lead to a significantly decreased function (median AOFAS 95 vs 88, P = .16). If the PMFF size was >5%, osteoarthritis occurred more frequently when there was a postoperative step-off ≥1 mm in the tibiotalar joint surface (41% vs 61%, P = .02) (whether the posterior fragment had been fixed or not). In this group, fixing the PMFF did not influence development of osteoarthritis. However, in 42% of the cases with fixation of the fragment a postoperative step-off remained (vs 45% in the group without fixation). Osteoarthritis is 1 component of long-term outcome of malleolar fractures, and the results of this study demonstrate that there was more radiographic osteoarthritis in

  19. Effect of feature size on dielectric nonlinearity of patterned PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J. I.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Polcawich, R. G.; Sanchez, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate, PZT (52/48), thin films with a PbTiO 3 seed layer were patterned into features of different widths, including various sizes of squares and 100 μm, 50 μm, and 10 μm serpentine designs, using argon ion beam milling. Patterns with different surface area/perimeter ratios were used to study the relative importance of damage produced by the patterning. It was found that as the pattern dimensions decreased, the remanent polarization increased, presumably due to the fact that the dipoles near the feature perimeter are not as severely clamped to the substrate. This investigation is in agreement with a model in which clamping produces deep wells, which do not allow some fraction of the spontaneous polarization to switch at high field. The domain wall mobility at modest electric fields was investigated using the Rayleigh law. Both the reversible, ε init , and irreversible, α, Rayleigh coefficients increased with decreasing serpentine line width for de-aged samples. For measurements made immediately after annealing, ε init of 500 μm square patterns was 1510 ± 13; with decreasing serpentine line width, ε init rose from 1520 ± 10 for the 100 μm serpentine to 1568 ± 23 for the 10 μm serpentine. The irreversible parameter, α, for the square patterns was 39.4 ± 3.2 cm/kV and it increased to 44.1 ± 3.2 cm/kV as the lateral dimension is reduced. However, it was found that as the width of the serpentine features decreased, the aging rate rose. These observations are consistent with a model in which sidewall damage produces shallow wells that lower the Rayleigh constants of aged samples at small fields. These shallow wells can be overcome by the large fields used to measure the remanent polarization and the large unipolar electric fields typically used to drive thin film piezoelectric actuators

  20. Innovative small and medium sized reactors: Design features, safety approaches and R and D trends. Final report of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    In order to beat the economy of scale small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) have to incorporate specific design features that result into simplification of the overall plant design, modularization and mass production. Several approaches are being under development and consideration, including the increased use of passive features for reactivity control and reactor shut down, decay heat removal and core cooling, and reliance on the increased margin to fuel failure achieved through the use of advanced high-temperature fuel forms and structural materials. Some SMRs also offer the possibility of very long core lifetimes with burnable absorbers or high conversion ratio in the core. These reactors incorporate increased proliferation resistance and may offer a very attractive solution for the implementation of adequate safeguards in a scenario of global deployment of nuclear power. About 50 concepts and designs of the innovative SMRs are under development in more than 15 IAEA Member States representing both industrialized and developing countries. SMRs are under development for all principle reactor lines, i.e., water cooled, liquid metal cooled, gas cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors, as well as for some non-conventional combinations thereof. Upon a diversity of the conceptual and design approaches to SMRs, it may be useful to identify the so-called enabling technologies that are common to certain reactor types or lines. An enabling technology is the technology that needs to be developed and demonstrated to make a certain reactor concept viable. When a certain technology is common to several SMR concepts or designs, it could benefit from being developed on a common or shared basis. The identification of common enabling technologies could speed up the development and deployment of many SMRs by merging the efforts of their designers through an increased international cooperation. This publication has been prepared through the collaboration of all participants of this

  1. Effect of feature size on dielectric nonlinearity of patterned PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. I., E-mail: jxy194@psu.edu; Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Polcawich, R. G.; Sanchez, L. M. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783-1197 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    Lead zirconate titanate, PZT (52/48), thin films with a PbTiO{sub 3} seed layer were patterned into features of different widths, including various sizes of squares and 100 μm, 50 μm, and 10 μm serpentine designs, using argon ion beam milling. Patterns with different surface area/perimeter ratios were used to study the relative importance of damage produced by the patterning. It was found that as the pattern dimensions decreased, the remanent polarization increased, presumably due to the fact that the dipoles near the feature perimeter are not as severely clamped to the substrate. This investigation is in agreement with a model in which clamping produces deep wells, which do not allow some fraction of the spontaneous polarization to switch at high field. The domain wall mobility at modest electric fields was investigated using the Rayleigh law. Both the reversible, ε{sub init}, and irreversible, α, Rayleigh coefficients increased with decreasing serpentine line width for de-aged samples. For measurements made immediately after annealing, ε{sub init} of 500 μm square patterns was 1510 ± 13; with decreasing serpentine line width, ε{sub init} rose from 1520 ± 10 for the 100 μm serpentine to 1568 ± 23 for the 10 μm serpentine. The irreversible parameter, α, for the square patterns was 39.4 ± 3.2 cm/kV and it increased to 44.1 ± 3.2 cm/kV as the lateral dimension is reduced. However, it was found that as the width of the serpentine features decreased, the aging rate rose. These observations are consistent with a model in which sidewall damage produces shallow wells that lower the Rayleigh constants of aged samples at small fields. These shallow wells can be overcome by the large fields used to measure the remanent polarization and the large unipolar electric fields typically used to drive thin film piezoelectric actuators.

  2. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-02-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ-ɛ martensitic transformation.

  3. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-04-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ- ɛ martensitic transformation.

  4. Influencing factors on the size uniformity of self-assembled SiGe quantum rings grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Lv, Y; Yang, X J; Fan, Y L; Zhong, Z; Jiang, Z M

    2011-03-25

    The size uniformity of self-assembled SiGe quantum rings, which are formed by capping SiGe quantum dots with a thin Si layer, is found to be greatly influenced by the growth temperature and the areal density of SiGe quantum dots. Higher growth temperature benefits the size uniformity of quantum dots, but results in low Ge concentration as well as asymmetric Ge distribution in the dots, which induces the subsequently formed quantum rings to be asymmetric in shape or even broken somewhere in the ridge of rings. Low growth temperature degrades the size uniformity of quantum dots, and thus that of quantum rings. A high areal density results in the expansion and coalescence of neighboring quantum dots to form a chain, rather than quantum rings. Uniform quantum rings with a size dispersion of 4.6% and an areal density of 7.8×10(8) cm(-2) are obtained at the optimized growth temperature of 640°C.

  5. An Assessment of Transport Property Estimation Methods for Ammonia–Water Mixtures and Their Influence on Heat Exchanger Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Modi, Anish; Jensen, Jonas Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Transport properties of fluids are indispensable for heat exchanger design. The methods for estimating the transport properties of ammonia–water mixtures are not well established in the literature. The few existent methods are developed from none or limited, sometimes inconsistent experimental...... of ammonia–water mixtures. Firstly, the different methods are introduced and compared at various temperatures and pressures. Secondly, their individual influence on the required heat exchanger size (surface area) is investigated. For this purpose, two case studies related to the use of the Kalina cycle...... the interpolative methods in contrast to the corresponding state methods. Nevertheless, all possible mixture transport property combinations used herein resulted in a heat exchanger size within 4.3 % difference for the flue-gas heat recovery boiler, and within 12.3 % difference for the oil-based boiler....

  6. Beyond the genetic basis of sensation seeking: The influence of birth order, family size and parenting styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feij, Jan A,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses of sensation seeking have shown fairly high heritabilities for measures of this trait. However, 40 to 60% of the variance remains unexplained by genetic factors. This longitudinal study examines the influence of characteristics of the family environment -- birth order, family size, socio-economic status and parenting styles -- on two dimensions of sensation seeking: disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Previous research has shown that these dimensions load on the same factor, are related to biologically based impulsive disorders, and have a common genetic basis. Questionnaire and biographical data obtained from 532 female and 479 male young adults (age between 18 and 30 years were analyzed using structural modeling. The results show that participants who experienced little parental care and much control were more likely to have high scores on disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. It appears that these family factors may partly explain the previously reported effects of birth order and family size on sensation seeking.

  7. Social network size can influence linguistic malleability and the propagation of linguistic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ari, Shiri

    2018-07-01

    We learn language from our social environment, but the more sources we have, the less informative each source is, and therefore, the less weight we ascribe its input. According to this principle, people with larger social networks should give less weight to new incoming information, and should therefore be less susceptible to the influence of new speakers. This paper tests this prediction, and shows that speakers with smaller social networks indeed have more malleable linguistic representations. In particular, they are more likely to adjust their lexical boundary following exposure to a new speaker. Experiment 2 uses computational simulations to test whether this greater malleability could lead people with smaller social networks to be important for the propagation of linguistic change despite the fact that they interact with fewer people. The results indicate that when innovators were connected with people with smaller rather than larger social networks, the population exhibited greater and faster diffusion. Together these experiments show that the properties of people's social networks can influence individuals' learning and use as well as linguistic phenomena at the community level. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of pellet-clad-gap-size on LWR fuel rod performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, B.; Fuchs, H.P.; Garzarolli, F.; Manzel, R.

    1979-01-01

    The as-fabricated pellet-clad-gap size varies due to fabricational tolerances of the cladding inner diameter and the pellet outer diameter. The consequences of these variations on the fuel rod behaviour are analyzed using the KWU fuel rod code CARO. The code predictions are compared with experimental results of special pathfinder test fuel rods irradiated in the OBRIGHEIM nuclear power plant. These test fuel rods include gap sizer in the range of 140 μm to 270 μm, prepressurization between 13 bar to 36 bar and Helium and Argon fill gases irradiated up to a local burnup of 35 MWd/kg(U). Post irradiation examination were performed at different burnups. CARC calculations have been performed with special emphasis in cladding creep down, fission gas release and pellet clad gap closure. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of candidate regions influencing litter size in Danish Landrace sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Ditte; Mark, Thomas; Sørensen, P.

    2010-01-01

    allele effect of microsatellite alleles in the region. In spite of the apparent increased historical selection pressure on chromosome 13, fairly large variation in allele effects was observed, indicating that the markers within the region may be used for marker-assisted selection. However, substantial...... and low EBV for litter size were genotyped. An assignment test showed that 91 and 90% of the sows could be assigned correctly to the group of sows representing high and low EBV, respectively, based on genotype information. Allele effects were estimated separately for each marker by using deregressed EBV...... and a linear model that include both a polygenic and an allele effect. The investigated region on chromosome 13 was found to have a greater average identity by state relationship compared with the other regions, indicating that selection has taken place in this region. This is supported by an increased average...

  10. Experimental Evaluation of User Influence on Test Zone Size in Multi-probe Anechoic Chamber Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Ji, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    , an extensive measurement campaign was carried out in the paper. Two realistic LTE mockups were designed and their performance were evaluated under standard spatial channel models with and without the presence of user phantom. The measurement results have shown that the nearby user phantom can significantly...... affect the MIMO performance. However, its impact on the test zone size of the MPAC system is negligible, since emulation accuracy in terms of received power, branch power ratio (BPR), antenna correlation and measured throughput under the target and the emulated channels is not affected by the presence...... of user phantom. Moreover, results measured with the synthetic MPAC method generally match those obtained with the reference two-stage method. These findings are valuable inputs for the ongoing MIMO OTA harmonization work in the standardization....

  11. Hard substrate in the deep ocean: How sediment features influence epibenthic megafauna on the eastern Canadian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacharité, Myriam; Metaxas, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Benthic habitats on deep continental margins (> 1000 m) are now considered heterogeneous - in particular because of the occasional presence of hard substrate in a matrix of sand and mud - influencing the distribution of megafauna which can thrive on both sedimented and rocky substrates. At these depths, optical imagery captured with high-definition cameras to describe megafauna can also describe effectively the fine-scale sediment properties in the immediate vicinity of the fauna. In this study, we determined the relationship between local heterogeneity (10-100 sm) in fine-scale sediment properties and the abundance, composition, and diversity of megafauna along a large depth gradient (1000-3000 m) in a previously-unexplored habitat: the Northeast Fan, which lies downslope of submarine canyons off the Gulf of Maine (northwest Atlantic). Substrate heterogeneity was quantified using a novel approach based on principles of computer vision. This approach proved powerful in detecting gradients in sediment, and sporadic complex features (i.e. large boulders) in an otherwise homogeneous environment because it characterizes sediment properties on a continuous scale. Sediment heterogeneity influenced megafaunal diversity (morphospecies richness and Shannon-Wiener Index) and community composition, with areas of higher substrate complexity generally supported higher diversity. However, patterns in abundance were not influenced by sediment properties, and may be best explained by gradients in food supply. Our study provides a new approach to quantify fine-scale sediment properties and assess their role in shaping megafaunal communities in the deep sea, which should be included into habitat studies given their potential ecological importance.

  12. Influence of species, size and relative abundance on the outcomes of competitive interactions between brook trout and juvenile coho salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Emily J; Duda, Jeff; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Resource competition between animals is influenced by a number of factors including the species, size and relative abundance of competing individuals. Stream-dwelling animals often experience variably available food resources, and some employ territorial behaviors to increase their access to food. We investigated the factors that affect dominance between resident, non-native brook trout and recolonizing juvenile coho salmon in the Elwha River, WA, USA, to see if brook trout are likely to disrupt coho salmon recolonization via interference competition. During dyadic laboratory feeding trials, we hypothesized that fish size, not species, would determine which individuals consumed the most food items, and that species would have no effect. We found that species, not size, played a significant role in dominance; coho salmon won 95% of trials, even when only 52% the length of their brook trout competitors. As the pairs of competing fish spent more time together during a trial sequence, coho salmon began to consume more food, and brook trout began to lose more, suggesting that the results of early trials influenced fish performance later. In group trials, we hypothesized that group composition and species would not influence fish foraging success. In single species groups, coho salmon consumed more than brook trout, but the ranges overlapped. Brook trout consumption remained constant through all treatments, but coho salmon consumed more food in treatments with fewer coho salmon, suggesting that coho salmon experienced more intra- than inter-specific competition and that brook trout do not pose a substantial challenge. Based on our results, we think it is unlikely that competition from brook trout will disrupt Elwha River recolonization by coho salmon.

  13. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm and Department of Physics, Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  14. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  15. The Theory-based Influence of Map Features on Risk Beliefs: Self-reports of What is Seen and Understood for Maps Depicting an Environmental Health Hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Severtson, Dolores J.; Vatovec, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Theory-based research is needed to understand how maps of environmental health risk information influence risk beliefs and protective behavior. Using theoretical concepts from multiple fields of study including visual cognition, semiotics, health behavior, and learning and memory supports a comprehensive assessment of this influence. We report results from thirteen cognitive interviews that provide theory-based insights into how visual features influenced what participants saw ...

  16. The memory characteristics of submicron feature-size PZT capacitors with PtOx top electrode by using dry-etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Wang, C.-C.; Wu, T.-B.

    2007-01-01

    Dry etching and its effect on the characteristics of submicron feature-size PbZr 1-x Ti x O 3 (PZT) capacitors with PtO x top electrode were investigated. The photoresist (PR)-masked PtO x films were etched by an Ar/(20%)Cl 2 /O 2 helicon wave plasma. A fence-free pattern with a significantly high etch rate and sidewall slope was obtained by the addition of O 2 into the etching gas mixture, due to the chemical instability of PtO x and the formation of a PtO 2 passivation layer to suppress redeposition of the etch by-products on the etched surface. The patterned PtO x electrode can be further used as a hard mask for etching the PZT film, subsequently, with the gas mixture of Ar, CF 4 and O 2 . A high etching rate of PZT and a good etching selectivity to PtO x can be obtained at 30% O 2 addition into the Ar/(50%)CF 4 plasma. The etched capacitors have a steep, 72 0 , sidewall angle with a clean surface. Moreover, the addition of O 2 into the etching gas can well preserve the properties and the fatigue endurance of PtO x /PZT capacitors

  17. The Tax Pressure Influence on Underground Economy Size in Romania between 2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica PRIPOAIE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aggressive extension of the level of underground economy, with a more and more organized developmental character, tends to place the phenomenon as a direct threat to the proper operation of State democratic institutions and, due to the generalized internationalization trend of the phenomenon, quantification and control of underground economy constitutes a problem considered by national governments and international bodies as well. The obvious growth and refinement trends of the methods used by the „practicants” of underground activities impose the need to know and to evaluate this phenomenon, to establish the possibe reaction ways of the public power, according to the cost and consequences forecast on the short term and, especially, on the long term, of the adopted measures. It is therefore necessary to analyze all pertinent factors that influence the level and structure of the underground economy and particularly the fiscal pressure.

  18. Comparison of manual and automated size measurements of lung metastases on MDCT images: Potential influence on therapeutic decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, Sandra [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: sandra.pauls@uni-ulm.de; Kuerschner, Christian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: chris.kuerschner@web.de; Dharaiya, Ekta [CT-Clinical Science, Philips Medical Systems, Highland Heights, OH 44143 (United States)], E-mail: ekta.shah@philips.com; Muche, Rainer [Institute of Biometrics, University of Ulm, Schwabstrasse 13, 89075 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: rainer.muche@uni-ulm.de; Schmidt, Stefan A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: stefan-a.schmidt@gmx.de; Krueger, Stefan [Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: s.krueger@uniklinik-ulm.de; Brambs, Hans-Juergen [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: hans-juergen.brambs@uniklinik-ulm.de; Aschoff, Andrik J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: andrik.aschoff@uni-ulm.de

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of automated measurement of diameter, area, and volume from chest CT scans on therapeutic decisions of lung nodules as compared to manual 2-D measurements. Patients and method: The retrospective study involved 25 patients with 75 lung metastases. Contrast enhanced CT scans (16 row) of the lung were performed three times during chemotherapy with a mean time interval of 67.9 days between scans. In each patient, three metastases were evaluated (n = 225). Automatic measurements were compared to manual assessment for the following parameters: diameter, area, and density. The influence on the therapeutic decisions was evaluated using the RECIST criteria. Results: The maximum diameter measured by the automatic application was on an average 27% (S.D. 39; CI: 0.22-0.32; p < 0.0001) higher than the maximum diameter with manual assessment, and the differences depended on metastases size. Based on diameter calculation, manual and automated assessment disagreed in up to 32% of therapeutic decisions. Volumetric assessment tended towards more changes in therapy as compared to diameter calculation. The calculation of mean transversal area of metastases was 36% (S.D. 0.305; CI: -0.40 to -0.32; p < 0.0001) less with automated measurement. Therapeutic strategy would be changed in up to 25.7% of nodules using automated area calculation. Automated assessment of nodules' area and volume could influence the therapeutic decisions in up to 51.4% of all nodules. Density of the nodules was not validated to determine the influence on therapeutic decisions. Conclusion: There is a discrepancy between the manual and automated size measurement of lung metastases which could be significant.

  19. Comparison of manual and automated size measurements of lung metastases on MDCT images: Potential influence on therapeutic decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauls, Sandra; Kuerschner, Christian; Dharaiya, Ekta; Muche, Rainer; Schmidt, Stefan A.; Krueger, Stefan; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Aschoff, Andrik J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of automated measurement of diameter, area, and volume from chest CT scans on therapeutic decisions of lung nodules as compared to manual 2-D measurements. Patients and method: The retrospective study involved 25 patients with 75 lung metastases. Contrast enhanced CT scans (16 row) of the lung were performed three times during chemotherapy with a mean time interval of 67.9 days between scans. In each patient, three metastases were evaluated (n = 225). Automatic measurements were compared to manual assessment for the following parameters: diameter, area, and density. The influence on the therapeutic decisions was evaluated using the RECIST criteria. Results: The maximum diameter measured by the automatic application was on an average 27% (S.D. 39; CI: 0.22-0.32; p < 0.0001) higher than the maximum diameter with manual assessment, and the differences depended on metastases size. Based on diameter calculation, manual and automated assessment disagreed in up to 32% of therapeutic decisions. Volumetric assessment tended towards more changes in therapy as compared to diameter calculation. The calculation of mean transversal area of metastases was 36% (S.D. 0.305; CI: -0.40 to -0.32; p < 0.0001) less with automated measurement. Therapeutic strategy would be changed in up to 25.7% of nodules using automated area calculation. Automated assessment of nodules' area and volume could influence the therapeutic decisions in up to 51.4% of all nodules. Density of the nodules was not validated to determine the influence on therapeutic decisions. Conclusion: There is a discrepancy between the manual and automated size measurement of lung metastases which could be significant

  20. Influence of local habitat features on disease avoidance by Caribbean spiny lobsters in a casita-enhanced bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Candia-Zulbarán, Rebeca I; Negrete-Soto, Fernando; Barradas-Ortiz, Cecilia; Huchin-Mian, Juan P; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique

    2012-08-27

    In Bahía de la Ascensión, Mexico, 'casitas' (large artificial shelters) are extensively used to harvest Caribbean spiny lobsters Panulirus argus. After the discovery of a pathogenic virus, Panulirus argus virus 1 (PaV1), in these lobsters, laboratory experiments revealed that PaV1 could be transmitted by contact and through water, and that lobsters avoided shelters harboring diseased conspecifics. To examine these issues in the context of casitas, which typically harbor multiple lobsters of all sizes, we examined the distribution and aggregation patterns of lobsters in the absence/presence of diseased conspecifics (i.e. visibly infected with PaV1) in 531 casitas distributed over 3 bay zones, 1 poorly vegetated ('Vigía Chico', average depth: 1.5 m) and 2 more extensively vegetated ('Punta Allen': 2.5 m; 'Los Cayos': 2.4 m). All zones had relatively high indices of predation risk. Using several statistical approaches, we found that distribution parameters of lobsters were generally not affected by the presence of diseased conspecifics in casitas. Interestingly, however, in the shallower and less vegetated zone (Vigía Chico), individual casitas harbored more lobsters and lobsters were actually more crowded in casitas containing diseased conspecifics, yet disease prevalence was the lowest in lobsters of all sizes. These results suggest that (1) investment in disease avoidance by lobsters is partially modulated by local habitat features, (2) contact transmission rates of PaV1 may be lower in nature than in the laboratory, and (3) water-borne transmission rates may be lower in shallow, poorly vegetated habitats more exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation, which can damage viral particles.

  1. Influence of group size on the success of wolves hunting bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Tallian, Aimee; Stahler, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing aspect of social foraging behaviour is that large groups are often no better at capturing prey than are small groups, a pattern that has been attributed to diminished cooperation (i.e., free riding) in large groups. Although this suggests the formation of large groups is unrelated to prey capture, little is known about cooperation in large groups that hunt hard-to-catch prey. Here, we used direct observations of Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus) hunting their most formidable prey, bison (Bison bison), to test the hypothesis that large groups are more cooperative when hunting difficult prey. We quantified the relationship between capture success and wolf group size, and compared it to previously reported results for Yellowstone wolves hunting elk (Cervus elaphus), a prey that was, on average, 3 times easier to capture than bison. Whereas improvement in elk capture success levelled off at 2-6 wolves, bison capture success levelled off at 9-13 wolves with evidence that it continued to increase beyond 13 wolves. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that hunters in large groups are more cooperative when hunting more formidable prey. Improved ability to capture formidable prey could therefore promote the formation and maintenance of large predator groups, particularly among predators that specialize on such prey.

  2. Influence of group size on the success of wolves hunting bison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R MacNulty

    Full Text Available An intriguing aspect of social foraging behaviour is that large groups are often no better at capturing prey than are small groups, a pattern that has been attributed to diminished cooperation (i.e., free riding in large groups. Although this suggests the formation of large groups is unrelated to prey capture, little is known about cooperation in large groups that hunt hard-to-catch prey. Here, we used direct observations of Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus hunting their most formidable prey, bison (Bison bison, to test the hypothesis that large groups are more cooperative when hunting difficult prey. We quantified the relationship between capture success and wolf group size, and compared it to previously reported results for Yellowstone wolves hunting elk (Cervus elaphus, a prey that was, on average, 3 times easier to capture than bison. Whereas improvement in elk capture success levelled off at 2-6 wolves, bison capture success levelled off at 9-13 wolves with evidence that it continued to increase beyond 13 wolves. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that hunters in large groups are more cooperative when hunting more formidable prey. Improved ability to capture formidable prey could therefore promote the formation and maintenance of large predator groups, particularly among predators that specialize on such prey.

  3. Influence of size, shape, and flexibility on bacterial passage through micropore membrane filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Hammes, Frederik; Düggelin, Marcel; Egli, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Sterilization of fluids by means of microfiltration is commonly applied in research laboratories as well as in pharmaceutical and industrial processes. Sterile micropore filters are subject to microbiological validation, where Brevundimonas diminuta is used as a standard test organism. However, several recent reports on the ubiquitous presence of filterable bacteria in aquatic environments have cast doubt on the accuracy and validity of the standard filter-testing method. Six different bacterial species of various sizes and shapes (Hylemonella gracilis, Escherichia coli, Sphingopyxis alaskensis, Vibrio cholerae, Legionella pneumophila, and B. diminuta) were tested for their filterability through sterile micropore filters. In all cases, the slender spirillum-shaped Hylemonella gracilis cells showed a superior ability to pass through sterile membrane filters. Our results provide solid evidence that the overall shape (including flexibility), instead of biovolume, is the determining factor for the filterability of bacteria, whereas cultivation conditions also play a crucial role. Furthermore, the filtration volume has a more important effect on the passage percentage in comparison with other technical variables tested (including flux and filter material). Based on our findings, we recommend a re-evaluation of the grading system for sterile filters, and suggest that the species Hylemonella should be considered as an alternative filter-testing organism for the quality assessment of micropore filters.

  4. Newborn screening blood spot analysis in the UK: influence of spot size, punch location and haematocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, A J; Bernstone, L; Hall, S K

    2016-03-01

    In dried blood spot analysis, punch location and variations in applied sample volume and haematocrit can produce different measured concentrations of analytes. We investigated the magnitude of these effects in newborn screening in the UK. Heparinized blood spiked with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), phenylalanine, tyrosine, leucine, methionine, octanoyl carnitine (C8), and immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) was spotted onto filter paper: (i) at a constant haematocrit of 50% at various volumes, and (ii) at a range of haematocrits using a constant volume. Subpunches (3.2 mm) of the dried blood spots were then analysed. Compared with a central punch from a 50 µL blood spot with 50% haematocrit, 10 µL spots can have significantly lower measured concentrations of all analytes, with decreases of 15% or more observed for leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. Punching at the edge of a spot can increase measured concentrations up to 35%. Higher haematocrit decreased measured TSH and C8 yet increased amino acids and IRT by 15% compared with 50% haematocrit. Lower haematocrits had the opposite effect, but only with higher concentrations of some analytes. Differences in blood spot size, haematocrit and punch location substantially affect measured concentrations for analytes used in the UK newborn screening programme, and this could affect false positive and negative rates. To minimize analytical bias, these variables should be controlled or adjusted for where possible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Gill rakers in six teleost species: influence of feeding habit and body size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gottlieb Almeida

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the structure of the gill rakers of Parapimelodus valenciennis and Parapimelodus nigribarbis (planktivorous, Serrasalmus maculatus and Hoplias malabaricus (piscivorous, Iheringichthys labrosus (benthophagous and Hypostomus commersonii (detritivorous and related it with the body size and feeding habits of these species. The species of Parapimelodus and H. commersonii showed long, filiform and closely spaced gill rakers, similar to those of species that use the gill rakers as a filter to assist in the retention of small particles. The widely spaced gill rakers of I. labrosus probably allow the retention of insect larvae, but not particles of inorganic matter. In H. malabaricus and S. maculatus the gill rakers are most likely related to prey capture and swallowing, as observed in other piscivorous species. In general, gill raker length and the distance between gill rakers have a positive relationship with fish length. The gill rakers show adaptations related to the diet of the fish, but morphological variation may occur even between species whose feeding habits are the same.

  6. Influence of particle size on the recovery of galene in electro flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntampaka, B.

    1987-01-01

    The difficulties to recovery very small particles by conventional flotation need the development of all methods likely to give the best results. And this owing to the actual tendency which consists in including in the stocks of valorized ores, those with mineral particles finely scattered needing a very advanced grinding. Among these methods (va cum flotation, ionic flotation, column flotation, etc...), the electro flotation, which uses the electrolysis of pulp for it's airing seems to have a great interest but in fortunately its still on a laboratory scale. The passage to the industrial scale needs the putting in a conspicuous position of all possibilities of the method. However the studies have shown that the method should particularly be effective in recovering of several minerals finely ground. In this article, we have confirmed the fact in the case of galene. We have furthermore showed that the rate of recuperation increases with the decreasing of the size of the particles. The recovering is maximal for the particles under μm. This phenomen is different from the one observed in conventional flotation. We have given the reasons of this difference in this article.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of lithographically defined graphene nanoribbons - influence of size and defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampmann, Felix; Scheuschner, Nils [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Joerger, Danny [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Maultzsch, Janina [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik, Department Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene nanostructures are an important building block to make use of the properties of graphene for applications in integrated devices. It is important to study edge roughness and defects in such nanostructures for further device improvement as they become important when downscaling structures. Recent Raman studies focused mainly on the D mode to characterize the defects in graphene and graphene nanoribbons (GNR) whereas not much attention has been paid to the D' mode that is smaller in Raman intensity. In this work we show by comparison with AFM measurements of the GNR width that both defect-induced Raman modes have different scattering length scales. Furthermore the size and quality of lithographically defined GNRs can be estimated by a close analysis of the defect-induced Raman modes and the width of the well-studied 2D mode of graphene. The findings are explained by the different vibration pattern for both Raman modes and the differences in the matrix elements determining the Raman intensity, i.e. the electron-phonon coupling and the phonon density of states. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE VEGETATION IN MIDDLE-SIZED STREAMS IN LATVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. GRINBERGA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study the species diversity and distribution of macrophytes in 131 surveyed sites of middle-sized streams of Latvia were investigated. The aim of the study was to determine the composition of macrophyte vegetation in Latvian streams in relation to the environmental factors (stream width, water depth, substrate type, shading and flow velocity. On the basis of these factors, five major groups of streams were distinguished representing mutually different typical macrophyte communities – (1 fast flowing streams on gravelly and stony substrate, (2 slow flowing streams on gravelly and stony substrate, (3 fast flowing streams on sandy substrate, (4 slow flowing streams on sandy substrate, and (5 streams with soft, silty substrate. Totally, 47 macrophyte taxa were found in the streams. The most common macrophyte species were Nuphar lutea found in 65% of all sites, followed by Sparganium emersum (64%, S. erectum s.l. (48%, Phalaris arundinacea (50%, Alisma plantago-aquatica (54% and Lemna minor (41%. The highest species richness (22 was found in slow flowing streams with gravelly substrate. Species-poor macrophyte communities were characteristic for fast flowing streams on sandy substrate.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE VEGETATION IN MIDDLE-SIZED STREAMS IN LATVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. GRINBERGA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the species diversity and distribution of macrophytes in 131 surveyed sites of middle-sized streams of Latvia were investigated. The aim of the study was to determine the composition of macrophyte vegetation in Latvian streams in relation to the environmental factors (stream width, water depth, substrate type, shading and flow velocity. On the basis of these factors, five major groups of streams were distinguished representing mutually different typical macrophyte communities – (1 fast flowing streams on gravelly and stony substrate, (2 slow flowing streams on gravelly and stony substrate, (3 fast flowing streams on sandy substrate, (4 slow flowing streams on sandy substrate, and (5 streams with soft, silty substrate. Totally, 47 macrophyte taxa were found in the streams. The most common macrophyte species were Nuphar lutea found in 65% of all sites, followed by Sparganium emersum (64%, S. erectum s.l. (48%, Phalaris arundinacea (50%, Alisma plantago-aquatica (54% and Lemna minor (41%. The highest species richness (22 was found in slow flowing streams with gravelly substrate. Species-poor macrophyte communities were characteristic for fast flowing streams on sandy substrate.

  10. Grain size influence on residual stresses in alumina/zirconia composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergo, V.; Sbaizero, O.; Pezzotti, G.; Nishida, T.

    1998-01-01

    The grain size (GS) and volume fraction of alumina have been systematically varied in composites with a zirconia matrix and the corresponding residual stresses have been assessed by means of piezospectroscopy. The compressive stress in alumina depends on the volume fraction and it is well predicted by a stochastic model based on information theory. No dependence with GS has been detected, except at the highest volume content (20% vol. alumina). Conversely the stress distribution is independent from the volume fraction and depends on GS: intermediate values of GS exhibit the wider stress distribution. The tensile stress in zirconia shows no clear correlation with the volume fraction and increases with increasing zirconia GS. This latter behavior has been compared with a model based on diffusion relaxation of stresses. The model reproduces correctly the stress change due to different alumina contents, but it diverges from the experimental data at smaller GSs, overestimating the residual stress. It is suggested that grain boundary sliding may also contribute to the relaxation of stresses

  11. Raman spectroscopy of lithographically defined graphene nanoribbons - influence of size and defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampmann, Felix; Scheuschner, Nils; Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph; Joerger, Danny; Maultzsch, Janina

    2017-01-01

    Graphene nanostructures are an important building block to make use of the properties of graphene for applications in integrated devices. It is important to study edge roughness and defects in such nanostructures for further device improvement as they become important when downscaling structures. Recent Raman studies focused mainly on the D mode to characterize the defects in graphene and graphene nanoribbons (GNR) whereas not much attention has been paid to the D' mode that is smaller in Raman intensity. In this work we show by comparison with AFM measurements of the GNR width that both defect-induced Raman modes have different scattering length scales. Furthermore the size and quality of lithographically defined GNRs can be estimated by a close analysis of the defect-induced Raman modes and the width of the well-studied 2D mode of graphene. The findings are explained by the different vibration pattern for both Raman modes and the differences in the matrix elements determining the Raman intensity, i.e. the electron-phonon coupling and the phonon density of states. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Factors that influence planning for physical activity among workers in small- and medium-sized enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Sawako; Tadaka, Etsuko; Okochi, Ayako

    2018-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) is necessary for improving the health of workers in small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, behavioral changes conducive to PA are often difficult to achieve despite intentions. Because intention to perform PA does not always translate to action, proper planning may be critical for achieving PA. In this study, we aimed to identify factors related to planning for PA among workers in SMEs because this is one population that has been identified as being at higher risk for lifestyle-related diseases in Japan. Participants completed a series of validated questionnaires. Of 353 valid responses, 226 individuals (149 men; aged 47.5 ± 8.7 years) stated their intention to perform PA. Multiple regression analysis indicated that a higher PA planning score was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy for PA ( p  < 0.001), higher risk perception regarding inactivity ( p  = 0.012), and greater knowledge of information about PA community services ( p  = 0.019). Therefore, we recommend that self-efficacy, risk perception, and information regarding PA community services are enhanced in the daily working lives of workers at their workplaces. In this manner, they can promote their planning of health behavioral changes in a supportive environment, drawing upon available services, supports, and other resources.

  13. Influence of high-pressure torsion on formation/destruction of nano-sized spinodal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamidi, Ali; Edalati, Kaveh; Horita, Zenji

    2018-04-01

    The microstructures and hardness of Al - 30 mol.% Zn are investigated after processing by high-pressure torsion (HPT) for different numbers of revolutions, N = 1, 3, 10 or 25, as well as after post-HPT annealing at different temperatures, T = 373 K, 473 K, 573 K and 673 K. It was found that a work softening occurs by decreasing the grain size to the submicrometer level and increasing the fraction of high-angle boundaries. As a result of HPT processing, a complete decomposition of supersaturated solid solution of Zn in Al occurs and the spinodal structure is destroyed. This suggests that softening of the Al-Zn alloys after HPT is due to the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution and destruction of spinodal decomposition. After post-HPT annealing, ultrafine-grained Al-Zn alloys show an unusual mechanical properties and its hardness increased to 187 HV. Microstructural analysis showed that the high hardness after post-HPT annealing is due to the formation of spinodal structures.

  14. Influence of the measurement method of features in ultrasound images of the thyroid in the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koprowski Robert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This paper shows the influence of a measurement method of features in the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s disease. Sensitivity of the algorithm to changes in the parameters of the ROI, namely shift, resizing and rotation, has been presented. The obtained results were also compared to the methods known from the literature in which decision trees or average gray level thresholding are used. Material In the study, 288 images obtained from patients with Hashimoto’s disease and 236 images from healthy subjects have been analyzed. For each person, an ultrasound examination of the left and right thyroid lobe in transverse and longitudinal sections has been performed. Method With the use of the developed algorithm, a discriminant analysis has been conducted for the following five options: linear, diaglinear, quadratic, diagquadratic and mahalanobis. The left and right thyroid lobes have been analyzed both together and separately in transverse and longitudinal sections. In addition, the algorithm enabled to analyze specificity and sensitivity as well as the impact of sensitivity of ROI shift, repositioning and rotation on the measured features. Results and summary The analysis has shown that the highest accuracy was obtained for the longitudinal section (LD with the method of linear, yielding sensitivity = 76%, specificity = 95% and accuracy ACC = 84%. The conducted sensitivity assessment confirms that changes in the position and size of the ROI have little effect on sensitivity and specificity. The analysis of all cases, that is, images of the left and right thyroid lobes in transverse and longitudinal sections, has shown specificity ranging from 60% to 95% and sensitivity from 62% to 89%. Additionally, it was shown that the value of ACC for the method using decision trees as a classifier is equal to 84% for the analyzed data. Thresholding of average brightness of the ROI gave ACC equal to 76%.

  15. The influence of lifestyle, menstrual function and oral contraceptive use on bone mass and size in female military cadets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendy Susan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine the influence of menstrual irregularity, oral contraceptive use and other factors on bone mineral density (BMD and bone size at different skeletal sites in 135 college-aged fit women. Methods Menstrual history, oral contraceptive use, exercise history, and nutritional factors including calcium, caffeine, and alcohol intake as well as tobacco use were determined by written survey. Height, weight and fitness levels were measured. Spine and hip BMD were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA, calcaneus BMD by peripheral DXA, and tibial bone mineral content (BMC and size by peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT. Results The mean age was 18.4 ± 0.8 years. Weight and prior exercise were positively related to BMD at most skeletal sites and to tibial bone size. Milk intake was positively related to calcaneal BMD, tibial BMC and cortical thickness. Fracture history was an important predictor of spine, hip and heel BMD. Women who had ≥ 10 menstrual cycles in the year prior to BMD measurement had higher BMD at all sites as well as a greater tibial mineral content and cortical thickness than women who had oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (≤ 9 cycles in the prior year; all p p p = 0.04, smaller tibial periosteal circumference and lower tibial mineral content (p Conclusion In a population of fit, college-aged women, OC use and oligomenorrhea were associated with reduced BMD and bone size. Weight, as well as prior exercise and milk intake was positively related to bone density and size at some skeletal sites. Understanding these relationships would help improve skeletal health in young women.

  16. Influence of Solution Treatment Duration on Microstructural Features of an Industrial Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Vasile Dănuţ; Răducanu, Doina; Angelescu, Mariana Lucia; Vintilă, Adrian Nicolae; Şerban, Nicolae; Dan, Ioan; Cojocaru, Elisabeta Mirela; Cinca, Ion

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural changes induced by solution treatment of an industrial forged F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel alloy were studied, in order to emphasize how component phases are influenced by heat treatment temperature and duration. The solution treatment was done at a temperature of 1100°C, with variable holding times: 0.6 ks (10 min), 3.6 ks (60 min) and 10.8 ks (180 min). Scanning electron microscopy-electron backscattered diffraction was used as main characterization technique, to obtain and analyse data referring to microstructural features, such as: nature and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation. It was shown that in all studied cases the microstructure consisted of a mixture of about 45% δ-Fe (ferrite) and 55% γ-Fe (austenite). Besides δ-Fe and γ-Fe phases, other phases were also identified, such as τ-phase (chromium-iron carbide), σ-phase (chromium-iron) and δ-(Cr-Fe) (ferrite).

  17. INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT: FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ITS ADOPTION IN SMALL AND MID-SIZED BUSINESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abner da Silva Netto

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were verify in what measure the small and medium companies accomplish the management security information and identify which factors influence the small and medium companies to adopt measures of management security information. The source research was exploratory-descriptive and the design used was the survey. The sample was compound of 43 metal production industries located in ABC region. According to management information security literature and Brazilian norm of information security were identified the tools or techniques of management security information and classified it into three layers: physic, logic and human. The study identified that the human layer is the one that presents the major shortage of cares in the companies followed by the logical one. The companies get used to have the antivirus as the main security tool/technique according to the researched companies to guarantee the safety of information. Besides that, the research showed that 59% of the companies have a safety satisfactory level and the main motivator factor to adopt the management security information is "to avoid possible financial loss”. On the other hand, all the inhibitors factors showed important to the researched companies like: lack of knowledge, investments value, organization culture and difficulty to measure cost/benefit.

  18. Influence of Crude Protein Intake on the Duration of Delivery and Litter Size in Sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tydlitát

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of different intakes of crude protein during the period from 94 to 100 days of pregnancy to the parturition, lengths of pregnancy and delivery, number and birth weights of piglets and concentrations of progesterone, 17-β estradiol and cortisol on days 100, 110 and 114 of pregnancy in sows. Daily feed intake of the sow represented 2.5 kg of complete mixtures containing 13% (group A, n = 23, 15% (group B, n = 52, 18% (group C, n = 10 and 21% (group D, n = 10 of crude protein. Lengths of pregnancy in experimental groups were not significantly different. The mean durations of delivery synchronously increased with the intake of crude protein; significant difference was found between groups A (4.5 h and D (8.6 h (p p < 0.05. The average birth weights of piglets did not differ between experimental groups. No statistical differences in hormone concentrations were found between experimental groups. High intake of crude protein in sows before parturition prolonged delivery and increased the number of stillborn piglets.

  19. Trophic phylogenetics: evolutionary influences on body size, feeding, and species associations in grassland arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Eric M; Vincent, John B; Weiblen, George D; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary animal-plant interactions such as herbivory are widely understood to be shaped by evolutionary history. Yet questions remain about the role of plant phylogenetic diversity in generating and maintaining herbivore diversity, and whether evolutionary relatedness of producers might predict the composition of consumer communities. We tested for evidence of evolutionary associations among arthropods and the plants on which they were found, using phylogenetic analysis of naturally occurring arthropod assemblages sampled from a plant-diversity manipulation experiment. Considering phylogenetic relationships among more than 900 arthropod consumer taxa and 29 plant species in the experiment, we addressed several interrelated questions. First, our results support the hypothesis that arthropod functional traits such as body size and trophic role are phylogenetically conserved in community ecological samples. Second, herbivores tended to cooccur with closer phylogenetic relatives than would be expected at random, whereas predators and parasitoids did not show phylogenetic association patterns. Consumer specialization, as measured by association through time with monocultures of particular host plant species, showed significant phylogenetic signal, although the. strength of this association varied among plant species. Polycultures of phylogenetically dissimilar plant species supported more phylogenetically dissimilar consumer communities than did phylogenetically similar polycultures. Finally, we separated the effects of plant species richness and relatedness in predicting the phylogenetic distribution of the arthropod assemblages in this experiment. The phylogenetic diversity of plant communities predicted the phylogenetic diversity of herbivore communities even after accounting for plant species richness. The phylogenetic diversity of secondary consumers differed by guild, with predator phylogenetic diversity responding to herbivore relatedness, while parasitoid

  20. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 10 11 n/cm 2 /s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 10 19 n/cm 2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 10 13 n/cm 2 /s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT 0 , were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-07-07

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. Copyright © 2016 Reis et al.

  2. Factors Influencing Sustainable Entrepreneurship in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Iran: A Case Study of Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Hosseininia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish the social and environmental factors that influence sustainable entrepreneurship (SE in Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. It also attempted to identify whether the demographic background of the entrepreneur influences the SE in SMEs of the Iranian food industry. A mixed method approach, employing the use of questionnaires and interviews from a sample size of approximately 130 participants and 12 owner-managers of SMEs in food industry, was used to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and several inferential analyses. Findings showed that certain characteristics of the entrepreneur, including work experience and education, have a significant impact on SE. Furthermore, out of the eight identified factors, according to the participants’ perception, the most important factors towards sustainable performance of SMEs in food industry are social factors, including customer orientation, as well as human resources and environmental factors, including recycling and the future of Earth. This research paper concludes that considering the social and environmental aspects of sustainability and employing experienced staff would majorly contribute to the pursuit of SE in SMEs of food industry.

  3. Influence of groove size and reinforcements addition on mechanical properties and microstructure of friction stir welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Baridula, Ravinder; Ibrahim, Abdullah Bin; Yahya, Che Ku Mohammad Faizal Bin Che Ku; Kulkarni, Ratnakar; Varma Ramaraju, Ramgopal

    2018-03-01

    The butt joints fabricated by friction stir welding were found to have more strength than the joints obtained by conventional joining process. The important outcome of this process is the successful fabrication of surface composites with improved properties. Thus in order to further enhance the strength of the dissimilar alloy joints the reinforcements can be deposited in to the aluminium matrix during the process of friction stir welding. In the present study the multi-walled carbon nanotubes were embedded in to the groove by varying the width during joining of dissimilar alloys AA2024 and AA7075. Four widths were selected with constant depth and optimum process parameters were selected to fabricate the sound welded joints. The results show that the mechanical properties of the fabricated butt joints were influenced by the size of the groove, due to variation in the deposition of reinforcement in the stir zone. The microstructural study and identification of the elements of the welded joints show that the reinforcements deposition is influenced by the size of the groove. It has also been observed that the groove with minimum width is more effective than higher width. The mechanical properties are found to be improved due to the pinning of grain boundaries.

  4. Influence of media size on energy distribution of pulsed thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowska, J.

    2007-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of the diffusion cooling phenomenon of pulsed thermalized neutron fields in bounded media. It is aimed at the examination of the validity of the neutron temperature model that involves the assumption that an asymptotic energy distribution of neutrons in bounded media can be described by the Maxwell distribution but with a shifted temperature, lower than a temperature of medium. The research carried out entirely by means of Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron transport was preceded by a measurement of the time decay constants obtained in all variants of Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment and the measured one was stated. The form of asymptotic energy distribution of neutrons and its dependence on the size of medium was investigated in three kinds of materials of different thermal neutron transport properties: energy independent scatterer with negligible absorption (silica), energy dependent scatterer with 1/v absorption (borated silica) and energy dependent scatterer with 1/v absorption (water). As it was expected, in the case of large media, which can be treated as infinite, neutrons attained the Maxwell energy distribution at the temperature of the medium. For all materials under investigation the average and the most probable values of the energy distribution steadily decreased with decreasing geometric dimensions of the media. At the same time a growing distortion from the pure Maxwellian energy distribution was observed, which means that the concept of the neutron temperature fails in the case of small media. Although the spectra under investigation in general did not have the Maxwellian shape, the most probable velocity in a neutron density distribution decreased linearly with the increasing geometric buckling of the medium. This dependence manifested a stronger cooling than the one predicted by a certain approximate formula. The neutron spectrum in a small medium of pure silica was cooler than the spectrum in

  5. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lucon, Enrico [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 1011 n/cm2/s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 1019 n/cm2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 1013 n/cm2/s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 1013 n/cm2/s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 1019n/cm2. The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT0, for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT0, were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  6. Influence of moisture content, particle size and forming temperature on productivity and quality of rice straw pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kazuei, E-mail: k-ishii@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Furuichi, Toru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Optimized conditions were determined for the production of rice straw pellets. • The moisture content and forming temperature are key factors. • High quality rice pellets in the lower heating value and durability were produced. - Abstract: A large amount of rice straw is generated and left as much in paddy fields, which causes greenhouse gas emissions as methane. Rice straw can be used as bioenergy. Rice straw pellets are a promising technology because pelletization of rice straw is a form of mass and energy densification, which leads to a product that is easy to handle, transport, store and utilize because of the increase in the bulk density. The operational conditions required to produce high quality rice straw pellets have not been determined. This study determined the optimal moisture content range required to produce rice straw pellets with high yield ratio and high heating value, and also determined the influence of particle size and the forming temperature on the yield ratio and durability of rice straw pellets. The optimal moisture content range was between 13% and 20% under a forming temperature of 60 or 80 °C. The optimal particle size was between 10 and 20 mm, considering the time and energy required for shredding, although the particle size did not significantly affect the yield ratio and durability of the pellets. The optimized conditions provided high quality rice straw pellets with nearly 90% yield ratio, ⩾12 MJ/kg for the lower heating value, and >95% durability.

  7. Influence of particle size and mineral phase in the analysis of iron ore slurries by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mich