WorldWideScience

Sample records for fe-like au ions

  1. Emission characteristics of AuSiBe field ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drandarov, N.; Georgieva, St.; Nikolov, B.; Donchev, T. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika)

    A ribbon type AuSiBe alloy field ion source, which combines the advantages of both hairpin type sources and reservoir type sources, has been constructed. The current-voltage characteristics of this source have been investigated. Hysteresis and four differentiated emission regions have been observed for them. By means of scanning electronic microscopy, it has been established that this complicated behaviour of the I-V curves and the angular distribution of the extracted ions are associated with the shape of the emitting surface. The mass spectrum of the emitted ions has been determined by means of an E x B mass filter. Considerable emission of Au[sup +], AuBe[sub 3][sup 2+], Si[sup 2+], Be[sup 2+], AuBe[sub 3][sup +], Be[sup +], Si[sup +], and Au[sup 2+] has been observed. (author).

  2. Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2006-03-31

    Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

  3. Ionic Charge State Distribution of Au Plasma for 7-Ion System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The present work extends the previous work[2] on 5-ion system to consider 7-ion system (i.e., Au47+ ~ Au53+). It is found that more highly charged ions, e.g., Au53+, Au54+ etc., could be able to be neglected, however, less highly charged ions, e.g., Au47+, Au46+ etc., are rather important. Therefore, a new idea to consider 8-ion system, i.e., Au46+ ~ Au53+, is under way. As a supplement, we discuss the simultaneous reaction, which would be important in this sort of works.

  4. Net baryon density in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, S A; Srivastava, D K; Bass, Steffen A.; Müller, Berndt; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the net baryon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the framework of the Parton Cascade Model (PCM). Parton rescattering and fragmentation leads to a substantial increase in the net baryon density at mid-rapidity over the density produced by initial primary parton-parton scatterings. The PCM is able to describe the measured net baryon density at RHIC.

  5. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  6. Digging gold: keV He+ ion interaction with Au

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilisa Veligura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Helium ion microscopy (HIM was used to investigate the interaction of a focused He+ ion beam with energies of several tens of kiloelectronvolts with metals. HIM is usually applied for the visualization of materials with extreme surface sensitivity and resolution. However, the use of high ion fluences can lead to significant sample modifications. We have characterized the changes caused by a focused He+ ion beam at normal incidence to the Au{111} surface as a function of ion fluence and energy. Under the influence of the beam a periodic surface nanopattern develops. The periodicity of the pattern shows a power-law dependence on the ion fluence. Simultaneously, helium implantation occurs. Depending on the fluence and primary energy, porous nanostructures or large blisters form on the sample surface. The growth of the helium bubbles responsible for this effect is discussed.

  7. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  8. Semiconducting Properties of Swift Au Ion-Irradiated ZnO Thin Films at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sera; Park, Hyun-Woo; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2017-02-01

    The semiconducting properties of Au ion-irradiated ZnO thin films were investigated as a function of ion irradiation dose at room temperature. The Au ion irradiation was conducted with acceleration energy of 130 MeV in the ion dose range from 1 × 1011 to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. The physical properties showed no change regardless of the Au ion irradiation dose; however, the electrical properties of Au ion-irradiated ZnO thin films changed, depending on the Au ion irradiation dose. The electronic structure drastically changed with the evolution of hybridized molecular orbital structure for the conduction band and band edge states below the conduction band. These remarkable changes in electronic structure correlate with changes in electrical properties, such as carrier concentration and mobility.

  9. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co–Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hua-jian [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yu-hua, E-mail: wangyuhua@wust.edu.cn [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Zhang, Xiao-jian [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Song, Shu-peng [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu [Hubei province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Zheng, Li-rong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Co–Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by ion implantation in silica glass. • The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. • EXAFS, AFM and TEM have been used to study the local structural information of imetallic nanoparticles. • With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Three oscillations are determined. - Abstract: Co–Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co–O, Co–Co and Co–Au coordination are determined.

  10. An investigation of enhanced secondary ion emission under Au(n)+ (n = 1-7) bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, G; Gelb, L D; Walker, A V

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the nonlinear secondary ion yield enhancement using Au(n)+ (n = 1, 2, 3, 5, 7) primary ions bombarding thin films of Irganox 1010, DL-phenylalanine and polystyrene on Si, Al, and Ag substrates. The largest differences in secondary ion yields are found using Au+, Au2+, and Au3+ primary ion beams. A smaller increase in secondary ion yield is observed using Au5+ and Au7+ primary ions. The yield enhancement is found to be larger on Si than on Al, while the ion yield is smaller using an Au+ beam on Si than on Al. Using Au(n)+ ion structures obtained from Density Functional Theory, we demonstrate that the secondary yield enhancement is not simply due to an increase in energy per area deposited into the surface (energy deposition density). Instead, based on simple mechanical arguments and molecular dynamics results from Medvedeva et al, we suggest a mechanism for nonlinear secondary ion yield enhancement wherein the action of multiple concerted Au impacts leads to efficient energy transfer to substrate atoms in the near surface region and an increase in the number of secondary ions ejected from the surface. Such concerted impacts involve one, two, or three Au atoms, which explains well the large nonlinear yield enhancements observed going from Au+ to Au2+ to Au3+ primary ions. This model is also able to explain the observed substrate effect. For an Au+ ion passing through the more open Si surface, it contacts fewer substrate atoms than in the more dense Al surface. Less energy is deposited in the Si surface region by the Au+ primary ion and the secondary ion yield will be lower for adsorbates on Si than on Al. In the case of Au(n)+ the greater density of Al leads to earlier break-up of the primary ion and a consequent reduction in energy transfer to the near-surface region when compared with Si. This results in higher secondary ion yields and yield enhancements on silicon than aluminum substrates.

  11. Modulation of electrical mobility in Au ion irradiated titanium oxide with crystal field splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Choi, Dukhyun; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2016-11-01

    Electrical modulation of radio frequency (RF) sputtered TiO2- x films were investigated as a function of Au swift heavy ion irradiation dose at room temperature. The prepared TiO2- x films were irradiated with 130 MeV Au swift heavy ion in the range from 1 × 1011 to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. As the Au ion irradiation dose increased up to 1 × 1012 ions/cm2, the electrical mobility of TiO2- x films were dramatically increased 3.07 × 102 cm2 V-1 s-1 without the change of carrier concentration. These changes in electrical properties of Au irradiated TiO2- x film, are related to the modification of electronic structure such as crystal field splitting of Ti 3d orbital hybridization and sub-band edge states below the conduction band as a function of Au swift heavy ion irradiation dose.

  12. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  13. Thermalization of dense hadronic matter in Au + Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Somnath; De, Sudipan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-11-01

    The conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium of baryons (nonstrange, strange) and mesons (strange) are presented for central Au + Au collisions at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) energies using the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The net particle density, longitudinal-to-transverse pressure anisotropy, and inverse slope parameters of the energy spectra of nonstrange and strange hadrons are calculated inside a cell in the central region within rapidity window |y |evolution of the entropy densities at FAIR energies are found to be very similar to the ideal hydrodynamic behavior at top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy.

  14. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  15. Charged-particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity in Au-Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider

    CERN Document Server

    Silvermyr, D

    2003-01-01

    The particle density at mid-rapidity is an essential global variable for the characterization of nuclear collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. It provides information about the initial conditions and energy density reached in these collisions. The pseudorapidity densities of charged particles at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s//N//N = 130 and 200 GeV at RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) have been measured with the PHENIX detector. The measurements were performed using sets of wire-chambers with pad readout in the two central PHENIX tracking arms. Each arm covers one quarter of the azimuth in the pseudorapidity interval vertical bar eta vertical bar less than 0.35. Data is presented and compared with results from proton-proton collisions and nucleus-nucleus collisions at lower energies. Extrapolations to LHC energies are discussed. 16 Refs.

  16. Anisotropy of >35 keV ions in corotating particle events at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, I.G. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK). Blackett Lab.)

    1985-02-01

    The anisotropy of 35-1000 keV ions in two corotating particle events associated with high-speed solar wind streams at 1 AU is examined in terms of the diffusion-convection propagation model using data from the Energetic Proton Anisotropy Spectrometer on ISEE-3. The calculated diffusive anisotropy in the solar wind frame is found to be sunward and closely field-aligned, with a nearly energy-independent magnitude of approx. 40%. For one stream, using the Voyager 2 data of Decker et al.(1981), a positive gradient of approx. 100%/AU is found for >approx. 50 keV ions between 1 and 4 AU. The observations do not appear to support the scatter-free propagation model and indicate that ions with energies as low as a few tens of keV may be in diffusive equilibrium with the solar wind in this class of events.

  17. Optical properties of ion-beam-synthesized Au nanoparticles in SiO{sub 2} matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chang-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Oyoshi, Keiji [Quantum Beam Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Chao, Der-Sheng [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Hsu-Sheng [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hong, Wei-Lun [Quantum Beam Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Takeda, Yoshihiko [Quantum Beam Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Liang, Jenq-Horng, E-mail: jhliang@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-05-15

    In recent years, gold (Au) nanoparticles have been synthesized via various methods and used in optical and biomedical detection. Au nanoparticles contain some remarkable dimension-dependent optical properties due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in Au nanoparticles which causes high absorption in visible light regions. Since SPR in well-crystallized Au nanoparticles can enhance the local electromagnetic field, it is thus expected that greater efficiency in the photoluminescence (PL) originating from oxygen deficiency centers (ODC) can be achieved in Au-implanted SiO{sub 2} matrix. In order to demonstrate the enhancement of PL, Au nanoparticles were formed in SiO{sub 2} film using ion beam synthesis and their optical and microstructural properties were also investigated in this study. The results revealed that a clear absorption peak at approximately 530 nm was identified in the UV-Vis spectra and was attributed to SPR induced by Au nanoparticles in SiO{sub 2}. The SPR of Au nanoparticles is also dependent on thermal treatment conditions, such as post-annealing temperature and ambient. The Au nanoparticle-containing SiO{sub 2} film also displayed several distinctive peaks at approximately 320, 360, 460, and 600 nm in the PL spectra and were found to be associated with ODC-related defects and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) in SiO{sub 2}. In addition, the PL peak intensities increased as post-annealing temperature increased, a finding contradictory to the defect recovery but highly consistent with the SPR tendency. A maximum PL emission was achieved when the Au-implanted SiO{sub 2} film was annealed at 1100 °C for 1 h under N{sub 2}. Therefore, the existence of Au nanoparticles in SiO{sub 2} film can induce SPR effects as well as enhance PL emission resulting from defect-related luminescence centers.

  18. Sputtering of a metal nanofoam by Au ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Christian [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials, such as nanofoams, may react differently to irradiation than compact targets. This is caused by the influence of the cavities on the evolution of collision cascades, but also by the differing heat conduction which affects the spike phase. Using molecular dynamics simulation we study the sputtering of a Au nanofoam by 10 keV Au projectiles, and compare to the sputtering of a compact Au target. These bombardment conditions lead to a strong contribution of spikes to the sputtering process. We find the foam to sputter considerably less than the compact target; the open structure of the foam prevents the build-up of strong collision spike regions at the surface, which are the major source of sputtering in the compact target. Also emission takes a longer time scale in the foam, as particles need to travel longer pathways to be emitted. On the other hand, the molten phase is more extended in the foam and also exists for a longer time; this is caused by the reduced heat conductivity in this material.

  19. Phase decomposition of AuFe alloy nanoparticles embedded in silica matrix under swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannu, Compesh, E-mail: Compesh@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Bala, Manju; Singh, U.B. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Srivastava, S.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Amity University, Noida 201313, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2016-07-15

    AuFe alloy nanoparticles embedded in silica matrix are synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique and subsequently irradiated with 100 MeV Au ions at various fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 6 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The X-ray diffraction, absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results show that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to decomposition of AuFe alloy nanoparticles from surface region and subsequent reprecipitation of Au and Fe nanoparticles occur. The process of phase decomposition and reprecipitation of individual element nanoparticles is explained on the basis of inelastic thermal spike model.

  20. Electron emission yields from boron-like Ar ions impinging on Au(100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Bekker, H.; de Nijs, A. J.; Hoekstra, R.; Winklehner, D.; Daniel, B.; Kowarik, G.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2011-01-01

    Using a new experimental station to be installed at the HITRAP facility at GSI we studied electron emission yields of Ar13+ ions impinging on a clean Au(1 00) surface. By taking data under different incidence angles and at different initial kinetic energies, contributions from kinetic and potential

  1. Cross sections for medium energy He ions scattered from Hf and Au atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki, E-mail: t-nishi@hosei.ac.jp [Research Center of Ion Beam Technology and College of Engineering, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Mitsuhara, Kei; Visikovskiy, Anton; Kido, Yoshiaki [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga-ken 525-8577 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    The elastic scattering cross sections for medium energy He ions incident on Ni, Hf and Au atoms were measured precisely using a toroidal electrostatic analyzer. We prepared the targets of Ni({approx}1 nm)/HfO{sub 2}(1.5 nm)/Si(0 0 1) and Ni({approx}1 nm)/Au({approx}0.5 nm)/Si(1 1 1) and performed in situ ion scattering measurement under ultrahigh vacuum condition. The absolute amounts of Ni, Hf and Au were determined by Rutherford backscattering using 1.5 MeV He ions at a scattering angle of 150 Degree-Sign . The scattering cross sections for Hf and Au were normalized by those for Ni to avoid the ambiguities of the number of incident particles, solid angle subtended by a detector, detection efficiency and the He{sup +} fractions for the emerging He ions from the surfaces. The results obtained are compared with the simple Lee-Hart formula and the calculated values using the Moliere and ZBL potentials and the potentials derived from the Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions.

  2. Nitrogen ion irradiation of Au(110) : formation of gold nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šiller, L.; Hunt, M.R.C.; Brown, J.W.; Coquel, J-M.; Rudolf, P.

    2002-01-01

    Often metal nitrides posses unique properties for applications, such as great hardness, high melting points, chemical stability, novel electrical and magnetic properties. One route to the formation of metal nitride films is through ion irradiation of metal surfaces. In this report, the results of ir

  3. Ion-beam-induced nanodots formation from Au/Si thin films on quartz surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, D.P.; Siva, V.; Singh, A. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), Bhubaneswar, Jatni - 752050, Odisha (India); Joshi, S.R. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sahoo, P.K., E-mail: pratap.sahoo@niser.ac.in [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), Bhubaneswar, Jatni - 752050, Odisha (India)

    2016-07-15

    We report the synthesis of Si nanodots on quartz surface using ion irradiation. When a bi-layer of ultrathin Au and Si on quartz surface is irradiated by 500 keV Xe-ion beam, the bi-layer spontaneously transforms into nanodots at a fluence of 5 × 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup −2}. The spatial density and diameter of the nanodots are reduced with increase in applied ion fluence. The nanostructures exhibit photoluminescence in the visible range at room temperature where the intensity and wavelength depends upon ion fluence. The observed evolution seems to be correlated to ion beam mixing induced silicide formation at Au–Si interface.

  4. Luminescent, freestanding composite films of Au15 for specific metal ion sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anu; Shibu, E S; Maliyekkal, Shihabudheen M; Bootharaju, M S; Pradeep, T

    2012-02-01

    A highly luminescent freestanding film composed of the quantum cluster, Au(15), was prepared. We studied the utility of the material for specific metal ion detection. The sensitivity of the red emission of the cluster in the composite to Cu(2+) has been used to make a freestanding metal ion sensor, similar to pH paper. The luminescence of the film was stable when exposed to several other metal ions such as Hg(2+), As(3+), and As(5+). The composite film exhibited visual sensitivity to Cu(2+) up to 1 ppm, which is below the permissible limit (1.3 ppm) in drinking water set by the U.S. environmental protection agency (EPA). The specificity of the film for Cu(2+) sensing may be due to the reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(1+)/Cu(0) by the glutathione ligand or the Au(15) core. Extended stability of the luminescence of the film makes it useful for practical applications.

  5. Ion-irradiation induced chemical ordering of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetala, Naidu V.; Harrell, J. W.; Lawson, Jeremy; Nikles, David E.; Williams, John R.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the effect of ion-beam irradiation on reducing the ordering temperature of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles. FePt and FePt(Au14%) 4 nm particles dispersed on a Si-substrate were irradiated by 300 keV Al-ions with a dose of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 at 43 °C using a water-cooled flange in order to minimize the vacancy migration and voids formation within the collision cascades. Partial chemical ordering has been observed in as-irradiated particles with coercivity of 60-130 Oe. Post-irradiation annealing at 220 °C enhanced chemical ordering in FePt nanoparticles with coercivity of 3500 Oe, magnetic anisotropy of 1.5 × 107 erg/cc, and thermal stability factor of 130. A much higher 375 °C post-irradiation annealing was required in FePtAu, presumably because Au atoms were trapped at Fe/Pt lattice sites at lower temperatures. As the annealing temperature increased, anomalous features in the magnetization reversal curves were observed that disappeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  6. Ion-irradiation induced chemical ordering of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetala, Naidu V. [Department of Physics, Grambling State University, RWE Jones Drive, Carver Hall 81, Grambling, LA 71245 (United States)]. E-mail: naidusv@gram.edu; Harrell, J.W. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Lawson, Jeremy [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Nikles, David E. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We have studied the effect of ion-beam irradiation on reducing the ordering temperature of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles. FePt and FePt(Au14%) 4 nm particles dispersed on a Si-substrate were irradiated by 300 keV Al-ions with a dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 43 {sup o}C using a water-cooled flange in order to minimize the vacancy migration and voids formation within the collision cascades. Partial chemical ordering has been observed in as-irradiated particles with coercivity of 60-130 Oe. Post-irradiation annealing at 220 {sup o}C enhanced chemical ordering in FePt nanoparticles with coercivity of 3500 Oe, magnetic anisotropy of 1.5 x 10{sup 7} erg/cc, and thermal stability factor of 130. A much higher 375 {sup o}C post-irradiation annealing was required in FePtAu, presumably because Au atoms were trapped at Fe/Pt lattice sites at lower temperatures. As the annealing temperature increased, anomalous features in the magnetization reversal curves were observed that disappeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  7. Splitting Behaviour of Implanted MeV Au+ Ions in LiB3O5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke-ming; SHI Bo-rong; Nelson Cue; LU Fei; WANG Feng-xiang; XIE Zhao-xia; SHEN Ding-yu; LIU Yao-gang

    2000-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of 1.0 and 2.0 MeV Au+ implanted into LiB3O5 single crystal has been studied by the Rutherford backscattering of 2.1 MeV He ions. Annealing was performed at temperatures of 600, 700, and 800℃each for 30min. The results show that the diffusion behaviour is quite different in two cases. In LiB3O5, the depth distribution of the 1.0 Me V Au is nearly Gaussian and becomes bimodal after annealing at 800℃ for 30 min.But in the case of 2.0 MeV, the depth distribution of as implanted Au+ in LiBsO5 has splitting behaviour. After 800C for 30 min annealing, there is no obvious diffusion observed. The precise interpretation is needed.

  8. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Sundaravel, B.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm)-1, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm2 (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  9. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sundaravel, B. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm){sup −1}, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  10. Stopping power of heavy ions (22<= Z{sub 1} <= 28) in Au and Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, R.; Medina, N.H.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Cybulska, E.W.; Seale, W.A.; Wiedemann, K.T.; Toufen, D.L.; Allegro, P.R.P.; Ribas, R.V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Accurate prediction of heavy ion stopping at low energies is necessary in nuclear structure physics, with the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM). In this technique, knowledge of stopping power is used to determine a timescale for the decaying nuclei while slowing down in a heavy substrate, usually Au. Since ab initio calculations are unable to produce reliable estimates, most models currently in use are of semiempirical nature. Regarding to low energies this is especially true due to additional difficulties arising from a complicated dependence on atomic numbers of stopper medium and projectile ion. The main aim of this contribution is to present new experimental data for Ti, V, Cr, Co and Ni ions slowing down in Ge and Au in the energy range from 5 to 20 MeV. Experimental data for Ti, V, Cr ions were obtained using the elastic scattering technique, where a primary beam is used to scatter heavy ions from a thin target ({approx} 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). The scattered primary beam produces recoiling atoms of the target at low energies at a given direction. Experimental data for Co and Ni ions were measured using a ToF-E apparatus (Time of Flight - Energy detection system) which allows measuring stopping over a continuous energy range. Our experimental data were compared to current models addressed to low energies. (author)

  11. Angular distribution and recoil effect for 1 MeV Au+ ions through a Si3N4 thin foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Liu, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Chen, Chien-Hung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely used to predict nuclear stopping power and angular distribution of ion-solid collisions. However, experimental validation of the predictions is insufficient for slow heavy ions in nonmetallic compounds. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is applied to determine the angular distribution of 1 MeV Au ions after penetrating a Si3N4 foil with a thickness of ~100 nm. The exiting Au ions are collected by a Si wafer located ~14 mm behind the Si3N4 foil, and the resulting 2-dimensional distribution of Au ions on the Si wafer is measured by ToF-SIMS. The SRIM-predicted angular distribution of Au ions through the Si3N4 thin foil is compared with the measured results, indicating that SRIM slightly overestimates the nuclear stopping power by up to 10%. In addition, thickness reduction of the suspended Si3N4 foils induced by 1 MeV Au ion irradiation is observed with an average loss rate of ~107 atom/ion.

  12. Focused-ion-beam-fabricated homogeneous acute-angled Au nanorods for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Haochih Liu, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Well-ordered acute-angled Au nanorod (NR) arrays were fabricated using a focused ion beam (FIB) (fibAu_NR). The angle between the NRs and the substrate was tilted at 30-90°. A fibAu_NR with an angle of less than 90° significantly increased the effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering, which was evaluated using low-concentration rose bengal (milk solution with good reproducibility.

  13. Effects of high energy Au-ion irradiation on the microstructure of diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shih-Show [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Department of Information Technology and Mobile Communication, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Chen, Huang-Chin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, I-Nan; Chang, Ching-Lin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Guo Jinghua [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-03-21

    The effects of 2.245 GeV Au-ion irradiation and subsequent annealing processes on the evolution of microstructure of diamond films with microcrystalline (MCD) or ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) granular structure were investigated, using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy loss spectroscopy in transmission electron microscopy. For MCD films, the Au-ion irradiation disintegrated some of the diamond grains, resulting in the formation of nano-sized carbon clusters embedded in a matrix of amorphous carbon (a-C). The annealing process recrystallized the diamond grains and converted the a-C into nano-sized graphite particulates and, at the same time, induced the formation of nano-sized i-carbon clusters, the bcc structured carbon with a{sub 0} = 0.432 nm. In contrast, for UNCD films, the Au-ion irradiation transformed the grain boundary phase into nano-sized graphite, but insignificantly altered the crystallinity of the grains of the UNCD films. The annealing process recrystallized the materials. In some of the regions, the residual a-C phases were transformed into nano-sized graphites, whereas in other regions i-carbon nanoclusters were formed. The difference in irradiation-induced microstructural transformation behavior between the MCD and the UNCD films is ascribed to the different granular structures of the two types of films.

  14. Role of interface in forming non-equilibrium hcp phase by ion mixing in an immiscible Au-Co system

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, H F; Liu, B X

    2003-01-01

    In an equilibrium immiscible Au-Co system characterized by a positive heat of formation of +11 kJ mol sup - sup 1 , a non-equilibrium Au-Co phase of hcp structure was formed by 200 keV xenon ion mixing at 77 K in the Au sub 5 sub 0 Co sub 5 sub 0 multilayered films. Based on the free energy calculation, the excess interfacial free energy stored in the Au-Co multilayered films could provide adequate thermodynamic driving force for alloying between Au and Co and forming the non-equilibrium Au-Co hcp phase. Besides, the average magnetic moment per Co atom in the newly formed hcp structure was reduced by 22% of its equilibrium value, within a measuring error of 8%.

  15. Ion collisional transport coefficients in the solar wind at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Proton and alpha particle collisional transport coefficients (isotropization, relative deceleration frequencies and heating rates) at 1 AU are quantified using the WIND/SWE data. In agreement with previous studies the ion-ion Coulomb collisions are generally important for slow solar wind streams and tend to reduce the temperature anisotropies, the differential streaming and the differences between proton and alpha particle temperatures. In slow solar wind streams the Coulomb collisions between protons and alpha particles are important for the overall proton energetics as well as for the relative deceleration between the two species. It is also shown that ion temperature anisotropies and differential streaming need to be generally taken into account for evaluation of the collisional transport coefficients.

  16. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.

  17. Physical Investigation of Au8+ Ions Irradiated CdSe/FTO Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuvraj G. Gudage

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of cadmium selenide (CdSe have been electrodeposited on Fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO coated glass substrate in an electrolyte containing Cd(CH3COO2.2H2O and SeO2 at pH 2.7 and temperature 300 K. The as-deposited films were irradiated using Au8+ ions with energy of 100 MeV at fluencies of 1 x 1011 and 1 x 1012 ions/cm2 using tandem pelletron accelerator. The irradiation-induced modifications in CdSe thin films were studied using structural, optical and electrical X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, optical band gap, and I-V characteristics. XRD analysis revealed that the as-deposited films were polycrystalline in nature with cubic phase. After irradiating the films with Au8+ ions metastable cubic phase transformed into stable polycrystalline hexagonal phase. An enhancement in grain size, decrease in band gap energy and decrease in resistivity of the film after irradiation was seen from SEM micrographs, optical analysis, and I-V characteristics, respectively.

  18. Investigation of the 2p_{32}-3d_{52} line emission of Au;{53+}-Au;{69+} for diagnosing high energy density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G V; Hansen, S B; Träbert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Widmann, K; Chen, H; Chung, H K; Clementson, J H T; Gu, M F; Thorn, D B

    2008-06-01

    Measurements of the L -shell emission of highly charged gold ions were made under controlled laboratory conditions using the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap, allowing detailed spectral observations of lines from Fe-like Au53+ through Ne-like Au69+ . Using atomic data from the Flexible Atomic Code, we have identified strong 3d_{52}-->2p_{32} emission features that can be used to diagnose the charge state distribution in high energy density plasmas, such as those found in the laser entrance hole of hot hohlraum radiation sources. We provide collisional-radiative calculations of the average ion charge Z as a function of temperature and density, which can be used to relate charge state distributions inferred from 3d_{52}-->2p_{32} emission features to plasma conditions, and investigate the effects of plasma density on calculated L -shell Au emission spectra.

  19. Gold nano-particle formation from crystalline AuCN: Comparison of thermal, plasma- and ion-beam activated decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mihály T.; Bertóti, Imre; Mohai, Miklós; Németh, Péter; Jakab, Emma; Szabó, László; Szépvölgyi, János

    2017-02-01

    In this work, in addition to the conventional thermal process, two non-conventional ways, the plasma and ion beam activations are described for preparing gold nanoparticles from microcrystalline AuCN precursor. The phase formation at plasma and ion beam treatments was compared with that at thermal treatments and the products and transformations were characterized by thermogravimetry-mass-spectrometry (TG-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TG-MS measurements in Ar atmosphere revealed that AuCN decomposition starts at 400 °C and completes at ≈700 °C with evolution of gaseous (CN)2. XPS and TEM show that in heat treatment at 450 °C for 1 h in Ar, loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs and small, 5-30 nm gold particles forms. Heating at 450 °C for 10 h in sealed ampoule, much larger, 60-200 nm size and well faceted Au particles develop together with a fibrous (CN)n polymer phase, and the Au crystallites are covered by a 3-5 nm thick polymer shell. Low pressure Ar plasma treatment at 300 eV energy results in 4-20 nm size Au particles and removes most of the nitrogen and part of carbon. During Ar+ ion bombardment with 2500 eV energy, 5-30 nm size Au crystallites form already in 10 min, with preferential loss of nitrogen and with increased amount of carbon residue. The results suggest that plasma and ion beam activation, acting similarly to thermal treatment, may be used to prepare Au nanoparticles from AuCN on selected surface areas either by depositing AuCN precursors on selected regions or by focusing the applied ionized radiation. Thus they may offer alternative ways for preparing tailor-made catalysts, electronic devices and sensors for different applications.

  20. Photoluminescent Au-Ge composite nanodots formation on SiO2 surface by ion induced dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, D. P.; Siva, V.; Singh, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    Medium energy ion irradiation on a bilayer of Au and Ge on SiO2 is observed to result in gradual morphological evolution from an interconnected network to a nanodot array on the insulator surface. Structural and compositional analyses reveal composite nature of the nanodots, comprising of both Au and Ge. The growing nanostructures are found to be photoluminescent at room temperature where the emission intensity and wavelengths vary with morphology. The growth of such nanostructures can be understood in terms of dewetting of the metal layer under ion irradiation due to ion-induced melting along the ion tracks. The visible PL emission is found to be related with evolution of the Au-Ge nanodots. The study indicates a route towards single step synthesis of metal-semiconductor nanodots on insulator surface.

  1. Secondary electron emission from Au by medium energy atomic and molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, A; Obata, F; Hamamoto, Y; Yogo, A

    2002-01-01

    Number distributions of secondary electrons emitted from a Au metal surface have been measured for atomic and molecular ions of H sup + , He sup + , C sup + , N sup + , O sup + , H sup + sub 2 , H sup + sub 3 , HeH sup + , CO sup + and O sup + sub 2 in the energy range 0.3-2.0 MeV. The emission statistics obtained are described fairly well by a Polya function. The Polya parameter b, determining the distribution shape, is found to decrease monotonously with increasing emission yield gamma, revealing a surprising relationship of b gamma approx 1 over the different projectile species and impact energies. This finding supports certainly the electron cascading model. Also we find a strong negative molecular effect for heavier molecular ions, showing a significant reduction of gamma compared to the estimated values using constituent atomic projectile data.

  2. NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeng-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin

    2009-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants, spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  3. The lithium-ion accumulators in Japan; Les accumulateurs lithium-ion au Japon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzari, O

    2006-07-15

    This document takes stock on the different technologies of lithium based batteries developed in Japan as the materials used to produce their different elements. The today tendencies of the japanese researches are discussed. The applications of the lithium-ion are presented. A list of the main public and private laboratories in the domain and the research programs is provided. (A.L.B.)

  4. Modification in surface properties of poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 implanted by Au+ ions at different fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagheer Riffat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion implantation has a potential to modify the surface properties and to produce thin conductive layers in insulating polymers. For this purpose, poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 was implanted by 400 keV Au+ ions with ion fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The chemical, morphological and optical properties of implanted CR-39 were analyzed using Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity of implanted samples was determined through four-point probe technique. Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbonaceous structures in the implanted layer of CR-39. From FT-IR spectroscopy analysis, changes in functional groups of CR-39 after ion implantation were observed. AFM studies revealed that morphology and surface roughness of implanted samples depend on the fluence of Au ions. The optical band gap of implanted samples decreased from 3.15 eV (for pristine to 1.05 eV (for sample implanted at 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The electrical conductivity was observed to increase with the ion fluence. It is suggested that due to an increase in ion fluence, the carbonaceous structures formed in the implanted region are responsible for the increase in electrical conductivity.

  5. Enhancement of chitosan-graphene oxide SPR sensor with a multi-metallic layers of Au-Ag-Au nanostructure for lead(II) ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A.; Yaacob, Mohd Hanif; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkefly; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique by implementing a multi-metallic layers of Au-Ag-Au nanostructure in the chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO) SPR sensor for lead(II) ion detection. The performance of the sensor is analyzed via SPR measurements, from which the sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and repeatability are determined. The nanostructure layers are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We showed that the proposed structure has increased the shift in the SPR angle up to 3.5° within the range of 0.1-1 ppm due to the enhanced evanescent field at the sensing layer-analyte interface. This sensor also exhibits great repeatability which benefits from the stable multi-metallic nanostructure. The SNR value of 0.92 for 5 ppm lead(II) ion solution and reasonable linearity range up to that concentration shows that the tri-metallic CS-GO SPR sensor gives a good response towards the lead(II) ion solution. The CS-GO SPR sensor is also sensitive to at least a 10-5 change in the refractive index. The results prove that our proposed tri-metallic CS-GO SPR sensor demonstrates a strong performance and reliability for lead(II) ion detection in accordance with the standardized lead safety level for wastewater.

  6. Au ion irradiation of various silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaâbane, Nihed, E-mail: nihed.chaabane@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Flem, Marion Le [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tanguy, Morgane [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Urvoy, Stéphane [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Serruys, Yves [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMP, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-08-15

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites are promising candidates as fuel cladding for several concepts of Generation IV reactors and as structural materials for fusion reactors. The composites used in this study were composed of a SiC matrix obtained by chemical vapor infiltration associated with various fiber types (Tyranno Type-S, Tyranno SA Grade-3 and Hi-Nicalon Type-S) and with a PyC layer as the interphase. 12 MeV Au ions were used for irradiation up to 0.05 and 1 displacement per atom (dpa) fluences at room temperature and 800 °C. Analysis of both microstructure and composition of composites were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature and low fluence, Raman spectroscopy results showed that irradiation induces a disordered/distorted state into fibers and matrix. With increasing fluence, a total amorphization of these constituents occurs. The increase in the irradiation temperature leads to a damage recovery and partial recrystallization of samples. Image analysis performed from SEM micrographs highlights no significant change in fiber diameter and shape. However, SEM analysis suggests a longitudinal shrinkage of Tyranno Type-S fibers for the composite irradiated at 1 dpa at room temperature and 800 °C. These results are in complete agreement with conclusions from neutron irradiations suggesting an appropriate relevance of irradiations with 12 MeV Au.

  7. Kinetic-energy-driven enhancement of secondary-electron yields of highly charged ions impinging on thin films of C-60 on Au

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary electron yields as a result of slow highly charged ions (Ar4+, Ar13+) impinging on clean Au(111), highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, and thin films of C-60 on Au are presented. In order to investigate the dynamics of the neutralization of the highly charged ions in front of the surfac

  8. Kinetic-energy-driven enhancement of secondary-electron yields of highly charged ions impinging on thin films of C-60 on Au

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary electron yields as a result of slow highly charged ions (Ar4+, Ar13+) impinging on clean Au(111), highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, and thin films of C-60 on Au are presented. In order to investigate the dynamics of the neutralization of the highly charged ions in front of the

  9. Imaging with mass spectrometry: a secondary ion and VUV-photoionization study of ion-sputtered atoms and clusters from GaAs and Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-04-23

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As(2), Au, and Au(2), are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered As(m) (m = 1,2) and Au(n) (n = 1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by approximately 0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  10. Energy Reflection Coefficients for 5-10 keV He Ions Incident on Au, Ag, and Cu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Littmark, U.

    1978-01-01

    The calorimetric deuterium-film method was used for measurements of the energy reflection coefficient γ for normal incidence of 5-10 keV He ions on Cu, Ag and Au. A theoretical calculation of γ by means of transport theory gives fair agreement with the experimental results. The experimental data ...

  11. Study of the heavy ions (Au+Au at 150 AMeV) collisions with the FOPI detector. Comparison with the Landau-Vlasov model; Etude des collisions d`ions lourds AU+AU a 150 A.MeV avec le detecteur FOPI. Comparaison avec le modele de Landau-Vlasov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussange, S.

    1995-09-15

    In this thesis, heavy ions (Au+Au) collisions experiments are made at 150 AMeV.In the first part, a general study of the nuclear matter equation is presented. Then the used Landau-Vlasov theoretical model is describe. The third part presents the FOPI experience and the details of how to obtain this theoretical predictions (filter, cuts, corrections, possible centrality selections).At the end, experimental results and comparisons with the Landau-Vlasov model are presented. (TEC). 105 refs., 96 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana, E-mail: dianabachillerperea@gmail.com [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Debelle, Aurélien, E-mail: aurelien.debelle@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P. 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique. - Highlights: • High-temperature MeV-ion irradiated MgO exhibits a two-step damage process. • The occurrence of the second step is delayed with increasing temperature. • The damage level decreases with increasing temperature. • A shift of the damage peak is observed with increasing fluence. • A high defect mobility at high temperatures in MgO is clearly evidenced.

  13. Simulation study of elliptic flow of charged hadrons produced in Au + Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S.; Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2017-01-01

    Centrality and system geometry dependence of azimuthal anisotropy of charged hadrons measured in terms of the elliptic flow parameter are investigated using Au+Au event samples at incident beam energy 20 A and 40 A GeV generated by ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) and a multiphase transport (AMPT) models. The Monte Carlo-Glauber model is employed to estimate the eccentricity of the overlapping zone at an early stage of the collisions. Anisotropies present both in the particle multiplicity distribution and in the kinetic radial expansion are examined by using standard statistical and phenomenological methods. In the context of the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment to be held at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), the present set of simulated results provide us not only with an opportunity to examine the expected collective behavior of hadronic matter at high baryon density and moderate temperature, but when compared with similar results obtained from Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments, they also allow us to investigate how anisotropy of hadronic matter may differ or agree with its low-baryon-density and high-temperature counterpart.

  14. Interaction of Au, Ag, and Bi ions with Ba2YCu3O(7-y) - Implications for superconductor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, A. F.; Gaier, J. R.; Pouch, J. J.; Hambourger, P. D.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented on the reactions of Au, Ag, and Bi ions with Ba2YCu3O(7-y) oxides and on the properties of the resultant materials. The results indicate that Au(3+) structural chemistry makes gold an excellent candidate for multiphase structures of the Ba2Y(Cu/1-x/Au/x/)3O(7-y)-type substituted superconductors. Silver is structurally and chemically compatible with the perovskite structure, but when it forms a second phase, it does so without the destruction of the superconducting phase, making silver a useful metal for metal/ceramic applications. On the other hand, bismuth was shown to degrade Tc phase or to form other phases, indicating that it may not be useful in applications with rare-earth-based superconductors.

  15. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana; Debelle, Aurélien; Thomé, Lionel; Behar, Moni

    2016-09-01

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 1014 cm-2 has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique.

  16. Microstructure of Au-ion irradiated 316L and FeNiCr austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Li, X.; Legras, L.; Lescoat, M.-L.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.

    2016-11-01

    Thin foils of 316L were irradiated in situ in a Transmission Electron Microscope with 4 MeV Au ions at 450 °C and 550 °C. Similar irradiations were performed at 450 °C in FeNiCr. The void and dislocation microstructure of 316L is found to depend strongly on temperature. At 450 °C, a dense network of dislocation lines is observed in situ to grow from black dot defects by absorption of other black dots and interstitial clusters whilst no Frank loops are detected. At 550 °C, no such network is observed but large Frank loops and perfect loops whose sudden appearance is concomitant with a strong increase in void density as a result of a strong coupling between voids and dislocations. Moreover, differences in both alloys microstructure show the major role played by the minor constituents of 316L, increasing the stacking fault formation energy, and possibly leading to significant differences in swelling behaviour.

  17. Grain growth of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC under Au ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Limin; Jiang, Weilin; Dissanayake, Amila C.; Varga, Tamas; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Hu, Dehong; Wang, Haiyan; Henager, Charles H.; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-01-09

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) represents an excellent model system for a fundamental study of interfacial (grain boundary) processes under nuclear radiation, which are critical to the understanding of the response of nanostructured materials to high-dose irradiation. This study reports on a comparison of irradiation effects in cubic phase SiC (3C-SiC) grains of a few nanometers in size and single-crystal 3C-SiC films under identical Au ion irradiation to a range of doses at 700 K. In contrast to the latter, in which lattice disorder is accumulated to a saturation level without full amorphization, the average grain size of the former increases with dose following a power-law trend. In addition to coalescence, the grain grows through atomic jumps and mass transport, where irradiation induced vacancies at grain boundaries assist the processes. It is found that a higher irradiation temperature leads to slower grain growth and a faster approach to a saturation size of SiC nanograins. The results could potentially have a positive impact on structural components of advanced nuclear energy systems.

  18. Net-charge fluctuation in Au+Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research using the UrQMD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Mali, Provash; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2017-08-01

    We have studied the dynamical fluctuation of net charge of hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at energies that in near future will be available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Data simulated by a microscopic transport model based on ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics are analyzed for this purpose. The centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of the net-charge fluctuation of hadrons are examined. Our simulated results are compared with the results available for nucleus-nucleus collision experiments held at similar energies. The gross features of our simulated results on net-charge fluctuations are found to be consistent with the experiment. At incident beam energy Elab=10 A GeV, the magnitude of net-charge fluctuation is very large, and in comparison with the rest its centrality dependence appears to be a little unusual. The effect of global charge conservation is expected to be very crucial at FAIR energies. The charge fluctuations measured with varying pesudorapidity window size depend on the collision centrality. The dependence is, however, exactly opposite in nature to that observed in the Pb+Pb collision at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV.

  19. Beam-energy dependence of charge balance functions from Au + Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, H. F.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R. M.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solanki, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Q. H.; Yan, W.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Balance functions have been measured in terms of relative pseudorapidity (Δ η ) for charged particle pairs at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 200 GeV using the STAR detector. These results are compared with balance functions measured at the CERN Large Hadron Collider from Pb + Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. The width of the balance function decreases as the collisions become more central and as the beam energy is increased. In contrast, the widths of the balance functions calculated using shuffled events show little dependence on centrality or beam energy and are larger than the observed widths. Balance function widths calculated using events generated by UrQMD are wider than the measured widths in central collisions and show little centrality dependence. The measured widths of the balance functions in central collisions are consistent with the delayed hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma (QGP). The narrowing of the balance function in central collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV implies that a QGP is still being created at this relatively low energy.

  20. Flux dependent MeV self-ion-induced effects on Au nanostructures: dramatic mass transport and nanosilicide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, J; Umananda Bhatta, M; Sundaravel, B; Nair, K G M; Liou, Sz-Chian; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Wang, Yuh-Lin; Satyam, P V

    2008-08-13

    We report a direct observation of dramatic mass transport due to 1.5 MeV Au(2+) ion impact on isolated Au nanostructures of average size ≈7.6 nm and height ≈6.9 nm that are deposited on Si(111) substrate under high flux (3.2 × 10(10)-6.3 × 10(12) ions cm(-2) s(-1)) conditions. The mass transport from nanostructures was found to extend up to a distance of about 60 nm into the substrate, much beyond their size. This forward mass transport is compared with the recoil implantation profiles using SRIM simulation. The observed anomalies with theory and simulations are discussed. At a given energy, the incident flux plays a major role in mass transport and its redistribution. The mass transport is explained on the basis of thermal effects and the creation of rapid diffusion paths in the nanoscale regime during the course of ion irradiation. The unusual mass transport is found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide nano-alloys at subsurfaces. The complexity of the ion-nanostructure interaction process is discussed with a direct observation of melting (in the form of spherical fragments on the surface) phenomena. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy methods have been used.

  1. Simple and rapid mercury ion selective electrode based on 1-undecanethiol assembled Au substrate and its recognition mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Qing; Liang, Hai-Qing; Cao, Zhong; Xiao, Qing; Xiao, Zhong-Liang; Song, Liu-Bin; Chen, Dan; Wang, Fu-Liang

    2017-03-01

    A simple and rapid mercury ion selective electrode based on 1-undecanethiol (1-UDT) assembled Au substrate (Au/1-UDT) has been well constructed. 1-UDT was for the purpose of generating self-assembled monolayer on gold surface to recognize Hg(2+) in aqueous solution, which had a working concentration range of 1.0×10(-8)-1.0×10(-4)molL(-1), with a Nernst response slope of 28.83±0.4mV/-pC, a detection limit of 4.5×10(-9)molL(-1), and a good selectivity over the other tested cations. Also, the Au/1-UDT possessed good reproducibility, stability, and short response time. The recovery obtained for the determination of mercury ion in practical tremella samples was in the range of 99.8-103.4%. Combined electrochemical analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with quantum chemical computation, the probable recognition mechanism of the electrode for selective recognition of Hg(2+) has been investigated. The covalent bond formed between mercury and sulfur is stronger than the one between gold and sulfur and thus prevents the adsorption of 1-UDT molecules on the gold surface. The quantum chemical computation with density functional theory further demonstrates that the strong interaction between the mercury atom and the sulfur atom on the gold surface leads to the gold sulfur bond ruptured and the gold mercury metallophilic interaction.

  2. Charged-particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity in Au–Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Silvermyr

    2003-05-01

    The particle density at mid-rapidity is an essential global variable for the characterization of nuclear collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. It provides information about the initial conditions and energy density reached in these collisions. The pseudorapidity densities of charged particles at mid-rapidity in Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ and 200 GeV at RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) have been measured with the PHENIX detector. The measurements were performed using sets of wire-chambers with pad readout in the two central PHENIX tracking arms. Each arm covers one quarter of the azimuth in the pseudorapidity interval || < 0.35. Data is presented and compared with results from proton–proton collisions and nucleus–nucleus collisions at lower energies. Extrapolations to LHC energies are discussed.

  3. Au{sup 3+} ion implantation on FTO coated glasses: Effect on structural, electrical, optical and phonon properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Bindu; Dey, Ranajit; Bajpai, P.K., E-mail: bajpai.pk1@gmail.com

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Effects of 11.00 MeV Au{sup 3+} ions implanted in FTO coated (thickness ≈300 nm) silicate glasses at varying fluence. • Metal clustering near the surface and subsurface region below glass-FTO interface changes electrical and optical properties significantly. • Ion implantation does not affect the crystalline structure of the coated films; however, the tetragonal distortion increases with increasing ion fluence. • Significant surface reconstruction takes place with ion beam fluence; The average roughness also decreases with increasing fluence. • The sheet resistivity increases with increasing fluence. • Raman analysis also corroborates the re-crystallization process inducing due to ion implantation. • Optical properties of the implanted surfaces changes significantly. - Abstract: Effects of 11.00 MeV Au{sup 3+} ions implanted in FTO coated (thickness ≈300 nm) silicate glasses on structural, electrical optical and phonon behavior have been explored. It has been observed that metal clustering near the surface and sub-surface region below glass-FTO interface changes electrical and optical properties significantly. Ion implantation does not affect the crystalline structure of the coated films; however, the unit cell volume decreases with increase in fluence and the tetragonal distortion (c/a ratio) also decreases systematically in the implanted samples. The sheet resistivity of the films increases from 11 × 10{sup −5} ohm-cm (in pristine) to 7.5 × 10{sup −4} ohm-cm for highest ion beam fluence ≈10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The optical absorption decreases with increasing fluence whereas, the optical transmittance as well as reflectance increases with increasing fluence. The Raman spectra are observed at ∼530 cm{sup −1} and ∼1103 cm{sup −1} in pristine sample. The broad band at 530 cm{sup −1} shifts towards higher wave number in the irradiated samples. This may be correlated with increased disorder and strain relaxation in

  4. Ion-polymer interactions. Applications to electronics. Interactions ions-polymeres. Applications au domaine de l'electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratier, B.; Merhari, L.; Bahna, Z.; Le Hue, C.; Moliton, A.; Guille, B.; Moliton, J.P. (Limoges Univ., 87 (FR)); Froyer, G. (Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 22 - Lannion (FR)); Sudraud, P. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (FR). Lab. de Physique des Solides)

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the ions effect in polymers commonly seen as irreversible damages, can be the starting point of new technologies, that are described by the same physics. This latter can be explained by oscillators strengths, using experimental results. With its help, we depict new technologies such as ions self-developing resists microfabrication using focused ions beams, and ion implanted conducting and semiconducting polymers.

  5. Human erythrocytes and neuroblastoma cells are affected in vitro by Au(III) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwalsky, Mario, E-mail: msuwalsk@udec.cl [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion, Casilla 160C, Concepcion (Chile); Gonzalez, Raquel [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion, Casilla 160C, Concepcion (Chile); Villena, Fernando [Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Aguilar, Luis F.; Sotomayor, Carlos P. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo [CNR Center on Metalloproteins, University of Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2010-06-25

    Gold compounds are well known for their neurological and nephrotoxic implications. However, haematological toxicity is one of the most serious toxic and less studied effects. The lack of information on these aspects of Au(III) prompted us to study the structural effects induced on cell membranes, particularly that of human erythrocytes. AuCl{sub 3} was incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. The latter consisted of multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. This report presents evidence that Au(III) interacts with red cell membranes as follows: (a) in scanning electron microscopy studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that Au(III) induced shape changes at a concentration as low as 0.01 {mu}M; (b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes Au(III) induced a decrease in the molecular dynamics and/or water content at the glycerol backbone level of the lipid bilayer polar groups in a 5-50 {mu}M concentration range, and (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that Au(III) in the 10 {mu}m-1 mM range induced increasing structural perturbation only to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Additional experiments were performed in human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. A statistically significant decrease of cell viability was observed with Au(III) ranging from 0.1 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M.

  6. Multienergy gold ion implantation for enhancing the field electron emission characteristics of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Manoharan, D.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Multienergy Au-ion implantation enhanced the electrical conductivity of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates to a high level of 5076.0 (Ω cm)-1 and improved the field electron emission (FEE) characteristics of the films to low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm, high current density of 5.4 mA/cm2 (@ 2.65 V/μm), and high lifetime stability of 1825 min. The catalytic induction of nanographitic phases in the films due to Au-ion implantation and the formation of diamond-to-Si eutectic interface layer due to Au-coating on Si together encouraged the efficient conducting channels for electron transport, thereby improved the FEE characteristics of the films.

  7. Catalytically active Au-O(OH)x-species stabilized by alkali ions on zeolites and mesoporous oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Li, Sha; Wang, Yuan; Herron, Jeffrey A; Xu, Ye; Allard, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Huang, Jun; Mavrikakis, Manos; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2014-12-19

    We report that the addition of alkali ions (sodium or potassium) to gold on KLTL-zeolite and mesoporous MCM-41 silica stabilizes mononuclear gold in Au-O(OH)x-(Na or K) ensembles. This single-site gold species is active for the low-temperature (alkali ions and establishing an active site on various supports. The intrinsic activity of the single-site gold species is the same on irreducible supports as on reducible ceria, iron oxide, and titania supports, apparently all sharing a common, similarly structured gold active site. This finding paves the way for using earth-abundant supports to disperse and stabilize precious metal atoms with alkali additives for the WGS and potentially other fuel-processing reactions.

  8. Focused-ion-beam-fabricated Au nanorods coupled with Ag nanoparticles used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active substrate for analyzing trace melamine constituents in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivashanmugan, Kundan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Der, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liu, Bernard Haochih; Yao, Chih-Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Well-ordered Au-nanorod array with a controlled tip ring diameter (Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}) is made by focused ion beam. •Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} coupled with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}) is competent to sense target molecules in a solution. •Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} SERS active substrate can detect a single molecule of crystal violet. •Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} as a SERS-active substrate can distinguish melamine contaminants at low concentrations (e.g., 10{sup −12} M). -- Abstract: A well-ordered Au-nanorod array with a controlled tip ring diameter (Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}) was fabricated using the focused ion beam method. Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} was then coupled with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to bridge the gaps among Au nanorods. The effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} and Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} was particularly verified using crystal violet (CV) as the molecular probe. Raman intensity obtained from a characteristic peak of CV on Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} was estimated by an enhancement factor of ≈10{sup 7} in magnitude, which increased ≈10{sup 12} in magnitude for that on Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}. A highly SERS-active Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} was furthermore applied for the detection of melamine (MEL) at very low concentrations. Raman-active peaks of MEL (10{sup −3} to 10{sup −12} M) in water or milk solution upon Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} or Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} were well distinguished. The peaks at 680 and 702 cm{sup −1} for MEL molecules were found suitable to be used as the index for sensing low-concentration MEL in a varied solution, while that at 1051 cm{sup −1} was practical to interpret MEL molecules in water or milk solution bonded with Au (i.e., Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}) or Ag (i.e., Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d}) surface. At the interface of Ag NPs/Au{sub N}Rs{sub d} and MEL molecules in milk solution, a laser-induced electromagnetic field or hotspot effect was produced and

  9. Synthesis of butterfly-like ZnO nanostructures and study of their self-reducing ability toward Au(3+) ions for enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueling; Liu, Yumeng; Zheng, Yan; Ding, Kun; Nie, Shijie; Yang, Ping

    2016-02-14

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with diverse morphologies were successfully fabricated via a simple one-step hydrothermal synthesis and subsequent calcination. The formation of butterfly-like ZnO was mainly ascribed to a typical nucleation-growth-assembly process as a result of electrostatic interactions between the nanoparticles and the reconstructed sheets. Au nanoparticles (NPs) created from Au(3+) ions were deposited on the butterfly-like ZnO without the use of any reducing agents by simply stirring the solution at room temperature. Tartaric acid was present in the ZnO calcined at a low temperature (300 °C), which resulted in the self-reducing ability of ZnO toward the Au(3+) ions. The Au NPs were closely connected with the ZnO matrix. This close connection resulted in hierarchical ZnO-Au composites with efficient photocatalytic activity for use in environmental remediation. Compared with the pure ZnO sample calcined at 300 °C, the hierarchical ZnO-Au composites showed an enhanced photocatalytic performance toward rhodamine B. The results of photodegradation indicated that the incorporation of the Au NPs drastically increased the photocatalytic efficiency by promoting the separation of the electron-hole pairs created by the absorption of photons.

  10. Effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on the surface nanostructure of Au thin films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ruixuan; Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Yatsu, Shigeo; Ishioka, Junya; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    Ion irradiation and short-pulsed laser irradiation can be used to form nanostructures on the surfaces of substrates. This work investigates the synergistic effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on surface nanostructuring of Au thin films deposited under vacuum on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates. Gold nanoparticles are randomly formed on the surface of the substrate after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation under vacuum at a wavelength of 532 nm with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and laser energy density of 0.124 kJ/m{sup 2}. Gold nanoparticles are also randomly formed on the substrate after 100-keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at doses of up to 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and nearly all of these nanoparticles are fully embedded in the substrate. With increasing ion irradiation dose (number of incident laser pulses), the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles decreases (increases). However, Au nanoparticles are only formed in a periodic surface arrangement after co-irradiation with 6000 laser pulses and 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The periodic distance is ∼540 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser, and the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles remains at ∼20 nm with a relatively narrow distribution. The photoabsorption peaks of the ion- or nanosecond-pulsed laser-irradiated samples clearly correspond to the mean diameter of Au nanoparticles. Conversely, the photoabsorption peaks for the co-irradiated samples do not depend on the mean nanoparticle diameter. This lack of dependence is likely caused by the periodic nanostructure formed on the surface by the synergistic effects of co-irradiation.

  11. A study on the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on Au/TiO2 system for its application in photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anuradha; Srivastav, Anupam; Sharma, Dipika; Banerjee, Anamika; Sharma, Shailja; Satsangi, Vibha Rani; Shrivastav, Rohit; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar; Dass, Sahab

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate via sol-gel technique and were modified by plasmonic Au layer. The plasmonic Au modified TiO2 (Au/TiO2) thin films were then irradiated with 500 keV Ar2+ ion beam at different ion fluences viz. 1 × 1016, 3 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 to study the effect of nuclear energy deposition on the morphology, crystallinity, band gap, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak exhibited by Au particles and photoelectrochemical properties of the system. Prepared thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements revealed that both Au/TiO2 and Au/TiO2 thin film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence exhibits enhanced photoelectrochemical response in comparison to pristine TiO2. The film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence offered maximum applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) and shows 6 times increment in photocurrent density which was attributed to more negative flat band potential, maximum decrease in band gap, high open circuit voltage (Voc) and reduced charge transfer resistance.

  12. A study on the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on Au/TiO{sub 2} system for its application in photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Anuradha; Srivastav, Anupam; Sharma, Dipika; Banerjee, Anamika; Sharma, Shailja [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Dayalbagh, Agra 282005 (India); Satsangi, Vibha Rani [Department of Physics & Computer Science, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Dayalbagh, Agra 282005 (India); Shrivastav, Rohit [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Dayalbagh, Agra 282005 (India); Avasthi, Devesh Kumar [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Amity University, Noida-201313, Uttar Pradesh (India); Dass, Sahab, E-mail: drsahabdas@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Dayalbagh, Agra 282005 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Nanostructured TiO{sub 2} thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate via sol–gel technique and were modified by plasmonic Au layer. The plasmonic Au modified TiO{sub 2} (Au/TiO{sub 2}) thin films were then irradiated with 500 keV Ar{sup 2+} ion beam at different ion fluences viz. 1 × 10{sup 16}, 3 × 10{sup 16} and 1 × 10{sup 17} to study the effect of nuclear energy deposition on the morphology, crystallinity, band gap, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak exhibited by Au particles and photoelectrochemical properties of the system. Prepared thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements and UV–visible spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements revealed that both Au/TiO{sub 2} and Au/TiO{sub 2} thin film irradiated at 1 × 10{sup 16} fluence exhibits enhanced photoelectrochemical response in comparison to pristine TiO{sub 2}. The film irradiated at 1 × 10{sup 16} fluence offered maximum applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) and shows 6 times increment in photocurrent density which was attributed to more negative flat band potential, maximum decrease in band gap, high open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and reduced charge transfer resistance.

  13. He and Au ion radiation damage in sodalite, Na{sub 4}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Eric R., E-mail: erv@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Gregg, Daniel J.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Davis, Joel [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Institute of Environment Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Sodalite, a candidate ceramic for the immobilisation of pyroprocessing nuclear waste, showed no observable lattice dilatation in grazing incidence X-ray diffraction when irradiated with up to 10{sup 17} 5 MeV He ions/cm{sup 2}. However micro-Raman scattering showed considerable spectral broadening characteristic of radiation damage near the end of the ∼22 μm He range. Partial amorphism plus nepheline formation was observed in grazing incidence X-ray diffraction when sodalite was irradiated by 10{sup 16} 12 MeV Au ions/cm{sup 2}. Nepheline appeared less susceptible to 12 MeV Au ion damage than sodalite, with ∼25% less amorphous fraction at 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Microwave-assisted synthesis of photoluminescent glutathione-capped Au/Ag nanoclusters: A unique sensor-on-a-nanoparticle for metal ions, anions, and small molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhang[1; Yue Yuan[1; Yu Wang[2; Fanfei Sun[2; Gaolin Liang[1; Zheng Jiang[2; Shu-Hong Yu[1,3

    2015-01-01

    Even though great advances have been achieved in the synthesis of luminescent metal nanoclusters, it is still challenging to develop metal nanoclusters with high quantum efficiency as well as multiple sensing functionalities. Here, we demonstrate the rapid preparation of glutathione-capped Au/Ag nanoclusters (GS-Au/Ag NCs) using microwave irradiation and their unique sensing capacities. Compared to bare GS-Au NCs, the doped Au/Ag NCs possess an enhanced quantum yield (7.8% compared to 2.2% for GS-Au NCs). Several characterization techniques were used to elucidate the atomic composition, particulate character, and electronic structure of the fabricated NCs. According to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra, a significant amount of Au exists in the oxidized state as Au(I), and the Ag atoms are positively charged. In contrast to those nanoclusters that detect only one analyte, the GS-Au/Ag NCs can be used as a versatile sensor for metal ions, anions, and small molecules. In this manner, the NCs can be regarded as a unique sensor-on-a-nanoparticle.

  15. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Li, G.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Desai, M. I., E-mail: glenn.mason@jhuapl.edu [Department of Space Science, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are

  16. Adsorption of some transition metal ions (Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III)) onto lignite-based activated carbons modified by oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paunka St. Vassileva; Albena K. Detcheva [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry

    2010-03-15

    The main purpose of the present work was to study the adsorption of some transition metal ions from aqueous solution via a novel porous material obtained from Bulgarian lignite (Chukurovo deposit) and its oxidized modifications. The adsorption of Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III) ions was investigated using batch methods to study solutions with different concentrations and acidities. It was found that the adsorption process was affected significantly by the pH value of the aqueous solution. Treatment of the equilibrium data using the linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models allowed the maximum adsorption capacities to be calculated. The uptake of Au(III) ions was almost 100% for the three adsorbents investigated, being greater than 300 mg/l and independent of the pH over the pH range studied. The initial activated carbon proved to be the most suitable for the selective adsorption of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions in the presence of other transition metal ions, while its oxidized modification Ch-P exhibited an enhanced adsorption efficiency towards transition metals.

  17. Adsorption of Some Transition Metal Ions (Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III)) onto lignite-based activated carbons modified by oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassileva, P.S.; Detcheva, A.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Science, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-07-01

    The main purpose of the present work was to study the adsorption of some transition metal ions from aqueous solution via a novel porous material obtained from Bulgarian lignite (Chukurovo deposit) and its oxidized modifications. The adsorption of Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III) and Au(III) ions was investigated using batch methods to study solutions with different concentrations and acidities. It was found that the adsorption process was affected significantly by the pH value of the aqueous solution. Treatment of the equilibrium data using the linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models allowed the maximum adsorption capacities to be calculated. The uptake of Au(III) ions was almost 100% for the three adsorbents investigated, being greater than 300 mg/l and independent of the pH over the pH range studied. The initial activated carbon proved to be the most suitable for the selective adsorption of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions in the presence of other transition metal ions, while its oxidized modification Ch-P exhibited an enhanced adsorption efficiency towards transition metals.

  18. Interface controlled growth of nanostructures in discontinuous Ag and Au thin films fabricated by ion beam sputter deposition for plasmonic applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Brahma; M Ghanashyam Krishna

    2012-08-01

    The growth of discontinuous thin films of Ag and Au by low energy ion beam sputter deposition is reported. The study focuses on the role of the film–substrate in determining the shape and size of nanostructures achieved in such films. Ag films were deposited using Ar ion energy of 150 eV while the Au films were deposited with Ar ion energies of 250–450 eV. Three types of interfaces were investigated in this study. The first set of film–substrate interfaces consisted of Ag and Au films grown on borosilicate glass and carbon coated Cu grids used as substrates. The second set of films was metallic bilayers in which one of the metals (Ag or Au) was grown on a continuous film of the other metal (Au or Ag). The third set of interfaces comprised of discontinuous Ag and Au films deposited on different dielectrics such as SiO2, TiO2 and ZrO2. In each case, a rich variety of nanostructures including self organized arrays of nanoparticles, nanoclusters and nanoneedles have been achieved. The role of the film–substrate interface is discussed within the framework of existing theories of thin film nucleation and growth. Interfacial nanostructuring of thin films is demonstrated to be a viable technique to realize a variety of nanostructures. The use of interfacial nanostructuring for plasmonic applications is demonstrated. It is shown that the surface Plasmon resonance of the metal nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range of wavelengths from 400 to 700 nm by controlling the film–substrate interface.

  19. Thiol-functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 microspheres with superparamagnetism and their adsorption properties for Au(III) ion separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangqian; Zhang, Wei; Gai, Ligang; Jiang, Haihui; Tian, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Thiol-functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 microspheres (Fe3O4/SiO2-SH) with high saturation magnetization (69.3 emu g-1), superparamagnetism, and good dispersibility have been prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method in combination with a modified Stöber method. The as-prepared composite magnetic spheres are characterized with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), zeta potential, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference magnetometer, and tested in separation of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions. The data for Au(III) adsorption on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH are analyzed with the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models, and the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion kinetics models. The adsorption behaviors of Au(III) on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH follow the Langmuir isotherm model, and the adsorption process conforms to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Au(III) on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH is 43.7 mg g-1. Acetate anions play an important role yet Cu(II) ions have little interference in the adsorption of Au(III) on the adsorbent. A satisfactory recovery percentage of 89.5% is acquired by using an eluent with 1 M thiourea and 5% HCl, although thiols have a high affinity to Au(III) ions based on the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory by Pearson.

  20. Growth and morphological analysis of segmented AuAg alloy nanowires created by pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schubert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multicomponent heterostructure nanowires and nanogaps are of great interest for applications in sensorics. Pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched polymer templates is a suitable method to synthesise segmented nanowires with segments consisting of two different types of materials. For a well-controlled synthesis process, detailed analysis of the deposition parameters and the size-distribution of the segmented wires is crucial.Results: The fabrication of electrodeposited AuAg alloy nanowires and segmented Au-rich/Ag-rich/Au-rich nanowires with controlled composition and segment length in ion-track etched polymer templates was developed. Detailed analysis by cyclic voltammetry in ion-track membranes, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to determine the dependency between the chosen potential and the segment composition. Additionally, we have dissolved the middle Ag-rich segments in order to create small nanogaps with controlled gap sizes. Annealing of the created structures allows us to influence their morphology.Conclusion: AuAg alloy nanowires, segmented wires and nanogaps with controlled composition and size can be synthesised by electrodeposition in membranes, and are ideal model systems for investigation of surface plasmons.

  1. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  2. Event-by-event fluctuations of mean transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions in STAR experiment at relativistic heavy-ion collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zubayer Ahammed

    2003-05-01

    We report results on event-by-event fluctuations in mean transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The dynamical fluctuations, $_{\\langle p_{t}\\rangle,\\text{dynam}}$, is found to be about 1.2 ± 0.2% of the mean transverse momentum for particles in pseudo-rapidity range of -0.5 < < 0.5 and for the top 6% central collisions.

  3. Interaction of bilirubin with Ag and Au ions: green synthesis of bilirubin-stabilized nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shashi P.; Roy, Mainak; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Tyagi, A. K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2012-07-01

    We report a simple green chemistry to synthesize and stabilize monodispersed silver and gold nanoparticles sols by reducing aqueous solution of the respective metal salts in the presence of bilirubin (BR). No additional capping agent was used in the process of stabilization of the nanoparticles. As a completely new finding, we have observed that BR known to be toxic at higher concentration in one hand and conversely an antioxidant at physiological concentration reduces these metal ions to form the respective metal nanoparticles. Moreover, BR and its oxidized products also serve as capping agents to the nanoparticles. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. BR and its oxidized products capped nanoparticles are stable for months. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of symmetric spherical particles which was further reflected in the TEM images. The sizes of the silver particles were about 5 nm. These silver particles showed reasonably high antibacterial activity in Gram negative wild type E. coli. In the case of interaction of BR with gold ions, we could obtain cubic gold nanoparticles of average sizes 20-25 nm. Possible modes of anchorage of BR and/its oxidized products to silver nanoparticles were demonstrated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that in turn demonstrated the feasibility of using these nanoparticles as SERS substrates.

  4. Interaction of bilirubin with Ag and Au ions: green synthesis of bilirubin-stabilized nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Shashi P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation and Photochemistry Division (India); Roy, Mainak [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Division (India); Mukherjee, Poulomi [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division (India); Tyagi, A. K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Division (India); Mukherjee, Tulsi [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Chemistry Group (India); Adhikari, Soumyakanti, E-mail: asoumya@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation and Photochemistry Division (India)

    2012-07-15

    We report a simple green chemistry to synthesize and stabilize monodispersed silver and gold nanoparticles sols by reducing aqueous solution of the respective metal salts in the presence of bilirubin (BR). No additional capping agent was used in the process of stabilization of the nanoparticles. As a completely new finding, we have observed that BR known to be toxic at higher concentration in one hand and conversely an antioxidant at physiological concentration reduces these metal ions to form the respective metal nanoparticles. Moreover, BR and its oxidized products also serve as capping agents to the nanoparticles. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. BR and its oxidized products capped nanoparticles are stable for months. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the silver sol show the plasmon peak of symmetric spherical particles which was further reflected in the TEM images. The sizes of the silver particles were about 5 nm. These silver particles showed reasonably high antibacterial activity in Gram negative wild type E. coli. In the case of interaction of BR with gold ions, we could obtain cubic gold nanoparticles of average sizes 20-25 nm. Possible modes of anchorage of BR and/its oxidized products to silver nanoparticles were demonstrated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that in turn demonstrated the feasibility of using these nanoparticles as SERS substrates.

  5. Structural evolution of trimesic acid (TMA)/Zn2 + ion network on Au(111) to final structure of (10√3 × 10√3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jandee; Lee, Jaesung; Rhee, Choong Kyun

    2016-02-01

    Presented is a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of structural evolution of TMA/Zn2 + ion network on Au(111) to the final structure of (10√3 × 10√3) during solution phase post-modification of pristine trimesic acid (TMA) network of a (5√3 × 5√3) structure with Zn2 + ions. Coordination of Zn2 + ions into adsorbed TMA molecules transforms crown-like TMA hexamers in pristine TMA network to chevron pairs in TMA/Zn2 + ion network. Two ordered transient structures of TMA/Zn2 + ion network were observed. One is a (5√7 × 5√7) structure consisting of Zn2 + ion-containing chevron pairs and Zn2 + ion-free TMA dimers. The other is a (5√39 × 5√21) structure made of chevron pairs and chevron-pair-missing sites. An STM image showing domains of different stages of crystallization of chevron pairs demonstrates that the TMA/Zn2 + network before reaching to the final one is quite dynamic. The observed structural evolution of the TMA/Zn2 + ion network is discussed in terms of modification of configurations of adsorbed TMA as accommodating Zn2 + ions and re-ordering of Zn2 + ion-containing chevron pairs.

  6. Angular Distribution and Recoil Effect for 1 MeV Au+ Ions through a Si3N4 Thin Foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ke [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Chien-Hung [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Shutthanandan, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weber, William J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-18

    The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code has been widely used to predict nuclear stopping power and angular distribution of ion-solid collisions. However, experimental validation of the predictions is insufficient for slow heavy ions in nonmetallic compounds. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is applied to determine the angular distribution of 1 MeV Au ions after penetrating a Si3N4 foil with a thickness of ~100 nm. The exiting Au ions are collected by a Si wafer located ~14 mm behind the Si3N4 foil, and the resulting 2-dimensional distribution of Au ions on the Si wafer is measured by ToF-SIMS. The SRIM-predicted angular distribution of Au ions through the Si3N4 thin foil is compared with the measured results, indicating that SRIM slightly overestimates the nuclear stopping power by up to 10%. In addition, thickness reduction of the suspended Si3N4 foils induced by 1 MeV Au ion irradiation is observed with an average loss rate of ~107 atom/ion.

  7. Interstellar flow longitude from pickup ion cut-off observations at 1 AU with STEREO and ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Drews, C.; Keilbach, D.

    2016-11-01

    A precision determination of the interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction is important in several ways. As a cardinal axis of the heliosphere it has strong leverage on the plane subtended by the ISN velocity and interstellar magnetic field vector, which controls the shape of the heliosphere and its interaction with the interstellar medium. Continuing observations of the ISN flow through the heliosphere for several decades allow the search for potential temporal variations of the ISN flow and comparison with astronomical observations. Recent efforts to obtain a consistent ISN vector and temperature with Ulysses and IBEX neutral gas observations point to remaining uncertainties and potential systematic effects. In particular, IBEX measurements provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but they contain larger uncertainties along the parameter tube defined by this relation. The pickup ion (PUI) cut-off variation with ecliptic longitude at 1 AU can provide a complementary determination of the ISN flow longitude with high precision. We compare STEREO PLASTIC and ACE SWICS observations with a simple analytical model of the cut-off. We perform a Pearson correlation analysis of the cut-off as a function of ecliptic longitude with its mirrored function and obtain the symmetry axis with a statistical uncertainty <0.1°. Here we test variations of this value due to Poisson fluctuations in the original data with simulations and due to systematic effects with multi year and location ACE SWICS and STEREO PLASTIC samples.

  8. Focused ion beam-fabricated Au micro/nanostructures used as a surface enhanced Raman scattering-active substrate for trace detection of molecules and influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ying-Yi; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Ju, Yu-Hung; Chang, Chia-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Ai-Li, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Cheng Kung University, No 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-06

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique was used to precisely fabricate patterned Au micro/nanostructures (fibAu). The effects of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the fibAu samples were investigated by adjusting the geometrical, dimensional, and spacing factors. The SERS mechanism was evaluated using low-concentration rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, physically adsorbed or suspended on/within the micro/nanostructures. The results indicated that for detecting R6G molecules, hexagon-like micro/nanostructures induced a higher electromagnetic mechanism (EM) due to the availability of multiple edges and small curvature. By decreasing the dimensions from 300 to 150 nm, the laser-focused area contained an increasing number of micro/nanostructures and therefore intensified the excitation of SERS signals. Moreover, with an optimized geometry and dimensions of the micro/nanostructures, the relative intensity/surface area value reached a maximum as the spacing was 22 nm. An exponential decrease was found as the spacing was increased, which most probably resulted from the loss of EM. The spacing between the micro/nanostructures upon the fibAu was consequently regarded as the dominant factor for the detection of R6G molecules. By taking an optimized fibAu to detect low-concentration influenza virus, the amino acids from the outermost surface of the virus can be well distinguished through the SERS mechanism.

  9. Modeling interstellar pickup ion distributions in corotating interaction regions inside 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Schwadron, N. A.; Möbius, E.; Gorby, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present a modeling study of interstellar pickup ion (PUI) distributions in corotating interaction regions (CIRs). We consider gradual compressions associated with CIRs formed when fast speed streams overtake slower streams in the inner heliosphere. For the analysis, we adopt a simplified magnetohydrodynamic model of a CIR. The Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module, a parallelized particle numerical kinetic code, is used to model PUI distributions using the focused transport equation, including adiabatic cooling/heating, adiabatic focusing, and parallel and perpendicular diffusion. The continuous injection of PUIs is handled as a source term with a ring distribution in velocity space that is produced from the local neutral density obtained from a hot model of the interstellar neutral gas. The simulated distributions exhibit a harder spectrum in the compression region and a softer spectrum in the rarefaction region than that in undisturbed solar wind. As an additional result, a v-5 power law tail distribution above the PUI cutoff speed (a knee in the distribution) emerges for a particular velocity gradient in the CIR. The tail above the PUI cutoff is sensitive to the CIR velocity gradient, and in one observational case studied, this relationship adequately explains the observed spectrum from 2 to 4 times the solar wind speed. This suggests that the velocity gradient associated with the CIR formation can efficiently create a seed population of PUIs before a shock forms even without stochastic acceleration. Thus, local CIR compressions without shocks may play a significant role in the acceleration process as suggested previously.

  10. Time evolution of relativistic d + Au and Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolschin, G; Mizoguchi, T; Suzuki, N; Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi; Wolschin, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of charged-particle production in collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies is investigated as function of centrality in a nonequilibrium-statistical framework. Precise agreement with recent d + Au and Au + Au data at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is found in a Relativistic Diffusion Model with three sources for particle production. Only the midrapidity source comes very close to local equilibrium, whereas the analyses of the overall pseudorapidity distributions show that the systems remain far from statistical equilibrium.

  11. Determination of Xylene and Toluene by Solid-Phase Microextraction Using Au Nanoparticles-Thiol Silane Film Coupled to Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allafchian, Ali Reza; Akhgar, Ava; Ielbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method for analysis of xylene and toluene was developed using the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion mobilityspectrometry (IMS). Gold nanoparticles-thiol silane film (Au NPs-TSF) was applied as a newsorbent for SPME. Thiol silane film was formed on the surface of a stainless steel wire through incorporating Au nanoparticles during synthesis using sol-gel technique. The extraction properties of the fiber to xylene and toluene were examined, using a SPME device and thermal desorption ininjection port of IMS. The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1.10-32.0 and 16.0-112.0 ppb for xylene and toluene, respectively. The detection limits for xylene and toluene were 0.7 and 8.0 ppb, respectively. The proposed method was applied without any considerable sample pretreatment and it was found to be simple enough to be strongly recommended for real sample analysis.

  12. XAS and XMCD studies of magnetic properties modifications of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers induced by Ga⁺ ions irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazalski, Piotr; Sveklo, Iosif; Kurant, Zbigniew; Ollefs, Katharina; Rogalev, Andrei; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Fassbender, Juergen; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Wawro, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers subjected to 30 keV Ga(+) ion irradiation are compared. In two-dimensional maps of these properties as a function of cobalt thickness and ion fluence, two branches with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) for Pt/Co/Pt trilayers are well distinguished. The replacement of the Pt capping layer with Au results in the two branches still being visible but the in-plane anisotropy for the low-fluence branch is suppressed whereas the high-fluence branch displays PMA. The X-ray absorption spectra and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra are discussed and compared with non-irradiated reference samples. The changes of their shapes and peak amplitude, particularly for the high-fluence branch, are related to the modifications of the local environment of Co(Pt) atoms and the etching effects induced by ion irradiation. Additionally, in irradiated trilayers the XMCD measurements at the Pt L2,3-edge reveal an increase of the magnetic moment induced in Pt atoms.

  13. Enhancement of chitosan-graphene oxide SPR sensor with a multi-metallic layers of Au–Ag–Au nanostructure for lead(II) ion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba [Department of Electric, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A., E-mail: ashrif@ukm.edu.my [Department of Electric, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaacob, Mohd Hanif; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir [Wireless and Photonic Network Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkefly [Department of Electric, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Shaari, Sahbudin [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Tri-metallic Au–Ag–Au CS-GO SPR sensor was fabricated for the first time. • The tri-metallic nanostructure provided an enhanced evanescent field. • Successful functionalization of the CS-GO sensing layer. • Superior performance for lead(II) ion detection. - Abstract: We demonstrate the enhancement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique by implementing a multi-metallic layers of Au–Ag–Au nanostructure in the chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO) SPR sensor for lead(II) ion detection. The performance of the sensor is analyzed via SPR measurements, from which the sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and repeatability are determined. The nanostructure layers are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We showed that the proposed structure has increased the shift in the SPR angle up to 3.5° within the range of 0.1–1 ppm due to the enhanced evanescent field at the sensing layer-analyte interface. This sensor also exhibits great repeatability which benefits from the stable multi-metallic nanostructure. The SNR value of 0.92 for 5 ppm lead(II) ion solution and reasonable linearity range up to that concentration shows that the tri-metallic CS-GO SPR sensor gives a good response towards the lead(II) ion solution. The CS-GO SPR sensor is also sensitive to at least a 10{sup −5} change in the refractive index. The results prove that our proposed tri-metallic CS-GO SPR sensor demonstrates a strong performance and reliability for lead(II) ion detection in accordance with the standardized lead safety level for wastewater.

  14. Stage II recovery behavior of a series of ion-irradiated platinum (gold) alloys as studied by field-ion microscopy. [0. 10, 0. 62, and 4. 0 at. percent Au and pure Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, C.Y.; Seidman, D.N.

    1976-11-01

    Direct and visible evidence was obtained for long-range migration of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in Stage II of three different ion-irradiated platinum (gold) alloys. Field-ion microscope (FIM) specimens of Pt--0.10, 0.62 and 4.0 at. percent Au alloys were irradiated in-situ with 30-keV W/sup +/ or Pt/sup +/ ions at a tip temperature of 35 to 41 K at 2 x 10/sup -9/ torr. Direct observation of the surfaces of the FIM specimens during isochronal warming experiments to 100 K showed that a flux of SIAs crossed the surfaces of the specimens between 40 to 100 K. The spectrum for each alloy consisted of two recovery peaks (substages II/sub B/ and II/sub C/). The results are explained on the basis of an impurity-delayed diffusion mechanism employing a two-level trapping model. The application of this diffusion model to the isochronal recovery spectra yielded a dissociation enthalpy (DELTAh/sub li-Au//sup diss/) and an effective diffusion coefficient for each substage; for substage II/sub B/ DELTAh/sub li-Au//sup diss/ (II/sub B/) = 0.15 eV and for substage II/sub C/ DELTAh/sub li-Au//sup diss/ (II/sub C/) = 0.24 eV. A series of detailed control experiments was also performed to show that the imaging electric field had not caused the observed long-range migration of SIAs and that the observed effects were not the result of surface artifacts. 14 figures, 6 tables.

  15. The distribution of gas and ions in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko between 3 AU before and after its perihelion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, Dennis; Lara, Luisa; La Forgia, Fiorangela; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Knollenberg, Jörg; Lazzarin, Monica; Li, Zhong-Yi; Osiris team

    2016-10-01

    Rosetta explored a regime not accessible before: the inner coma of a low-activity comet at a large range of heliocentric distances. The Wide Angle Camera (WAC) of the OSIRIS instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft is equipped with several narrowband filters that are centered on the emission lines and bands of various molecules and ions. These filters center on fragment species that are relatively bright and that have been used for numerous comet studies from the ground (e.g. A'Hearn et al. 1995). Surprisingly, we found that outside 2 AU pre-perihelion, the emission in the filters was dominated by emission from dissociative electron impact excitation (Bodewits et al. 2016). Closer to perihelion, higher gas densities reduced electron temperatures in the inner coma and photo-processes drove much if not most of the emission from the comet. Our observations allowed us to study changes in the physical environment of the inner coma, and Rosetta's excursions as far as 1000 km from the surface allowed us to study different regions of the coma.In this contribution, we will summarize the results of our OSIRIS observations from approximately 3 AU before to 3 AU after perihelion.

  16. Influence of 120 MeV Au+9 ions irradiation on resistive switching properties of Cr:SrZrO3/SRO junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Komal H.; Joshi, Utpal S.

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation has been successfully used to modify structural and electrical properties of heterostructured Cr doped SrZrO3 thin films grown on 200 nm thick SrRuO3/SiO2 by chemical solution deposition method. Samples were irradiated by 120 MeV Au+9 ions with fluence value 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the influence of SHI irradiation on the resistive switching (RS) phenomenon. Structural characterization with grazing angle X-ray diffraction exhibited an enhancement of crystallinity as well as crystallographic strain. Typical energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectrum was carried out to study the interface mixing, if any, after the ion irradiation. The pristine sample exhibits a narrow hysteresis loop in the current voltage (I-V) curves with maximum RS ratio of 98. Highly reproducible resistive switching characteristics with pronounced loops in the I-V curves have been observed for the irradiated Ag/Cr:SZO/SRO structure with maximum RS ratio of 985. I-V curves in low resistive state (LRS) demonstrate linear Ohmic conduction mechanism for both positive as well as negative bias region. The high resistive state (HRS) is consistent with space charge limited (SCLC) mechanism. The observed electrical behavior can be attributed to the high energy density of electronic excitations resulting from the impact of swift heavy ions induced defects and strain.

  17. Effect of Ni and Au ion irradiations on structural and optical properties of nanocrystalline Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir, Feroz A. [University of Kashmir, University Science Instrumentation Centre, Srinagar, J and K (India); Batoo, Khalid Mujasam [King Saud University, King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-04-15

    The effect of swift heavy ion irradiations on the structural and optical properties of 6 % Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} thin films deposited on quartz substrate by electron beam evaporation technique is presented. Two ion species Ni and Au with energy 120 MeV and fluence of 1 x 10{sup 13} ion/cm{sup 2} were used. These films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, UV-visible and micro-Raman spectroscopy. From structural analysis, these films exhibit tetragonal rutile structure and retain it even after irradiation. The ion irradiations have shown improvement in the structural properties, such as increase in grain size and decrease in the lattice strain. Raman study also indicates enhancement in quality of crystal structure after irradiations. The grain growth after ion interaction is also observed by atomic force microscope study. Further, a variation in optical band gap and reduction in disorder is observed after irradiation. Other parameters such as Urbach tails energy and steepness parameter are obtained from optical data. The overall observed physical properties show a significant improvement after irradiation. A good correspondence between structures with its various properties can be seen. (orig.)

  18. Influence of 120 MeV Au{sup +9} ions irradiation on resistive switching properties of Cr:SrZrO{sub 3}/SRO junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhavsar, Komal H.; Joshi, Utpal S., E-mail: usjoshi@gmail.com

    2016-07-15

    Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation has been successfully used to modify structural and electrical properties of heterostructured Cr doped SrZrO{sub 3} thin films grown on 200 nm thick SrRuO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} by chemical solution deposition method. Samples were irradiated by 120 MeV Au{sup +9} ions with fluence value 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} in order to investigate the influence of SHI irradiation on the resistive switching (RS) phenomenon. Structural characterization with grazing angle X-ray diffraction exhibited an enhancement of crystallinity as well as crystallographic strain. Typical energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectrum was carried out to study the interface mixing, if any, after the ion irradiation. The pristine sample exhibits a narrow hysteresis loop in the current voltage (I–V) curves with maximum RS ratio of 98. Highly reproducible resistive switching characteristics with pronounced loops in the I–V curves have been observed for the irradiated Ag/Cr:SZO/SRO structure with maximum RS ratio of 985. I–V curves in low resistive state (LRS) demonstrate linear Ohmic conduction mechanism for both positive as well as negative bias region. The high resistive state (HRS) is consistent with space charge limited (SCLC) mechanism. The observed electrical behavior can be attributed to the high energy density of electronic excitations resulting from the impact of swift heavy ions induced defects and strain.

  19. Origin and Properties of Quiet-time 0.11-1.28 MeV Nucleon-1 Heavy-ion Population near 1 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Ebert, R. W.; Farahat, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer near 1 au, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2015 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ∼0.11 and ∼1.28 MeV nucleon‑1. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following. (1) The number of quiet hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 82% of the time. (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy-ion population (3He, C-through-Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum. (3) The heavy-ion (C–Fe) spectra exhibit suprathermal tails at energies of 0.11–0.32 MeV nucleon‑1 with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.40 to 2.97. Fe spectra soften (steepen, i.e., spectral index increases) smoothly with increasing energies compared with Fe, indicating a rollover behavior of Fe at higher energies (0.45–1.28 MeV nucleon‑1). (4) Spectral indices of Fe and O do not appear to exhibit clear solar cycle dependence. (2) and (3) imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ∼0.1 MeV nucleon‑1, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events. We discuss the implications of these extended observations in the context of the current understanding of the suprathermal ion population near 1 au.

  20. Adsorption properties of Ag(I), Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) ions on commercial 717 anion-exchange resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; LIU Guang-feng; CHEN Da-lin; CHENG Shao-yi; TANG Ning

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption properties of the four precious metal ions (Ag(Ⅰ),Au(Ⅲ),Pd(Ⅱ) and Pt(Ⅳ)) on the commercial Cl--form 717 strongly basic anion-exchange resin were studied in detail.The effects of the contact time,solution acidity,and concentrations of Cl~- and Pb~(2+) ions on the adsorption properties were studied by the batch method.Then,the column method was conducted under the optimized adsorption conditions (pH=3.0).The effects of the sample loading flow rate and the length-to-diameter ratios of the columns were investigated.The precious metal ions adsorbed could not be eluted completely after the saturated adsorption because the precious metal ions were found to be reduced to their metallic states during the adsorption process.So,it is recommended that the commercial Cl~--form 717 strongly basic anion-exchange resin should be decomposed directly to recovery the precious metals after the saturated adsorption.

  1. Analysis of shower particle pseudorapidity spectra in interactions of relativistic Au and Pb ions with emulsion nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Z. Belashev; M. K. Suleymanov; S. Vokál; J. Vrláková; M. Ajaz; Ali Zaman; K. H. Khan; Z. Wazir

    2011-01-01

    The pseudorapidity spectra of fast particles (with β > 0.7) produced in Au (at 11.6 A GeV) and Pb (at 158 A GeV) induced collisions with emulsion (Em) nuclei contain some visual plateaus and shoulders.The plateau is wider for Pb+Em reactions compared with the Au+Em ones.The existence of a plateau is expected for parton models.The Fourier transformation and maximum entropy methods were used to get additional information about the plateaus.The dependence of the plateaus on the centrality of the collisions was also studied using the number of g-particles to fix centrality.It shows that the maximum entropy method could confirm the existence of the plateau and the shoulder on distributions.

  2. Etude preliminaire des equilibres de distribution de l'eau et des ions au cours de l'ovogenese de Solea solea

    OpenAIRE

    Gallis, J; Lemenn, F; Lebrun, A; NUNEZ R

    1983-01-01

    Les mécanismes d'évolution de l'eau et des ions K+ et Na + dans 1'ovocyte , étudiés- chez Solea so lea L . au¿cours de l'ovogenèse, paraissent liés aux processus d'accumulation des réserves vitellines. Dans l'ovocyte.le ralentissement de l'accumulation de l'eau, parallèle à une accélération de son accumulation dans le milieu péricellulaire, est concomitant de l'entrée de vitellogénine. Ces processus sont associés à une baisse de la teneur en K intraovocytaire. La teneur ovocytaire en Na dimin...

  3. Ion-stimulated gas desorption yields of coated (Au, Ag, Pd) stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Malabaila, M; Taborelli, M

    2005-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, and palladium-coated 316LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analysed for chemical composition by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The large effective desorption yield of 2 x 10**4 molecules/ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with heavy ions and the consequence of a subsequent venting on the desorption yields of a beam-scrubbed vacuum chamber are described. Practical consequences for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) are discussed.

  4. Au{sup 9+} swift heavy ion irradiation of Zn[CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 3}SO{sub 4} crystal: Crystalline perfection and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, S.K., E-mail: kushwaha@princeton.edu [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Maurya, K.K.; Vijayan, N.; Gupta, A.K.; Haranath, D. [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kumar, B. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [CSIR – National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • Zn[CS(NH2){sub 2}]{sub 3}SO{sub 4}, a NLO crystal irradiated by Au{sup 9+} 150 MeV swift heavy ions. • Structural defects in pristine and irradiated crystals investigated and compared. • Functional groups and Raman lattice modes in crystal investigated. • Au{sup 9+} irradiation related PL emission, optical transparency and band gap studied. • Correlation of crystalline perfection with optical properties is discussed. - Abstract: The single crystal of tris(thiourea)zinc sulphate (Zn[CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 3}SO{sub 4}) was irradiated by 150 MeV Au{sup 9+} swift heavy ions and analyzed in comparison with pure crystal for crystalline perfection and optical properties. The Fourier transform infrared and X-ray powder diffraction inferred that swift ions lead the disordering and breaking of molecular bonds in lattice without formation of new structural phases. High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) revealed the abundance of point defects, and formation of mosaics and low angle grain boundaries in the irradiated region of crystal. The swift ion irradiation found to affect the lattice vibrational modes and functional groups significantly. The defects induced by heavy ions act as the color centers and resulted in enhance of photoluminescence emission intensity. The optical transparency and band gap found to be decreased.

  5. Site Preference in Multimetallic Nanoclusters: Incorporation of Alkali Metal Ions or Copper Atoms into the Alkynyl-Protected Body-Centered Cubic Cluster [Au7 Ag8 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ]().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Ren, Liting; Malola, Sami; Lin, Shuichao; Teo, Boon K; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-11-21

    The synthesis, structure, substitution chemistry, and optical properties of the gold-centered cubic monocationic cluster [Au@Ag8 @Au6 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) are reported. The metal framework of this cluster can be described as a fragment of a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice with the silver and gold atoms occupying the vertices and the body center of the cube, respectively. The incorporation of alkali metal atoms gave rise to [Mn Ag8-n Au7 (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) clusters (n=1 for M=Na, K, Rb, Cs and n=2 for M=K, Rb), with the alkali metal ion(s) presumably occupying the vertex site(s), whereas the incorporation of copper atoms produced [Cun Ag8 Au7-n (C≡C(t) Bu)12 ](+) clusters (n=1-6), with the Cu atom(s) presumably occupying the capping site(s). The parent cluster exhibited strong emission in the near-IR region (λmax =818 nm) with a quantum yield of 2 % upon excitation at λ=482 nm. Its photoluminescence was quenched upon substitution with a Na(+) ion. DFT calculations confirmed the superatom characteristics of the title compound and the sodium-substituted derivatives. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Magnetic beads-based DNAzyme recognition and AuNPs-based enzymatic catalysis amplification for visual detection of trace uranyl ion in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Lin, Ling; Zeng, Xiaoxue; Ruan, Yajuan; Wu, Yongning; Lin, Minggui; He, Ye; Fu, FengFu

    2016-04-15

    We herein developed a novel biosensor for the visual detection of trace uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) in aqueous environment with high sensitivity and specificity by using DNAzyme-functionalized magnetic beads (MBs) for UO2(2+) recognition and gold nano-particles (AuNPs)-based enzymatic catalysis oxidation of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate) for signal generation. The utilization of MBs facilitates the magnetic separation and collection of sensing system from complex sample solution, which leads to more convenient experimental operation and more strong resistibility of the biosensor to the matrix of sample, and the utilization of AuNPs-based enzymatic catalysis amplification greatly improved the sensitivity of the biosensor. Compared with the previous DNAzyme-based UO2(2+) sensors, the proposed biosensor has outstanding advantages such as relative high sensitivity and specificity, operation convenience, low cost and more strong resistibility to the matrix of sample. It can be used to detect as low as 0.02 ppb (74 pM) of UO2(2+) in aqueous environment by only naked-eye observation and 1.89 ppt (7.0 pM) of UO2(2+) by UV-visible spectrophotometer with a recovery of 93-99% and a RSD ≤ 5.0% (n=6) within 3h. Especially, the visual detection limit of 0.02 ppb (74 pM) is much lower than the maximum allowable level of UO2(2+) (130 nM) in the drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), indicating that our method meets the requirement of rapid and on-site detection of UO2(2+) in the aqueous environment by only naked-eye observation.

  7. Shift of localized surface plasmon resonance by Ar-ion irradiation of Ag–Au bimetallic films deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xuan [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Yu, Ruixuan; Takayanagi, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Effects of Ar-ion induced surface nanostructuring were studied using 100 keV Ar-ion irradiation of 30 nm Ag–Au bimetallic films deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals, under irradiation fluences ranging from 5.0 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} to 6.3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Scanning electron microscope was used to study the ion-beam-induced surface nanostructuring. As the irradiation fluence increased, dewetting of the bimetallic films on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was observed, and formation of isolated Ag–Au nanostructures sustained on the substrate were obtained. Next, thermal annealing was performed under high vacuum at 1073 K for 2 h; a layer of photosensitive Ag–Au alloy nanoballs partially embedded in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was obtained when higher fluence irradiation (>3.8 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) was used. The microstructures of the nanoballs were investigated using a transmission electron microscope, and the nanoballs were found to be single crystals with a FCC structure. In addition, photoabsorption spectra were measured, and localized surface plasmon resonance peaks were observed. With increase in the irradiation fluence, the size of the Ag–Au nanoballs on the substrate decreased, and a blue-shift of the LSPR peaks was observed. Further control of the LSPR frequency over a wide range was achieved by modifying the chemical components, and a red-shift of the LSPR peaks was observed as the Au concentration increased. In summary, ion irradiation is an effective approach toward surface nanostructuring, and the nanocomposites obtained have potential applications in optical devices.

  8. Spectrophotometric study of neptunium (VI) complexation by nitrate ions; Etude par spectrophotometrie de la complexation du neptunium au degre d'oxydation (VI) par les ions nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochon, P. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)]|[Centre Regional Associe de Lyon, 69 (France)

    2000-07-01

    Neptunium(VI) complexation by nitrate ions was investigated by visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry, a technique suitable for observing the appearance and evolution of the species in solution. In the absence of reference spectra for Np(VI) nitrate- complexes, mathematical (factor analysis) tools were used to interpret the spectra. These chemo-metric techniques were first tested and validated on a simpler chemical system: Np(VI)complexation by the SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}{sup 8-} anion. The test media used to investigate Np(VI) nitrate- complexes generally contain nitrate and perchlorate salts at high concentrations (high ionic strength). Media effects arising from the presence of cations, acidity or the perchlorate ion concentration are therefore significant, and no doubt account for the scattered values of the complexation constants published in the literature. The evolution of the neptunium spectra according to the parameters of the reaction medium illustrated these effects and allowed them to be quantified by a global 'perturbation constant'. In order to minimize the spectrum modifications due to media effects, the neptunium nitrate-complexes were studied at constant ionic strength in weak acidic media (2 mol.kg{sup -1}{sub H2O}) in the presence of sodium salts. The bulk formation constants and the spectrum of the NpO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sup +} complex were determined for ionic strength values of 2.2, 4, 6 and 8 mol.kg{sup -1}{sub H2O}. The constants remained on the same order of magnitude regardless of the ionic strength; the thermodynamic constant {beta}{sub 1}{sup 0} determined from them according to specific interaction theory is thus probably of little significance. Conversely, the bulk constants can be corrected for the effects of the perchlorate ions by taking the global 'perturbation constant' into account. (author)

  9. Response of cubic zirconia irradiated with 4-MeV Au ions at high temperature: An X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debelle, A., E-mail: aurelien.debelle@u-psud.fr [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Thome, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Boulle, A. [Science des Procedes Ceramiques et de Traitements de Surface (SPCTS), CNRS UMR 6638, Centre Europeen de la Ceramique, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges (France); Moll, S.; Garrido, F.; Qasim, L.; Rosza, P. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-04-15

    Yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia single-crystals have been irradiated with 4-MeV Au{sup 2+} ions at fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} and at three temperatures (room temperature, 500 Degree-Sign C and 800 Degree-Sign C). Evaluation of the irradiation-induced strain has been performed by the X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that, whatever the irradiation temperature, the elastic-strain build-up exhibits two steps. An increase of the (tensile) strain-level is observed in the first step. A drastic strain relaxation occurs at a transition fluence, which defines the beginning of the second step. Increasing the irradiation temperature induces a decrease of the strain level and a shift of the transition fluence towards low fluence. Both effects may be explained by an enhanced defect-clustering rate which occurs already at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  10. Application of resistivity measurements to the control of protein elutions using cellulose ion-exchangers; Application de la mesure de resistivite au controle d'une elution de proteines a partir de celluloses echangeuses d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplaa, A.M.; Brandolin, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The eluate obtained by chromatography of a mixture of proteins on columns of cellulose ion-exchangers (DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose) sometimes have very low proteins concentrations. The resistivity measurement gives more information than the UV control which is often inadequate. The modifications undergone by elution buffers are recorded and the best conditions for the extraction of an enzymatic protein are determined. The tests are performed without proteins on the columns; they consist in a double control of resistivity and ph of elution buffers after they pass on the exchangers columns. (author) [French] Apres chromatographie d'un melange de proteine; sur colonnes d'echangeurs d'ions tels que DEAE-cellulose et CM-cellulose, les eluats obtenus ont quelquefois des concentrations en proteines tres faibles. Au controle en UV souvent insuffisant, on a ajoute la mesure de resistivite apportant des donnees complementaires. Des essais, realises en l'absence de proteines et consistant a effectuer un double controle de resistivite et de pH des tampons d'elution apres leur passage sur colonnes d'echangeurs, ont permis d'enregistrer les modifications subies par ces tampons et de determiner leurs meilleures conditions d'utilisation pour l'extraction d'une proteine enzymatique. (auteur)

  11. Performances of a lithium-carbon ``lithium ion``battery for electric powered vehicle; Performances d`un accumulateur au lithium-carbone ``Lithium Ion`` pour vehicule electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broussely, M.; Planchat, J.P.; Rigobert, G.; Virey, D.; Sarre, G. [SAFT, Advanced and Industrial Battery Group, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    1996-12-31

    The lithium battery, also called `lithium-carbon` or `lithium ion`, is today the most promising candidate that can reach the expected minimum traction performances of electric powered vehicles. Thanks to a more than 20 years experience on lithium generators and to a specific research program on lithium batteries, the SAFT company has developed a 100 Ah electrochemical system, and full-scale prototypes have been manufactured for this application. These prototypes use the Li{sub x}NiO{sub 2} lithiated graphite electrochemical pair and were tested in terms of their electrical performances. Energy characteristics of 125 Wh/kg and 265 Wh/dm{sup 3} could be obtained. The possibility of supplying a power greater than 200 W/kg, even at low temperature (-10 deg. C) has been demonstrated with these elements. A full battery set of about 20 kWh was built and its evaluation is in progress. It comprises the electronic control systems for the optimum power management during charge and output. (J.S.) 9 refs.

  12. 硅胶表面AuCl4-印迹聚乙烯亚胺的制备及识别特性研究%Preparation of AuCl4- Imprinted Polyethyleneimine on Silica Gel Surface and Recognition Capability for Gold Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳晓霞; 张栋; 杜瑞奎; 张永奇; 王靖雯; 安富强

    2015-01-01

    A functional graft material PEI-g-SiO2 was prepared via grafting functional polymer PEI (polyethyleneimine, PEI) onto the surface of silica gel particles. Then, PEI macromolecules grafted onto the surface of silica gel particles were crosslinked to produce ionic imprinted material IIP-PEI-g-SiO2by using AuCl4- as template ions and ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE) as the crosslinking agent. The adsorption ability of IIP-PEI-g-SiO2 for AuCl4- was investigated through the static method. The experiment results showed that the ionic imprinted material IIP-PEI-g-SiO2displayed excellent adsorption performance and great ability of recognition memory for AuCl4-. The adsorption capacity could be up to 23.59 mg/g, and the relative selectivity coefficients relative to Cu2+ was 32.45. Furthermore, IIP-PEI-g-SiO2 also possessed an excellent reusability.%将功能高分子聚乙烯亚胺(polyethyleneimine,PEI)化学接枝在硅胶微粒表面,形成功能接枝材料PEI-g-SiO2;再以AuCl4-为模板离子,乙二醇二缩水甘油醚(EGDE)为交联剂,将接枝在硅胶表面的PEI大分子链进行交联,同时实施AuCl4-的印迹,制备了AuCl4-印迹材料IIP-PEI-g-SiO2。采用静态法考察了IIP-PEI-g-SiO2对AuCl4-的吸附特性。实验结果表明,IIP-PEI-g-SiO2对AuCl4-具有优良的吸附性能与较强的记忆识别能力。吸附容量可以达到23.59 mg/g,相对于Cu2+,印迹材料对AuCl4-的选择性系数为32.45。此外,IIP-PEI-g-SiO2还具有优良的重复使用性能。

  13. In situ fabrication of ultrathin porous alumina and its application for nanopatterning Au nanocrystals on the surface of ion-sensitive field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, A; Heggen, M; Fischer, W; Tillmann, K; Offenhäusser, A; Kubota, L T; Mourzina, Y

    2012-12-07

    In situ fabrication in a single step of thin films of alumina exhibiting a thickness of less than 100 nm and nanopores with a highly regular diameter distribution in order to pattern nanostructures over field-effect devices is a critical issue and has not previously been demonstrated. Here we report the fabrication in situ of 50 nm thick ultrathin nanoporous alumina membranes with a regular pore size directly over metal-free gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistors. Depositing thin films of aluminum by an electron beam at a relatively low rate of deposition on top of chips containing the transistors and using a conventional single-step anodization process permits the production of a well-adhering nanoporous ultrathin layer of alumina on the surface of the devices. The anodization process does not substantially affect the electrical properties of the transistors. The small thickness and pore size of ultrathin alumina membranes allow them to be sequentially employed as masks for patterning Au nanocrystals grown by an electroless approach directly on the top of the transistors. The patterning process using a wet chemical approach enables the size of the patterned crystals to be controlled not only by the dimensions of the pores of alumina, but also by the concentration of the reactants employed. Surface modification of these nanocrystals with alkanethiol molecules demonstrates that the electrostatic charge of the functional groups of the molecules can modulate the electrical characteristics of the transistors. These results represent substantial progress towards the development of novel nanostructured arrays on top of field-effect devices that can be applied for chemical sensing or non-volatile memories.

  14. Bonding in gold-rare earth [Au2M] (M = Eu, Yb, Lu) ions. A strong covalent gold-lanthanide bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Arratia-Perez, Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure and bonding nature of a series of intermetallic gold-lanthanide [Au2Ln] molecules, where Ln = Eu, Yb, Lu is predicted via the DFT and CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations. The 2c-2e bond model shows a good description of the intermetallic bonding which have a large covalent component with important contribution from bonding interaction between the 6s-Au and the 6s-Ln shell of orbitals.

  15. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    PHENIX Collaboration; Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1

  16. 分离、富集液相中金离子的反应型材料%Advance of Reactive Material for the Separation and Enrichment of Au Ion in the Liquid Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵可江; 赵亮; 王新军

    2007-01-01

      本文介绍了近些年来国内外以化学吸附纤维(离子交换和螯合纤维)、活性炭纤维和树脂等有机功能材料为基础研究开发分离、富集液相中金离子(Au3+和Au+)的研究进展,其中包括含N、O、S等各种官能团有机功能纤维和树脂、活性炭纤维对液相中金离子吸附的实验理论研究、预富集分析测试和实际湿法冶金中的应用,对于不同吸附材料对金离子的吸附行为、吸附机理、影响因素等进行了初步探讨。指出了反应型材料的优势和目前所存在的问题,对其应用前景作了适当展望。%  It is introduced in this article the advance of the separation and enrichment of Au ion(Au+,Au3+) from liquid phase on the basis of reactive material(chemical adsorptive fiber(ion exchange and chelating fiber),active carbon fiber(ACF),resin et al) in China and abroad in recent years,which includes the experimental theoretical research,pre-enrichment analytical test and application in hydrometallagy by organic functional fiber and resin with functional groups containing N,O,S atom,ACF.As for different adsorbents,it simply discusses the gold adsorption performance,adsorption mechanism,affecting factor.Last it points out the advantages and the defects of the reactive material,and properly forcasts its application prospects.

  17. Production and ion-ion cooling of highly charged ions in electron string ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B; Syresin, E M

    2009-06-01

    The scheme of an internal injection of Au atoms into the working space of the "Krion-2" electron string ion source (ESIS) was applied and tested. In this scheme Au atoms are evaporated from the thin tungsten wire surface in vicinity of the source electron string. Ion beams with charge states up to Au51+ were produced. Ion-ion cooling with use of C and O coolant ions was studied. It allowed increasing of the Au51+ ion yield by a factor of 2. Ions of Kr up to charge state 28+ were also produced in the source. Electron strings were first formed with injection electron energy up to 6 keV. Methods to increase the ESIS ion output are discussed.

  18. Determination of electronic stopping powers of 0.05-1 MeV/u 131Xe ions in C-, Ni- and Au-absorbers with calorimetric low temperature detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kettunen, H.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Laitinen, M.; Müller, K.; Rossi, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Virtanen, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new experimental system for precise determination of electronic stopping powers of heavy ions has been set up at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä. The new setup, combining an established B-ToF system and an array of calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTDs), has been used for the determination of electronic stopping powers of 0.05-1 MeV/u 131Xe ions in carbon, nickel and gold. Thereby advantage of the improved linearity and energy resolution of CLTDs as compared to the previously used ionization detector was taken to reduce energy calibration errors and to increase sensitivity for the energy loss determination, in particular at very low energies. The total uncertainties of 3-4% for C- and Ni-targets, and 5-7% for Au-targets, respectively, are dominated by the target properties, i.e. thickness determination and inhomogeneities. The results are compared to data from literature and to predictions of different theoretical computer codes. In the high energy part of the examined energy range the results are in good agreement with previously published data, while new stopping power data for very heavy ions in different Z2-materials have been obtained at lower energies. Moreover, unexpectedly strong channeling effects for the transmission of the 131Xe ions in thin, partly polycrystalline nickel and gold target foils have been observed and investigated.

  19. Determination of Tetracycline in Pharmaceutical Preparation by Molecular and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography via Complex Formation with Au(III) and Hg(II) Ions in Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Ahlam Jameel; Jasim, Hadi Hassan; Hassan, Abbas Shebeeb

    2013-01-01

    UV-visible and atomic spectrophotometry and HPLC techniques were applied for the determination of tetracycline (TC) in pharmaceutical preparations via complexation of the drug with Au(III) and Hg(II) ions in solutions. The mole ratio of TC to metal ions was 1 : 1. Maximum peak absorption at λ 425 and 320 nm for the two ions, respectively, was optimized at heating temperature 75°C for 15 minutes at pH = 4 followed by the extraction with ethyl acetate. The percentage of extraction and stability constants for the two complexes was 95.247, 95.335% and 2.518 × 10(4), 1.162 × 10(5) M(-1), respectively. HPLC method was applied without extraction process. The analytical data obtained from direct calibration curves of UV-visible absorption, FAAS, and HPLC for Au(III) complexes were recovery (100.78, 104.85, and 101.777%, resp.); detection limits (0.7403, 0.0997, and 2.647  μ g/ml, resp.); linearity (5-70, 5-30, and 10-150  μ g/ml, resp.), and correlation coefficient (0.9991, 0.9967, and 0.9986, resp.). The analytical data obtained from direct calibration curves for Hg(II) complexes by UV-visible spectrophotometry and HPLC were recovery (100.95 and 102.000%, resp.); detection limits (0.5867 and 2.532  μ g/ml, resp.); linearity (5-70 and 10-150  μ g/ml, resp.); and correlation coefficients (0.9989 and 0.9997, resp.).

  20. Relative Distribution of Au48+ ~ Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-Yan; ZHU Zheng-He; JIANG Gang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Macroscopic Dynamical Description of Rotating au + au System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cârjan, N.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Wilczyński, J.

    Events with more than two heavy fragments have been abundantly observed in heavy-ion semi-peripheral (fission-like) reaction 197Au+197Au at 15 MeV/nucleon. This raised interesting questions about their origin and about the time-scale at which they occur. As a possible explanation of this process, the surface instability of the cylindrical neck that is formed along the path from contact to reseparation of the rotating Au+Au system is investigated in the present paper. For this purpose the Los Alamos finite-range macroscopic dynamical model was used. The calculations were performed at relatively high angular momenta, L = 100 to 300 ħ, for two types of dissipation mechanisms: two-body viscosity and one-body dissipation. Various initial nuclear deformations and initial kinetic energies in the fission direction were considered. The resulting dynamical evolution in the multidimensional deformation space always led to multifragment scission configurations suggesting that ternary and quaternary break-up can occur during the heavy-ion reaction studied.

  2. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections of H, He, N, O, Ar, Xe, Au, Pb Atoms and Their Ions in the Electron Energy Range from the Threshold up to 200 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Povyshev, V M; Shevelko, V P; Shirkov, G D; Vasina, E G; Vatulin, V V

    2001-01-01

    Single electron-impact ionization cross sections of H, He, N, O, Ar, Xe, Au, Pb atoms and their positive ions (i.e. all ionization stages) are presented in the electron energy range from the threshold up to 200 keV. The data-set for the cross sections has been created on the basis of available experimental data and calculations performed by the computer code ATOM. Consistent data for the ionization cross sections have been fitted by seven parameters using the LSM method. The accuracy of the calculated data presented is within a factor of 2 that in many cases is sufficient to solve the plasma kinetics problems. Contributions from excitation-autoionization and resonant-ionization processes as well as ionization of atoms and ions are not considered here. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the well-known Lotz formulae for ionization of neutral atoms and positive ions. The material is illustrated by figures and includes tables of ionization cross sections, binding energies and fitting para...

  3. Identified hadron production in $\\sqrt{s}=130$ GeV Au–Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Julia Velkovska

    2003-05-01

    Identified +/-, +/-, and $\\overline{p}$ transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity in $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ GeV Au–Au collisions were measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC as a function of collision centrality. Average transverse momenta increase with the number of participating nucleons (part) similarly for all particle species. The multiplicity densities scale faster than part. The +/- and +/- yields per participant increase faster than the +/- yields. We combine the PHENIX neutral and charged pion measurement and find that in central collisions for T ≥ 2 GeV/c, $\\overline{p}$ and yields are comparable to or even exceed the pion yields.

  4. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and e...

  5. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  6. Coherent rho(0) production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-12-30

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive rho(0) photoproduction, AuAu-->AuAurho(0), and rho(0) production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu-->Au*Au*rho(0), in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The rho(0) have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating rho(0) production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes.

  7. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  8. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and eta in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, R_AA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  9. Influence des ions lithium et borate sur l'hydratation de ciments sulfo-alumineux : application au conditionnement de résines échangeuses d'ions boratées

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, a solution of boric acid, the pH of which is controlled by the addition of lithium hydroxide, is injected in the primary circuit. Boron acts as a neutron moderator and helps controlling the fission reactions. The primary coolant is purified by flowing through columns of ion exchange resins. These resins are periodically renewed and constitute a low-level radioactive waste. In addition to radionuclides, they mainly contain borate and lithium ions. They are curren...

  10. Colorimetric determination of the fluoride ion - application to uranium metal and to uranous fluoride; Dosage colorimetrique de l'ion fluor - application a l'uranium metal et au fluorure uraneux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H.; Hure, J.; Legrand, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (France)

    1949-12-01

    In the determination described for fluoride in U metal, the U is brought into H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution by anodic oxidation, the fluo-silicic acid is distilled by entrainment in water vapor, and the F ion is determined in the distillate by using the fact that it complexes Zr and thus prevents the formation of the Zr-alizarin S lake. For F ion in UF{sub 4}, the compound is dissolved in a Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} mixture, and F is determined in the solution by the colorimetric method described. (author)

  11. Contribution au développement de fibres optiques à base de silice dopée aux ions de terres rares

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Loin de seulement guider la lumière, les fibres optiques s'avèrent être extrêmement polyvalentes. Dotées de fonctions passives tel qu'un filtrage spectral, elles sont à la base de très nombreux capteurs de contraintes (température, pression, allongement, etc). Dopées d'ions de terres rares, elles acquièrent des propriétés de luminescence exploitées pour la réalisation d'amplificateurs ou de lasers. Parmi les matériaux utilisés pour préparer des fibres, la silice est le verre de référence. Les...

  12. Baryonic Effect on XcJ Suppression in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ru; XU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Dai-Cui

    2004-01-01

    @@ We predict that xcJ mesons at low transverse momentum in the central rapidity region are almost dissociated by nucleons and antinucleons in hadronic matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic high-ion collider (RHIC) energies √SNN = 130 and 200 GeV. In the calculations the nucleon and antinucleon distributions in hadronic matter are results of evolution from their freeze-out distributions which well fit the experimental transverse momentum spectra of proton and antiproton.

  13. Electronic sputtering of LiF, CaF2, LaF3 and UF4 with 197 MeV Au ions. Is the stoichiometry of atom emission preserved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemonde, M.; Assmann, W.; Muller, D.; Trautmann, C.

    2017-09-01

    Sputtering experiments with swift heavy ions in the electronic energy loss regime were performed by using the catcher technique in combination with elastic recoil detection analysis. Four different fluoride targets, LiF, CaF2, LaF3 and UF4 were irradiated in the electronic energy loss regime using 197 MeV Au ions. The angular distribution of particles sputtered from the surface of freshly cleaved LiF and CaF2 single crystals is composed of a broad cosine distribution superimposed by a jet-like peak that appears perpendicular to the surface independent of the angle of beam incidence. For LiF, the particle emission in the entire angular distribution (jet plus broad cosine component) is stoichiometric, whereas for CaF2 the ratio of the sputtered F to Ca particles is at large angles by a factor of two smaller than the stoichiometry of the crystal. For single crystalline LaF3 no jet component is observed and the angular distribution is non-stoichiometric with the number of sputtered F particles being slightly larger than the number of sputtered La particles. In the case of UF4, the target was polycrystalline and had a much rougher surface compared to cleaved crystals. This destroys the appearance of a possible jet component leading to a broad angular distribution. The ratio of sputtered U atoms compared to F atoms is in the order of 1-2, i.e. the number of collected particles on the catcher is also non-stoichiometric. Such unlike behavior of particles sputtered from different fluoride crystals creates new questions.

  14. Ion-stimulated Gas Desorption Yields of Electropolished, Chemically Etched, and Coated (Au, Ag, Pd, TiZrV) Stainless Steel Vacuum Chambers and St707 Getter Strips Irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Malabaila, M; Taborelli, M

    2005-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting under grazing incidence on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. Desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, and CO2, which are of fundamental interest for future accelerator applications, are reported for different stainless steel surface treatments. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, palladium-, and getter-coated 316 LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analysed for chemical composition by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The large effective desorption yield of 2 x 104 molecules/Pb53+ ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble-metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, pressure rise measurements, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with le...

  15. Direct observation of Dijets in central Au+Au Ccllisions at VsNN=200  GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Botje, M.A.J.; Castillo, J.; Grebenyuk, O.; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; Russcher, M.J.; Snellings, R.J.M.; van der Kolk, N.

    2006-01-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider reports measurements of azimuthal correlations of high transverse momentum (pT) charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at higher pT than reported previously. As pT is increased, a narrow, back-to-back peak emerges above the decreasing backgr

  16. Strange particle correlations measured by the Star experiment in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions a RHIC; Etude des correlations de particules etranges mesurees par l'experience STAR dans les collisions d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes au RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renault, G

    2004-09-01

    Non-identical correlation functions allow to study the space-time evolution of the source of particles formed in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The STAR experiment is dedicated to probe the formation of a new state of nuclear matter called Quark Gluon Plasma. The proton - lambda correlation function is supposed to be more sensitive to bigger source sizes than the proton - proton because of the absence of the final state Coulomb interaction. In this thesis, proton - lambda, anti-proton - anti-lambda, anti-proton - lambda and proton - anti-lambda correlation functions are studied in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV using an analytical model. The proton - lambda and anti-proton - anti-lambda correlation functions exhibit the same behavior as in previous measurements. The anti-proton - lambda and proton - anti-lambda correlation functions, measured for the first time, show a very strong signal corresponding to the baryon - anti-baryon annihilation channel. Parameterizing the correlation functions has allowed to characterize final state interactions. (author)

  17. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  18. Chromatographic separation process with pellicular ion exchange resins that can be used for ion or isotope separation and resins used in this process. Procede de separation chromatographique au moyen de resines echangeuses d'ions pelliculaires, utilisable notamment pour la separation des isotopes ou des ions, et resines utilisables dans ce procede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carles, M.; Neige, R.; Niemann, C.; Michel, A.; Bert, M.; Bodrero, S.; Guyot, A.

    1989-01-06

    For separation of uranium, boron or nitrogen isotopes, an isotopic exchange is carried out betwen an isotope fixed on an ion exchange resin and another isotope of the same element in the liquid phase contacting the resin. Pellicular resins are used comprising composite particulates with an inert polymeric core and a surface layer with ion exchange groups.

  19. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1Au+Au collisions, the R_AA of phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is lin...

  20. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  1. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  2. Relative Distribution of Au48+~Au52+ in Au Plasma by Ionization Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUZhi-Yan; ZHUZheng-He; JIANGGang

    2003-01-01

    The present work proposes a theoretical method called ionization dynamics to derive the ionic charge state distribution. Using relativistic quantum mechanics to calculate the energy level lifetime and average ionic lifetime of each ion, the first-order ionization rate constant can be obtained. Based on these data, from the solution of differential equations for consecutive-irreversible ionization reactions, one will be able to derive the ionic charge state distribution.The calculated average positive charge 49.24 of Au48+ ~ Au52+ and their relative distribution are in good agreement with the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  3. The Alice experiment for the study of ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions; Experience ALICE pour l'etude des collisions d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes au CERN-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forestier, B

    2003-12-01

    Alice is the detector dedicated to the study of heavy ions at the LHC (large hadron collider). It will allow scientists to investigate all the signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The spectrometer of the dimuon arm of Alice has been designed to study the production of high mass resonances through their dimuon decay. The first chapter is dedicated to some aspects of the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion: confinement and de-confinement of quarks, the absence of heavy resonances as a signature for the presence of QGP. The second chapter presents Alice and its ancillary detectors. The third chapter deals with the trigger system of the dimuon spectrometer, a detailed algorithm of this system is given. A method for the optimization of the trigger response is presented in the fourth chapter. The fifth chapter describes the testing of a prototype of the trigger system, this testing with muons has shown that the efficiency of the track reconstruction of the trigger system and the efficiency of the resistive plate chamber reach 98%.In the sixth chapter the author comments the simulations of the production of heavy resonances from Pb-Pb collisions as a function of centrality. (A.C.)

  4. Biogenic synthesis of Ag, Au and bimetallic Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles using aqueous extract of mahogany (Swietenia mahogani JACQ.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samiran; Roy, Nayan; Laskar, Rajibul A; Sk, Ismail; Basu, Saswati; Mandal, Debabrata; Begum, Naznin Ara

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated for the first time, the superb efficiency of aqueous extract of dried leaves of mahogany (Swietenia mahogani JACQ.) in the rapid synthesis of stable monometallic Au and Ag nanoparticles and also Au/Ag bimetallic alloy nanoparticles having spectacular morphologies. Our method was clean, nontoxic and environment friendly. When exposed to aqueous mahogany leaf extract, competitive reduction of Au(III) and Ag(I) ions present simultaneously in same solution leads to the production of bimetallic Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to monitor the kinetics of nanoparticles formation. UV-visible spectroscopic data and TEM images revealed the formation of bimetallic Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles. Mahogany leaf extract contains various polyhydroxy limonoids which are responsible for the reduction of Au(III) and Ag(I) ions leading to the formation and stabilization of Au and Ag nanopaticles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of Au@Pt nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; WU Gang; XU Boqing

    2005-01-01

    Aucore-Ptshell (Au@Pt) nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature by reducing K2PtCl6 with hydrogen in the solution containing Au colloids and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The particles obtained were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM and XPS techniques. UV-Vis spectra show that the surface plasmon absorption feature of Au colloids is significantly reduced with increasing the amount of reduced Pt. TEM images that the metals are found always appear as spherical nanoparticles and their sizes grow apparently due to the reduction of PtCl62- ions, indicating that Pt is deposited from solution onto Au particle surface and forms a Pt-layer with uniform thickness. In the XPS spectra, the signals of Au metal decrease due to the reductive deposition of Pt on the surface of the Au colloids. UV-Vis and XPS data are consistent in showing that when the amount of Pt in the AuPt colloids is increased to reach an overall atomic ratio of Pt/Au=2, the Pt deposits form a shell covering completely the surface of Au particles, demonstrating the core-shell structure of the synthesized AuPt particles.

  6. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloczynski, John [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Huang, Xu-Guang, E-mail: huangxuguang@fudan.edu.cn [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Physics Department and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Xilin [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Liao, Jinfeng [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  7. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  8. Jet-hadron correlations in √[s(NN)]=200  GeV p+p and central Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-03-28

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √[s(NN)]=200  GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Jet-Hadron Correlations in sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai,; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks,; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan,; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased towards jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum ($p_{T}^{assoc}$) and enhanced at low $p_{T}^{assoc}$ in Au+Au collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  10. 129Xe20+入射Au表面X射线产额与离子动能的相关性%The relativity of X-ray yield with kinetic energies by the interaction of 129Xe20+ ions with solid Au surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李耀宗; 徐戈; 李锦玉; 肖国青; 张小安; 梁昌慧; 赵永涛; 程锐; 周贤明; 王兴; 雷瑜; 孙渊博

    2011-01-01

    报道了在兰州重离子加速器国家实验室320kV高电荷态离子综合研究平台上,用2.4~6.0 MeV动能的高电荷态离子129 Xe20+轰击Au表面,探测X射线谱的实验结果.当离子动能较大时,相互作用不仅激发出了Au的M-X射线,还激发出了Xe的L-X射线,且X射线产额随入射离子动能的增加总体呈增加趋势.对碰撞导致X射线产生的微观机制进行了初步分析.%The experimental results of the X-ray spectrum by the interaction of I29Xe20+ ions of 2. 4~6. OMeV kinetic energies with solid Au surface has been detected, to do the experiment with the 320 kV research platform for highly charged ions of the national laboratory of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou. The experimental results showed that, as ion's kinetic energies are larger the incident ions not only excited Au M X-ray but also excited Xe L X-ray. The X-ray yield show increasing trend with the ion's kinetic energies. The micro-mechanism of X-ray excitation by the collision has been preliminary analyzed.

  11. Synthesis of Au nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide nanosheets: Noncovalent functionalization by TWEEN 20 in situ reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions for hydrazine detection and catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wenbo [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, Jilin (China); Ning, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, Jilin (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Qin, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yingwei; Chang, Guohui; Liu, Sen; Luo, Yonglan [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, Jilin (China); Sun, Xuping, E-mail: sunxp@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, Jilin (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TWEEN 20 is used as a stabilizing agent for GO as well as a reducing and immobilizing agent for Au nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrazine sensor based on the nanocomposites has a fast amperometric response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detection limit of the hydrazine sensor is estimated to be 78 nM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocomposites also exhibit good catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction. - Abstract: In this paper, we develop a cost-effective and simple route for the synthesis of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorated graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets using polyoxyethylene sorbitol anhydride monolaurate (TWEEN 20) as a stabilizing agent for GO as well as a reducing and immobilizing agent for AuNPs. The AuNPs assemble on the surface of TWEEN-functionalized GO by the in situ reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} aqueous solution. The morphologies of these composites were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the resultant AuNPs decorated GO nanosheets (AuNPs/TWEEN/GO) exhibit remarkable catalytic performance for hydrazine oxidation. This hydrazine sensor has a fast amperometric response time of less than 3 s. The linear range is estimated to be from 5 {mu}M to 3 mM (r = 0.999), and the detection limit is estimated to be 78 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The AuNPs/TWEEN/GO composites also exhibit good catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) reduction and the GO supports also enhance the catalytic activity via a synergistic effect.

  12. Structural and optical studies of Au doped titanium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E., E-mail: ealves@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N.; Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, B. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Lopes, J. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEC-CEMUC - Universidade de Coimbra, Dept. Eng. Mecanica, Polo II, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Torrell, M.; Cunha, L.; Vaz, F. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2012-02-01

    Thin films of TiO{sub 2} were doped with Au by ion implantation and in situ during the deposition. The films were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and deposited in silicon and glass substrates at a temperature around 150 Degree-Sign C. The undoped films were implanted with Au fluences in the range of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Au/cm{sup 2}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} Au/cm{sup 2} with a energy of 150 keV. At a fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Au/cm{sup 2} the formation of Au nanoclusters in the films is observed during the implantation at room temperature. The clustering process starts to occur during the implantation where XRD estimates the presence of 3-5 nm precipitates. After annealing in a reducing atmosphere, the small precipitates coalesce into larger ones following an Ostwald ripening mechanism. In situ XRD studies reveal that Au atoms start to coalesce at 350 Degree-Sign C, reaching the precipitates dimensions larger than 40 nm at 600 Degree-Sign C. Annealing above 700 Degree-Sign C promotes drastic changes in the Au profile of in situ doped films with the formation of two Au rich regions at the interface and surface respectively. The optical properties reveal the presence of a broad band centered at 550 nm related to the plasmon resonance of gold particles visible in AFM maps.

  13. Phase transfer based synthesis and thermophysical properties of Au/Therminol VP-1 nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caixia Wang; Jun Yang; Yulong Ding

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a phase transfer based wet chemistry method for the preparation of Au/VP-1 nanofluids. The method involves the transfer of AuCl4- ions from water to the base liquid Therminol VP-1, followed by the reduction of AuCl4- ions using NaBH4. The prepared nanofluids are characterized for their thermophysical properties and stability. The results show that the mass concentration of Au particles has a significant effect on the stability of Au/VP-1 nanofluids. An increase in the Au concentration results in a higher extent of agglomeration among the particles, leading to a decrease in the nanofluid stability. The results also show that the introduction of 0.005-0.05%Au nanoparticles enhances the thermal conductivity of the fluids by up to 6.5%, whereas the viscosity increase is minimal.

  14. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  15. Suppression of high transverse momentum π0 spectra in Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2008-02-01

    Au + Au, s1/2 = 200 GeV measurements at RHIC, obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors, have all indicated a suppression of high p⊥ particle production, relative to an appropriately normalized NN level. For central collisions and vanishing pseudo-rapidity these experiments exhibit suppression in charged meson production, especially at medium-to-large transverse momenta. In the PHENIX experiment similar behaviour has been reported for π0 spectra. In a recent work [1] on the simpler D + Au interaction, to be considered perhaps as a tune-up for Au + Au, we reported on a pre-hadronic cascade mechanism which can explain the mixed observation of moderately reduced p⊥ suppression at higher pseudo-rapidity as well as the Cronin enhancement at mid-rapidity. Here, we present the extension of this work to the more massive ion-ion collisions. Our major thesis is that much of the suppression is generated in a late stage cascade of colourless pre-hadrons produced after an initial short-lived coloured phase. We present a pQCD argument to justify this approach and to estimate the time duration τp of this initial phase. Of essential importance is the brevity in time of the coloured phase existence relative to that of the strongly interacting pre-hadron phase, the latter essentially an interactive cascade. These distinctions in phase are of course not strict, but adequate for treating the suppression of moderate and high p⊥ mesons.

  16. Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity of Gold (I) and (III) Ions and Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Shareena Dasari, TP; Zhang, Y; Yu, H.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold ion complexes have been investigated for their antibacterial activities. However, the majority of the reports failed to disclose the concentration of free Au(I) or Au(III) present in solutions of AuNPs or gold ion complexes. The inconsistency of antibacterial activity of AuNPs may be due to the effect of the presence of Au(III). Here we report the antibacterial activity of Au(I) and Au(III) to four different bacteria: one nonpathogenic bacterium: E. coli an...

  17. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in multifragmentation of Au + Au

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, C. L; Ma, Y. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Li, S.X.; G.Q. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the shear viscosity ($\\eta$) to entropy density ($s$) for the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo method in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The theoretical curve of $\\eta/s$ as a function of the incident energy for the head-on Au+Au collisions displays that a minimum region of $\\eta/s$ has been approached at higher incident energies, where the minimum $\\eta/s$ value is about 7 times Kovtun-Son- Starinets (KSS...

  18. Nuclear Stopping in Central Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear stopping in central Au+Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC energies is studied in the framework of a cascade mode and the modified ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD transport model. In the modified mode, the mean field potentials of both formed and “preformed” hadrons (from string fragmentation are considered. It is found that the nuclear stopping is increasingly influenced by the mean-field potentials in the projectile and target regions with the increase of the reaction energy. In the central region, the calculations of the cascade model considering the modifying factor can describe the experimental data of the PHOBOS collaboration.

  19. D and $^{3}He$ production in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A B; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Foley, Kenneth J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Greiner, D E; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Guschin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A V; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Lednicky, R; Leontiev, V M; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Oson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.262301

    2001-01-01

    The first measurements of light antinucleus production in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider are reported. The observed production rates for d and /sup 3/He are much larger than in lower energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. A coalescence model analysis of the yields indicates that there is little or no increase in the antinucleon freeze-out volume compared to collisions at CERN SPS energy. These analyses also indicate that the 3He freeze-out volume is smaller than the d freeze-out volume. (22 refs).

  20. Au3+/Au0 Supported on Chromium(III Terephthalate Metal Organic Framework (MIL-101 as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalystfor Three-Component Coupling Synthesis of Propargylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-synthesis modification is a useful method for the functionalization of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs. A novel catalyst Au@MIL-101-ED-SA (ED = ethylenediamine, SA = salicylaldehyde, containing coexisting Au3+ ions and Au0 nanoparticles, was prepared successfully by post-synthesis modification with ethylenediamine, salicylaldehyde and gold. Gold nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 (Au@MIL-101 were prepared successfully by the impregnation method. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were applied as environmentally friendly catalysts in the three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes for the preparation of diverse propargylamines. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA contained a fraction of cationic gold (Au3+/Au0 = 0.9 and showed higher catalytic activity than Au@MIL-101, which was prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, the reactions were performed under heterogeneous conditions and the novel catalyst was successfully recycled for four consecutive runs.

  1. Au3+/Au0 Supported on Chromium(III) Terephthalate Metal Organic Framework (MIL-101) as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalystfor Three-Component Coupling Synthesis of Propargylamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Tai, Xishi; Zhou, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    Post-synthesis modification is a useful method for the functionalization of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). A novel catalyst Au@MIL-101-ED-SA (ED = ethylenediamine, SA = salicylaldehyde), containing coexisting Au3+ ions and Au0 nanoparticles, was prepared successfully by post-synthesis modification with ethylenediamine, salicylaldehyde and gold. Gold nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 (Au@MIL-101) were prepared successfully by the impregnation method. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were applied as environmentally friendly catalysts in the three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes for the preparation of diverse propargylamines. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA contained a fraction of cationic gold (Au3+/Au0 = 0.9) and showed higher catalytic activity than Au@MIL-101, which was prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, the reactions were performed under heterogeneous conditions and the novel catalyst was successfully recycled for four consecutive runs. PMID:28772462

  2. Controlled building of CdSe@ZnS/Au and CdSe@ZnS/ Au2S/Au nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel E. Galian[1; Pilar Diaz[1; Antonio Ribera[1; Alejandro Rincon-Bertolin[1; Said Agouram[2; Julia Perez-Prieto[1

    2015-01-01

    The addition of Au3. to spherical amine-capped CdSe@ZnS nanoparticles in toluene at room temperature and under darkness can lead to ternary CdSe@ZnS/Au nanohybrids. We demonstrate that this happens only when the nanoparticles possess a relatively thin ZnS shell, thus showing that thickness plays a key role in gold deposition on the CdSe@ZnS nanoparticle surface. Our hypothesis is that the amine ligand acts as the reductant of Au3+ ions into Au+ ions, whose affinity for sulfur would keep them at the CdSe@ZnS surface. This interaction stabilizes the Au+ ion, making it less prone to reduction than a non-coordinated Au+ ion. In CdSe@ZnS with a thin shell, Au+ ions at the surface of, or most probably within, the ZnS shell cause the transfer of Cd2+ ions into the solution. Subsequently, the core Se2- anion, which is a better reductant than the shell S2- reduces Au+ ions to Au(0), and large gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are quickly deposited on the CdSe@ZnS surface in room temperature process, leading to ternary CdSe@ZnS/Au nanohybrids. In solution, these ternary nanohybrids progressively transform into quaternary CdSe@ZnS/Au2S/Au nanohybrids due to the reaction of the shell S2- anion with the remaining Au+ at the CdSe@ZnS surface, thus leading to the growth of Au2S nanoparticles on the CdSe@ZnS surface while Zn concomitantly leaches from the nanohybrid into the solution. Photoirradiation of the heterostructures with visible light enhances their emission efficiency. Comparatively, irradiation of the precursors, i.e., CdSe@ZnS nanoparticles, causes a drastic decrease in their emission accompanied by a blue shift of their emission maximum. The optical properties of these nanohybrids were analyzed by absorption and fluorescence (steady-state and time-resolved) spectroscopy, and the composition of the samples and the chemical states were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  3. Effects of temperature and operation parameters on the galvanic corrosion of Cu coupled to Au in organic solderability preservatives process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, SeKwon; Kim, YoungJun; Jung, KiMin; Kim, JongSoo; Shon, MinYoung; Kwon, HyukSang

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we quantitatively examined the effects of temperature and operation parameters such as anode (Cu) to cathode (Au) area ratio, stirring speed, and Cu ion concentration on the galvanic corrosion kinetics of Cu coupled to Au (icouple ( Cu-Au)) on print circuit board in organic solderability preservative (OSP) soft etching solution. With the increase of temperature, galvanic corrosion rate (icouple ( Cu-Au) was increased; however, the degree of galvanic corrosion rate (icouple ( Cu-Au) - icorr (Cu)) was decreased owing to the lower activation energy of Cu coupled to Au, than that of Cu alone. With the increase of area ratio (cathode/anode), stirring speed of the system, icouple ( Cu-Au) was increased by the increase of cathodic reaction kinetics. And icouple ( Cu-Au) was decreased by the increase of the Cu-ion concentration in the OSP soft etching solution.

  4. Effects of temperature and operation parameters on the galvanic corrosion of Cu coupled to Au in organic solderability preservatives process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, SeKwon; Kim, YoungJun; Jung, KiMin; Kim, JongSoo; Shon, MinYoung; Kwon, HyukSang

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we quantitatively examined the effects of temperature and operation parameters such as anode (Cu) to cathode (Au) area ratio, stirring speed, and Cu ion concentration on the galvanic corrosion kinetics of Cu coupled to Au (icouple (Cu-Au)) on print circuit board in organic solderability preservative (OSP) soft etching solution. With the increase of temperature, galvanic corrosion rate (icouple (Cu-Au) was increased; however, the degree of galvanic corrosion rate (icouple (Cu-Au) - icorr (Cu)) was decreased owing to the lower activation energy of Cu coupled to Au, than that of Cu alone. With the increase of area ratio (cathode/anode), stirring speed of the system, icouple (Cu-Au) was increased by the increase of cathodic reaction kinetics. And icouple (Cu-Au) was decreased by the increase of the Cu-ion concentration in the OSP soft etching solution.

  5. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send import...... the Danish au pair scheme therefore speaks to current research on domestic work migration, the transnational family relations of young Filipina migrants and the forms of self-transformation that Filipino migration might engender.......Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...... ethnographic component of the dissertation consists of four articles, all emphasizing the au pairs’ agency by viewing their migration as a dynamic personal and social experience. Arguing that Filipina au pairs tend to be understood primarily from the perspective of their precarious situation as domestic...

  6. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  7. Indicateurs cles au Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Au cours des dernieres annees, on s'est beaucoup interesse sur la scene internationale aux indicateurs cles. Le present document se veut un tour d'horizon des efforts deployes recemment au Canada en vue d'elaborer des indicateurs cles du bien etre economique, social, environnemental et physique. Y sont classifies et examines en detail plus de 40 projets et publications portant sur ce sujet. Y figurent aussi l'enumeration breve de 20 autres projets, ainsi que des renvois a plusieurs enquetes a...

  8. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  9. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  10. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of hollow magnetic nanospheres modified with Au nanoparticles for bio-encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisno, Satoshi; Suga, Kent; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2017-04-01

    Hollow magnetic nanospheres modified with Au nanoparticles were successfully synthesized. Au/SiO2 nanospheres fabricated by a radiochemical process were used as templates for ferrite templating. After the ferrite plating process, Au/SiO2 templates were fully coated with magnetite nanoparticles. Dissolution of the SiO2 core lead to the formation of hollow magnetic nanospheres with Au nanoparticles inside. The hollow magnetic nanospheres consisted of Fe3O4 grains, with an average diameter of 60 nm, connected to form the sphere wall, inside which Au grains with an average diameter of 7.2 nm were encapsulated. The Au nanoparticles immobilized on the SiO2 templates contributed to the adsorption of the Fe ion precursor and/or Fe3O4 seeds. These hollow magnetic nanospheres are proposed as a new type of nanocarrier, as the Au grains could specifically immobilize biomolecules inside the hollow sphere.

  12. Atomistic Simulations of Functional Au-144(SR)(60) Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Gurtovenko, A. A.; Martinez-Seara, H.

    2012-01-01

    Charged monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been studied in aqueous solution by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at physiological temperature (310 K). Particular attention has been paid to electrostatic properties that modulate the formation of a complex comprised...... of the nanoparticle together with surrounding ions and water. We focus on Au-144 nanoparticles that comprise a nearly spherical Au core (diameter similar to 2 nm), a passivating Au-S interface, and functionalized alkanethiol chains. Cationic and anionic AuNPs have been modeled with amine and carboxyl terminal groups...... potential displays a minimum for AuNP- at 1.9 nm from the center of the nanoparticle, marking a preferable location for Na+, while the AuNP+ potential (affecting the distribution of Cl-) rises almost monotonically with a local maximum. Comparison to Debye-Huckel theory shows very good agreement for radial...

  13. Laser Desorption Ionization Quadrupole Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Au m Fe n +/- Clusters Generated from Gold-Iron Nanoparticles and their Giant Nanoflowers. Electrochemical and/or Plasma Assisted Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawale, Ravi Madhukar; Ausekar, Mayuri Vilas; Pavliňák, David; Galmiz, Oleksandr; Kubáček, Pavel; Havel, Josef

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NP) with average diameter 100 nm synthesized from tetrachloroauric acid solution using stainless steel as a reducing agent were found to contain iron. Applying simultaneously high frequency (HF) plasma discharge in solution during the electrochemical reduction, giant gold-iron nanoflowers with average size 1000-5000 nm were formed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the morphology of the nanopowders produced as polygonal yet nearly spherical, whereas iron content in both products determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) was found to be at 2.5 at. %. Laser desorption ionization (LDI) of both nanomaterials and mass spectrometric analysis show the formation of Au m Fe n +/- ( m = 1-35; n = 1-3) clusters. Structure of few selected clusters in neutral or monocharged forms were computed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and it was found that typical distances of an iron nucleus from adjacent gold nuclei lie in the interval 2.5 to 2.7 Å. Synthetized Au-Fe nanoparticles were found stable for at least 2 mo at room temperature (even in aqueous solution) without any stabilizing agent. Produced Au-Fe nanoparticles in combination with standard MALDI matrices enhance ionization of peptides and might find use in nanomedicine.

  14. Solid-Phase Equilibria in the Au-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-28

    AD6i5 469 SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Ru-As AU-GA-SB AU-IN-AS- 1/17 AND AU-IN-SB TERNAR (U) CALIFORNIA UNIV LOS ANGELES DEPT OF CHEMISTRY AND...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED SOLID- PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb Thchnical Report Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb TEARIEIS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGEMI*n Does Entepd) 4./ lie- . .- - - - - -- -- Solid Phase Equilibria in the Au-Ga-As, Au-Ga-Sb, Au-In-As, and Au-In-Sb Ternaries C

  15. Ion optics of RHIC electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kuznetsov, G. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    RHIC electron beam ion source has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  16. Ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline medium on electrochemically synthesized Co(OH)2/Au composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Sreejith P.; Elumalai, Perumal

    2017-01-01

    Gold (Au), cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH)2) and different Co(OH)2/Au compositions were electro-deposited onto stainless steel by a potentiodynamic method from the respective metal-ion solutions. The deposits were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). The XRD and IR data confirmed that the deposits were Au, α-Co(OH)2 or Co(OH)2/Au composites. The SEM observations confirmed that the morphology of the Au was spherical, while the α-Co(OH)2 was flakey with pores. The morphology of the Co(OH)2/Au composites consisted of highly agglomerated Au grains distributed on the Co(OH)2 matrix. The electrocatalytic activity of each of the Au, Co(OH)2 and Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes towards ethanol electrooxidation in an alkaline medium was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. It turned out that the Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes exhibited superior catalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation compared with the pristine Au or Co(OH)2 electrodes. A peak current density as high as 25 mA cm‑2 was exhibited by the Co(OH)2/ Au composite while the Au and Co(OH)2 showed only 0.9 and 13 mA cm‑2, respectively. The enhanced conductivity of the Co(OH)2/Au matrix due to the presence of Au, as well as the combined catalytic activity, seemed to be responsible for the superior performance of the Co(OH)2/Au-composite electrodes.

  17. Injection and acceleration of Au31+ in the BNL AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer,W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Thieberger, P.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, S.Y.; Zeno, K.; Omet, C.; Spiller, P.

    2008-06-23

    Injection and acceleration of ions in a lower charge state reduces space charge effects, and, if further elcctron stripping is needed, may allow elimination of a stripping stage and the associated beam losses. The former is of interest to the accelerators in the GSI FAIR complex, the latter for BNL RHIC collider operation at energies lower than the current injection energy. Lower charge state ions, however, have a higher likelihood of electron stripping which can lead to dynamic pressures rises and subsequent beam losses. We report on experiments in the AGS where Au{sup 31+} ions were injected and accelerated instead of the normally used Au{sup 77+} ions. Beam intensities and the average pressure in the AGS ring are recorded, and compared with calculations for dynamic pressures and beam losses. The experimental results will be used to benchmark the StrahlSim dynamic vacuum code and will be incorporated in the GSI FAIR SIS100 design.

  18. Amplification of the discharge current density of lithium-ion batteries with spinel phase Li(PtAu)0.02Mn1.98O4 nano-materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ross, N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available capacity retention of 99% after 50 cycles. Faster charge transportation at high current rates proved to prevent the pronounced pile-up of Li(sup+) ions and undesired Mn(sup3+) ions on the surfaces. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results...

  19. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  20. Reconstruction and study of the multi-strange baryons in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV, with the Star experiment at RHIC; Reconstruction et etude des baryons multi-etranges dans les collisions d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes a {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV avec l'experience STAR au RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faivre, J

    2004-10-15

    The study of strangeness production is essential for the understanding of processes occurring in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Strangeness production is directly linked to the phase of deconfined partons that followed these collisions: the quark and gluon plasma. STAR, one of the 4 experiments at RHIC collider, is a perfect tool for studying the multi-strange {xi} and {omega} particles. We have devised a {xi} and {omega} reconstruction program using signals from the STAR time projection chamber. We have worked out a multi-variable selection method for extracting the signals from the combinative background: the linear discriminant analysis. We have applied it to Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV (in the center of mass frame) to improve the accuracy of previous results. The {omega} and anti-{omega} production rates have been obtained for 3 ranges of centrality as well as their radial flow and their kinetic uncoupling temperatures. The gain on the relative uncertainty is between 15 and 30% according to the variable. The average speed of the radial flow is 0.50 {+-} 0.02 and the kinetic uncoupling temperature is 132 {+-} 20 MeV which indicates that multi-strange baryons uncouple in hadronic medium earlier that lighter particles like pions, kaons and protons. However, uncertainty intervals remain too broad to draw strong conclusions. (A.C.)

  1. Properties and characterization of Au3+-adsorption by mycelial waste of Streptomyces aureofaciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mycelial waste of Streptomyces aureofaciences procured from the aureomycin fermentation industry is used as biosorbent for Au3+. The properties of Au3+ adsorption by the mycelial waste are studied. The results indicate that the optimum pH value of Au3+ adsorption is 3.5. The biosorption is a rapid and non-temperature-dependent process. The biosorptive capacity with 45.6 mg/g and efficiency with 91.2% are achieved under the conditions of pH 3.5 and 30℃ for 45 min, in which the ratio is 50 mg/g dry weight for the concentrations of initial Au3+ and the myceliai waste. The Au3+ ions adsorbed on the mycelial waste can be eluted. The observation in a transmission electron microscope shows that the Au3+ ions can be reduced to Au particles by the mycelial waste and the Au0 can become gold crystals with different forms and sizes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis further proves that the Au3+ can be reduced to Au0 by the mycelial waste.

  2. Biosorption Equilibrium and Kinetics of Au(Ⅲ) and Cu(Ⅱ) on Magnetotactic Bacteria%趋磁细菌对Au(III)和Cu(II)的吸附平衡及动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧平; 李鑫钢; 孙津生; 尹晓红; 王艳红; 武振华

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) as biosorbents for the adsorption of Au(Ⅲ) and Cu(Ⅱ) ions from aqueous solution have been investigated. The optimum adsorption conditions for both metal ions were the initial pH scope of capacity of 1.0g of MTB (dry mass basis) for Au(Ⅲ) and Cu(Ⅱ) were calculated as 505.2mg of Au(Ⅲ) and 493.1mg of Cu(Ⅱ) by Langmuir model in single system,respectively. The isotherm equilibrium of Au(Ⅲ) and Cu(Ⅱ) ions in the Au-Cu binary system reflected a unique phenomenon that the adsorption of Au(Ⅲ) was reinforced and that of Cu(Ⅱ) prohibited,compared respectively with their performances in the single metal system.kinetic data were fitted well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model with a high correlation coefficient (R2>0.999).

  3. Synthesis of Au/C and Au/Pani for anode electrodes in glucose microfluidic fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra-Balcazar, M.; Morales-Acosta, D.; Castaneda, F.; Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, 76703 Queretaro (Mexico); Ledesma-Garcia, J. [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, 76010 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2010-06-15

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared by two methods: chemical (ex-situ, Au/C) by two phase protocol, and electrochemical (in-situ, Au/Pani) by electroreduction of gold ions on a polyaniline film and compared as anode catalysts in a glucose microfluidic fuel cell. In this paper the structural characteristics and electrocatalytic properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements. The catalytic behavior of both anodes was tested in a microfluidic fuel cell with a reference electrode incorporated, by means of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), showing a cathodic shift in the glucose oxidation peak for Au/Pani. Results show a higher power density (0.5 mW cm{sup -} {sup 2}) for Au/C anode compared with an already reported value, where a glucose microfluidic fuel cell was used in similar conditions. (author)

  4. Centrality Dependence of Direct Photons in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Fries, R J; Srivastava, D K

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the spectra of high energy photons emitted in relativistic Au+Au collisions for various centralities and compare to data recently collected at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider by the PHENIX collaboration. Our results for photons from primary hard scatterings and photons from interactions of jets with the medium are consistent with the measurements of neutral pion and direct photon production in p+p collisions and give a good description of direct photon spectra measured in Au+Au collisions. The contribution of photons from jet-to-photon conversion in the medium can be as large as the photon yield from hard scatterings in the momentum range p_T = 2...6 GeV/c. We show that this novel mechanism is not ruled out by any existing data.

  5. /Au Back Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Compaan, Alvin D.; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of CdTe thin-film solar cells with Cu-free MoO3- x /Au back contacts. CdTe solar cells with sputtered CdTe absorbers of thicknesses from 0.5 to 1.75 μm were fabricated on Pilkington SnO2:F/SnO2-coated soda-lime glasses coated with a 60- to 80-nm sputtered CdS layer. The MoO3- x /Au back contact layers were deposited by thermal evaporation. The incorporation of MoO3- x layer was found to improve the open circuit voltage ( V OC) but reduce the fill factor of the ultrathin CdTe cells. The V OC was found to increase as the CdTe thickness increased.

  6. EST Table: AU001857 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aa ref|XP_001659721.1| crumbs [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT39075.1| crumbs [Aedes aegypti] 10/08/27 50 %/187 aa FB...AU001857 fbm1459f 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0005509(calcium ion binding) 10/09/28 53 %/192

  7. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  8. Facile one-pot synthesis of luminescent-thiolated Au nanocluster and Au(I)–thiolate complexes as highly selective Cu{sup 2+} probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Nabin Kumar; Kryschi, Carola, E-mail: carola.kryschi@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy and ICMM (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Here in this paper, we reported of a facile photo-induced one-step method for synthesizing highly luminescent Au(I)–thiolate complexes (size ∼2–3 nm) and thiolated Au nanocluster (AuNC, size ∼1.6 nm). The hydrophilic thiol being 3-mercaptopropanoic acid (3-MPA) was used as stabilizing agent. The as-prepared Au(I)–thiolate complexes exhibit bright red photoluminescence (PL) and were used as an efficient sensor for the selective detection of Cu{sup 2+} ions. We also observed the formation of thiol-stabilized Au nanoparticles through continuous electron beam irradiation of Au(I)–thiolated complexes. The Au(I)–thiolate complexes show a PL lifetime on the μs time scale, whereas the PL lifetime of the thiolated AuNC is on the ns time scales. The photo-physical, electronic, structural and morphological properties of the thiolated AuNC and Au(I)–thiolate complexes were examined upon performing UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy, stationary and time-resolved PL spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  9. $\\pi-\\Xi$ correlations in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Chaloupka, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative comparison of source sizes from pi-Xi correlations analyses in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200G GeV and sqrt(s_NN)=62 GeV is presented. For the most central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV we report first quantitative results concerning size of the pi-Xi source and relative shift of the average emission points between pi and Xi showing that the homogeneity region of Xi source is smaller then that of pion and significantly shifted in the transverse direction.

  10. Preparation and characterization of planar Ni–Au bimetallic model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan, E-mail: fan.yang@chem.tamu.edu; Yao, Yunxi; Yan, Zhen; Min, Hlaing; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2013-10-15

    Ni–Au bimetallic model catalysts were prepared as thin films on Re(0 0 0 1) or Ru(0 0 0 1) single crystal substrates. Surface compositions and electronic structures of the Ni–Au thin films were characterized by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Surface alloys were prepared by annealing Ni–Au thin films from 500 to 800 K, resulting in substantial surface enrichment of Au. Annealing a Ni–Au thin film with a 1:1 bulk composition ratio at 700 K for 10 min resulted in a surface alloy with 84% (atomic concentration) of Au in the outermost surface layer. The surface atomic structure was investigated using CO as probe molecules, which exclusively adsorbs on the Ni atoms rather than on the Au atoms at room temperature. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy of CO adsorption on Ni–Au surface alloys showed that CO adsorption on two-fold bridge sites decreased and finally disappeared with an increase of Au surface concentration. The absence of Ni bridge site CO adsorption indicated that Ni atoms were isolated by Au atoms on Ni–Au alloyed surface.

  11. Green synthesis and characterization of Au@Pt core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles using gallic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojun; Zheng, Hongmei; Shen, Ming; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaosan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed a facile and benign green synthesis approach for the successful fabrication of well-dispersed urchin-like Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) using gallic acid (GA) as both a reducing and protecting agent. The proposed one-step synthesis exploits the differences in the reduction potentials of AuCl4- and PtCl62-, where the AuCl4- ions are preferentially reduced to Au cores and the PtCl62- ions are then deposited continuously onto the Au core surface as a Pt shell. The as-prepared Au@Pt NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM); high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM); scanning electron microscope (SEM); UV-vis absorption spectra (UV-vis); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transmission infrared spectra (FT-IR). We systematically investigated the effects of some experimental parameters on the formation of the Au@Pt NPs, i.e., the reaction temperature, the molar ratios of HAuCl4/H2PtCl6, and the amount of GA. When polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 (PVP) was used as a protecting agent, the Au@Pt core-shell NPs obtained using this green synthesis method were better dispersed and smaller in size. The as-prepared Au@Pt NPs exhibited better catalytic activity in the reaction where NaBH4 reduced p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol. However, the results showed that the Au@Pt bimetallic NPs had a lower catalytic activity than the pure Au NPs obtained by the same method, which confirmed the formation of Au@Pt core-shell nanostructures because the active sites on the surfaces of the Au NPs were covered with a Pt shell.

  12. Charged-particle rapidity density in Au+Au collisions in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Yao, Tao; Xie, Qu-Bing

    2007-03-01

    Rapidity/pseudorapidity densities for charged particles and their centrality, rapidity, and energy dependence in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a quark combination model. Using a Gaussian-type rapidity distribution for constituent quarks as a result of Landau hydrodynamic evolution, the data at sNN=130,200 GeV at various centralities in full pseudorapidity range are well described, and the charged-particle multiplicities are reproduced as functions of the number of participants. The energy dependence of the shape of the dNch/dη distribution is also described at various collision energies sNN=200,130,62.4 GeV in central collisions with same value of parameters except 19.6 GeV. The calculated rapidity distributions and yields for the charged pions and kaons in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration.

  13. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects in d+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Sahlmueller, Baldo

    2012-01-01

    To interpret the measurements in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), it is crucial to understand the initial state of the colliding gold (Au) nuclei. The parton distribution in Au nuclei is modified compared to protons, and their isospin composition is different due to the presence of neutrons. d+Au collisions at RHIC at the same collision energies are an important tool to study initial state modifications. PHENIX has measured pi0, eta, and reconstructed jets at high transverse momentum. These data are compared to predictions from nuclear parton distribution functions. Furthermore, single electrons from heavy-flavor decays have been measured by PHENIX.

  14. Au pairs on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Ethnographers are increasingly making use of Facebook to acquire access and general acquaintance with their field of study. However, little has been written on how Facebook is used methodologically in research that does not have social media sites as the main focus of interest. This article argues...... that engagement with Facebook as a methodological tool can be useful in research among migrants in highly politicised fields. Pointing to a discursive construction of Filipina au pairs as victims of labour exploitation, the article shows how fieldwork on Facebook enables the exploration of the ways in which...... and on Facebook....

  15. Elections au Bundestag

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Quelle influence ont eue programmes et personnalités politiques sur la campagne et les résultats des élections au Bundestag de 2013 ? Et avec quelles conséquences sur la façon de diriger le pays ? Politistes, sociologues, chercheurs en communication et responsables politiques abordent ces questions sous quatre angles : recherche électorale, recherche sur les partis, recherche en communication et recherche sur la gouvernance. (Solène Hazouard)

  16. Au pairs on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Ethnographers are increasingly making use of Facebook to acquire access and general acquaintance with their field of study. However, little has been written on how Facebook is used methodologically in research that does not have social media sites as the main focus of interest. This article argues...... that engagement with Facebook as a methodological tool can be useful in research among migrants in highly politicised fields. Pointing to a discursive construction of Filipina au pairs as victims of labour exploitation, the article shows how fieldwork on Facebook enables the exploration of the ways in which...... and on Facebook....

  17. Substrate effects on the analysis of biomolecular layers using Au{sup +}, Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} bombardments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordys, Jeanette [Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, M1 7DN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Jeanette.Soerensen@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C. [Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Effects of platinum silicon, graphite and PET substrates on the secondary ion yield of sub-monolayer and multilayer samples of Cyclosporin A following 20 keV Au{sup +}, Au{sub 3}{sup +}and C{sub 60}{sup +} impacts have been investigated. The obtained results of sub-monolayer samples show that platinum enhances the yield of the pseudo-molecular ion following Au{sup +} and Au{sub 3}{sup +} impacts due to the high density of the substrate that enables the energy of the primary ions to be deposited near the surface. C{sub 60}{sup +} impacts on sub-monolayer samples are less effective, but there is an enhancement on PET substrates. Impacts of 20 keV Au{sup +} and Au{sub 3}{sup +} are not very efficient on multilayer samples. 20 keV C{sub 60}{sup +} impacts enhance the yields significantly, especially for the relatively high molecular weight [M+H]{sup +} ion.

  18. Nuclear matter effects on $J/\\psi$ production in asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aidala, C; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bai, X; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Belmont, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bing, X; Black, D; Blau, D S; Bok, J; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Ding, L; Do, J H; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; D'Orazio, L; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger,, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guragain, H; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hanks, J; Hashimoto, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hollis, R S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoshino, T; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isinhue, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kistenev, E; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kofarago, M; Komkov, B; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Krizek, F; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, G H; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leitgab, M; Lewis, B; Li, X; Lim, S H; Liu, M X; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Maruyama, T; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moskowitz, M; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Oide, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S; Park, S K; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Peng, J -C; Perepelitsa, D; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Ryu, M S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sekiguchi, Y; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sharma, D; Shaver, A; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skolnik, M; Slunečka, M; Solano, S; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Soumya, M; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Stone, M R; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Whitaker, S; Wolin, S; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on $J/\\psi$ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of $J/\\psi$ yields in Cu$+$Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au$+$Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, $J/\\psi$ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-$x$ gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. The relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  19. Controlling Au Photodeposition on Large ZnO Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Joseph F S; Shortell, Matthew P; Noble, Christopher J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Jaatinen, Esa A; Waclawik, Eric R

    2016-06-08

    This study investigated how to control the rate of photoreduction of metastable AuCl2(-) at the solid-solution interface of large ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (50-100 nm size). Band-gap photoexcitation of electronic charge in ZnO by 370 nm UV light yielded Au NP deposition and the formation of ZnO-Au NP hybrids. Au NP growth was observed to be nonepitaxial, and the patterns of Au photodeposition onto ZnO NPs observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were consistent with reduction of AuCl2(-) at ZnO facet edges and corner sites. Au NP photodeposition was effective in the presence of labile oleylamine ligands attached to the ZnO surface; however, when a strong-binding dodecanethiol ligand coated the surface, photodeposition was quenched. Rates of interfacial electron transfer at the ZnO-solution interface were adjusted by changing the solvent, and these rates were observed to strongly depend on the solvent's permittivity (ε) and viscosity. From measurements of electron transfer from ZnO to the organic dye toluidine blue at the ZnO-solution interface, it was confirmed that low ε solvent mixtures (ε ≈ 9.5) possessed markedly higher rates of photocatalytic interfacial electron transfer (∼3.2 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)) compared to solvent mixtures with high ε (ε = 29.9, ∼1.9 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)). Dissolved oxygen content in the solvent and the exposure time of ZnO to band-gap, near-UV photoexcitation were also identified as factors that strongly affected Au photodeposition behavior. Production of Au clusters was favored under conditions that caused electron accumulation in the ZnO-Au NP hybrid. Under conditions where electron discharge was rapid (such as in low ε solvents), AuCl2(-) precursor ions photoreduced at ZnO surfaces in less than 5 s, leading to deposition of several small, isolated ∼6 nm Au NP on the ZnO host instead.

  20. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  1. Selenolate gold complexes with aurophilic Au(I)-Au(I) and Au(I)-Au(III) interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Silvia; Crespo, Olga; Gimeno, M Concepción; Jones, Peter G; Laguna, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    The gold(I) selenolate compound [Au(2)(SePh)(2)(mu-dppf)] (dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene) has been prepared by reaction of [Au(2)Cl(2)(mu-dppf)] with PhSeSiMe(3) in a molar ratio 1:2. This complex reacts with gold(I) or gold(III) derivatives to give polynuclear gold(I)-gold(I) or gold(I)-gold(III) complexes of the type [Au(4)(mu-SePh)(2)(PPh(3))(2)(mu-dppf)](OTf)(2), [Au(3)(C(6)F(5))(3)(mu-SePh)(2)(mu-dppf)], or [Au(4)(C(6)F(5))(6)(mu-SePh)(2)(mu-dppf)], with bridging selenolate ligands. The reaction of [Au(2)(SePh)(2)(mu-dppf)] with 1 equiv of AgOTf leads to the formation of the insoluble Ag(SePh) and the compound [Au(2)(mu-SePh)(mu-dppf)]OTf. The complexes [Au(4)(C(6)F(5))(6)(mu-SePh)(2)(mu-dppf)] and [Au(2)(mu-SePh)(mu-dppf)]OTf (two different solvates) have been characterized by X-ray diffraction studies and show the presence of weak gold(I)-gold(III) interactions in the former and intra- and intermolecular gold(I)-gold(I) inter-actions in the later.

  2. Sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at 400 A.MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, V.; Dupieux, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Berger, L.; Boussange, S.; Fraysse, L.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Pras, P.; Basrak, Z.; Belayev, I. M.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Buta, A.; Caplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Donà, R.; Erö, J.; Fan, Z. G.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Freifelder, R.; Frolov, S.; Gobbi, A.; Gregorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hartnack, C.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Krämer, M.; Khun, C.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; Sadchikov, A.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Tezkratt, R.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.; FOPI Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    We present new experimental data obtained with the FOPI detector at SIS, for the Au + Au heavy-ion collisions at 400 A MeV incident energy. The sideward flow, determined from a method without reaction-plane reconstruction, and the nuclear stopping are studied as a function of the centrality of the collisions. In order to study the nuclear in-medium effects, which act on the NN cross sections and potential and hence on experimental observables like the nuclear-matter flow and stopping, these results are compared with the predictions of two different QMD versions. The first one offers a fully microscopic calculation of the cross sections and potential in the G-matrix formalism and naturally includes the in-medium effects (this version is for the first time confronted with experiment). The second one uses a standard Skyrme potential plus a momentum-dependent term in order to mimic the in-medium effects.

  3. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, D.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  4. Charge-Asymmetry Dependence of Proton Elliptic Flow in 200 GeV Au +Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The chiral magnetic wave (CMW) is predicted to manifest a finite electric quadrupole moment in the quark-gluon plasma produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This quadrupole moment generates a divergence in the azimuthal anisotropy (v2) of positively and negatively charged particles such that v2(+) charge asymmetry (Ach) of particles in the same rapidity window. The Ach dependence of v 2 has already been observed in the cases of charged pions and kaons. We present preliminary STAR measurements of v 2 for protons and anti-protons as a function of Ach from √sNN = 200 GeV Au +Au collisions for different centrality classes. The results are then compared with the previously reported results of pions and kaons. For the STAR Collaboration.

  5. Propagation of Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at FAIR energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, S; Bashir, S; jahan, H; Ahmad, N; Chattopadhyay, S

    2014-01-01

    Event by event fluctuations of particle multiplicities and their ratios are considered to be sensitive probes to the exotic phenomena in high energy heavy ion collisions like phase transtion or the occurence of critical point. These phenomena might take place at different time after the collision based on fulfilling the required conditions at a particular time. Fluctuations are therefore expected to show non-monotonic behaviour at the of time of occurence of these phenomena. Experimentally, fluctuations are measured at freezeout. In this work, using the hybrid version of the UrQMD event generator, we have investigated the propagation of fluctuations of particle multiplicities, their ratios and the ratio of total positive and negative charges in AuAu collisions at E_{lab} < 90 AGeV. Two commonly used experimental measures i.e., {\\sigma^2}/mean and {\

  6. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  7. A facile strategy to synthesize bimetallic Au/Ag nanocomposite film by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Yi

    2012-05-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the preparation of bimetallic gold-silver (Au-Ag) nanocomposite films by alternating absorption of poly-(ethyleneimine)-silver ions and Au onto substrates and subsequent reduction of the silver ions. The composition, micro-structure and properties of the {PEI-Ag/Au}n nanocomposite films were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), transmisson electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The UV-vis characteristic absorbances of {PEI-Ag/Au}n nanocomposite thin film increase almost linear with the number of bilayers, which indicates a process of uniform assembling. Appearance of a double plasmon bands in the visible region and the lack of apparent core-shell structures in the TEM images confirm the formation of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles. The result of XPS also demonstrates the existence of Ag and Au nanoparticles in the nanocomposite films. TEM and FESEM images show that these Ag and Au nanoparticles in the films possess sphere structure with the size of 20-25 nm. The resulting {PEI-Ag/Au}n films inherit the properties from both the metal Ag and Au, which exhibits a unique performance in SERS and electrocatalytic activities to the oxidation of dopamine. As a result, the {PEI-Ag/Au}n films are more attractive compared to {PEI-Ag/PSS}n and {PEI/Au}n films.

  8. Pseudorapidity distribution of multiplicity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ya-Fei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin; Wang, Zeng-Wei

    2008-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we discuss the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in heavy-ion collisions. Based on the latter, after considering the effect of energy loss of the nucleons in multiple collisions, we derive the pseudorapidity distribution of the multiplicity as a function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Using this, we analyze the experimental measurements carried out by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Supported by Key Foundation of Shanghai (06JC14075)

  9. Pseudorapidity distribution of multiplicity in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ya-Fei; JIANG Zhi-Jin; WANG ZengWei

    2008-01-01

    Using the Glauber model,we discuss the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in heavy-ion collisions.Based on the latter,after considering the effect of energy loss of the nucleons in multiple collisions,we derive the pseudorapidity distribution of the multiplicity as a function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions.Using this,we analyze the experimental measurements carried out by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV.The results are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Energy dependence of elliptic flow over a large pseudorapidity range in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Chai, Z; Decowski, M P; García, E; Gburek, T; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Hauer, M; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Mignerey, A C; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sagerer, J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Seals, H; Sedykh, I; Skulski, W; Smith, C E; Stankiewicz, M A; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Tang, J L; Tonjes, M B; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vaurynovich, S S; Verdier, R; Veres, G I; Wenger, E; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the energy dependence of elliptic flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Data taken at collision energies of $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =$ 19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV are shown over a wide range in pseudorapidity. These results, when plotted as a function of $\\eta'=|\\eta|-y_{beam}$, scale with approximate linearity throughout $\\eta'$, implying no sharp changes in the dynamics of particle production as a function of pseudorapidity or increasing beam energy.

  11. Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Alder, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E..; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Corral, M. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.. J; Fu, J..; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S. M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A.C.; Landgraf, J. M..; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H. [et al.

    2003-05-01

    The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization.

  12. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion.

  13. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  14. Transition from in-plane to out-of-plane azimuthal enhancement inAu+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, A.; Stoicea, G.; Petrovici, M.; Simion, V.; Crochet,P.; Alard, J.P.; Averbeck, R.; Barret, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, Dzelalija M.; Eskef, M.; Finck, Ch.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Hartmann,O.N.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kim,Y.J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Kress, T.; Kutsche, R.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K.S.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Merlitz, H.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Plettner, C.; Rami, F.; Resdorf, W.; de Schauenberg, B.; Schull, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K.S.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stockmeier, M.R.; Vasiliev, M.; Wagner, P.; Wisniewski,K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A.

    2000-08-09

    The incident energy at which the azimuthal distributions in semi-central heavy ion collisions change from in-plane to out-of-plane enhancement--E{sub tran} is studied as a function of mass of emitted particles, their transverse momentum and centrality for Au+Au collisions. The analysis is performed in a reference frame rotated with the sidewards flow angle ({Theta}{sub flow}) relative to the beam axis. A systematic decrease of E{sub tran} as function of mass of the reaction products, their transverse momentum and collision centrality is evidenced. The predictions of a microscopic transport model (IQMD) are compared with the experimental results.

  15. Transition from in-plane to out-of-plane azimuthal enhancement in Au+Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A; Petrovici, M; Simion, V; Crochet, Philippe; Alard, J P; Averbeck, R; Barret, V; Basrak, Z; Bastid, N; Bendarag, A; Berek, G; Devismes, A; Dupieux, P; Dzelalija, M; Eskef, M; Finck, C; Fodor, Z; Gobbi, A; Grishkin, Yu L; Hartmann, O N; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Hong, B H; Kecskeméti, J; Kim, Y J; Kirejczyk, M; Korolija, M; Kotte, R; Kress, T; Kutsche, R; Lebedev, A; Lee, K S; Leifels, Y; Man'ko, V I; Merlitz, H; Neubert, W; Pelte, D; Plettner, C; Rami, F; Reisdorf, W; De Schauenburg, B; Schull, D; Seres, Z; Sikora, B; Sim, K S; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Smolyankin, V T; Stockmeier, M R; Vasilev, M; Wagner, P; Wisniewski, K; Wohlfarth, D; Yushmanov, I E; Zhilin, A V

    2001-01-01

    The incident energy at which the azimuthal distributions in semi-central heavy ion collisions change from in-plane to out-of-plane enhancement, E_tran, is studied as a function of mass of emitted particles, their transverse momentum and centrality for Au+Au collisions. The analysis is performed in a reference frame rotated with the sidewards flow angle, Theta_flow, relative to the beam axis. A systematic decrease of E_tran as function of mass of the reaction products, their transverse momentum and collision centrality is evidenced. The predictions of a microscopic transport model (IQMD) are compared with the experimental results.

  16. Energy dependence of directed flow over a wide range of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Chai, Z; Decowski, M P; García, E; Gburek, T; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Hauer, M; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Mignerey, A C; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sagerer, J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Seals, H; Sedykh, I; Skulski, W; Smith, C E; Stankiewicz, M A; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Tang, J L; Tonjes, M B; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vaurynovich, S S; Verdier, R; Veres, G I; Wenger, E; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2006-01-01

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =$ 19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  17. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, M. J., E-mail: mattiti@gmail.com [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town 7700 (South Africa); Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joloit-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    An assembly for a commercial Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga{sup +} ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga{sup +} and Au{sup +} ion beams will be reported as well.

  18. Highly-charged-ion-induced electron emission from C-60 thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Kowarik, G.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2011-01-01

    The secondary electron yields as a result of highly charged ions impinging on clean Au(111) and thin films of C-60 on Au have been measured. This has been done for film thicknesses of one to five monolayers and several charge states of Ar and Xe ions. For all ions an increase of 35% in the secondary

  19. Au Centenaire Immortel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marie Théodat

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Le septième cahier est d’abord l’occasion de rendre hommage, Sur le Métier, à Claude Lévi-Strauss dont c’est le centième anniversaire aujourd’hui. Il arrive que l’oeuvre d’un seul homme soit le symbole de toute une culture, et que son prestige rejaillisse sur tout un pays, jusqu’à instituer celui-ci en modèle aux yeux du reste du monde. La France est heureuse de rendre hommage au plus prestigieux de ses penseurs, véritable trésor vivant, dont les travaux continuent d’irriguer une pensée fécon...

  20. ITS au Japon

    OpenAIRE

    JANIN, JF; LOUETTE, E; MALLEJACQ, P; PAGNY, R; YGNACE, JL

    2003-01-01

    Dans le cadre de l'accord de coopération signe entre les ministres des transports français et japonais en janvier 2002, des échanges de mission sont organisés de manière à comparer de façon concrète les développements des programmes its dans les deux pays. La première mission française avait eu lieu en mai 2002 à Tokyo. Elle a permis d'organiser un premier séminaire à l'arche de la défense il y a un an au cours duquel les experts japonais ont présenté leurs projets. Un second séminaire s'est ...

  1. EDTA assisted highly selective detection of As(3+) on Au nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrodes: facile in situ electrochemical characterization of Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fang

    2014-12-16

    A facile electrochemical characterization technique of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) developed by Wang et al. ( Wang, Y.; Laborda, E.; Salter, C.; Crossley, A.; Compton, R. G. Analyst 2012 , 137 , 4693 - 4697 ) was used to track the variation in the particle size and density of AuNPs in situ and to assist in optimizing the conditions of analysis and catalysis. In this method, the combination of total surface area determined by Pb underpotential deposition (UPD) and the amount of Au obtained by anodic stripping of Au in HCl solution was used to evaluate the average diameter of AuNPs and the number of particles on the electrode. The detection of As(3+) in aqueous solution by a AuNP modified glassy carbon electrode (Aunano@GCE) using the electrochemical characterization technique was examined. The AuNPs with a uniform shape and size, deposited onto the GCEs using multiple-scan cyclic voltammetry (MSCV), were suitable for the electrochemical evaluation. The calibration curve for the detection of As(3+) had a dynamic range of 0.1-15.0 μg L(-1) (from 1.30 to 200 nM, y = 0.21x (in μA L μg(-1)) + 0.01 (R(2) = 0.999)) and showed a sensitivity of 0.21 μA L μg(-1) (16.15 μA μM(-1)). A detection limit as low as 0.0025 μg L(-1) (32.5 pM) was achieved. The chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) selectively chelated with the interfering metal ions and effectively inhibited the interfering ions from competing with the ion of interest (As(3+)), in the preconcentration process. The presence of EDTA effectively eliminated interference from several metal ions, especially Cu(2+) and Hg(2+). This method was validated by analyzing the As(3+) content in real water samples.

  2. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  3. Bifunctional composite microspheres of silica/lanthanide-polyoxometalates/Au: Study on luminescence and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: junwang924@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Fan, Shaohua; Zhao, Weiqian; Lu, Xuelian; Li, Wuke

    2013-12-02

    In this paper, the synthesis and properties of composite silica microspheres grafted with gold nanoparticles and lanthanide-polyoxometalates are described. This synthesis employs polyethyleneimine as the crosslink polymer to immobilize the Au nanoparticles and lanthanide-polyoxometalates on silica spheres, which results in the formation of bifunctional composite microspheres of silica/lanthanide-polyoxometalates/Au. The composite material was found to be catalytically active in the oxidation of styrene, and benzaldehyde and styrene oxide were the main products. Catalyzed oxidation of styrene demonstrates the size-dependent activity of catalysts and the smaller catalyst shows the higher selectivity. Moreover, the composite particles show bright red luminescence under UV light, which could be seen by naked eyes. The luminescence properties of composite material and the effect of Au nanoparticles on the luminescence of Eu ion were investigated, and energy could be more effectively transferred from ligand to lanthanide ion when Au nanoparticles were grafted on silica spheres. The integration of luminescent components and Au particles makes it possible to label catalyst and monitor the catalyzed reactions. - Highlights: • The bifunctional composite microspheres were fabricated. • Both polyoxometalates and Au nanoparticles could be grafted on silica spheres. • The composite particles exhibit the excellent luminescence and catalytic activity. • The Au nanoparticles affect the luminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  4. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  5. Centrality dependence of antiproton production in Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)]|[A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)]|[University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles California (United States)]|[National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)]|[University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)]|[University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley California (United States)]|[Universities Space Sciences Research Association/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)]|[Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University, Irvington, New York (United States)]|[Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); (E878 Collaboration)

    1995-11-13

    We have measured the yields of antiprotons in Au+Au interactions in the rapidity range 1.2{lt}{ital y}{lt}2.8 as a function of centrality using a beam line spectrometer. The shapes of the invariant multiplicity distributions at {ital p}{sub {ital t}}=0 are used to explore the dynamics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  6. Facile synthesis of fluorescent Au/Ce nanoclusters for high-sensitive bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Jing; Chen, Donghua; Rehman, Fawad Ur; Li, Qiwei; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-02-03

    Tumor-target fluorescence bioimaging is an important means of early diagnosis, metal nanoclusters have been used as an excellent fluorescent probe for marking tumor cells due to their targeted absorption. We have developed a new strategy for facile synthesis of Au/Ce nanoclusters (NCs) by doping trivalent cerium ion into seed crystal growth process of gold. Au/Ce NCs have bright fluorescence which could be used as fluorescent probe for bioimaging. In this study, we synthesized fluorescent Au/Ce NCs through two-step hydrothermal reaction. The concentration range of 25-350 μM, Au/Ce NCs have no obvious cell cytotoxicity effect on HeLa, HepG2 and L02 cells. Furthermore, normal cells (L02) have no obvious absorption of Au/Ce NCs. Characterization of synthesized Au/Ce NCs was done by using TEM, EDS and XPS. Then these prepared Au/Ce NCs were applied for in vitro/in vivo tumor-target bioimaging due to its prolonged fluorescence lifetime and bright luminescence properties. The glutathione stabilized Au/Ce NCs synthesized through hydrothermal reaction possess stable and bright fluorescence that can be readily utilized for high sensitive fluorescence probe. Our results suggest that Au/Ce NCs are useful candidate for in vitro/in vivo tumor bioimaging in potential clinical application.

  7. Investigation of 11B+197Au Reaction at Intermediate Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Karapetyan, G S; Balabekyan, A R

    2016-01-01

    Mechanism of nuclear reactions on 197Au induced by 11B ions at energies above Coulomb barrier was studied by induced-activity method and gamma-spectroscopy. The cross sections of the reaction fragments from 197Au induced by 11B ions were measured at bombarding energies 137.5 and 255.5 MeV. The fission process was investigated by using multimodal fission approach at the energy 137.5 MeV, and pure symmetric distribution at 255.5 MeV. It was observed that the transferred linear momentum provides the information on the initial projectile-target information. The fissility for both fission reactions under study was deduced from measured fission cross section using the total inelastic cross section. Comparison with proton-induced fission shown, that the linear momentum transferred to the fissile system depends on the probe.

  8. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  9. Systematic studies of the centrality dependence of soft photon production in Au+Au collision with PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Bannier, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Since the earliest days of Heavy Ion Physics thermal soft photon radiation emitted during the reaction had been theorized as a smoking gun signal for formation of a quark-gluon plasma and as a tool to characterize its properties. In recent years the existence of excess photon radiation in heavy ion collisions over the expectation from initial hard interactions has been confirmed at both RHIC and LHC energies by PHENIX and ALICE respectively. There the radiation has been found to exhibit elliptic flow $v_2$ well above what can currently be reconciled with a picture of early emission from a plasma phase. During the 2007 and 2010 Au+Au runs PHENIX has measured a high purity sample of soft photons down to $p_T>0.4\\,\\text{GeV}/c$ using an external conversion method. We present recent systematic studies by PHENIX from that sample on the centrality dependence of the soft photon yield, and elliptic and triangular flow $v_2$ and $v_3$ in Au+Au collisions which fill in the experimental picture and enable discrimination...

  10. ΛΛ Correlation function in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-16

    We present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for dihyperon searches are discussed.

  11. Facet selective etching of Au microcrystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gangaiah Mettela and Giridhar U. Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    High-symmetry crystals exhibit isotropic properties. Inducing anisotropy, e.g., by facet selective etching, is considered implausible in face-centered cubic (FCC) metals, particularly gold, which, in addition to being an FCC, is noble. We report for the first time the facet selective etching of Au microcrystals obtained in the form of cuboctahedra and pentagonal rods from the thermolysis of a gold- organic precursor. The selective etching of {111} and {100} facets was achieved using a capping method in which tetraoctylammonium cations selectively cap the {111} facets while Br- ions protect the {100} facets. The exposed facets are oxidized by O2/C1-, yielding a variety of interesting geometries. The facet selective etching of the Au microcrystallites is governed only by the nature of the facets; the geometry of the microcystallite does not appear to play a significant role. The etched surfaces appear rough, but a closer examination reveals well-defined corrugations that are indexable to high hkl values. Such surfaces exhibit enhanced Raman activity.

  12. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  13. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  14. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-Zr system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志华; 金展鹏; 刘华山

    2003-01-01

    Au-Zr binary system was reassessed by using the calculation phase diagram (CALPHAD) technique based on experimental thermodynamic data and newly reported phase diagrams. The excess Gibbs energies of the three terminal solutions and the liquid phases were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial. All the intermetallic phases were treated as stoichiometric compounds with the exception of ZrAu which is modeled by a two-sublattice model, (Au,Zr) : (Au, Zr). The results show that there exist seven intermetallics: Zr3Au, Zr2Au, Zr5Au4,Zr7Au10, ZrAu2 , ZrAu3, and ZrAu4 in the system. The eutectoid reaction: β(Zr) →α(Zr)+Zr3Au takes place at 1 048 K and the maximal solubility of Au in α-Zr is 4.7 % (mole fraction). The maximal solubility of Zr in Au is 6.0%(mole fraction) at 1 347 K. The homogeneity range of ZrAu phase is about 44.5%-52.9%(mole fraction) of Au. The present assessment fits experimental data very well.

  15. Investigation on the Extraction Mechanism of Au (I) from Cyanide Solution with Quaternary Ammonium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of Au (I) extraction has been characterized using 198Au radiometry, thermodynamic equilibrium, Karl-Fischer titration and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that the extraction follows ionic combination and solvent interaction mechanism. The stoichiometry of the extracted species is 1:1:4:4 for TDMBA+: Au(CN)2- : TBP : H2O. The microstructure model of the extracted complex is a supramolecular structure via hydrogen bonding, ion dipole interaction and ionic combination. The extraction process can be described as micelles in the aqueous phase transfer into the organic phase and reversed micelles or microemulsion (W/O) form in the organic phase.

  16. Photochemical Synthesis of Au@Pd Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Methanol Oxidation Reaction: the Promotional Effect of the Au Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yingnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for synthesizing Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles was proposed based on photochemistry. By irradiating the mixture of Au (III and Pd (II ions using ultraviolet light, the Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles were prepared. The size of the nanoparticles and the thickness of the Pd shell could be efficiently adjusted by changing the molar ratio of Au (III to Pd (II ion. In this way, nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 5.6~4.6 nm were obtained. The core-shell structure of the synthesized nanoparticles was showed by the characterization using UV-Vis, TEM/HR-TEM and XPS. The paper investigated the electrocatalysis performance of Au@Pd nanoparticles in the methanol catalytic oxidation reaction, as well as the electron donating effect of Au core to Pd shell and the promotion of this effect on the catalytic activity of Pd shell. The experimental results provided reference for the development of non-platinum catalysts of low-temperature fuel cell anode.

  17. Extracellular Saccharide-Mediated Reduction of Au(3+) to Gold Nanoparticles: New Insights for Heavy Metals Biomineralization on Microbial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Fuxing; Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2017-02-15

    Biomineralization is a critical process controlling the biogeochemical cycling, fate, and potential environmental impacts of heavy metals. Despite the indispensability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to microbial life and their ubiquity in soil and aquatic environments, the role played by EPS in the transformation and biomineralization of heavy metals is not well understood. Here, we used gold ion (Au(3+)) as a model heavy metal ion to quantitatively assess the role of EPS in biomineralization and discern the responsible functional groups. Integrated spectroscopic analyses showed that Au(3+)was readily reduced to zerovalent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, 2-15 nm in size) in aqueous suspension of Escherichia coli or dissolved EPS extracted from microbes. The majority of AuNPs (95.2%) was formed outside Escherichia coli cells, and the removal of EPS attached to cells pronouncedly suppressed Au(3+) reduction, reflecting the predominance of the extracellular matrix in Au(3+) reduction. XPS, UV-vis, and FTIR analyses corroborated that Au(3+) reduction was mediated by the hemiacetal groups (aldehyde equivalents) of reducing saccharides of EPS. Consistently, the kinetics of AuNP formation obeyed pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics with respect to the concentrations of Au(3+) and the hemiacetal groups in EPS, with minimal dependency on the source of microbial EPS. Our findings indicate a previously overlooked, universally significant contribution of EPS to the reduction, mineralization, and potential detoxification of metal species with high oxidation state.

  18. Ternary Reactions in 197AU + 197AU Collisions Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwira-Chalot, I.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Wilczyński, J.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Auditore, L.; Baran, V.; Brzychczyk, J.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, S.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Colonna, M.; de Filippo, E.; di Toro, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guazzoni, P.; Kowalski, S.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzanò, G.; Lanzalone, G.; Maiolino, C.; Majka, Z.; Nicolis, N. G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Piasecki, E.; Pirrone, S.; Płaneta, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Schmidt, K.; Sochocka, A.; Świderski, Ł.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Zetta, L.; Zipper, W.

    Ternary events originating from the 197Au + 197Au reaction at 15 MeV/nucleon, studied by using the multidetector array CHIMERA at LNS Catania, have been collected in almost complete 2π range of the forward hemisphere of CHIMERA thus extending the angular range of our previously reported preliminary data. Energy- and time calibrations for heavy fragments at large angles were supplemented with an analysis of coincidence events of binary strongly damped reactions. Contrary to the previous preliminary results, the new complete data clearly show presence of sequential fission processes in which one of Au-like nuclei undergoes fission after re-separation of the primary binary system. Mechanism of these two types of reactions observed in our data, sequential fission reactions and prompt ternary processes, are presently studied using comparisons with predictions of the stochastic BNV model of Baran, Colonna and Di Toro and the QMD model of Łukasik.

  19. Ion-stimulated gas desorption yields of electropolished, chemically etched, and coated (Au, Ag, Pd, TiZrV stainless steel vacuum chambers and St707 getter strips irradiated with 4.2  MeV/u lead ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2  MeV/u lead ions impacting under grazing incidence on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. Desorption yields for H_{2}, CH_{4}, CO, and CO_{2}, which are of fundamental interest for future accelerator applications, are reported for different stainless steel surface treatments. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, palladium-, and getter-coated 316 LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analyzed for chemical composition by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The large effective desorption yield of 2×10^{4}   molecules /Pb^{53+} ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble-metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, pressure rise measurements, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with lead ions, and the consequence of a subsequent venting on the desorption yields of a beam-scrubbed vacuum chamber are described. Practical consequences for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring are discussed.

  20. Tuning Charge Transfer in Ion-Surface Collisions at Hyperthermal Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunxi; Giapis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-18

    Charge exchange in ion-surface collisions may be influenced by surface adsorbates to alter the charge state of the scattered projectiles. We show here that the positive-ion yield, observed during ion scattering on metal surfaces at low incident energies, is greatly enhanced by adsorbing electronegative species onto the surface. Specifically, when beams of N(+) and O(+) ions are scattered off of clean Au surfaces at hyperthermal energies, no positive ions are observed exiting. Partial adsorption of F atoms on the Au surface, however, leads to the appearance of positively charged primary ions scattering off of Au, a direct result of the increase in the Au work function. The inelastic energy losses for positive-ion exits are slightly larger than the corresponding ionization energies of the respective N and O atoms, which suggest that the detected positive ions are formed by surface reionization during the hard collision event.

  1. Search for Chiral Magnetic Effect with Identified Particles in Au+Au Collisions at √{sNN} = 39 GeV from RHIC/STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yiwen; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Chirality imbalance could occur in local domains inside the hot nuclear matter formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, this chirality imbalance will induce an electric charge separation along the magnetic field direction, owing to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Previous azimuthal-angle correlation measurements with unidentified charged particles have manifested charge separation signals consistent with the predictions of the CME. But the magnitudes of the background contributions have not been understood. In this poster, we present the correlation results with identified particles (protons and pions) using STAR data of 39 GeV Au+Au collisions. The results will be compared with those from Au+Au at √{sNN} = 200GeV , as well as the published results of unidentified particles at √{sNN} = 39GeV . For the STAR Collaboration.

  2. L’apprentissage au cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    pour les professions d’électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L’apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l’examen de fin d’apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat fédéral de capacité suisse (CFC). 6 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L’apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l’apprentissage ; avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9e du Cycle d’orientation genevois (3e en France) ; être ressortissant d’un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, Royaume-Uni, République tchèque, République slovaque , Suède, Suisse) ; pour les résidents en Suisse : être ressortissant su...

  3. [Resonance scattering detection of trace Hg2+ using aptamer modified AuSe nanoalloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-liang; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Hui-min; Zhou, Lian-ping; Liang, Ai-hui; Wang, Peng-fei; Ouyang, Hui-xiang

    2011-05-01

    Under the condition of sodium citrate as stabilizer, the gold-selenium (AuSe) nano-alloy was prepared by sodium borohydride reduction procedure, and was modified by single-strand aptamer to obtain an aptamer nano-alloy probe (apta-AuSe) for Hg(II). In pH 6.8 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution and in the presence of NaCl of 33 mmol L(-1), the Apta-AuSe probe is not aggregation. The apta-AuSe interacts with Hg2+ to form stable double-strand T-Hg(II)-T mismatches and to release AuSe nano-alloy particles from the probe. The released AuSe nano-alloy particles (20:1) aggregated to form bigger clusters that resulted in the resonance scattering (RS) intensity (I590 nm) increasing at 590 nm. The increased intensity delta I590 nm was proportional to the Hg2+ concentration from 1.3 to 1466 nmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 0.74 nmol L(-1). The regress equation was delta I590 nm = 0.603c + 2.0. Thus, a new resonance scattering (RS) spectroscopy of apta-AuSe was applied to the analysis of trace mercury ion. This simple, rapid, selective and sensitive aptamer AuSe nano-alloy RS assay was applied to the determination of Hg2+ in wastewater, with satisfactory results.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of bis-(3-sulfopropyl) disulfide during Cu electrodeposition and stripping at Au electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yong-Da; Dow, Wei-Ping; Krug, Klaus; Liu, Yung-Fang; Lee, Yuh-Lang; Yau, Shueh-Lin

    2012-10-09

    The adsorption and desorption of bis-(3-sulfopropyl) disulfide (SPS) on Cu and Au electrodes and its electrochemical effect on Cu deposition and dissolution were examined using cyclic voltammetry stripping (CVS), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SPS dissociates into 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate when it is contacted with Au and Cu electrodes, producing Cu(I)- and Au(I)-thiolate species. These thiolates couple with chloride ions and promote not only the reduction of Cu(2+) in Cu deposition but also the oxidation of Cu(0) to Cu(+) in Cu stripping. During Cu electrodeposition on the SPS-modified Au electrode, thiolates transfer from Au onto the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) layer. The Cu UPD layer stabilizes a large part of the transferred thiolates which subsequently is buried by the Cu overpotential deposition (OPD) layer. The buried thiolates reappear on the Au electrode after the copper deposit is electrochemically stripped off. A much smaller part of thiolates transfers to the top of the Cu OPD layer. In contrast, when SPS preadsorbs on a Cu-coated Au electrode, almost all of the adsorbed SPS leaves the Cu surface during Cu electrochemical stripping and does not return to the uncovered Au surface. A reaction mechanism is proposed to explain these results.

  5. Coherent ρ⁰ production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A..; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E..; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V..; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A.C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q. [Wayne State U.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Ludlam, T.

    2002-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive ρ⁰ photoproduction, AuAu→AuAuρ⁰, and ρ⁰ production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu→Au*Au*ρ⁰, in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The ρ0 have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at √(sNN)=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating ρ⁰ production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes.

  6. 啤酒酵母废菌体Au3+的透射电镜观察%Transmission electron microscopic observation of Au3+ biosorption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae waste biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yue-ying; FU Jin-kun; LUO Xue-feng; NI Zi-mian; CHEN Ping; YU Xin-sheng

    2000-01-01

    本文报告啤酒酵母废菌体对Au3+ 的吸附还原作用.该菌体在金离子起始浓度200 μg/ml,菌体浓度2mg/ml, pH3.0和30℃的条件下, 吸附60min,吸附量达55.9mg/g干菌体.TEM观察结果表明,溶液中的Au3+ 离子能被啤酒酵母废菌体吸附,并还原生成Au0颗粒.所生成的Au0颗粒能形成不同形状和大小的金晶体.吸附在α-Fe2O3和SiO2上的Au3+离子也能被啤酒酵母废菌体还原形成纳米大小的金颗粒.%The biosorption and bioreduction of Au3+ by waste biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are reported. The biosorptive capacity of the biomass could reach 55.9 mg/g under the conditions of 200 μg Au3+/ml,2 mg biomass/ml, pH 3.0 and 30 ℃ for 60 min of contact. The observation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that the Au3+ ions in the solution could be adsorbed and reduced to Au0 by S. cerevisiae waste biomass. The Au0 could become gold crystals of different sizes and forms. Au3+ ions adsorbed on the α-Fe2O3 and SiO2 could be reduced to Au particles of nanometer size.

  7. Control of Melt Structures on Cu-Au Mineralization in Basic-Ultrabasic Complexes of Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on systematic analyses of 72 samples of different basic-ultrabasic rocks, the present paper discusses the relationship between melt strcture and Cu and Au mineralization. It is found that if the NBO/T, NBO, M2+,FeO and MgO values are relatively high and the T, M3+, Fe2O3 and CaO values are low the basic-ultrahasic melt will be favourable to Cu (Ni) mineralization, but if the former are low and the latter are high it is favourable to Au metallization. Cu ions occupy dominantly octahedra in basic-ultrabasic melt and the higher the NBO/T, NBO and M2+ values, the more the octahedra in the melt. Au element mainly takes the form of Au+ions in basic-ultrabasic melt and the Au+ ions constitute tetrahedral sites together with Fe3+ ions. Therefore, low M2+ and high Fe3+, i.e. high oxygen fugacity, can promote the enrichment of Au+ ions and Au mineralization. Components M+ (other than Au+), Al2O3 and SiO2 in basic-ultrabasic melt have no effect on metallogenetic species. As mentioned above, in relevant diagrams distribution areas of the characteristic values of ore-free melt and those of ore-forming melt are overlapped in different degrees, which possibly indicates that not all the magmas have mineralizing ability. It can be well distinguished whather basic-ultrabasic rocks are favourable to Cu or Au mineralization or they are just ore-free rocks by analysing integrated diagrams of the characteristic values of the magmatic melt structure.

  8. Computer simulation of the emission process of some field emission alloy ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, S.; Vichev, R.; Drandarov, N. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-10-01

    The ion emission process from InGa, AuBe and AuSi field emission alloy ion sources (LAIS) is simulated. Field strength is calculated using the SOC model. Paraxial source size, beam spot size, energy and angular distributions are estimated. The effects on the emission characteristics of Coulomb interaction between ions are investigated, and the strong influences of ion mass and charge are also shown. (Author).

  9. Membrane-based assay for iodide ions based on anti-leaching of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Wei; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Li, Yu-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-02-26

    We report a label-free colorimetric strategy for the highly selective and sensitive detection of iodide (I(-)) ions in human urine sample, seawater and edible salt. A poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized Au nanoparticle (34.2-nm) was prepared to detect I(-) ions using silver (Ag(+)) and cyanide (CN(-)) ions as leaching agents in a glycine-NaOH (pH 9.0) solution. For the visual detection of the I(-) ions by naked eye, and for long time stability of the probe, Au nanoparticles (NPs) decorated mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM) was prepared (Au NPs/MCEM). The Au NPs-based probe (CN(-)/Ag(+)-Au NPs/MCEM) operates on the principle that Ag(+) ions form a monolyar silver atoms/ions by aurophilic/argentophilic interactions on the Au NPs and it accelerates the leaching rate of Au atoms in presence of CN(-) ions. However, when I(-) is introduced into this system, it inhibits the leaching of Au atoms because of the strong interactions between Ag/Au ions and I(-) ions. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface properties of the Au NPs in the presence of Ag(+) and I(-). Under optimal solution conditions, the CN(-)/Ag(+)-Au NPs/MCEM probe enabled the detection of I(-) by the naked eye at nanomolar concentrations with high selectivity (at least 1000-fold over other anions). In addition, this cost-effective probe allowed the determination of I(-) ions in complex samples, such as urine, seawater, and edible salt samples.

  10. Filipino au pairs on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial interdep......Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial...

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Au-Island Ripening on Au(100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kleiner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multiscale modeling hierarchy for the particular case of Au-island ripening on Au(100. Starting at the microscopic scale, density functional theory was used to investigate a limited number of self-diffusion processes on perfect and imperfect Au(100 surfaces. The obtained structural and energetic information served as basis for optimizing a reactive forcefield (here ReaxFF, which afterwards was used to address the mesoscopic scale. Reactive force field simulations were performed to investigate more diffusion possibilities at a lower computational cost but with similar accuracy. Finally, we reached the macroscale by means of kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC simulations. The reaction rates for the reaction process database used in the kMC simulations were generated using the reactive force field. Using this strategy, we simulated nucleation, aggregation, and fluctuation processes for monoatomic high islands on Au(100 and modeled their equilibrium shape structures. Finally, by calculating the step line tension at different temperatures, we were able to make a direct comparison with available experimental data.

  12. Fabrication and properties of poly(vinylidenefluoride)/PbS/Au heterogeneous nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Pill; Gopalan, Anantha Iyengar; Park, Jong Wook; Ragupathy, Dhanusuraman; Manesh, Kalayil Manian

    2009-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVdF) PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au heterogeneous nanostructures by the processes, electrospinning and chemical treatment. Initially electrospinning a solution consisting of PVdF and lead acetate was used to form PVdF nanofibers loaded with Pb ions. Exposure of Pb ions loaded PVdF fibers to H2S resulted in PVdF/PbS nanostructures. The deposition of gold nanoparticles onto PVdF/PbS nanostructures results in PVdF/PbS/Au heterogeneous structure. The existence of PbS particles with an average diameter of 11 nm is evident from field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) image of PVdF/PbS. The results from X-ray diffraction of PVdF/PbS also predict the size of PbS particles as in accordance with FETEM. A blue shift in the optical transition of PbS is noticed in the UV-visible spectrum of PVdF/PbS as a result of quantum confinement effect. The band gap of PbS is influenced by the presence of Au nanoparticles over the PbS particles. An equal atomic weight % of Au and PbS is found in the PVdF/PbS/Au nanostructure as inferred from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au are compared. Emission peaks are noticed at 400 nm and 480 nm for PVdF/PbS and PVdF/PbS/Au nanostructures respectively for an excitation wavelength of 254 nm. The presence of Au nanoclusters in PVdF/PbS/Au diminishes the intensity of photo emission of PbS.

  13. Reconstruction of K*+/-(892) in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, He; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produces a hot, dense and deconfined Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) medium, called the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), with Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The K*+/-(892) resonance is a short-lived particle with a lifetime shorter than the expected lifetime of the QGP. The K* production may provide an effective tool to probe the QGP properties, such as strangeness enhancement. Experimentally, K*+/- analysis is difficult and less studied previously because of large combinatorial background. In recent years, improvements in data sample statistics and particle identification capability promise better K*+/- measurements. In this presentation, we report the reconstruction of K*+/- resonance via the hadronic decay channel K*+/- (892) ->KS0π+/- as a function of transverse momentum (pT) up to 5 GeV/c for various collision centrality classes. The data are Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV collected in the year 2011 run from the STAR experiment. Physics implications of our measurements will also be discussed. For the STAR collaboration.

  14. Nuclear Modification Factor of D0 Meson in Au + Au Collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guannan

    2016-12-01

    Heavy-flavor quarks are dominantly produced in initial hard scattering processes and experience the whole evolution of the system in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. Thus they are suggested to be an excellent probe to the medium properties through their interaction with the medium. In this proceedings, we report our first measurement of D0 production via topological reconstruction using STAR's recently installed Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). We also report our new measurement of Nuclear Modification Factor (RAA) of D0 mesons in central Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV as a function of transverse momentum (pT). New results confirm the strong suppression at high pT with a much improved precision, and show that the RAA at high pT are comparable with light hadrons (π) and with D meson measurements at the LHC. Furthermore, several theoretical calculations are compared to our data, and with charm diffusion coefficient 2 πTDS ∼ 2- 12 can reproduce both the D0RAA and v2 data in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

  15. Fabrication of metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and isotropic reactive ion. etching (RIE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE GuoYong; ZHANG Jin; ZHANG YongYi; ZHANG YingYing; ZHU Tao; LIU ZhongFan

    2009-01-01

    We report herein e rational approach for fabricating metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching (RIE). The approach comprises three principal steps:(1) mold fabrication, (2) structure replication by NIL, and (3) suspending nanostructures creation by isotropic RIE. Using this approach, suspending nanostructures with Au, Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers, and Au/TilAu sandwiched structures are demonstrated. For Au nanostructures, straight suspending nanostructurea can be obtained when the thickness of Au film is up to 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger patterns. When the thickness of Au is below 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger, the Au suspending nanostructures bend upward as a result of the mismatch of thermal expansion between the thin Au films and Si substrate. This leads to residual stresses in the thin Au films. For Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers nanostructures, the cantilevers bend toward Au film, since Au has a larger thermal expansion coefficient than that of Ti. While in the case of sandwich structures, straight suspending nanostructures are obtained, this may be due to the balance of residual stress between the thin films.

  16. AU Political Solution in Libya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    May 3,2011 The African Union(AU),through its High-Level ad hoc Committee on the Situation in Libya and the Commission, is driven by the conviction that, ultimately,only a political solution will make it possible to promote,in a sustainable way,the legitimate aspira-

  17. Comparative study of anchoring groups for molecular electronics: structure and conductance of Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Iben Sig; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    The electrical properties of single-molecule junctions, consisting of an organic molecule coupled to metal electrodes, are sensitive to the detailed atomic structure of the molecule-metal contact. This, in turn, is determined by the anchoring group linking the molecule to the metal. With the aim...... of identifying and comparing the intrinsic properties of two commonly used anchoring groups, namely thiol and amine groups, we have calculated the atomic structure and conductance traces of different Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au nanojunctions using density functional theory (DFT). Whereas NH2 shows a strong structural...... selectivity towards atop-gold configurations, S shows large variability in its bonding geometries. As a result, the conductance of the Au-NH2-Au junction is less sensitive to the structure of the gold contacts than the Au-S-Au junction. These findings support recent experiments which show that amine...

  18. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E. [INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G. [IFISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ferullo, Ricardo M., E-mail: caferull@criba.edu.ar [INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET) and Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • On the hydroxylated surface, the adsorption of Au clusters is relatively weak. • Au-oxide interaction induces a polarization of the Au particles on the bare surface. • A predominance of planar (111) arrangements was obtained on both surfaces. • Comparing both surfaces, atom-by-atom nucleation energies show opposite behaviors. - Abstract: We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Au{sub n} (n = 1–5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au{sub 3}, Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 5} planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au{sup +δ}(basal)/Au{sup −δ}(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  19. Open heavy flavor measurements in d+Au collisions at PHENIX experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sanghoon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The heavy quarks produced in the early stage of heavy-ion collisions are very effective probes of the dense partonic medium produced at RHIC. PHENIX has the ability to measure heavy quark production through single electrons in the central arm spectrometers (|η| < 0.35 and single muons in the forward (backward muon spectrometers (1.2 < |η| < 2.2. As these single leptons are from open heavy-flavor meson semi-leptonic decays, initial state cold nuclear matter effects on heavy quark production can be probed by measuring the single leptons in d+Au collisions. PHENIX have observed a large enhancement of heavy-flavor electrons in d+Au collisions at mid-rapidity, which indicates strong CNM effects on heavy quark production, in contrast to the suppression observed in Au+Au collisions. Measurement of single muons from open heavy flavor in d+Au collisions at forward (backward rapidity provide detailed look into rapidity dependent CNM effects as well as the low (high x parton distribution function within Au nucleus. We discuss recent PHENIX heavy flavor measurements and how they expand our understanding of CNM effects and contribute to the interpretation of other results in heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Spontaneous decoration of Au nanoparticles on micro-patterned reduced graphene oxide shaped by focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y. C.; Tok, E. S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teoh, H. F. [Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Sow, C. H. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    We report a facile, two-step method for the micro-landscaping of Au nanoparticles(NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film en route to micro-patterned Au(NPs)-rGO hybrid functional materials. This method employs a focused laser beam to first locally convert GO to rGO before immersing the micro-patterned GO-rGO film into HAuCl{sub 4} solution. The rGO micro-pattern, shaped by the focused laser beam, serves as nucleation sites for the reduction of Au ions. The reduction mechanism that governs the decoration of Au NPs on rGO films is akin to electroless deposition process. In this instance, surface charges that are formed during laser reduction of GO to rGO provide active nucleation sites for Au{sup 3+} ions to form Au NPs when HAuCl{sub 4} solution is introduced. The number density, the size, and size distribution of the Au NPs can thus be directly tuned and preferentially anchored onto the rGO micro-pattern by varying the incident laser power, the scanning speed of the laser, or the concentration of HAuCl{sub 4}. The resulting hybrid materials can be used as a substrate for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Using Rhodamine 6G as the test subject, we found an improvement of SERS enhancement over bare rGO of up to four times, depending on the size of the Au NPs.

  1. Thermal Description of Particle Production in Au-Au Collisions at STAR Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    The hadron ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions are analysed by means of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model over a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies ranging from 7.7 to 200 GeV as offered by the STAR Beam Energy Scan I (BES-I). We restrict the discussion on STAR BES-I, because of large statistics and over all homogeneity of STAR measurements (one detector) against previous experiments. Over the last three decades, various heavy-ion experiments utilizing different detectors (different certainties) have been carried out. Regularities in produced particles at different energies haven been studied. The temperature and baryon chemical potential are deduced from fits of experimental ratios to thermal model calculations assuming chemical equilibrium. We find that the resulting freeze-out parameters using single hard-core value and point-like constituents of HRG are identical. This implies that the excluded-volume comes up with no effect on the extracted parameters. We compare the results wit...

  2. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, W; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, X; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, $v_2\\{2\\}$ and $v_2\\{4\\}$, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the amount of energy deposited by spectators in the STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of $v_2\\{2\\}$ on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. An initial-state model with gluon saturation describes the slope of $v_2\\{2\\}$ as a function of multiplicity in central collisions better than one based on Glauber with a two-component multiplicity model.

  3. Spiral Patterning of Au Nanoparticles on Au Nanorod Surface to Form Chiral AuNR@AuNP Helical Superstructures Templated by DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenqi; Lan, Xiang; Zhu, Chenggan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Qiangbin

    2017-02-20

    Plasmonic motifs with precise surface recognition sites are crucial for assembling defined nanostructures with novel functionalities and properties. In this work, a unique and effective strategy is successfully developed to pattern DNA recognition sites in a helical arrangement around a gold nanorod (AuNR), and a new set of heterogeneous AuNR@AuNP plasmonic helices is fabricated by attaching complementary-DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the predesigned sites on the AuNR surface. AuNR is first assembled to one side of a bifacial rectangular DNA origami, where eight groups of capture strands are selectively patterned on the other side. The subsequently added link strands make the rectangular DNA origami roll up around the AuNR into a tubular shape, therefore giving birth to a chiral patterning of DNA recognition sites on the surface of AuNR. Following the hybridization with the AuNPs capped with the complementary strands to the capture strands on the DNA origami, left-handed and right-handed AuNR@AuNP helical superstructures are precisely formed by tuning the pattern of the recognition sites on the AuNR surface. Our strategy of nanoparticle surface patterning innovatively realizes hierarchical self-assembly of plasmonic superstructures with tunable chiroptical responses, and will certainly broaden the horizon of bottom-up construction of other functional nanoarchitectures with growing complexity.

  4. A facile strategy to synthesize bimetallic Au/Ag nanocomposite film by layer-by-layer assembly technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Li, E-mail: zhlisuzh@163.com [Anhui Key Laboratory of Spin Electron and Nanomaterials (Cultivating Base), Suzhou University, Suzhou 234000 (China); Wang Cong; Zhang Yi [Anhui Key Laboratory of Spin Electron and Nanomaterials (Cultivating Base), Suzhou University, Suzhou 234000 (China)

    2012-05-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the preparation of bimetallic gold-silver (Au-Ag) nanocomposite films by alternating absorption of poly-(ethyleneimine)-silver ions and Au onto substrates and subsequent reduction of the silver ions. The composition, micro-structure and properties of the {l_brace}PEI-Ag/Au{r_brace}{sub n} nanocomposite films were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), transmisson electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The UV-vis characteristic absorbances of {l_brace}PEI-Ag/Au{r_brace}{sub n} nanocomposite thin film increase almost linear with the number of bilayers, which indicates a process of uniform assembling. Appearance of a double plasmon bands in the visible region and the lack of apparent core-shell structures in the TEM images confirm the formation of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles. The result of XPS also demonstrates the existence of Ag and Au nanoparticles in the nanocomposite films. TEM and FESEM images show that these Ag and Au nanoparticles in the films possess sphere structure with the size of 20-25 nm. The resulting {l_brace}PEI-Ag/Au{r_brace}{sub n} films inherit the properties from both the metal Ag and Au, which exhibits a unique performance in SERS and electrocatalytic activities to the oxidation of dopamine. As a result, the {l_brace}PEI-Ag/Au{r_brace}{sub n} films are more attractive compared to {l_brace}PEI-Ag/PSS{r_brace}{sub n} and {l_brace}PEI/Au{r_brace}{sub n} films.

  5. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Crochet, Philippe; Gobbi, A; Donà, R; Coffin, J P; Fintz, P; Guillaume, G; Jundt, F; Kühn, C E; Roy, C; De Schauenburg, B; Tizniti, L; Wagner, P; Alard, J P; Amouroux, V; Andronic, A; Basrak, Z; Bastid, N; Belyaev, I; Best, D; Biegansky, J; Butà, A; Caplar, R; Cindro, N; Dupieux, P; Dzelalija, M; Fan, Z G; Fodor, Z; Fraysse, L; Freifelder, R P; Herrmann, N; Hildenbrand, K D; Hong, B H; Jeong, S C; Kecskeméti, J; Kirejczyk, M; Koncz, P; Korolija, M; Kotte, R; Lebedev, A; Leifels, Y; Man'ko, V I; Moisa, D; Mösner, J; Neubert, W; Pelte, D; Petrovici, M; Pinkenburg, C H; Pras, P; Ramillien, V; Reisdorf, W; Ritman, J L; Sadchikov, A G; Schüll, D; Seres, Z; Sikora, B; Simion, V; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Sodan, U; Teh, K M; Trzaska, M; Vasilev, M A; Wang, G S; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Wisniewski, K; Wohlfarth, D; Zhilin, A V

    1997-01-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100AMeV to 800AMeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z>2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  6. Onset of nuclear matter expansion in Au+Au collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, P.; Rami, F.; Gobbi, A.; Dona, R.; Coffin, J. P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; de Schauenburg, B.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Best, D.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cindro, N.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fan, Z. G.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Freifelder, R. P.; Berrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Jeong, S. C.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koncz, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Moisa, D.; Mösner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pras, P.; Ramillien, V.; Reisdorf, W.; Ritman, J. L.; Sadchikov, A. G.; Schüll, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K. M.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wang, G. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Using the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, excitation functions of collective flow components were measured for the Au+Au system, in the reaction plane and out of this plane, at seven incident energies ranging from 100 A MeV to 800 A MeV. The threshold energies, corresponding to the onset of sideward-flow (balance energy) and squeeze-out effect (transition energy), are extracted from extrapolations of these excitation functions toward lower beam energies for charged products with Z ⩾ 2. The transition energy is found to be larger than the balance energy. The impact parameter dependence of both balance and transition energies, when extrapolated to central collisions, suggests comparable although slightly higher values than the threshold energy for the radial flow. The relevant parameter seems to be the energy deposited into the system in order to overcome the attractive nuclear forces.

  7. Charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Xu(蔡勖); ZHOU; Daimei(周代梅); SA; Benhao(萨本豪)

    2003-01-01

    A hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, together with the corresponding Monte Carlo eventgenerator, has been employed in this paper to investigate further the charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at√Snn= 130 GeV. The default JPCIAE calculations are in good agreement with PHENIX and STAR data. Wefound that the thermal predictions for the π gas, the resonance π gas and quark matter deviate, respectively,from the corresponding dynamical simulations from the JPCIAE model. The discrepancies were also foundbetween the π charge fluctuations and the charge fluctuations of all species of hadrons. However the chargefluctuations for "π from ρ and ω decay" and for all the hadrons from resonance decay are close to each other,indicating the correlation between positively and negatively charged hadrons is not sensitive to the species ofhadrons. This work shows further that it is questionable to use the charge fluctuations as a signature of QGP.

  8. Colloidal domain lithography for regularly arranged artificial magnetic out-of-plane monodomains in Au/Co/Au layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuświk, Piotr; Ehresmann, Arno; Tekielak, Maria; Szymański, Bogdan; Sveklo, Iosif; Mazalski, Piotr; Engel, Dieter; Kisielewski, Jan; Lengemann, Daniel; Urbaniak, Maciej; Schmidt, Christoph; Maziewski, Andrzej; Stobiecki, Feliks

    2011-03-04

    Regularly arranged magnetic out-of-plane patterns in continuous and flat films are promising for applications in data storage technology (bit patterned media) or transport of individual magnetic particles. Whereas topographic magnetic structures are fabricated by standard lithographical techniques, the fabrication of regularly arranged artificial domains in topographically flat films is difficult, since the free energy minimization determines the existence, shape, and regularity of domains. Here we show that keV He(+) ion bombardment of Au/Co/Au layer systems through a colloidal mask of hexagonally arranged spherical polystyrene beads enables magnetic patterning of regularly arranged cylindrical magnetic monodomains with out-of-plane magnetization embedded in a ferromagnetic matrix with easy-plane anisotropy. This colloidal domain lithography creates artificial domains via periodic lateral anisotropy variations induced by periodic defect density modulations. Magnetization reversal of the layer system observed by magnetic force microscopy shows individual disc switching indicating monodomain states.

  9. Beam-energy dependence of the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, and pions in Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-04-25

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y=0) are reported in sNN=7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  10. Transverse momentum dependence of η meson suppression in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hegyi, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niita, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2010-07-01

    New measurements by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider for η production at midrapidity as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions are presented. They indicate nuclear modification factors (RAA) which are similar in both magnitude and trend to those found in earlier π0 measurements. Linear fits to RAA as a function of pT in 5-20 GeV/c show that the slope is consistent with zero within two standard deviations at all centralities, although a slow rise cannot be excluded. Having different statistical and systematic uncertainties, the π0 and η measurements are complementary at high pT; thus, along with the extended pT range of these data they can provide additional constraints for theoretical modeling and the extraction of transport properties.

  11. Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow($v_1$) measurements for charged pions, protons and antiprotons near mid-rapidity ($y=0$) are reported in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au + Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  12. Third Harmonic Flow of Charged Particles in Au+Au Collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L -X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Luszczak, A; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, v_3, known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrtsNN = 200$ GeV, based on data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Two-particle correlations as a function of their pseudorapidity separation are fit with narrow and wide Gaussians. Measurements of triangular flow are extracted from the wide Gaussian, from two-particle cumulants with a pseudorapidity gap, and also from event plane analysis methods with a large pseudorapidity gap between the particles and the event plane. These results are reported as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. A large dependence on the pseudorapidity gap is found. Results are compared with other experiments and model calculations.

  13. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    McGlinchey, D

    2015-01-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  14. Observation of direct-photon collective flow in Au + Au collisions at √s(NN)] = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2012-09-21

    The second Fourier component v(2) of the azimuthal anisotropy with respect to the reaction plane is measured for direct photons at midrapidity and transverse momentum (p(T)) of 1-12 GeV/c in Au + Au collisions at √s(NN)] = 200 GeV. Previous measurements of this quantity for hadrons with p(T) 6 GeV/c a reduced anisotropy is interpreted in terms of a path-length dependence for parton energy loss. In this measurement with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider we find that for p(T) > 4 GeV/c the anisotropy for direct photons is consistent with zero, which is as expected if the dominant source of direct photons is initial hard scattering. However, in the p(T) hadrons, whereas model calculations for thermal photons in this kinematic region underpredict the observed v(2).

  15. Transverse momentum and transverse mass distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au-Au collisions at high energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fu-Hu

    2008-01-01

    The transverse momentum distribution and the transverse mass distribution of charged hadrons produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies are described by using a two-cylinder model. The results calculated by the model are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of the STAR and E895 Collaborations, measured in Au-Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and alternating-gradient synchrotron (AGS) energies, respectively. In the energy range concerned, the excitation degree of emission source close to the central axis of cylinders increases obviously with the collision centrality and incident energy increasing, but it does not show any obvious change with the increase of the (pseudo) rapidity in central collisions. The excitation degree of emission source close to the side-surface of cylinders does not show any obvious change with the collision centrality, the (pseudo) rapidity, and the incident energy increasing.

  16. Single electrons from semi-leptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at PHENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Heavy quarks are clean probes to explore the nature of strongly coupled quark gluon plasma created in high energy heavy ion collisions. The strong suppression of single electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons was observed. To further understand the heavy quark suppressions, PHENIX installed the silicon vertex detector (VTX) which allows us to measure the bottom and charm productions separately from measurement of displaced tracks. For the first time, we observed the electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charms for 3 < pT < 4 GeV/c and are similarly strongly suppressed for higher pT in minimum bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. We present the results of separated bottom and charm productions using the 2011 dataset with the VTX.

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy of the identified charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 39 - 200 GeV at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovkina, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    A new form of nuclear matter, where quarks and gluons are deconfined and interact strongly with each other, is produced in heavy ion collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). Azimuthal anisotropies of particle distributions relative to the symmetry plane in high energy heavy ion collisions are used to characterize the collision dynamics. The results of measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameters vn (n=2,3) of identified charged hadrons (pions, kaons and protons) in Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV are presented and discussed. The energy dependence of the difference between the flow of the particles and their anti-particles are discussed as well.

  18. Azimuthal correlations of electrons from heavy-flavor decay with hadrons in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niita, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of electrons from the decay of open-heavy-flavor mesons have shown that the yields are suppressed in Au+Au collisions compared to expectations from binary-scaled p+p collisions. These measurements indicate that charm and bottom quarks interact with the hot dense matter produced in heavy-ion collisions much more than expected. Here we extend these studies to two-particle correlations where one particle is an electron from the decay of a heavy-flavor meson and the other is a charged hadron from either the decay of the heavy meson or from jet fragmentation. These measurements provide more detailed information about the interactions between heavy quarks and the matter, such as whether the modification of the away-side-jet shape seen in hadron-hadron correlations is present when the trigger particle is from heavy-meson decay and whether the overall level of away-side-jet suppression is consistent. We statistically subtract correlations of electrons arising from background sources from the inclusive electron-hadron correlations and obtain two-particle azimuthal correlations at sNN=200 GeV between electrons from heavy-flavor decay with charged hadrons in p+p and also first results in Au+Au collisions. We find the away-side-jet shape and yield to be modified in Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions.

  19. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickles, Anne M., E-mail: anne@bnl.gov

    2014-06-15

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v{sub 2} at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v{sub 2} in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  20. Effects of chloride and silver ions on gold nanorod formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ock Park, Jin; Cho, So-Hye; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Kong, Young-Min; Lee, Seung Yong

    2015-01-01

    The ability to tune the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanorods (AuNRs) via simple modification of their aspect ratio is a large contributing factor to their widespread use across multiple fields. An understanding of the synthesis conditions that affect the aspect ratio and yield of AuNRs is therefore of utmost importance. From this perspective, we take a systematic approach in investigating the effect of the following conditions on the seed-mediated formation of AuNRs: the addition of chloride or silver ions, and the use of a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) source with different levels of effectiveness on controlling the shape of growing AuNRs.

  1. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  2. Studies of Nucleon-Gold Collisions at 200 GeV per Nucleon Pair Using Tagged d+Au Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The spectra of charged hadrons produced near mid-rapidity in d+Au, p+Au and n+Au collisions at 200 GeV center of mass energy per nucleon pair are presented as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. These measurements were performed using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Nucleon-nucleus interactions were extracted from the d+Au data by identifying the deuteron spectators. The deuteron spectators were measured using two calorimeters; one that detected forward-going single neutrons and a newly installed calorimeter that detected forward-going single protons. The large suppression of high-pT hadron production in central Au+Au interactions relative to a naive superposition of p+pbar collisions has been interpreted as evidence of partonic energy loss in a dense medium. This interpretation is founded upon the absence of such suppression in the yield of d+Au collisions. It is shown that d+Au is indeed a valid reference system, as hadron production in d+Au agrees with a sim...

  3. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Aun (n = 1-5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au3, Au4 and Au5 planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au+δ(basal)/Au-δ(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  4. Midrapidity Λ and Λ¯¯ production in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN) = 130 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu I..; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A.C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q. [Wayne State U.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.

    2002-08-01

    We report the first measurement of strange (Λ) and antistrange (Λ¯¯¯) baryon production from √(sNN)=130 GeV Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at midrapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of Λ and Λ¯¯¯ hyperons is found to be approximately proportional to the number of negative hadrons. The production of Λ¯¯¯ hyperons relative to negative hadrons increases very rapidly with transverse momentum. The magnitude of the increase cannot be described by existing hadronic string fragmentation models alone.

  5. d Macro and (3)He macro production in square root of s(NN) = 130 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; de Toledo, A S; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-12-24

    The first measurements of light antinucleus production in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider are reported. The observed production rates for d macro and (3)He macro are much larger than in lower energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. A coalescence model analysis of the yields indicates that there is little or no increase in the antinucleon freeze-out volume compared to collisions at CERN SPS energy. These analyses also indicate that the (3)He macro freeze-out volume is smaller than the d macro freeze-out volume.

  6. Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au+Au collisions at the square root of SNN = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderónde la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vander Molen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-05-02

    The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au+Au collisions at the square root of SNN = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization.

  7. Midrapidity Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at the square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-08-26

    We report the first measurement of strange (Lambda) and antistrange (Lambda macro) baryon production from square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at midrapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of Lambda and Lambda; hyperons is found to be approximately proportional to the number of negative hadrons. The production of Lambda; hyperons relative to negative hadrons increases very rapidly with transverse momentum. The magnitude of the increase cannot be described by existing hadronic string fragmentation models alone.

  8. Centrality dependence of high-p(T) hadron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-11-11

    Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons within 0.2Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV. Hadron yields are suppressed at high p(T) in central collisions relative to peripheral collisions and to a nucleon-nucleon reference scaled for collision geometry. Peripheral collisions are not suppressed relative to the nucleon-nucleon reference. The suppression varies continuously at intermediate centralities. The results indicate significant nuclear medium effects on high-p(T) hadron production in heavy-ion collisions at high energy.

  9. Ferromagnetism of polythiophene-capped Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.; Zhang, H.; Saito, K.; Garitaonandia, J. S.; Goikolea, E.; Insausti, M.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic and electrical transport properties of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) doped with iodine have been investigated to clarify the effectiveness of conductive polymer capping on the induction of ferromagnetism in Au. The room-temperature magnetization curve of the undoped polythiophene-capped Au NPs exhibits a clear hysteresis behavior with a coercive force of 160 Oe. The spontaneous magnetization normalized by the mass of Au is 2.0 × 10-2 emu/g. The spontaneous magnetization was found virtually unaffected by iodine doping, whereas the electrical conductivity is enhanced dramatically to ˜10 S/cm. Our results show that polythiophene capping could lead to spontaneous magnetic polarization in Au NPs, and the conductivity of the polymer capping does not affect the ferromagnetism of the Au nanoparticles, opening a possibility for further investigation into the magnetotransport behavior of ferromagnetic Au NPs.

  10. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  11. Energy dependence of K π , p π , and K p fluctuations in Au + Au collisions from √{sN N}=7.7 to 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; S'anchez, M. Calder'on de la Barca; campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical K π , p π , and K p fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0-5% Au + Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √{sN N}=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude of the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the K π , p π , and K p pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0-5% Au + Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.

  12. Mecanismes de deformation de nanoparticules d'Au par irradiation ionique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkati Kerbouah, Chahineze

    2011-12-01

    In the present thesis, we study the anisotropic deformation of gold nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silica or crystalline aluminum arsenide, under ion bombardment. We try to comprehend the mechanism responsible for this deformation and to remove any ambiguity related to the explanation of this phenomenon. A hybrid process combining sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition was used to fabricate Au/SiO2 layers on fused silica substrates. Structures with single and multilayer were obtained. Heating during or after deposition activates the Au atom agglomeration and favours the growth of the nanoparticles. Also, a Au/AlAs nanocomposite was obtained by ion implantation of AlAs films, followed by rapid thermal annealing. The samples of the two nanocomposites, cooled with liquid nitrogen, were irradiated with 2 to 40 MeV Cu, Si, Au or In ion beams, at fluences ranging from 1x10 13 to 4x1015 ions/cm2, using a Tandem or Tandetron accelerator. The structural and morphological properties of the Au/SiO2 nanocomposite were extracted by optical means; the frequency and the width of surface plasmon resonance band depend on the nanoparticle shape and size, their concentration, the inter-particle distance and the dielectric properties of material in which the particles are embedded. The aluminum arsenide crystallinity was studied by two techniques: Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channelling configuration (RBS/ channelling). The Au concentration in the nanocomposite layers was deducted from RBS results. The size distribution and metallic nanoparticles shape transformation in both nanocomposites were observed by electronic transmission microscopy. The results obtained within the framework of this work are the subject of three journal papers. The first publication shows the possibility of manipulating the width and spectral position of the gold nanoparticle absorption band in Au/SiO2 nanocomposites by modifying their structure

  13. Introduction au filtre de Kalman

    OpenAIRE

    Alazard, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Ce document est une introduction au filtre optimal de Kalman appliquée aux systèmes linéaires. On suppose connues la théorie des asservissements linéaires et du filtrage fréquentiel (continu et discret) ainsi que les notions d'états pour représenter les systèmes dynamiques linéaires.

  14. L’apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    En 1961, sur la base du constat que l’évolution du marché du travail nécessitait un besoin croissant de personnel qualifié, le 1er accord entre la République et canton de Genève et le CERN fut signé. Cet accord avait notamment pour objet la formation professionnelle de jeunes électroniciens et techniciens de laboratoires en physique. Le CERN, acteur local économique d’importance, soulignait par cet accord sa volonté de participer au développement économique et social local. Le 1er apprenti arriva au CERN en 1965. En 1971, le centre d’apprentissage fut créé ; il accueille aujourd’hui plus d’une vingtaine d’apprentis au total, à raison d’environ six nouveaux apprentis chaque année. Cet apprentissage est dédié aux jeunes âgés e...

  15. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  16. High Pt Suppression at Forward Rapidities in d+Au and Au+Au at $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ristea, C; Bearden, I G; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, R; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S; Ristea, Catalin

    2005-01-01

    We present centrality dependent charged hadron yields at several pseudorapidities from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=200GeV measured with BRAHMS spectrometers. Nuclear modification factors RAA and RCP for charged hadrons at forward angles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC will be discussed.

  17. Rhodamine B immobilized on hollow Au-HMS material for naked-eye detection of Hg2+ in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Gang; Cheng, Zhuhong; Zuo, Xiujin

    2012-08-30

    A simple, effective method has been demonstrated to immobilize Rhodamine B (RhB) probes on mesoporous silica (Au-HMS). The prepared chemosensor (Au-HMS-Probe) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrum and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Further application of Au-HMS-Probe in sensing Hg(2+) was confirmed by fluorescence titration experiment. Au-HMS-Probe afforded "turn-on" fluorescence enhancement and displayed high brightness in water, and it also showed excellent selectivity for Hg(2+) over alkali (Na(+), K(+)), alkaline earth (Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) and other heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+)). Importantly, Au-HMS-Probe could be regenerated by treatment with tetrapropylammonium hydroxide solution.

  18. Low temperature fabrication and doping concentration analysis of Au/Sb ohmic contacts to n-type Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. Q.; Wang, C.; Zhu, T.; Wu, W. J. [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Fan, J.; Tu, L. C., E-mail: tlc@hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Geophysics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-11-15

    This paper investigates low temperature ohmic contact formation of Au/Sb to n-type Si substrates through AuSb/NiCr/Au metal stacks. Liquid epitaxy growth is utilized to incorporate Sb dopants into Si substrate in AuSi melt. The best specific contact resistivity achieved is 0.003 Ω ⋅ cm{sup 2} at 425 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals inverted pyramidal crater regions at the metal/semiconductor interface, indicating that AuSi alloying efficiently occurs at such sites. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) shows that Sb atoms are successfully incorporated into Si as doping impurities during the anneal process, and the Sb doping concentration at the contact interface is found to be higher than the solid solubility limit in a Si crystal. This ohmic contacts formation method is suitable for semiconductor fabrication processes with limited thermal budget, such as post CMOS integration of MEMS.

  19. Influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the emission of molecular secondary ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Kollmer, F.; Moellers, R.; Niehuis, E

    2004-06-15

    In order to further our understanding of the secondary ion emission behavior from organic surfaces, we have performed a systematic study on the influence of the primary ion parameters. As model sample Irganox 1010 on low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used. Both monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au) and polyatomic (Au{sub 2}, Au{sub 3}, SF{sub 5}, C{sub 60}) primary ions were used. Additionally, the primary ion energy was varied. The data were evaluated by calculating secondary ion yields, disappearance cross sections and ion formation efficiencies (yield/damage cross section). The results show that heavier monoatomic ions are more efficient than lighter ones and that polyatomic primary ions are more efficient than monoatomic ones. Highest efficiency values are found for C{sub 60} bombardment at 20 keV. Compared to Ga bombardment the efficiency gain in this case is more than 2000-fold. Additionally it can be shown that the higher efficiency is correlated with a softer ionization, i.e. less fragmentation. The results suggest a much more homogeneous energy distribution in the sample surface by polyatomic primary ions compared to monoatomic ones.

  20. Influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the emission of molecular secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Kollmer, F.; Möllers, R.; Niehuis, E.

    2004-06-01

    In order to further our understanding of the secondary ion emission behavior from organic surfaces, we have performed a systematic study on the influence of the primary ion parameters. As model sample Irganox 1010 on low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used. Both monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au) and polyatomic (Au 2, Au 3, SF 5, C 60) primary ions were used. Additionally, the primary ion energy was varied. The data were evaluated by calculating secondary ion yields, disappearance cross sections and ion formation efficiencies (yield/damage cross section). The results show that heavier monoatomic ions are more efficient than lighter ones and that polyatomic primary ions are more efficient than monoatomic ones. Highest efficiency values are found for C 60 bombardment at 20 keV. Compared to Ga bombardment the efficiency gain in this case is more than 2000-fold. Additionally it can be shown that the higher efficiency is correlated with a softer ionization, i.e. less fragmentation. The results suggest a much more homogeneous energy distribution in the sample surface by polyatomic primary ions compared to monoatomic ones.

  1. Structure and stress in Cu/Au and Fe/Au systems: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zientarski, Tomasz, E-mail: martom@dyzio.umcs.lublin.pl [Department for the Modelling of Physico-Chemical Processes, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, ul. Gliniana 33, 20-614 Lublin (Poland); Chocyk, Dariusz [Department of Applied Physics, Lublin University of Technology, ul. Nadbystrzycka 38, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Growth of Fe and Cu thin films on Au substrate and stress evolution were modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions in the system are described by embedded atom method. The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure obtained from simulations. The gold layers undergo reconstruction before deposition. The deposited copper atoms do not disturb the atoms in the reconstructed gold layer, but the deposited iron atoms cause the disappearance of the reconstructed gold surfaces. In both systems Cu/Au and Fe/Au, in the early stage of growth one observes compressive stress. Next, Cu/Au systems have the compressive stress, while in the case of Fe/Au the tensile stress is observed. In the Fe/Au system, the body-centered cubic lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer. In the Fe/Au system we observed a larger diffusion of Au atoms than in Cu/Au systems. - Highlights: • The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure. • The correlation between the stress and the deformation is observed. • The relaxation of the stress depends on the orientation of layers. • The lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer in the Fe/Au system. • The Cu layer continues the lattice of Au in the Cu/Au system.

  2. Net-proton probability distribution in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Braun-Munzinger, P; Karsch, F; Redlich, K; Skokov, V

    2011-01-01

    We compute net-proton probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The model results are compared with data taken by the STAR Collaboration in Au-Au collisions at sqrt(s_{NN})= 200 GeV for different centralities. We show that in peripheral Au-Au collisions the measured distributions, and the resulting first four moments of net-proton fluctuations, are consistent with results obtained from the hadron resonance gas model. However, data taken in central Au-Au collisions differ from the predictions of the model. The observed deviations can not be attributed to uncertainties in model parameters. We discuss possible interpretations of the observed deviations.

  3. Fluorescent detection of lead in environmental water and urine samples using enzyme mimics of catechin-synthesized Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Shiuan; Huang, Fan-Feng; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2013-02-01

    A facile, cost-effective, and sensitive fluorescent method for Pb²⁺ ion detection had been developed using catechin synthesized gold nanoparticles (C-Au NPs). The Pb-catechin complexes and Pb-Au alloys that formed on the C-Au NPs surfaces allowed NPs to exhibit peroxidase-mimicking catalytic activity in the H₂O₂-mediated oxidation of Amplex UltraRed (AUR). In 5 mM Tris-acetate buffers at pH 7.0, the H₂O₂-AUR-C-Au NP probe was highly selective (>100-fold) for Pb²⁺ ions in the presence of other tested metal ions (K⁺, Ag⁺, Na⁺, Cd²⁺, Ni²⁺, Ca²⁺, Hg²⁺, Sr²⁺, Co²⁺, Cu²⁺, Ba²⁺, Fe²⁺, Mg²⁺, Cr³⁺, and Fe³⁺ ions). The fluorescence intensity (excitation/emission maxima ∼540/588 nm) of the AUR product was proportional to the concentration of Pb²⁺ ions in the range of 10 nM-1.0 μM with a linear correlation (R² = 0.99). The H₂O₂-AUR-C-Au NP probe detected Pb²⁺ ions with a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio: 3) of 1.5 nM. The practicality of the H₂O₂-AUR-C-Au NP probe was validated for the determination of Pb²⁺ ion concentration in environmental water and urine samples, demonstrating its advantages of simplicity, selectivity, and sensitivity.

  4. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Aboukaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP and impregnation (Imp. The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl- ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids.

  5. Gold Ion-Angiotensin Peptide Interaction by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P.; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2012-05-01

    Stimulated by the interest in developing gold compounds for treating cancer, gold ion-angiotensin peptide interactions are investigated by mass spectrometry. Under the experimental conditions used, the majority of gold ion-angiotensin peptide complexes contain gold in the oxidation states I and III. Both ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF MS detect singly/multiply charged ions for mononuclear/multinuclear gold-attached peptides, which are represented as [peptide + a Au(I) + b Au(III) + (e - a -3b) H]e+, where a,b ≥ 0 and e is charge. ESI-MS data shows singly/multiply charged ions of Au(I)-peptide and Au(III)-peptide complexes. This study reveals that MALDI-TOF MS mainly detects singly charged Au(I)-peptide complexes, presumably due to the ionization process. The electrons in the MALDI plume seem to efficiently reduce Au(III) to Au(I). MALDI also tends to enhance the higher polymeric forms of gold-peptide complexes regardless of the laser power used. Collision-induced dissociation experiments of the mononuclear and dinuclear gold-attached peptide ions for angiotensin peptides show that the gold ion (a soft acid) binding sites are in the vicinity of Cys (a soft ligand), His (a major anchor of peptide for metal ion chelation), and the basic residue Arg. Data also suggests that the abundance of gold-attached peptides increases with higher gold concentration until saturation, after which an increase in gold ion concentration leads to the aggregation and/or precipitation of gold-bound peptides.

  6. Extraction of Emission Source Images in d+Au and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, produce a fireball of nuclear matter with extremely high energy density. The dynamical evolution of this fireball is driven by such fundamental properties as the nuclear Equation of State (EOS) and possibly by a phase transition, e.g., to a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Two-particle correlation studies, for various particle species,provide an important probe of the space-time extent of this fireball. In recent measurements the PHENIX collaboration has used a model-independent imaging technique proposed by Brown and Danielewicz(D.Brown and P.Danieliwicz, Phys.Rev.C 64, 014902 (2001))to extract two-particle source functions directly from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Source images obtained from these two systems for various particle species for several centality and kt selections will be presented and compared/contrasted. The implications of these results for the decay dynamics of the fireball created at RHIC will also be dicussed.

  7. Evaluation of secondary ion yield enhancement from polymer material by using TOF-SIMS equipped with a gold cluster ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimoto, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)]. E-mail: dm053502@cc.seikei.ac.jp; Aoyagi, S. [Department of Regional Development, Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu-cho, Matsue-shi, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Kato, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Iida, N. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Yamamoto, A. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Kudo, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)

    2006-07-30

    We investigated the enhancement of the secondary ion intensity in the TOF-SIMS spectra obtained by Au{sup +} and Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment in comparison with Ga{sup +} excitation using polymer samples with different molecular weight distributions. Since the polymer samples used in this experiment have a wide molecular weight distribution, the advantages of the gold cluster primary ion source over monoatomic ion could accurately be evaluated. It was observed that the degree of fragmentation decreased by the usage of cluster primary ion beam compared with monoatomic ion beam, which was observed as a shift of the intensity distribution in the spectra. It was also found out that the mass effect of Au{sup +} and Ga{sup +} as monoatomic primary ion, resulted in about 10-60 times of enhancement for both samples with different molecular distributions. On the other hand, the Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment caused intensity enhancement about 100-2600 compared with Ga{sup +} bombardment, depending on the mass range of the detected secondary ion species. The cluster primary ion effect of Au{sub 3} {sup +}, compared with Au{sup +}, therefore, was estimated to be about 10-45.

  8. Fabrication of metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography(NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching(RIE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We report herein a rational approach for fabricating metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography(NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching(RIE).The approach comprises three principal steps:(1) mold fabrication,(2) structure replication by NIL,and(3) suspending nanostructures creation by isotropic RIE.Using this approach,suspending nanostructures with Au,Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers,and Au/Ti/Au sandwiched structures are demonstrated.For Au nanostructures,straight suspending nanostructures can be obtained when the thickness of Au film is up to 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger patterns.When the thickness of Au is below 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger,the Au suspending nanostructures bend upward as a result of the mismatch of thermal expansion between the thin Au films and Si substrate.This leads to residual stresses in the thin Au films.For Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers nanostructures,the cantilevers bend toward Au film,since Au has a larger thermal expansion coefficient than that of Ti.While in the case of sandwich structures,straight suspending nanostructures are obtained,this may be due to the balance of residual stress between the thin films.

  9. Biosynthesis and stabilization of Au and Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles by fungus, Fusarium semitectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Dasaratrao Sawle, Basavaraja Salimath, Raghunandan Deshpande, Mahesh Dhondojirao Bedre, Belawadi Krishnamurthy Prabhakar and Abbaraju Venkataraman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallized and spherical-shaped Au and Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles have been synthesized and stabilized using a fungus, F . semitectum in an aqueous system. Aqueous solutions of chloroaurate ions for Au and chloroaurate and Ag+ ions (1 : 1 ratio for Au–Ag alloy were treated with an extracellular filtrate of F . semitectum biomass for the formation of Au nanoparticles (AuNP and Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au–AgNP. Analysis of the feasibility of the biosynthesized nanoparticles and core–shell alloy nanoparticles from fungal strains is particularly significant. The resultant colloidal suspensions are highly stable for many weeks. The obtained Au and Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles were characterized by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR peaks using a UV-vis spectrophotometer, and the structure, morphology and size were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, x-ray diffraction (XRD, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Possible optoelectronics and medical applications of these nanoparticles are envisaged.

  10. ASAXS study on the formation of core-shell Ag/Au nanoparticles in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haug, J; Kruth, H; Dubiel, M [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Hofmeister, H [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Haas, S; Tatchev, D; Hoell, A, E-mail: joerg.haug@physik.uni-halle.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Institute of Applied Materials, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-16

    Nanosized metal particles of various configurations embedded in surface regions of glass have great potential as nonlinear optical materials for photonic devices. We have prepared Ag/Au nanoparticles in core-shell configuration in soda-lime silicate glass by double-ion implantation and investigated their structural characteristics by anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements at x-ray energies slightly below the Au L{sub 3} edge indicate the formation of bimetallic Ag/Au shells in some of the nanoparticles for high-dose ion implantation. An element-specific analysis of the ASAXS results allowed us not only to validate and quantify the core-shell structure, but simultaneously also the composition of the shells. Hollow nanoparticles were found for an Au-Ag implantation sequence, whereas an Ag-Au sequence generates a diluted core composition. The shift of the maximum position of optical absorption of the samples due to surface plasmon resonance of bimetallic nanoparticles, as monitored by optical spectroscopy, revealed the considerable influence of the respective particle configuration.

  11. Filipino au pairs on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial interdep...... by including the migrants’ broader social network within the frame of research.......Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial...... interdependence, whilst they continuously form their trajectories in relation to opportunities and restraints posed along the way by their local and transnational social relations. The article argues that examinations of migration trajectories benefit from broadening the research out in both time and space...

  12. Low-temperature growth of Au on H-terminated Si(111): instability of hydrogen at the Au/Si interface revealed by non-destructive ultra-shallow H-depth profiling

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, M

    2003-01-01

    The initial stage of Au/Si(111)-interface formation has been investigated by hydrogen-specific ultra-shallow depth profiling using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N, alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C reaction in grazing incidence, which achieves submonolayer depth resolution. Gold was deposited on the H-terminated Si(111)(1 x 1) substrate at 110K to suppress Au-silicide formation known to occur at room temperature. The experimental NRA spectrum clearly rules out the prevalence of H at the Au/Si (111) interface, even though the reactive Au-Si segregation is inhibited at the low deposition temperature. Nevertheless only approx 30% of the initial H termination layer is desorbed upon deposition of 4.1 A Au. The shading of the remaining H from the incident sup 1 sup 5 N ions by the Au film is analyzed with aid of NRA spectrum simulations, which allows estimating the average of the Au particle size distribution and for exclusion of layer-by-layer growth of Au independent from morphological inf...

  13. L’olivier au Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    El Mouhtadi Issam; Agouzzal Mohamed; Guy François

    2014-01-01

    L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive) mais pour conq...

  14. J/ψ suppression at forward rapidity in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2011-11-01

    Heavy quarkonia are observed to be suppressed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions relative to their production in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. In order to determine if this suppression is related to color screening of these states in the produced medium, one needs to account for other nuclear modifications including those in cold nuclear matter. In this paper, we present new measurements from the PHENIX 2007 data set of J/ψ yields at forward rapidity (1.2<|y|<2.2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The data confirm the earlier finding that the suppression of J/ψ at forward rapidity is stronger than at midrapidity, while also extending the measurement to finer bins in collision centrality and higher transverse momentum (pT). We compare the experimental data to the most recent theoretical calculations that incorporate a variety of physics mechanisms including gluon saturation, gluon shadowing, initial-state parton energy loss, cold nuclear matter breakup, color screening, and charm recombination. We find J/ψ suppression beyond cold-nuclear-matter effects. However, the current level of disagreement between models and d+Au data precludes using these models to quantify the hot-nuclear-matter suppression.

  15. 3D Interdigital Au/MnO2 /Au Stacked Hybrid Electrodes for On-Chip Microsupercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Pei, Zhibin; Fan, Hongjin; Ye, Changhui

    2016-06-01

    On-chip microsupercapacitors (MSCs) have application in powering microelectronic devices. Most of previous MSCs are made from carbon materials, which have high power but low energy density. In this work, 3D interdigital Au/MnO2 /Au stacked MSCs have been fabricated based on laser printed flexible templates. This vertical-stacked electrode configuration can effectively increase the contact area between MnO2 active layer and Au conductive layer, and thus improve the electron transport and electrolyte ion diffusion, resulting in enhanced pseudocapacitive performance of MnO2 . The stacked electrode can achieve an areal capacitance up to 11.9 mF cm(-2) . Flexible and all-solid-state MSCs are assembled based on the sandwich hybrid electrodes and PVA/LiClO4 gel electrolyte and show outstanding high-rate capacity and mechanical flexibility. The laser printing technique in this work combined with the physical sputtering and electrodeposition allows fabrication of MSC array with random sizes and patterns, making them promising power sources for small-scale flexible microelectronic energy storage systems (e.g., next-generation smart phones).

  16. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  17. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is located between the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe, and includes the Au'au Channel as well as parts of the Kealaikahiki, Alalakeiki...

  18. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  19. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  20. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Montipora Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Montipora in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  1. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  2. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for all mesophotic corals in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to...

  3. Synthesis and adsorption properties for Au(Ⅲ) of alkoxycarbonyl thiourea resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuai; ZHONG Hong; LIU Guang-yi; ZHANG Qian; LI Ting

    2008-01-01

    A novel alkoxycarbonyl thiourea resin(ATR) was synthesized by monomer polymerization of oxydiethane-2,1-diyl dicarbonisothiocyanatidate and polyethylene polyamine, and characterized by FT-IR. The adsorption properties of ATR were investigated by batch test. The adsorption capacities for Au(Ⅲ), Ag(Ⅰ), Cu(Ⅱ), Zn(Ⅱ), Fe(Ⅲ), Ca(Ⅱ) and Mg(Ⅱ) are 4.65, 4.40,0.40, 0.90, 0.86, 0.0080 and 0.016 mmol/g, respectively, when the adsorption condition is as follows: contact time 24 h, temperature 30 ℃, initial concentration of Au(Ⅲ) 5.08 mmol/L and that of other metals 0.10 mol/L, and concentration of acid 1.0 mol/L. The adsorption capacity for Au(Ⅲ) increases with the increase of contact time, temperature and initial concentration of Au(Ⅲ). The capacity after five adsorption-desorption cycles remains 90% that of the first time, and the separation factors of ATR for binary metal ion solutions are larger than 995, indicating that ATR is of good regeneration property and selectivity. XPS results show that the functional atoms of ATR supply electrons for Au and coordinate with Au during the adsorption.

  4. Effect of SDS concentration on colloidal suspensions of Ag and Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Ridhima; Sharma, Rajeshwar; Maiti, Nandita; Ballal, Anand; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2015-11-05

    We present a kinetic study of the effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration on reduction and aggregation of Ag(+) and Au(3+) ions in aqueous solutions. There are distinct differences between the surface plasmon absorption bands of Ag nanoparticles at different concentrations of SDS. The results reveal the existence of two competing SDS-induced processes: stabilization of the Ag nanoparticles due to adsorption and aggregation of the Ag nanoparticles due to increase in ionic strength. However, SDS induced aggregation of Au nanoparticles is negligible because of less surface passivity as evident from eaq(-) reaction with AuCl4(-). Nevertheless, the average size of the Ag and Au nanoparticles remains almost similar at all SDS concentrations. UV-Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the nanoparticles. Moreover, it is shown that these SDS-capped Ag, Au and Au/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles could function as catalysts for the reduction of o-nitro aniline in the presence of NaBH4.

  5. Kinematic Correlation of the Ternary Fission for the System 197Au + 197Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junlong; Li, Xian; Yan, Shiwei; Wu, Xizhen; Li, Zhuxia

    Collisions of very heavy nuclei 197Au + 197Au at the energy of 15A MeV has been studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The experimental mass distributions of ternary fission fragments for the system 197Au + 197 Au are reproduced well. The direct and sequential ternary fission modes are studied by the time dependent snapshots of typical ternary events. The analysis of deviation from Viola systematics indicates the nonstatistical feature of the ternary fission in these reactions.

  6. Synthesis of hollow Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles in polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Guangyu; Zhang, Bodong; Su, Zhaohui

    2013-06-04

    Ag nanoparticles of ~20 nm size and rather uniform size distribution were synthesized in polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) via an ion-exchange/reduction process in two stages (seeding and growth), which were used as sacrificial templates to fabricate Ag-Au bimetallic hollow nanoparticles via galvanic replacement reaction. The reaction process was monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which confirmed the formation of hollow Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles. UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy and TEM results indicated that both size and optical properties of the Ag nanoparticles in the PEM can be controlled by manipulating ion content in the PEM and the number of the ion-exchange/reduction cycle, whereas that of Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles were dependent on size of the Ag templates and the replacement reaction kinetics. The hollow Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles exhibited a significant red shift in the surface plasmon resonance to the near-infrared region. The strategy enables facile preparation of hollow bimetallic nanoparticles in situ in polymer matrixes.

  7. Measurement of $\\Upsilon$(1S+2S+3S) production in $p$$+$$p$ and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy ion and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three $\\Upsilon$ states, $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)$, was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au$+$Au and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. The $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) \\rightarrow e^+e^-$ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be $B_{\\rm ee} d\\sigma/dy =$ 108 $\\pm$ 38 (stat) $\\pm$ 15 (syst) $\\pm$ 11 (luminosity) pb in $p$$+$$p$ collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au$+$Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total $\\Upsilon$ state yield relative to the extrapolation from $p$$+$$p$ collision data. The suppression is consistent with measurements made by STAR at RHIC and at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Cu(2+)-assisted synthesis of hexoctahedral Au-Pd alloy nanocrystals with high-index facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jiawei; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Shuifen; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2011-11-02

    Controlled syntheses of multicomponent metal nanocrystals (NCs) and high-index surfaces have attracted increasing attention due to the specific physical and chemical properties of such NCs. Taking advantage of copper underpotential deposition as a bridge, hexoctahedral Au-Pd alloy NCs with {hkl} facets exposed were successfully synthesized, while phase separation occurred in the absence of Cu(2+) ions. The as-prepared hexoctahedral Au-Pd alloy NCs exhibited very excellent performance in terms of both formic acid electro-oxidation and methanol tolerance due to synergism between the high-index facets and the alloy.

  9. Average Distribution of Ionic Charges and Ionizability for the Au Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天丽; 蒋刚; 朱正和

    2002-01-01

    Using relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock theory, we calculate the transition data of 3dj - n fj, (n =5, 6, 7) for the M-shell from an Ni-like Au ion to an As-like Auion using the GRASP programme with the core-polarization, quantum electrodynamical effect and Breit correction. Based on the present calculation results andthe experiment of the Xingguang-Ⅱ laser facilities, the average distribution of ionic charge and the ionizabilityhave been derived. The average ionization degree of Au plasma Z* is 49.06 ± 0.5, which is comparable with theresult of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. A simple approach to obtain hybrid Au-loaded polymeric nanoparticles with a tunable metal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Michel, Edurne; Larrea, Ane; Lahuerta, Celia; Sebastian, Víctor; Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Arruebo, Manuel; Blanco-Prieto, María J.; Santamaría, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new strategy to nanoengineer multi-functional polymer-metal hybrid nanostructures is reported. By using this protocol the hurdles of most of the current developments concerning covalent and non-covalent attachment of polymers to preformed inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are overcome. The strategy is based on the in situ reduction of metal precursors using the polymeric nanoparticle as a nanoreactor. Gold nanoparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, are located in the core and shell, respectively. This novel technique enables the production of PLGA NPs smaller than 200 nm that bear either a single encapsulated Au NP or several smaller NPs with tunable sizes and a 100% loading efficiency. In situ reduction of Au ions inside the polymeric NPs was achieved on demand by using heat to activate the reductive effect of citrate ions. In addition, we show that the loading of the resulting Au NPs inside the PLGA NPs is highly dependent on the surfactant used. Electron microscopy, laser irradiation, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy characterization techniques confirm the location of Au nanoparticles. These promising results indicate that these hybrid nanomaterials could be used in theranostic applications or as contrast agents in dark-field imaging and computed tomography.A new strategy to nanoengineer multi-functional polymer-metal hybrid nanostructures is reported. By using this protocol the hurdles of most of the current developments concerning covalent and non-covalent attachment of polymers to preformed inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are overcome. The strategy is based on the in situ reduction of metal precursors using the polymeric nanoparticle as a nanoreactor. Gold nanoparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid), PLGA, are located in the core and shell, respectively. This novel technique enables the production of PLGA NPs smaller than 200 nm that bear either a single encapsulated Au NP or several smaller NPs with tunable sizes and a 100% loading

  11. Ion emission in solids bombarded with Au{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1 - 9) clusters accelerated within the 0.15 - 1.25 MeV energy range; Emission ionique des solides a l'impact d'agregats Au{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-9) acceleres entre 0,15 et 1,25 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehbe, Nimer [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    This experimental work is devoted to the study of the ion emission in solids at the impact of gold clusters of energies within 0.15 to 1.25 MeV range. The physics of ion-solid collisions and the theoretical models of sputtering of solids under ion bombardment are presented in the first chapter. The chapter no. 2 deals with the description of the experimental setup. The study of a gold target allowed to evidence the role of the size and energy of the clusters in determining the emission intensity and the mass distribution of the ions. The 4. chapter gives results from the study of cesium iodide in which the intense emission of CsI clusters could be investigated quantitatively due to multiplicity measurements. Finally, the chapter no. 5 was devoted to the study of a biologic molecule, the phenylalanine, and of a pesticide molecule, chlorosulfuron. This work evidenced the importance of clusters for surface analyses by mass spectrometry.

  12. A hydrodynamical model including phase transition and the transverse momentum spectra of identified charged particles produced in Au-Au collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhi-Jin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    It is widely believed that the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) might be formed in heavy ion collisions. It is also widely recognized that the relativistic hydrodynamics is one of the best tools for describing the process of expansion and particlization of QGP. In this paper, one dimensional hydrodynamic model involving the phase transition from QGP state to hadronic state is used to analyze the transverse momentum spectra of identified charged particles produced in heavy ion collisions. The analytical solutions are presented. A comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data. The theoretical model works well in Au-Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 and 130 GeV at RHIC.

  13. Gold ion beams induced desorption studies for Booster Nuclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. B.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy ions induced pressure rise is one of the machine limits. The calculation results of the gold ion beam 197Au31+ losses due to residual gas interaction in view of desorption of adsorbed particles on the Booster Nuclotron vacuum chamber surface are discussed.

  14. Elastic scattering of the halo nucleus 6 He from 197 Au at Elab=27 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Kakuee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available   A radioactive ion beam of 6He produced via the 7Li(p,2p6He reaction with typical intensity of 3 × 106 ions/see was elastically scattered from LiF(Au targets. Elastic scattering of 6He at Elab=27 MeV with 197Au have been measured in the angular range of 6º-72º in the laboratory system employing LEDA and LAMP detection system. Optical Model calculations have been used to fit the data .

  15. Elastic scattering of the halo nucleus 6 He from 197 Au at Elab=27 MeV

    OpenAIRE

    Kakuee, O. R.; Rahighi, J.; Afarideh, H.; Cherubini, S.; Davinson, T.; Galster, W.; Laird, A M; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; P. Oliaiy; Shotter, A.C.; F. Shokouhi; Smith, W.B.

    2003-01-01

      A radioactive ion beam of 6He produced via the 7Li(p,2p)6He reaction with typical intensity of 3 × 106 ions/see was elastically scattered from LiF(Au) targets. Elastic scattering of 6He at Elab=27 MeV with 197Au have been measured in the angular range of 6º-72º in the laboratory system employing LEDA and LAMP detection system. Optical Model calculations have been used to fit the data .

  16. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    plasma were identified using a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer. In these experimento it is a simple matter to establish H+(H 2 0):f as the...pressure as predicted by the Thomson t2rnary mechanism whicK hzr been suownr to be valid experimentally at hiTh rrsurs (,han and Peron, 1:EI4 hereafter t...of NO , NO2 ions in various gases and the ternary recombination coefficients of these ions in the higher pres:;ure ( Thomson ) re"ie. Equation (5) cr>n

  17. Cluster primary ion bombardment of organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollmer, F

    2004-06-15

    In order to evaluate their potential for molecular surface analysis, we applied monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au, Bi) as well as polyatomic (SF{sub 5}, Au{sub n}, Bi{sub n}, C{sub 60}) primary ions to a series of organic samples. For the model system Irganox 1010 on LDPE we determined the secondary ion yield, the disappearance cross section and the resulting ion formation efficiency as a function of the primary ion energy. As a general result the efficiency is improved with the mass of the monoatomic primary ion. A further increase is obtained by the use of polyatomic primary ions. According to this, highest efficiencies are obtained for C{sub 60}, the lowest for Ga. Additionally, molecular imaging was performed on real world samples (electronic components, pharmaceuticals): for this a cluster LMIS operated with Ga, AuGe or Bi was applied. The results reveal the potential of cluster SIMS to overcome existing limitations and to establish TOF-SIMS for new applications in the fields of polymers, biology and medicine.

  18. Cluster primary ion bombardment of organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmer, F.

    2004-06-01

    In order to evaluate their potential for molecular surface analysis, we applied monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au, Bi) as well as polyatomic (SF 5, Au n, Bi n, C 60) primary ions to a series of organic samples. For the model system Irganox 1010 on LDPE we determined the secondary ion yield, the disappearance cross section and the resulting ion formation efficiency as a function of the primary ion energy. As a general result the efficiency is improved with the mass of the monoatomic primary ion. A further increase is obtained by the use of polyatomic primary ions. According to this, highest efficiencies are obtained for C 60, the lowest for Ga. Additionally, molecular imaging was performed on real world samples (electronic components, pharmaceuticals): for this a cluster LMIS operated with Ga, AuGe or Bi was applied. The results reveal the potential of cluster SIMS to overcome existing limitations and to establish TOF-SIMS for new applications in the fields of polymers, biology and medicine.

  19. Au(3+)/Au⁰ Supported on Chromium(III) Terephthalate Metal Organic Framework (MIL-101) as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalystfor Three-Component Coupling Synthesis of Propargylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Tai, Xishi; Zhou, Xiaojing

    2017-01-25

    Post-synthesis modification is a useful method for the functionalization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). A novel catalyst Au@MIL-101-ED-SA (ED = ethylenediamine, SA = salicylaldehyde), containing coexisting Au(3+) ions and Au⁰ nanoparticles, was prepared successfully by post-synthesis modification with ethylenediamine, salicylaldehyde and gold. Gold nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 (Au@MIL-101) were prepared successfully by the impregnation method. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were characterized by N₂ adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were applied as environmentally friendly catalysts in the three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes for the preparation of diverse propargylamines. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA contained a fraction of cationic gold (Au(3+)/Au⁰ = 0.9) and showed higher catalytic activity than Au@MIL-101, which was prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, the reactions were performed under heterogeneous conditions and the novel catalyst was successfully recycled for four consecutive runs.

  20. Using polyatomic primary ions to probe an amino acid and a nucleic base in water ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlan, X.A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: x.conlan@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Biddulph, G.X. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: G.Biddulph@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Lockyer, N.P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, J.C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Vickerman@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-07-30

    In this study on pure water ice, we show that protonated water species [H{sub 2}O] {sub n}H{sup +} are more prevalent than (H{sub 2}O) {sub n} {sup +} ions after bombardment by Au{sup +} monoatomic and Au{sub 3} {sup +} and C{sub 60} {sup +} polyatomic projectiles. This data also reveals significant differences in water cluster yields under bombardment by these three projectiles. The amino acid alanine and the nucleic base adenine in solution have been studied and have been shown to have an effect on the water cluster ion yields observed using an Au{sub 3} {sup +} ion beam.

  1. Damage creation in silicon single crystals irradiated with 200 keV/atom Au{sub n}{sup +} clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canut, B. E-mail: bruno.canut@dpmsun1.univ-lyon1.fr; Fallavier, M.; Marty, O.; Ramos, S.M.M

    2000-04-01

    Silicon wafers of (1 0 0) orientation were irradiated with Au{sub n} cluster beams (1{<=}n{<=}7) produced by the 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon equipped with a liquid metal source. The incident energy was of 200 keV per gold atom, which corresponds to a slowing-down mainly governed by elastic processes (nuclear energy loss of Au{sup +} ions: 3 keV nm{sup -1}). All the irradiations were performed at room temperature with fluences up to 5x10{sup 14} Au (at. cm{sup -2}). The typical beam currents varied from 1.5 nA for Au{sup +} down to 20 pA for Au{sub 7}{sup +}. The radiation-induced disorder was measured by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS-C), using a {sup 4}He{sup +} beam accelerated at 2 MV. From the fluence evolution of the lattice disorder at the target surface, we evidence that polyatomic projectiles produce more defects per incident atom than single Au{sup +} ions. As an example we measured damage cross-sections per incident Au atom of 12.5 and 2.7 nm{sup 2} for Au{sub 7}{sup +} and Au{sup +} projectiles, respectively. This cluster effect was ascribed to the high density of nuclear energy deposited within the cascade. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on samples irradiated at low fluences (10{sup 9} at. cm{sup -2}) in order to visualize each projectile impact.

  2. Fabrication of a Au-polystyrene sphere substrate with three-dimensional nanofeatures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Xu, Zongwei; Li, Kang; Fang, Fengzhou; Wang, Liyang

    2015-11-01

    Methods for fabricating three-dimensional nanofeature arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates were explored by combining the self-assembly of nanoscale polystyrene (PS) spheres with subsequent Au film ion sputter coating modulation. The substrate's nanoscale hot-spot features were controlled using the Au coating film thickness regulation and focused ion beam (FIB) nano-patterning regulation methods. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the substrate morphology and the enhancement mechanism of the three-dimensional SERS substrate. PS microspheres with diameters of 151 nm and 360 nm were coated with Au layers of different thicknesses ranging from 10 nm to 270 nm. The configuration of the Au-PS spheres can be regulated to hexagonal close packing with nanoscale V-shaped slits with a 10-20 nm gap pattern. Nanoscale Au particles and clusters with a clear outline covered the surface of the PS spheres, in which the multiple-scale structures increase the specific surface area of the SERS-active substrate. Nanoscale cracks formed on the smaller Au-PS spheres with a diameter of 151 nm, which also exhibited strong SERS activity. The substrate surface temperature regularly increased after Au coating, and the thermal expansion coefficient difference and PS glass transition properties were studied to explain the Au-PS spheres nanofeature configuration development. The fabricated Au-PS spheres SERS feature is a type of three-dimensional and highly ordered array, which can show Raman scattering characteristics by providing a SERS enhancement factor of greater than 107.

  3. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudapathy, P., E-mail: pmp@igcar.gov.in; Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603 102 India (India)

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  4. L’olivier au Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mouhtadi Issam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive mais pour conquérir de nouveaux marchés au niveau mondial et profiter ainsi de l’engouement que connaît cette huile reconnue pour ses bienfaits. Le plan national « Maroc Vert » permet ainsi, grâce à des subventions conséquentes, non seulement de renouveler les vergers existant avec la variété traditionnelle picholine du Maroc, mais également la plantation de nouvelles variétés en super-intensif dans le but d’industrialiser au maximum de nouveaux vergers. Il en est de même pour la transformation des olives en huile de bonne qualité avec la mise en place d’unités de trituration modernes qui doivent supplanter à terme la multitude de « maâsra » et réduire ainsi l’impact environnemental dû aux margines. L’olive ne sera plus dans l’avenir que représentée par son huile et ses formes comestibles, mais les résidus de son extraction seront valorisés soit sous forme de combustible élaboré pour le grignon, soit sous forme d’une base de chimie verte pour les sous-produits du raffinage. D’autres applications sont actuellement à l’étude, car le Maroc à compris, comme tous les autres grands pays producteurs, que l’olive était un nouveau gisement de richesses.

  5. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  6. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  7. Chemisorption of Au on Si(001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Shu-Yi; Wang Jian-Guang; Ma Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ The chemisorption of one monolayer of Au atoms on an ideal Si(001) surface is studied by using the self-consistent tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. Energies of the adsorption system of a Au atom on different sites are calculated. It is found that the most stable position is A site (top site) for the adsorbed Au atoms above the Si(001)surface. It is possible for the adsorbed Au atoms to sit below the Si(001) surface at the B1 site(bridge site), resulting in a Au-Si mixed layer. This is in agreement with the experiment results. The layer projected density of states is calculated and compared with that of the clean surface. The charge transfer is also investigated.

  8. Enhanced activity for supported Au clusters: Methanol oxidation on Au/TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Samuel A.; Cagg, Brett A.; Levine, Mara S.; He, Wei; Manandhar, Kedar; Chen, Donna A.

    2012-08-01

    Gold clusters supported on TiO2(110) exhibit unusual activity for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Temperature programmed desorption studies of methanol on Au clusters show that both Au and titania sites are necessary for methanol reaction. Isotopic labeling experiments with CD3OH demonstrate that reaction occurs via Osbnd H bond scission to form a methoxy intermediate. When the TiO2 surface is oxidized with 18O2 before or after Au deposition, methanol reaction produces H218O below 300 K, indicating that oxygen from titania promotes Osbnd H bond scission and is incorporated into desorbing products. XPS experiments provide additional evidence that during methanol reaction on the Au/TiO2 surface, methanol adsorption occurs on TiO2, given that the titania support becomes slightly oxidized after exposure to methanol in the presence of Au clusters. While the role of TiO2 is to dissociate the Osbnd H bond and form the reactive methoxy intermediate, the role of the Au sites is to remove hydrogen from the surface as H2, thus preventing the recombination of methoxy and hydrogen to methanol. The decrease in formaldehyde yield with increasing Au coverage above 0.25 ML suggests that reaction occurs at Au-titania interfacial sites; scanning tunneling microscopy images of various Au coverages confirm that the number of interfacial sites at the perimeter of the Au clusters decreases as the Au coverage is increased between 0.25 and 5 ML.

  9. Strain distributions of confined Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄红华; 章英; 刘晓山; 骆兴芳; 袁彩雷; 叶双莉

    2015-01-01

    The strain distributions of Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles confined in the Al2O3 matrix with different core sizes are investigated by using the finite element method, respectively. The simulation results clearly indicate that the compressive strains exerted on the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles can be induced by the Al2O3 matrix. Moreover, it can be found that the strain gradient existing in a Au/Ag nanoparticle is much larger than that in a Ag/Au nanoparticle, which could be due to the larger Young’s modulus of Au than that of Ag. With the core size increasing, the strain gradient existing in the Au/Ag nanoparticle becomes larger, while the strain gradient existing in the Ag/Au nanoparticle keeps constant. These different strain distributions may have significant infl uences on the structures and morphologies of the Au/Ag and Ag/Au nanoparticles, leading to the different physical properties for potential applications.

  10. Chahla Chafiq, Demande au Miroir

    OpenAIRE

    Guilyardi, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Le regard est omniprésent dans le premier roman en français de Chahla Chafiq, écrivain et sociologue iranienne exilée en France depuis 1983, reconnue pour ses travaux sur l’islamisme. Le personnage central de Demande au miroir, Guita Salim, regarde la vie de sa fenêtre. « Entre la fenêtre et le voir, il y a toujours un écart », écrit Forough Farrokhzâd, poétesse persane qui illumina les années 1950-1960, dont la poésie traverse ce roman. Adolescente, dans une ruelle de Téhéran, la jeune héroï...

  11. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  12. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Vinod; K.G.Gopchandran

    2014-01-01

    Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  13. Investigation of the Phase Equilibria of Sn-Cu-Au Ternary and Ag-Sn-Cu-Au Quaternary Systems and Interfacial Reactions in Sn-Cu/Au Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yee-Wen; Jao, Chien-Chung; Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yung; Lee, Chiapyng

    2007-02-01

    The phase equilibria of the Sn-Cu-Au ternary, Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary systems and interfacial reactions between Sn-Cu alloys and Au were experimentally investigated at specific temperatures in this study. The experimental results indicated that there existed three ternary intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and a complete solid solubility between AuSn and Cu6Sn5 phases in the Sn-Cu-Au ternary system at 200°C. No quaternary IMC was found in the isoplethal section of the Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary system. Three IMCs, AuSn, AuSn2, and AuSn4, were found in all couples. The same three IMCs and (Au,Cu)Sn/(Cu,Au)6Sn5 phases were found in all Sn-Cu/Au couples. The thickness of these reaction layers increased with increasing temperature and time. The mechanism of IMC growth can be described by using the parabolic law. In addition, when the reaction time was extended and the Cu content of the alloy was increased, the AuSn4 phase disappeared gradually. The (Au, Cu)Sn and (Cu,Au)6Sn5 layers played roles as diffusion barriers against Sn in Sn-Cu/Au reaction couple systems.

  14. Spontaneous wrinkling of soft matter by energetic deposition of Cr and Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Wrinkling of stiff thin films deposited on compliant substrates is an effect that has been broadly investigated. However, wrinkling consequent to metal ion implantation has been less studied. In the work described here, we have explored the sub-micron wrinkling phenomena that spontaneously occur when metal ions (Au and Cr) are implanted with energy of a few tens of electron volts (49 eV for Au and 72 eV for Cr) into a compliant material (PDMS). This very low energy ion implantation was performed using a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc technique, a process often referred to as energetic deposition or energetic condensation. For comparison, Au and Cr depositions with similar doses were also done using a sputtering technique (with lower particle energy of approximately 2 eV), and no wrinkle formation was then observed. In this way, we can discuss the role of ion energy in wrinkle formation. Depth profiles of the implanted material were calculated using the Tridyn computer simulation code for each metal, for several implantation doses. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of metal nanoparticles. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging with spectral processing was used to compare the wrinkle morphology for each case investigated.

  15. Crystal structures and new perspectives on Y3Au4 and Y14Au51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celania, Chris; Smetana, Volodymyr; Mudring, Anja Verena

    2017-09-01

    Y3Au4 (triyttrium tetragold) and Y14Au51 (tetradecayttrium henpentacontagold), two binary representatives of Au-rich rare earth (R) systems crystallize with the space groups R-3 and P6/m, adopting the Pu3Pd4 and Gd14Ag51 structure types, respectively (Pearson symbols hR42 and hP65). A variety of binary R-Au compounds have been reported, although only a few have been investigated thoroughly. Many reports lack information or misinterpret known compounds reported elsewhere. The Pu3Pd4 type is fairly common for group 10 elements Ni, Pd, and Pt, while Au representatives are restricted to just five examples, i.e. Ca3Au4, Pr3Au4, Nd3Au4, Gd3Au4, and Th3Au4. Sm6Au7 is suspected to be Sm3Au4 due to identical symmetry and close unit-cell parameters. The Pu3Pd4 structure type allows for full substitution of the position of the rare earth atom by more electronegative and smaller elements, i.e. Ti and Zr. The Gd14Ag51 type instead is more common for the group 11 metals, while rare representatives of group 12 are known. Y3Au4 can be represented as a tunnel structure with encapsulated cations and anionic chains. Though tunnels are present in Y14Au51, this structure is more complex and is best described in terms of polyhedral `pinwheels' around the tunnel forming polyhedra along the c axis.

  16. The velocity distribution of pickup He{sup +} measured at 0.3 AU by MESSENGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershman, Daniel J. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fisk, Lennard A.; Gloeckler, George; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Solomon, Sean C., E-mail: djgersh@umich.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    During its interplanetary trajectory in 2007-2009, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvrionment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft passed through the gravitational focusing cone for interstellar helium multiple times at a heliocentric distance R ≈ 0.3 AU. Observations of He{sup +} interstellar pickup ions made by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer sensor on MESSENGER during these transits provide a glimpse into the structure of newly formed inner heliospheric pickup-ion distributions. This close to the Sun, these ions are picked up in a nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field. Compared with the near-Earth environment, pickup ions observed near 0.3 AU will not have had sufficient time to be energized substantially. Such an environment results in a nearly pristine velocity distribution function that should depend only on pickup-ion injection velocities (related to the interstellar gas), pitch-angle scattering, and cooling processes. From measured energy-per-charge spectra obtained during multiple spacecraft observational geometries, we have deduced the phase-space density of He{sup +} as a function of magnetic pitch angle. Our measurements are most consistent with a distribution that decreases nearly monotonically with increasing pitch angle, rather than the more commonly modeled isotropic or hemispherically symmetric forms. These results imply that pitch-angle scattering of He{sup +} may not be instantaneous, as is often assumed, and instead may reflect the velocity distribution of initially injected particles. In a slow solar wind stream, we find a parallel-scattering mean free path of λ {sub ||} ∼ 0.1 AU and a He{sup +} production rate of ∼0.05 m{sup –3} s{sup –1} within 0.3 AU.

  17. Simultaneous determination of paracetamol and ascorbic acid using tetraoctylammonium bromide capped gold nanoparticles immobilized on 1,6-hexanedithiol modified Au electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Santhosh S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India); John, S. Abraham [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India)], E-mail: abrajohn@yahoo.co.in; Sagara, Takamasa [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India)], E-mail: sagara@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2009-11-30

    Tetraoctylammonium bromide stabilized gold nanoparticles (TOAB-AuNPs) attached to 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) modified Au electrode was used for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PA) and ascorbic acid (AA) at physiological pH. The attachment of TOAB-AuNPs on HDT modified Au surface was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). The ATR-FT-IR spectrum of TOAB-AuNPs attached to the HDT monolayer showed a characteristic stretching modes corresponding to -CH{sub 2} and -CH{sub 3} of TOAB, confirming the immobilization of AuNPs with surface-protecting TOAB ions on the surface of the AuNPs after being attached to HDT modified Au electrode. AFM image showed that the immobilized AuNPs were spherical in shape and densely packed to a film of ca. 7 nm thickness. Interestingly, TOAB-AuNPs modified electrode shifted the oxidation potential of PA towards less positive potential by 70 mV and enhanced its oxidation current twice when compared to bare Au electrode. In addition, the AuNPs modified electrode separated the oxidation potentials of AA and PA by 210 mV, whereas bare Au electrode failed to resolve them. The amperometry current of PA was increased linearly from 1.50 x 10{sup -7} to 1.34 x 10{sup -5} M with a correlation coefficient of 0.9981 and the lowest detection limit was found to be 2.6 nM (S/N = 3). The present method was successfully used to determine the concentration of PA in human blood plasma and commercial drugs.

  18. Chlorine adlayer-templated growth of a hybrid inorganic-organic layered structure on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeźnicka, I. I.; Horino, H.; Yagyu, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kajimoto, S.; Fukumura, H.

    2016-10-01

    Growth of a hybrid inorganic-organic layered structure on the Au(111) surface using a one-step solution growth is reported. The hybrid structure is consist of 4,4‧-bipyridine [4,4‧-BiPyH2]2 + cations, Cl anions and Au adatoms, provided from substrate by means of the adsorbate-induced surface phase transition of a surface reconstruction. Its surface and bulk structures were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and Raman spectroscopy. STM results reveal growth of the first [4,4‧-BiPyH2]2 + layer on top of the p(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})" separators=", R 30 ° chlorine overlayer formed on the Au(111) surface. These two layers are found to provide a platform for a following three-dimensional growth facilitated by hydrogen bonding, aurophilic and π-π stacking interactions.

  19. Alloy formation during the electrochemical growth of a Ag-Cd ultrathin film on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, M.C. del; Garcia, S.G. [Instituto de Ingenieria Electroquimica y Corrosion (INIEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Salinas, D.R., E-mail: dsalinas@uns.edu.a [Instituto de Ingenieria Electroquimica y Corrosion (INIEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avda. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2009-12-30

    The electrodeposition of a Ag/Cd ultrathin film on a Au(1 1 1) surface and the formation of a surface alloy during this process have been studied using classical electrochemical techniques and in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The films were obtained from separate electrolytes containing Ag{sup +} or Cd{sup 2+} ions and from a multicomponent solution containing both ions. First, the polarization conditions were adjusted in order to form a Ag film by overpotential deposition. Afterwards, a Cd monolayer was formed onto this Au(1 1 1)/Ag modified surface by underpotential deposition. The voltammetric behavior of the Cd UPD and the in situ STM images indicated that the ultrathin Ag films were uniformly deposited and epitaxially oriented with respect to the Au(1 1 1) surface. Long time polarization experiments showed that a significant Ag-Cd surface alloying accompanied the formation of the Cd monolayer on the Au(1 1 1)/Ag modified surface, independent of the Ag film thickness. In the case of an extremely thin Ag layer (1 Ag ML) the STM images and long time polarization experiments revealed a solid state diffusion process of Cd, Ag, and Au atoms which can be responsible for the formation of different Ag-Cd or Au-Ag-Cd alloy phases.

  20. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  1. Excitation function of squared speed-of-sound extracted from (net-)proton rapidity spectra in Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions over an energy range from AGS to RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Li-Na; Sun, Yan; Sun, Zhu; Lacey, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results of the rapidity distributions of protons and net-protons (protons minus antiprotons) emitted in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, measured by a few collaborations at the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS), super proton synchrotron (SPS), and relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC), are described by a revised Landau hydrodynamic model. The values of squared speed-of-sound parameter $c^2_s$ are then extracted from the rapidity distribution widths of (net-)protons. The excitation function of $c^2_s$ of the interacting system in Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions over an energy range from AGS to RHIC is obtained to show a local minimum or softest point in the equation of state (EoS) at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=8.8$ GeV which confirms our previous result.

  2. Multiple species beam production on laser ion source for electron beam ion source in Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M., E-mail: sekine.m.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Department of Energy Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Extracted ion beams from the test laser ion source (LIS) were transported through a test beam transport line which is almost identical to the actual primary beam transport in the current electron beam ion source apparatus. The tested species were C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta, and Au. The all measured beam currents fulfilled the requirements. However, in the case of light mass ions, the recorded emittance shapes have larger aberrations and the RMS values are higher than 0.06 π mm mrad, which is the design goal. Since we have margin to enhance the beam current, if we then allow some beam losses at the injection point, the number of the single charged ions within the acceptance can be supplied. For heaver ions like Ag, Ta, and Au, the LIS showed very good performance.

  3. Anion Adsorption on an Au Colloid Monolayer Based Cysteamine-Modified Gold Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Anion adsorption behavior on Au colloid surface was investigated in virture of depositing monolayers of Au colloid on the self-assembled monolayers of cysteamine on a gold electrode. Po tential-dependent anion adsorption-desorption waves via the nonfaradaic current were obtained by means of cyclic voltammetry at Au colloid-modified gold electrodes in the potential range of -200-600 mV. The adsorption sequence in the order of adsorption peak potentials(Epa) is OH->citrate3->H2PO4->Cl->SO42->ClO4->NO3-. Among them, citrate3-exhibited an en tirely irreversible adsorption. A rise in temperature can increase the rates of adsorption-desorp tion and improve the reversibility of the adsorption-desorption of CI-, SO24-, CIO4-, NO3- and H2PO4-. The adsorption peak potentials shifted more negatively for ca. 63 mV as the anion con centrations were increased by a decade factor. The change of pH from 7 to 1 slightly affected the adsorption peak potentials of Cl- and NO3-. Au colloids with a smaller size (16 nm) gave rise to a better reversibility of the adsorption-desorption process and lower adsorption currents. The ex perimental results of citrate ions adsorption on Au colloid surface show that Au colloids with a smaller size prepared by sodium citrate method exhibited a higher stability in the solution in com parison to those with larger sizes because of its higher ratio of charge/mass. In other words, the smaller gold nanoparticles are covered with citrate ions monolayer that can also be formed at larg er gold nanoparticles by means of electrochemical scan.

  4. Observation of a mixed-metal transition in heterobimetallic Au/Ag dicyanide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, Samanthika R; Schaefer, Brian K; Yson, Renante L; Staples, Richard J; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Patterson, Howard H

    2007-08-20

    Crystals of the mixed-metal heterobimetallic Au/Ag dicyanide complex, K[AuxAg1-x(CN)2] (x = 0-->1), were obtained by slow evaporation. The mixed-metal complex K[Au0.44Ag0.56(CN)2] crystallizes in a rhombohedral crystal system, space group R. The crystal structure consists of layers of linear chains of Au(CN)2- and Ag(CN)2- ions and K+ ions that connect the layers through the N atoms. The excitation and emission spectra of single crystals of K[AuxAg1-x(CN)2] were recorded at 4.2-180 K using excitation wavelengths between 230 and 260 nm. Two emission bands due to Ag-Au interactions were observed at 343 and 372 nm. Lifetime measurements indicate the shorter-wavelength emission corresponds to fluorescence and the longer-wavelength band is phosphorescence. These new emission bands are not seen in the pure K[Ag(CN)2] or pure K[Au(CN)2] crystals. Extended Hückel calculations show that the LUMO of the mixed-metal system is bonding while the HOMO is antibonding or very weakly bonding. Moreover, excited-state extended Hückel calculations indicate the formation of exciplexes with shorter metal-metal distances and higher metal-metal overlap populations than the corresponding ground-state oligomers. The luminescence is assigned to a mixed-metal transition from a molecular orbital with Au character to a molecular orbital with Ag character.

  5. Au Fixed Point Development at NRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedyulin, S. N.; Gotoh, M.; Todd, A. D. W.

    2017-04-01

    Two Au fixed points filled using metal of different nominal purities in carbon crucibles have been developed at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). The primary motivation behind this project was to provide the means for direct thermocouple calibrations at the Au freezing point (1064.18°C). Using a Au fixed point filled with the metal of maximum available purity [99.9997 % pure according to glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS)], multiple freezing plateaus were measured in a commercial high-temperature furnace. Four Pt/Pd thermocouples constructed and calibrated in-house were used to measure the freezing plateaus. From the calibration at Sn, Zn, Al and Ag fixed points, the linear deviation function from the NIST-IMGC reference function (IEC 62460:2008 Standard) was determined and extrapolated to the freezing temperature of Au. For all the Pt/Pd thermocouples used in this study, the measured EMF values agree with the extrapolated values within expanded uncertainty, thus substantiating the use of 99.9997 % pure Au fixed point cell for thermocouple calibrations at NRC. Using the Au fixed point filled with metal of lower purity (99.99 % pure according to GDMS), the effect of impurities on the Au freezing temperature measured with Pt/Pd thermocouple was further investigated.

  6. Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually.

  7. Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually.

  8. Thermodynamic assessment of Au-La and Au-Er binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, H.Q., E-mail: hongqun.dong@aalto.fi [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland); Tao, X.M. [Key Laboratory of New Processing Technology for Nonferrous Metals and Materials of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liu, H.S. [Scientific Center of Phase Diagrams and Materials Design, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Laurila, T.; Paulastro-Kroeckel, M. [Department of Electronics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, FIN-02601 Espoo (Finland)

    2011-03-31

    Research highlights: > It's the first time that Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were thermodynamically assessed since 1985. > Besides, in the present work, the ab initio approach has been employed to calculate the formation enthalpies of the IMCs involved in Au-Er and Au-La binary systems, and then, by combining with all of the available experimental information, these two-system were thermodynamically optimized via CALPHAD method. Therefore, a more reliable thermodynamic description has been obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Phase relationships in Au-La and Au-Er binary systems have been thermodynamically assessed by using the CALPHAD technique. The existing thermodynamic descriptions of the systems were improved by incorporating the ab initio calculated enthalpies of formation of the intermetallic compounds, except for the Au{sub 51}La{sub 14} and Au{sub 10}Er{sub 7} phases. All the binary intermetallic compounds were treated as stoichiometric phases, while the solution phases, including liquid, fcc, bcc, and dhcp, were treated as substitutional solution phases and the excess Gibbs energies were formulated with Redlich-Kister polynomial function. As a result, two self-consist thermodynamic data sets for describing the Au-La and Au-Er binary systems were obtained.

  9. Periodicity, Electronic Structures, and Bonding of Gold Tetrahalides [AuX4](-) (X = F, CI, Br, I, At, Uus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Li, Yong; Xu, Congqiao; Wang, Xue B.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Li, Jun

    2015-12-07

    Systematic theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed to understand the periodicity and electronic structures of trivalent-gold halides using gold tetrahalides [AuX4]⁻ anions (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, Uus). The [AuX4]⁻ (X = Cl, Br, I) anions were produced in gas phase and their negative-ion photoelectron spectra were obtained, which exhibited rich and well-resolved spectral peaks. We calculated the adiabatic as well as vertical electron detachment energies using density functional methods with scalar and spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects. The simulated photoelectron spectra based on these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results show that the trivalent Au(III) oxidation state becomes progressively less stable while Au(I) is preferred when the halides become heavier along the Period Table. This trend reveals that the oxidation state of metals in complexes can be manipulated through ligand design

  10. In situ biosynthesis of Ag, Au and bimetallic nanoparticles using Piper pedicellatum C.DC: green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamuly, Chandan; Hazarika, Moushumi; Borah, Sarat Ch; Das, Manash R; Boruah, Manas P

    2013-02-01

    The synthesis of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles using Piper pedicellatum C.DC leaf extract is demonstrated here. The rapid formation of stable Ag and Au nanoparticles has been found using P. pedicellatum C.DC leaf extract in aqueous medium at normal atmospheric condition. Competitive reduction of Ag(+) and Au(3+) ions present simultaneously in solution during exposure to P. pedicellatum C.DC leaf extract leads to the synthesis of bimetallic Ag-Au nanoparticles in solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that the Ag nanoparticles predominantly form spherical in shape with the size range of 2.0±0.5-30.0±1.2 nm. In case of Au nanoparticles, the particles are spherical in shape along with few triangular, hexagonal and pentagonal shaped nanoparticles also observed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies revealed that the nanoparticles were face centered cubic (fcc) in shape. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed nanoparticles were capped with plant compounds. The chemical constituents, viz. catechin, gallic acid, courmaric acid and protocatechuic acid of the leaf extract were identified which may act as a reducing, stabilizing and capping agent. The expected reaction mechanism in the formation of Ag and Au nanoparticles is also reported.

  11. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance of an inverted ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Spirin, R. E. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, CEP 05315-970, Sao Paulo S.P. (Brazil); Oks, E. M. [State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Brown, I. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Whereas energetic ion beams are conventionally produced by extracting ions (say, positive ions) from a plasma that is held at high (positive) potential, with ion energy determined by the potential drop through which the ions fall in the beam formation electrode system, in the device described here the plasma and its electronics are held at ground potential and the ion beam is formed and injected energetically into a space maintained at high (negative) potential. We refer to this configuration as an 'inverted ion source.' This approach allows considerable savings both technologically and economically, rendering feasible some ion beam applications, in particular small-scale ion implantation, that might otherwise not be possible for many researchers and laboratories. We have developed a device of this kind utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source, and explored its operation and beam characteristics over a range of parameter variation. The downstream beam current has been measured as a function of extraction voltage (5-35 kV), arc current (50-230 A), metal ion species (Ti, Nb, Au), and extractor grid spacing and beamlet aperture size (3, 4, and 5 mm). The downstream ion beam current as measured by a magnetically-suppressed Faraday cup was up to as high as 600 mA, and with parametric variation quite similar to that found for the more conventional metal vapor vacuum arc ion source.

  13. Becoming independent through au pair migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    . This article argues that, despite this critique, au pairing does play an important formative role for young Filipinas because it opens up for experiences abroad that enable them to be recognised as independent adults in Philippine society. Rather than autonomy, however, au pairs define their independence...... in terms of their capacity to assume responsibility for others, thereby achieving a position of social respect. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Denmark and the Philippines, this article explores how young Filipinas use the social, economic, and cultural resources they gain from their au pair stay abroad...

  14. Azimuthal Correlation of Collective Motion in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Lei; ZHANG Wei-Ning; CHEN Xiang-Jun; TANG Gui-Xin; ZHANG Jing-Bo

    2001-01-01

    The out-of-plane squeeze-out effect in relativistic heavy ion collisions is used to estimate the reaction plane by performing a modified transverse momentum analysis. A technique for investigating the azimuthal correlation between the out-of-plane squeeze-out and directed in-plane flow is described. A clear signature of the azimuthal correlation is evidenced in the 600 A MeV Au + Au reaction from the quantum molecular dynamic model calculations.

  15. Adsorption behavior of terephthalic acid on Au(100), Au(111) and Au(110) electrodes in neutral solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezawa, Yasunari; Masuda, Ryoko [Development of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Rikkyo University, Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171 (Japan)

    2008-06-30

    Adsorption of terephthalic acid on Au(1 0 0), Au(1 1 1) and Au(1 1 0) electrodes in neutral solution has been investigated using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential capacity measurements and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At negative potentials, the terephthalate anions in solution adsorb in a flat orientation onto the electrode via the {pi} electrons of the aromatic ring. At positive potentials, the terephthalate anions adsorb in a vertical orientation via the oxygen atoms of one of the carboxyl groups as a form of dianion. At more positive potentials, the anions adsorb in a vertical orientation as a form of hydrogen terephthalate. For the three electrodes examined, the overtone and/or combination bands, due to vertically oriented hydrogen terephthalate, were observed at 2642 and 2517 cm{sup -1}, respectively. For the Au(1 1 1) electrode, STM observations indicated a flat orientation in the form of terephthalic acid. (author)

  16. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f-oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase transformation from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) is observed upon coating the hcp Au square sheets with Pt or Pd under ambient conditions. The prepared fcc Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates demonstrate unique (101)f orientation (picture shows a typical fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplate). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Green synthesis of Au nanoparticles using potato extract: stability and growth mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-López, D. N.; Pal, U.

    2014-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of spherical, well-dispersed colloidal gold nanoparticles of 17.5-23.5 nm average sizes in water using potato extract (PE) both as reducing and stabilizing agent. The effects of PE content and the pH value of the reaction mixture have been studied. Formation and growth dynamics of the Au nanoparticles in the colloids were studied using transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis optical absorption spectroscopy techniques. While the reductor content and, hence, the nucleation and growth rates of the nanoparticles could be controlled by controlling the PE content in the reaction solution, the stability of the nanoparticles depended strongly on the pH of the reaction mixture. The mechanisms of Au ion reduction and stabilization of Au nanoparticles by potato starch have been discussed. The use of common natural solvent like water and biological reductor like PE in our synthesis process opens up the possibility of synthesizing Au nanoparticles in fully green (environmental friendly) way, and the Au nanoparticles produced in such way should have good biocompatibility.

  18. Interacting ZnCo2O4 and Au nanodots on carbon nanotubes as highly efficient water oxidation electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui; Su, Chang-Yuan; Tan, Zhi-Yun; Tai, Su-Zhen; Liu, Zhao-Qing

    2017-07-01

    An advanced hybrid electrocatalyst consisting of ZnCo2O4 nanodots and Au decorated carbon nanotubes is developed for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In the catalyst system, carbon nanotubes are served as the support substrate to enhance the conductivity of ZnCo2O4 and provide a high specific area; meanwhile, Au species accelerate the electron-stripping from cobalt ions during the catalytic process, leading to a fast promotion of cobalt ions with high valence state which possess a highly electrocatalytic efficiency. With the well synergistic effect between the components, ZnCo2O4/Au/CNTs exhibits low potential of 1.67 V at j = 10 mA cm-2, large current density of 97.8 mA cm-2 at high operating potential (1.8 V), and prominent durability in alkaline. This finding will pave a new avenue to search highly efficient and stable electrocatalysts for water splitting devices.

  19. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  20. Studies of multiplicity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo,a, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cical, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino,c, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hokobyan, R; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos,a, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu, T

    2005-01-01

    In this talk I'll review the present status of charged particle multiplicity measurements from heavy-ion collisions. The characteristic features of multiplicity distributions obtained in Au+Au collisions will be discussed in terms of collision centrality and energy and compared to those of p+p collisions. Multiplicity measurements of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy will also be discussed. The results will be compared to various theoretical models and simple scaling properties of the data will be identified.

  1. Anisotropic surroundings effects on photo absorption of partially embedded Au nanospheroids in silica glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xuan; Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060–8628 (Japan); Yu, Ruixuan; Ishioka, Junya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060–8628 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    The influence of a directly adjacent or an anisotropic surrounding medium alters the plasmonic properties of a nanoparticle because it provides a mechanism for symmetry breaking of the scattering. Given the success of ion irradiation induced embedment of rigid metallic nanospheroids into amorphous substrate, it is possible to examine the effect of the silica glass substrate on the plasmonic properties of these embedded nanospheroids. In this work presented here, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations for the Au nanospheroids’ optical properties were performed based on 3–dimensional (3D) configuration extracted from planar SEM micrographs and cross–sectional TEM micrographs of the Au nanospheroids partially embedded in the silica glass, and the well–matched simulations with respect to the experimental measurements could demonstrate the dielectric constant at the near surface of silica glass decreased after Ar–ion irradiation.

  2. Et pourquoi pas au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Télétravail ou travail à distance, aménagement des horaires de travail et autres évolutions favorables à un meilleur équilibre vie privée et vie professionnelle sont adoptés par nombre d’entreprises et d’organisations !   Rendu possible grâce au développement de nouvelles technologies dont Internet, le travail à distance séduit de plus en plus de personnels, ainsi que de plus en plus de sociétés qui y trouvent des avantages en matière de gestion de l’espace, de sécurité (moins de trajets domicile-entreprise), de développement durable (moins de pollution), de motivation et de bien-être de leurs personnels. Les horaires aménagés, voire les « core-hours1 », sont également des pratiques de plus e...

  3. Longitudinal scaling of net-protons in AuAu and pp collisions at RHIC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    2008-10-01

    BRAHMS has studied net-protons distributions in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Net-proton distributions reflect the net-baryon yields and can be used to extract the nuclear stopping in the collisions, thus providing information on baryon number transport and energy available for particle production. The talk will present final and preliminary results from the above mentioned systems. It will be shown that in p+p and in Au+Au central collisions that net-proton distributions exhibit longitudinal scaling once the target contribution to the projectile rapidity range is corrected for. The difference between p+p and Au+Au will be discussed. Aspects of future measurements at the LHC of net-baryons at mid-rapidity will be brought forth.

  4. Production of {lambda}(1520) in p+p and Au+Au collisions with {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment at RHIC; Production de {lambda}(1520) dans les collisions p+p et Au+Au a {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV dans l'experience STAR au RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudichet, L

    2003-10-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions are produced in order to observe the created hot and dense matter. One major goal is to probe the existence of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP would be the state of matter in which temperature and density are high enough to break the quark confinement into hadrons. For that purpose, the RHIC collider has produced p+p and Au+Au collisions at the energy of {radical}s{sub NN}= 200 GeV. This thesis work is focused on the production of {lambda}(1520) resonances in these collisions with the STAR experiment. In comparison with statistical prediction, the measured {lambda}(1520)/{lambda} show a significant lowering in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These results strongly support the decoupling of the system in two stages: a chemical freeze-out followed by a thermal freeze-out. This conclusion constitutes an important step to an understanding of the created matter in high energy heavy ion collisions. (author)

  5. MISSING MOMENTUM VECTOR IN THE AU-197(NE-20-F-1,F-2,PLF) REACTION AT 15-MEV/U

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIELOCH, A; BRZYCHCZYK, J; GROTOWSKI, K; LEEGTE, HKW; MICEK, S; PAWLOWSKI, P; PLANETA, R; SIEMSSEN, RH; SOSIN, Z; WILSCHUT, HW; SIWEKWILCZYNSKA, K; WILCZYNSKI, J

    1995-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments (PLF's) emitted in damped collisions of 15 MeV/u Ne-20 ions with Au-197 were observed in coincidence with two fission fragments. For given detection angles of the PLF's differential and energy-integrated fission probabilities were obtained and the average missing momentum v

  6. Simulation of ion beam injection and extraction in an EBIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L., E-mail: zhao@far-tech.com; Kim, J. S. [FAR-TECH, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    An example simulation of Au+ charge breeding using FAR-TECH’s integrated EBIS (electron beam ion source) modeling toolset is presented with the emphasis on ion beam injection and extraction. The trajectories of injected ions are calculated with PBGUNS (particle beam gun simulation) self-consistently by including the space charges from both ions and electrons. The ion beam, starting with initial conditions within the 100% acceptance of the electron beam, is then tracked by EBIS-PIC (particle-in-cell EBIS simulation code). In the trap, the evolution of the ion charge state distribution is estimated by charge state estimator. The extraction of charge bred ions is simulated with PBGUNS. The simulations of the ion injections show significant ion space charge effects on beam capture efficiency and the ionization efficiency.

  7. Simulation of ion beam injection and extraction in an EBIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    An example simulation of Au+ charge breeding using FAR-TECH's integrated EBIS (electron beam ion source) modeling toolset is presented with the emphasis on ion beam injection and extraction. The trajectories of injected ions are calculated with PBGUNS (particle beam gun simulation) self-consistently by including the space charges from both ions and electrons. The ion beam, starting with initial conditions within the 100% acceptance of the electron beam, is then tracked by EBIS-PIC (particle-in-cell EBIS simulation code). In the trap, the evolution of the ion charge state distribution is estimated by charge state estimator. The extraction of charge bred ions is simulated with PBGUNS. The simulations of the ion injections show significant ion space charge effects on beam capture efficiency and the ionization efficiency.

  8. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... equivalent and a personality profile. Such personality profile will be based upon a psychometric test... such academic course work in an amount not to exceed $1,000 for EduCare au pair participants and in an...

  9. PHENIX results on jets in d + Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, J. Ali

    2016-12-01

    We present recently published results [A. Adare, et al., arxiv:arXiv:1509.04657] on fully reconstructed R=0.3 anti-kt jets measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy. The jet yields for four centrality classes along with the p+p reference are presented, as well as both the minimum bias RdAu and centrality dependent RdAu and RCP. We find that while the minimum bias RdA is consistent with unity, providing a strong constraint on models including cold-nuclear-matter effects or energy loss in small systems, the centrality dependent RdAu show a striking variation which presents a challenge to models attempting to describe the interplay between soft and hard processes in these systems.

  10. Centrality Dependent Particle Production at $y=0$ and $y \\sim1$ in Au+Au Collisions at $y=0$ and $y \\sim1$ in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Lystad, R; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Samset, B H; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2005-01-01

    Particle production of identified charged hadrons, $\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, and $\\bar{p}$ in Au+Au collisions at $\\snn =$ 200 GeV has been studied as a function of transverse momentum and collision centrality at $y=0$ and $y\\sim1$ by the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC. Significant collective transverse flow at kinetic freeze-out has been observed in the collisions. The magnitude of the flow rises with the collision centrality. Proton and kaon yields relative to the pion production increase strongly as the transverse momentum increases and also increase with centrality. Particle yields per participant nucleon show a weak dependence on the centrality for all particle species. Hadron production remains relatively constant within one unit around midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\snn =$ 200 GeV.

  11. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Aprá, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  12. Laser-Induced, Polarization Dependent Shape Transformation of Au/Ag Nanoparticles in Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmeister H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bimetallic, initially spherical Ag/Au nanoparticles in glass prepared by ion implantation have been irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses at intensities still below the damage threshold of the material surface. This high-intensity laser processing produces dichroism in the irradiated region, which can be assigned to the observed anisotropic nanoparticle shapes with preferential orientation of the longer particle axis along the direction of laser polarization. In addition, the particle sizes have considerably been increased upon processing.

  13. Production of the φ mesons at intermediate rapidity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dipali

    2007-10-01

    Study of the φ mesons produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions can unfold properties of the hot and dense quark gluon matter produced in these reactions. Since the φ is a bound state of s and s quarks it is not subject to the canonical suppression of strangeness in p+p interactions and thus serves as a clean probe of strangeness enhancement in Au+Au collisions. The measurement of the φ-meson spectra, yield, and temperature parameter gives information on strangeness enhancement and the bulk properties of the partonic matter. The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC has measured particles produced in high luminosity Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV over a broad range of rapidity and pT. Using the efficient tracking system and high resolution time of flight wall of the mid-rapidity spectrometer (MRS), we have measured the φ mesons in the K^+K^- decay channel at y ˜ 1. The first results of the φ -> K^+K^- measurements with focus on spectra and yield analysis will be presented.

  14. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belmont, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Black, D; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dairaku, S; Danley, D; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamilton, H F; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, S; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hollis, R S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isinhue, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Komkov, B; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Krizek, F; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lewis, B; Li, X; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liu, M X; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Maruyama, T; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Midori, J; Mignerey, A C; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morrison, D P; Moskowitz, M; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nukariya, A; Nyanin, A S; Obayashi, H; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Okada, K; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ryu, M S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skolnik, M; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Solano, S; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Voas, B; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Whitaker, S; White, A S

    2015-01-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy-flavor production in minimum bias Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy-flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks due to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au$+$Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for $p_T>4$ GeV/$c$. We use the bottom electron fr...

  15. Synthesis of Monometallic (Au and Pd) and Bimetallic (AuPd) Nanoparticles Using Carbon Nitride (C3N4) Quantum Dots via the Photochemical Route for Nitrophenol Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fageria, Pragati; Uppala, Shravan; Nazir, Roshan; Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Basu, Mrinmoyee; Pande, Surojit

    2016-10-04

    In this study, we report the synthesis of monometallic (Au and Pd) and bimetallic (AuPd) nanoparticles (NPs) using graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) quantum dots (QDs) and photochemical routes. Eliminating the necessity of any extra stabilizer or reducing agent, the photochemical reactions have been carried out using a UV light source of 365 nm where C3N4 QD itself functions as a suitable stabilizer as well as a reducing agent. The g-C3N4 QDs are excited upon irradiation with UV light and produce photogenerated electrons, which further facilitate the reduction of metal ions. The successful formation of Au, Pd, and AuPd alloy nanoparticles is evidenced by UV-vis, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photon spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy techniques. The morphology and distribution of metal nanoparticles over the C3N4 QD surface has been systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and SAED analysis. To explore the catalytic activity of the as-prepared samples, the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol with excellent performance is also investigated. It is noteworthy that the synthesis of both monometallic and bimetallic NPs can be accomplished by using a very small amount of g-C3N4, which can be used as a promising photoreducing material as well as a stabilizer for the synthesis of various metal nanoparticles.

  16. Measurements of jet quenching with semi-inclusive hadron+jet distributions in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    The STAR Collaboration reports the measurement of semi-inclusive distributions of charged-particle jets recoiling from a high transverse momentum hadron trigger, in central and peripheral Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. Charged jets are reconstructed with the anti-kT algorithm for jet radii R between 0.2 and 0.5 and with low infrared cutoff of track constituents (pT>0.2 GeV / c ). A novel mixed-event technique is used to correct the large uncorrelated background present in heavy ion collisions. Corrected recoil jet distributions are reported at midrapidity, for charged-jet transverse momentum pT,jet chcharged energy transport out of the jet cone of 2.8 ±0.2 (stat )±1.5 (sys ) GeV /c , for 10 Au +Au collisions of 50 ±30 (sys )% of the large-angle yield in p +p collisions predicted by pythia.

  17. Identified hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_(NN))=62.4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Chai, Z; Decowski, M P; García, E; Gburek, T; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Hauer, M; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Khan, N; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Lin, W T; Manly, S; Mignerey, A C; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Reed, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Sagerer, J; Seals, H; Sedykh, I; Smith, C E; Stankiewicz, M A; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Tonjes, M B; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; Vaurynovich, S S; Verdier, R; Veres, G I; Wenger, E; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wyslouch, B; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J

    2006-01-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 62.4 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The identification of particles relies on three different methods: low momentum particles stopping in the first detector layers; the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the silicon Spectrometer, and Time-of-Flight measurement. These methods cover the transverse momentum ranges 0.03-0.2, 0.2-1.0 and 0.5-3.0 GeV/c, respectively. Baryons are found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The pT region in which the proton to pion ratio reaches unity in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 62.4 GeV fits into a smooth trend as a function of collision energy. At low transverse momenta, the spectra exhibit a significant deviation from transverse mass scaling, and when the observed particle yields at very low pT are compared to extrapolations from higher p...

  18. Significant in-medium eta' mass reduction in sqrt(s(NN))=200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Vertesi, R; Sziklai, J

    2009-01-01

    In high energy heavy ion collisions a hot and dense medium is formed, where the U_A(1) or chiral symmetry may temporarily be restored. As a consequence, the mass of the eta'(958) mesons may be reduced to its quark model value, and the abundance of eta' mesons at low p_T may be enhanced by more than a factor of 10. The intercept parameter lambda_* of the charged pion Bose Einstein Correlations provides a sensitive observable of the possibly enhanced eta' abundance. We have analyzed lambda_*(m_T) data from sqrt(s(NN))=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions measured at RHIC, using extensive Monte Carlo simulations based on six popular models for hadronic multiplicities. Based on the combined STAR and PHENIX dataset, and on various systematic investigations of resonance multiplicities and model parameters, we conclude that in sqrt(s(NN))=200 GeV central Au+Au reactions the mass of the eta' meson is reduced by Delta m > 220 MeV, at the 99.9% confidence level in the considered model class. A similar analysis of NA44 S+Pb ...

  19. Bipolar resistive switching of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au heterostructure nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, S.; Perego, D.; Tallarida, G.; Bestetti, M.; Franz, S.; Spiga, S.

    2013-10-01

    Arrays of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm were characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy, which was used to probe the electrical behavior of single nanowires still included in the array. A bipolar switching of the single Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires is demonstrated and is attributed to the choice of an asymmetric couple of electrode materials and, possibly, to a non-uniform Ni oxidation profile inside the NiOx segments. An analysis of the conduction mechanism in a single nanowire is presented to further support this conclusion.

  20. Unravelling Thiol’s Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod–Au Nanoparticle Dimers

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-12-15

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. Pickup protons and pressure-balanced structures from 39 to 43 AU: Voyager 2 observations during 1993 and 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Belcher, J. W.; Whang, Y. C.

    1996-07-01

    The pressure of interstellar pickup protons in the distant heliosphere can be determined by analyzing pressure-balanced structures, observed on a scale of a few hundredths of an AU. This paper extends the earlier work of L. F. Burlaga et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research, 99, 21, 511, 1994) by analyzing pressure-balanced structures observed by Voyager 2 from 39.3 to 40.6 AU in 1993 and from 42.6 to 43.2 AU during 1994. The pickup proton temperature is high in the region of the distant heliosphere that we considered: (5.4+/-0.1)×106 K at 39-41 AU and (6.0+/-0.4)×106 K at ~43 AU. The density of the pickup protons is (1.6+/-0.3)×10-4 cm-3 at 39-41 AU and (1.2+/-0.2)×10-4 cm-3 at ~43 AU. The ratio of the pickup proton density to the solar wind proton density (Ni/N) is small, only 0.03+/-0.01 during both 1993 and 1994. Nevertheless, the pickup proton pressures are relatively high because of their high temperatures. The pickup proton pressure was (11+/-2)×10-14 ergcm-3 at 39-41 AU and (9+/-1)×10-14 ergcm-3 at 43 AU. There is a possible decrease in Pi with increasing distance from the Sun. The pickup proton pressure is an order of magnitude greater than the solar wind proton pressure: Pi/Pswp=10+/-2 at 39-41 AU and 8+/-2 at 43 AU. Our results support the hypothesis of Burlaga et al. that the pickup proton pressure is more important than the solar wind thermal pressure in the dynamics of the distant heliosphere. The ratio of the pickup ion pressure to the magnetic pressure is Pi/(B2/8π)=1.7+/-0.3 at 39-41 AU and 1.7+/-0.72 at ~43 AU. These results are compared with a model.

  2. Apprentissages techniques : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES GESTION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DU PERSONNEL HR/PMD L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9ème du Cycle d'orientation genevois (3ème en France) • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgiqu...

  3. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  4. X-ray spectra induced in highly charged 40Arq+ interacting with Au surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By use of optical spectrum technology, the spectra of X-ray induced by highly charged 40Arq+ ions interacting with Au surface have been studied. The results show that the argon Kα X-ray were emitted from the hollow atoms formed below the surface. There is a process of multi-electron exciting in neutralization of the Ar16+ion, with electronic configuration 1s2 in its ground state below the solid surface. The yield of the projectile Kα X-ray is related to its initial electronic configuration, and the yield of the target X-ray is related to the projectile kinetic energy.

  5. Rhodium deposition onto a 4-mercaptopyridine SAM on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolova, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kayser, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kolb, D.M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)]. E-mail: dieter.kolb@uni-ulm.de; Boyen, H.-G. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Ziemann, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Mayer, D. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wirth, A. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-02-10

    The application of a recently developed method for the deposition of Pd and Pt on top of a SAM, has been successfully extended to Rh, thus proving the versatility of the new concept. Experimental evidence from cyclic voltammetry, in situ STM and ex situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is presented for the deposition of monoatomic high rhodium islands onto a 4-mercaptopyridine self-assembled monolayer on a Au(1 1 1) electrode. By repetitive complexation of the Rh ions to the ring-nitrogen and reduction in a Rh-ion free solution, an almost completely covered SAM is obtained. The consequences of making contacts for molecular electronics are briefly discussed.

  6. Radii broadening due to molecular collision in focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    Point exposures of poly(methyl methacrylate) resist are carried out with focused ion beams of Si++ and Au++ from a liquid AuSi ion source in order to obtain a current density distribution in the probe. All the distributions are composed of a main Gaussian distribution and a long tail dependent on r-3.3 (r means radial distance). The magnitude of this tail increases with the increase in ambient pressure of the ion-drifting space. When the probe is steered at the corner of deflection field, two types of clear ghost patterns appear: (1) circular patterns and (2) lines trailing from the main spot toward the deflection center. It is revealed that they are produced by exposures to ions or energetic neutrals generated with charge transfer collision of the primary ions with residual gas molecules. It is shown that the long tail in the current density distribution is also due to scattering with the residual gas molecules.

  7. Measurement of D-meson azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au 200 GeV collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lomnitz, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Heavy quarks are produced through initial hard scatterings and they are affected by the hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions throughout its whole evolution. Due to their heavy mass, charm quarks are expected to thermalize much more slowly than light flavor quarks. The charm quark flow is a unique tool to study the extent of thermalization of the bulk medium dominated by light quarks and gluons. At high $p_T$, D meson azimuthal anisotropy is sensitive to the path length dependence of charm quark energy loss in the medium, which offers new insights into heavy quark energy loss mechanisms - gluon radiation vs. collisional processes. We present the STAR measurement of elliptic flow ($v_2$) of $D^0$ and $D^{\\pm}$ mesons in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV, for a wide transverse momentum range. These results are obtained from the data taken in the first year of physics running of the new STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker detector, which greatly improves open heavy flavor hadron measurements by ...

  8. Observation of Direct-Photon Collective Flow in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2012-09-01

    The second Fourier component v2 of the azimuthal anisotropy with respect to the reaction plane is measured for direct photons at midrapidity and transverse momentum (pT) of 1-12GeV/c in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. Previous measurements of this quantity for hadrons with pT6GeV/c a reduced anisotropy is interpreted in terms of a path-length dependence for parton energy loss. In this measurement with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider we find that for pT>4GeV/c the anisotropy for direct photons is consistent with zero, which is as expected if the dominant source of direct photons is initial hard scattering. However, in the pT<4GeV/c region dominated by thermal photons, we find a substantial direct-photon v2 comparable to that of hadrons, whereas model calculations for thermal photons in this kinematic region underpredict the observed v2.

  9. Rapidity dependence of deuteron production in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I; Beavis, D; Bekele, S; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christensen, P; Dalsgaard, H H; Debbe, R; Gaardhøje, J J; Jørgensen, C E; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Johnson, E B; Karabowicz, R; Katrynska, N; Kim, E J; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Murray, M; Natowitz, J; Nielsen, B S; Nygaard, C; Ouerdane, D; Pal, D; Qville, A; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Sanders, S J; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbæk, F; Wada, R; Yang, H; Yin, Z; Zgura, S

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the distributions of protons and deuterons produced in high energy heavy ion Au+Au collisions at RHIC over a very wide range of transverse and longitudinal momentum. Near mid-rapidity we have also measured the distribution of anti-protons and anti-deuterons. We present our results in the context of coalescence models. In particular we extract the "volume of homogeneity" and the average phase-space density for protons and anti-protons. Near central rapidity the coalescence parameter $B_2(p_T)$ and the space averaged phase-space density $\\langle f \\rangle (p_T)$ are very similar for both protons and anti-protons. For protons we see little variation of either $B_2(p_T)$ or the space averaged phase-space density as the rapidity increases from 0 to 3. However both these quantities depend strongly on $p_T$ at all rapidities. These results are in contrast to lower energy data where the proton and anti-proton phase-space densities are different at $y$=0 and both $B_2$ and $f$ depend strongly on rapid...

  10. Moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in Au+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, P

    2013-01-01

    Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC is important to search for the existence of the critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Lattice QCD have shown that the predictions of the susceptibility of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions can be sensitive to the various moments (mean ($\\mu$) =${}$, variance ($\\sigma^2$) = ${}$, skewness (S) = $\\frac{}{\\sigma^3}$ and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) =$\\frac{}{\\sigma^4} -3$) of conserved quantities like net-baryon number ($\\Delta$B), net-electric charge ($\\Delta$Q) and net-strangeness ($\\Delta$S). Any non-monotonic behavior of the higher moments would confirm the existence of the QCD critical point. The recent results of the higher moments of net-charge multiplicity distributions for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$ varying from 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The energy and centrality dependence of the higher moments and their products (S$\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are shown for the net-charge multiplicity distributions. Further...

  11. Single Identified Hadron Spectra from sqrt(s_NN)=130 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adcox, K; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S V; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Yu A; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V A; Bunce, G M; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S K; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B A; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Bösing, C; Klinksiek, S A; Kochenda, L M; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C H; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiryak, Yu; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sørensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torie, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2004-01-01

    Transverse momentum spectra and yields of hadrons are measured by the PHENIX collaboration in Au + Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The time-of-flight resolution allows identification of pions to transverse momenta of 2 GeV/c and protons and antiprotons to 4 GeV/c. The yield of pions rises approximately linearly with the number of nucleons participating in the collision, while the number of kaons, protons, and antiprotons increases more rapidly. The shape of the momentum distribution changes between peripheral and central collisions. Simultaneous analysis of all the p_T spectra indicates radial collective expansion, consistent with predictions of hydrodynamic models. Hydrodynamic analysis of the spectra shows that the expansion velocity increases with collision centrality and collision energy. This expansion boosts the particle momenta, causing the yield from soft processes to exceed that for hard to large transverse momentum, perhaps as large as 3 GeV/c.

  12. Baryon-Strangeness Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC BES energies from UrQMD model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations and correlations of conserved charges are sensitive observables for studying the QCD phase transition and critical point in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We have studied the centrality and energy dependence of mixed-cumulants (up to fourth order) between net-baryon and net-strangeness in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, 200 GeV from UrQMD model. To compare with other theoretical calculations, we normalize these mixed-cumulants by various order cumulants of net-strangeness distributions. We found that the results obtained from UrQMD calculations are comparable with the results from Lattice QCD at low temperature and hadron resonance gas model. The ratios of mixed-cumulants ($R_{11}^{BS},R_{13}^{BS},R_{22}^{BS}$,$R_{31}^{BS}$) from UrQMD calculations show weak centrality dependence. However, the mixed-cumulant ratios $R_{11}^{BS}$ and $R_{31}^{BS}$ show strong increase at low energy, while the $R_{13}^{BS}$ snd $R_{22}^{BS}$ are similar at different energies. ...

  13. Light fragment yields from central Au+Au collisions at 11.5A GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette, J. [McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2T5 (Canada); Bellwied, R. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Bennett, S. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Bersch, R. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Braun-Munzinger, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, (Germany); Chang, W. C. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Cleland, W. E. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Clemen, M. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Cole, J. D. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Cormier, T. M. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-04-01

    Inclusive double differential multiplicities of deuterons, {sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He measured by E877 for 11.5A GeV/c Au+Au collisions at the Brookhaven's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) are presented. Light fragments at beam rapidity are measured for the first time at AGS energies. Beam rapidity deuteron and {sup 4}He yields and transverse slope parameters are found to be strongly dependent on the impact parameter, and the shape of the deuteron spectra is not consistent with that expected for a simple thermal distribution. The deuteron yields relative to proton yields are analyzed in terms of a simple coalescence model. While results indicate an increase in source size compared to collisions of lighter systems at the same energy, they are inconsistent with a simple coalescence model reflected by a rapidity dependence of the coalescence parameter B{sub d}. A new approach utilizing an expanding thermalized source combined with a coalescence code is developed for studying deuteron formation in heavy-ion collisions. The strong dependence of deuteron yields on collective motion implies that deuteron yields relative to those of protons can be used for constraining source parameters. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Measurement of D-meson azimuthal anisotropy in Au + Au 200 GeV collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are produced through initial hard scatterings and they are affected by the hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions throughout its whole evolution. Due to their heavy mass, charm quarks are expected to thermalize much more slowly than light flavor quarks. The charm quark flow is a unique tool to study the extent of thermalization of the bulk medium dominated by light quarks and gluons. At high pT, D-meson azimuthal anisotropy is sensitive to the path length dependence of charm quark energy loss in the medium, which offers new insights into heavy quark energy loss mechanisms - gluon radiation vs. collisional processes. We present the STAR measurement of elliptic flow (v2) of D0 and D± mesons in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV, for a wide transverse momentum range. These results are obtained from the data taken in the first year of physics running of the new STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker detector, which greatly improves open heavy flavor hadron measurements by the topological reconstruction of secondary decay vertices. The D-meson v2 is finite for pT > 2 GeV/c and systematically below the measurement of light particle species at the same energy. Comparison to a series of model calculations favors scenarios where charm flows with the medium and is used to infer a range for the charm diffusion coefficient 2 πTDs.

  15. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  16. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  17. On the role of metal particle size and surface coverage for photo-catalytic hydrogen production; a case study of the Au/CdS system

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, I.

    2015-09-25

    Photo-catalytic hydrogen production has been studied on Au supported CdS catalysts under visible light irradiation in order to understand the effect of Au particle size as well as the reaction medium properties. Au nanoparticles of size about 2-5 nm were deposited over hexagonal CdS particles using a new simple method involving reduction of Au3+ ions with iodide ions. Within the investigated range of Au (between 1 and 5 wt. %) fresh particles with mean size of 4 nm and XPS Au4f/Cd3d surface ratio of 0.07 showed the highest performance (ca. 1 molecule of H2 / Auatom s−1) under visible light irradiation (>420 nm and a flux of 35 mW/cm2). The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained from water (92%)-ethanol (8%) in an electrolyte medium (Na2S-Na2SO3). TEM studies of fresh and used catalysts showed that Au particle size increases (almost 5 fold) with increasing photo-irradiation time due to photo-agglomeration effect yet no sign of deactivation was observed. A mechanism for hydrogen production from ethanol-water electrolyte mixture is presented and discussed.

  18. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  19. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin A., E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Bakakin, Vladimir V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag{sub 2−x}Au{sub x}Se with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag{sub 2}Se – Ag{sub 1.94}Au{sub 0.06}Se, fischesserite Ag{sub 3}AuSe{sub 2} - Ag{sub 3.2}Au{sub 0.8}Se{sub 2} and gold selenide AuSe - Au{sub 0.94}Ag{sub 0.06}Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe. - Highlights: • Au-Ag selenides were synthesized. • Limited Ag-Au isomorphism in the selenides is affected by structural features. • Some new phases were introduced to the phase diagram Ag-Au-Se.

  20. Small cluster ions from source of negative ions by cesium sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X M; Shao, L; Liu, J R; Chu, W K

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the delivery of small cluster ions using a source of negative ions by cesium sputtering (SNICS). The negative cluster ions of B sub n , C sub n , Si sub n , Co sub n , Cu sub n , Ge sub n , Au sub n , GeB sub n and SiB sub n have been extracted by SNICS. Adequate beam current of some small clusters was obtained by changing several parameters for cluster ion yield. After a comprehensive study of the operation parameters, such as target material selection, target geometry, sputtering voltage and current, the small cluster ion current can be increased by several orders of magnitude, with little change on the monomer ion yield.

  1. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of low-momentum direct photons in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z

    2015-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured 2nd and 3rd order Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distributions of direct photons emitted at midrapidity in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV for various collision centralities. Combining two different analysis techniques, results were obtained in the transverse momentum range of $0.4

  2. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai,; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks,; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan,; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results from the STAR collaboration suggest event-by-event charge separation fluctuations perpendicular to the event plane in non-central heavy-ion collisions. Here we present the correlator previously used split into its two component parts to reveal correlations parallel and perpendicular to the event plane. The results are from a high statistics 200 GeV Au+Au collisions data set collected by the STAR experiment at RHIC. We explicitly count units of charge separation from which we find clear evidence for more charge separation fluctuations perpendicular than parallel to the event plane. We also employ a modified correlator to study the possible P-even background in same and opposite charge correlations.

  3. Event characterization and high order flow components of Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardan, Behruz; Blume, Christoph; Subotic, Maja [Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    HADES provides a large acceptance combined with a high mass resolution and therefor allows to study dielectron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. With the high statistics of seven billion Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV recorded in April/May 2012 also the investigation of higher order flow harmonics is possible. Collective flow is a sensitive probe for the properties of extreme QCD matter. However, its interpretation relies on the understanding of the initial conditions e.g. the eccentricity of the fireball created in the nuclear overlap region. Based on Glauber Monte Carlo calculations the initial conditions of nuclear collisions, with special emphasis on the correlations between participating nucleons, were examined. Observables of event-by-event flow fluctuations with respect to the reaction centrality are deduced from geometrical properties of the initial state and compared to the measured data.

  4. Azimuthal anisotropy of K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda production at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-09-23

    We report STAR results on the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) for strange particles K(0)(S), Lambda, and Lambda at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The value of v(2) as a function of transverse momentum, p(t), of the produced particle and collision centrality is presented for both particles up to p(t) approximately 3.0 GeV/c. A strong p(t) dependence in v(2) is observed up to 2.0 GeV/c. The v(2) measurement is compared with hydrodynamic model calculations. The physics implications of the p(t) integrated v(2) magnitude as a function of particle mass are also discussed.

  5. Centrality dependence of high-pt hadron suppression in Au + Au collisions at √(sNN) = 130 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Bonner, B. E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R. V.; Caines, H.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K. J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M..; Gushin, E.; Hallman, Timothy J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M. A.C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V. M.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, Q. [Wayne State U.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q. J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.

    2002-10-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons within 0.2T <6.0 GeV/c have been measured over a broad range of centrality for Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=130 GeV. Hadron yields are suppressed at high pT in central collisions relative to peripheral collisions and to a nucleon-nucleon reference scaled for collision geometry. Peripheral collisions are not suppressed relative to the nucleon-nucleon reference. The suppression varies continuously at intermediate centralities. The results indicate significant nuclear medium effects on high-pT hadron production in heavy-ion collisions at high energy.

  6. Collective motion in selected central collisions of Au on Au at 150A MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. C.; Herrmann, N.; Fan, Z. G.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Krämer, M.; Randrup, J.; Reisdorf, W.; Schüll, D.; Sodan, U.; Teh, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Pelte, D.; Trzaska, M.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belayev, I. M.; Berger, L.; Bini, M.; Blaich, Th.; Boussange, S.; Buta, A.; Čaplar, R.; Cerruti, C.; Cindro, N.; Coffin, J. P.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Erö, J.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Frolov, S.; Grigorian, Y.; Guillaume, G.; Hölbling, S.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Koncz, P.; Korchagin, Y.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Legrand, I.; Lebedev, A.; Maguire, C.; Manko, V.; Maurenzig, P.; Mgebrishvili, G.; Mösner, J.; Moisa, D.; Montarou, G.; Montbel, I.; Morel, P.; Neubert, W.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Petrovici, M.; Poggi, G.; Rami, F.; Ramillien, V.; Sadchikov, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Smolyankin, S.; Tezkratt, R.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A. V.

    1994-05-01

    Using the FOPI facility at GSI Darmstadt complete data of Au on Au collisions at 150A MeV were collected for charged products (Z=1-15) at laboratory angles 1°=3) are used to determine the collective energy which is found to be at least 10A MeV.

  7. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Trzeciakiewicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides.

  8. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy; Su, Dangshen [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Wang, Di [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  9. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRY OF NEUTRAL PION EMISSION IN AU+AU REACTIONS AT 1-GEV NUCLEON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VENEMA, LB; BRAAK, H; LOHNER, H; RASCHKE, AE; SIEMSSEN, RH; SUMBERA, M; WILSCHUT, HW; BERG, FD; KUHN, W; METAG, [No Value; NOTHEISEN, M; NOVOTNY, R; PFEIFFER, M; RITMAN, J; SCHWALB, O; GOBBI, A; HILDENBRAND, KD; HLAVAC, S; HOLZMANN, R; SIMON, RS; SODAN, U; TEH, K; WESSELS, JP; HERRMANN, N; WIENOLD, T; KOTTE, R; MOSNER, J; NEUBERT, W; WOHLFARTH, D; OSTENDORF, R; SCHUTZ, Y; BRUMMUND, N; SANTO, R

    1993-01-01

    The azimuthal angle distributions of neutral pions at midrapidity from Au+Au reactions at 1 GeV/nucleon incident energy have been measured. An enhanced emission of pi0's perpendicular to the reaction plane is observed. The azimuthal asymmetry is dependent on the pi0 momentum: the pi0 spectrum perpen

  10. EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRAINOR,T.A.; (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

    2004-03-15

    Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

  11. Observation of anisotropic event shapes and transverse flow in ultrarelativistic Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette, J.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cleland, W.E.; Clemen, M.; Cole, J.; Cormier, T.M.; David, G.; Dee, J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drigert, M.; Gilbert, S.; Hall, J.R.; Hemmick, T.K.; Herrmann, N.; Hong, B.; Jiang, C.L.; Kwon, Y.; Lacasse, R.; Lukaszew, A.; Li, Q.; Ludlam, T.W.; McCorkle, S.; Mark, S.K.; Matheus, R.; O' Brien, E.; Panitkin, S.; Piazza, T.; Pruneau, C.; Rao, M.N.; Rosati, M.; daSilva, N.C.; Sedykh, S.; Sonnadara, U.; Stachel, J.; Takai, H.; Takagui, E.M.; Voloshin, S.; Wang, G.; Wessels, J.P.; Woody, C.L.; Xu, N.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zou, C. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 (United States) McGill Univesity, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada) University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States) SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794 (United States) University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (B; (E877 Collaboration)

    1994-11-07

    Event shapes for Au + Au collisions at 11.4 GeV/[ital c] per nucleon were studied over nearly the full solid angle with the E877 apparatus. The analysis was performed by Fourier expansion of azimuthal distributions of the transverse energy ([ital E][sub [ital T

  12. LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormaza, M.; Fernández, L.; Lafuente, S.; Corso, M.; Schiller, F.; Xu, B.; Diakhate, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Ortega, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the crystal structure and electronic bands of LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111). By scanning-tunneling microscopy we study the formation of different alloy phases as a function of growth temperature and lanthanide coverage. We determine the specific growth conditions to achieve monolayers and bilayers of LaAu2 and CeAu2 with high crystalline quality. Due to lattice mismatch with the underlying Au substrate, both LaAu2 and CeAu2 exhibit long-range moiré patterns, which can serve as templates for further nanostructure growth. By angle-resolved photoemission we map the two-dimensional band structure of these surface alloys, discussing the nature of the different spectral features in the light of first-principles calculations.

  13. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  14. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-