WorldWideScience

Sample records for fear human shields

  1. Fear, human shields and the redistribution of prey and predators in protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joel

    2007-12-22

    Protected areas form crucial baselines to judge ecological change, yet areas of Africa, Asia and North America that retain large carnivores are under intense economic and political pressures to accommodate massive human visitation and attendant infrastructure. An unintended consequence is the strong modulation of the three-way interaction involving people, predators and prey, a dynamic that questions the extent to which animal distributions and interactions are independent of subtle human influences. Here, I capitalize on the remarkable 9-day synchronicity in which 90% of moose neonates in the Yellowstone Ecosystem are born, to demonstrate a substantive change in how prey avoid predators; birth sites shift away from traffic-averse brown bears and towards paved roads. The decade-long modification was associated with carnivore recolonization, but neither mothers in bear-free areas nor non-parous females altered patterns of landscape use. These findings offer rigorous support that mammals use humans to shield against carnivores and raise the possibility that redistribution has occurred in other mammalian taxa due to human presence in ways we have yet to anticipate. To interpret ecologically functioning systems within parks, we must now also account for indirect anthropogenic effects on species distributions and behaviour.

  2. Beyond extinction: erasing human fear responses and preventing the return of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, Merel; Soeter, Marieke; Vervliet, Bram

    2009-03-01

    Animal studies have shown that fear memories can change when recalled, a process referred to as reconsolidation. We found that oral administration of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol before memory reactivation in humans erased the behavioral expression of the fear memory 24 h later and prevented the return of fear. Disrupting the reconsolidation of fear memory opens up new avenues for providing a long-term cure for patients with emotional disorders.

  3. Passive Avoidance Is Linked to Impaired Fear Extinction in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Overstreet, Cassie; Krimsky, Marissa; Grillon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates we must face our fears to conquer them. This idea is embodied in exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders, where the intent of exposure is to reverse a history of avoidant behavior that is thought to fuel a patient's irrational fears. We tested in humans the relationship between fear and avoidance by combining…

  4. Beyond extinction: erasing human fear responses and preventing the return of fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Soeter, M.; Vervliet, B.

    2009-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that fear memories can change when recalled, a process referred to as reconsolidation. We found that oral administration of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol before memory reactivation in humans erased the behavioral expression of the fear memory 24 h

  5. Thalamocortical interactions underlying visual fear conditioning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithari, Chrysa; Moratti, Stephan; Weisz, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    Despite a strong focus on the role of the amygdala in fear conditioning, recent works point to a more distributed network supporting fear conditioning. We aimed to elucidate interactions between subcortical and cortical regions in fear conditioning in humans. To do this, we used two fearful faces as conditioned stimuli (CS) and an electrical stimulation at the left hand, paired with one of the CS, as unconditioned stimulus (US). The luminance of the CS was rhythmically modulated leading to "entrainment" of brain oscillations at a predefined modulation frequency. Steady-state responses (SSR) were recorded by MEG. In addition to occipital regions, spectral analysis of SSR revealed increased power during fear conditioning particularly for thalamus and cerebellum contralateral to the upcoming US. Using thalamus and amygdala as seed-regions, directed functional connectivity was calculated to capture the modulation of interactions that underlie fear conditioning. Importantly, this analysis showed that the thalamus drives the fusiform area during fear conditioning, while amygdala captures the more general effect of fearful faces perception. This study confirms ideas from the animal literature, and demonstrates for the first time the central role of the thalamus in fear conditioning in humans. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Don't fear 'fear conditioning': Methodological considerations for the design and analysis of studies on human fear acquisition, extinction, and return of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Menz, Mareike M; Andreatta, Marta; Fullana, Miguel A; Golkar, Armita; Haaker, Jan; Heitland, Ivo; Hermann, Andrea; Kuhn, Manuel; Kruse, Onno; Meir Drexler, Shira; Meulders, Ann; Nees, Frauke; Pittig, Andre; Richter, Jan; Römer, Sonja; Shiban, Youssef; Schmitz, Anja; Straube, Benjamin; Vervliet, Bram; Wendt, Julia; Baas, Johanna M P; Merz, Christian J

    2017-06-01

    The so-called 'replicability crisis' has sparked methodological discussions in many areas of science in general, and in psychology in particular. This has led to recent endeavours to promote the transparency, rigour, and ultimately, replicability of research. Originating from this zeitgeist, the challenge to discuss critical issues on terminology, design, methods, and analysis considerations in fear conditioning research is taken up by this work, which involved representatives from fourteen of the major human fear conditioning laboratories in Europe. This compendium is intended to provide a basis for the development of a common procedural and terminology framework for the field of human fear conditioning. Whenever possible, we give general recommendations. When this is not feasible, we provide evidence-based guidance for methodological decisions on study design, outcome measures, and analyses. Importantly, this work is also intended to raise awareness and initiate discussions on crucial questions with respect to data collection, processing, statistical analyses, the impact of subtle procedural changes, and data reporting specifically tailored to the research on fear conditioning. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Human Fear Chemosignaling : Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Jasper H B; Smeets, Monique A M

    2017-01-01

    Alarm pheromones are widely used in the animal kingdom. Notably, there are 26 published studies (N = 1652) highlighting a human capacity to communicate fear, stress, and anxiety via body odor from one person (66% males) to another (69% females). The question is whether the findings of this

  8. Fear conditioning, safety learning, and sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Anisa J; Acheson, Dean T; Risbrough, Victoria B; Straus, Laura D; Drummond, Sean P A

    2014-08-27

    Fear conditioning is considered an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder. Such models have shown fear conditioning disrupts subsequent rapid eye movement sleep (REM). Here, we provide a translation of these models into humans. Using the fear potentiated startle (FPS) procedure, we examined the effects of fear conditioning and safety signal learning on subsequent REM sleep in healthy adults. We also examined the effects of changes in REM sleep on retention of fear and safety learning. Participants (n = 42 normal controls) spent 3 consecutive nights in the laboratory. The first was an adaptation night. Following the second night, we administered a FPS procedure that included pairing a wrist shock with a threat signal and a safety signal never paired with a shock. The next day, we administered the FPS procedure again, with no wrist shocks to any stimulus, to measure retention of fear and safety. Canonical correlations assessed the relationship between FPS response and REM sleep. Results demonstrated that increased safety signal learning during the initial acquisition phase was associated with increased REM sleep consolidation that night, with 28.4% of the variance in increased REM sleep consolidation from baseline accounted for by safety signal learning. Overnight REM sleep was, in turn, related to overnight retention of fear and safety learning, with 22.5% of the variance in startle retention accounted for by REM sleep. These data suggest that sleep difficulties, specifically REM sleep fragmentation, may play a mechanistic role in post-traumatic stress disorder via an influence on safety signal learning and/or threat-safety discrimination. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411754-07$15.00/0.

  9. Calculating the electric field in real human head by transcranial magnetic stimulation with shield plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system by incorporating a conductive shield plate. The magnetic field, induced current density, and electric field in a real human head were calculated by impedance method and the results were compared with TMS without shielding. Our results show that the field localization can be improved by introducing a conductive shield plate; the stimulation magnitude (depth) in the brain is reduced comparing with the TMS without shielding. The strong magnetic field near the TMS coil is difficult to be efficiently shielded by a thinner conductive shield plate.

  10. Social Fear Learning: from Animal Models to Human Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiec, Jacek; Olsson, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Learning about potential threats is critical for survival. Learned fear responses are acquired either through direct experiences or indirectly through social transmission. Social fear learning (SFL), also known as vicarious fear learning, is a paradigm successfully used for studying the transmission of threat information between individuals. Animal and human studies have begun to elucidate the behavioral, neural and molecular mechanisms of SFL. Recent research suggests that social learning mechanisms underlie a wide range of adaptive and maladaptive phenomena, from supporting flexible avoidance in dynamic environments to intergenerational transmission of trauma and anxiety disorders. This review discusses recent advances in SFL studies and their implications for basic, social and clinical sciences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Narrow Fellow in the Grass: Human Infants Associate Snakes and Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoache, Judy S.; LoBue, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Why are snakes such a common target of fear? One current view is that snake fear is one of several innate fears that emerge spontaneously. Another is that humans have an evolved predisposition to learn to fear snakes. In the first study reported here, 9- to 10-month-old infants showed no differential spontaneous reaction to films of snakes versus…

  12. Human fear conditioning and extinction in neuroimaging: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sehlmeyer

    between neuroimaging investigations on human fear conditioning and extinction and should, therefore, be taken into serious consideration in the planning and the interpretation of research projects.

  13. Rating data are underrated: validity of US expectancy in human fear conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddez, Y.; Baeyens, F.; Luyten, L.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Hermans, D.; Beckers, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Human fear conditioning is widely regarded as one of the prime paradigms for the study of fear and anxiety disorders. We provide an evaluation of a commonly used subjective measure in the human fear conditioning paradigm, namely the US-expectancy measurement. Methods: We

  14. Fear generalization in humans: impact of prior non-fearful experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervliet, B.; Kindt, M.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Hermans, D.

    2010-01-01

    Fear generalization lies at the heart of many anxiety problems, and is therefore an important target for prevention and/or treatment. Here, we investigated whether fear generalization towards a specific stimulus can be weakened by prior non-fearful experiences with that stimulus. Using the standard

  15. Human fear extinction and return of fear using reconsolidation update mechanisms: the contribution of on-line expectancy ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Victor Taylor; Anderson, Kemp M; Kwon, Cliffe; Bosshardt, Lauren; Jovanovic, Tanja; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth Davin

    2014-09-01

    Disruption of the reconsolidation of conditioned fear memories has been suggested as a non-pharmacological means of preventing the return of learned fear in human populations. A reconsolidation update paradigm was developed in which a reconsolidation window is opened by a single isolated retrieval trial of a previously reinforced CS+ which is then followed by Extinction Training within that window. However, follow-up studies in humans using multi-methods fear conditioning indices (e.g., fear-potentiated startle, skin conductance, US-expectancy) have failed to replicate the retrieval+extinction effects. In the present study, we further investigated the retrieval+extinction reconsolidation update paradigm by directly comparing the acquisition, extinction, and return of fear-potentiated startle in the absence or presence of US-expectancy measures (using a trial-by-trial response keypad) with and without retrieval of a previously acquired CS-US association. Participants were fear conditioned to two visual cue CS+'s, one of which was presented as a single, isolated retrieval trial before Extinction Training and one that was extinguished as usual. The results show that the inclusion of US-expectancy measures strengthens the CS-US association to provide enhanced fear conditioning and maintenance of fear memories over the experimental sessions. In addition, in the groups that used on-line US-expectancy measures, the retrieval+extinction procedure reduced reinstatement of fear-potentiated startle to both previously reinforced CS+'s, as compared to the extinction as usual group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Fear and panic in humans with bilateral amygdala damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S; Buzza, Colin; Hurlemann, Rene; Follmer, Robin L; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Coryell, William H; Welsh, Michael J; Tranel, Daniel; Wemmie, John A

    2013-03-01

    Decades of research have highlighted the amygdala's influential role in fear. We found that inhalation of 35% CO(2) evoked not only fear, but also panic attacks, in three rare patients with bilateral amygdala damage. These results indicate that the amygdala is not required for fear and panic, and make an important distinction between fear triggered by external threats from the environment versus fear triggered internally by CO(2).

  17. Young and Old Pavlovian Fear Memories Can Be Modified with Extinction Training during Reconsolidation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfurth, Elisa C. K.; Kanen, Jonathan W.; Raio, Candace M.; Clem, Roger L.; Huganir, Richard L.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training during reconsolidation has been shown to persistently diminish conditioned fear responses across species. We investigated in humans if older fear memories can benefit similarly. Using a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm we compared standard extinction and extinction after memory reactivation 1 d or 7 d following acquisition.…

  18. Radiation production and absorption in human spacecraft shielding systems under high charge and energy Galactic Cosmic Rays: Material medium, shielding depth, and byproduct aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Joseph; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2018-03-01

    Deep space missions such as the planned 2025 mission to asteroids require spacecraft shields to protect electronics and humans from adverse effects caused by the space radiation environment, primarily Galactic Cosmic Rays. This paper first reviews the theory on how these rays of charged particles interact with matter, and then presents a simulation for a 500 day Mars flyby mission using a deterministic based computer code. High density polyethylene and aluminum shielding materials at a solar minimum are considered. Plots of effective dose with varying shield depth, charged particle flux, and dose in silicon and human tissue behind shielding are presented.

  19. Multilayer Polymeric Shielding to Protect Humans from Galactic Cosmic Radiation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic X4.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from the hazards of galactic cosmic...

  20. Multilayer Polymeric Shielding to Protect Humans from Galactic Cosmic Radiation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic X4.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from the hazards of galactic cosmic...

  1. Dissociable roles for the hippocampus and the amygdala in human cued versus context fear conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschner, A.; Kalish, R.; Vervliet, B.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Büchel, C.

    2008-01-01

    Lesion studies in animals have identified a critical role of the hippocampus in context fear conditioning. To extend these findings to human volunteers, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural responses associated with context fear conditioning in humans. Our novel

  2. COURAGE AND FEAR IN THE CONTEXT OF OPPOSITION OF HUMAN ACTIVITY AND INACTIVITY: EXISTENTIAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Yu. Snitko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to analyse fear and courage in the history of philosophy in the context of opposi-tion of human activity and inactivity that may lead to a profound understanding of the essence, causes and existen-tial aspects of human activity and inactivity. The implementation of the objective assumes the solution of the follow-ing tasks: analysis of philosophical interpretation of fear and courage; investigation of the relationship of fear and courage with active and passive forms of human being; revelation of existential dialectic of human activity and inac-tivity through the opposition of fear and courage. Methodology. The application of phenomenological approach and other methods of existential philosophy enabled to discover the importance of fear and courage for human existence. Significant contribution to the importance of the investigation of the fear-courage opposition in the context of hu-man activity and inactivity was made by M. Heidegger who pointed to the main modes of human being - «authen-tic» and «inauthentic» in the context of human activity and passivity. The application of hermeneutic method made possible the reconstruction of the reflection of fear-courage opposition in the history of philosophy. Scientific nov-elty. For the first time the analysis of the fear-courage opposition in the context of human activity and inactivity was carried out. Due to the analysis the fundamental existential character of the fear and courage opposition and its es-sential relationship with active and passive forms of human being were justified. Conclusions. In the course of this research it was found out that fear is closely connected with passive modes of human being. If classical philosophy placed emphasis on courage and associated fear with human mind and conscious decision, non-classical philosophy of the XIX century and existentialism focused on existential and ontological character of fear, its fundamental mean

  3. Fear generalization in humans: impact of verbal instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervliet, B.; Kindt, M.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Hermans, D.

    2010-01-01

    Fear generalization lies at the heart of many anxiety problems, but little is known about the factors that can influence this phenomenon. The present study investigated whether verbal instructions about specific stimulus features can influence conditioned fear generalization. All participants were

  4. Pattern Analyses Reveal Separate Experience-Based Fear Memories in the Human Right Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, Senne; De Houwer, Jan; Demanet, Jelle; Yuen, Kenneth S L; Kalisch, Raffael; Brass, Marcel

    2017-08-23

    Learning fear via the experience of contingencies between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US) is often assumed to be fundamentally different from learning fear via instructions. An open question is whether fear-related brain areas respond differently to experienced CS-US contingencies than to merely instructed CS-US contingencies. Here, we contrasted two experimental conditions where subjects were instructed to expect the same CS-US contingencies while only one condition was characterized by prior experience with the CS-US contingency. Using multivoxel pattern analysis of fMRI data, we found CS-related neural activation patterns in the right amygdala (but not in other fear-related regions) that dissociated between whether a CS-US contingency had been instructed and experienced versus merely instructed. A second experiment further corroborated this finding by showing a category-independent neural response to instructed and experienced, but not merely instructed, CS presentations in the human right amygdala. Together, these findings are in line with previous studies showing that verbal fear instructions have a strong impact on both brain and behavior. However, even in the face of fear instructions, the human right amygdala still shows a separable neural pattern response to experience-based fear contingencies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In our study, we addressed a fundamental problem of the science of human fear learning and memory, namely whether fear learning via experience in humans relies on a neural pathway that can be separated from fear learning via verbal information. Using two new procedures and recent advances in the analysis of brain imaging data, we localized purely experience-based fear processing and memory in the right amygdala, thereby making a direct link between human and animal research. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/378116-15$15.00/0.

  5. Fear conditioning and extinction across development: Evidence from human studies and animal models☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechner, Tomer; Hong, Melanie; Britton, Jennifer C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate danger and safety through associative processes emerges early in life. Understanding the mechanisms underlying associative learning of threat and safety can clarify the processes that shape development of normative fears and pathological anxiety. Considerable research has used fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to delineate underlying mechanisms in animals and human adults; however, little is known about these mechanisms in children and adolescents. The current paper summarizes the empirical data on the development of fear conditioning and extinction. It reviews methodological considerations and future directions for research on fear conditioning and extinction in pediatric populations. PMID:24746848

  6. Disrupting reconsolidation of fear memory in humans by a noradrenergic β-blocker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Soeter, M.; Sevenster, D.

    2014-01-01

    The basic design used in our human fear-conditioning studies on disrupting reconsolidation includes testing over different phases across three consecutive days. On day 1 - the fear acquisition phase, healthy participants are exposed to a series of picture presentations. One picture stimulus (CS1+)

  7. The functional neuro-anatomy of the human response to fear: A brief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the past few decades functional neuro-imaging studies in humans exploring the neural basis of fear have contributed significantly to the understanding of its mechanisms. Imaging studies help to clarify the role of the amygdala-based neurocircuitry in fear activation. The aim of this paper is briefly to review the most ...

  8. Top carnivores increase their kill rates on prey as a response to human-induced fear

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Justine A.; Wang, Yiwei; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The fear induced by predators on their prey is well known to cause behavioural adjustments by prey that can ripple through food webs. Little is known, however, about the analogous impacts of humans as perceived top predators on the foraging behaviour of carnivores. Here, we investigate the influence of human-induced fear on puma foraging behaviour using location and prey consumption data from 30 tagged individuals living along a gradient of human development. We observed strong behavioural re...

  9. Fear of communicating fear versus fear of terrorism: A human rights violation or a sign of our time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Chika

    2018-02-01

    At its very first session, the United Nations General Assembly, adopted Resolution 59(I) which states that "freedom of information is a fundamental human right and … the touchstone of all the freedoms to which the United Nations is consecrated". In 1948, it proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Paris. Article 19 of that Declaration states that "everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers". When we place these basic human rights against current global terror threats, and consequent restrictive antiterror legislations to combat them, the question becomes whether Article 19 is still relevant in the context of today's changed security landscape. The aim of this paper is to explore ways that anti-terror legislations can balance between national security, and the protection of freedom of information.

  10. No Effect of Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Fear Memory in Healthy Human Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Mungee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have demonstrated that fear memories can be modified using non-invasive methods. Recently, we demonstrated that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is capable of enhancing fear memories. Here, we examined the effects of cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during fear reconsolidation in humans. Methods: Seventeen young, healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups, which underwent fear conditioning with mild electric stimuli paired with a visual stimulus. Twenty-four hours later, both groups were shown a reminder of the conditioned fearful stimulus. Shortly thereafter, they received either tDCS (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal for 20 min at 1 mA, or sham stimulation. A day later, fear responses of both groups were compared. Results: On Day 3, during fear response assessment, there were no significant differences between the tDCS and sham group (p > 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal did not influence fear memories.

  11. Human fear conditioning conducted in full immersion 3-dimensional virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Nicole C; Zeilinski, David J; Fecteau, Matthew E; Brady, Rachael; LaBar, Kevin S

    2010-08-09

    Fear conditioning is a widely used paradigm in non-human animal research to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying fear and anxiety. A major challenge in conducting conditioning studies in humans is the ability to strongly manipulate or simulate the environmental contexts that are associated with conditioned emotional behaviors. In this regard, virtual reality (VR) technology is a promising tool. Yet, adapting this technology to meet experimental constraints requires special accommodations. Here we address the methodological issues involved when conducting fear conditioning in a fully immersive 6-sided VR environment and present fear conditioning data. In the real world, traumatic events occur in complex environments that are made up of many cues, engaging all of our sensory modalities. For example, cues that form the environmental configuration include not only visual elements, but aural, olfactory, and even tactile. In rodent studies of fear conditioning animals are fully immersed in a context that is rich with novel visual, tactile and olfactory cues. However, standard laboratory tests of fear conditioning in humans are typically conducted in a nondescript room in front of a flat or 2D computer screen and do not replicate the complexity of real world experiences. On the other hand, a major limitation of clinical studies aimed at reducing (extinguishing) fear and preventing relapse in anxiety disorders is that treatment occurs after participants have acquired a fear in an uncontrolled and largely unknown context. Thus the experimenters are left without information about the duration of exposure, the true nature of the stimulus, and associated background cues in the environment. In the absence of this information it can be difficult to truly extinguish a fear that is both cue and context-dependent. Virtual reality environments address these issues by providing the complexity of the real world, and at the same time allowing experimenters to constrain fear

  12. Influence of stress on fear memory processes in an aversive differential conditioning paradigm in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Wilhelm, Frank H; Hartmann, Francina R; Kunz, Sabrina; von Rohr, Isabelle R Rudolf; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-07-01

    It is widely assumed that learning and memory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis, expression, maintenance and therapy of anxiety disorders, such as phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Memory retrieval is involved in symptom expression and maintenance of these disorders, while memory extinction is believed to be the underlying mechanism of behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders. There is abundant evidence that stress and stress hormones can reduce memory retrieval of emotional information, whereas they enhance memory consolidation of extinction training. In this study we aimed at investigating if stress affects these memory processes in a fear conditioning paradigm in healthy human subjects. On day 1, fear memory was acquired through a standard differential fear conditioning procedure. On day 2 (24h after fear acquisition), participants either underwent a stressful cold pressor test (CPT) or a control condition, 20 min before memory retrieval testing and extinction training. Possible prolonged effects of the stress manipulation were investigated on day 3 (48 h after fear acquisition), when memory retrieval and extinction were tested again. On day 2, men in the stress group showed a robust cortisol response to stress and showed lower unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy ratings than men in the control group. This reduction in fear memory retrieval was maintained on day 3. In women, who showed a significantly smaller cortisol response to stress than men, no stress effects on fear memory retrieval were observed. No group differences were observed with respect to extinction. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that stress can reduce memory retrieval of conditioned fear in men. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of stress and glucocorticoids on fear symptoms in anxiety disorders and suggest that such effects may be sex-specific. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Erythropoietin reduces neural and cognitive processing of fear in human models of antidepressant drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Harmer, Catherine J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects in animal models and affects cognitive and associated neural responses in humans. These effects have highlighted Epo as a candidate for treatment of psychiatric disease including schizophrenia and depression. The current......) versus saline on the neural processing of happy and fearful faces in 23 healthy volunteers. Facial expression recognition was assessed outside the scanner. RESULTS: One week after administration, Epo reduced neural response to fearful versus neutral faces in the occipito-parietal cortex consistent...... with reduced attention to fear. Erythropoietin additionally reduced recognition of fearful facial expressions without affecting recognition of other emotional expressions. These actions occurred in the absence of changes in hematological parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that Epo directly...

  14. Assessment of social transmission of threats in humans using observational fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaker, Jan; Golkar, Armita; Selbing, Ida; Olsson, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Across the human life span, fear is often acquired indirectly by observation of the emotional expressions of others. The observational fear conditioning protocol was previously developed as a laboratory model for investigating socially acquired threat responses. This protocol serves as a suitable alternative to the widely used Pavlovian fear conditioning, in which threat responses are acquired through direct experiences. In the observational fear conditioning protocol, the participant (observer) watches a demonstrator being presented with a conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). The expression of threat learning is measured as the conditioned response (CR) expressed by the observer in the absence of the demonstrator. CRs are commonly measured as skin conductance responses, but behavioral and neural measures have also been implemented. The experimental procedure is suitable for divergent populations, can be administered by a graduate student and takes ∼40 min. Similar protocols are used in animals, emphasizing its value as a translational tool for studying socioemotional learning.

  15. Human perception of fear in dogs varies according to experience with dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Wan

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of experience in humans' perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the "fearful" category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the "happy" category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain.

  16. From Pavlov to PTSD: The extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and in anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B.; Dahlgren, M. Kathryn; Davis, F. Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders. PMID:24321650

  17. From Pavlov to PTSD: the extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B; Dahlgren, M Kathryn; Davis, F Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High individual consistency in fear of humans throughout the adult lifespan of rural and urban burrowing owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Martina; Tella, José L.

    2013-12-01

    Human-induced rapid environmental changes challenge individuals by creating evolutionarily novel scenarios, where species encounter novel enemies, the new species sometimes being humans themselves. However, little is known about how individuals react to human presence, specifically whether they are able to habituate to human presence, as frequently assumed, or are selected based on their fear of humans. We tested whether fear of humans (measured as flight initiation distance in a diurnal owl) is reduced through habituation to human presence (plasticity) or whether it remains unchanged throughout the individuals' life. Results show an unusually high level of individual consistency in fear of humans throughout the adult lifespan of both rural (r = 0.96) and urban (r = 0.90) birds, lending no support to habituation. Further research should assess the role of inter-individual variability in fear of humans in shaping the distribution of individuals and species in an increasingly humanized world.

  19. GABA Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Are Associated with Fear Network Function and Fear Recovery in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levar, Nina; van Leeuwen, Judith M. C.; Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Denys, Damiaan; van Wingen, Guido A.

    2017-01-01

    Relapse of fear after successful treatment is a common phenomenon in patients with anxiety disorders. Animal research suggests that the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in the maintenance of extinguished fear. Here, we combined magnetic resonance

  20. GABA Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Are Associated with Fear Network Function and Fear Recovery in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levar, Nina; van Leeuwen, Judith M C; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Denys, Damiaan; Van Wingen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Relapse of fear after successful treatment is a common phenomenon in patients with anxiety disorders. Animal research suggests that the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in the maintenance of extinguished fear. Here, we combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  1. Chronic cannabis use is associated with impaired fear extinction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Santiago; Ruglass, Lesia M; Lopez-Castro, Teresa; Powers, Mark B; Smits, Jasper A J; Hien, Denise A

    2017-01-01

    The use of fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to examine intermediate phenotypes of anxiety and stress-related disorders has facilitated the identification of neurobiological mechanisms that underlie specific components of abnormal psychological functioning. Across species, acute pharmacologic manipulation of the endogenous cannabinoid system has provided evidence of its critical role in fear extinction, but the effects of chronic cannabis on extinction are relatively understudied. In rats, chronic cannabinoid administration impairs fear extinction in a drug-free state. Here we examine whether chronic cannabis use is associated with impaired fear extinction in humans. Participants were healthy chronic cannabis users (n = 20) and nonuser controls with minimal lifetime cannabis use (n = 20) matched on age, sex, and race who all screened negative for psychiatric disorders. A 2-day differential fear conditioning paradigm was used to test the hypothesis that chronic cannabis use would be associated with impaired extinction of the skin conductance response. Consistent with hypotheses, chronic cannabis use was associated with reduced within-session extinction of skin conductance response on Day 1 (d = 0.78), and between-session extinction on Day 2 (d = 0.76). Unexpectedly, cannabis use was also associated with reduced subjective differentiation between threat and safety stimuli during conditioning. Replication and translation of findings are necessary to test potential mechanisms directly and examine whether impairments can be reversed pharmacologically or after a period of cannabis abstinence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Effect of conditioned stimulus exposure during slow wave sleep on fear memory extinction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Li, Su-Xia; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Shi, Jie; Ai, Si-Zhi; Li, Yun; Li, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Repeated exposure to a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) in the absence of a noxious unconditioned stimulus (US) elicits fear memory extinction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of mild tone exposure (CS) during slow wave sleep (SWS) on fear memory extinction in humans. The healthy volunteers underwent an auditory fear conditioning paradigm on the experimental night, during which tones served as the CS, and a mild shock served as the US. They were then randomly assigned to four groups. Three groups were exposed to the CS for 3 or 10 min or an irrelevant tone (control stimulus, CtrS) for 10 min during SWS. The fourth group served as controls and was not subjected to any interventions. All of the subjects completed a memory test 4 h after SWS-rich stage to evaluate the effect on fear extinction. Moreover, we conducted similar experiments using an independent group of subjects during the daytime to test whether the memory extinction effect was specific to the sleep condition. Ninety-six healthy volunteers (44 males) aged 18-28 y. Participants exhibited undisturbed sleep during 2 consecutive nights, as assessed by sleep variables (all P > 0.05) from polysomnographic recordings and power spectral analysis. Participants who were re-exposed to the 10 min CS either during SWS and wakefulness exhibited attenuated fear responses (wake-10 min CS, P memory extinction without altering sleep profiles. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Amygdala-dependent fear is regulated by Oprl1 in mice and humans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andero, Raül; Brothers, Shaun P; Jovanovic, Tanja; Chen, Yen T; Salah-Uddin, Hasib; Cameron, Michael; Bannister, Thomas D; Almli, Lynn; Stevens, Jennifer S; Bradley, Bekh; Binder, Elisabeth B; Wahlestedt, Claes; Ressler, Kerry J

    2013-06-05

    The amygdala-dependent molecular mechanisms driving the onset and persistence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are poorly understood. Recent observational studies have suggested that opioid analgesia in the aftermath of trauma may decrease the development of PTSD. Using a mouse model of dysregulated fear, we found altered expression within the amygdala of the Oprl1 gene (opioid receptor-like 1), which encodes the amygdala nociceptin (NOP)/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP-R). Systemic and central amygdala infusion of SR-8993, a new highly selective NOP-R agonist, impaired fear memory consolidation. In humans, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within OPRL1 is associated with a self-reported history of childhood trauma and PTSD symptoms (n = 1847) after a traumatic event. This SNP is also associated with physiological startle measures of fear discrimination and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of amygdala-insula functional connectivity. Together, these data suggest that Oprl1 is associated with amygdala function, fear processing, and PTSD symptoms. Further, our data suggest that activation of the Oprl1/NOP receptor may interfere with fear memory consolidation, with implications for prevention of PTSD after a traumatic event.

  4. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungha Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT improve cognitive function of Alzheimer’s disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level.

  5. Physiological evidence for a human-induced landscape of fear in brown bears (Ursus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Ordiz, Andres; Evans, Alina L; Laske, Timothy G; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Swenson, Jon E; Arnemo, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    Human persecution is a major cause of mortality for large carnivores. Consequently, large carnivores avoid humans, but may use human-dominated landscapes by being nocturnal and elusive. Behavioral studies indicate that certain ecological systems are "landscapes of fear", driven by antipredator behavior. Because behavior and physiology are closely interrelated, physiological assessments may provide insight into the behavioral response of large carnivores to human activity. To elucidate changes in brown bears' (Ursus arctos) behavior associated with human activity, we evaluated stress as changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in 12 GPS-collared, free-ranging bears, 7 males and 5 females, 3-11 years old, using cardiac-monitoring devices. We applied generalized linear regression models with HR and HRV as response variables and chest activity, time of day, season, distance traveled, and distance to human settlements from GPS positions recorded every 30 min as potential explanatory variables. Bears exhibited lower HRV, an indication of stress, when they were close to human settlements and especially during the berry season, when humans were more often in the forest, picking berries and hunting. Our findings provide evidence of a human-induced landscape of fear in this hunted population of brown bears. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural signatures of human fear conditioning: an updated and extended meta-analysis of fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, M A; Harrison, B J; Soriano-Mas, C; Vervliet, B; Cardoner, N; Àvila-Parcet, A; Radua, J

    2016-04-01

    Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning remains the most widely employed experimental model of fear and anxiety, and continues to inform contemporary pathophysiological accounts of clinical anxiety disorders. Despite its widespread application in human and animal studies, the neurobiological basis of fear conditioning remains only partially understood. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of human fear-conditioning studies carried out with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), yielding a pooled sample of 677 participants from 27 independent studies. As a distinguishing feature of this meta-analysis, original statistical brain maps were obtained from the authors of 13 of these studies. Our primary analyses demonstrate that human fear conditioning is associated with a consistent and robust pattern of neural activation across a hypothesized genuine network of brain regions resembling existing anatomical descriptions of the 'central autonomic-interoceptive network'. This finding is discussed with a particular emphasis on the neural substrates of conscious fear processing. Our associated meta-analysis of functional deactivations-a scarcely addressed dynamic in fMRI fear-conditioning studies-also suggests the existence of a coordinated brain response potentially underlying the 'safety signal' (that is, non-threat) processing. We attempt to provide an integrated summary on these findings with the view that they may inform ongoing studies of fear-conditioning processes both in healthy and clinical populations, as investigated with neuroimaging and other experimental approaches.

  7. Effects of Divergent Selection for Fear of Humans on Behaviour in Red Junglefowl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Agnvall

    Full Text Available Domestication has caused a range of similar phenotypic changes across taxa, relating to physiology, morphology and behaviour. It has been suggested that this recurring domesticated phenotype may be a result of correlated responses to a central trait, namely increased tameness. We selected Red Junglefowl, the ancestors of domesticated chickens, during five generations for reduced fear of humans. This caused a marked and significant response in tameness, and previous studies have found correlated effects on growth, metabolism, reproduction, and some behaviour not directly selected for. Here, we report the results from a series of behavioural tests carried out on the initial parental generation (P0 and the fifth selected generation (S5, focusing on behaviour not functionally related to tameness, in order to study any correlated effects. Birds were tested for fear of humans, social reinstatement tendency, open field behaviour at two different ages, foraging/exploration, response to a simulated aerial predator attack and tonic immobility. In S5, there were no effects of selection on foraging/exploration or tonic immobility, while in the social reinstatement and open field tests there were significant interactions between selection and sex. In the aerial predator test, there were significant main effects of selection, indicating that fear of humans may represent a general wariness towards predators. In conclusion, we found only small correlated effects on behaviours not related to the tameness trait selected for, in spite of them showing high genetic correlations to fear of humans in a previous study on the same population. This suggests that species-specific behaviour is generally resilient to changes during domestication.

  8. Effects of Divergent Selection for Fear of Humans on Behaviour in Red Junglefowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnvall, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Domestication has caused a range of similar phenotypic changes across taxa, relating to physiology, morphology and behaviour. It has been suggested that this recurring domesticated phenotype may be a result of correlated responses to a central trait, namely increased tameness. We selected Red Junglefowl, the ancestors of domesticated chickens, during five generations for reduced fear of humans. This caused a marked and significant response in tameness, and previous studies have found correlated effects on growth, metabolism, reproduction, and some behaviour not directly selected for. Here, we report the results from a series of behavioural tests carried out on the initial parental generation (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5), focusing on behaviour not functionally related to tameness, in order to study any correlated effects. Birds were tested for fear of humans, social reinstatement tendency, open field behaviour at two different ages, foraging/exploration, response to a simulated aerial predator attack and tonic immobility. In S5, there were no effects of selection on foraging/exploration or tonic immobility, while in the social reinstatement and open field tests there were significant interactions between selection and sex. In the aerial predator test, there were significant main effects of selection, indicating that fear of humans may represent a general wariness towards predators. In conclusion, we found only small correlated effects on behaviours not related to the tameness trait selected for, in spite of them showing high genetic correlations to fear of humans in a previous study on the same population. This suggests that species-specific behaviour is generally resilient to changes during domestication. PMID:27851792

  9. Effect of continuous and partial reinforcement on the acquisition and extinction of human conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Ashley K; Bowen, Kenton H; Hyde, Andrew T; Totsch, Stacie K; Knight, David C

    2016-02-01

    Extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear in humans is a popular paradigm often used to study learning and memory processes that mediate anxiety-related disorders. Fear extinction studies often only pair the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (UCS) on a subset of acquisition trials (i.e., partial reinforcement/pairing) to prolong extinction (i.e., partial reinforcement extinction effect; PREE) and provide more time to study the process. However, there is limited evidence that the partial pairing procedures typically used during fear conditioning actually extend the extinction process, while there is strong evidence these procedures weaken conditioned response (CR) acquisition. Therefore, determining conditioning procedures that support strong CR acquisition and that also prolong the extinction process would benefit the field. The present study investigated 4 separate CS-UCS pairing procedures to determine methods that support strong conditioning and that also exhibit a PREE. One group (C-C) of participants received continuous CS-UCS pairings; a second group (C-P) received continuous followed by partial CS-UCS pairings; a third group (P-C) received partial followed by continuous CS-UCS pairings; and a fourth group (P-P) received partial CS-UCS pairings during acquisition. A strong skin conductance CR was expressed by C-C and P-C groups but not by C-P and P-P groups at the end of the acquisition phase. The P-C group maintained the CR during extinction. In contrast, the CR extinguished quickly within the C-C group. These findings suggest that partial followed by continuous CS-UCS pairings elicit strong CRs and prolong the extinction process following human fear conditioning. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. A Launch Requirements Trade Study for Active Space Radiation Shielding for Long Duration Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Bollweg, Ken; Martin, Trent; Westover, Shayne; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.; Meinke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    A trade study for an active shielding concept based on magnetic fields in a solenoid configuration versus mass based shielding was developed. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the radiation exposure for two values of the magnetic field strength and the mass of the magnetic shield configuration. For each field strength, results were reported for the magnetic region shielding (end caps ignored) and total region shielding (end caps included but no magnetic field protection) configurations. A value of 15 cSv was chosen to be the maximum exposure for an astronaut. The radiation dose estimate over the total shield region configuration cannot be used at this time without a better understanding of the material and mass present in the end cap regions through a detailed vehicle design. The magnetic shield region configuration, assuming the end cap regions contribute zero exposure, can be launched on a single Space Launch System rocket and up to a two year mission can be supported. The magnetic shield region configuration results in two versus nine launches for a comparable mass based shielding configuration. The active shielding approach is clearly more mass efficient because of the reduced number of launches than the mass based shielding for long duration missions.

  11. Behavioral Correlations Associated with Fear of Humans Differ between Rural and Urban Burrowing Owls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Carrete

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies are fundamental to understanding how animal populations face global change. Although much research has centered upon the idea that individuals can adaptively modify their behaviors to cope with environmental changes, recent evidence supports the existence of individual differences in suites of correlated behaviors. However, little is known about how selection can change these behavioral structures in populations subject to different environmental constraints. The colonization of urban environments by birds has been related to their inter-individual variability in their fear of humans, measured as their flight initiation distance to an approaching human, such that urban life would select for fearless individuals. This behavior has been demonstrated to be heritable and highly consistent throughout the adult lifespan of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia. Here, we experimentally assessed, in field conditions, whether urban life involves changes in other behaviors such as exploration and antipredatory response through their correlation with fear of humans. Breeding urban birds were more fearless toward humans and were quicker to explore a new food resource and defend their nests from predators than their rural counterparts. However, while fear of humans positively correlated with exploration and antipredatory response in the rural population, it only correlated with exploration in the urban one. Predator release in urban environments could relax—and even counterselect—antipredator behaviors, thus dismantling the behavioral correlation existent in natural populations. Altogether, our results suggest that rural and urban animals may differ in some behavioral aspects, may be as a consequence of the selection processes acting during the colonization of urban areas as well as the different ecological environments encountered by individuals.

  12. Top carnivores increase their kill rates on prey as a response to human-induced fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justine A; Wang, Yiwei; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2015-03-07

    The fear induced by predators on their prey is well known to cause behavioural adjustments by prey that can ripple through food webs. Little is known, however, about the analogous impacts of humans as perceived top predators on the foraging behaviour of carnivores. Here, we investigate the influence of human-induced fear on puma foraging behaviour using location and prey consumption data from 30 tagged individuals living along a gradient of human development. We observed strong behavioural responses by female pumas to human development, whereby their fidelity to kill sites and overall consumption time of prey declined with increasing housing density by 36 and 42%, respectively. Females responded to this decline in prey consumption time by increasing the number of deer they killed in high housing density areas by 36% over what they killed in areas with little residential development. The loss of food from declines in prey consumption time paired with increases in energetic costs associated with killing more prey may have consequences for puma populations, particularly with regard to reproductive success. In addition, greater carcass availability is likely to alter community dynamics by augmenting food resources for scavengers. In light of the extensive and growing impact of habitat modification, our study emphasizes that knowledge of the indirect effects of human activity on animal behaviour is a necessary component in understanding anthropogenic impacts on community dynamics and food web function. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of acute exercise on fear extinction in rats and exposure therapy in humans: Null findings from five experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquart, Jolene; Roquet, Rheall F; Papini, Santiago; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Monfils, Marie-H

    2017-08-01

    Exposure therapy is an established learning-based intervention for the treatment of anxiety disorders with an average response rate of nearly 50%, leaving room for improvement. Emerging strategies to enhance exposure therapy in humans and fear extinction retention in animal models are primarily pharmacological. These approaches are limited as many patients report preferring non-pharmacological approaches in therapy. With general cognitive enhancement effects, exercise has emerged as a plausible non-pharmacological augmentation strategy. The present study tested the hypothesis that fear extinction and exposure therapy would be enhanced by a pre-training bout of exercise. We conducted four experiments with rats that involved a standardized conditioning and extinction paradigm and a manipulation of exercise. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated vigorous-intensity exercise prior to a standardized virtual reality exposure therapy session among adults with fear of heights. In experiments 1-4, exercise did not facilitate fear extinction, long-term memory, or fear relapse tests. In experiment 5, human participants showed an overall reduction in fear of heights but exercise did not enhance symptom improvement. Although acute exercise prior to fear extinction or exposure therapy, as operationalized in the present 5 studies, did not enhance outcomes, these results must be interpreted within the context of a broader literature that includes positive findings. Taken all together, this suggests that more research is necessary to identify optimal parameters and key individual differences so that exercise can be implemented successfully to treat anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Timing of extinction relative to acquisition: A parametric analysis of fear extinction in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norrholm, S.D.; Vervliet, B.; Jovanovic, T.; Boshoven, W.; Myers, K.M.; Davis, M.; Rothbaum, B.O.; Duncan, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is a reduction in conditioned fear following repeated exposure to the feared cue in the absence of any aversive event. Extinguished fear often reappears after extinction through spontaneous recovery. Animal studies suggest that spontaneous recovery can be abolished if extinction

  15. Hand-rearing reduces fear of humans in European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Feenders

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pending changes in European legislation ban the use of wild-caught animals in research. This change is partly justified on the assumption that captive-breeding (or hand-rearing increases welfare of captive animals because these practices result in animals with reduced fear of humans. However, there are few actual data on the long-term behavioural effects of captive-breeding in non-domestic species, and these are urgently needed in order to understand the welfare and scientific consequences of adopting this practice. We compared the response of hand-reared and wild-caught starlings to the presence of a human in the laboratory. During human presence, all birds increased their general locomotor activity but the wild-caught birds moved away from the human and were less active than the hand-reared birds. After the human departed, the wild-caught birds were slower to decrease their activity back towards baseline levels, and showed a dramatic increase in time at the periphery of the cage compared with the hand-reared birds. We interpret these data as showing evidence of a greater fear response in wild-caught birds with initial withdrawal followed by a subsequent rebound of prolonged attempts to escape the cage. We found no effects of environmental enrichment. However, birds in cages on low shelves were less active than birds on upper shelves, and showed a greater increase in the time spent at the periphery of their cages after the human departed, perhaps indicating that the lower cages were more stressful. In demonstrating reduced fear of humans in hand-reared birds, our results support one of the proposed welfare benefits of this practice, but without further data on the possible welfare costs of hand-rearing, it is not yet possible to reach a general conclusion about its net welfare impact. However, our results confirm a clear scientific impact of both hand-rearing and cage position at the behavioural level.

  16. Thermal, Radiation and Impact Protective Shields (TRIPS) for Robotic and Human Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, M. P.; Arnold, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    New concepts for protective shields for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEVs) and planetary probes offer improved mission safety and affordability. Hazards include radiation from cosmic rays and solar particle events, hypervelocity impacts from orbital debris/ micrometeorites, and the extreme heating environment experienced during entry into planetary atmospheres. The traditional approach for the design of protection systems for these hazards has been to create single-function shields, i.e. ablative and blanket-based heat shields for thermal protection systems (TPS), polymer or other low-molecular-weight materials for radiation shields, and multilayer, Whipple-type shields for protection from hypervelocity impacts. This paper introduces an approach for the development of a single, multifunctional protective shield, employing nanotechnology- based materials, to serve simultaneously as a TPS, an impact shield and as the first line of defense against radiation. The approach is first to choose low molecular weight ablative TPS materials, (existing and planned for development) and add functionalized carbon nanotubes. Together they provide both thermal and radiation (TR) shielding. Next, impact protection (IP) is furnished through a tough skin, consisting of hard, ceramic outer layers (to fracture the impactor) and sublayers of tough, nanostructured fabrics to contain the debris cloud from the impactor before it can penetrate the spacecraft s interior.

  17. Extinction of Conditioned Fear in Adolescents and Adults: A Human fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina E. Ganella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the neural correlates of fear learning in adolescents, a population at increased risk for anxiety disorders. Healthy adolescents (mean age 16.26 and adults (mean age 29.85 completed a fear learning paradigm across two stages during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Stage 1 involved conditioning and extinction, and stage 2 involved extinction recall, re-conditioning, followed by re-extinction. During extinction recall, we observed a higher skin conductance response to the CS+ relative to CS− in adolescents compared to adults, which was accompanied by a reduction in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC activity. Relative to adults, adolescents also had significantly reduced activation in the ventromedial PFC, dlPFC, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, and temporoparietal junction (TPJ during extinction recall compared to late extinction. Age differences in PCC activation between late extinction and late conditioning were also observed. These results show for the first time that healthy adolescent humans show different behavioral responses, and dampened PFC activity during short-term extinction recall compared to healthy adults. We also identify the PCC and TPJ as novel regions that may be associated with impaired extinction in adolescents. Also, while adults showed significant correlations between differential SCR and BOLD activity in some brain regions during late extinction and recall, adolescents did not show any significant correlations. This study highlights adolescent-specific neural correlates of extinction, which may explain the peak in prevalence of anxiety disorders during adolescence.

  18. Attentional Bias for Uncertain Cues of Shock in Human Fear Conditioning: Evidence for Attentional Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Koenig

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a human fear conditioning experiment in which three different color cues were followed by an aversive electric shock on 0, 50, and 100% of the trials, and thus induced low (L, partial (P, and high (H shock expectancy, respectively. The cues differed with respect to the strength of their shock association (L < P < H and the uncertainty of their prediction (L < P > H. During conditioning we measured pupil dilation and ocular fixations to index differences in the attentional processing of the cues. After conditioning, the shock-associated colors were introduced as irrelevant distracters during visual search for a shape target while shocks were no longer administered and we analyzed the cues’ potential to capture and hold overt attention automatically. Our findings suggest that fear conditioning creates an automatic attention bias for the conditioned cues that depends on their correlation with the aversive outcome. This bias was exclusively linked to the strength of the cues’ shock association for the early attentional processing of cues in the visual periphery, but additionally was influenced by the uncertainty of the shock prediction after participants fixated on the cues. These findings are in accord with attentional learning theories that formalize how associative learning shapes automatic attention.

  19. Fear extinction in the human brain: A meta-analysis of fMRI studies in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Miquel A; Albajes-Eizagirre, Anton; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Vervliet, Bram; Cardoner, Narcís; Benet, Olívia; Radua, Joaquim; Harrison, Ben J

    2018-05-01

    The study of fear extinction represents an important example of translational neuroscience in psychiatry and promises to improve the understanding and treatment of anxiety and fear-related disorders. We present the results of a set of meta-analyses of human fear extinction studies in healthy participants, conducted with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and reporting whole-brain results. Meta-analyses of fear extinction learning primarily implicate consistent activation of brain regions linked to threat appraisal and experience, including the dorsal anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices. An overlapping anatomical result was obtained from the meta-analysis of extinction recall studies, except when studies directly compared an extinguished threat stimulus to an unextinguished threat stimulus (instead of a safety stimulus). In this latter instance, more consistent activation was observed in dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex regions, together with other areas including the hippocampus. While our results partially support the notion of a shared neuroanatomy between human and rodent models of extinction processes, they also encourage an expanded account of the neural basis of human fear extinction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF CRYOGENIC HYDROGEN RADIATION SHIELD FOR HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen is the most mass-efficient radiation shielding material for protection against the space radiation environment. The concept of Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation...

  1. Radiation shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, the thickness of the radiation shields is minimized to save the quantity of shields thereby utilizing spaces in a facility effectively. That is, the radiation shields of the present invention comprise first and second shields forming stepwise gaps. They are disposed between a high dose region and a low dose region. The first and second shields have a feature in that the thickness thereof can be set to a size capable of shielding the gaps in accordance with the strength of the radiation source to be shielded. With such a constitution, the thickness of the shields of the radiation processing facility can be minimized. Accordingly, the quantity of the shields can be greatly saved. Spaces in the facility can be utilized effectively. (I.S.)

  2. The Topological Properties of Stimuli Influence Fear Generalization and Extinction in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Su, Hongyu; Xie, Xiaoyuan; Yan, Pei; Li, Junjiao; Zheng, Xifu

    2018-01-01

    Fear generalization is an etiologically significant indicator of anxiety disorders, and understanding how to inhibit it is important in their treatment. Prior studies have found that reducing fear generalization using a generalization stimulus (GS) is ineffective in removing a conditioned fear that incorporates local features, and that topological properties appear to play a comparatively more significant role in the processes of perception and categorization. Our study utilized a conditioned-fear generalization design to examine whether the topological properties of stimuli influence the generalization and return of fear. Fear was indexed using online expectancy ratings and skin conductance responses (SCRs). The study's 52 participants were divided into three groups: Group 1, conditioned danger cue (CS+) extinction; Group 2, extinction of one GS; Group 3, extinction of three GSs. We found that the three groups acquired conditioned fear at the same level. In the generalization and extinction phase, fear was transferred to the GS with the same topological properties as CS+, and gradual decreases in both shock expectancy and SCRs over non-reinforced extinction trials were observed. In the test phase, participants' online expectancy ratings indicated that fear did not return in Group 1, but did return in Groups 2 and 3. All three groups demonstrated successful GS fear extinction, but only Group 1 did not show a return of fear for CS+. Regarding SCRs results, none of the groups demonstrated a return of fear, suggesting that utilization of topological properties successfully reduced the return of conditioned fear. Our results indicate that, in clinical settings, using GS with topological equivalence to CS+ might offer a potential method with which to extinct conditioned fear.

  3. The Topological Properties of Stimuli Influence Fear Generalization and Extinction in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fear generalization is an etiologically significant indicator of anxiety disorders, and understanding how to inhibit it is important in their treatment. Prior studies have found that reducing fear generalization using a generalization stimulus (GS is ineffective in removing a conditioned fear that incorporates local features, and that topological properties appear to play a comparatively more significant role in the processes of perception and categorization. Our study utilized a conditioned-fear generalization design to examine whether the topological properties of stimuli influence the generalization and return of fear. Fear was indexed using online expectancy ratings and skin conductance responses (SCRs. The study’s 52 participants were divided into three groups: Group 1, conditioned danger cue (CS+ extinction; Group 2, extinction of one GS; Group 3, extinction of three GSs. We found that the three groups acquired conditioned fear at the same level. In the generalization and extinction phase, fear was transferred to the GS with the same topological properties as CS+, and gradual decreases in both shock expectancy and SCRs over non-reinforced extinction trials were observed. In the test phase, participants’ online expectancy ratings indicated that fear did not return in Group 1, but did return in Groups 2 and 3. All three groups demonstrated successful GS fear extinction, but only Group 1 did not show a return of fear for CS+. Regarding SCRs results, none of the groups demonstrated a return of fear, suggesting that utilization of topological properties successfully reduced the return of conditioned fear. Our results indicate that, in clinical settings, using GS with topological equivalence to CS+ might offer a potential method with which to extinct conditioned fear.

  4. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  5. Multimodal assessment of long-term memory recall and reinstatement in a combined cue and context fear conditioning and extinction paradigm in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Haaker

    Full Text Available Learning to predict danger via associative learning processes is critical for adaptive behaviour. After successful extinction, persisting fear memories often emerge as returning fear. Investigation of return of fear phenomena, e.g. reinstatement, have only recently began and to date, many critical questions with respect to reinstatement in human populations remain unresolved. Few studies have separated experimental phases in time even though increasing evidence shows that allowing for passage of time (and consolidation between experimental phases has a major impact on the results. In addition, studies have relied on a single psychophysiological dimension only (SCRs/SCL or FPS which hampers comparability between different studies that showed both differential or generalized return of fear following a reinstatement manipulation. In 93 participants, we used a multimodal approach (fear-potentiated startle, skin conductance responses, fear ratings to asses fear conditioning (day 1, extinction (day 2 as well as delayed memory recall and reinstatement (day 8 in a paradigm that probed contextual and cued fear intra-individually. Our findings show persistence of conditioning and extinction memory over time and demonstrate that reinstated fear responses were qualitatively different between dependent variables (subjective fear ratings, FPS, SCRs as well as between cued and contextual CSs. While only the arousal-related measurement (SCRs showed increasing reactions following reinstatement to the cued CSs, no evidence of reinstatement was observed for the subjective ratings and fear-related measurement (FPS. In contrast, for contextual CSs, reinstatement was evident as differential and generalized reinstatement in fear ratings as well as generally elevated physiological fear (FPS and arousal (SCRs related measurements to all contextual CSs (generalized non-differential reinstatement. Returning fear after reinstatement likely depends on a variety of variables

  6. Testing the effects of Δ9-THC and D-cycloserine on extinction of conditioned fear in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpers, Floris; Denys, Damiaan; Kenemans, J Leon; Grillon, Christian; van der Aart, Jasper; Baas, Johanna MP

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical evidence implicates several neurotransmitter systems in the extinction of conditioned fear. These results are of great interest, because the reduction of acquired fear associations is critical in therapies for anxiety disorders. We tested whether findings with respect to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and cannabinoid receptor (CB) systems in animals carry over to healthy human subjects. To that end, we administered selected doses of D-cycloserine (partial NMDA receptor agonist, 250 mg), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, CB1 receptor agonist, 10 mg), or placebo prior to the extinction session of a 3-day conditioning protocol. D-cycloserine did not affect within-session extinction, or the retention of extinction in healthy human participants, in contrast with patient data but in line with previous reports in healthy volunteers. During extinction training, Δ9-THC reduced conditioned skin conductance responses, but not fear-potentiated startle. This effect was not retained at the retention test 2 days later, suggesting it was dependent on acute effects of the drug. Our findings implicate that facilitation of the CB1 or NMDA system with the substances used in this study does not affect conditioned fear extinction lastingly in healthy humans. The apparent discrepancy between these findings and the results from (pre-) clinical trials is discussed in terms of room for improvement in these systems in healthy volunteers, and the lack of specificity of THC as a CB1 agonist. PMID:22351380

  7. Convergent effects of mouse Pet-1 deletion and human PET-1 variation on amygdala fear and threat processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Cara L; Camp, Marguerite; Jones, V Morgan; MacPherson, Kathryn P; Ihne, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Paul; Maroun, Mouna; Drabant, Emily; Bogdan, Ryan; Hariri, Ahmad R; Holmes, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin is critical for shaping the development of neural circuits regulating emotion. Pet-1 (FEV-1) is an ETS-domain transcription factor essential for differentiation and forebrain targeting of serotonin neurons. Constitutive Pet-1 knockout (KO) causes major loss of serotonin neurons and forebrain serotonin availability, and behavioral abnormalities. We phenotyped Pet-1 KO mice for fear conditioning and extinction, and on a battery of assays for anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. Morphology of Golgi-stained neurons in basolateral amygdala (BLA) and prelimbic cortex was examined. Using human imaging genetics, a common variant (rs860573) in the PET-1 (FEV) gene was tested for effects on threat-related amygdala reactivity and psychopathology in 88 Asian-ancestry subjects. Pet-1 KO mice exhibited increased acquisition and expression of fear, and elevated fear recovery following extinction, relative to wild-type (WT). BLA dendrites of Pet-1 KO mice were significantly longer than in WT. Human PET-1 variation associated with differences in amygdala threat processing and psychopathology. This novel evidence for the role of Pet-1 in fear processing and dendritic organization of amygdala neurons and in human amygdala threat processing extends a growing literature demonstrating the influence of genetic variation in the serotonin system on emotional regulation via effects on structure and function of underlying corticolimbic circuitry. © 2013.

  8. Parental buffering of fear and stress neurobiology: Reviewing parallels across rodent, monkey, and human models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R; Hostinar, Camelia E; Sanchez, Mar M; Tottenham, Nim; Sullivan, Regina M

    2015-01-01

    It has been long recognized that parents exert profound influences on child development. Dating back to at least the seventeenth-century Enlightenment, the ability for parents to shape child behavior in an enduring way has been noted. Twentieth-century scholars developed theories to explain how parenting histories influence psychological development, and since that time, the number of scientific publications on parenting influences in both human and nonhuman animal fields has grown at an exponential rate, reaching numbers in the thousands by 2015. This special issue describes a symposium delivered by Megan Gunnar, Regina Sullivan, Mar Sanchez, and Nim Tottenham in the Fall of 2014 at the Society for Social Neuroscience. The goal of the symposium was to describe the emerging knowledge on neurobiological mechanisms that mediate parent-offspring interactions across three different species: rodent, monkey, and human. The talks were aimed at designing testable models of parenting effects on the development of emotional and stress regulation. Specifically, the symposium aimed at characterizing the special modulatory (buffering) effects of parental cues on fear- and stress-relevant neurobiology and behaviors of the offspring and to discuss examples of impaired buffering when the parent-infant relationship is disrupted.

  9. Loss anxiety: an alternative explanation for the fundamental fears in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca-Atabey, Müjde; Oner-Özkan, Bengi

    2014-01-01

    In this article, fear of loss as well as fear of death are introduced to explain cultural worldview defence reactions of individuals. Participants were subjected to mortality salience, disability salience and control conditions. Mortality salience and paralysis salience were found to lead to a change in conservatism scores. In a qualitative follow-up study, when reminded about mortality, the participants reported less individual sadness than expected; whereas when the participants were reminded about paralysis, greater individual sadness was reported. Any kind of loss manipulation that is moderately fearful, highly imaginable, and highly self-relevant is suggested to affect cultural worldview defence reactions.

  10. Fear in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Janne Winther

    2006-01-01

    Fear is generally considered to be an undesirable emotional state that may reduce welfare, growth and reproductive performance in animals. Fear in horses is additionally problematic, because fear reactions can cause serious injury to both horse and human. Horses are primarily used for sports and leisure for a large number of children and young women. Unfortunately, horse riding ranks as one of the most dangerous sports in terms of the number and seriousness of accidents, and the ability of a ...

  11. Chronic cannabis use is associated with impaired fear extinction in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papini, S.; Ruglass, L.M.; Lopez-Castro, T.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.; Hien, D.A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to examine intermediate phenotypes of anxiety and stress-related disorders has facilitated the identification of neurobiological mechanisms that underlie specific components of abnormal psychological functioning. Across species, acute

  12. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  13. Fears of Disaster and (Post-Human Raciologies in European Popular Culture (2001-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Giuliani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at mapping the impact of 'fears of disasters and crisis' on European self-representations in terms of racial stereotypes, 'white fantasies', gender hierarchies, and heteronormativities. Its methodology is a critical discourse analysis of texts - specifically television series such as the BBC's Dead Set (2009 and the first season of BBC US and UK, In the Flesh, (2013 and movies such as 28 Days Later (2002, L'Horde (2009, and World War Z (2013 - read through the lens of postcolonial theories, critical race and whiteness studies, the concepts of political philosophy and the theoretical insights of post-human feminism. This composite theoretical framework permits a grasp of gendered, racialised and classed fantasies behind the narratives of catastrophe and the visions of the post-apocalyptic world(s the catastrophe is supposed to bring to life; it also allows an analysis of the meaning and articulations of catastrophe and post-world spatial constructions, and the latter's relation to actual and imagined social hierarchies (gender, colour and class of the survivors. These are examined in order to understand whose eyes we are expected to imagine and experience the crisis/catastrophe through; the geographies of catastrophe and of post-world(s (where in the world, and why; the relation between the undead and the living; life amongst the living before the undead threat; and the way protagonists look at the laws, rule, governmentalities, and use of violence in the past, present and future societies. These are a few of the themes that this article discusses in an attempt to uncover what fantasies of the present are hidden behind present memories of the future.

  14. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  15. Dissociable roles for hippocampal and amygdalar volume in human fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Pohlack, Sebastian T; Flor, Herta; Nees, Frauke

    2015-09-01

    Fear conditioning is a basic learning process which involves the association of a formerly neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) with a biologically relevant aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). Previous studies conducted in brain-lesioned patients have shown that while the acquisition of autonomic fear responses requires an intact amygdala, a spared hippocampus is necessary for the development of the CS-US contingency awareness. Although these data have been supported by studies using functional neuroimaging techniques in healthy people, attempts to extend these findings to the morphological aspects of amygdala and hippocampus are missing. Here we tested the hypothesis that amygdalar and hippocampal volumes play dissociable roles in determining autonomic responses and contingency awareness during fear conditioning. Fifty-two healthy individuals (mean age 21.83) underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. We used a differential delay fear conditioning paradigm while assessing skin conductance responses (SCRs), subjective ratings of CS-US contingency, as well as emotional valence and perceived arousal. Left amygdalar volume significantly predicted the magnitude of differential SCRs during fear acquisition, but had no impact on contingency learning. Conversely, bilateral hippocampal volumes were significantly related to contingency ratings, but not to SCRs. Moreover, left amygdalar volume predicted SCRs to the reinforced CS alone, but not those elicited by the US. Our findings bridge the gap between previous lesion and functional imaging studies, by showing that amygdalar and hippocampal volumes differentially modulate the acquisition of conditioned fear. Further, our results reveal that the morphology of these limbic structures moderate learning and memory already in healthy persons.

  16. Fear conditioning to subliminal fear relevant and non fear relevant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Ottmar V; Kempnich, Clare; Jee, Sang Hoon; Arnold, Derek H

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that conscious visual awareness is not a prerequisite for human fear learning. For instance, humans can learn to be fearful of subliminal fear relevant images--images depicting stimuli thought to have been fear relevant in our evolutionary context, such as snakes, spiders, and angry human faces. Such stimuli could have a privileged status in relation to manipulations used to suppress usually salient images from awareness, possibly due to the existence of a designated sub-cortical 'fear module'. Here we assess this proposition, and find it wanting. We use binocular masking to suppress awareness of images of snakes and wallabies (particularly cute, non-threatening marsupials). We find that subliminal presentations of both classes of image can induce differential fear conditioning. These data show that learning, as indexed by fear conditioning, is neither contingent on conscious visual awareness nor on subliminal conditional stimuli being fear relevant.

  17. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  18. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  19. Evidence for serotonin function as a neurochemical difference between fear and anxiety disorders in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchs, Felipe; Nutt, David J; Hince, Dana A; Davies, Simon J C; Bernik, Marcio; Hood, Sean D

    2015-10-01

    The relationships between serotonin and fear and anxiety disorders have been much studied yet many important questions remain, despite selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors having been the primary treatments for these disorders for some time. In order to explore this issue we performed a pooled analysis of six of our studies in remitted patients with a fear/anxiety disorder who were exposed to syndrome-specific aversive stimulation under acute tryptophan depletion. We based our analysis on the hypothesis that the inconsistencies observed in the studies could be predicted by Deakin and Graeff's theory about the dual role of serotonin in responses to threats, whereby serotonin is critical to prevent fear (panic) but not anxiety. In accordance with this view, our results give support to a dissociation of the disorders traditionally grouped under fear and anxiety-related disorders in terms of different roles of serotonin in modulation of responses to aversive stimulation. Implications for future studies and psychiatric nosology are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  1. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  2. Serotonergic Modulation of Conditioned Fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Homberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditioned fear plays a key role in anxiety disorders as well as depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions. Understanding how neuromodulators drive the associated learning and memory processes, including memory consolidation, retrieval/expression, and extinction (recall, is essential in the understanding of (individual differences in vulnerability to these disorders and their treatment. The human and rodent studies I review here together reveal, amongst others, that acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment facilitates fear conditioning, reduces contextual fear, and increases cued fear, chronic SSRI treatment reduces both contextual and cued fear, 5-HT1A receptors inhibit the acquisition and expression of contextual fear, 5-HT2A receptors facilitates the consolidation of cued and contextual fear, inactivation of 5-HT2C receptors facilitate the retrieval of cued fear memory, the 5-HT3 receptor mediates contextual fear, genetically induced increases in serotonin levels are associated with increased fear conditioning, impaired cued fear extinction, or impaired extinction recall, and that genetically induced 5-HT depletion increases fear conditioning and contextual fear. Several explanations are presented to reconcile seemingly paradoxical relationships between serotonin levels and conditioned fear.

  3. Human Histologic Evidence of New Bone Formation and Osseointegration Between Root Dentin (Unplanned Socket-Shield) and Dental Implant: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimer, Charles; Pette, Gregory A; Gluckman, Howard; Salama, Maurice; Du Toit, Jonathan

    The socket-shield technique described 7 years ago has since grown in its reporting in the literature as a valid method of ridge preservation at immediate implant placement. To date, large clinical cohorts with up-to-4-year follow-up have been reported. Additionally, evidence of tissue histology at the dental implant and socket-shield has been demonstrated in the animal model. However, human histologic evidence has not yet been available, and the clinician's uncertainty regarding the tissues that may form between the socket-shield and dental implant may remain unanswered until now. This case report presents the first human histologic evidence that bone may entirely fill the space between root dentin and an osseointegrated implant surface.

  4. The Biology of Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphs, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Each of us has felt afraid, and we can all recognize fear in many animal species. Yet there is no consensus in the scientific study of fear. Some argue that “fear” is a psychological construct rather than discoverable through scientific investigation. Others argue that the term “fear” cannot properly be applied to animals because we cannot know whether they feel afraid. Studies in rodents show that there are highly specific brain circuits for fear, whereas findings from human neuroimaging seem to make the opposite claim. Here I review the field and urge three approaches that could reconcile the debates. For one, we need a broadly comparative approach that would identify core components of fear conserved across phylogeny. This also pushes us towards the second point of emphasis: an ecological theory of fear that is essentially functional. Finally, we should aim even to incorporate the conscious experience of being afraid, reinvigorating the study of feelings across species. PMID:23347946

  5. Testing the effects of Delta 9-THC and D-cycloserine on extinction of conditioned fear in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumpers, Floris; Denys, Damiaan; Kenemans, J. Leon; Grillon, Christian; van der Aart, Jasper; Baas, Johanna M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical evidence implicates several neurotransmitter systems in the extinction of conditioned fear. These results are of great interest, because the reduction of acquired fear associations is critical in therapies for anxiety disorders. We tested whether findings with respect to the

  6. Testing the effects of Delta9-THC and D-cycloserine on extinction of conditioned fear in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumpers, F.; Denys, D.; Kenemans, J.L.; Grillon, C.; van der Aart, J.; Baas, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical evidence implicates several neurotransmitter systems in the extinction of conditioned fear. These results are of great interest, because the reduction of acquired fear associations is critical in therapies for anxiety disorders. We tested whether findings with respect to the

  7. Erasing Fear : Effect of Disrupting Fear Memory Reconsolidation on Central and Peripheral Nervous System Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ågren, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fear memories, here defined as learned associations between a stimulus and a physiological fear reaction, are formed through fear conditioning. In animals, fear memories, present in the lateral amygdala, undergo reconsolidation after recall. Moreover, this reconsolidation process can be disrupted both pharmacologically and behaviourally, resulting in a reduced fear response to the stimulus. This thesis examines the attenuation of fear memories by disrupting reconsolidation in humans, using me...

  8. New approach to the interaction of cosmic rays with nuclei in spacecraft shielding and the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, B.W.; Nix, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of high-energy cosmic rays with nuclei in spacecraft shielding and the human body is important for manned interplanetary missions and is not well understood either experimentally or theoretically. We present a new theoretical approach to this problem based on classical hadrodynamics for extended nucleons, which treats nucleons of finite size interacting with massive meson fields. This theory represents the classical analogue of the quantum hadrodynamics of Serot and Walecka without the assumptions of the mean-field approximation and point nucleons. It provides a natural covariant microscopic approach to collisions between cosmic rays and nuclei that automatically includes space-time non-locality and retardation, nonequilibrium phenomena, interactions among all nucleons, and particle production. Unlike previous models, this approach is manifestly Lorentz covariant and satisfies a priori the basic conditions that are present when cosmic rays collide with nuclei, namely an interaction time that is extremely short and a nucleon mean-free path, force range, and internucleon separation that are all comparable in size. We review the history of classical meson-field theory and derive the classical relativistic equations of motion for nucleons of finite size interacting with massive scalar and vector meson fields

  9. Short- and long-term effects of unpredictable repeated negative stimuli on Japanese quail's fear of humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Laurence

    Full Text Available Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail. When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production.

  10. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Unpredictable Repeated Negative Stimuli on Japanese Quail's Fear of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Agathe; Lumineau, Sophie; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Boissy, Alain; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS) applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail) and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail). When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production. PMID:24668017

  11. Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Björkstrand

    Full Text Available Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear. We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

  12. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are enabling to shield humans in aerospace transportation vehicles and other human habited spaces....

  13. Erasing fear memories with extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Gregory J; Paré, Denis; Richardson, Rick; Herry, Cyril; Monfils, Marie H; Schiller, Daniela; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2010-11-10

    Decades of behavioral studies have confirmed that extinction does not erase classically conditioned fear memories. For this reason, research efforts have focused on the mechanisms underlying the development of extinction-induced inhibition within fear circuits. However, recent studies in rodents have uncovered mechanisms that stabilize and destabilize fear memories, opening the possibility that extinction might be used to erase fear memories. This symposium focuses on several of these new developments, which involve the timing of extinction training. Extinction-induced erasure of fear occurs in very young rats, but is lost with the development of perineuronal nets in the amygdala that render fear memories impervious to extinction. Moreover, extinction administered during the reconsolidation phase, when fear memory is destabilized, updates the fear association as safe, thereby preventing the return of fear, in both rats and humans. The use of modified extinction protocols to eliminate fear memories complements existing pharmacological strategies for strengthening extinction.

  14. Are fear memories erasable?–reconsolidation of learned fear with fear-relevant and fear-irrelevant stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Golkar, Armita; Bellander, Martin; Olsson, Andreas; Öhman, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of fear learning have demonstrated that a single reminder exposure prior to extinction training can prevent the return of extinguished fear by disrupting the process of reconsolidation. These findings have however proven hard to replicate in humans. Given the significant implications of preventing the return of fear, the purpose of the present study was to further study the prerequisites for the putative effects of disrupting reconsolidation. In two experiments, w...

  15. Freedom versus fear: The symbiotic relationship between human security and freedom of thought and conscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alfaro–Pareja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay is within the Peace, Conflicts and Development Studies field. It is a descriptive and explicative study that intends to show: a the influence of mass media communications in the violation of freedom of thought and of conscience today; b the influence of National Security in the increase of the violence and c the relation between the freedom of thought and of conscience as a Human Right and the Human Security as a new way to protect the individual from challenges that threaten him directly. The main objective is to analyze how this interaction could help to power and to increase both conceptions for human development.

  16. Erythropoietin reduces neural and cognitive processing of fear in human models of antidepressant drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Harmer, Catherine J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects in animal models and affects cognitive and associated neural responses in humans. These effects have highlighted Epo as a candidate for treatment of psychiatric disease including schizophrenia and depression. The curren...

  17. The European court of human rights and religion: Between 'Christian' neutrality and the fear of Islam

    OpenAIRE

    Cebada Romero, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights (the ECtHR), remains open to different constitutional formulae regarding the regulation of the relationship between state and religion. At the present moment non-secular, soft secular and hard secular constitutional arrangements coexist in Europe. A general pre-requisite of the European Convention order is the obligation for states to remain neutral towards...

  18. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable

  19. Are fear memories erasable? –reconsolidation of learned fear with fear relevant and fear-irrelevant stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita eGolkar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the field of fear learning have demonstrated that a single reminder exposure prior to extinction training can prevent the return of extinguished fear by disrupting the process of reconsolidation. These findings have however proven hard to replicate in humans. Given the significant implications of preventing the return of fear, the purpose of the present study was to further study the prerequisites for the putative effects of disrupting reconsolidation. In two experiments, we assessed whether extinction training initiated within the reconsolidation time window could abolish the return of fear using fear-relevant (experiment 1 or fear-irrelevant (experiment 2 conditioned stimuli (CS. In both experiments, participants went through conditioning, extinction and reinstatement testing on three consecutive days, with one of two reinforced CS being reactivated 10 minutes prior to extinction. We found that a single reminder exposure prior to extinction training did not prevent the return of extinguished fear responding using either fear-relevant or fear-irrelevant CSs. Our findings point to the need to further study the specific parameters that enable disruption of reconsolidation.

  20. The Ecology of Human Fear: Survival Optimization and the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean eMobbs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a Survival Optimization System (SOS to account for the strategies that humans and other animals use to defend against recurring and novel threats. The SOS attempts to merge ecological models that define a repertoire of contextually relevant threat induced survival behaviors with contemporary approaches to human affective science. We first propose that the goal of the nervous system is to reduce surprise and optimize actions by (i predicting the sensory landscape, through simulation of possible encounters with threat, selecting appropriate action by pre-encounter avoidance and (ii prevention strategies in which the organism manufactures safe environments. When a potential threat is encountered the (iii threat orienting system is engaged to determine whether the organism ignores the stimulus or switches into a process of (iv assessment, where the organism monitors the stimulus, weighs the threat value, predicts the actions of the threat, searches for safety, and guides behavioral actions crucial to directed escape. When under imminent attack, (v defensive systems evoke fast reflexive indirect escape behaviors (i.e. fight or flight. This cascade of responses to threat of increasing magnitude are underwritten by an interconnected neural architecture that extends from cortical and hippocampal circuits, to attention, action and threat systems including the amygdala, striatum, and hard-wired defensive systems in the midbrain. The SOS also includes a modulatory feature consisting of cognitive appraisal systems that flexibly guide perception, risk and action. Moreover, personal and vicarious threat encounters fine-tune avoidance behaviors via model-based learning, with higher organisms bridging data to reduce face-to-face encounters with predators. Our theory unifies the divergent field of human affective science, proposing the highly integrated, interconnected nervous systems are optimized to avoid ecological dangers.

  1. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  2. Expression profiles of mitochondrial genes in the frontal cortex and the caudate nucleus of developing humans and mice selectively bred for high and low fear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang H Choi

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial function may be important in brain development and psychiatric disorders. However, detailed expression profiles of those genes in human brain development and fear-related behavior remain unclear. Using microarray data available from the public domain and the Gene Ontology analysis, we identified the genes and the functional categories associated with chronological age in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and the caudate nucleus (CN of psychiatrically normal humans ranging in age from birth to 50 years. Among those, we found that a substantial number of genes in the PFC (115 and the CN (117 are associated with the GO term: mitochondrion (FDR qv <0.05. A greater number of the genes in the PFC (91% than the genes in the CN (62% showed a linear increase in expression during postnatal development. Using quantitative PCR, we validated the developmental expression pattern of four genes including monoamine oxidase B (MAOB, NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein (NDUFV1, mitochondrial uncoupling protein 5 (SLC25A14 and tubulin beta-3 chain (TUBB3. In mice, overall developmental expression pattern of MAOB, SLC25A14 and TUBB3 in the PFC were comparable to the pattern observed in humans (p<0.05. However, mice selectively bred for high fear did not exhibit normal developmental changes of MAOB and TUBB3. These findings suggest that the genes associated with mitochondrial function in the PFC play a significant role in brain development and fear-related behavior.

  3. Food fears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumney, R.

    1988-01-01

    Radurisation can give a new lease of shelf life to food and cut down contamination, but it is bound to cause problems - even among comparatively tame South African consumers. In this article the facts about radurization are discussed: the labelling of irradiated products, the problem of making a bad product good by using irradiation, consumer pressure, attitudes, fears and resistance. The economics of radurised foodstuffs are also discussed

  4. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  5. The fragrant power of collective fear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roa Harb

    Full Text Available Fear is a well-characterized biological response to threatening or stressful situations in humans and other social animals. Importantly, fearful stimuli in the natural environment are likely to be encountered concurrently by a group of animals. The modulation of fear acquisition and fear memory by a group as opposed to an individual experience, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a robust reduction in fear memory to an aversive event undertaken in a group despite similar fear learning between individually- and group-conditioned rats. This reduction persists outside the group confines, appears to be a direct outcome of group cognizance and is counteracted by loss of olfactory signaling among the group members. These results show that a group experience of fear can be protective and suggest that distinct neural pathways from those classically studied in individuals modulate collective fear memories.

  6. Generalization of Conditioned Fear along a Dimension of Increasing Fear Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Mitroff, Stephen R.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which fear generalization in humans is determined by the amount of fear intensity in nonconditioned stimuli relative to a perceptually similar conditioned stimulus. Stimuli consisted of graded emotionally expressive faces of the same identity morphed between neutral and fearful endpoints. Two…

  7. I can see, hear, and smell your fear : Comparing olfactory and audiovisual media in fear communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Jasper H B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/373435754; Semin, Gün R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072830409; Smeets, Monique A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/141926600

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that humans can become fearful after exposure to olfactory fear signals, yet these studies have reported the effects of fear chemosignals without examining emotion-relevant input from traditional communication modalities (i.e., vision, audition). The question that we pursued

  8. Forming Competing Fear Learning and Extinction Memories in Adolescence Makes Fear Difficult to Inhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages.…

  9. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  11. Dissociating response systems: erasing fear from memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2010-07-01

    In addition to the extensive evidence in animals, we previously showed that disrupting reconsolidation by noradrenergic blockade produced amnesia for the original fear response in humans. Interestingly, the declarative memory for the fear association remained intact. These results asked for a solid replication. Moreover, given the constructive nature of memories, the intact recollection of the fear association could eventually 'rebuild' the fear memory, resulting in the spontaneous recovery of the fear response. Yet, perseverance of the amnesic effects would have substantial clinical implications, as even the most effective treatments for psychiatric disorders display high percentages of relapse. Using a differential fear conditioning procedure in humans, we replicated our previous findings by showing that administering propranolol (40mg) prior to memory reactivation eliminated the startle fear response 24h later. But most importantly, this effect persisted at one month follow-up. Notably, the propranolol manipulation not only left the declarative memory for the acquired contingency untouched, but also skin conductance discrimination. In addition, a close association between declarative knowledge and skin conductance responses was found. These findings are in line with the supposed double dissociation of fear conditioning and declarative knowledge relative to the amygdala and hippocampus in humans. They support the view that skin conductance conditioning primarily reflects contingency learning, whereas the startle response is a rather specific measure of fear. Furthermore, the results indicate the absence of a causal link between the actual knowledge of a fear association and its fear response, even though they often operate in parallel. Interventions targeting the amygdalar fear memory may be essential in specifically and persistently dampening the emotional impact of fear. From a clinical and ethical perspective, disrupting reconsolidation points to promising

  12. Neural correlates of fear: insights from neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garfinkel SN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarah N Garfinkel,1,2 Hugo D Critchley1,2 1Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, 2Department of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK Abstract: Fear anticipates a challenge to one's well-being and is a reaction to the risk of harm. The expression of fear in the individual is a constellation of physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and experiential responses. Fear indicates risk and will guide adaptive behavior, yet fear is also fundamental to the symptomatology of most psychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging studies of normal and abnormal fear in humans extend knowledge gained from animal experiments. Neuroimaging permits the empirical evaluation of theory (emotions as response tendencies, mental states, and valence and arousal dimensions, and improves our understanding of the mechanisms of how fear is controlled by both cognitive processes and bodily states. Within the human brain, fear engages a set of regions that include insula and anterior cingulate cortices, the amygdala, and dorsal brain-stem centers, such as periaqueductal gray matter. This same fear matrix is also implicated in attentional orienting, mental planning, interoceptive mapping, bodily feelings, novelty and motivational learning, behavioral prioritization, and the control of autonomic arousal. The stereotyped expression of fear can thus be viewed as a special construction from combinations of these processes. An important motivator for understanding neural fear mechanisms is the debilitating clinical expression of anxiety. Neuroimaging studies of anxiety patients highlight the role of learning and memory in pathological fear. Posttraumatic stress disorder is further distinguished by impairment in cognitive control and contextual memory. These processes ultimately need to be targeted for symptomatic recovery. Neuroscientific knowledge of fear has broader relevance to understanding human and societal behavior. As yet, only some of

  13. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  14. AMYGDALA MICROCIRCUITS CONTROLLING LEARNED FEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvarci, Sevil; Pare, Denis

    2014-01-01

    We review recent work on the role of intrinsic amygdala networks in the regulation of classically conditioned defensive behaviors, commonly known as conditioned fear. These new developments highlight how conditioned fear depends on far more complex networks than initially envisioned. Indeed, multiple parallel inhibitory and excitatory circuits are differentially recruited during the expression versus extinction of conditioned fear. Moreover, shifts between expression and extinction circuits involve coordinated interactions with different regions of the medial prefrontal cortex. However, key areas of uncertainty remain, particularly with respect to the connectivity of the different cell types. Filling these gaps in our knowledge is important because much evidence indicates that human anxiety disorders results from an abnormal regulation of the networks supporting fear learning. PMID:24908482

  15. What's wrong with fear conditioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Tom; Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Boddez, Yannick; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2013-01-01

    Fear conditioning is one of the prime paradigms of behavioural neuroscience and a source of tremendous insight in the fundamentals of learning and memory and the psychology and neurobiology of emotion. It is also widely regarded as a model for the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders in a diathesis-stress model of psychopathology. Starting from the apparent paradox between the adaptive nature of fear conditioning and the dysfunctional nature of pathological anxiety, we present a critique of the human fear conditioning paradigm as an experimental model for psychopathology. We discuss the potential benefits of expanding the human fear conditioning paradigm by (1) including action tendencies as an important index of fear and (2) paying more attention to "weak" (i.e., ambiguous) rather than "strong" fear learning situations (Lissek et al., 2006), such as contained in selective learning procedures. We present preliminary data that illustrate these ideas and discuss the importance of response systems divergence in understanding individual differences in vulnerability for the development of pathological anxiety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methylphenidate enhances extinction of contextual fear

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Antony D.; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin) is a norepinephrine and dopamine transporter blocker that is widely used in humans for treatment of attention deficit disorder and narcolepsy. Although there is some evidence that targeted microinjections of MPH may enhance fear acquisition, little is known about the effect of MPH on fear extinction. Here, we show that MPH, administered before or immediately following extinction of contextual fear, will enhance extinction retention in C57BL/6 mice. Animals that ...

  17. Linking fearfulness and coping styles in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, C.I.; Silva, P.I.M.; Conceição, L.E.C.; Costas, B.; Höglund, E.; Overli, O.; Schrama, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in cognitive appraisal and emotional reactivity, including fearfulness, are important personality traits in humans, non-human mammals, and birds. Comparative studies on teleost fishes support the existence of coping styles and behavioral syndromes also in

  18. ON PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND FEAR OF DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena IORGA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and fear are normal reactions in humans when situations are evaluating as being painful. In medical dentistry, anxiety and fear characterize in fact o problematic patient with special reactions during dental interventions and avoidance behavior, both behaviors having a great impact on patient’s dental health. The paper presents some aspects on the psychological profile of odontophobics, causes and consequences of dental fear on patient’s dental health, and some considerations on psychological interventions meant at reducing anxiety and fear during dental treatment.

  19. Methylphenidate Enhances Extinction of Contextual Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Antony D.; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin) is a norepinephrine and dopamine transporter blocker that is widely used in humans for treatment of attention deficit disorder and narcolepsy. Although there is some evidence that targeted microinjections of MPH may enhance fear acquisition, little is known about the effect of MPH on fear extinction. Here, we show…

  20. Dissociating response systems: erasing fear from memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, A.C.; Kindt, M.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the extensive evidence in animals, we previously showed that disrupting reconsolidation by noradrenergic blockade produced amnesia for the original fear response in humans. Interestingly, the declarative memory for the fear association remained intact. These results asked for a solid

  1. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  2. Fears and Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calls for. Many people have a fear of public speaking . Whether it's giving a report in class, speaking ... guy with social phobia experiences intense fear of public speaking or interacting, and may be afraid to answer ...

  3. Primal Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    The emerging evolutionary approach to literature explores the way that culture and biology interact. As a branch of evolutionary literary criticism, Darwinian horror study sees horror fiction as crucially dependent on evolved properties of the human constitution. This article argues that a Darwin...... that a Darwinian perspective on Dan Simmons’ 1985 novel Song of Kali best explains the atheist author’s preoccupation with themes of the supernatural, and accounts for the novel’s emotional impact as a result of humanity’s evolutionary history....

  4. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Forming competing fear learning and extinction memories in adolescence makes fear difficult to inhibit

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages. We examined neural correlates of impaired extinction retention by detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase immunoreactivity (pMA...

  6. Improvement of memory recall by quercetin in rodent contextual fear conditioning and human early-stage Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masanori; Ohta, Kazunori; Hayashi, Yuichi; Hayakawa, Miki; Yamada, Yasushi; Akanabe, Hiroshi; Chikaishi, Tokio; Nakagawa, Kiyomi; Itoh, Yoshinori; Muro, Takato; Yanagida, Daisuke; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki; Ohzawa, Kaori; Suzuki, Chihiro; Li, Shimo; Ueda, Masashi; Wang, Miao-Xing; Nishida, Emika; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Kobori, Masuko; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-06-15

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience a wide array of cognitive deficits, which typically include the impairment of explicit memory. In previous studies, the authors reported that a flavonoid, quercetin, reduces the expression of ATF4 and delays memory deterioration in an early-stage AD mouse model. In the present study, the effects of long-term quercetin intake on memory recall were assessed using contextual fear conditioning in aged wild-type mice. In addition, the present study examined whether memory recall was affected by the intake of quercetin-rich onion (a new cultivar of hybrid onion 'Quergold') powder in early-stage AD patients. In-vivo analysis indicated that memory recall was enhanced in aged mice fed a quercetin-containing diet. Memory recall in early-stage AD patients, determined using the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale, was significantly improved by the intake of quercetin-rich onion (Quergold) powder for 4 weeks compared with the intake of control onion ('Mashiro' white onion) powder. These results indicate that quercetin might influence memory recall.

  7. A climate of fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, Tom Alexander; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework that incorporates fear, acoustics, thought processing and digital game sound theory; with the potential to not only improve understanding of our relationship with fear, but also generate a foundation for reliable and significant manipulation of the fear experience....

  8. The advances of fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farouki, N.

    2001-01-01

    This book treats of four sensible topics of the last decade - the nuclear industry, the cloning, Internet and the greenhouse effect - in order to analyze the irrational or organized fears among the public: what do we fear and why? How this fear is shown? Which questions need to be answered and how? (J.S.)

  9. Effects of humans on behaviour of wildlife exceed those of natural predators in a landscape of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuti, Simone; Northrup, Joseph M; Muhly, Tyler B; Simi, Silvia; Musiani, Marco; Pitt, Justin A; Boyce, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Human disturbance can influence wildlife behaviour, which can have implications for wildlife populations. For example, wildlife may be more vigilant near human disturbance, resulting in decreased forage intake and reduced reproductive success. We measured the effects of human activities compared to predator and other environmental factors on the behaviour of elk (Cervus elaphus Linnaeus 1758) in a human-dominated landscape in Alberta, Canada. We collected year-round behavioural data of elk across a range of human disturbances. We estimated linear mixed models of elk behaviour and found that human factors (land-use type, traffic and distance from roads) and elk herd size accounted for more than 80% of variability in elk vigilance. Elk decreased their feeding time when closer to roads, and road traffic volumes of at least 1 vehicle every 2 hours induced elk to switch into a more vigilant behavioural mode with a subsequent loss in feeding time. Other environmental factors, thought crucial in shaping vigilance behaviour in elk (natural predators, reproductive status of females), were not important. The highest levels of vigilance were recorded on public lands where hunting and motorized recreational activities were cumulative compared to the national park during summer, which had the lowest levels of vigilance. In a human-dominated landscape, effects of human disturbance on elk behaviour exceed those of habitat and natural predators. Humans trigger increased vigilance and decreased foraging in elk. However, it is not just the number of people but also the type of human activity that influences elk behaviour (e.g. hiking vs. hunting). Quantifying the actual fitness costs of human disturbance remains a challenge in field studies but should be a primary focus for future researches. Some species are much more likely to be disturbed by humans than by non-human predators: for these species, quantifying human disturbance may be the highest priority for conservation.

  10. Equal pain – Unequal fear response: Enhanced susceptibility of tooth pain to fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lukas Meier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental fear conditioning in humans is widely used as a model to investigate the neural basis of fear learning and to unravel the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. It has been observed that fear conditioning depends on stimulus salience and subject vulnerability to fear. It is further known that the prevalence of dental-related fear and phobia is exceedingly high in the population. Dental phobia is unique as no other body part is associated with a specific phobia. Therefore, we hypothesized that painful dental stimuli exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to fear conditioning when comparing to equal perceived stimuli applied to other body sites. Differential susceptibility to pain-related fear was investigated by analyzing responses to an unconditioned stimulus (UCS applied to the right maxillary canine (UCS-c versus the right tibia (UCS-t. For fear conditioning, UCS-c and USC-t consisted of painful electric stimuli, carefully matched at both application sites for equal intensity and quality perception. UCSs were paired to simple geometrical forms which served as conditioned stimuli (CS+. Unpaired CS+ were presented for eliciting and analyzing conditioned fear responses. Outcome parameter were 1 skin conductance changes and 2 time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, thalamus, orbitofrontal cortex and medial prefrontal cortex.A preferential susceptibility of dental pain to fear conditioning was observed, reflected by heightened skin conductance responses and enhanced time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses in the fear network. For the first time, this study demonstrates fear-related neurobiological mechanisms that point towards a superior conditionability of tooth pain. Beside traumatic dental experiences our results offer novel evidence that might explain the high prevalence of dental-related fears in the population.

  11. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  12. [Mechanisms for regulation of fear conditioning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning is a model of fear learning and memory. The mechanisms regulating fear conditioning and memory have been investigated in humans and rodents. In this paradigm, animals learn and memorize an association between a conditioned stimulus (CS), such as context, and an unconditioned stimulus (US), such as an electrical footshock that induces fear. Fear memory generated though fear conditioning is stabilized via a memory consolidation process. Moreover, recent studies have shown the existence of memory processes that control fear memory following the retrieval of consolidated memory. Indeed, when fear memory is retrieved by re-exposure to the CS, the retrieved memory is re-stabilized via the reconsolidation process. On the other hand, the retrieval of fear memory by prolonged re-exposure to the CS also leads to fear memory extinction, new inhibitory learning against the fear memory, in which animals learn that they do not need to respond to the CS. Importantly, the reinforcement of fear memory after retrieval (i.e., re-experience such as flashbacks or nightmares) has been thought to be associated with the development of emotional disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this review, I summarize recent progress in studies on the mechanism of fear conditioning and memory consolidation, reconsolidation and extinction, and furthermore, introduce our recent establishment of a mouse PTSD model that shows enhancement of fear memory after retrieval.

  13. Challenges, fears and expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Urbanija

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The author deals with developmental projections in the future. In the light of the accelerated development of civilization periods, we can talk about postinformation era or at least about its characteristics which are directly related to basic questions of life and society and problems of survival concerning library and information sciences. In the frames of globalization and individualization, the users will turn from quantity of information to selective and quality ones.As to the contents, these information will be related to the basic facts of life and society and the problems of survival (globalization on one hand, while on the other, they will be more focused, more confined as to their contents and of higher quality necessary for individual performance and survival (individualization. In the background of these events, even more fears than today will be rising, related to loss of work, loss of professional identity, loss of the sense of meaning, loss of economical and social standard. From the actual situation and from the above mentioned fears expectations will arise. It will be possible to master the quantity of information with information and communication technologies and to enable access to them while human cognitive abilities will represent a bottleneck to their flow also in the future. An important field of the work of librarians in the future will be in the area of interdisciplinary connections with cognitive sciences.

  14. Self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  15. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  16. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  17. Of Hissing Snakes and Angry Voices: Human Infants Are Differentially Responsive to Evolutionary Fear-Relevant Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Nicole; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Slaughter, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Adult humans demonstrate differential processing of stimuli that were recurrent threats to safety and survival throughout evolutionary history. Recent studies suggest that differential processing of evolutionarily ancient threats occurs in human infants, leading to the proposal of an inborn mechanism for rapid identification of, and response to,…

  18. Grounding, shielding, and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrysse, J.

    1991-06-01

    In the electromagnetic compatibility design (EMC) of systems and circuits, both grounding and shielding are related to the coupling mechanisms of the system with (radiated) electromagnetic fields. Grounding is more related to the source or victim circuit (or system) and determines the characteristic of the coupling mechanism between fields and currents/voltages. Shielding is a way of interacting in the radiation path of an electromagnetic field. The basic principles and practical design rules are discussed.

  19. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuochi, Akira; Narita, Takuya; Omori, Tetsu; Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Kunihiro.

    1997-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprising a lead plate or a lead fabrication product is covered integrally with a rubber, a synthetic resin or a flame retardant fabric having a thickness greater than that of an oxidation preventive membrane made of a copper material. Radiation rays are shielded by the lead material, and not only oxidation but also failure of the lead material and generation of lead pieces or powder can be prevented by the coating of the rubber, the synthetic resin or the flame retardant fabric. The shape of the radiation shielding member can be conformed to constitutional products, a reinforcing frame or plate is formed integrally with the radiation shielding plate, alternatively, lowering of strength of the structure by fabrication of the shape is reinforced by the reinforcing frame or plate. The radiation shielding member is suspended by hanging a rope on a grommet, or disposed on constitutional products, or adjacent radiation shielding members are combined with each other by fixing metals. The thickness of the coating made of rubber, synthetic rubber or flame retardant fabric is determined to 0.1mm or greater to prevent failures of the lead material or formation of lead powder. (N.H.)

  20. Fear less : Individual differences in fear conditioning and their relation to treatment outcome in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duits, P.

    2016-01-01

    Findings from animal and human experimental studies highlight the importance of fear conditioning processes in the development and treatment of anxiety disorders. The work reported in this thesis was focused on potential abnormalities in the acquisition and extinction of fear in patients with

  1. Potential of Nanocellulose Composite for Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Yah Nurul Fatihah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most people rely on the electronic devices for work, communicating with friends and family, school and personal enjoyment. As a result, more new equipment or devices operates in higher frequency were rapidly developed to accommodate the consumers need. However, the demand of using wireless technology and higher frequency in new devices also brings the need to shield the unwanted electromagnetic signals from those devices for both proper operation and human health concerns. This paper highlights the potential of nanocellulose for electromagnetic shielding using the organic environmental nanocellulose composite materials. In addition, the theory of electromagnetic shielding and recent development of green and organic material in electromagnetic shielding application has also been reviewed in this paper. The use of the natural fibers which is nanocelllose instead of traditional reinforcement materials provides several advantages including the natural fibers are renewable, abundant and low cost. Furthermore, added with other advantages such as lightweight and high electromagnetic shielding ability, nanocellulose has a great potential as an alternative material for electromagnetic shielding application.

  2. Links between fear of humans, stress and survival support a non-random distribution of birds among urban and rural habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Carrete, Martina; Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Cabezas, Sonia; Marchant, Tracy A; Bortolotti, Gary R; Tella, José L

    2015-09-08

    Urban endocrine ecology aims to understand how organisms cope with new sources of stress and maintain allostatic load to thrive in an increasingly urbanized world. Recent research efforts have yielded controversial results based on short-term measures of stress, without exploring its fitness effects. We measured feather corticosterone (CORTf, reflecting the duration and amplitude of glucocorticoid secretion over several weeks) and subsequent annual survival in urban and rural burrowing owls. This species shows high individual consistency in fear of humans (i.e., flight initiation distance, FID), allowing us to hypothesize that individuals distribute among habitats according to their tolerance to human disturbance. FIDs were shorter in urban than in rural birds, but CORTf levels did not differ, nor were correlated to FIDs. Survival was twice as high in urban as in rural birds and links with CORTf varied between habitats: while a quadratic relationship supports stabilizing selection in urban birds, high predation rates may have masked CORTf-survival relationship in rural ones. These results evidence that urban life does not constitute an additional source of stress for urban individuals, as shown by their near identical CORTf values compared with rural conspecifics supporting the non-random distribution of individuals among habitats according to their behavioural phenotypes.

  3. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Christopher Buckley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available People can speak, and this provides opportunities to analyse human emotions using perceived experiences communicated via language, as well as through measurement and imaging techniques that are also applicable to other higher animal species. Here I compare four qualitative methodological approaches to test if, and how, thrill depends on fear. I use 8 high-risk, high-skill, real-life outdoor adventure recreation activities to provide the test circumstances. I present data from: >4000 person-days of participant observation; interviews with 40 expert practitioners; retrospective autoethnography of 50 critical incidents over 4 decades; and experimental autoethnography of 60 events. Results from different methods are congruent, but different approaches yield different insights. The principal findings are as follows. Individuals differ in their fear and thrill responses. The same individual may have different responses on different occasions. Fear boosts performance, but panic causes paralysis. Anxiety or apprehension prior to a risky action or event differs from fear experienced during the event itself. The intensity of pre-event fear generally increases with the immediacy of risk to life, and time to contemplate that risk. Fear must be faced assessed and overcome in order to act. Thrill can occur either during after a high-risk event. Thrill can occur without fear, and fear without thrill. Below a lower threshold of perceived risk, thrill can occur without fear. Between a lower and upper threshold, thrill increases with fear. Beyond the upper threshold, thrill vanishes but fear remains. This there is a sawtooth relation between fear and thrill. Perceived danger generates intense focus and awareness. Fear and other emotions can disappear during intense concentration and focus. Under high risk, the usual emotional sequence is fear before the action or event, then focus during the action or event, then thrill, relief, or triumph afterwards. The

  4. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Ralf C

    2016-01-01

    People can speak, and this provides opportunities to analyze human emotions using perceived experiences communicated via language, as well as through measurement and imaging techniques that are also applicable to other higher animal species. Here I compare four qualitative methodological approaches to test if, and how, thrill depends on fear. I use eight high-risk, high-skill, real-life outdoor adventure recreation activities to provide the test circumstances. I present data from: >4000 person-days of participant observation; interviews with 40 expert practitioners; retrospective autoethnography of 50 critical incidents over 4 decades; and experimental autoethnography of 60 events. Results from different methods are congruent, but different approaches yield different insights. The principal findings are as follows. Individuals differ in their fear and thrill responses. The same individual may have different responses on different occasions. Fear boosts performance, but panic causes paralysis. Anxiety or apprehension prior to a risky action or event differs from fear experienced during the event itself. The intensity of pre-event fear generally increases with the immediacy of risk to life, and time to contemplate that risk. Fear must be faced, assessed and overcome in order to act. Thrill can occur either during or after a high-risk event. Thrill can occur without fear, and fear without thrill. Below a lower threshold of perceived risk, thrill can occur without fear. Between a lower and upper threshold, thrill increases with fear. Beyond the upper threshold, thrill vanishes but fear remains. This there is a sawtooth relation between fear and thrill. Perceived danger generates intense focus and awareness. Fear and other emotions can disappear during intense concentration and focus. Under high risk, the usual emotional sequence is fear before the action or event, then focus during the action or event, then thrill, relief, or triumph afterward. The emotionless state

  5. The fear of awful smell: risk perceptions among farmers in Vietnam using wastewater and human excreta in agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Line G; Phuc, Pham D; Hiep, Nguyen T

    2008-01-01

    Vietnamese farmers' health-risk awareness, knowledge, and practices related to their use of wastewater and human excreta was investigated in an anthropological study by a multidisciplinary team in peri-urban Hanoi and Nghe An Province. Farmers identified health risks associated with their use of ...

  6. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  7. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  8. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T. [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Textile Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Üncü, I. S. [Suleyman Demirel University, Technological Fac. Electrical-Electronic Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Kılıncarslan, S., E-mail: seref@tef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Civil Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Akkurt, I. [Suleyman Demirel University, Art and Science Fac., Physics Dep., Isparta (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  9. The Impact of fear on the stock exchange gamblers’ behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus SUCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper creates a link between the five basic fears in humans and their occurrence when we invest in the stock exchange. The author identifies five basic fears in humans: fear of being rejected, abandoned, humiliated, betrayed and the victim of an injustice. The stock market investor is confronted with the following fears: the disposition effect, the hedonistic approach, the effect of the committed expenditure, the snake bite effect, the dismissal of any regret (or the no regret approach, the status quo prejudice and the endowment effect. The author shows that the stock investor’s seven fears are specific cases of the five basic fears. The first step in confronting these fears is to become aware of the mask worn.

  10. Attachment Without Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David C

    2009-12-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, openness, and dependence interact with the caregiving elements of caring, empathy, and responsibility.

  11. Attachment Without Fear

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, David C.

    2009-01-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, o...

  12. The fear of awful smell: risk perceptions among farmers in Vietnam using wastewater and human excreta in agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Line G; Phuc, Pham D; Hiep, Nguyen T

    2008-01-01

    Vietnamese farmers' health-risk awareness, knowledge, and practices related to their use of wastewater and human excreta was investigated in an anthropological study by a multidisciplinary team in peri-urban Hanoi and Nghe An Province. Farmers identified health risks associated with their use...... of excreta and wastewater, but they viewed these as unavoidable risks related to production. They perceived the health risks as different for the use of wastewater and human feces. They perceived health risks from wastewater as non-serious because it remained on the skin and only caused skin problems......, but they considered health risks from non-composted smelly feces serious because it entered the body through 'polluted' air. Most farmers were more aware of threats to health from 'dirt' entering the domestic environment than of the health risks during their work. The concept of 'dirt' should be separated from...

  13. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  14. Serotonergic Modulation of Conditioned Fear

    OpenAIRE

    Homberg, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    Conditioned fear plays a key role in anxiety disorders as well as depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions. Understanding how neuromodulators drive the associated learning and memory processes, including memory consolidation, retrieval/expression, and extinction (recall), is essential in the understanding of (individual differences in vulnerability to) these disorders and their treatment. The human and rodent studies I review here together reveal, amongst others, that acute selective...

  15. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. The vicarious learning pathway to fear 40 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Chris; Field, Andy P

    2008-10-01

    Forty years on from the initial idea that fears could be learnt vicariously through observing other people's responses to a situation or stimulus, this review looks at the evidence for this theory as an explanatory model of clinical fear. First, we review early experimental evidence that fears can be learnt vicariously before turning to the evidence from both primate and human research that clinical fears can be acquired in this way. Finally, we review recent evidence from research on non-anxious children. Throughout the review we highlight problems and areas for future research. We conclude by exploring the likely underlying mechanisms in the vicarious learning of fear and the resulting clinical implications.

  17. Yale University's Institute of Human Relations and the Spanish Civil War: Dollard and Miller's study of fear and courage under battle conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondra, José María; Sánchez de Miguel, Manuel

    2009-11-01

    In the late 1930s, the Institute of Human Relations of Yale University developed a research program on conflict and anxiety as an outcome of Clark Hull's informal seminar on the integration of Freud's and Pavlov's theories. The program was launched at the 1937 Annual Meeting of the APA in a session chaired by Clark L. Hull, and the experiments continued through 1941, when the United States entered the Second World War. In an effort to apply the findings from animal experiments to the war situation, John Dollard and Neal E. Miller decided to study soldiers' fear reactions in combat. As a first step, they arranged interviews with a few veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. Taking these interviews as a point of departure, Dollard devised a questionnaire to which 300 former Lincoln brigaders responded. The present paper analyzes the main outcomes of the questionnaire, together with the war experiences reported in the interview transcripts. Our purpose was to evaluate a project which was initially investigated by the FBI because of the communists among the Lincoln ranks, but eventually supported by the American Army, and which exerted great influence on the military psychology of the time.

  18. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  19. Glove box shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  20. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  1. The Pleasure of Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjøllund, Niels-Peder Osmundsen

    I plan to take departure in the Freudian concept of the uncanny and unfold how this also plays on aesthetics of pleasure. The way we cope with fear is often related to pleasure, for example how children often laugh when frightened. This will lead me to a discussion of how fear and pleasure...

  2. Resting-state functional connectivity between amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex following fear reminder predicts fear extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pan; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of fear conditioning have elucidated the neural mechanisms of fear acquisition, consolidation and extinction, but it is not clear how the neural activation following fear reminder influence the following extinction. To address this question, we measured human brain activity following fear reminder using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and investigated whether the extinction effect can be predicted by resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Behaviorally, we found no significant differences of fear ratings between the reminder group and the no reminder group at the fear acquisition and extinction stages, but spontaneous recovery during re-extinction stage appeared only in the no reminder group. Imaging data showed that functional connectivity between ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and amygdala in the reminder group was greater than that in the no reminder group after fear memory reactivation. More importantly, the functional connectivity between amygdala and vmPFC of the reminder group after fear memory reactivation was positively correlated with extinction effect. These results suggest RSFC between amygdala and the vmPFC following fear reminder can predict fear extinction, which provide important insight into the neural mechanisms of fear memory after fear memory reactivation. PMID:27013104

  3. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  4. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  5. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Nobuo; Ito, Masato; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Takeshi, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprises a metal vessel and a liquid therein, and is disposed to the upper surface of a lower flange of a reactor core shroud. Waterproof hot wires are contained in the liquid and are connected to a power source disposed at the outside. Electric current is supplied to the hot wires to elevate the temperature of the liquid, and the temperature of the vessel is kept higher than an atmospheric temperature thereby suppressing generation of dew condensation or water droplets. In addition, a water repellent coating is applied to the shielding member itself to prevent deposition of water droplets. Further, the bottom of the shielding member is inclined, and a water droplet-recovering vessel is disposed at the lower portion of the shielding member, so that the water droplets collected by the inclination of the bottom are recovered to the water droplet recovering vessel. With such a constitution, access of an operator to the inside of a reactor pressure vessel is facilitated, and at the same time, the working circumstance at the reactor bottom can be improved. (I.N.)

  6. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  7. Heat shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatabe, Hiroshi; Motoya, Koji; Kodama, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Panel-like water cooling tubes are disposed on a shielding concrete wall as a floor surface on which a reactor pressure vessel of a HTGR type reactor is settled. The panel like water cooling tube comprises a large number of water cooling tubes and fin plates connecting them with each other. A heat shielding device is disposed to the opening of an air vent hole on the shielding concrete wall. The heat shielding device has a plurality of supports are disposed between a disk-like upper support plate larger than the opening of the vent hole and covered with a heat insulation material and a lower support plate having a vent hole at the center. The lower support plate is connected with the fin plate. A portion between the supports is formed as pressure releasing channels. Radiation heat from the reactor pressure vessel is transferred to the fin plate by way of the upper support plate, support and a lower support plate and transferred to cooling water of a water-cooling pipeline. Accordingly, radiation heat of the reactor pressure vessel is not transferred to the vent holes. (I.N.)

  8. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora

    2017-01-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  9. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora, E-mail: cesar.hueso@idom.com [IDOM, Consulting, Engineering and Architecture, S.A.U, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  10. Human brain evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of fear-circuitry-related traits in DSM-V and for studying resilience to warzone-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2006-07-01

    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in adult humans. Over 30 empirically testable/falsifiable predictions are presented. It is noted that in DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10, the classification of stress and fear circuitry disorders is neither mode-of-acquisition-based nor brain-evolution-based. For example, snake phobia (innate) and dog phobia (overconsolidational) are clustered together. Similarly, research on blood-injection-injury-type-specific phobia clusters two fears different in their innateness: 1) an arguably ontogenetic memory-trace-overconsolidation-based fear (hospital phobia) and 2) a hardwired (innate) fear of the sight of one's blood or a sharp object penetrating one's skin. Genetic architecture-charting of fear-circuitry-related traits has been challenging. Various, non-phenotype-based architectures can serve as targets for research. In this article, the author will propose one such alternative genetic architecture. This article was inspired by the following: A) Nesse's "Smoke-Detector Principle", B) the increasing suspicion that the "smooth" rather than "lumpy" distribution of complex psychiatric phenotypes (including fear-circuitry disorders) may in some cases be accounted for by oligogenic (and not necessarily polygenic) transmission, and C) insights from the initial sequence of the chimpanzee genome and comparison with the human genome by the Chimpanzee Sequencing

  11. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  12. Persistence of Amygdala-Hippocampal Connectivity and Multi-Voxel Correlation Structures During Awake Rest After Fear Learning Predicts Long-Term Expression of Fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, E.J.; Kanen, J.W.; Tambini, A.; Fernandez, G.; Davachi, L.; Phelps, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    After encoding, memories undergo a process of consolidation that determines long-term retention. For conditioned fear, animal models postulate that consolidation involves reactivations of neuronal assemblies supporting fear learning during postlearning "offline" periods. However, no human studies to

  13. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  14. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  15. Italian women and HPV prevention. Knowledge, fears, uncertainty on Human Papillomavirus and the relative vaccination: dual research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta M. Vaccaro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract:
    Background: the main purpose of this study was to identify and describe knowledge, beliefs and atti- tudes towards Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection and HPV vaccination among Italian women aged between 18 and 55. MeTHods: 6 Focus groups, in each of which 8 women took part, held in 6 different locations and a survey on a representative sample of 3 500 Italian women aged between 18 and 55, with oversizing for three regions (Lombardy, Latium, sicily. The survey was conducted by telephone using the caTI (computer assisted Telephone Interview technique, in september 2011, adopting a structured questionnaire. data were codified and statistical analysis was computed using sPss software.
    Results: italian women have only a partial, even superficial, knowledge of pathologies associated with HPV, and also their information on the purpose of prevention activity, in which they choose to partici- pate, is more generic than one might expect. The weakness of the information framework is partly due to the fact that the main source of information is the mass media, mainly the press and television, and to a lesser extent the Internet, and that information is random and fragmented.
    Information about HPV and the possibility of vaccination often overlap, and it is the specific occasion of contact with the asL (local health authority vaccine services, providing information to youngsters that are the target of the free campaign, that is central in gaining access to information about the virus and vaccination, especially for the mothers of adolescent daughters. The vaccine campaign not only plays a key role in providing information about HPV and about the vaccination, but also ends up by influencing the notions and beliefs that Italian women hold about this vaccination.
    Conslusions: only a small portion of the female population, directly involved in the free

  16. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  17. Erasing fear for an imagined threat event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2012-11-01

    Although memory for emotionally arousing and stressful experiences is strong and resistant to change, recent years have witnessed rapidly emerging evidence for the plasticity of fear memories. Upon retrieval a memory may be rendered labile and vulnerable to the disruptive effects of amnestic agents. This process is referred to as "disrupting reconsolidation" and may point to a novel therapeutic strategy for the permanent reduction of fear in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. However, the fear-reducing effects are thus far only demonstrated for freezing reactions in rodents and autonomic fear responding in humans. If disrupting reconsolidation will be of value for clinical practice, it should also target the subjective feelings of anxiety. Using an instructed fear-learning paradigm in humans, we here tested whether disrupting reconsolidation would diminish the subjective feelings of anxiety for a noxious event that was anticipated but never actually experienced. Beta-adrenergic receptor blockade during reconsolidation strongly diminished the behavioral expression of the instructed fear memory (i.e., startle responding) as well as the subjective feelings of anxiety 24h later, yet without affecting both the physiological and cognitive component of the anticipation of threat (i.e., skin conductance responding, expectancy ratings). Together, the present findings suggest that the various memory traces of a learned fear association do not necessarily undergo reconsolidation in harmony. Considering that patients with anxiety disorders (1) often fear objects and situations that they have never actually experienced, and (2) primarily suffer from the subjective feelings of anxiety, the present findings may have important ramifications for psychotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bilateral Alternating Auditory Stimulations Facilitate Fear Extinction and Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Boukezzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of fear conditioning, its extinction and its retrieval are at the core of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Such deficits, especially fear extinction delay, disappear after alternating bilateral stimulations (BLS during eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR therapy. An animal model of fear recovery, based on auditory cued fear conditioning and extinction learning, recently showed that BLS facilitate fear extinction and fear extinction retrieval. Our goal was to determine if these previous results found in animals can be reproduced in humans. Twenty-two healthy participants took part in a classical fear conditioning, extinction, and extinction recall paradigm. Behavioral responses (fear expectations as well as psychophysiological measures (skin conductance responses, SCRs were recorded. The results showed a significant fear expectation decrease during fear extinction with BLS. Additionally, SCR for fear extinction retrieval were significantly lower with BLS. Our results demonstrate the importance of BLS to reduce negative emotions, and provide a successful model to further explore the neural mechanisms underlying the sole BLS effect in the EMDR.

  19. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  1. THE FEAR OF FEAR CONCEPT - EVIDENCE IN FAVOR OF MULTIDIMENSIONALITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARRINDELL, WA

    In recent years, questions have been raised regarding the dimensionality of existing measures of fear of fear. This is an important issue that needs to be addressed if the dimensions(s) of any scale purporting to assess fear of fear are to guide theory and research. One of the most widely used

  2. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  3. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  4. Neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoshige, Toru; Fujii, Yasumasa; Nifuku, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain shielding materials excellent in heat and radiation resistance, as well as having mechanical strength in a reduced weight. Constitution: A mixture comprising from 30 to 80 % by weight of epoxy resin, from 5 to 50 % by weight of polyethylene and from 1 to 50 % by weight of inorganic boron compound is cured to prepare a neutron shielding material. The epoxy resin used herein is a compound having more than 18 epoxy groups per one molecule. Polyethylene is a polyethylene homopolymer or a copolymer of ethylene and less than 10 % of other copolymerizable monomer which is preferably powdery and in the grain size of from 10 to 200 μm. The inorganic boric compound can include, for example, boron carbide, boron nitride and anhydrous boric acid. As the curing agent, all sorts of compounds known as the curing agent for epoxy resins can be used. The shielding material is excellent in heat resistance, particularly, in the strength, thermal deformation temperature and the bondability at high temperature and also satisfactory in compression strength and bondability. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Brief fear preexposure facilitates subsequent fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Tetsuya; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that occurs following an unexpected exposure to a severe psychological event. A history of a brief trauma is reported to affect a risk for future PTSD development; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which a previous trauma exposure drives the sensitivity to a late-coming trauma. Using a mouse PTSD model, we found that a prior foot shock enhances contextual fear conditioning. This shock-induced facilitation of fear conditioning (i.e., priming effect) persisted for 7 days and was prevented by MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Other types of trauma, such as forced swimming or tail pinch, did not induce a priming effect on fear conditioning. Thus, a trauma is unlikely generalized to modify the sensitivity to other traumatic experiences. The behavioral procedure employed in this study may be a useful tool to elucidate the etiology of PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  7. Energy, Ecology and Psychology of Fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fear of highly industrialized societies from industrial and technological systems, from power plants is partially founded on rational reasons and partially on irrational which can be characterized as antitechnological and antiindustrial paranoia. The fear from nuclear accidents, disease and death, which are impossible to run away from, could be characterised as a fear and stress of living and working in complex and highly technological system the man is alienated from. The fear from air pollution and intoxicated environment, nuclear power plants, coal, that can cause biological dying and extinction must and can become subject of rational and objective analysis. The prediction of the near future climate and anxiety about our planet in the near future have to be separated from predicting the far future climate. The human technique and the anthropogenic sources are major factors of the near future climate (next few hundred years), but the far future climate (0000 years) of our planet is determined by long-term variations in the earth's orbital parameters; eccentricity of ellipse, precession and tilt, and the long term process on the Sun. The irrational fear from power plants and industry beside the rational and logical fear could be sublimated and directed toward the full control of technique dealing with the nature and environment, creating acceptable international laws for sustainable development. (author)

  8. In the vicious circle of fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zischka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Fear is the great driving force, the basic effect, without which there would be no adaption to new living conditions, and no provision for the future. But fear has a positive influence only as long as it does not gain the upper hand, for then it makes human beings blind and stifles activity. What is important, and will remain so, is the equilibrium between fear and courage, caution and the desire for action, optimism und pessimism. This equilibrium has now been disturbed in the western countries - and only here. Our present fears give rise to hardly any positive measures, but prevent provision for the future. We are threatened with failure due to the manipulated conversion of fear from the maintenance of life to an effect which destroys life. In this way we got into a vicious circle of fear: we must try to weaken the imagined dangers by emphasising the true conditions. The author discusses how the viscious circle can be broken. (orig.) 891 UA/orig. 892 MKO [de

  9. Neuroimaging of Fear-Associated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, John A; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning has been commonly used as a model of emotional learning in animals and, with the introduction of functional neuroimaging techniques, has proven useful in establishing the neurocircuitry of emotional learning in humans. Studies of fear acquisition suggest that regions such as amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and hippocampus play an important role in acquisition of fear, whereas studies of fear extinction suggest that the amygdala is also crucial for safety learning. Extinction retention testing points to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex as an essential region in the recall of the safety trace, and explicit learning of fear and safety associations recruits additional cortical and subcortical regions. Importantly, many of these findings have implications in our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease. Recent studies using clinical populations have lent insight into the changes in regional activity in specific disorders, and treatment studies have shown how pharmaceutical and other therapeutic interventions modulate brain activation during emotional learning. Finally, research investigating individual differences in neurotransmitter receptor genotypes has highlighted the contribution of these systems in fear-associated learning. PMID:26294108

  10. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  11. Development of a laboratory model to assess fear and anxiety in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rivera, Christina; Ley, Jacqui; Milgram, Bill; Landsberg, Gary

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a laboratory-based model to assess fear and anxiety in cats using the feline open-field test (OFT) and the feline human interaction test (HIT); and (2) to validate the model using diazepam, a known anxiolytic. Methods Laboratory-housed cats (n = 41) were first classified as fearful, mildly fearful or non-fearful by a technician familiar with the cats and also by veterinary behaviorists (GL, JL), by assessing the cats' behavior in their home rooms. In experiment 1, each cat's behavior was assessed in an OFT and an HIT. In experiment 2, after administration of the anxiolytic diazepam, a subset of the cats was re-tested. Results In experiment 1, the OFT revealed significant group effects on two measures: duration of inactivity, and vocalization. Fearful animals had significantly longer periods of inactivity than non-fearful animals. Non-fearful and mildly fearful cats vocalized more frequently than fearful cats. In the HIT, fearful cats travelled less than non-fearful and mildly fearful cats. Fearful and mildly fearful animals had significantly longer durations of inactivity, and non-fearful and mildly fearful cats had a significantly higher frequency of vocalization compared with fearful cats. In experiment 2, in the OFT, treatment with diazepam caused an increase in distance travelled, shorter durations of inactivity, and more frequent inactivity and vocalization. In the HIT, diazepam increased distance travelled and decreased duration of inactivity. Fearful cats spent significantly less time near the human compared with non-fearful cats, and this persisted under diazepam. Conclusions and relevance The feline OFT and feline HIT can be used jointly to assess the effects of medications or other therapies on fear and anxiety in the domestic cat.

  12. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  13. Effects of sleep on memory for conditioned fear and fear extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Germain, Anne; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory for extinction of conditioned fear is a basic mammalian mechanism for regulating negative emotion. Sleep promotes both the consolidation of memory and the regulation of emotion. Sleep can influence consolidation and modification of memories associated with both fear and its extinction. After brief overviews of the behavior and neural circuitry associated with fear conditioning, extinction learning and extinction memory in the rodent and human, interactions of sleep with these processes will be examined. Animal and human studies suggest that sleep can serve to consolidate both fear and extinction memory. In humans, sleep also promotes generalization of extinction memory. Time-of-day effects on extinction learning and generalization are also seen. REM may be a sleep stage of particular importance for the consolidation of both fear and extinction memory as evidenced by selective REM deprivation experiments. REM sleep is accompanied by selective activation of the same limbic structures implicated in the learning and memory of fear and extinction. Preliminary evidence also suggests extinction learning can take place during slow wave sleep. Study of low-level processes such as conditioning, extinction and habituation may allow sleep effects on emotional memory to be identified and inform study of sleep’s effects on more complex, emotionally salient declarative memories. Anxiety disorders are marked by impairments of both sleep and extinction memory. Improving sleep quality may ameliorate anxiety disorders by strengthening naturally acquired extinction. Strategically timed sleep may be used to enhance treatment of anxiety by strengthening therapeutic extinction learned via exposure therapy. PMID:25894546

  14. High Trait Anxiety: A Challenge for Disrupting Fear Memory Reconsolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting reconsolidation may be promising in the treatment of anxiety disorders but the fear-reducing effects are thus far solely demonstrated in the average organism. A relevant question is whether disrupting fear memory reconsolidation is less effective in individuals who are vulnerable to develop an anxiety disorder. By collapsing data from six previous human fear conditioning studies we tested whether trait anxiety was related to the fear-reducing effects of a pharmacological agent targeting the process of memory reconsolidation - n = 107. Testing included different phases across three consecutive days each separated by 24 h. Fear responding was measured by the eye-blink startle reflex. Disrupting the process of fear memory reconsolidation was manipulated by administering the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol HCl either before or after memory retrieval. Trait anxiety uniquely predicted the fear-reducing effects of disrupting memory reconsolidation: the higher the trait anxiety, the less fear reduction. Vulnerable individuals with the propensity to develop anxiety disorders may need higher dosages of propranolol HCl or more retrieval trials for targeting and changing fear memory. Our finding clearly demonstrates that we cannot simply translate observations from fundamental research on fear reduction in the average organism to clinical practice. PMID:24260096

  15. High trait anxiety: a challenge for disrupting fear memory reconsolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Soeter

    Full Text Available Disrupting reconsolidation may be promising in the treatment of anxiety disorders but the fear-reducing effects are thus far solely demonstrated in the average organism. A relevant question is whether disrupting fear memory reconsolidation is less effective in individuals who are vulnerable to develop an anxiety disorder. By collapsing data from six previous human fear conditioning studies we tested whether trait anxiety was related to the fear-reducing effects of a pharmacological agent targeting the process of memory reconsolidation--n = 107. Testing included different phases across three consecutive days each separated by 24 h. Fear responding was measured by the eye-blink startle reflex. Disrupting the process of fear memory reconsolidation was manipulated by administering the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol HCl either before or after memory retrieval. Trait anxiety uniquely predicted the fear-reducing effects of disrupting memory reconsolidation: the higher the trait anxiety, the less fear reduction. Vulnerable individuals with the propensity to develop anxiety disorders may need higher dosages of propranolol HCl or more retrieval trials for targeting and changing fear memory. Our finding clearly demonstrates that we cannot simply translate observations from fundamental research on fear reduction in the average organism to clinical practice.

  16. Human defensive behaviors to threat scenarios show parallels to fear- and anxiety-related defense patterns of non-human mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D C; Hynd, A L; Minke, K A; Minemoto, T; Blanchard, R J

    2001-12-01

    Defense patterns of rats and mice have been characterized in terms of the relationships between the type of defensive behavior (e.g. flight, freezing, hiding, defensive threat/attack, and risk assessment) and particular features of the eliciting (threat) stimulus and the situation in which it is encountered. Because the defense systems of rodents serve as major models for investigating and understanding both the physiology and the behavioral expression of emotional response to aversive stimuli, it is essential to evaluate whether these systems show strong parallels in human responsivity to threat. One hundred and sixty male and female undergraduate students read a set of 12 scenarios involving a present or potential threatening conspecific, and chose a primary defensive response to each. These scenarios were designed to vary features known to influence defensive responding in rodents: magnitude of threat; escapability of the situation; ambiguity of the threat stimulus; distance between the threat and the subject; presence of a hiding place. Male and female responses to the various scenarios were highly correlated, except for yell, scream, or call for help which was frequent for females, rare for males. However, a combination of this response category with 'attack' showed a highly positive (+0.96) male-female correlation, across scenarios.Correlations between manipulated (and rated) features of the threat stimulus and situation, and type of defensive behavior chosen, strongly supported a view that the patterning of defensive behavior is similar for humans and non-human mammals. Significant correlations were obtained relevant to eight specific hypotheses derived from the animal literature, with some support for two additional hypotheses (non-significant correlations averaging 0.4 or more in expected direction). While three predicted correlations were not supported in these findings, only a single significant correlation was obtained that had not been predicted on the

  17. Neutron Shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kiiro; Okuda, Hisashi; Harada, Yoshihisa.

    1994-01-01

    1, 3-bis (N, N-diglycidyl aminomethyl) cyclohexane as a specific epoxy resin is used together with a usual epoxy resin. A polyamine mixture and an imidazole type compound are used as a hardening agent. Further, a boron compound and an inorganic filler are added. Such a neutron shielding composition is hardened at a normal temperature without requiring heating, and mechanical strength, especially, compression strength can be kept over a wide range from low temperature to high temperature after the hardening. (T.M.)

  18. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  19. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  20. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  1. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  2. BDNFval66met affects neural activation pattern during fear conditioning and 24 h delayed fear recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Golkar, Armita; Lindström, Kara M; Haaker, Jan; Öhman, Arne; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the most abundant neutrophin in the mammalian central nervous system, is critically involved in synaptic plasticity. In both rodents and humans, BDNF has been implicated in hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning and memory and has more recently been linked to fear extinction processes. Fifty-nine healthy participants, genotyped for the functional BDNFval66met polymorphism, underwent a fear conditioning and 24h-delayed extinction protocol while skin conductance and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses (functional magnetic resonance imaging) were acquired. We present the first report of neural activation pattern during fear acquisition 'and' extinction for the BDNFval66met polymorphism using a differential conditioned stimulus (CS)+ > CS- comparison. During conditioning, we observed heightened allele dose-dependent responses in the amygdala and reduced responses in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in BDNFval66met met-carriers. During early extinction, 24h later, we again observed heightened responses in several regions ascribed to the fear network in met-carriers as opposed to val-carriers (insula, amygdala, hippocampus), which likely reflects fear memory recall. No differences were observed during late extinction, which likely reflects learned extinction. Our data thus support previous associations of the BDNFval66met polymorphism with neural activation in the fear and extinction network, but speak against a specific association with fear extinction processes. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The Physiology of Fear: Reconceptualizing the Role of the Central Amygdala in Fear Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Orion P.; Hurt, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    The historically understood role of the central amygdala (CeA) in fear learning is to serve as a passive output station for processing and plasticity that occurs elsewhere in the brain. However, recent research has suggested that the CeA may play a more dynamic role in fear learning. In particular, there is growing evidence that the CeA is a site of plasticity and memory formation, and that its activity is subject to tight regulation. The following review examines the evidence for these three main roles of the CeA as they relate to fear learning. The classical role of the CeA as a routing station to fear effector brain structures like the periaqueductal gray, the lateral hypothalamus, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus will be briefly reviewed, but specific emphasis is placed on recent literature suggesting that the CeA 1) has an important role in the plasticity underlying fear learning, 2) is involved in regulation of other amygdala subnuclei, and 3) is itself regulated by intra- and extra-amygdalar input. Finally, we discuss the parallels of human and mouse CeA involvement in fear disorders and fear conditioning, respectively. PMID:26328883

  4. Genes and neurons: molecular insights to fear and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, C; Albrecht, A; Pape, H-C; Stork, O

    2006-01-01

    Experimental animal models provide an important tool for the identification of inheritable components of fear and anxiety. 'Pavlovian' fear conditioning has been tremendously successful to characterize the neuronal circuitry and cellular mechanisms of the formation, consolidation and extinction of fear memories. Here we summarize recent progress that has led to the identification of gene products contributing to such experience-dependent changes in fear and anxiety and may guide the search for genetic factors involved in the development and treatment of human anxiety disorders.

  5. Fear of what, fear for what reason

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.; Schaefer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Two plebiscites on nuclear power were held with very small majorities: In Austria, the opponents of nuclear power had a slight majority - in Switzerland its advocates. In both countries, attendance at the polls was very low - lack of interest, insecurity. In West Germany, The number of opponents and proponents of nuclear power vary with every public opinion poll - insecurity. In any case, it has become manifest that modern technologies involve problems as well as advantages. Apart from possible environmental and individual risks, social and political consequences are feared most. (orig.) [de

  6. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is performing preliminary development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure (HOST) heat shield for planetary entry. Results of this development will...

  7. Fearfulness in red junglefowl and domesticated White Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campler, Magnus; Jöngren, Markus; Jensen, Per

    2009-05-01

    It may be hypothesised that reduced fearfulness has been a major target of selection during domestication. We tested 20 domesticated White Leghorn (WL) chickens and their ancestors, red junglefowl (RJF), in four different fear tests (Open Field, Novel Object, Aerial Predator, and Fear for Humans). The tests were designed to measure reactions to different types of potentially fearful stimuli. The correlations between durations of the same four variables from each of the tests (Stand/sit alert, Locomotion, Fly/jump, and Vocalisation) were analysed with principal components analysis (PCA). In the PCA, 33.5% of the variation in responses was explained by a single factor, interpreted as a general fear factor. Higher scores on this were related to stronger fear reactions. Red junglefowl scored significantly higher than White Leghorns on this factor, and also had a longer latency to feed in the Fear of Humans-test, used as an independent measure of fear in the same tests. The results suggest that selection for low fearfulness has been an important element of domestication.

  8. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  9. Efficiency of the cervical lead shield during intraoral radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaffe, I.; Littner, M.M.; Shlezinger, T.; Segal, P.

    1986-12-01

    The cervical lead shield was compared with the conventional lead apron with regard to efficiency of protection against radiation during a full-month survey (fourteen periapical and two bitewing radiographs). The study was performed on a Temex tissue-equivalent human phantom, and thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure radiation absorption in the ovaries, testes, and thyroid gland areas. Results showed that the cervical shield significantly reduces the amount of radiation to the skin in all three areas and is equally as effective as the combination of lead apron and thyroid shield. It is therefore recommended as a protective measure during intraoral radiography.

  10. Development of silicone rubber-type neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Bum; Cho, Soo Hang; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Seok; Noh, Sung Ki; Jeong, Duk Yeon.

    1997-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 16 tabs., 17 figs., 25 refs

  11. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy.

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs

  12. SHIELDS Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. “space weather”, remains a big space physics challenge. A new capability was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. This framework simulates the dynamics of the Surface Charging Environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and micro-scale. In addition to using physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites were developed. An order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy in the simulation of the spacecraft surface charging environment was thus obtained. SHIELDS also includes a post-processing tool designed to calculate the surface charging for specific spacecraft geometry using the Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell (CPIC) code and to evaluate anomalies' relation to SCE dynamics. Such diagnostics is critically important when performing forensic analyses of space-system failures.

  13. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  14. Sleep deprivation facilitates extinction of implicit fear generalization and physiological response to fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-12-01

    Neuroendocrine hormones, which regulate both homeostasis and stress responses, provide homeostatic recovery and sleep suppression to brains under stress. We examined the effects of total sleep deprivation on subsequent enhancement of aversive event memory, implicit fear recognition, and fear conditioning in healthy humans. Three different recognitions (explicit event, implicit emotion, and physiological response) were assessed in two groups of 14 healthy young volunteers (sleep control and sleep deprived) with aversive (motor vehicle accident films) and nonaversive episodic memory stimuli. Both groups were tested on Day 1 of the experiment and again on Days 3 and 10; the sleep-deprived group was totally deprived of initial nocturnal sleep after the first trial on Day 1. Event recognition performances were similar in both groups throughout the study. Implicit fear recognition remained high for aversive stimuli, with generalization of implicit fear recognition occurring for nonaversive stimuli on Day 3 in the sleep control group. Physiological fear and generalized fear responses were observed for every episode, and delayed enhancement of physiological response was only observed for misidentified aversive episodes in the sleep control group on Day 3. However, in the sleep-deprived group, generalization of implicit fear recognition for nonaversive stimuli on Day 3 and all physiological and generalized fear responses on Days 3 and 10 were comprehensively extinguished. Clinically, trauma-exposed victims often experience acute insomnia, indicating that such insomnia might provide prophylactic benefits in reducing the development of posttraumatic stress disorder via extinction of the fear-magnifying effects of memory. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-01-01

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  16. Fear of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, T.

    1987-01-01

    Problem of psychological consequences of nuclear war threat is considered. Two categories of persons are distinguished: persons who are not decision-making but whose life is threatened, and persons who make decisions but are not responsible for them. An active approach to problems, related to a possible nuclear disaster, appears to be a powerfull socio-political means against nuclear danger and also has both psychotherapeutic and preventive meaning from the viewpoint of at least a partial liberation and protecion of people against the fear of nuclear death. By their effective activity among people, physicians and psychologists can effectively struggle against the fear of nuclear death

  17. Sexual fears are increasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R C; Frazer, N; Wilson, L

    1993-10-01

    This study compared scores from three samples of college students (N = 810) on the Sexual Aversion Scale, a measure of sexual anxiety based on DSM-III-R criteria for diagnosing sexual aversion disorder. Measurements were taken in 1988, 1991, and 1992. There was a significant increase in sexual anxiety during this period, most of it attributable to fear of acquiring AIDS. Although the women reported more sexual anxiety than the men over-all, there was no difference on fear of AIDS. These findings could foreshadow an increase in sexual dysfunctions and desire disorders.

  18. Eye-lens bismuth shielding in paediatric head CT: artefact evaluation and reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, Maria; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    CT scans of the brain, sinuses and petrous bones performed as the initial imaging test for a variety of indications have the potential to expose the eye-lens, considered among the most radiosensitive human tissues, to a radiation dose. There are several studies in adults discussing the reduction of orbital dose resulting from the use of commercially available bismuth-impregnated latex shields during CT examinations of the head. To evaluate bismuth shielding-induced artefacts and to provide suggestions for optimal eye-lens shielding in paediatric head CT. A bismuth shield was placed over the eyelids of 60 consecutive children undergoing head CT. Images were assessed for the presence and severity of artefacts with regard to eye-shield distance and shield wrinkling. An anthropomorphic paediatric phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) were used to study the effect of eye lens-to-shield distance on shielding efficiency. Shields were tolerated by 56/60 children. Artefacts were absent in 45% of scans. Artefacts on orbits, not affecting and affecting orbit evaluation were noted in 39% and 14% of scans, respectively. Diagnostically insignificant artefacts on intracranial structures were noted in 1 case (2%) with shield misplacement. Mean eye-lens-to-shield distance was 8.8 mm in scans without artefacts, and 4.3 mm and 2.2 mm in scans with unimportant and diagnostically important artefacts, respectively. Artefacts occurred in 8 out of 9 cases with shield wrinkling. Dose reduction remained unchanged for different shield-to-eye distances. Bismuth shielding-related artefacts occurring in paediatric head CT are frequent, superficial and diagnostically insignificant when brain pathology is assessed. Shields should be placed 1 cm above the eyes when orbital pathology is addressed. Shield wrinkling should be avoided. (orig.)

  19. Genetic mapping of canine fear and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Isain; Serpell, James A; Alvarez, Carlos E

    2016-08-08

    Fear/anxiety and anger/aggression greatly influence health, quality of life and social interactions. They are a huge burden to wellbeing, and personal and public economics. However, while much is known about the physiology and neuroanatomy of such emotions, little is known about their genetics - most importantly, why some individuals are more susceptible to pathology under stress. We conducted genomewide association (GWA) mapping of breed stereotypes for many fear and aggression traits across several hundred dogs from diverse breeds. We confirmed those findings using GWA in a second cohort of partially overlapping breeds. Lastly, we used the validated loci to create a model that effectively predicted fear and aggression stereotypes in a third group of dog breeds that were not involved in the mapping studies. We found that i) known IGF1 and HMGA2 loci variants for small body size are associated with separation anxiety, touch-sensitivity, owner directed aggression and dog rivalry; and ii) two loci, between GNAT3 and CD36 on chr18, and near IGSF1 on chrX, are associated with several traits, including touch-sensitivity, non-social fear, and fear and aggression that are directed toward unfamiliar dogs and humans. All four genome loci are among the most highly evolutionarily-selected in dogs, and each of those was previously shown to be associated with morphological traits. We propose that the IGF1 and HMGA2 loci are candidates for identical variation being associated with both behavior and morphology. In contrast, we show that the GNAT3-CD36 locus has distinct variants for behavior and morphology. The chrX region is a special case due to its extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD). Our evidence strongly suggests that sociability (which we propose is associated with HS6ST2) and fear/aggression are two distinct GWA loci within this LD block on chrX, but there is almost perfect LD between the peaks for fear/aggression and animal size. We have mapped many canine fear and

  20. Implications of newborn amygdala connectivity for fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alice M.; Buss, Claudia; Rasmussen, Jerod M.; Rudolph, Marc D.; Demeter, Damion V.; Gilmore, John H.; Styner, Martin; Entringer, Sonja; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Fair, Damien A.

    2015-01-01

    The first year of life is an important period for emergence of fear in humans. While animal models have revealed developmental changes in amygdala circuitry accompanying emerging fear, human neural systems involved in early fear development remain poorly understood. To increase understanding of the neural foundations of human fear, it is important to consider parallel cognitive development, which may modulate associations between typical development of early fear and subsequent risk for fear-related psychopathology. We, therefore, examined amygdala functional connectivity with rs-fcMRI in 48 neonates (M=3.65 weeks, SD=1.72), and measured fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age. Stronger, positive neonatal amygdala connectivity to several regions, including bilateral anterior insula and ventral striatum, was prospectively associated with higher fear at 6-months. Stronger amygdala connectivity to ventral anterior cingulate/anterior medial prefrontal cortex predicted a specific phenotype of higher fear combined with more advanced cognitive development. Overall, findings demonstrate unique profiles of neonatal amygdala functional connectivity related to emerging fear and cognitive development, which may have implications for normative and pathological fear in later years. Consideration of infant fear in the context of cognitive development will likely contribute to a more nuanced understanding of fear, its neural bases, and its implications for future mental health. PMID:26499255

  1. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  2. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  3. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  4. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  5. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  6. Socket Shield Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, João Eduardo Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Nos dias atuais, é cada vez mais comum a realização de extrações de dentes que estejam severamente comprometidos e substituí-los por implantes dentários. Após extração, existe uma reabsorção de osso alveolar que vai resultar numa perda de osso vertical e horizontal, tornando-se um dos fatores que subsequentemente se vai colocar como uma das maiores dificuldades na colocação de implantes. A técnica Socket Shield é uma técnica de preservação de osso alveolar em situações de implantes imediatos,...

  7. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  8. Computational shielding benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Standards Committee 6.2.1 is engaged in the documentation of radiation transport problems and their solutions. The primary objective of this effort is to test computational methods used within the international shielding community. Dissemination of benchmarks will, it is hoped, accomplish several goals: (1) Focus attention on problems whose solutions represent state-of-the-art methodology for representative transport problems of generic interest; (2) Specification of standard problems makes comparisons of alternate computational methods, including use of approximate vs. ''exact'' computer codes, more meaningful; (3) Comparison with experimental data may suggest improvements in computer codes and/or associated data sets; (4) Test reliability of new methods as they are introduced for the solution of specific problems; (5) Verify user ability to apply a given computational method; and (6) Verify status of a computer program being converted for use on a different computer (e.g., CDC vs IBM) or facility

  9. Dorky Poll Scientific Fears

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The questions posed in yesterday's posts about hopes for 2008 were half of what we were asked by the Powers That Be. The other half: What scientific development do you fear you'll be blogging or reading about in 2008?

  10. Pursued by fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonneke van Noije; Jurjen Iedema

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Achtervolgd door angst. This publication focuses on fear of victimisation as one of the most urgent aspects of subjective unsafety. Dutch research on subjective unsafety often uses a standard question drawn from the series of national Safety Monitors published by Statistics

  11. Activation of BDNF Signaling Prevents the Return of Fear in Female Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Andresen, Danay; Flavell, Charlotte R.; Li, Xiang; Bredy, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    There are significant sex differences in vulnerability to develop fear-related anxiety disorders. Females exhibit twice the rate of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as males and sex differences have been observed in fear extinction learning in both humans and rodents, with a failure to inhibit fear emerging as a precipitating factor in the…

  12. Fear of Reinjury in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Meierbachtol, Adam; George, Steven Z.; Chmielewski, Terese L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: A sports injury has both physical and psychological consequences for the athlete. A common postinjury psychological response is elevated fear of reinjury. Objective: To provide an overview of the implications of fear of reinjury on the rehabilitation of athletes, including clinical methods to measure fear of reinjury; the impact of fear of reinjury on rehabilitation outcomes, including physical impairments, function, and return to sports rate; and potential interventions to address fear of reinjury during rehabilitation. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for articles published in the past 16 years (1990-2016) relating to fear of reinjury in athletes. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were searched for additionally relevant articles. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can negatively affect the recovery of physical impairments, reduce self-report function, and prevent a successful return to sport. Athletes with high fear of reinjury might benefit from a psychologically informed practice approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The application of psychologically informed practice would be to measure fear of reinjury in the injured athletes and provide interventions to reduce fear of reinjury to optimize rehabilitation outcomes. Conclusion: Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. Incorporating principles of psychologically informed practice into sports injury rehabilitation could improve rehabilitation outcomes for athletes with high fear of reinjury. PMID:27590793

  13. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-12-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Sex differences in conditioned stimulus discrimination during context-dependent fear learning and its retrieval in humans: the role of biological sex, contraceptives and menstrual cycle phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Haaker, Jan; Schümann, Dirk; Sommer, Tobias; Bayer, Janine; Brassen, Stefanie; Bunzeck, Nico; Gamer, Matthias; Kalisch, Raffael

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are more prevalent in women than in men. Despite this sexual dimorphism, most experimental studies are conducted in male participants and studies focusing on sex differences are sparse. In addition, the role of hormonal contraceptives and menstrual cycle phase in fear conditioning and extinction processes remain largely unknown. We investigated sex differences in context-dependent fear acquisition and extinction (day 1) and their retrieval/expression (day 2). Skin conductance responses (SCRs), fear and unconditioned stimulus expectancy ratings were obtained. We included 377 individuals (261 women) in our study. Robust sex differences were observed in all dependent measures. Women generally displayed higher subjective ratings but smaller SCRs than men and showed reduced excitatory/inhibitory conditioned stimulus (CS+/CS-) discrimination in all dependent measures. Furthermore, women using hormonal contraceptives showed reduced SCR CS discrimination on day 2 than men and free-cycling women, while menstrual cycle phase had no effect. Possible limitations include the simultaneous testing of up to 4 participants in cubicles, which might have introduced a social component, and not assessing postexperimental contingency awareness. The response pattern in women shows striking similarity to previously reported sex differences in patients with anxiety. Our results suggest that pronounced deficits in associative discrimination learning and subjective expression of safety information (CS- responses) might underlie higher prevalence and higher symptom rates seen in women with anxiety disorders. The data call for consideration of biological sex and hormonal contraceptive use in future studies and may suggest that targeting inhibitory learning during therapy might aid precision medicine.

  15. Running from fear: Exercise modulation of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Margaret K; Hake, Holly S; Bouchet, Courtney A; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2018-03-31

    Extinction-based exposure therapy is the most common behavioral therapy for anxiety and trauma-related disorders, but fear tends to resurface even after successful extinction. Identification of novel strategies to enhance fear extinction and reduce fear relapse is of paramount importance to mental health. Exercise can enhance cognitive function, but it is not yet well understood whether exercise can be an effective augmentation strategy for fear extinction. In the current review, we present the current state of knowledge on the effects of exercise on fear extinction. Effects of exercise duration, explanations for conflicting results, and potential mechanisms, focusing on a hypothesized role for dopamine, are all discussed. We also provide new data suggesting that the timing in which acute exercise occurs relative to fear extinction, is a crucial variable in determining whether exercise can enhance fear extinction. Clinical implications and ideas to guide future research endeavors in this area are provided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  17. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerhofer, L.; Feldbaumer, E.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Vincke, H.

    2017-09-01

    MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  18. Radiation shielding in dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenström, B; Rehnmark-Larsson, S; Julin, P; Richter, S

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shielding at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shielding tested were the different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure times corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shielding reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 microGy compared with 18 microGy (parallelling) and 31 microGy (bisecting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained, but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 microGy per single intraoral exposure.

  19. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  20. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1984-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey. In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  1. Morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low-angle edifices built primarily by the accumulation of successive lava flows. This generic view of shield volcano morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galápagos). Here, the morphometry of 158 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes is analyzed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution SRTM DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 24 lava-dominated 'shield-like' volcanoes, considered so far as stratovolcanoes, are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes from 0.1 to > 1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width (H/WB) ratios mostly from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients (average slopes mostly from 1° to 15°), elongation and summit truncation. Although there is no clear-cut morphometric difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes, an approximate threshold can be drawn at 12° average slope and 0.10 H/WB ratio. Principal component analysis of the obtained database enables to identify four key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Hierarchical cluster analysis of these descriptors results in 12 end-member shield types, with intermediate cases defining a continuum of morphologies. The shield types can be linked in terms of growth stages and shape evolution, related to (1) magma composition and rheology, effusion rate and lava/pyroclast ratio, which will condition edifice steepness; (2) spatial distribution of vents, in turn related to the magmatic feeding system and the tectonic framework, which will control edifice plan shape; and (3) caldera formation, which will condition edifice truncation.

  2. Shielding around spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M; Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Golovatyuk, S; Zamani, M

    2006-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources provide more intense and harder neutron spectrum than nuclear reactors for which a substantial amount of shielding measurements have been performed. Although the main part of the cost for a spallation station is the cost of the shielding, measurements regarding shielding for the high energy neutron region are still very scarce. In this work calculation of the neutron interaction length in polyethylene moderator for different neutron energies is presented. Measurements which were carried out in Nuclotron accelerator at the Laboratory of High Energies (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) and comparison with calculation are also presented. The measurements were performed with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs)

  3. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Coming to terms with fear

    OpenAIRE

    LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Research on Pavlovian fear conditioning has been very successful in revealing what has come to be called the brain’s fear system. The field has now matured to the point where a sharper conceptualization of what is being studied could be very useful as we go forward. Terms like “fear conditioning” and “fear system” blur the distinction between processes that give rise to conscious feelings of fear and nonconscious processes that control defense responses elicited by threats. These processes in...

  5. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  6. Mediating Potency and Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    2018-01-01

    ’ [Shaviro, S., 2010. Post-cinematic affect. Winchester: Zero Books]. These intensity effects mediate between the age of terror's ecology of fear [Massumi, Brian, 2002. Parables for the virtual: movement, affect, sensation. Durham: Duke University Press] and our bodies. Rather than producing fear, action....... Adey, M. Whitehead, and A.J. Williams, eds. From above: war, violence and verticality. London: Hurst & Company]. Through a sensory assault of intense bass soundtracks, kinetic camera movements, and intense CGI effects action movies work to produce what Steven Shaviro has termed ‘intensity effects....... Robin James significantly posits a drone atmosphere where our perceptual limit reconfigures through ‘droning’ – the creation of an affective timbre [James, R., 2013. Drones, sound, and super-panoptic surveillance. Cyborgology]. As James argues, ‘[d]roning rivets you to material conditions, affects...

  7. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Akira; Omori, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A single body of a radiation shield comprises a bag prepared by welding or bonding a polyurethane sheet which is made flat while interposing metal plates at the upper and the lower portion of the bag. Eyelet fittings are disposed to the upper and the lower portions of the bag passing through the metal plates and the flat portion of the bag. Water supplying/draining ports are disposed to two upper and lower places of the bag at a height where the metal plates are disposed. Reinforcing walls welded or bonded to the inner wall surface of the bag are elongated in vertical direction to divide the inside of the bag to a plurality of cells. The bag is suspended and supported from a frame with S-shaped hooks inserted into the eyelet fittings as connecting means. A plurality of bags are suspended and supported from the frame at a required height by way of the eyelets at the lower portion of the suspended and supported bag and the eyelet fittings at the upper portion of the bag below the intermediate connection means. (I.N.)

  9. The Politics of Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the school shootings in Newtown, Connecticut this past December, people experienced the world around them as less safe--understandably so. In response to such a tragic event, there is a degree of fear instilled in all people that for many was at its peak in the New Year as they prepared to send their children back to school.…

  10. Stress and Fear Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maren, Stephen; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Stress has a critical role in the development and expression of many psychiatric disorders, and is a defining feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Stress also limits the efficacy of behavioral therapies aimed at limiting pathological fear, such as exposure therapy. Here we examine emerging evidence that stress impairs recovery from trauma by impairing fear extinction, a form of learning thought to underlie the suppression of trauma-related fear memories. We describe the major structural and functional abnormalities in brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to stress, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus, which may underlie stress-induced impairments in extinction. We also discuss some of the stress-induced neurochemical and molecular alterations in these brain regions that are associated with extinction deficits, and the potential for targeting these changes to prevent or reverse impaired extinction. A better understanding of the neurobiological basis of stress effects on extinction promises to yield novel approaches to improving therapeutic outcomes for PTSD and other anxiety and trauma-related disorders. PMID:26105142

  11. Gradients of fear: How perception influences fear generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Dieter; Zaman, Jonas; Hermans, Dirk; Vervliet, Bram

    2017-06-01

    The current experiment investigated whether overgeneralization of fear could be due to an inability to perceptually discriminate the initial fear-evoking stimulus from similar stimuli, as fear learning-induced perceptual impairments have been reported but their influence on generalization gradients remain to be elucidated. Three hundred and sixty-eight healthy volunteers participated in a differential fear conditioning paradigm with circles of different sizes as conditioned stimuli (CS), of which one was paired to an aversive IAPS picture. During generalization, each subject was presented with one of 10 different sized circles including the CSs, and were asked to categorize the stimulus as either a CS or as novel after fear responses were recorded. Linear mixed models were used to investigate differences in fear generalization gradients depending on the participant's perception of the test stimulus. We found that the incorrect perception of a novel stimulus as the initial fear-evoking stimulus strongly boosted fear responses. The current findings demonstrate that a significant number of novel stimuli used to assess generalization are incorrectly identified as the initial fear-evoking stimulus, providing a perceptual account for the observed overgeneralization in panic and anxiety disorders. Accordingly, enhancing perceptual processing may be a promising treatment for targeting excessive fear generalization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Active Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DEC-Shield technology offers the means to generate electric power from cosmic radiation sources and fuse dissimilar systems and functionality into a structural...

  13. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  14. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadori Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  15. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  16. Cortisol modifies extinction learning of recently acquired fear in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy builds on the mechanism of fear extinction leading to decreased fear responses. How the stress hormone cortisol affects brain regions involved in fear extinction in humans is unknown. For this reason, we tested 32 men randomly assigned to receive either 30 mg hydrocortisone or placebo 45 min before fear extinction. In fear acquisition, a picture of a geometrical figure was either partially paired (conditioned stimulus; CS+) or not paired (CS−) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus; UCS). In fear extinction, each CS was presented again, but no UCS occurred. Cortisol increased conditioned skin conductance responses in early and late extinction. In early extinction, higher activation towards the CS− than to the CS+ was found in the amygdala, hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus. This pattern might be associated with the establishment of a new memory trace. In late extinction, the placebo compared with the cortisol group displayed enhanced CS+/CS− differentiation in the amygdala, medial frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. A change from early deactivation to late activation of the extinction circuit as seen in the placebo group seems to be needed to enhance extinction and to reduce fear. Cortisol appears to interfere with this process thereby impairing extinction of recently acquired conditioned fear. PMID:23945999

  17. Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable, unpredictable and dangerous. Methods The study used a clustered, stratified national sample of Australians aged 15 years and over. All participants were asked in a telephone interview survey to indicate their level of dental fear. Participants who received an oral examination were subsequently provided with a self-complete questionnaire in which they rated their perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness associated with dental visiting. Results 3937 participants were recruited. Each of the three vulnerability-related perceptions was strongly associated with the prevalence of high dental fear. In a logistic regression analysis, uncontrollability and dangerousness perceptions were significantly associated with high dental fear after controlling for age and sex. However, unpredictability perceptions did not have a statistically significant independent association with dental fear after controlling for all other variables. Conclusion Results are mostly consistent with the Cognitive Vulnerability Model of the etiology of fear, with perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness each showing a strong bivariate relationship with high dental fear prevalence. However, more extensive measures of vulnerability perceptions would be valuable in future investigations.

  18. High frequency electromagnetic interference shielding magnetic polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingliang

    Electromagnetic interference is one of the most concerned pollution and problem right now since more and more electronic devices have been extensively utilized in our daily lives. Besides the interference, long time exposure to electromagnetic radiation may also result in severe damage to human body. In order to mitigate the undesirable part of the electromagnetic wave energy and maintain the long term sustainable development of our modern civilized society, new technology development based researches have been made to solve this problem. However, one of the major challenges facing to the electromagnetic interference shielding is the relatively low shielding efficiency and the high cost as well as the complicated shielding material manufacture. From the materials science point of view, the key solutions to these challenges are strongly depended on the breakthrough of the current limit of shielding material design and manufacture (such as hierarchical material design with controllable and predictable arrangement in nanoscale particle configuration via an easy in-situ manner). From the chemical engineering point of view, the upgrading of advanced material shielding performance and the enlarged production scale for shielding materials (for example, configure the effective components in the shielding material in order to lower their usage, eliminate the "rate-limiting" step to enlarge the production scale) are of great importance. In this dissertation, the design and preparation of morphology controlled magnetic nanoparticles and their reinforced polypropylene polymer nanocomposites will be covered first. Then, the functionalities of these polymer nanocomposites will be demonstrated. Based on the innovative materials design and synergistic effect on the performance advancement, the magnetic polypropylene polymer nanocomposites with desired multifunctionalities are designed and produced targeting to the electromagnetic interference shielding application. In addition

  19. Effects of sleep on memory for conditioned fear and fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Germain, Anne; Milad, Mohammed R

    2015-07-01

    Learning and memory for extinction of conditioned fear is a basic mammalian mechanism for regulating negative emotion. Sleep promotes both the consolidation of memory and the regulation of emotion. Sleep can influence consolidation and modification of memories associated with both fear and its extinction. After brief overviews of the behavior and neural circuitry associated with fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction memory in the rodent and human, interactions of sleep with these processes will be examined. Animal and human studies suggest that sleep can serve to consolidate both fear and extinction memory. In humans, sleep also promotes generalization of extinction memory. Time-of-day effects on extinction learning and generalization are also seen. Rapid eye movement (REM) may be a sleep stage of particular importance for the consolidation of both fear and extinction memory as evidenced by selective REM deprivation experiments. REM sleep is accompanied by selective activation of the same limbic structures implicated in the learning and memory of fear and extinction. Preliminary evidence also suggests extinction learning can take place during slow wave sleep. Study of low-level processes such as conditioning, extinction, and habituation may allow sleep effects on emotional memory to be identified and inform study of sleep's effects on more complex, emotionally salient declarative memories. Anxiety disorders are marked by impairments of both sleep and extinction memory. Improving sleep quality may ameliorate anxiety disorders by strengthening naturally acquired extinction. Strategically timed sleep may be used to enhance treatment of anxiety by strengthening therapeutic extinction learned via exposure therapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Comparison of inbred mouse substrains reveals segregation of maladaptive fear phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Temme

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maladaptive fear, such as fear that is persistent or easily generalized to a nonthreatening stimuli, is associated with anxiety-related disorders in humans. In the laboratory, maladaptive fear can be modeled in rodents using Pavlovian fear conditioning. Recently, an inbred mouse strain known as 129S1/SvImJ, or 129S1 have been reported as exhibiting impairments in fear extinction and enhanced fear generalization. With a long-term goal of identifying segregating genetic markers of maladaptive fear, we used Pavlovian fear conditioning to characterize a closely related substrain designated as 129S6/SvEvTac, or 129S6. Here we report that, like 129S1 animals, 129S6 mice exhibit appropriate levels of fear upon conditioning, but are unable to extinguish fear memories once they are consolidated. Importantly, the maladaptive fear phenotype in this inbred stain can be segregated by sub-strain when probed using conditioning protocols designed to assess generalized fear. We find that unlike the 129S1 substrain, mice from the 129S6 sub-strain do not generalize conditioned fear to previously novel contexts and can learn to discriminate between two similar contexts when trained using a discrimination protocol. These results suggest that at least two forms of maladaptive fear (deficits in fear extinction and fear generalization can be can be functionally segregated, further suggesting that the underlying neurobiology is heritable. Given the observation that two closely related sub-strains can exhibit different constellations of maladaptive fear suggests that these findings could be exploited to facilitate the identification of candidate genes for anxiety-related disorders.

  1. Targeting memory reconsolidation to prevent the return of fear in patients with fear of flying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Price, Matthew; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Odenat, Lydia; Post, Loren; Zwiebach, Liza; Breazeale, Kathryn; Gross, Robin; Kim, Sae-Jin; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2017-07-01

    When a memory is recalled, it may again exist in a labile state and stored information becomes amenable to change, a psychobiological process known as reconsolidation. Exposure therapy for anxiety disorders involves accessing a fear memory and modifying it with less fearful information. A preclinical study reported that providing a reminder of a fear memory 10 min prior to extinction training in humans decreased fear up to 1 year later (Schiller et al., 2010). For this pilot clinical study, we used virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE) for fear of flying (FoF) to determine if using a cue to reactivate the memory of the feared stimulus 10 min prior to exposure sessions leads to fewer anxiety-related behaviors and a more durable response compared to a neutral cue. FoF participants (N = 89) received four sessions of anxiety management training followed by four sessions of VRE. Participants were randomly assigned to receive an FoF cue (reactivation group) or a neutral cue (control group) prior to the VRE sessions. Heart rate (HR) and skin conductance levels (SCLs) were collected during posttreatment and 3-month follow-up assessments as objective markers of fear responding. Treatment was effective and all clinical measures improved equally between groups at posttreatment with maintained gains through follow-ups. Significant differences were identified with regard to HR and SCL indices. These results suggest that memory reactivation prior to exposure therapy did not have an impact on clinical measures but may enhance the effect of exposure therapy at the physiological level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The cost of fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    What should parents do when they detect indications of more predators nearby that might eat their babies? This scenario is commonly faced by parents in the wild, and the consequences are important. The number of offspring that organisms produce has a major influence on fitness and, when averaged across a population, affects whether this population will increase or decrease. Offspring production thus has critical implications for evolution via fitness, and ecology and conservation via demography. On page 1398 of this issue, Zanette et al. (1) show that the fear of predation can, by itself, strongly affect the number of offspring produced over an annual cycle by song sparrows (see the figure).

  3. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilinçarslan, Şemsettin; Mavi, Betül; Günoǧlu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender; Akkaş, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  4. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-01-01

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  5. The Dalkon Shield in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, P; Hirsh, H L

    1986-01-01

    When the Dalkon Shield IUD became clinically available in the early 1970s, it appeared that an ideal contraceptive had been developed, with essentially no adverse effects (very safe) and a very high degree of efficacy. Within a few years, however, it became apparent that the Dalkon Shield had not lived up to expectations. In fact, it caused very severe complications, not infrequently resulting in the loss of reproductive ability and in 17 cases, death. In addition, the pregnancy rate among women using this IUD was significantly high, with many resulting in mid-trimester abortion when the IUD remained in-place. The authors trace the legal consequences of this medical disaster, which has resulted in both the development of new and the extension of old legal theories and doctrines involving negligence and product liability. Dalkon Shield litigation is most likely to continue. Many women are assumed to wear the shield still, and neither the FDA or A.H. Robins, manufacturer of the shield, has issued a formal recall.

  6. Neuroscience of fear extinction: implications for assessment and treatment of fear-based and anxiety related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milad, Mohammed R; Rosenbaum, Blake L; Simon, Naomi M

    2014-11-01

    Current exposure-based therapies aimed to reduce pathological fear and anxiety are now amongst the most effective interventions for trauma and anxiety related disorders. Nevertheless, they can be further improved to enhance initial and long-term outcomes. It is now widely accepted that a greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of fear extinction is needed to further develop and identify novel effective targeted treatments as well as prevention strategies for fear-based and anxiety-related disorders. Guided by elegant mechanistic, cellular, and molecular preclinical reports, data from imaging studies are beginning to shape our understanding of how fear is quelled in the human brain. In this article, we briefly review the neural circuits underlying fear extinction in rodents and healthy humans. We then review how these circuits may fail to extinguish fear in patients with anxiety disorders. We end with a discussion examining how fear extinction research may lead to significant advances of current therapeutics for anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Generalization of Pain-Related Fear Based on Conceptual Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulders, Ann; Vandael, Kristof; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2017-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that pain-related fear is key to the transition from acute to chronic pain. Previous research has shown that perceptual similarity with a pain-associated movement fosters the generalization of fear to novel movements. Perceptual generalization of pain-related fear is adaptive as it enables individuals to extrapolate the threat value of one movement to another without the necessity to learn anew. However, excessive spreading of fear to safe movements may become maladaptive and may lead to sustained anxiety, dysfunctional avoidance behaviors, and severe disability. A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to extract conceptual knowledge from a learning episode as well. Although this conceptual pathway may be important to understand fear generalization in chronic pain, research on this topic is lacking. We investigated acquisition and generalization of concept-based pain-related fear. During acquisition, unique exemplars of one action category (CS+; e.g., opening boxes) were followed by pain, whereas exemplars of another action category (CS-; e.g., closing boxes) were not. Subsequently, spreading of pain-related fear to novel exemplars of both action categories was tested. Participants learned to expect the pain to occur and reported more pain-related fear to the exemplars of the CS+ category compared with those of the CS- category. During generalization, fear and expectancy generalized to novel exemplars of the CS+ category, but not to the CS- category. This pattern was not corroborated in the eyeblink startle measures. This is the first study that demonstrates that pain-related fear can be acquired and generalized based on conceptual knowledge. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Characterization and biocompatibility studies of lead free X-ray shielding polymer composite for healthcare application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bhupesh; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Lead based X-ray shielding systems are widely being used in healthcare and radiation processing centers to protect technicians, operators and patients from unwanted exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the use of lead is avoided mainly due to its toxic effects on human health and environment, and also discomfort due to heavier in weight. Hence, production of non-toxic, environment friendly, lead-free X-ray shielding system with less weight and good radiation shielding efficiency compared to conventional lead-based shielding systems is a challenging issue and need of the day. The objectives of present study are to develop, characterize and establish synergy of the materials making radiation shielding composition and their biocompatibility without compromising on radiation shielding efficiency and physico-mechanical attributes vis-à-vis lead based systems.

  9. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  10. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Prior fear conditioning and reward learning interact in fear and reward networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eBulganin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to flexibly adapt responses to changes in the environment is important for survival. Previous research in humans separately examined the mechanisms underlying acquisition and extinction of aversive and appetitive conditioned responses. It is yet unclear how aversive and appetitive learning interact on a neural level during counterconditioning in humans. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study investigated the interaction of fear conditioning and subsequent reward learning. In the first phase (fear acquisition, images predicted aversive electric shocks or no aversive outcome. In the second phase (counterconditioning, half of the CS+ and CS- were associated with monetary reward in the absence of electric stimulation. The third phase initiated reinstatement of fear through presentation of electric shocks, followed by CS presentation in the absence of shock or reward. Results indicate that participants were impaired at learning the reward contingencies for stimuli previously associated with shock. In the counterconditioning phase, prior fear association interacted with reward representation in the amygdala, where activation was decreased for rewarded compared to unrewarded CS- trials, while there was no reward-related difference in CS+ trials. In the reinstatement phase, an interaction of previous fear association and previous reward status was observed in a reward network consisting of substantia nigra / ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA, striatum and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, where activation was increased by previous reward association only for CS- but not for CS+ trials. These findings suggest that during counterconditioning, prior fear conditioning interferes with reward learning, subsequently leading to lower activation of the reward network.

  12. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  13. Growing up to be fearful? Social evaluative fears during adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumter, Sindy Resita

    2010-01-01

    This thesis studies the normal developmental pattern of social evaluative fears from childhood to adolescence. We have investigated age differences in self-reported social fears and physical responses during a public speaking task. In addition, youth's perceptions of speaking in public were studied

  14. Effects of postretrieval-extinction learning on return of contextually controlled cued fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir Drexler, Shira; Merz, Christian J; Hamacher-Dang, Tanja C; Marquardt, Veronica; Fritsch, Nathalie; Otto, Tobias; Wolf, Oliver T

    2014-08-01

    Reactivation of an already consolidated memory makes it labile for a period of several hrs, which are required for its reconsolidation. Evidence suggests that the return of conditioned fear through spontaneous recovery, reinstatement, or renewal can be prevented by blockading this reconsolidation process using pharmacological or behavioral interventions. Postretrieval-extinction learning has been shown to prevent the return of cued fear in humans using fear-irrelevant stimuli, as well as cued and contextual fear in rodents. The effects of postretrieval extinction on human contextually controlled cued fear to fear-relevant stimuli remain unknown, and are the focus of the present study. The experimental design was based on 3 consecutive days: acquisition, reactivation and extinction, and re-extinction. For the fear conditioning, 2 zoo frames served as different contexts, 5 fear-relevant stimuli (aversive animal pictures) served as conditioned stimuli (CS), electric shocks served as unconditioned stimuli (UCS). Expectancy ratings and skin-conductance response (SCR) were used as measures of fear responses; spontaneous recovery and renewal were used as indicators of the return of fear. The expectancy ratings and SCR results indicated spontaneous recovery on the third day, regardless of retrieval prior to extinction. No robust renewal effect was seen. It is suggested that the use of fear-relevant stimuli, the context salience, or reactivation context may explain the lack of reconsolidation effect. Our study indicates that the beneficial effects of postretrieval-extinction learning are sensitive to subtle methodological changes.

  15. Heritability of fear: Ukrainian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Filiptsova

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The conducted research demonstrated genetic component presence for nine types of fear – psychic disorder development, complications in personal life, making responsible decisions, senility, closed spaces, sexual dysfunction, suicide commission, speaking in public, and aggressive behavior possibility to relatives. It helps to consider these fear perspectives for further molecular-genetic analysis in Ukraine.

  16. Fear responses to media entertainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Buijzen, M.A.; Calvert, S.L.; Wilson, B.J>

    2008-01-01

    Most experts on childhood fears agree that some fears are necessary for the healthy cognitive and emotional development of children (e.g., Fraiberg, 1959; Sarafino, 1986). But they also agree that being confronted with shocking events that go beyond a child’s processing ability can have a negative

  17. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  18. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  19. The materialization of fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    Perhaps more than ever before Western societies are shaped by powerful imaginaries of terror, security treats and the politics of fear. Copenhagen, while often perceived as a liberal and ‘walkable city’, is no exception. With little public involvement or democratic participation, recent political...... to matter in ways not simply reducible to security optimization, risk management and symbolic politics? To reach this aim, I draw on material studies, mobilities design and non-representational theories to provide a rich socio-material tale of how granite stones, bollards and other counter......-terrorist materials contribute to the construction and ‘feel’ of contemporary urban tourism. How do such prominent material designs influence, both affectively, practically and emotionally, tourists? How are they re-appropriated and imbued with (inter)subjective meanings, and how may a richer understanding of how...

  20. [Phenomenon of dental fear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Birn, H

    1990-01-01

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle of dental fear. The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists. The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has other psychologic problems (in 20% of cases), such as serious phobias and/or neuroses. A strategy of researching and thus tackling the problem is presented which focuses on three essential targets that require studying and change: 1) the community at large and their image of the dentist, 2) the patient role and 3) the dentist role. Various model projects are presented along with their diagnostic systems. These are seen to focus in varying degrees on different elements of the target groups that effect the dentist-patient relationship but the need to come out into the community and make the social environment right for these patients is an important factor in all strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  2. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance of shielded thermocouple designs. A mathematical model of the thermocouple is obtained by derivation of the heat propagation equation in cylindrical coordinates and by considering the ... Here k is the thermal conductivity, p c is the specific heat capacity, ρ is the density,. ∞. T is the ambient temperature, and μ ...

  3. Fear extinction causes target-specific remodeling of perisomatic inhibitory synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouche, Stéphanie; Sasaki, Jennifer M.; Tu, Tiffany; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A more complete understanding of how fear extinction alters neuronal activity and connectivity within fear circuits may aid in the development of strategies to treat human fear disorders. Using a c-fos based transgenic mouse, we found that contextual fear extinction silenced basal amygdala (BA) excitatory neurons that had been previously activated during fear conditioning. We hypothesized that the silencing of BA fear neurons was caused by an action of extinction on BA inhibitory synapses. In support of this hypothesis, we found extinction-induced target-specific remodeling of BA perisomatic inhibitory synapses originating from parvalbumin and cholecystokinin-positive interneurons. Interestingly, the predicted changes in the balance of perisomatic inhibition matched the silent and active states of the target BA fear neurons. These observations suggest that target-specific changes in perisomatic inhibitory synapses represent a mechanism through which experience can sculpt the activation patterns within a neural circuit. PMID:24183705

  4. Do Learners Fear More than Fear Itself: The Role of Fear in Law Students Educational Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jeffrey; O'Neil, Jennifer; Grimes, Ashley; Bryson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    While previous research has examined the various relationships between fear and learning in K-12 academic settings, the relationship is surprisingly unexplored amongst law students. Using a descriptive qualitative approach, we examine the role fear plays in law students' learning experiences. Through a series of semi-structured interviews a few…

  5. Early Extinction after Fear Conditioning Yields a Context-Independent and Short-Term Suppression of Conditional Freezing in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-hui; Maren, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats is a useful model for therapeutic interventions in humans with anxiety disorders. Recently, we found that delivering extinction trials soon (15 min) after fear conditioning yields a short-term suppression of fear, but little long-term extinction. Here, we explored the possible mechanisms underlying…

  6. A message to Fukushima: nothing to fear but fear itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2016-01-01

    The linear no-threshold model (LNT) has been the basis for radiation protection policies worldwide for 60 years. LNT was fabricated without correct data. The lifespan study of Atomic bomb survivors (LSS) has provided fundamental data to support the NLT. In LSS, exposure doses were underestimated and cancer risk was overestimated; LSS data do not support LNT anymore. In light of these findings, radiation levels and cancer risk in Fukushima are reexamined. Soon after the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection issued an emergency recommendation that national authorities set reference highest levels in the band of 20-100 mSv and, when the radiation source is under control, reference levels are in the band of 1-20 mSv/y. The Japanese government set the limit dose as low as 1 mSv for the public and stirred up radiophobia, which continues to cause tremendous human, social, and economic losses. Estimated doses in three areas of Fukushima were 0.6-2.3 mSv/y in Tamura City, 1.1-5.5 mSv/y in Kawauchi Village, and 3.8-17 mSv/y in Iitate Village. Since even after acute irradiation, no significant differences are found below 200 mSv for leukemia and below 100 mSv for solid cancers. These data indicate that cancer risk is negligible in Fukushima. Moreover, beneficial effects (lessened cancer incidence) were observed at 400-600 mSv in LSS. Living organisms, which have established efficient defense mechanisms against radiation through 3.8 billion years of evolutionary history, can tolerate 1000 mSv/y if radiation dose rates are low. In fact, people have lived for generations without adverse health effects in high background radiation areas such as Kelara (35 mSv/y), India, and Ramsar (260 mSv/y), Iran. Low dose radiation itself is harmless, but fear of radiation is vitally harmful. When people return to the evacuation zones in Fukushima now and in the future, they will be exposed to such low radiation doses as to cause no physical

  7. Persistence of Amygdala-Hippocampal Connectivity and Multi-Voxel Correlation Structures During Awake Rest After Fear Learning Predicts Long-Term Expression of Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Erno J; Kanen, Jonathan W; Tambini, Arielle; Fernández, Guillén; Davachi, Lila; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2017-05-01

    After encoding, memories undergo a process of consolidation that determines long-term retention. For conditioned fear, animal models postulate that consolidation involves reactivations of neuronal assemblies supporting fear learning during postlearning "offline" periods. However, no human studies to date have investigated such processes, particularly in relation to long-term expression of fear. We tested 24 participants using functional MRI on 2 consecutive days in a fear conditioning paradigm involving 1 habituation block, 2 acquisition blocks, and 2 extinction blocks on day 1, and 2 re-extinction blocks on day 2. Conditioning blocks were preceded and followed by 4.5-min rest blocks. Strength of spontaneous recovery of fear on day 2 served as a measure of long-term expression of fear. Amygdala connectivity primarily with hippocampus increased progressively during postacquisition and postextinction rest on day 1. Intraregional multi-voxel correlation structures within amygdala and hippocampus sampled during a block of differential fear conditioning furthermore persisted after fear learning. Critically, both these main findings were stronger in participants who exhibited spontaneous recovery 24 h later. Our findings indicate that neural circuits activated during fear conditioning exhibit persistent postlearning activity that may be functionally relevant in promoting consolidation of the fear memory. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Shielding: people and shelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krissdottir, M.; Simon, J.

    1977-01-01

    Housing is something that protects and defends. This book explores the ways in which humans have sought to defend themselves against physical dangers and to protect themselves against the imagined evils of the natural world by means of the shelters built. The book examines briefly the shelters built in ancient times, and shows how several basic types recurred in different ages and at different times. Following this there is a brief survey of the kinds of shelters built by the native peoples of Canada, depending on their environment--climate, the natural materials on hand--and the culture and life-style of each people. The next chapter explores the psychology of human beings, and how shelters should satisfy not only physical needs but psychological needs as well--the need for companionship and yet for privacy, space for children to play and community centers for adults to meet. The second half of the book looks at the dilemmas of housing today, and at various attempts around the world and in Canada to solve the problems--garden cities in England, the famous community of Tapiola in Finland, the technological innovations of Disneyland, new housing suburbs in Canada. There is a discussion of the problems of urban renewal, of overcoming the high cost of home-ownership--condominiums, cooperatives, owner-built homes, and the disadvantages of trailers--and of overcoming the energy crisis by building ecological houses.

  9. Mechanisms of Sex Differences in Fear and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramikie, Teniel Sonya; Ressler, Kerry James

    2017-11-21

    Following sexual maturity, females disproportionately have higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and experience greater symptom severity and chronicity as compared with males. This observation has led many to examine sex differences in PTSD risk factors. Though relatively few, these studies reveal that the root causes of PTSD sex differences are complex, and partly represent interactions between sex-specific nonbiological and biological risk factors, which differentially shape PTSD vulnerability. Moreover, these studies suggest that sex-specific PTSD vulnerability is partly regulated by sex differences in fear systems. Fear, which represents a highly conserved adaptive response to threatening environmental stimuli, becomes pathological in trauma- and stress-based psychiatric syndromes, such as PTSD. Over the last 30 years, considerable progress has been made in understanding normal and pathological molecular and behavioral fear processes in humans and animal models. Thus, fear mechanisms represent a tractable PTSD biomarker in the study of sex differences in fear. In this review, we discuss studies that examine nonbiological and biological sex differences that contribute to normal and pathological fear behaviors in humans and animal models. This, we hope, will shed greater light on the potential mechanisms that contribute to increased PTSD vulnerability in females. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Public fear of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.M.; Radford, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Excessive fear of nuclear technology (EFONT) is estimated to affect from 35-50 percent of the U.S. public, EFONT is defined as an unpleasant state of fear with components of stress and anxiety, threat to security, and anger. The cognitive aspect of EFONT involves perception of risks, benefits, and values which reinforce and perpetuate the fear. EFONT can be reduced through communications and outreach programs by providing basic information, encouraging participation, and targeting misinformation. Risks need to be put in perspective and benefits made explicit. Safety messages should be combined with other information. Understanding and patience are indispensable in dealing with those who are afraid

  11. The history of nuclear fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weart, S.

    1993-01-01

    The history of military and civilian nuclear energy is not only a matter of hard technology, politics, and economics. Our thinking about bombs and reactors is also affected by images with a curious and sometimes overwhelming power. Weird rays that can transform flesh or create monsters, the atom-powered marvels of a future uptopia, the mad scientist who plots to destroy the world: all have an influence on the way people think. Already decades before scientists had discovered how to exploit nuclear energy, a web of interconnected symbols was fully formed in the public mind. These images can be traced back to primitive imagery and, still deeper, into common human experiences, but they were often connected specifically to nuclear energy by nuclear scientists themselves. After the actual development of nuclear technology, a variety of groups used the old symbolism for their propaganda. Since nuclear energy was the most impressive case of the application of the arcane mysteries of science by modern technological authorities, it came to stand for all that people hoped, and still more what they feared, from such authorities

  12. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  13. Neutronic design of MYRRHA reactor hall shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Yurdunaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral shielding of a 600 MeV proton linear accelerator beam line in the MYRRHA reactor hall has been assessed using neutronic calculations by the MCNPX code complemented with analytical predictions. Continuous beam losses were considered to define the required shielding thickness that meets the requirements for the dose rate limits. Required shielding thicknesses were investigated from the viewpoint of accidental full beam loss as well as beam loss on collimator. The results confirm that the required shielding thicknesses are highly sensitive to the spatial shape of the beam and strongly divergent beam losses. Therefore shielding barrier should be designed according to the more conservative assumptions.

  14. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  15. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  16. Hydrogen-rich Interpenetrating Polymer Networks for Radiation-Shield Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic H11.01, NASA has identified a need for advanced radiation-shielding materials and structures to protect humans from space radiation during NASA...

  17. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11-01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  18. A Reinforcement for Multifunctional Composites for Non-Parasitic Radiation Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding is a requirement to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation during NASA missions. Multifunctional materials have the potential to...

  19. Hydrogenous Polymer-Regolith Composites for Radiation-Shielding Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified a need in Sub-topic H11.01 for advanced radiation-shielding technologies using in situ resources, such as regolith, to protect humans from the...

  20. Hydrogenous Polymer-Regolith Composites for Radiation-Shielding Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified a need in Sub-topic H11.01 for advanced radiation-shielding technologies using in situ resources, such as regolith, to protect humans from the...

  1. Heritability of fear: Ukrainian experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.V. Filiptsova

    2014-08-04

    compulsive syndrome. The prevalence of such disor- ders in the world population is relatively high [13], weakening people's health and quality of life [14]. Nonetheless, in spite of many studies done on fear, many questions are not yet ...

  2. MODERN IDEOLOGIES OF MANAGING FEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Konstantinovna Vasilchenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is a studying of modern ideologies of managing fear. The purpose of the article is to examine the managing fear practice and explain how it is used in the policy of homeland security. The research methodology is based on the general scientific methods such as analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction and special kind of theoretical me-thods such as studying literature about the problem. The study can be used in courses on social philosophy and political science. The author concludes that social fears are very effective instrument of influence with mass consciousness. The authorities need to legitimize their political decisions through public opinion. But before that they should form it. The author shows how policy of homeland security helps to produce fears in society and how politicians intentionally exaggerate them. In this regard the author considers a concept of homeland security which can eliminate the negative sides of homeland security in future.

  3. Perceived Quality of Private Education and Fears of Stratification: Investigating the Propositions of Human Capital Theory by Exploring the Case of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel Páez, Pedro; Teelken, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the recent developments in the higher education system of Colombia in order to illustrate how these encourage stratification between (types of) universities and their students. We do so by discussing propositions generated by human capital theory and apply them to the experiences of students and graduates…

  4. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  5. Fear and aggression in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzunova Krasimira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the concepts of fear, phobia and aggression in dogs were precisely defined, as well as their underlying causes. The behavioural activities specific for these conditions were indicated. The accompanying symptoms were consistently explained. The causes that the development of pathological fear leads to aggression in dogs as well as the ex various therapy options depending on the clinical signs were presented.

  6. Systemic blockade of D2-like dopamine receptors facilitates extinction of conditioned fear in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Nissim, Helen A.; Barad, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear in animals is the explicit model of behavior therapy for human anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Based on previous data indicating that fear extinction in rats is blocked by quinpirole, an agonist of dopamine D2 receptors, we hypothesized that blockade of D2 receptors might facilitate extinction in mice, while agonists should block extinction, as they do in rats. One day after fear con...

  7. Radiation shield vest and skirt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-piece garment is described which provides shielding for female workers exposed to radiation. The upper part is a vest, overlapping and secured in the front by adjustable closures. The bottom part is a wraparound skirt, also secured by adjustable closures. The two parts overlap, thus providing continuous protection from shoulder to knee and ensuring that the back part of the body is protected as well as the front

  8. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1976-07-01

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  9. Shielding Idiosyncrasy from Isomorphic Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, José Luis; Mazza, Carmelo; Strandgaard Pedersen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    with legitimacyin the field. Our theory of creative actionfor optimal distinctiveness suggests thatfilm directors increase their control bypersonally consolidating artistic andproduction roles, by forming closepartnership with committed producer, andby establishing own production company.Ironically, to escape......Abstract. This paper advances a microtheory of creative action by examining howdistinctive artists shield their idiosyncraticstyles from the isomorphic pressures of afield. It draws on the cases of threeinternationally recognized, distinctiveEuropean film directors - Pedro Almodóvar(Spain), Nanni...

  10. Unusual Fears in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Aggarwal, Richa; Baker, Courtney; Mathapati, Santosh; Molitoris, Sarah; Mayes, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Unusual fears have long been recognized as common in autism, but little research exists. In our sample of 1033 children with autism, unusual fears were reported by parents of 421 (41%) of the children, representing 92 different fears. Many additional children had common childhood fears (e.g., dogs, bugs, and the dark). More than half of children…

  11. Genes, Fears, Phobias, and Phobic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Surveyed literature on genetics and fears and phobias to determine what might be heritable. Found, for ordinary fears among the general population, heredity appears to contribute mainly to a trait of general fearfulness and may be a major reason for the strong intercorrelation among different fears. Found evidence of little environmental…

  12. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  13. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  14. Revealing context-specific conditioned fear memories with full immersion virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eHuff

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The extinction of conditioned fear is known to be context specific, and often referred to as more robustly contextually bound than the fear memory itself (Bouton, 2004. Yet, recent findings in rodents have challenged the notion that contextual fear retention is initially generalized. The context specificity of a cued-fear memory to the learning context has not been addressed in the human literature largely due to limitations in methodology. Here we adapt a novel technology to test the context specificity of cued fear conditioning using full immersion 3-dimensional virtual reality (VR. During acquisition training, healthy participants navigated through virtual environments containing dynamic snake and spider conditioned stimuli (CSs, one of which was paired with electrical wrist stimulation. During a 24-hour delayed retention test, one group returned to the same context as acquisition training whereas another group experienced the CSs in a novel context. Unconditioned stimulus (US expectancy ratings were assayed on-line during fear acquisition as an index of contingency awareness. Skin conductance responses (SCR time-locked to CS onset were the dependent measure of cued fear, and skin conductance levels during the interstimulus interval were an index of context fear. Findings indicate that early in acquisition training, participants express contingency awareness as well as differential contextual fear, whereas differential cued fear emerged later in acquisition. During the retention test, differential cued fear retention was enhanced in the group who returned to the same context as acquisition training relative to the context shift group. The results extend recent rodent work to illustrate differences in cued and context fear acquisition and the contextual specificity of recent fear memories. Findings support the use of full immersion VR as a novel tool in cognitive neuroscience to bridge rodent models of contextual phenomena underlying human

  15. [Reducing fear in preschool children receiving intravenous injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Hui-Tzu; Cho, Yen-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Our pediatric medical ward administers an average of 80 intravenous injections to preschool children. We found that 91.1% exhibit behavior indicative of fear and anxiety. Over three-quarters (77.8%) of this number suffer severe fear and actively resist receiving injections. Such behavior places a greater than normal burden on human and material resources and often gives family members negative impressions that lower their trust in the healthcare service while raising nurse-patient tensions. Using observation and interviews, we found primary factors in injection fear to be: Past negative experiences, lack of adequate prior communication, measures taken to preemptively control child resistance, and default cognitive behavioral strategies from nursing staff. This project worked to develop a strategy to reduce cases of severe injection fear in preschool children from 77.8% to 38.9% and achieve a capacity improvement target for members of 50%. Our team identified several potential strategy solutions from research papers and books between August 1st, 2009 and April 30th, 2010. Our proposed method included therapeutic games, self-selection of injection position, and cognitive behavioral strategies to divert attention. Other measures were also specified as standard operating procedures for administering pediatric intravenous injections. We applied the strategy on 45 preschool children and identified a post-injection "severe fear" level of 37.8%. This project was designed to reduce fear in children to make them more accepting of vaccinations and to enhance children's positive treatment experience in order to raise nursing care quality.

  16. Subjective fear, interference by threat, and fear associations independently predict fear-related behavior in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.M.; Kleinherenbrink, A.V.; Simons, C.; de Gier, E.; Klein, S.; Allart, E.; Bögels, S.M.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives: Several information-processing models highlight the independent roles of controlled and automatic processes in explaining fearful behavior. Therefore, we investigated whether direct measures of controlled processes and indirect measures of automatic processes predict

  17. The Modified Socket Shield Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hun; Park, Kwang-Bum; Mangano, Francesco Guido

    2018-03-20

    In the anterior regions, the resorption of the buccal bone after tooth extraction leads to a contraction of the overlying soft tissues, resulting in an esthetic problem, particularly with immediate implant placement. In the socket shield technique, the buccal root section of the tooth is maintained, to preserve the buccal bone for immediate implant placement. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the survival, stability, and complication rates of implants placed using a "modified" socket shield technique. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a dental clinic for treatment with oral implants were considered for inclusion in this study. Inclusion criteria were healthy adult patients who presented nonrestorable single teeth with intact buccal periodontal tissues in the anterior regions of both jaws. Exclusion criteria were teeth with present/past periodontal disease, vertical root fractures on the buccal aspect, horizontal fractures below bone level, and external/internal resorptions. The buccal portion of the root was retained to prevent the resorption of the buccal bone; the shield was 1.5 mm thick with the most coronal portion at the bone crest level. All patients then underwent immediate implants. In the patient with a gap between the implant and shield, no graft material was placed. All implants were immediately restored with single crowns and followed for 1 year. The main outcomes were implant survival, stability, and complications. Thirty patients (15 males, 15 females; mean age was 48.2 ± 15.0 years) were enrolled in the study and installed with 40 immediate implants. After 1 year, all implants were functioning, for a survival rate of 100%; excellent implant stability was reported (mean implant stability quotient at placement: 72.9 ± 5.9; after 1 year: 74.6 ± 2.7). No biologic complications were reported, and the incidence of prosthetic complications was low (2.5%). The "modified" socket shield technique seems to be a

  18. Individual differences in detecting rapidly presented fearful faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Zhang

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of evolutionarily relevant threats (e.g., fearful faces is important for human survival. The ability to rapidly detect fearful faces exhibits high variability across individuals. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between behavioral detection ability and brain activity, using both event-related potential (ERP and event-related oscillation (ERO measurements. Faces with fearful or neutral facial expressions were presented for 17 ms or 200 ms in a backward masking paradigm. Forty-two participants were required to discriminate facial expressions of the masked faces. The behavioral sensitivity index d' showed that the detection ability to rapidly presented and masked fearful faces varied across participants. The ANOVA analyses showed that the facial expression, hemisphere, and presentation duration affected the grand-mean ERP (N1, P1, and N170 and ERO (below 20 Hz and lasted from 100 ms to 250 ms post-stimulus, mainly in theta band brain activity. More importantly, the overall detection ability of 42 subjects was significantly correlated with the emotion effect (i.e., fearful vs. neutral on ERP (r = 0.403 and ERO (r = 0.552 measurements. A higher d' value was corresponding to a larger size of the emotional effect (i.e., fearful--neutral of N170 amplitude and a larger size of the emotional effect of the specific ERO spectral power at the right hemisphere. The present results suggested a close link between behavioral detection ability and the N170 amplitude as well as the ERO spectral power below 20 Hz in individuals. The emotional effect size between fearful and neutral faces in brain activity may reflect the level of conscious awareness of fearful faces.

  19. Bench evaluation: three face-shield CPR barrier devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M; Deao, D; Moon, L; Peters, K; Cavanaugh, S

    1995-06-01

    Due to the fear of disease transmission, the practice of mouth-to-mouth (M-M) rescue breathing is rarely performed; to address this concern, many types of CPR barrier devices have been developed. These include bag-valve-mask devices, mouth-to-mask devices, and face shields (FS). The purpose of this study was to measure the volumes delivered during mouth-to-face shield (M-FS) breathing, to measure the back pressure and calculate the resistance to flow through their 1-way valves, and to test for backward leak of gas through the valves. Three FS brands were evaluated: Kiss of Life (KOL), MicroSHIELD (Micro) and Res-Cue Key (RCK). Volume delivered during M-M and M-FS breathing was evaluated by 10 rescuers who used the devices while performing rescue breathing on a CPR mannequin. Back pressure was measured and resistance calculated by directing airflow through the 1-way valves. Backward leak was evaluated by measuring the O2 concentration at the rescuer side of the valve while 100% O2 was directed toward the patient side of the valve. Differences among the brands were evaluated using analysis of variance. The mean (SD) values for volumes in L were: M-M 1.00 (0.25), Micro 0.77 (0.20), RCK 0.64 (0.10), and KOL 0.24 (0.11). Mean values for back pressure in cm H2O at 50 L/min were Micro 16.7 (1.29), KOL 7.22 (0.13), and RCK 2.15 (0.16). Significant backward leak only occurred with RCK. Not one of the FSs tested met all of the requirements suggested by the American Heart Association and by the International Standards Organization.

  20. Facing My Fears (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available I’m scared. I’m nervous. In a few short weeks the contractors and electricians will take over my library for several months. They will drill huge gouges in the concrete floor, hammer, saw, scrape,move, wire, etc. No doubt they may have to be asked to keep their voices down once or twice. Half of the print journal collection will be relocated to accommodate a new teaching lab that will also double as an information commons. The planning has been going on for many months. We have consulted with other libraries, reviewed the literature, identified the needs of our various user groups, measured space,tested technical possibilities, and met with architects and engineers. Up until now the new lab was an organic idea on paper, discussed over coffee and in meetings. That’s fairly easy to deal with. But just around the corner it becomes a reality and I’m a bag of nerves. Have we made the right decisions? Will it address all our needs? Is there anything I forgot to consider? What if our users don’t like it? What if it is a complete failure?!Theoretically, it should be ok. I’ve followed the right steps and worked with a creative, talented and dedicated team. This is different from trying out a new instructional technique or reorganizing the information desk. This is big. I talk the evidence based talk regularly, but now I am walking the walk in a bigger way than I had ever imagined. Change can be frightening. Moving out of comfort zones is not easy. Having said that, the challenge can be invigorating and the change, refreshing. I find myself welcoming the change as much as I dread it. I’ll face my fears and see it through to the implementation and evaluations and beyond. And hey, no matter what the outcome, it should make for a good paper. If anyone else out there is going through a similar process, I’d be interested in comparing notes. I invite you to try something new this year in your work environment or in your professional activities

  1. Altered resting-state brain activity at functional MRI during automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingyong; Feng, Pan; Chen, Zhencai

    2013-07-26

    Investigations of fear conditioning in rodents and humans have illuminated the neural mechanisms of fear acquisition and extinction. However, the neural mechanism of automatic memory consolidation of fear conditioning is still unclear. To address this question, we measured brain activity following fear acquisition using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). In the current study, we used a marker of fMRI, amplitude of low-frequency (0.01-0.08Hz) fluctuation (ALFF) to quantify the spontaneous brain activity. Brain activity correlated to fear memory consolidation was observed in parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus in resting-state. Furthermore, after acquired fear conditioning, compared with control group some brain areas showed ALFF increased in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the experimental group, whereas some brain areas showed decreased ALFF in striatal regions (caudate, putamen). Moreover, the change of ALFF in vmPFC was positively correlated with the subjective fear ratings. These findings suggest that the parahippocampus, insula, and thalamus are the neural substrates of fear memory consolidation. The difference in activity could be attributed to a homeostatic process in which the vmPFC and ACC were involved in the fear recovery process, and change of ALFF in vmPFC predicts subjective fear ratings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fear learning and memory across adolescent development Hormones and Behavior Special Issue: Puberty and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattwell, Siobhan S.; Lee, Francis S.; Casey, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the past several decades, studies have uncovered a wealth of information about the neural circuitry underlying fear learning and extinction that has helped to inform treatments for fear-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress and anxiety. Yet, up to 40 percent of people do not respond to such treatments. Adolescence, in particular, is a developmental stage during which anxiety disorders peak, yet little is known about the development of fear-related neural circuitry during this period. Moreover, pharmacological and behavioral therapies that have been developed are based on mature circuitry and function. Here, we review neural circuitry implicated in fear learning and data from adolescent mouse and human fear learning studies. In addition, we propose a developmental model of fear neural circuitry that may optimize current treatments and inform when, during development, specific treatments for anxiety may be most effective. PMID:23998679

  3. Fear and anxiety as separable emotions: an investigation of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Adam M; Kemp, Samantha E; Corr, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    The Gray and McNaughton (2000) theory draws on a wide range of animal data to hypothesize that the emotions of fear and anxiety are separable. The authors tested their hypothesis in two studies. The first study examined associations between scores on questionnaire measures of fear, anxiety, and neuroticism; correlational analysis revealed that fear and anxiety are not interchangeable constructs. The second study examined associations between scores on questionnaire measures of fear/anxiety and performance in a military training setting; regression analysis revealed that fear captured significant variance in performance that was not shared with anxiety. These results imply that hypotheses derived from nonhuman animal data may hold important implications for understanding human emotion and motivation, especially in relation to fear and anxiety.

  4. Passive radiation shielding considerations for the proposed space elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Patamia, S. E.; Gassend, B.

    2007-02-01

    The Earth's natural van Allen radiation belts present a serious hazard to space travel in general, and to travel on the space elevator in particular. The average radiation level is sufficiently high that it can cause radiation sickness, and perhaps death, for humans spending more than a brief period of time in the belts without shielding. The exact dose and the level of the related hazard depends on the type or radiation, the intensity of the radiation, the length of exposure, and on any shielding introduced. For the space elevator the radiation concern is particularly critical since it passes through the most intense regions of the radiation belts. The only humans who have ever traveled through the radiation belts have been the Apollo astronauts. They received radiation doses up to approximately 1 rem over a time interval less than an hour. A vehicle climbing the space elevator travels approximately 200 times slower than the moon rockets did, which would result in an extremely high dose up to approximately 200 rem under similar conditions, in a timespan of a few days. Technological systems on the space elevator, which spend prolonged periods of time in the radiation belts, may also be affected by the high radiation levels. In this paper we will give an overview of the radiation belts in terms relevant to space elevator studies. We will then compute the expected radiation doses, and evaluate the required level of shielding. We concentrate on passive shielding using aluminum, but also look briefly at active shielding using magnetic fields. We also look at the effect of moving the space elevator anchor point and increasing the speed of the climber. Each of these mitigation mechanisms will result in a performance decrease, cost increase, and technical complications for the space elevator.

  5. Systemic Blockade of D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Facilitates Extinction of Conditioned Fear in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Nissim, Helen A.; Barad, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear in animals is the explicit model of behavior therapy for human anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Based on previous data indicating that fear extinction in rats is blocked by quinpirole, an agonist of dopamine D2 receptors, we hypothesized…

  6. Psychological reactions to catastrophes: fear as a reaction to accidents and emergencies in industriel complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernli, G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the subject 'stress' and its effects on the personality. Specific types of behavior, which the human develops in a fearful situation are demonstrated by means of the psychoanalytical personality model. In the conclusion possible methods of alleviating fear, shock and panic reactions are described. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs

  7. Shielded room measurements, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.

    1949-02-22

    The attenuation of electro-statically and electro-magnetically shielded rooms in the ``E,`` ``R,`` ``I,`` and ``T`` Buildings was measured so that corrective measure could be taken if the attenuation was found to be low. If remedial measures could not be taken, the shortcomings of the rooms would be known. Also, the men making the measurements should oversee construction and correct errors at the time. The work was performed by measuring the attenuation at spot frequencies over the range of from 150 kilocycles to 1280 megacycles with suitable equipment mounted in small rubber-tried trucks. The attenuation was determined by ``before and after`` shielding and/or ``door open and door closed`` measurements after installation of copper shielding. In general, attenuation in the frequency range of approximately 10 to 150 mc. was good and was of the order expected. At frequencies in the range of 150 mc. to 1280 mc., the attenuation curve was more erratic; that is, at certain frequencies a severe loss of attenuation was noted, while at others, the attenuation was very good. This was mainly due to poor or faulty seals around doors and pass windows. These poor seals existed in the ``T,`` ``E,`` and ``I`` Buildings because the doors were fitted improperly and somewhat inferior material was used. By experience from these difficulties, both causes were corrected in the ``R`` Building, which resulted in the improvement of the very high frequency (v.h.f.) range in this building. In some specific cases, however, the results were about the same. For the range of frequencies below approximately 10 mc., the attenuation, in almost all cases, gradually decreased as the frequency decreased and reached a minimum at .3 to 1.0 mc. This loss of attenuation was attributed to multiple grounding caused by moisture in the insulating timbers and will gradually decrease as the wood dries out.

  8. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  9. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  10. Irrigoscopy - irrigography method, dosimetry and radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubanov, Z.; Kolarevic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Use of patient's radiation shielding during radiology diagnostic procedures in our country is insufficiently represent, so patients needlessly receive very high entrance skin doses in body areas which are not in direct x-ray beam. During irrigoscopy, patient's radiation shielding is very complex problem, because of the organs position. In the future that problem must be solved. We hope that some of our suggestions about patient's radiation shielding during irrigoscopy, can be a small step in that way. (author)

  11. A Shielding Concept for the MedAustron Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jägerhofer L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MedAustron is a synchrotron based accelerator facility for cancer therapy and research in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km south of Vienna. The facility will provide protons up to kinetic energies of 250 MeV and carbon ions up to 400 MeV/n for ion beam therapy. Additionally, protons up to 800 MeV kinetic energy will be used in a dedicated room for non-clinical research. In order to obtain a shielding concept for this facility a detailed geometry of the accelerator facility was implemented into the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and shielding simulations were performed. In the course of these simulations the contributions of different particle types to the mixed fields around the accelerator and behind shielding were analysed. In an iterative process with the architect the final design of the shielding concept was developed until it was capable of reducing the effect of secondary radiation on humans and the environment below Austrian legal limits.

  12. Isotopic age of enderbites of Ukrainian shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnitskij, E.N.; Bojko, V.L.; Levkovskaya, N.Yu.; Lesnaya, I.M.; Siroshtan, R.I.; Sharkin, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of determining U-Pb isotopic age of accessory zircons from enderbites of Azov, Dniestrovo-Bug and Ingulo-Ingultsk regions of the Ukrainian shield are presented. The isotopic age values obtained make up from 3400 millions of years for enderbites of Novo-Pavlovsk complex of the Ukrainian shield up to 2100 millions of years for enderbites and charnockites of Berdichev complex. So, enderbites of both Archean and Proterozoic age are found in the Ukrainian shield area which points out to diversification of granulites metamorphism manifestation in various blocks of the Ukrainian shield

  13. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  14. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  15. Optimization of the CMS forward shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Huhtinen, Mika

    2000-01-01

    A first realistic version of the CMS forward shielding was presented in the 1999 Engineering Design Review. It was discovered that the background increased by a factor of 2 with respect to the TDR where an idealized shielding had been assumed. This note describes the optimizations implemented in the realistic shielding with the aim to recover the TDR performance. An optimization of the shielding geometry, the beam pipe and a filling of major cracks has allowed to achieve the goal. Although the differences to the TDR are very minor, these new calculations should be understood as an update to those presented in the TDR.

  16. The Fear of Art and the Art of Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective teachers often walk into my course, Arts in the Elementary Classroom, carrying a guarded consciousness that constrains unencumbered artistic exploration. My responsibility as their instructor is to question mantras that reflect insecurity in process and make pedagogical use of their fears. Through studying the nature of these fears…

  17. Counterconditioned Fear Responses Exhibit Greater Renewal than Extinguished Fear Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Nathan M.; Leung, Hiu T.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2016-01-01

    This series of experiments used rats to compare counterconditioning and extinction of conditioned fear responses (freezing) with respect to the effects of a context shift. In each experiment, a stimulus was paired with shock in context A, extinguished or counterconditioned through pairings with sucrose in context B, and then tested for renewal…

  18. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  19. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  20. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  1. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  2. When Fear Is Near

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Dean; Petrovic, Predrag; Marchant, Jennifer L.; Hassabis, Demis; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Seymour, Ben; Dolan, Raymond J.; Frith, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Humans, like other animals, alter their behavior depending on whether a threat is close or distant. We investigated spatial imminence of threat by developing an active avoidance paradigm in which volunteers were pursued through a maze by a virtual predator endowed with an ability to chase, capture, and inflict pain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that as the virtual predator grew closer, brain activity shifted from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex to the periaqueductal gray. This shift showed maximal expression when a high degree of pain was anticipated. Moreover, imminence-driven periaqueductal gray activity correlated with increased subjective degree of dread and decreased confidence of escape. Our findings cast light on the neural dynamics of threat anticipation and have implications for the neurobiology of human anxiety-related disorders. PMID:17717184

  3. Why the fear of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, S.

    1981-01-01

    Human nature does not change greatly in the course of centuries. In the middle ages aspirations were directed towards the next world and hopes of redemption were nourished by pictures of purgatory, hell, and the devil, which in the present day are replaced by visions of devastation caused by atomic catastrophe. That the linking of atomic energy with a menace to humanity can be effectively dispelled by rational information goes entirely unnoticed. In any case the efforts necessary to divert the population from its fear of nuclear energy are out of proportion to the results obtained. Sooner or later there will be an impatient clamour to the authorities for the construction of new nuclear power stations, but unfortunately it is not possible to say when this change of opinion will be. (A.G.P.)

  4. What's wrong with fear conditioning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, T.; Krypotos, A.M.; Boddez, Y.; Effting, M.; Kindt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fear conditioning is one of the prime paradigms of behavioural neuroscience and a source of tremendous insight in the fundamentals of learning and memory and the psychology and neurobiology of emotion. It is also widely regarded as a model for the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders in a

  5. Effects of handling on fear reactions in young Icelandic horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsbøll, Anna Feldberg; Christensen, Janne Winther

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a short-term standardised handling procedure on reactions of young horses in 2 types of fear tests (including and excluding human handling). Study design An experimental study with 3-year-old Icelandic horses (n = 24). Methods Handled horses (n = 12) were trained according...... to a standardised handling procedure whereas controls (n = 12) remained untrained. Behavioural and heart rate responses in a novel object test and 2 handling fear tests (HFTs) were measured. The HFTs were conducted with both an unknown (HFT-unknown) and a known handler (HFT-known). Results There was no effect...... correlated significantly between tests. Conclusions Previous handling may affect the behavioural fear response of horses when handled by their usual handler, whereas this effect did not apply to an unknown handler. Heart rates appeared unaffected by handling and may be a more reliable indicator...

  6. Prefrontal-amygdala fear networks come into focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maithe eArruda-Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form associations between aversive threats and their predictors is fundamental to survival. However, fear and anxiety in excess are detrimental and are a hallmark of psychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. PTSD symptomatology includes persistent and intrusive thoughts of an experienced trauma, suggesting an inability to downregulate fear when a corresponding threat has subsided. Convergent evidence from human and rodent studies supports a role for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC-amygdala network in both PTSD and the regulation of fear memory expression. In particular, current models stipulate that the prelimbic and infralimbic subdivisions of the rodent mPFC bidirectionally regulate fear expression via differential recruitment of amygdala neuronal subpopulations. However, an array of recent studies that employ new technical approaches has fundamentally challenged this interpretation. Here we explore how a new emphasis on the contribution of inhibitory neuronal populations, subcortical structures and the passage of time is reshaping our understanding of mPFC-amygdala circuits and their control over fear.

  7. Optically-transparent radiation-shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolles, T.F.; Fleming, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    An optically transparent, essentially colorless radiation shielding material for high energy radiation contains a combination of lead or thallium salts of C 1 to C 5 organic acids and may contain lead or thallium salts of mineral acids. Shields of complex shapes are easily constructed

  8. Improvements in or relating to nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.J.; Riley, K.; Powell, C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear radiation shield comprises two pieces of steel held together edge to edge by a weld, the depth of which is less than the thickness of either of the edges. As the radiaion shielding effect of the weld will be less than the steel, an insert is bolted or welded over the weld. (U.K.)

  9. Several problems in accelerator shielding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ban, Shuichi.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the utilization of accelerators has increased rapidly, and the increase of accelerating energy and beam intensity is also remarkable. The studies on accelerator shielding have become important, because the amount of radiation emitted from accelerators increased, the regulation of the dose of environmental radiation was tightened, and the cost of constructing shielding rose. As the plans of constructing large accelerators have been made successively, the survey on the present state and the problems of the studies on accelerator shielding was carried out. Accelerators are classified into electron accelerators and proton accelerators in view of the studies on shielding. In order to start the studies on accelerator shielding, first, the preparation of the cross section data is indispensable. The cross sections for generating Bremsstrahlung, photonuclear reactions generating neutrons, generation of neutrons by hadrons, nuclear reaction of neutrons and generation of gamma-ray by hadrons are described. The generation of neutrons and gamma-ray as the problems of thick targets is explained. The shielding problems are complex and diversified, but in this paper, the studies on the shielding, by which basic data are obtainable, are taken up, such as beam damping and side wall shielding. As for residual radioactivity, main nuclides and the difference of residual radioactivity according to substances have been studied. (J.P.N.)

  10. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  11. Fundamental Parameters of the SHIELD II Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John

    2014-10-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" ("SHIELD") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in early Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Cycle 19 HST observations of the 12 SHIELD galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Since the inception of SHIELD, the ALFALFA survey has completed data acquisition, thereby populating the faint end of the HI mass function with dozens of SHIELD analogs. In this proposal we request ACS imaging of 18 of these "SHIELD II" galaxies that have already been imaged in the HI spectral line with the WSRT. These data will enable a holistic HST imaging study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies (including 12 SHIELD and 18 SHIELD II systems). The primary science goal is the derivation of TRGB distances; the distance dependence of many fundamental parameters makes HST observations critical for the success of SHIELD II. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.

  12. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs

  13. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  14. Erasing fear memories with extinction training

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk, Gregory J.; Paré, Denis; Richardson, Rick; Herry, Cyril; Monfils, Marie H.; Schiller, Daniela; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Decades of behavioral studies have confirmed that extinction does not erase classically-conditioned fear memories. For this reason, research efforts have focused on the mechanisms underlying the development of extinction-induced inhibition within fear circuits. However, recent studies in rodents have uncovered mechanisms that stabilize and destabilize fear memories, opening the possibility that extinction might be used to erase fear memories. This symposium focuses on several of these new dev...

  15. Natural amyloid-β oligomers acutely impair the formation of a contextual fear memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Kara A; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina; Reijmers, Leon G

    2012-01-01

    Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss.

  16. Natural Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Acutely Impair the Formation of a Contextual Fear Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Kara A.; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2012-01-01

    Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss. PMID:22238679

  17. Natural amyloid-β oligomers acutely impair the formation of a contextual fear memory in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara A Kittelberger

    Full Text Available Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss.

  18. Extinction during reconsolidation eliminates recovery of fear conditioned to fear-irrelevant and fear-relevant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alina; Lipp, Ottmar V

    2017-05-01

    Extant literature suggests that extinction training delivered during the memory reconsolidation period is superior to traditional extinction training in the reduction of fear recovery, as it targets the original fear memory trace. At present it is debated whether different types of fear memories are differentially sensitive to behavioral manipulations of reconsolidation. Here, we examined post-reconsolidation recovery of fear as a function of conditioned stimulus (CS) fear-relevance, using the unconditioned stimulus (US) to reactivate and destabilize conditioned fear memories. Participants (N = 56; 25 male; M = 24.39 years, SD = 7.71) in the US-reactivation and control group underwent differential fear conditioning to fear-relevant (spiders/snakes) and fear-irrelevant (geometric shapes) CSs on Day 1. On Day 2, participants received either reminded (US-reactivation) or non-reminded extinction training. Tests of fear recovery, conducted 24 h later, revealed recovery of differential electrodermal responding to both classes of CSs in the control group, but not in the US-reactivation group. These findings indicate that the US reactivation-extinction procedure eliminated recovery of extinguished responding not only to fear-irrelevant, but also to fear-relevant CSs. Contrasting previous reports, our findings show that post-reconsolidation recovery of conditioned responding is not a function of CS fear-relevance and that persistent reduction of fear, conditioned to fear-relevant CSs, can be achieved through behavioral manipulations of reconsolidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Hamby, P.N. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison`s six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met.

  20. Technology development for radiation shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Woo; Lee, Jae Kee; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1986-12-01

    Radiation shielding analysis in nuclear engineering fields is an important technology which is needed for the calculation of reactor shielding as well as radiation related safety problems in nuclear facilities. Moreover, the design technology required in high level radioactive waste management and disposal facilities is faced on serious problems with rapidly glowing nuclear industry development, and more advanced technology has to be developed for tomorrow. The main purpose of this study is therefore to build up the self supporting ability of technology development for the radiation shielding analysis in order to achieve successive development of nuclear industry. It is concluded that basic shielding calculations are possible to handle and analyze by using our current technology, but more advanced technology is still needed and has to be learned for the degree of accuracy in two-dimensional shielding calculation. (Author)

  1. GFR Sub-Assembly Shielding Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Parry

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the methodology and results for a preliminary study for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) subassembly fast neutron shielding configurations. The purpose of the shielding in the subassembly is to protect reactor components from fast (E>0.1 MeV) neutrons. The subassembly is modeled in MCNP version 5 release 1.30. Parametric studies were performed varying the thickness of the shielding and calculating the fast neutron flux at the vessel head and the core grid plate. This data was used to determine the minimum thickness needed to protect the vessel head and the core grid plate. These thicknesses were used to analyze different shielding configurations incorporating coolant passages and also to estimate the neutron and photon energy deposition in the shielding material.

  2. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E.; Hamby, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison's six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met

  3. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  4. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  5. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Susumu; Asaumi, Hiroshi; Take, Shigeo; Miyakoshi, Jun-ichi; Takemoto, Hiroshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  6. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area is...

  7. When the mind forms fear: embodied fear knowledge potentiates bodily reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, S.; Topper, M.; Rotteveel, M.; Fischer, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the authors tested whether conceptual fear knowledge can (a) evoke bodily reactions and (b) enhance subsequent bodily reactions to fearful stimuli. Participants unscrambled neutral or fear sentences and subsequently viewed fearful and neutral pictures in combination with

  8. A large scale high-Tc superconducting shield and its cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintomi, K.; Yahara, A.; Irisawa, D.; Imai, K.; Matsuba, H. [Yokohama R& D Labs., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The authors have developed a cryostat for a large scale high-T{sub c} superconducting shield enclosing a human body to measure biomagnetism. The cryostat has an interior space of {phi} 0.8 m x L2.8 m and cools a high-T{sub c} superconducting shield {phi} 0.87 m x L2.4 m. The cryostat is made of non-magnetic materials to avoid internal magnetic noise. It also includes other provisions to achieve a very low magnetic noise environment. The authors investigated the optimal design of the radiation shields for the cryostats using liquid nitrogen and concluded that one radiation shield has sufficient performance for the thermal insulation. They designed the liquid nitrogen reservoir to keep the superconductor at 77.3 K until the reservoir is nearly emptied. A magnetic shielding capacity of the superconducting shield for an external magnetic fields reaching 1.8 mT was found. This sufficed for biomagnetic measurements. The critical current density distribution of the superconductor was evaluated using a magnetic field source formed by a pair of small opposing coils placed near the wall of the cryostat. The mean critical current density of the superconductor was about 450 A/cm{sup 2}. External noise was attenuated by 160 dB within the shielded space. This kept the external noises below the internal noise of the SQUID magnetometer.

  9. What Makes Children Fearful and Anxious

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2007-01-01

    This article explains the causes of children's fears and anxieties in the following age brackets: (1) 0-2 years old; (2) 3-4 years old; and (3) 5-6 years old. It presents situations wherein children develop fears and anxious feelings. It also discusses how to deal and manage these fears and anxieties and enumerates what can be done to make…

  10. Neurobiology of Fear and Specific Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, René

    2017-01-01

    Fear, which can be expressed innately or after conditioning, is triggered when a danger or a stimulus predicting immediate danger is perceived. Its role is to prepare the body to face this danger. However, dysfunction in fear processing can lead to psychiatric disorders in which fear outweighs the danger or possibility of harm. Although recognized…

  11. The use of nipple shields: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Chow

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A nipple shield is a breastfeeding aid with a nipple-shaped shield that is positioned over the nipple and areola prior to nursing. Nipple shields are usually recommended to mothers with flat nipples or in cases in which there is a failure of the baby to effectively latch onto the breast within the first two days postpartum. The use of nipple shields is a controversial topic in the field of lactation. Its use has been an issue in the clinical literature since some older studies discovered reduced breast milk transfer when using nipple shields, while more recent studies reported successful breastfeeding outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence and outcomes with nipple shield use. Methods: A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE Classic, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and CINAHL. The primary endpoint was any breastfeeding outcome following nipple shield use. Secondary endpoints included the reasons for nipple shield use and the average/median length of use. For the analysis, we examined the effect of nipple shield use on physiological responses, premature infants, mothers’ experiences, and health professionals’ experiences. Results: The literature search yielded 261 articles, 14 of which were included in this review. Of these 14 articles, three reported on physiological responses, two reported on premature infants, eight reported on mothers’ experiences, and one reported on health professionals’ experiences. Conclusion: Through examining the use of nipple shields, further insight is provided on the advantages and disadvantages of this practice, thus allowing clinicians and researchers to address improvements on areas that will benefit mothers and infants the most.

  12. Association Between Fear and Beauty Evaluation of Snakes: Cross-Cultural Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landová, Eva; Bakhshaliyeva, Natavan; Janovcová, Markéta; Peléšková, Šárka; Suleymanova, Mesma; Polák, Jakub; Guliev, Akif; Frynta, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    According to the fear module theory, humans are evolutionarily predisposed to perceive snakes as prioritized stimuli and exhibit a fast emotional and behavioral response toward them. In Europe, highly dangerous snake species are distributed almost exclusively in the Mediterranean and Caspian areas. While the risk of a snakebite is relatively low in Central Europe, Azerbaijan, on the other hand, has a high occurrence of the deadly venomous Levant viper (Macrovipera lebetina). We hypothesize that co-habitation with this dangerous snake has shaped the way in which humans evaluate snake species resembling it. For that purpose, we asked respondents from the Czech Republic and Azerbaijan to rank photographs depicting 36 snake species according to perceived fear and beauty. The results revealed a high cross-cultural agreement in both evaluations (fear r2 = 0.683, p Snakes species eliciting higher fear tend to be also perceived as more beautiful, yet people are able to clearly distinguish between these two dimensions. Deadly venomous snakes representing a serious risk are perceived as highly fearful. This is especially true for the vipers and allies (pit vipers) possessing a characteristic body shape with a distinct triangular head and thick body, which was found as the most fear evoking by respondents from both countries. Although the attitude toward snakes is more negative among the respondents from Azerbaijan, their fear evaluation is similar to the Czechs. For instance, despite co-habitation with the Levant viper, it was not rated by the Azerbaijanis as more fearful than other dangerous snakes. In conclusion, agreement in the evaluation of snake fear and beauty is cross-culturally high and relative fear attributed to selected snake species is not directly explainable by the current environmental and cultural differences. This may provide some support for the evolutionary hypothesis of preparedness to fear snakes. PMID:29615942

  13. The influence of acute stress on the regulation of conditioned fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace M. Raio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fear learning and regulation is a prominent model for describing the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders and stress-related psychopathology. Fear expression can be modulated using a number of regulatory strategies, including extinction, cognitive emotion regulation, avoidance strategies and reconsolidation. In this review, we examine research investigating the effects of acute stress and stress hormones on these regulatory techniques. We focus on what is known about the impact of stress on the ability to flexibly regulate fear responses that are acquired through Pavlovian fear conditioning. Our primary aim is to explore the impact of stress on fear regulation in humans. Given this, we focus on techniques where stress has been linked to alterations of fear regulation in humans (extinction and emotion regulation, and briefly discuss other techniques (avoidance and reconsolidation where the impact of stress or stress hormones have been mainly explored in animal models. These investigations reveal that acute stress may impair the persistent inhibition of fear, presumably by altering prefrontal cortex function. Characterizing the effects of stress on fear regulation is critical for understanding the boundaries within which existing regulation strategies are viable in everyday life and can better inform treatment options for those who suffer from anxiety and stress-related psychopathology.

  14. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  15. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  16. Fear of pain and fear of falling among younger and older adults with musculoskeletal pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ronald R; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; McCreary, Donald R

    2005-01-01

    The fear-avoidance model of pain accounts for the debilitating consequences of strong fear as a component of reactions to painful conditions (eg, movements become anxiety-provoking because they cause pain). The model, which is supported in the literature, posits that fear of pain interferes with recovery because it leads to avoidance of beneficial activity. Despite the high prevalence of pain among the elderly, investigations of fear of pain in this population are scarce. A related construct, fear of falling, has been studied among elderly (but not younger) adults as an age-specific concern. To examine the relationship between fear of pain and fear of falling. Specifically, it is hypothesized that fear of pain and fear of falling are distinct constructs. Moreover, the authors investigated whether fear of falling becomes more relevant with increasing age in a sample of seniors and younger adults with musculoskeletal conditions. A convenience sample of younger and older adult physiotherapy outpatients (n=226) receiving treatment for musculoskeletal conditions were recruited for the study. Fear of pain and fear of falling were assessed using self-report measures. There were no age differences with respect to fear of pain and fear of falling. Regression analyses showed that fear of pain measures contribute substantial unique variance to the prediction of each other; however, they only make minor unique contributions to the prediction of fear of falling. Similar results were obtained through confirmatory analyses using structural modelling techniques. The analyses supported the distinctiveness of fear of pain and fear of falling. Moreover, among physiotherapy outpatients with musculoskeletal pain conditions, fear of falling and fear of pain are distinct constructs that appear to represent the concerns of both seniors and younger pain patients.

  17. Fear Extinction as a Model for Translational Neuroscience: Ten Years of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milad, Mohammed R.; Quirk, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The psychology of extinction has been studied for decades. Approximately 10 years ago, however, there began a concerted effort to understand the neural circuits of extinction of fear conditioning, in both animals and humans. Progress during this period has been facilitated by an unusual degree of coordination between rodent and human researchers examining fear extinction. This successful research program could serve as a model for translational research in other areas of behavioral neuroscience. Here we review the major advances and highlight new approaches to understanding and exploiting fear extinction. PMID:22129456

  18. Recognizing Student Fear: The Elephant in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, T. Scott; Baskin, Janice J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding fear, its causes, and its impact on students can be important for educators who seek ways to help students manage their fears. This paper explores common types of student fears such as performance-based anxiety, fear of failure, fear of being laughed at, and cultural components of fear that impact learning. The cognitive, emotional,…

  19. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  20. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  1. Shielding concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Woods, R.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrons produced by 800-MeV proton reactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center spallation neutron source cause a variety of challenging shielding problems. We identify several characteristics distinctly different from reactor shielding and compute the dose attenuation through an infinite slab/shield composed of iron (100 cm) and borated polyethylene (15 cm). Our calculations show that (for an incident spallation spectrum characteristic of neutrons leaking from a tungsten target at 90/degree/) the dose through the shield is a complex mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. High-energy (> 20 MeV) neutron production from the target is ≅5% of the total, yet causes ≅68% of the dose at the shield surface. Primary low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutrons from the target contribute negligibly (≅0.5%) to the dose at the shield surface yet cause gamma rays, which contribute ≅31% to the total dose at the shield surface. Low-energy neutrons from spallation reactions behave similarly to neutrons with a fission spectrum distribution. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  3. Dental fear among medical and dental undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, H; Razak, I A

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). "Heart beats faster" and "muscle being tensed" were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. "Drill" and "anesthetic needle" were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  4. A 64-channel whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, H. [Communications Research Laboratory, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunication, Nukuikitamachi 4-2-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184 (Japan); The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Matsui, T. [Communications Research Laboratory, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunication, Nukuikitamachi 4-2-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184 (Japan); Aono, M. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Uchikawa, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Tanabe, K.; Takeuchi, S. [Tokyo Denki University, Oaza-Ishizaka, Hatoyama-cho, Hiki-gun, Saitama 350-03 (Japan); Narasaki, K.; Tsunematsu, S.; Koyabu, Y.; Kamekawa, Y. [Sumitomo Heavy Industry, Soukai-cho 5-2, Niihama-shi, Ehime 792-8588 (Japan); Nakayama, K.; Shimizu, T. [Nihonkeiki Corporation, Goshogaoka 4-3-5, Moriyacho, Kitasoma-gun, Ibaraki 302-0119 (Japan); Koike, J.; Hoshino, K.; Kotaka, H.; Sudoh, E.; Takahara, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co, Ltd., Corporate R and D Centre, Haraichi 1333-2, Ageo, Saitama 362 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [National Research Institute of Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Shinada, K.; Takahata, M.; Yamaga, Y. [Shimadzu Corporation, Keihanna Research Laboratory, Inuidani-Sunagatani, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-02 (Japan); Kamijo, K. [NEC Fundamental Research Laboratory, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 273-2310 (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    A superconducting magnetic shield of high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O{sub x} has been constructed whose diameter is 65 cm and length is 160 cm. We have successfully observed magnetic fields from somatosensory-evoked human brains in the superconducting magnetic shield by stimulating the median nerves of patients by current pulses. We made a 64-channel whole-head SQUID magnetometer of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) junctions which do not show low-frequency telegraph noise. The sensitivities of the dc SQUID mesoscopic SNS junctions are around 5 fT Hz{sup -1/2} even in rather unfavourable surroundings. The magnetic shield can reduce a magnetic field by around -80 dB or a factor of 10{sup -4} even at as low a frequency as 0.05 Hz. Therefore SQUIDs of SNS junctions and a superconducting magnetic shield are a good combination. (author)

  5. Development of highly effective neutron shielding material made of phenol-novolac type epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Jeong, Myeong Soo; Hong, Sun Seok; Lee, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy; Oh, Seok Jin

    1998-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. Especially we developed phenol-novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their characteristics were also evaluated. (author). 22 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs

  6. The central amygdala circuits in fear regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo

    The amygdala is essential for fear learning and expression. The central amygdala (CeA), once viewed as a passive relay between the amygdala complex and downstream fear effectors, has emerged as an active participant in fear conditioning. However, how the CeA contributes to the learning and expression of fear remains unclear. Our recent studies in mice indicate that fear conditioning induces robust plasticity of excitatory synapses onto inhibitory neurons in the lateral subdivision of CeA (CeL). In particular, this plasticity is cell-type specific and is required for the formation of fear memory. In addition, sensory cues that predict threat can cause activation of the somatostatin-positive CeL neurons, which is sufficient to drive freezing behavior. Here I will report our recent findings regarding the circuit and cellular mechanisms underlying CeL function in fear processing.

  7. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  8. A window of vulnerability: impaired fear extinction in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D; Den, Miriam L; Graham, Bronwyn M; Richardson, Rick

    2014-09-01

    There have been significant advances made towards understanding the processes mediating extinction of learned fear. However, despite being of clear theoretical and clinical significance, very few studies have examined fear extinction in adolescence, which is often described as a developmental window of vulnerability to psychological disorders. This paper reviews the relatively small body of research examining fear extinction in adolescence. A prominent finding of this work is that adolescents, both humans and rodents, exhibit a marked impairment in extinction relative to both younger (e.g., juvenile) and older (e.g., adult) groups. We then review some potential mechanisms that could produce the striking extinction deficit observed in adolescence. For example, one neurobiological candidate mechanism for impaired extinction in adolescence involves changes in the functional connectivity within the fear extinction circuit, particularly between prefrontal cortical regions and the amygdala. In addition, we review research on emotion regulation and attention processes that suggests that developmental changes in attention bias to threatening cues may be a cognitive mechanism that mediates age-related differences in extinction learning. We also examine how a differential reaction to chronic stress in adolescence impacts upon extinction retention during adolescence as well as in later life. Finally, we consider the findings of several studies illustrating promising approaches that overcome the typically-observed extinction impairments in adolescent rodents and that could be translated to human adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unemployment (Fears) and Deflationary Spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Den Haan, WJ; Riegler, M; Karner Rendahl, Robert Pontus

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of incomplete markets and sticky nominal wages is shown to magnify business cycles even though these two features—in isolation—dampen them. During recessions, fears of unemployment stir up precautionary sentiments that induce agents to save more. The additional savings may be used as investments in both a productive asset (equity) and an unproductive nominal liquid asset. The desire to hold the nominal liquid asset puts deflationary pressure on the economy which, provided that...

  10. Enhanced discriminative fear learning of phobia-irrelevant stimuli in spider-fearful individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eMosig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Avoidance is considered as a central hallmark of all anxiety disorders. The acquisition and expression of avoidance which leads to the maintenance and exacerbation of pathological fear is closely linked to Pavlovian and operant conditioning processes. Changes in conditionability might represent a key feature of all anxiety disorders but the exact nature of these alterations might vary across different disorders. To date, no information is available on specific changes in conditionability for disorder-irrelevant stimuli in specific phobia (SP. The first aim of this study was to investigate changes in fear acquisition and extinction in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful participants by using the de novo fear conditioning paradigm. Secondly, we aimed to determine whether differences in the magnitude of context-dependent fear retrieval exist between spider-fearful and non-fearful individuals. Our findings point to an enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful individuals at both the physiological and subjective level. The enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals was neither mediated by increased state anxiety, depression, nor stress tension. Spider-fearful individuals displayed no changes in extinction learning and/or fear retrieval. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for context-dependent modulation of fear retrieval in either group. Here we provide first evidence that spider-fearful individuals show an enhanced discriminative fear learning of phobia-irrelevant (de novo stimuli. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of fear acquisition and expression for the development and maintenance of maladaptive responses in the course of SP.

  11. Seismic proof test of shielding block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohte, Yukio; Watanabe, Takahide; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Kazuhide

    1989-01-01

    Most of the shielding block walls used for building nuclear facilities are built by dry process. When a nuclear facility is designed, seismic waves specific at each site are set as input seismic motions and they are adopted in the design. Therefore, it is necessary to assure safety of the shielding block walls for earthquake by performing anti-seismic experiments under the conditions at each site. In order to establish the normal form that can be applied to various seismic conditions in various areas, Shimizu Corp. made an actual-size test samples for the shielding block wall and confirmed the safety for earthquake and validity of normalization. (author)

  12. Fear of falling after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collicutt McGrath, Joanna

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and nature of fear of falling in a sample of people with severe acquired brain injury. A descriptive study. A regional inpatient neurological rehabilitation unit. One hundred and five adults with acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. All 105 participants were rated by observers who were asked to judge the degree to which fear behaviour interfered with rehabilitation therapy (activity limitation). Eighty-two participants also rated themselves. They were asked to report the degree of distress caused by fear. Both participants and observers were asked to describe the focus of any reported fear. Two stepwise logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify variables that predicted fear giving rise to significant activity limitation and fear giving rise to significant subjective distress. Self and observer rating scales designed and constructed specifically for the study. Raters reported significant fear-related activity limitation in 12-15% of participants. Significant fear-related subjective distress was reported by 40% of participants. Fear of falling, fear of physical harm and fear of not making sufficient rehabilitation progress dominated the reports of both observers and participants. The variables predicting significant activity limitation were premorbid alcohol misuse, low functional ability and the occurrence of a fall since onset. The variables predicting significant subjective distress were poor motor coordination and organization, and good verbal comprehension. Fear of falling is a clinically significant phenomenon in younger adults recovering from severe acquired brain injury. Fear sufficient to cause high degrees of subjective distress was often not evident to observers. Proactive questioning about fear of falling is therefore advisable when working clinically with this group.

  13. Seeing fearful body language rapidly freezes the observer's motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Vitale, Francesca; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    Fearful body language is a salient signal alerting the observer to the presence of a potential threat in the surrounding environment. Although detecting potential threats may trigger an immediate reduction of motor output in animals (i.e., freezing behavior), it is unclear at what point in time similar reductions occur in the human motor cortex and whether they originate from excitatory or inhibitory processes. Using single-pulse and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), here we tested the hypothesis that the observer's motor cortex implements extremely fast suppression of motor readiness when seeing emotional bodies - and fearful body expressions in particular. Participants observed pictures of body postures and categorized them as happy, fearful or neutral while receiving TMS over the right or left motor cortex at 100-125 msec after picture onset. In three different sessions, we assessed corticospinal excitability, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). Independently of the stimulated hemisphere and the time of the stimulation, watching fearful bodies suppressed ICF relative to happy and neutral body expressions. Moreover, happy expressions reduced ICF relative to neutral actions. No changes in corticospinal excitability or SICI were found during the task. These findings show extremely rapid bilateral modulation of the motor cortices when seeing emotional bodies, with stronger suppression of motor readiness when seeing fearful bodies. Our results provide neurophysiological support for the evolutionary notions that emotion perception is inherently linked to action systems and that fear-related cues induce an urgent mobilization of motor reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heritability and genetic correlations of fear-related behaviour in Red Junglefowl--possible implications for early domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Agnvall

    Full Text Available Domesticated species differ from their wild ancestors in a number of traits, generally referred to as the domesticated phenotype. Reduced fear of humans is assumed to have been an early prerequisite for the successful domestication of virtually all species. We hypothesized that fear of humans is linked to other domestication related traits. For three generations, we selected Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens solely on the reaction in a standardized Fear of Human-test. In this, the birds were exposed for a gradually approaching human, and their behaviour was continuously scored. This generated three groups of animals, high (H, low (L and intermediate (I fearful birds. The birds in each generation were additionally tested in a battery of behaviour tests, measuring aspects of fearfulness, exploration, and sociality. The results demonstrate that the variation in fear response of Red Junglefowl towards humans has a significant genetic component and is genetically correlated to behavioural responses in other contexts, of which some are associated with fearfulness and others with exploration. Hence, selection of Red Junglefowl on low fear for humans can be expected to lead to a correlated change of other behavioural traits over generations. It is therefore likely that domestication may have caused an initial suite of behavioural modifications, even without selection on anything besides tameness.

  15. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  16. Cannabidiol regulation of learned fear: implications for treating anxiety-related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regimantas Jurkus

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and trauma-related disorders are psychiatric diseases with a lifetime prevalence of up to 25%. Phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD are characterized by abnormal and persistent memories of fear-related contexts and cues. The effects of psychological treatments such as exposure therapy are often only temporary and medications can be ineffective and have adverse side effects. Growing evidence from human and animal studies indicates that cannabidiol, the main non-psychotomimetic phytocannabinoid present in Cannabis sativa, alleviates anxiety in paradigms assessing innate fear. More recently, the effects of cannabidiol on learned fear have been investigated in preclinical studies with translational relevance for phobias and PTSD. Here we review the findings from these studies, with an emphasis on cannabidiol regulation of contextual fear. The evidence indicates that cannabidiol reduces learned fear in different ways: (1 cannabidiol decreases fear expression acutely, (2 cannabidiol disrupts memory reconsolidation, leading to sustained fear attenuation upon memory retrieval, and (3 cannabidiol enhances extinction, the psychological process by which exposure therapy inhibits learned fear. We also present novel data on cannabidiol regulation of learned fear related to explicit cues, which indicates that auditory fear expression is also reduced acutely by cannabidiol. We conclude by outlining future directions for research to elucidate the neural circuit, psychological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fear memory processing by cannabidiol. This line of investigation may lead to the development of cannabidiol as a novel therapeutic approach for treating anxiety and trauma-related disorders such as phobias and PTSD in the future.

  17. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  18. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  19. Uplifting Fear Appeals: Considering the Role of Hope in Fear-Based Persuasive Messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Robin L; Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2018-01-09

    Fear appeal research has focused, understandably, on fear as the primary emotion motivating attitude and behavior change. However, while the threat component of fear appeals associates with fear responses, a fear appeals' efficacy component likely associates with a different emotional experience: hope. Drawing from appraisal theories of emotion in particular, this article theorizes about the role of hope in fear appeals, testing hypotheses with two existing data sets collected within the context of sun safety messages. In both studies, significant interactions between hope and self-efficacy emerged to predict behavioral intentions. Notable main effects for hope also emerged, though with less consistency. Further, these effects persisted despite controlling for the four cognitions typically considered central to fear appeal effectiveness. These results, consistent across two samples, support the claim that feelings of hope in response to fear appeals contribute to their persuasive success. Implications for developing a recursive model of fear appeal processing are discussed.

  20. Effects of memory age and interval of fear extinction sessions on contextual fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shingo; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Ishii, Daisuke; Tomizawa, Haruna; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-08-22

    Fear extinction is a major task in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of exposure therapy, one of the most used treatments for stress-related disorders. It was recently reported that an extinction of 5 consecutive days prevents spontaneous recovery of fear memory. Memory age and the timing of fear extinction influence the effect of fear extinction. In this study, we used contextual fear extinction in adult male mice to examine whether memory age influences an extinction of 5 consecutive days and whether consecutiveness is necessary to prevent spontaneous recovery. Our results showed that, although fear memory was not affected by the passage of time, the old fear memory (28 days after fear conditioning) was more sensitive to fear extinction than the young fear memory (7 days after fear conditioning). Additionally, we demonstrated that consecutiveness of extinction sessions is not necessary to prevent spontaneous recovery. Instead, fear extinction sessions at spaced intervals were found to be more effective than consecutive extinction sessions for young fear memory. Our results suggest that taking memory age and the interval of fear extinction sessions into consideration would help to optimize exposure therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Particle Tracing Modeling with SHIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2017-12-01

    The near-Earth inner magnetosphere, where most of the nation's civilian and military space assets operate, is an extremely hazardous region of the space environment which poses major risks to our space infrastructure. Failure of satellite subsystems or even total failure of a spacecraft can arise for a variety of reasons, some of which are related to the space environment: space weather events like single-event-upsets and deep dielectric charging caused by high energy particles, or surface charging caused by low to medium energy particles; other space hazards are collisions with natural or man-made space debris, or intentional hostile acts. A recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program aims at developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to understand the dynamics of the surface charging environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons on both macro- and microscale. These challenging problems are addressed using a team of world-class experts and state-of-the-art physics-based models and computational facilities. We present first results of a coupled BATS-R-US/RAM-SCB/Particle Tracing Model to evaluate particle fluxes in the inner magnetosphere. We demonstrate that this setup is capable of capturing the earthward particle acceleration process resulting from dipolarization events in the tail region of the magnetosphere.

  2. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-01-01

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data

  3. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-09-12

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data.

  4. Shielding Calculations for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) Fuel Transfer Cask with Micro shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Ariff Shah Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The shielding calculations for RTP fuel transfer cask was performed by using computer code Micro shield 7.02. Micro shield is a computer code designed to provide a model to be used for shielding calculations. The results of the calculations can be obtained fast but the code is not suitable for complex geometries with a shielding composed of more than one material. Nevertheless, the program is sufficient for As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) optimization calculations. In this calculation, a geometry based on the conceptual design of RTP fuel transfer cask was modeled. Shielding material used in the calculations were lead (Pb) and stainless steel 304 (SS304). The results obtained from these calculations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Shielding properties of fibre cement wallboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, D L; Godwin, G A; Coakley, K S

    1998-09-01

    Transmission data for a fibre cement wallboard (villaboard) are determined for use in diagnostic shielding designs. Villaboard is found to be more attenuating than plasterboard e.g. 9 mm of villaboard is equivalent to 16 mm of plasterboard.

  6. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  7. Multifunctional BHL Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in radiation shielding technology remain an important challenge for NASA in order to protect their astronauts, particularly as NASA grows closer to manned...

  8. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  9. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed fiber reinforced ceramic composites for radiation shielding that can be used for external walls in long duration manned...

  10. Radiation shielding method for pipes, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Shuichi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute shielding walls of a dense structure around pipes and enable to reduce the wall thickness thereof upon periodical inspection, etc. for nuclear power plants. Constitution: For those portions of pipes requring shieldings, cylindrical vessels surrounding the portions are disposed and connected to a mercury supply system, a mercury discharge system and a freezing system for solidifying mercury. After charging mercury in a tank by way of a supply hose to the cylindrical vessels, the temperature of the mercury is lowered below the freezing point thereof to solidify the mercury while circulating cooling medium, to thereby form dense cylindrical radioactive-ray shielding walls. The specific gravity of mercury is greater than that of lead and, accordingly, the thickness of the shielding walls can be reduced as compared with the conventional wall thickness of the entire laminates. (Takahashi, M.)

  11. Long Duration Space Shelter Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has developed a ceramic composite material system that is more effective for shielding both GCR and SPE than aluminum. The composite...

  12. Shielding design for better plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    Design methods are described for providing a shield system for nuclear power plants that will facilitate maintenance and inspection, increase overall plant availability, and ensure that man-rem exposures are as low as practicable

  13. Radiation shielding structure for concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Crack inducing members for inducing cracks in a predetermined manner are buried in a concrete structure. Namely, a crack-inducing member comprises integrally a shielding plate and extended plates situated at the center of a wall and inducing plates vertically disposed to the boundary portion between them with the inducing plates being disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. There are disposed integrally a pair of the inducing plate spaced at a predetermined horizontal distance on both sides of the shielding plate so as to form a substantially crank-shaped cross section and extended plates formed in the extending direction of the shielding plate, and the inducing plates are disposed each in a direction perforating the wall. Then, cracks generated when stresses are exerted can be controlled, and generation of cracks passing through the concrete structure can be prevented reliably. The reliability of a radiation shielding effect can be enhanced remarkably. (N.H.)

  14. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  15. Passive Shielding for Low Frequency Magnetic Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damaskos, Nickander

    1997-01-01

    Report developed under SBIR Contract. An approach to low frequency shielding is shown with application to suppression of electromagnetic fields emanating from rail gun barrels and power cable busses. Damaskos, Inc...

  16. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in the conditioning and extinction of fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Francis Giustino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Once acquired, a fearful memory can persist for a lifetime. Although learned fear can be extinguished, extinction memories are fragile. The resilience of fear memories to extinction may contribute to the maintenance of disorders of fear and anxiety, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. As such, considerable effort has been placed on understanding the neural circuitry underlying the acquisition, expression, and extinction of emotional memories in rodent models as well as in humans. A triad of brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala, form an essential brain circuit involved in fear conditioning and extinction. Within this circuit, the prefrontal cortex is thought to exert top-down control over subcortical structures to regulate appropriate behavioral responses. Importantly, a division of labor has been proposed in which the prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL subdivisions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC regulate the expression and suppression of fear in rodents, respectively. Here we critically review the anatomical and physiological evidence that has led to this proposed dichotomy of function within mPFC. We propose that under some conditions, the PL and IL act in concert, exhibiting similar patterns of neural activity in response to aversive conditioned stimuli and during the expression or inhibition of conditioned fear. This may stem from common synaptic inputs, parallel downstream outputs, or cortico-cortical interactions. Despite this functional covariation, these mPFC subdivisions may still be coding for largely opposing behavioral outcomes, with PL biased towards fear expression and IL towards suppression.

  17. Assessing fear following retrieval+extinction through suppression of baseline reward seeking vs. freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eShumake

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Freezing has become the predominant measure used in rodent studies of conditioned fear, but conditioned suppression of reward-seeking behavior may provide a measure that is more relevant to human anxiety disorders; that is, a measure of how fear interferes with the enjoyment of pleasurable activities. Previous work has found that an isolated presentation of a fear conditioned stimulus prior to extinction training (retrieval + extinction results in a more robust and longer-lasting reduction in fear. The objective of this study was to assess whether the retrieval + extinction effect is evident using conditioned suppression of reward seeking, operationalized as a reduction in baseline licking (without prior water deprivation for a 10% sucrose solution. We found that, compared to freezing, conditioned suppression of reward seeking was much more sensitive to fear conditioning and far less responsive to extinction training. As in previous work, we found that retrieval + extinction reduced post-extinction fear reinstatement when measured as freezing, but it did not reduce fear reinstatement when measured as conditioned suppression. This suggests that there is still residual fear following retrieval + extinction, or that this procedure only modifies memory traces in neural circuits relevant to the expression of freezing, but not to the suppression of reward seeking.

  18. Multi-domain active sound control and noise shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H; Utyuzhnikov, S V; Lam, Y W; Turan, A

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes an active sound control methodology based on difference potentials. The main feature of this methodology is its ability to automatically preserve "wanted" sound within a domain while cancelling "unwanted" noise from outside the domain. This method of preservation of the wanted sounds by active shielding control is demonstrated with various broadband and realistic sound sources such as human voice and music in multiple domains in a one-dimensional enclosure. Unlike many other conventional active control methods, the proposed approach does not require the explicit characterization of the wanted sound to be preserved. The controls are designed based on the measurements of the total field on the boundaries of the shielded domain only, which is allowed to be multiply connected. The method is tested in a variety of experimental cases. The typical attenuation of the unwanted noise is found to be about 20 dB over a large area of the shielded domain and the original wanted sound field is preserved with errors of around 1 dB and below through a broad frequency range up to 1 kHz.

  19. Shielding considerations and design concepts for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of shielding considerations and design concepts that have been under investigation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Lewis Research Center for the application of space reactor power systems to a wide range of future NASA missions. The missions are based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and Mission from Plant Earth programs currently under study. They include both instrument and human-rated applications in cislunar and outer space as well as planet surface locations. The SRPS configurations under consideration are based on advanced reactor and power-generation technologies being developed jointly by the US Department of Energy/NASA/US Department of Defense SP-100 space reactor power system program and the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative programs. The SP-100 reactor technology employs a UN-fueled, niobium-alloy-clad, pin-type core with high-temperature lithium coolant. Electrical power generation technologies include both direct or static and dynamic thermal-to-electrical conversion techniques, with selection dependent on mission power-level requirements. Shield designs are also highly mission dependent and can range from shadow-shield configurations employing tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) materials manufactured and assembled on Earth, to the use of indigenous planet surface materials that could be utilized on the moon and Mars

  20. Shielding design aspects of thermionic space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well documented that nuclear power sources will be required for the future exploration of space. Higher power levels [>10 kW (electric)] will be enabling, if not absolutely necessary, for the continued expansion of a human presence in the solar system and beyond. Space missions that will directly benefit continued life on Earth, including the monitoring for climate change and global warming, high-capacity communication satellites, and large, space-based radar systems to monitor the flow of airline traffic, will require progressively larger amounts of electrical power. Military applications, even with the ending of the Cold War, will continue to be needed for treaty verification activities. A thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor system is one of the many different technologies proposed for the utilization of nuclear energy in space. How the energy conversion is accomplished and the equipment requiring shielding have a profound effect on the overall shielding requirements for the system. There exist two configurations of this technology that can be exploited and will have a significant effect on shielding needs. The paper discusses in-core thermionic conversion and out-of-core conversion concepts

  1. Memory suppression trades prolonged fear and sleep-dependent fear plasticity for the avoidance of current fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Honma, Motoyasu; Yoshiike, Takuya; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2013-07-01

    Sleep deprivation immediately following an aversive event reduces fear by preventing memory consolidation during homeostatic sleep. This suggests that acute insomnia might act prophylactically against the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) even though it is also a possible risk factor for PTSD. We examined total sleep deprivation and memory suppression to evaluate the effects of these interventions on subsequent aversive memory formation and fear conditioning. Active suppression of aversive memory impaired retention of event memory. However, although the remembered fear was more reduced in sleep-deprived than sleep-control subjects, suppressed fear increased, and seemed to abandon the sleep-dependent plasticity of fear. Active memory suppression, which provides a psychological model for Freud's ego defense mechanism, enhances fear and casts doubt on the potential of acute insomnia as a prophylactic measure against PTSD. Our findings bring into question the role of sleep in aversive-memory consolidation in clinical PTSD pathophysiology.

  2. Encoding of Fear Memory in High and Low Fear Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    response to  masked   facial  stimuli in posttraumatic stress disorder: a  functional MRI study. Biological psychiatry 47:769‐76  105.  Repa JC, Muller J...none Developed a tissue or serum repository none Developed a data registry none Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle) Coyner...of tissue . RESULTS We find in a mouse line of high and low Pavlovian conditioned fear that inhibition of the phosphorylation of MAPK with the MEK

  3. Method to produce a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The neutron shielding for armoured vehicles consists of preshaped plastic plates which are coated on the armoured vehicle walls by conversion of the thermoplast. Suitable plastics or thermoplasts are PVC, PVC acetate, or mixtures of these, into which more than 50% B, B 4 C, or BN is embedded. The colour of the shielding may be determined by the choice of the neutron absorber, e.g. a white colour for BN. The plates are produced using an extruder or calender. (DG) [de

  4. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  5. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  6. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.M.; Martin, P.S.

    1995-05-01

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases

  7. The Absolute Shielding Constants of Heavy Nuclei: Resolving the Enigma of the (119)Sn Absolute Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Elena; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-02-07

    We demonstrate that the apparent disagreement between experimental determinations and four-component relativistic calculations of the absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei is due to the breakdown of the commonly assumed relation between the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the NMR shielding constants. We demonstrate that this breakdown has significant consequences for the absolute shielding constant of (119)Sn, leading to errors of about 1000 ppm. As a consequence, we expect that many absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei will be in need of revision.

  8. The Shadow of Physical Harm? Examining the Unique and Gendered Relationship Between Fear of Murder Versus Fear of Sexual Assault on Fear of Violent Crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Samantha; Cook, Carrie L

    2015-09-01

    The shadow hypothesis regarding the impact of fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime suggests that female fear of crime is characterized by concern about sexual assault as a contemporaneous victimization event during a violent crime event. Recent research has found that other types of crime, namely physical assault, may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. We know of no research that has examined the unique impact of fear of murder versus fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime. There is also a lack of research that explores how these two types of fear uniquely affect men and women. In addition to gender, we examine factors that have been suggested in previous research to correlate with fear of crime: race, victimization, vicarious victimization, and perceived risk. Through survey methodology, this research examines the unique relationship between both fear of murder and fear of sexual assault and fear of three types of violent crime for men and women. Results suggest differences in how fear of murder and fear of sexual assault are related to fear of other types of violence for men and women. Specifically, fear of murder is important in estimating male fear of robbery and aggravated assault. However, fear of sexual assault is almost as important as fear of murder for men in estimating fear of home invasion. Similarly, for women, fear of sexual assault and fear of murder both are significant factors associated with fear of violent crime, and differences between the levels of significance are marginal. This study is a first to examine whether murder may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. The results are informative in identifying what drives fear of crime, particularly violent crime, for both men and women. Avenues for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Fear patterns: a new approach to designing road safety advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algie, Jennifer; Rossiter, John R

    2010-01-01

    This research studies fear patterns within fear appeal anti-speeding television commercials. A pattern of fear is the sequence of fear arousal and fear reduction, if any, that is felt by the viewing audience when exposed to a fear appeal advertisement. Many road safety advertisers use fear appeals, such as "shock" advertising, that result in fear arousal, leaving the viewer feeling extremely tense. The moment-to-moment reactions of young drivers to 12 road safety commercials are gauged using a dynamic, temporal measure of fear. The fear patterns generated from each ad are analyzed and a new perspective on creating fear appeal road safety advertisements, with an emphasis on fear-relief, fear-partial relief, and fear-only patterns, is discussed.

  10. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  11. Reactor shielding. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Reactor shielding is necessary that people may work and live in the vicinity of reactors without receiving detrimental biological effects and that the necessary materials and instrumentation for reactor operation may function properly. Much of the necessary theoretical work and experimental measurement has been accomplished in recent years. Scientists have developed some very sophisticated methods which have contributed to a more thorough understanding of the problems involved and have produced some very reliable results leading to significant reductions in shield configurations. A panel of experts was convened from 9 to 13 March 1964 in Vienna at the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss the present status of reactor shielding. The participants were prominent shielding experts from most of the laboratories engaged in this field throughout the world. They presented status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of reactor shielding in their countries and much valuable discussion took place on some of the most relevant aspects of reactor shielding. All this material is presented in this report, together with abstracts of the supporting papers read to the Panel

  12. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  13. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm 2 ;. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach

  14. Specific and social fears in children and adolescents: separating normative fears from problem indicators and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Paola P; Pan, Pedro M; Hoffmann, Mauricio S; Wakschlag, Lauren S; Rohde, Luis A; Miguel, Euripedes C; Pine, Daniel S; Manfro, Gisele G; Salum, Giovanni A

    2017-01-01

    To distinguish normative fears from problematic fears and phobias. We investigated 2,512 children and adolescents from a large community school-based study, the High Risk Study for Psychiatric Disorders. Parent reports of 18 fears and psychiatric diagnosis were investigated. We used two analytical approaches: confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)/item response theory (IRT) and nonparametric receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. According to IRT and ROC analyses, social fears are more likely to indicate problems and phobias than specific fears. Most specific fears were normative when mild; all specific fears indicate problems when pervasive. In addition, the situational fear of toilets and people who look unusual were highly indicative of specific phobia. Among social fears, those not restricted to performance and fear of writing in front of others indicate problems when mild. All social fears indicate problems and are highly indicative of social phobia when pervasive. These preliminary findings provide guidance for clinicians and researchers to determine the boundaries that separate normative fears from problem indicators in children and adolescents, and indicate a differential severity threshold for specific and social fears.

  15. The genetic covariation between fear conditioning and self-report fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettema, John M; Annas, Peter; Neale, Michael C; Fredrikson, Mats; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2008-03-15

    Fear conditioning is a traditional model for the acquisition of phobias, whereas behavioral therapies use processes underlying extinction to treat phobic and other anxiety disorders. Furthermore, fear conditioning has been proposed as an endophenotype for genetic studies of anxiety disorders. Although prior studies have demonstrated that fear conditioning and self-report fears are heritable, no studies have determined whether they share a common genetic basis. We obtained fear conditioning data from 173 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry who also provided self-report ratings of 16 common fears. With multivariate structural equation modeling, we analyzed factor-derived scores for the subjective fear ratings together with the electrophysiologic skin conductance responses during habituation, acquisition, and extinction to determine the extent of their genetic covariation. Phenotypic correlations between experimental and self-report fear measures were modest and, counter-intuitively, negative (i.e., subjects who reported themselves as more fearful had smaller electrophysiologic responses). Best-fit models estimated a significant (negative) genetic correlation between them, although genetic factors underlying fear conditioning accounted for only 9% of individual differences in self-report fears. Experimentally derived fear conditioning measures share only a small portion of the genetic factors underlying individual differences in subjective fears, cautioning against relying too heavily on the former as an endophenotype for genetic studies of phobic disorders.

  16. Specific and social fears in children and adolescents: separating normative fears from problem indicators and phobias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola P. Laporte

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To distinguish normative fears from problematic fears and phobias. Methods: We investigated 2,512 children and adolescents from a large community school-based study, the High Risk Study for Psychiatric Disorders. Parent reports of 18 fears and psychiatric diagnosis were investigated. We used two analytical approaches: confirmatory factor analysis (CFA/item response theory (IRT and nonparametric receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Results: According to IRT and ROC analyses, social fears are more likely to indicate problems and phobias than specific fears. Most specific fears were normative when mild; all specific fears indicate problems when pervasive. In addition, the situational fear of toilets and people who look unusual were highly indicative of specific phobia. Among social fears, those not restricted to performance and fear of writing in front of others indicate problems when mild. All social fears indicate problems and are highly indicative of social phobia when pervasive. Conclusion: These preliminary findings provide guidance for clinicians and researchers to determine the boundaries that separate normative fears from problem indicators in children and adolescents, and indicate a differential severity threshold for specific and social fears.

  17. Radiation Shielding of Lunar Regolith/Polyethylene Composites and Lunar Regolith/Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Quincy F.; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Zhou, Jianren

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is a complex mixed field of ionizing radiation that can pose hazardous risks to sophisticated electronics and humans. Mission planning for lunar exploration and long duration habitat construction will face tremendous challenges of shielding against various types of space radiation in an attempt to minimize the detrimental effects it may have on materials, electronics, and humans. In late 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) discovered that water content in lunar regolith found in certain areas on the moon can be up to 5.6 +/-2.8 weight percent (wt%) [A. Colaprete, et. al., Science, Vol. 330, 463 (2010). ]. In this work, shielding studies were performed utilizing ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and aluminum, both being standard space shielding materials, simulated lunar regolith/ polyethylene composites, and simulated lunar regolith mixed with UHMWPE particles and water. Based on the LCROSS findings, radiation shielding experiments were conducted to test for shielding efficiency of regolith/UHMWPE/water mixtures with various percentages of water to compare relative shielding characteristics of these materials. One set of radiation studies were performed using the proton synchrotron at the Loma Linda Medical University where high energy protons similar to those found on the surface of the moon can be generated. A similar experimental protocol was also used at a high energy spalation neutron source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). These experiments studied the shielding efficiency against secondary neutrons, another major component of space radiation field. In both the proton and neutron studies, shielding efficiency was determined by utilizing a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) behind various thicknesses of shielding composite panels or mixture materials. Preliminary results from these studies indicated that adding 2 wt% water to regolith particles could increase shielding of

  18. Retrieving fear memories, as time goes by…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Monte, Fabricio H.; Quirk, Gregory J.; Li, Bo; Penzo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning researches have led to a comprehensive picture of the neuronal circuit underlying the formation of fear memories. In contrast, knowledge about the retrieval of fear memories is much more limited. This disparity may stem from the fact that fear memories are not rigid, but reorganize over time. To bring clarity and raise awareness on the time-dependent dynamics of retrieval circuits, we review current evidence on the neuronal circuitry participating in fear memory retrieval at both early and late time points after conditioning. We focus on the temporal recruitment of the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and its BDNFergic efferents to the central nucleus of the amygdala, for the retrieval and maintenance of fear memories. Finally, we speculate as to why retrieval circuits change across time, and the functional benefits of recruiting structures such as the paraventricular nucleus into the retrieval circuit. PMID:27217148

  19. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  20. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  1. Contributions of the Central Extended Amygdala to Fear and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackman, Alexander J; Fox, Andrew S

    2016-08-03

    It is widely thought that phasic and sustained responses to threat reflect dissociable circuits centered on the central nucleus of the amygdala (Ce) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), the two major subdivisions of the central extended amygdala. Early versions of this hypothesis remain highly influential and have been incorporated into the National Institute of Mental Health Research Research Domain Criteria framework. However, new observations encourage a different perspective. Anatomical studies show that the Ce and BST form a tightly interconnected unit, where different kinds of threat-relevant information can be integrated and used to assemble states of fear and anxiety. Imaging studies in humans and monkeys show that the Ce and BST exhibit similar functional profiles. Both regions are sensitive to a range of aversive challenges, including uncertain or temporally remote threat; both covary with concurrent signs and symptoms of fear and anxiety; both show phasic responses to short-lived threat; and both show heightened activity during sustained exposure to diffusely threatening contexts. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that both regions can control the expression of fear and anxiety during sustained exposure to diffuse threat. These observations compel a reconsideration of the central extended amygdala's contributions to fear and anxiety and its role in neuropsychiatric disease. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/368050-14$15.00/0.

  2. Altered Amygdala Development and Fear Processing in Prematurely Born Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismaru, Anca Liliana; Gui, Laura; Vasung, Lana; Lejeune, Fleur; Barisnikov, Koviljka; Truttmann, Anita; Borradori Tolsa, Cristina; Hüppi, Petra S

    2016-01-01

    Prematurely born children have a high risk of developmental and behavioral disabilities. Cerebral abnormalities at term age have been clearly linked with later behavior alterations, but existing studies did not focus on the amygdala. Moreover, studies of early amygdala development after premature birth in humans are scarce. To compare amygdala volumes in very preterm infants at term equivalent age (TEA) and term born infants, and to relate premature infants' amygdala volumes with their performance on the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB) fear episode at 12 months. Eighty one infants born between 2008 and 2014 at the University Hospitals of Geneva and Lausanne, taking part in longitudinal and functional imaging studies, who had undergone a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at TEA enabling manual amygdala delineation. Amygdala volumes assessed by manual segmentation of MRI scans; volumes of cortical and subcortical gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) automatically segmented in 66 infants; scores for the Lab-TAB fear episode for 42 premature infants at 12 months. Amygdala volumes were smaller in preterm infants at TEA than term infants (mean difference 138.03 mm(3), p motor activity in the fear episode. Our results indicate that premature birth is associated with a reduction in amygdala volumes and white matter volumes at TEA, suggesting that altered amygdala development might be linked to alterations in white matter connectivity reported in premature infants. Moreover, our data suggests that such alterations might affect infants' fear-processing capabilities.

  3. Exploring epigenetic regulation of fear memory and biomarkers associated with Post-traumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Maddox

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review examines recent work on epigenetic mechanisms underlying animal models of fear learning as well as its translational implications in disorders of fear regulation, such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Specifically, we will examine work outlining roles of differential histone acetylation and DNA methylation associated with consolidation, reconsolidation and extinction in Pavlovian fear paradigms. We then focus on the numerous studies examining the epigenetic modifications of the Brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF pathway and the extension of these findings from animal models to recent work in human clinical populations. We will also review recently published data on FKBP5 regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function, and how this is modulated in animal models of PTSD and in human clinical populations via epigenetic mechanisms. As glucocorticoid regulation of memory consolidation is well established in fear models, we examine how these recent data contribute to our broader understanding of fear memory formation. The combined recent progress in epigenetic modulation of memory with the advances in fear neurobiology suggest that this area may be critical to progress in our understanding of fear-related disorders with implications for new approaches to treatment and prevention.

  4. Fear of nuclear power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higson, D.J. [Paddington, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Communicating the benefits of nuclear power generation, although essential, is unlikely to be sufficient by itself to counter the misconceptions which hinder the adoption of this technology, viz: that it is unsafe, generates intractable waste, facilitates the proliferation of nuclear weapons, etc. Underlying most of these objections is the fear of radiation, engendered by misunderstandings of the effects of exposure - not the actual risks of radiation exposure themselves. Unfortunately, some aspects of current radiation protection practices promote the misconception that there is no safe dose. A prime purpose of communications from the nuclear industry should be to dispel these misconceptions. (author)

  5. The Safety Fears for Osprey

    OpenAIRE

    山下, 明博

    2012-01-01

    The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is the tiltrotor aircraft. In 2012, U.S. Marine deployed Osprey at the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma Air Station in Okinawa prefecture. But, Okinawa residents have opposed the move, citing safety fears. I think Osprey is the ideal aircraft blending the best of helicopters and airplanes, and it will be available for purposes other than military in a near future. This paper attempts to show that Japan should take note about the danger of unmanned aerial vehicle rat...

  6. Numerical Models for the Study of Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA Monica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents 2D and 3D models for the study of electromagnetic shielding of a coil. The magnetic fields are computed for defining the shielding effectiveness. Parametrized numerical studies were performed in order to established the influence of shield thickness and height on magnetic field in certain points located in the exterior of coil – shield setup and on induced power within the shield.

  7. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  8. Can Hospital Form Trigger Fear Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; O'Boyle, Michael; Hou, Jiancheng; Nanda, Upali; Ghamari, Hessam

    2016-04-01

    To examine whether exposure to curve versus sharp contours in the built healthcare setting produces systematic and identifiable patterns of amygdala activation and behavioral response in healthy adults. Recent studies in cognitive neuroscience suggest that humans prefer objects with a curved contour compared with objects that have pointed features and a sharp-angled contour. An implicit perception of threat represented by sharp objects, in humans, was hypothesized to explain this bias. The study adopted a within-subject experimental design, where 36 subjects (representing three age-groups and both sexes) were exposed to a randomized order of 312 real-life images (objects, interiors, exteriors, landscape, and a set of control images). Amygdala activation was simultaneously captured using functional magnetic resonance imaging technology. Subjects' preference (like/dislike) data were also collected while in the scanner. Data were collected in 2013. In case of images depicting landscape and healthcare objects, brain scans show significant higher amygdala activation associated with sharp contours. However, in relation to images depicting hospital interiors and exterior envelops, brain scans show significant higher amygdala activation associated with curve contours. These activations pertain to exposure during the precognitive stages of the subjects' perception. Hospital forms do have systematic impact on fear response during precognitive stages of human perception. Whether this first impression colors the subsequent experience of an actual patient with real illness or injury is unknown. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Instructed fear learning, extinction, and recall: additive effects of cognitive information on emotional learning of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, Arash; Duval, Elizabeth R; Cisneros, Maria E; Taylor, Stephan F; Kessler, Daniel; Liberzon, Israel

    2017-08-01

    The effects of instruction on learning of fear and safety are rarely studied. We aimed to examine the effects of cognitive information and experience on fear learning. Fourty healthy participants, randomly assigned to three groups, went through fear conditioning, extinction learning, and extinction recall with two conditioned stimuli (CS+). Information was presented about the presence or absence of conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) contingency at different stages of the experiment. Information about the CS-US contingency prior to fear conditioning enhanced fear response and reduced extinction recall. Information about the absence of CS-US contingency promoted extinction learning and recall, while omission of this information prior to recall resulted in fear renewal. These findings indicate that contingency information can facilitate fear expression during fear learning, and can facilitate extinction learning and recall. Information seems to function as an element of the larger context in which conditioning occurs.

  10. Immediate extinction promotes the return of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian J; Hamacher-Dang, Tanja C; Wolf, Oliver T

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that immediate extinction is less effective than delayed extinction in attenuating the return of fear. This line of fear conditioning research impacts the proposed onset of psychological interventions after threatening situations. In the present study, forty healthy men were investigated in a differential fear conditioning paradigm with fear acquisition in context A, extinction in context B, followed by retrieval testing in both contexts 24h later to test fear renewal. Differently coloured lights served as conditioned stimuli (CS): two CS (CS+) were paired with an electrical stimulation that served as unconditioned stimulus, the third CS was never paired (CS-). Extinction took place immediately after fear acquisition or 24h later. One CS+ was extinguished whereas the second CS+ remained unextinguished to control for different time intervals between fear acquisition and retrieval testing. Immediate extinction led to larger skin conductance responses during fear retrieval to both the extinguished and unextinguished CS relative to the CS-, indicating a stronger return of fear compared to delayed extinction. Taken together, immediate extinction is less potent than delayed extinction and is associated with a stronger renewal effect. Thus, the time-point of psychological interventions relative to the offset of threatening situations needs to be carefully considered to prevent relapses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  12. From fear to flow personality and information interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Heinstrom, Jannica

    2010-01-01

    From Fear to Flow explores how personality traits may influence attitude, behaviour and reaction to information. Consideration is made for individual differences in information behaviour and reasons behind individual search differences. The book reviews personality and information behaviour and discusses how personality may influence the attitude towards information. Reaction to information is examined in contexts such as everyday life, decision-making, work, studies and human-computer interaction.Introduces a little researched area which is current and needed in our Informatio

  13. D-Cycloserine Does Not Facilitate Fear Extinction by Reducing Conditioned Stimulus Processing or Promoting Conditioned Inhibition to Contextual Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D.; McNally, Gavan P.; Richardson, Rick

    2012-01-01

    The NMDA receptor partial agonist d-cycloserine (DCS) enhances the extinction of learned fear in rats and exposure therapy in humans with anxiety disorders. Despite these benefits, little is known about the mechanisms by which DCS promotes the loss of fear. The present study examined whether DCS augments extinction retention (1) through reductions…

  14. Retrieval cues that trigger reconsolidation of associative fear memory are not necessarily an exact replica of the original learning experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Disrupting the process of memory reconsolidation may point to a novel therapeutic strategy for the permanent reduction of fear in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. However both in animal and human studies the retrieval cue typically involves a re-exposure to the original fear-conditioned

  15. Factors of Child Dental Fear : A Literature Review of Dental Fear in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Ayumi; Sato, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of the literature investigating dental fear in children during the past ten years and to review factors of child dental fear. Methods. The literature was systematically retrieved from an electronic database. The thirty four literatures which were written about the fear of dentistry, psychology and behavior during dental treatment were chosen. Results. The terms of fear being used were “Shika-kyoufu”, “Dental fear”, etc. However, the terms were not defined in...

  16. Observational learning and pain-related fear: an experimental study with colored cold pressor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Kim; Goubert, Liesbet; Peters, Madelon L; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to experimentally test whether pain-related fear can be acquired through observational learning, whether extinction occurs after actual exposure to the aversive stimulus, and whether pain-related fear was associated with increased pain ratings. During an observation phase, female volunteers watched a video showing models performing cold pressor tasks (CPT), of which the color served as a conditioned stimulus (CS). In a differential fear conditioning paradigm, each of 2 colors were either paired with models' painful (CS+) or neutral (CS-) facial expressions. Exposure consisted of participants performing CPTs of both colors (10°C). Self-reported fear of pain and expected pain ratings were obtained after the observation period, while actual pain and avoidance measures were obtained during and after exposure. Results show that after observing another person performing the CPT associated with the painful faces, subjects report more fear of pain and expect more intense and unpleasant pain as compared with the CPT associated with the neutral faces. This effect of observational learning on pain-related fear persisted until after exposure. During and after exposure no stimulus-type effect for pain ratings was found. This study provides preliminary evidence for observational learning of pain-related fear in humans. Fear of pain can be more disabling than pain itself, and is a risk factor for chronic pain. Knowledge about the acquisition of pain-related fear may help to develop novel pain management programs. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the effects of observational learning on pain-related fear. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  18. Shielded chamber control stations: an answer to radiological protection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaboudiniere, Catherine.

    1979-06-01

    This study, carried out at the radiometallurgy laboratory of the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre, is based on an ergonomic approach. It shows that the shielded chamber control station, designed for human protection against ionizing radiations, demands an effort of adaptation on the part of the operator. This station does in fact meet radiological protection obligations but would benefit from certain improvements aimed at reducing the secondary fatigue of manipulators already under the strain of adapting to the machine. Fields in which improvements and/or changes are desirable have been investigated with special reference to telemanipulators. New and better designed instruments will soon appear on the telemanipulator market [fr

  19. Application of ceramics for neutron shielding. Proposal of multi-functional shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Kazuyoshi; Ueki, Kohtaro; Ohashi, Atsuto [Ship Research Inst., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Amada, Shigeyasu [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Radiation shielding is one of the fundamental technologies to ensure the safety of the nuclear plants. Particularly for the nuclear systems as the power plants of ships and undersea vehicles, radiation shielding should be achieved within limited space and weight. Ceramics are of great interest as shielding components, because they can be composed with a wide variation of elements that have different shielding specifications. They are also known as good structural materials at high temperatures. Therefore, ceramics may be promising as 'multi-functional' shielding materials. In the present study, neutron shielding effects are first investigated by a series of the experiments using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source and simulated by using Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4A. The role of each ceramics is discussed particularly in terms of the 'enhancement effect' by medium-heavy elements, such as chromium and titanium. As an advanced technique to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of the materials, a laser irradiation method is proposed and applied to those ceramics that are expected to be neutron shielding components. Detailed discussion is made on the effects of porosity and multiple irradiation resulting in a fatigue-like behavior. Based on the results of these experiments and simulations, a three-layered arrangement, consisting of chromium carbide, titanium boride and boron nitride, is proposed as a multi-functional shielding material that minimizes the dose-equivalent rate and also exhibits good thermal shock resistance. (author)

  20. Modelling the fear of crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Curiel, Rafael; Bishop, Steven

    2017-07-01

    How secure people feel in a particular region is obviously linked to the actual crime suffered in that region but the exact relationship between crime and its fear is quite subtle. Two regions may have the same crime rate but their local perception of security may differ. Equally, two places may have the same perception of security even though one may have a significantly lower crime rate. Furthermore, a negative perception might persist for many years, even when crime rates drop. Here, we develop a model for the dynamics of the perception of security of a region based on the distribution of crime suffered by the population using concepts similar to those used for opinion dynamics. Simulations under a variety of conditions illustrate different scenarios and help us determine the impact of suffering more, or less, crime. The inhomogeneous concentration of crime together with a memory loss process is incorporated into the model for the perception of security, and results explain why people are often more fearful than actually victimized; why a region is perceived as being insecure despite a low crime rate; and why a decrease in the crime rate might not significantly improve the perception of security.

  1. Modelling the fear of crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Steven

    2017-01-01

    How secure people feel in a particular region is obviously linked to the actual crime suffered in that region but the exact relationship between crime and its fear is quite subtle. Two regions may have the same crime rate but their local perception of security may differ. Equally, two places may have the same perception of security even though one may have a significantly lower crime rate. Furthermore, a negative perception might persist for many years, even when crime rates drop. Here, we develop a model for the dynamics of the perception of security of a region based on the distribution of crime suffered by the population using concepts similar to those used for opinion dynamics. Simulations under a variety of conditions illustrate different scenarios and help us determine the impact of suffering more, or less, crime. The inhomogeneous concentration of crime together with a memory loss process is incorporated into the model for the perception of security, and results explain why people are often more fearful than actually victimized; why a region is perceived as being insecure despite a low crime rate; and why a decrease in the crime rate might not significantly improve the perception of security. PMID:28804260

  2. Dreaming Your Fear Away: A Computational Model for Fear Extinction Learning During Dreaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.; Lu et al., B.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a computational model is presented that models how dreaming is used to learn fear extinction. The approach addresses dreaming as internal simulation incorporating memory elements in the form of sensory representations and their associated fear. During dream episodes regulation of fear

  3. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  4. Fear of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and fear of other illness in suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Jallinoja, P T; Henriksson, M M

    1994-01-01

    Suicide victims with fear of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other somatic illness were compared for psychosocial and health-related characteristics, triggers and content of fear. Fear of AIDS cases (n = 28), 2% of the 1-year Finnish suicide population (n = 1397), were younger...

  5. How fear appeals work : motivational biases in the processing of fear-arousing health communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, E.H.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the study of fear appeals, i.e. messages in which people are presented with fear-arousing health information, in order to convince them they should alter unhealthy habits and adopt healthy lifestyles. Fear appeals typically start with the presentation of the negative

  6. Blurring Aversive Memory: Exploring a Novel Route to Fear Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pathological fear typically involves exposure to the feared stimulus. This procedure is effective in reducing fear in the short term. However, many patients relapse, i.e. show a return of fear. The present thesis explored a novel route to counter the renewal of fear. Previous research

  7. Blurring Aversive Memory : Exploring a Novel Route to Fear Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leer, Arne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/381059650

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pathological fear typically involves exposure to the feared stimulus. This procedure is effective in reducing fear in the short term. However, many patients relapse, i.e. show a return of fear. The present thesis explored a novel route to counter the renewal of fear. Previous research

  8. Childhood dental fear in the Netherlands: prevalence and normative data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, M.; Hoogstraten, J.; Prins, P.J.M.; Veerkamp, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to present normative data on dental fear for the Dutch child population, by identifying not only highly fearful children but also children at risk for developing this high dental fear. METHODS: Fear distribution of samples of high and low fearful children was studied,

  9. Comparison of eye shields in radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, B.E.; Wellington Hospital, Wellington; Johnson, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Both MeV electrons and kV photons are used in the treatment of superficial cancers. The advantages and disadvantages for each of these modalities have been widely reported in the literature (See for example [1-2]). Of particular note in the literature is the use of lead and tungsten eye shields to protect ocular structures during radiotherapy. An investigation addressing issues raised in the literature that are relevant to the Wellington Cancer Centre method of treatment of lesions near the eye shall be summarised. Various small sized fields were irradiated to determine depth dose and profile curves in a water phantom shielded by various commercially available eye shields. Transmission factors relevant to critical ocular structures and particle distribution theories are used to further elucidate the comparison between the use of MeV electrons and kV photons in the treatment of superficial cancers. Superficial X-rays from a Pantak Therapax unit SXT 150 model of HVL 4.90mm Al were used for the lead eye shield measurements and electrons from a Varian Clinac 2100C nominal energies 6MeV and 9MeV (R p 3.00cm and 4.34cm respectively) were used for the tungsten eye shield measurements. For the photon measurements circular applicators of 3cm, 4cm and 5cm diameter were used and for the electrons standard 6x6cm and 10x 10cm applicators were used, with no custom inserts. A Scanditronix RFA-300 water phantom and Scanditronix RFAplus version 5.3 software application were used to collect and collate all data. The eye shields were the Radiation Products Design Inc. medium lead eye shield (item 934-014) and the MED-TEC tungsten eye shields MT-T-45 M and MT-T-45 S. It is demonstrated that electron fields have appreciably greater scatter into the area directly under the eye shields than the photon fields. Similarly at the region of d max for the electron fields the relative dose is appreciably greater than the photon fields at similar depth. The relative merits for

  10. A rational fear? Pedagogy of fear in public discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Ostrowicka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present the results of the critical analysis and interpretation of the debate on the issue of compulsory vaccination conducted in the weekly magazine Polityka in 2012. Based on the analysis of discursive strategies employed in the examined text, the constitutive role of the strategy of authorization has been found, which, because of excessive use of rhetorical devices and the power of “rhetoric of exclusion,” paradoxically resulted in “the problem” of authority. The results have been discussed from a pedagogic perspective, which is particularly interested in educational consequences of discursive practices and pedagogy. In view of its particular organizational and ideological dimensions, the analyzed discourse was interpreted through the prism of persuasion and pathos relations in the pedagogy of fear—fear of the discursively constructed ENEMY.

  11. Fear of childbirth: a neglected dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisto, Terhi; Halmesmäki, Erja

    2003-03-01

    Severe fear of childbirth complicates 6% to 10% of parturients and is manifested as nightmares, physical complaints and difficulties in concentrating on work or on family activities. Very often fear of childbirth leads to request for an elective cesarean section (CS). In Finland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, fear of childbirth or maternal request is the reason for about 7-22% of CS births. Fear of childbirth is as common in nulliparous as in parous women. Fear of labor pain is strongly associated with the fear of pain in general, and a previous complicated childbirth or inadequate pain relief are the most common reasons for requesting a CS among parous women. Previous psychological morbidity and a great number of daily stressors expose a woman to a great risk of fear of childbirth. Fear of childbirth is not an isolated problem but associated with the woman's personal characteristics, mainly general anxiety, low self-esteem, and depression, and dissatisfaction with their partnership, and lack of support. Also the partners of women with fear have a certain pattern of low psychological well-being, resulting in low life-satisfaction, dissatisfaction with partnerships, and depression. A vivid debate about the woman's right to choose the mode of delivery is going on in obstetric literature, but discussion on the reasons for women to request a CS, or on the possibilities to help them overcome the fear of vaginal childbirth is scanty. Preliminary Swedish and Finnish reports demonstrated the results of treatment during pregnancy, when more than half of the women withdrew their request after being able to discuss their anxiety and fear, and vaginal deliveries after treatment were successful.

  12. Radiation shielding fiber and its manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Ono, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture radiation shielding fibers of excellent shielding effects. Method: Fibers containing more than 1 mmol/g of carboxyl groups are bonded with heavy metals, or they are impregnated with an aqueous solution containing water-soluble heavy metal salts dissolved therein. Fibers as the substrate may be any of forms such as short fibers, long fibers, fiber tows, webs, threads, knitting or woven products, non-woven fabrics, etc. It is however necessary that fibers contain more than 1 mmol/g, preferably, from 2 to 7 mmol/g of carboxylic groups. Since heavy metals having radiation shielding performance are bonded to the outer layer of the fibers and the inherent performance of the fibers per se is possessed, excellent radiation shielding performance can be obtained, as well as they can be applied with spinning, knitting or weaving, stitching, etc. thus can be used for secondary fiber products such as clothings, caps, masks, curtains, carpets, cloths, etc. for use in radiation shieldings. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. De

    2003-02-24

    One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

  14. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  15. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  16. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  17. Analysis of Shield Construction in Spherical Weathered Granite Development Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quan; Li, Peigang; Gong, Shuhua

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of spherical weathered bodies (commonly known as "boulder") in the granite development area directly affects the shield construction of urban rail transit engineering. This paper is based on the case of shield construction of granite globular development area in Southern China area, the parameter control in shield machine selection and shield advancing during the shield tunneling in this special geological environment is analyzed. And it is suggested that shield machine should be selected for shield construction of granite spherical weathered zone. Driving speed, cutter torque, shield machine thrust, the amount of penetration and the speed of the cutter head of shield machine should be controlled when driving the boulder formation, in order to achieve smooth excavation and reduce the disturbance to the formation.

  18. Evaluation of a permanent reactor vessel head shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.S.; Johnson, T.G.; Tipswork, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Virginia Power recently completed installing permanent reactor vessel head shields at all four of its nuclear units-Surry 1 and 2 (781-MWe Westinghouse PWRs) and North Anna 1 and 2 (893-MWe Westinghouse PWRs). Permanent shields were chosen over the use of temporary shielding based on a cost/benefit analysis. Factors that were taken into account in the analysis included the cost of the shields, the one-time dose commitment for installation of permanent shields, dose and manpower commitments for installation and removal of temporary shielding during each outage, decontamination and storage of temporary shielding between outages, and projected dose savings for both types of shields. Basically, permanent shields were found to be more cot-effective because each required only a one-time dose commitment for installation

  19. Plasticity of Fear and Safety Neurons of the Amygdala in Response to Fear Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition learning induces plasticity and remodeling of circuits within the amygdala. Most studies examine these changes in nondiscriminative fear conditioning paradigms. Using a discriminative fear, safety, and reward conditioning task, Sangha et al. (2013) have previously reported several neural microcircuits within the basal amygdala (BA) which discriminate among these cues, including a subpopulation of neurons responding selectively to a safety cue and not a fear cue. Here, the hypothesis that these “safety” neurons isolated during discriminative conditioning are biased to become fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, when fear behavior diminishes, was tested. Although 41% of “safety” neurons became fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, the data revealed that there was no bias for these neurons to become preferentially responsive during fear extinction compared to the other identified subgroups. In addition to the plasticity seen in the “safety” neurons, 44% of neurons unresponsive to either the fear cue or safety cue during discriminative conditioning became fear cue responsive during extinction. Together these emergent responses to the fear cue as a result of extinction support the hypothesis that new learning underlies extinction. In contrast, 47% of neurons responsive to the fear cue during discriminative conditioning became unresponsive to the fear cue during extinction. These findings are consistent with a suppression of neural responding mediated by inhibitory learning, or, potentially, by direct unlearning. Together, the data support extinction as an active process involving both gains and losses of responses to the fear cue and suggests the final output of the integrated BA circuit in influencing fear behavior is a balance of excitation and inhibition, and perhaps reversal of learning-induced changes. PMID:26733838

  20. Fear of pain in pediatric headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Laura E; Pielech, Melissa; Cappucci, Stefanie; Lebel, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    The current study provides the first measure of pain-related fear for pediatric headache patients. From a large pediatric headache clinic, a cross-sectional cohort of 206 children and adolescents completed measures of pain-related fear, anxiety sensitivity, catastrophizing, pain acceptance, functional disability, and school functioning. The two-factor solution of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FOPQ) was confirmed from the originally derived structure with pediatric headache patients. Simultaneously regressing FOPQ subscales fear of pain and activity avoidance on theorized construct validity measures demonstrated that fear of pain was more closely linked with anxiety sensitivity and pain catastrophizing while activity avoidance had a strong negative association with pain acceptance (activity engagement and pain willingness). Pain-related fear was not significantly associated with pain level. After controlling for demographic factors and pain, fear of pain and activity avoidance accounted for an additional 26% of the variance in functional disability and school functioning outcomes, with activity avoidance accounting for much of this relationship. Although typically considered an influential construct among musculoskeletal patients, pain-related fear is also an important factor influencing functioning among pediatric headache patients, with the dimension of activity avoidance particularly salient. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Neuroticism modifies psychophysiological responses to fearful films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Reynaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroticism is a personality component frequently found in anxious and depressive psychiatric disorders. The influence of neuroticism on negative emotions could be due to its action on stimuli related to fear and sadness, but this remains debated. Our goal was thus to better understand the impact of neuroticism through verbal and physiological assessment in response to stimuli inducing fear and sadness as compared to another negative emotion (disgust. METHODS: Fifteen low neurotic and 18 high neurotic subjects were assessed on an emotional attending task by using film excerpts inducing fear, disgust, and sadness. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR and corrugator muscle activity (frowning as indices of emotional expression. RESULTS: SCR was larger in high neurotic subjects than in low neurotics for fear relative to sadness and disgust. Moreover, corrugator activity and SCR were larger in high than in low neurotic subjects when fear was induced. CONCLUSION: After decades of evidence that individuals higher in neuroticism experience more intense emotional reactions to even minor stressors, our results indicate that they show greater SCR and expressive reactivity specifically to stimuli evoking fear rather than to those inducing sadness or disgust. Fear processing seems mainly under the influence of neuroticism. This modulation of autonomic activity by neurotics in response to threat/fear may explain their increased vulnerability to anxious psychopathologies such as PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder.

  2. State anxiety modulates the return of fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, Manuel; Mertens, Gaetan; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for anxiety disorders are effective but limited by the high frequency of clinical relapse. Processes underlying relapse are thought to be experimentally modeled in fear conditioning experiments with return fear (ROF) inductions. Thereby reinstatement-induced ROF might be

  3. Fears, Hyperacusis and Musicality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Stefan; Rosander, Michael; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated the prevalence of fear and hyperacusis and the possible connections between fear, hyperacusis and musicality in a Swedish sample of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). The study included 38 individuals and a cross-sectional design, with no matched control group. Two persons, who knew the participant well, completed a…

  4. Cancer and the fear of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapp, R.

    1981-01-01

    In discussing the fear of the public to risks arising from radiation it is stressed that this fear is exacerbated by the media who opt for sensation and publicise the fearmongering of a small group of unorthodox scientists while being slow to report the less sensational views of the scientific majority. (U.K.)

  5. The neural dynamics of fear memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    While much of what we learn will be forgotten over time, fear memory appears to be particularly resilient to forgetting. Our understanding of how fearful events are transformed into durable memory, and how this memory subsequently influences the processing of (novel) stimuli, is limited. Studying

  6. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  7. Fear of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and fear of other illness in suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Jallinoja, P T; Henriksson, M M

    1994-01-01

    and fewer had serious somatic disease (32% vs 64%) compared with cases of fear of other somatic illness. Both groups had more depression, especially major depression (54% and 61% vs 26%), more psychotic disorders (50% and 32% vs 24%) and health care contacts during their final week (61% and 64% vs 36%) than...... other suicides. Suicidal fear of AIDS calls for evaluation of sexual and other risk behaviour, but fear of AIDS was largely generated by the extensive media coverage. Fear of other somatic illness was more diverse in origin and related to illness experiences. Suicidal fear of illness calls...

  8. Calculated shielding factors for selected European houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1984-12-01

    Shielding factors for gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces have been calculated with the computer model DEPSHIELD for single-family and multi-storey buildings in France, United Kingdom and Denmark. For all three countries it was found that the shielding factors for single-family houses are approximately a factor of 2 - 10 higher that those for buildings with five or more storeys. Away from doors and windows the shielding factors for French, British, and Danish single-family houses are in the range 0.03 - 0.1, 0.06 - 0.4, and 0.07 - 0.3, respectively. The uncertainties of the calculations are discussed and DEPSHIELD-results are compared with other methods as well as with experimental results. (author)

  9. Radiation safety shield for a syringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Safety apparatus for use in administering radioactive serums by a syringe, without endangering the health and safety of the medical operators is described. The apparatus consists of a sheath and a shield which can be retracted into the sheath to assay the radioactive serum in an assay well. The shield can be moved from the retracted position into an extended position when the serum is to be injected into the patient. To protect the operator, the shield can be constructed of tantalum or any like high density substance to attenuate the radiation, emanating from the radioactive serums contained in the syringe, from passing to the atmosphere. A lead glass window is provided so that the operator can determine the exact quantity of the radioactive serum which is contained in the syringe

  10. Slipforming of reinforced concrete shield building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, M.C.; King, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The unique design and construction features of slipforming the heavily reinforced concrete cylindrical shield walls at the Satsop nuclear plant in Washington, D.C. site are presented. The shield walls were designed in compliance with seismic requirements which resulted in the need for reinforcing steel averaging 326 kg/m/sup 3/. A 7.6 m high, three-deck moving platform was designed to permit easy installation of the reinforcing steel, embedments, and blockouts, and to facilitate concrete placement and finishing. Two circular box trusses, one on each side of the shield wall, were used in combination with a spider truss to meet both the tolerance and strength requirements for the slipform assembly

  11. Final design of ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Kyu; Park, Sungwoo [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dongkwon; Kang, Kyung-O. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungmun [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si 10060 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 49111 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Engineering design of thermal shield manifold is finalized. • Pipe routing, support design and flow balance are verified by analysis. • Mock-ups are fabricated to verify the design. - Abstract: The ITER thermal shield is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas. The helium coolant flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the final design of thermal shield manifold. Pipe design to accommodate the thermal contraction considering interface with adjacent components and detailed design of support structure are presented. R&D for the pipe branch connection is carried out to find a feasible manufacturing method. Global structural behavior and structural integrity of the manifold including pipe supports are investigated by a finite element analysis based on ASME B31.3 code. Flow analyses are performed to check the flow distribution.

  12. Progress of the ITER Thermal Shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Namil, E-mail: namil.her@iter.org [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hick, Robby; Le Barbier, Robin; Arzoumanian, Terenig; Choi, Chang-Ho; Sborchia, Carlo [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chung, Wooho; Nam, Kwanwoo; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Gyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngkil; Lim, Kisuk [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 10060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Design improvement of the ITER Thermal Shields was introduced. • Design of TS manifold and TS instrumentation were summarized. • Produced main material of the TS (SS304LN) was summarized. • Status of the VVTS manufacturing and the inspection requirements were summarized. - Abstract: The role of the ITER Thermal Shields (TS) is to minimize the radiation heat load from the warm components such as vacuum vessel and cryostat to magnet operating at 4.5 K. The final design of TS was completed in 2013 and manufacturing of the vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) is now on-going. This paper describes the development status of the TS in particular the design improvements, the fabrication and the requirements.

  13. Electromagnetic Shielding Efficiency Measurement of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dřínovský, J.; Kejík, Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of the shielding efficiency measurements of construction composite materials. This contribution describes an alternative test method of these measurements by using the measurement circular flange. The measured results and parameters of coaxial test flange are also discussed. The measurement circular flange is described by measured scattering parameters in the frequency range from 9 kHz up to 1 GHz. The accuracy of the used shielding efficiency measurement method was checked by brass calibration ring. The suitability of the coaxial test setup was also checked by measurements on the EMC test chamber. This data was compared with the measured data on the real EMC chamber. The whole measurement of shielding efficiency was controlled by the program which runs on a personal computer. This program was created in the VEE Pro environment produced by © Agilent Technology.

  14. Radiation shielding performance of some concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; Akyildirim, H.; Mavi, B.; Kilincarslan, S.; Basyigit, C.

    2007-01-01

    The energy consumption is increasing with the increased population of the world and thus new energy sources were discovered such as nuclear energy. Besides using nuclear energy, nuclear techniques are being used in a variety of fields such as medical hospital, industry, agriculture or military issue, the radiation protection becomes one of the important research fields. In radiation protection, the main rules are time, distance and shielding. The most effective radiation shields are materials which have a high density and high atomic number such as lead, tungsten which are expensive. Alternatively the concrete which produced using different aggregate can be used. The effectiveness of radiation shielding is frequently described in terms of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). These are the thicknesses of an absorber that will reduce the radiation to half, and one tenth of its intensity respectively. In this study the radiation protection properties of different types of concrete will be discussed

  15. Accelerator shielding experts meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen years after its first CERN edition, the Shielding Aspects of Accelerator, Targets and Irradiation Facility (SATIF) conference was held again here from 2-4 June. Now at its 10th edition, SATIF10 brought together experts from all over the world to discuss issues related to the shielding techniques. They set out the scene for an improved collaboration and discussed novel shielding solutions.   This was the most attended meeting of the series with more than 65 participants from 34 institutions and 14 countries. “We welcomed experts from many different laboratories around the world. We come from different contexts but we face similar problems. In this year’s session, among other things, we discussed ways for improving the effectiveness of calculations versus real data, as well as experimental solutions to investigate the damage that radiation produces on various materials and the electronics”, says Marco Silari, Chair of the conference and member of the DGS/RP gro...

  16. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  18. European Union: fears and hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles ROUET

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution analyses some data from Eurobarometer 83, spring 2015, especially to draw a map of Fears. The European Union is a divided space and one of the main consequences of the budget (financial crisis of Greece, followed by the crisis caused by the arrival of thousands of immigrants is an enhanced communication difficulty between the Western and Eastern parts of the EU But all citizens have some new rights with the European Citizenship, which are additional. One of the main issues for the future could be to change the fundamental basis of the Union, thus trying to organize a new articulation between local and supranational, with another role for States, for example to change the organisation of European elections, and to pursue the connection of public spaces with mobility.

  19. Fears caused by nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As after the Fukushima accident, fears with respect to nuclear energy may appear again, this very positive document outlines the differences between a nuclear bomb and a nuclear reactor, outlines the natural character of radioactivity and its benefits when used with low dose, outlines the fact that radioactivity although invisible can be easily and well measured. It comments the accident and recalls that TEPCO did not take the fact that ten meter high waves could happen as in Indonesia in 2004. It discusses the loss of confidence in scientists, in nuclear authorities. It addresses the issue of nuclear wastes, evokes the discovery of a natural underground nuclear reactor in Gabon, outlines properties of waste vitrification, discusses the case of high level wastes, of minor actinides, and of storage reversibility. It outlines the safety of installations containing plutonium, of plutonium transportation

  20. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.