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Sample records for fdg packed produced

  1. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidance on Facility Design and Production of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced rapidly in recent years and is becoming an indispensable imaging modality for the evaluation and staging of cancer patients. A key component of the successful operation of a PET centre is the on-demand availability of radiotracers (radiopharmaceuticals) labelled with suitable positron emitting radioisotopes. Of the hundreds of positron labelled radiotracers, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most successful and widely used imaging agent in PET today. While FDG is utilized largely in oncology for the management of cancer patients, its applications in neurology and cardiology are also steadily growing. A large number of PET facilities have been established in Member States over the past few years, and more are being planned. The design and operation of a facility for the production of FDG requires attention to detail, in particular the application of good manufacturing practices (GMP) guidelines and quality assurance. The product must conform to the required quality specifications and must be safe for human use. This book is intended to be a resource manual with practical information for planning and operating an FDG production facility, including design and implementation of the laboratories, facility layout, equipment, personnel and FDG quality assessment. GMP and quality management are discussed only briefly, since these topics are covered extensively in the IAEA publication Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidelines for Setting up a Facility (Technical Reports Series No. 471). It should be noted that manufacturing processes and quality specifications for FDG are not currently globally harmonized, and these do vary to some extent. However, there is no disagreement over the need to ensure that the product is manufactured in a controlled manner, that it conforms to applicable quality specifications and that it is safe for human use. Administrators, managers, radiopharmaceutical scientists, production

  2. 78 FR 48637 - Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Produce for Human Consumption; Extension of Comment Periods AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption,'' that appeared in... ``Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption'' with a 120...

  3. 78 FR 11611 - Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Produce for Human Consumption; Extension of Comment Period for Information Collection Provisions AGENCY..., Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption'' that appeared in the Federal Register of... ``Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption.'' FOR FURTHER...

  4. Low prevalence of human pathogens on fresh produce on farms and in packing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foodborne illness burdens individuals around the world. Consumption of produce contaminated with bacterial, parasite, and viral pathogens causes a significant proportion of cases of foodborne illness. Farms and packing facilities provide opportunities for contamination. This research aimed to determ...

  5. Structure and properties of a steel-based multilayer material produced by hot pack rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Plokhikh, A. I.; Yakovlev, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2013-07-01

    The structure of a multilayer metal material (MMM) produced from the U8 and 08Kh18N10 steels by the pack-rolling method has been studied using metallography and transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that two process cycles end in the formation of a laminated structure, which is characterized by structural and chemical inhomogeneity due to diffusion and relaxation processes. It is shown that, during pack rolling, an ultradispersed structure is formed in the layers; this structure is a mixture of ferrite, martensite, and austenite that consist of elements of submicrocrystalline, nanocrystalline, and microtwinned structures.

  6. Studying a multilayer material based on stainless steels and produced by hot pack rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Plokhikh, A. I.; Del'gado Reina, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure of a multilayer metal material produced from a composite blank based on sheets of the 08Kh18 and 08Kh18N10 steels by hot pack rolling has been studied using optical microscopy, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that two processing cycles are completed in the formation of a laminated structure that is characterized by structural and chemical inhomogeneities due to diffusion and relaxation processes. It has been shown that, during pack rolling, an ultradispersed structure is formed, which is a mixture of ferrite layers elongated in the direction of rolling and of packet martensite layers or layers of carbide-free bainite that has a subgrain structure.

  7. Comparison of Muscle Temperature Increases Produced by Moist Hot Pack and ThermoStim Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Jennifer

    2018-02-06

    ThermoStim Probe (TSP) has recently joined the market as a superficial heating modality. While there is limited research into the intramuscular heating capability of superficial heating modalities in general (moist hot pack, paraffin, warm whirlpool), no previous research has examined intramuscular heating capability of TSP. Evaluate rate and magnitude of intramuscular heating via TSP as compared to hydrocollator moist hot pack (MHP); determine if TSP can increase tissue temperature 3-4°C (vigorous heating range). Repeated-measures counterbalanced study. Multi-site trial; two college/university research laboratories. 18 healthy college-aged participants (11 females, 7 males, age: 23.0±2.1, weight: 74.64±18.64kg, height: 168.42±9.66cm, subcutaneous adipose: 0.71±0.17cm) with calf subcutaneous adipose heated faster than TSP at minutes 12 (p=.017), 16 (p=.002), and 20 (p=.001). There was no significant correlation between subcutaneous adipose thickness and maximum temperature increase obtained with either MHP (r=-.033, p=.896) or TSP (r=-.080, p=.753). MHP increased intramuscular temperature significantly more than TSP, however neither modality was capable of producing a 3-4°C temperature increase associated with increased tissue extensibility.

  8. Low Prevalence of Human Pathogens on Fresh Produce on Farms and in Packing Facilities: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia E. Van Pelt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne illness burdens individuals around the world and may be caused by consuming fresh produce contaminated with bacterial, parasite, and viral pathogens. Pathogen contamination on produce may originate at the farm and packing facility. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of human pathogens (bacteria, parasites, and viruses on fresh produce (fruits, herbs, and vegetables on farms and in packing facilities worldwide through a systematic review of 38 peer-reviewed articles. The median and range of the prevalence was calculated, and Kruskal–Wallis tests and logistic regression were performed to compare prevalence among pooled samples of produce groups, pathogen types, and sampling locations. Results indicated a low median percentage of fresh produce contaminated with pathogens (0%. Both viruses (p-value = 0.017 and parasites (p-value = 0.033, on fresh produce, exhibited higher prevalence than bacteria. No significant differences between fresh produce types or between farm and packing facility were observed. These results may help to better quantify produce contamination in the production environment and inform strategies to prevent future foodborne illness.

  9. Contamination of Fresh Produce by Microbial Indicators on Farms and in Packing Facilities: Elucidation of Environmental Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Faith E; Lickness, Jacquelyn Sunshine; Heredia, Norma; Fabiszewski de Aceituno, Anna; Newman, Kira L; Hodge, Domonique Watson; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; García, Santos; Leon, Juan S

    2017-06-01

    To improve food safety on farms, it is critical to quantify the impact of environmental microbial contamination sources on fresh produce. However, studies are hampered by difficulties achieving study designs with powered sample sizes to elucidate relationships between environmental and produce contamination. Our goal was to quantify, in the agricultural production environment, the relationship between microbial contamination on hands, soil, and water and contamination on fresh produce. In 11 farms and packing facilities in northern Mexico, we applied a matched study design: composite samples ( n = 636, equivalent to 11,046 units) of produce rinses were matched to water, soil, and worker hand rinses during two growing seasons. Microbial indicators (coliforms, Escherichia coli , Enterococcus spp., and somatic coliphage) were quantified from composite samples. Statistical measures of association and correlations were calculated through Spearman's correlation, linear regression, and logistic regression models. The concentrations of all microbial indicators were positively correlated between produce and hands (ρ range, 0.41 to 0.75; P contamination of soil and water and contamination of produce. This methodology provides a foundation for future field studies, and results highlight the need for interventions surrounding farmworker hygiene and sanitation to reduce microbial contamination of farmworkers' hands. IMPORTANCE This study of the relationships between microbes on produce and in the farm environment can be used to support the design of targeted interventions to prevent or reduce microbial contamination of fresh produce with associated reductions in foodborne illness. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. 75 FR 56019 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... budgeted increases in salaries, operating expenses, and promotion programs, and to build their operating... $29,000 contingency fund that would allow the Committee to take advantage of unexpected marketing... 7,600 pounds, of dates were produced per acre. The 2009-10 producer price published by NASS was $1...

  11. Microbial Indicator Profiling of Fresh Produce and Environmental Samples from Farms and Packing Facilities in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Norma; Caballero, Cindy; Cárdenas, Carmen; Molina, Karina; García, Rafael; Solís, Luisa; Burrowes, Vanessa; Bartz, Faith E; de Aceituno, Anna Fabiszewski; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; García, Santos; Leon, Juan

    2016-07-01

    To compare microbiological indicator and pathogen contamination among different types of fresh produce and environmental samples along the production chain, 636 samples of produce (rinsates from cantaloupe melons, jalapeño peppers, and tomatoes) and environmental samples (rinsates from hands of workers, soil, and water) were collected at four successive steps in the production process (from the field before harvest through the packing facility) on 11 farms in northern Mexico during 2011 and 2012. Samples were assayed for enteric pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, other Shiga toxigenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes) and microbial indicators (coliforms, other E. coli strains, and Enterococcus spp.). Salmonella was the only pathogen detected; it was found in one preharvest jalapeño sample (detection limits: 0.0033 CFU/ml in produce and hand samples, 0.0013 CFU/ml in water, and 0.04 CFU/g in soil). Microbial indicator profiles for produce, worker hands, and soil from jalapeño and tomato farms were similar, but cantaloupe farm samples had higher indicator levels (P soil (indicators were significantly more prevalent (70 to 89% of samples were positive; P = 0.01 to 0.02), and geometric mean levels were higher (0.3 to 0.6 log CFU/100 ml) than those in cantaloupe farm water (32 to 38% of samples were positive, geometric mean indicators were present during all production steps, but prevalence and levels were generally highest at the final on-farm production step (the packing facility) (P type and production step can inform the design of effective approaches to mitigate microbial contamination.

  12. A novel methodology to model the cooling processes of packed horticultural produce using 3D shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruyters, Willem; Verboven, Pieter; Rogge, Seppe; Vanmaercke, Simon; Ramon, Herman; Nicolai, Bart

    2017-10-01

    Freshly harvested horticultural produce require a proper temperature management to maintain their high economic value. Towards this end, low temperature storage is of crucial importance to maintain a high product quality. Optimizing both the package design of packed produce and the different steps in the postharvest cold chain can be achieved by numerical modelling of the relevant transport phenomena. This work presents a novel methodology to accurately model both the random filling of produce in a package and the subsequent cooling process. First, a cultivar-specific database of more than 100 realistic CAD models of apple and pear fruit is built with a validated geometrical 3D shape model generator. To have an accurate representation of a realistic picking season, the model generator also takes into account the biological variability of the produce shape. Next, a discrete element model (DEM) randomly chooses surface meshed bodies from the database to simulate the gravitational filling process of produce in a box or bin, using actual mechanical properties of the fruit. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is then developed with the final stacking arrangement of the produce to study the cooling efficiency of packages under several conditions and configurations. Here, a typical precooling operation is simulated to demonstrate the large differences between using actual 3D shapes of the fruit and an equivalent spheres approach that simplifies the problem drastically. From this study, it is concluded that using a simplified representation of the actual fruit shape may lead to a severe overestimation of the cooling behaviour.

  13. Graphic cigarette pack warnings do not produce more negative implicit evaluations of smoking compared to text-only warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dessel, Pieter; Smith, Colin Tucker; De Houwer, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Graphic warnings (GWs) on cigarette packs are widely used internationally with the aim of reducing smoking behavior. In the current study, we investigated whether GWs influence implicit evaluations of smoking, a potential moderator of smoking behavior, as measured with an Implicit Association Test (IAT). Results showed that viewing a GW did not produce more negative implicit evaluations of smoking for daily smokers, occasional smokers, or non-smokers, compared to viewing a text-only warning. If anything, effects were in the direction of evaluations of smoking being more positive after certain participants (i.e., daily and occasional smokers) viewed a GW. We also did not find any beneficial effects of GWs on explicit evaluations of smoking. These results contrast with the observation that non-smokers and occasional smokers (but not daily smokers) believed that GWs would be more effective than the text-only warnings. We discuss implications and limitations of these findings and provide recommendations for improving the effectiveness of cigarette pack warnings on implicit evaluations.

  14. 78 FR 17155 - Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Produce for Human Consumption; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule... fruits and vegetables grown for human consumption. FDA proposed these standards as part of our... for Human Consumption.'' The document published with several technical errors, including some errors...

  15. 78 FR 69605 - Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... Produce for Human Consumption; Extension of Comment Periods AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Consumption'' and for its information collection provisions. DATES: The FDA is extending the comment period... Consumption.'' The original comment period of 120 days was extended several times and interested persons were...

  16. 78 FR 24692 - Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Produce for Human Consumption; Extension of Comment Periods AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Consumption'' that appeared in the Federal Register of January 16, 2013. We are taking this action in response... Consumption'' with a 120-day comment period on the provisions of the proposed rule and a 30-day comment period...

  17. 78 FR 1130 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE....S.C. 601-674), hereinafter referred to as the ``Act.'' The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is... producers and handlers of Riverside County, California dates. They are familiar with the Committee's needs...

  18. Significance of volatile compounds produced by spoilage bacteria in vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon ( Salmo salar ) analyzed by GC-MS and multivariate regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik; Dalgaard, Paw

    2001-01-01

    , 1- penten-3-ol, and 1-propanol. The potency and importance of these compounds was confirmed by gas chromatography- olfactometry. The present study provides valuable information on the bacterial reactions responsible for spoilage off-flavors of cold-smoked salmon, which can be used to develop......Changes were studied in the concentration of 38 volatile compounds during chilled storage at 5 degreesC of six lots of commercially produced vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon and sterile cold-smoked salmon. The majority of volatile compounds produced during spoilage of cold-smoked salmon were...... alcohols, which were produced by microbial activity. Partial least- squares regression of volatile compounds and sensory results allowed for a multiple compound quality index to be developed. This index was based on volatile bacterial metabolites, 1- propanol and 2-butanone, and 2-furan...

  19. Supply of FDG : production and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloy, W.J.; Fallais, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Aim: To review the means of production of PET tracers and the logistIcs of their distribution, with special emphasis on 18 FDG - from an end-user point of view. Material and method: The experience of a satellite center (i.e. without in-house cyclotron) over one year. Results: The following topics are presented: Basic introduction to FDG and its radio-synthesis; properties of cyclotrons and linear accelerators; the economics of buying and running a cyclotron to produce FDG; satellite facilities (availability from radiopharmacies; fraction of FDG in the cost of running a PET center; recent developments in PET cameras, and their implications of FDG supply; diversification in the offer of commercial PET tracers; regulatory issues, and their influence on FDG supply; possible developments in onco-PET, neuro-PET, cardio-PET; generators and full PET Nuclear Medicine. Conclusion: The European experience is not necessarily completely applicable to a large country like South Africa; the question can be raised whether it is advisable to move the patients, the FDG or the camera around the country or its provinces. (author)

  20. Preparation of 18F-FDG by basic hydrolysis on '1-pot' FDG synthesis module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiming; Jin Rongbing; Fan Xijiang

    2007-01-01

    '1-pot' equipment is an automatic synthesis module of producing 18 F-FDG by acid hydrolysis process. Simple changes in the chemistry, plumbing, and programming of CPCU enable two back-to-back '1-pot' systems in a unit. The preparation of precursor of 18 F-FDG is the same with origin. The results of experiments showed that by basic hydrolysis procedure, the synthesis time is shorten from 45-50 min to 30-35 min, uncorrected synthesis yield can be increased from 45%-50% to 60%-65%, and the preparing procedure is stable. The quality of 18 F-FDG meets the requirements under USP fludeoxyglucose 18 F injection, radiochemical purity is more than 99% especially by HPLC. With '1-pot' FDG synthesis module Chemical Processing Control Unit (CPCU), 18 F-FDG can be prepared by basic hydrolysis process. (authors)

  1. Non FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, C., E-mail: cristina.nanni@aosp.bo.i [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fantini, L.; Nicolini, S.; Fanti, S. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    2- [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the radiopharmaceutical most frequently used for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). However, FDG cannot be used for many oncological, cardiological, or neurological conditions, either because the abnormal tissue does not concentrate it, or because the tissues under investigation demonstrate high physiological glucose uptake. Consequently, alternative PET tracers have been produced and introduced into clinical practice. The most important compounds in routine practice are {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-choline, mainly for the evaluation of prostate cancer; {sup 1}C-methionine for brain tumours; {sup 118}F-DOPA ({sup 18}F- deoxiphenilalanine) for neuroendocrine tumours and movement disorders; {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid-[1-Nal3]-octreotide) and other somatostatin analogues for neuroendocrine tumours; 11C-acetate for prostate cancer and hepatic masses and 18F-FLT (3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine) for a number of malignant tumours. Another impetus for the development of new tracers is to enable the investigation of biological processes in tumours other than glucose metabolism. This is especially important in the field of response assessment, where there are new agents that are targeted more specifically at angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis and other processes.

  2. Influence of support materials on continuous hydrogen production in anaerobic packed-bed reactor with immobilized hydrogen producing bacteria at acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Petra; Marinšek-Logar, Romana; Djinović, Petar; Pintar, Albin

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the impact of different support materials (Mutag BioChip™, expanded clay and activated carbon) on microbial hydrogen production in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) treating synthetic waste water containing glucose as the main carbon source at low pH value. The APBRs were inoculated with acid pretreated anaerobic sludge and operated at pH value of 4±0.2 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3h. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.80mol H 2 /mol glucose was achieved for the APBR packed with Mutag BioChip™ (R1), followed by expanded clay (R2, 1.74mol H 2 /mol glucose) and activated carbon (R3, 1.46mol H 2 /mol glucose). It was observed that the investigated support materials influenced the immobilization of hydrogen producing bacteria and consequently hydrogen production performance as well as composition of soluble metabolites. The main metabolic products were acetic acid and butyric acid accompanied with a smaller content of ethanol. The data indicated that in reactors with higher hydrogen yield (R1 and R2), acetate/butyrate (HAc/HBu) ratios were 1.7 and 1.6, respectively, while in the reactor with the lowest hydrogen yield (R3) the obtained HAc/HBu ratio was 4.8. Finally, stable hydrogen and organic acids production throughout the steady-state operation period at low pH values was achieved in all reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A fast linear predictive adaptive model of packed bed coupled with UASB reactor treating onion waste to produce biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milquez-Sanabria, Harvey; Blanco-Cocom, Luis; Alzate-Gaviria, Liliana

    2016-10-03

    Agro-industrial wastes are an energy source for different industries. However, its application has not reached small industries. Previous and current research activities performed on the acidogenic phase of two-phase anaerobic digestion processes deal particularly with process optimization of the acid-phase reactors operating with a wide variety of substrates, both soluble and complex in nature. Mathematical models for anaerobic digestion have been developed to understand and improve the efficient operation of the process. At present, lineal models with the advantages of requiring less data, predicting future behavior and updating when a new set of data becomes available have been developed. The aim of this research was to contribute to the reduction of organic solid waste, generate biogas and develop a simple but accurate mathematical model to predict the behavior of the UASB reactor. The system was maintained separate for 14 days during which hydrolytic and acetogenic bacteria broke down onion waste, produced and accumulated volatile fatty acids. On this day, two reactors were coupled and the system continued for 16 days more. The biogas and methane yields and volatile solid reduction were 0.6 ± 0.05 m 3 (kg VS removed ) -1 , 0.43 ± 0.06 m 3 (kg VS removed ) -1 and 83.5 ± 9.8 %, respectively. The model application showed a good prediction of all process parameters defined; maximum error between experimental and predicted value was 1.84 % for alkalinity profile. A linear predictive adaptive model for anaerobic digestion of onion waste in a two-stage process was determined under batch-fed condition. Organic load rate (OLR) was maintained constant for the entire operation, modifying effluent hydrolysis reactor feed to UASB reactor. This condition avoids intoxication of UASB reactor and also limits external buffer addition.

  4. Pack Up

    OpenAIRE

    Strømberg, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Dette projekt tager udgangspunkt i en målgruppe afprøvning af Pack Up. Pack Up er en prototype af en app, der omhandler at skabe et community for backpacker, hvor man kan interagere med hinanden og mødes mens man er på farten. Igennem projektet vil det belyses hvorvidt app'en dækker målgruppens behov, og om udformningen af produktet som en app, er hensigtmæssigt i forhold til målgruppen. Dette vil ske af en analyse ud fra den indsamlede empiri, hvor Preben Sepstrups1 målgruppe teori inddrages...

  5. Power Packing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-16

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about how to pack a lunch safely, to help keep you from getting sick.  Created: 8/16/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/16/2011.

  6. Packing Smart

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-22

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about packing a lunch that's not boring and is full of the power and energy kids need to make it through the day.  Created: 8/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/22/2011.

  7. Results of preliminary clinical trials of the positron emission mammography system PEM-I: a dedicated breast imaging system producing glucose metabolic images using FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, K; Aznar, M; Thompson, C J; Loutfi, A; Lisbona, R; Gagnon, J H

    2000-11-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is crucial for efficient and effective treatment. We have developed an instrument for positron emission mammography (PEM) called PEM-I that performs high-resolution metabolic imaging of breast cancer. Images of glucose metabolism are obtained after injection of 75 MBq FDG. The PEM detectors are integrated into a conventional mammography system, allowing acquisition of the emission images immediately after the mammogram, without subject repositioning, and accurate coregistration of images from the 2 modalities. In this article, we present the results of the first clinical pilot study with the instrument. Sixteen subjects (age range, 34-76 y) were studied. All subjects were nondiabetic, nonpregnant, and without a history of cancer. They had recently been found to have suggestive mammography findings or a palpable breast mass and underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy within 2 wk of the study. Results from the PEM study were compared with those from mammography and pathology. A PEM test was classified positive (indicating the presence of cancer) if significant focal uptake was seen in the image or if the counting rate in the breast with suggestive findings was significantly higher than in the contralateral breast. Of the 16 subjects studied, 14 were evaluable. Ten cancerous tumors and 4 benign tumors were confirmed by pathologic examination after complete removal of the tumor. PEM correctly detected the presence of disease in 8 of 10 subjects. Findings were false-negative in 2 instances and false-positive in none, giving the instrument 80% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 86% accuracy. Our preliminary results suggest that PEM can offer a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques and aid in expeditiously establishing the diagnosis of cancer. In all subjects, the PEM images were of diagnostic quality, with an

  8. Organic acids produced by lactic acid bacteria (Leuconostoc sp.) contribute to sensorial quality loss in modified-atmosphere-packed fresh-cut iceberg lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paillart, M.J.M.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der; Lommen, E.; Levin, E.; Otma, E.C.; Snels, J.C.M.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The shelf-life of fresh-cut lettuce packed in a modified atmosphere (MA) is determined by its "overall visual quality" (OVQ), being a measure of its general appearance based on colour and shape criteria. In addition to the OVQ, the development of off-flavour and acid off-smell reduces consumer

  9. Organic acids produced by lactic acid bacteria (Leuconostoc sp.) contribute to sensorial quality loss in modified-atmosphere-packed fresh-cut iceberg lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paillart, M.J.M.; Vossen, van der J.M.B.M.; Lommen, E.; Levin, E.; Otma, E.C.; Snels, J.C.M.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The shelf-life of fresh-cut lettuce packed in a modified atmosphere (MA) is determined by its "overall visual quality" (OVQ), being a measure of its general appearance based on colour and shape criteria. In addition to the OVQ, the development of off-flavour and acid off-smell reduces consumer

  10. Microbiological analysis of pre-packed sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) leaves for the presence of Salmonella spp. and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbeke, Stefanie; Ceuppens, Siele; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-09-02

    Enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and pathogenic Escherichia coli, have been detected and associated with food borne outbreaks from (imported) fresh leafy herbs. Screening on imported herbs from South East Asian countries has been described. However, limited information on prevalence of these pathogens is available from other sourcing regions. Therefore, fresh pre-packed basil and coriander leaves from a Belgian trading company were investigated for the presence of Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), generic E. coli and coliforms. In total 592 samples were collected originating from Belgium, Israel and Cyprus during 2013-2014. Multiplex PCR followed by further culture confirmation was used for the detection of Salmonella spp. and STEC, whereas the Petrifilm Select E. coli and VRBL-agar were used, respectively, for the enumeration of E. coli and coliforms. Salmonella was detected in 10 out of 592 samples (25g) (1.7%; 5 from basil and 5 from coriander), of which two samples were sourced from Israel and eight from Cyprus. The presence of STEC was suspected in 11 out of 592 samples (25g) (1.9%; 3 basil and 8 coriander), due to the detection of stx and eae genes, of which one sample originated from Belgium, four from Israel and six from Cyprus. No STEC was isolated by culture techniques, but in three samples a serotype (O26, O103 or O111) with its most likely associated eae-variant (β or θ) was detected by PCR. Generic E. coli was enumerated in 108 out of 592 samples, whereby 55, 32 and 13 samples respectively between 10-100, 100-1000 and 1000-10,000cfu/g and 8 samples exceeding 10,000cfu/g. Coliforms were enumerated in all herb samples at variable levels ranging from 1.6 to 7.5logcfu/g. Further statistics indicate that the E. coli class (categorized by level) was significantly correlated with the presence of Salmonella (p<0.001) or STEC (p=0.019), while coliform counts were significant correlated with Salmonella (p<0.001), but not with

  11. Cases of diffusely increased 18F FDG uptake in bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2009-01-01

    A whole body imaging of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT provides assessment of FDG uptake in bone marrow and other systemic organs. Diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow can be associated with leukocytosis, infection, anemia, administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor or erythropoietin. and cytokine-producing neoplasms and myeloproliferative syndromes, and etc, and this finding can be an important sign indicative of hyper-metabolism in hemopoietic tissue associated by various etiology. Diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow affect on FDG uptake in other organs or primary lesions, and must be differentiated from diffuse bone marrow involvement of malignant tumors. In this paper, we report cases of diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow experienced in our hospital, and discuss the mechanisms and diagnostic importance of this finding, by referring to the published literatures. (author)

  12. A simple method for the quality control of [F-18]FDG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziorowski, J.

    2010-01-01

    Most automated synthesis modules produce [F-18]FDG within half an hour, but the quality control involving up to three separate methods and three different analytical systems is time consuming. The use of HPLC, TLC, and GC for the quality control of [F-18]FDG is both time consuming and expensive (...

  13. A simple method for the quality control of [F-18]FDG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziorowski, J.

    2010-01-01

    Most automated synthesis modules produce [F-18]FDG within half an hour, but the quality control involving up to three separate methods and three different analytical systems is time consuming. The use of HPLC, TLC, and GC for the quality control of [F-18]FDG is both time consuming and expensive...

  14. A simple method for the quality control of [(18)F]FDG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziorowski, J

    2010-01-01

    Most automated synthesis modules produce [(18)F]FDG within half an hour, but the quality control involving up to three separate methods and three different analytical systems is time consuming. The use of HPLC, TLC, and GC for the quality control of [(18)F]FDG is both time consuming and expensive...

  15. Significance of volatile compounds produced by spoilage bacteria in vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon ( Salmo salar ) analyzed by GC-MS and multivariate regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik; Dalgaard, Paw

    2001-01-01

    -carboxaldehyde produced by autolytic activity. Only a few of the volatile compounds produced during spoilage of cold-smoked salmon had an aroma value high enough to indicate contribution to the spoilage off- flavor of cold-smoked salmon. These were trimethylamine, 3- methylbutanal, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol......, 1- penten-3-ol, and 1-propanol. The potency and importance of these compounds was confirmed by gas chromatography- olfactometry. The present study provides valuable information on the bacterial reactions responsible for spoilage off-flavors of cold-smoked salmon, which can be used to develop...

  16. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  17. Potential role of combined FDG PET/CT and contrast enhancement MRI in a rectal carcinoma model with nodal metastases characterized by a poor FDG-avidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Conti, Giamaica; Merigo, Flavia; Tambalo, Stefano; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Quarta, Carmelo; D’Ambrosio, Daniela; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Nanni, Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional role of MRI contrast enhancement (CE) in the primary tumor and the FDG uptake at PET in the lymph-node metastases. Materials and methods: A model of colorectal cancer induced by orthotopic HT-29 cells microinjection, producing pelvic lymph node metastases, was assessed using CE-MRI and FDG-PET. Histology and GLUT-1 immunohistochemistry were performed on primary tumors and iliac lymph nodes. Results: Primary tumors were characterized by low FDG-uptake but high CE-MRI, particularly at tumor periphery. Undetectable FDG-uptake characterized the metastatic lymph-nodes. Histology revealed large stromal bundles at tumor periphery and a dense network of stromal fibers and neoplastic cells in the inner portion of the tumors. Both primary tumors and positive lymph nodes showed poor GLUT-1 staining. Conclusion: Our data support the complementary role of MRI-CE and FDG PET in some types of carcinomas characterized by abundant cancer-associated stroma and poor FDG avidity consequent to poor GLUT-1 transported. In these tumors FDG-PET alone may be not completely adequate to obtain an adequate tumor radiotherapy planning, and a combination with dual CE-MRI is strongly recommended.

  18. Tunable random packings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumay, G; Vandewalle, N

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental protocol that allows one to tune the packing fraction η of a random pile of ferromagnetic spheres from a value close to the lower limit of random loose packing η RLP ≅0.56 to the upper limit of random close packing η RCP ≅0.64. This broad range of packing fraction values is obtained under normal gravity in air, by adjusting a magnetic cohesion between the grains during the formation of the pile. Attractive and repulsive magnetic interactions are found to affect stongly the internal structure and the stability of sphere packing. After the formation of the pile, the induced cohesion is decreased continuously along a linear decreasing ramp. The controlled collapse of the pile is found to generate various and reproducible values of the random packing fraction η

  19. Packings of deformable spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Peixinho, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    We present an experimental study of disordered packings of deformable spheres. Fluorescent hydrogel spheres immersed in water together with a tomography technique enabled the imaging of the three-dimensional arrangement. The mechanical behavior of single spheres subjected to compression is first examined. Then the properties of packings of a randomized collection of deformable spheres in a box with a moving lid are tested. The transition to a state where the packing withstands finite stresses before yielding is observed. Starting from random packed states, the power law dependence of the normal force versus packing fraction or strain at different velocities is quantified. Furthermore, a compression-decompression sequence at low velocities resulted in rearrangements of the spheres. At larger packing fractions, a saturation of the mean coordination number took place, indicating the deformation and faceting of the spheres.

  20. The value of FDG-PET in diagnosing peritoneal seeding of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Sun Mi; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Hwang, Dae Yong; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Peritoneal seeding of colon cancer cells is a common cause of morbidity and eventual mortality with recurrent disease. This study evaluated the role of F -18 FDG PET in detecting peritoneal seeding in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and to identify characteristic patterns of abdominal F-18 FDG uptake. We reviewed the FDG PET and CT images and clinical charts of 49 patients with peritoneal seeding and 22 cancer patients without peritoneal seeding. We also assessed FDG PET scans from 20 healthy volunteers as a baseline study. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over peritoneal lesions in cancer patients and over the area of most intense intestinal uptake in healthy volunteers and cancer patients without peritoneal carcinomatosis were measured. The result were correlated with either biopsy or ascitic aspirate. The characteristics of FDG uptake were evaluated: overall pattern (focal or diffuse), heterogeneity (yes or none), intensity (low, or equal, faint to moderate, intense). The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of FDG PET were superior to CT for the detection of peritoneal lesions (sensitivity: 71.4% vs 57.1%, specificity: 72.7% vs 54.5%: PPV: 85.4% vs 73.7%, NPV: 53.3 % vs 36.4% ). The FDG uptake in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis was divided into nodular(14), diffuse (23) and mixed pattern (12). An SUVmax threshold of 5.2 produced a diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET of 78%. The additional information provided by FDG PET allowed a more accurate diagnosis in 12 patients (24 %), and led to alteration of the therapeutic strategy in 6 (12.2%) of the enrolled patients (n=49) with peritoneal seeding. FDG-PET was more sensitive than CT for the detection of peritoneal seeding in CRC, and altered patient management. Thus, the application of PET may be beneficial to the management of peritoneal seeding in patient with CRC.

  1. The value of FDG-PET in diagnosing peritoneal seeding of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Sun Mi; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Hwang, Dae Yong; Lim, Sang Moo

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal seeding of colon cancer cells is a common cause of morbidity and eventual mortality with recurrent disease. This study evaluated the role of F -18 FDG PET in detecting peritoneal seeding in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and to identify characteristic patterns of abdominal F-18 FDG uptake. We reviewed the FDG PET and CT images and clinical charts of 49 patients with peritoneal seeding and 22 cancer patients without peritoneal seeding. We also assessed FDG PET scans from 20 healthy volunteers as a baseline study. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over peritoneal lesions in cancer patients and over the area of most intense intestinal uptake in healthy volunteers and cancer patients without peritoneal carcinomatosis were measured. The result were correlated with either biopsy or ascitic aspirate. The characteristics of FDG uptake were evaluated: overall pattern (focal or diffuse), heterogeneity (yes or none), intensity (low, or equal, faint to moderate, intense). The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of FDG PET were superior to CT for the detection of peritoneal lesions (sensitivity: 71.4% vs 57.1%, specificity: 72.7% vs 54.5%: PPV: 85.4% vs 73.7%, NPV: 53.3 % vs 36.4% ). The FDG uptake in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis was divided into nodular(14), diffuse (23) and mixed pattern (12). An SUVmax threshold of 5.2 produced a diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET of 78%. The additional information provided by FDG PET allowed a more accurate diagnosis in 12 patients (24 %), and led to alteration of the therapeutic strategy in 6 (12.2%) of the enrolled patients (n=49) with peritoneal seeding. FDG-PET was more sensitive than CT for the detection of peritoneal seeding in CRC, and altered patient management. Thus, the application of PET may be beneficial to the management of peritoneal seeding in patient with CRC

  2. Physiological FDG uptake in the palatine tonsils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Joji; Okamura, Terue; Shakudo, Miyuki

    2001-01-01

    In clinical F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) studies of the head and neck region, remarkable symmetric tonsillar FDG uptake is sometimes observed. We determined the incidence and degree of tonsillar FDG uptake and investigated the significance of tonsillar FDG uptake. Between June 1998 and August 1998, we obtained informed consent from 17 patients who were scheduled to undergo a FDG-PET study for their own disease (11 men and 6 women; aged 22 to 77 yr) and who did not have head and neck disease to perform FDG-PET scanning of the head and neck region in addition to their target organs. The incidence and degree of tonsillar FDG uptake were determined. Remarkable tonsillar FDG uptake was found in 9 patients. The SUVs of these FDG uptakes ranged from 2.48 to 6.75, with a mean of 4.29±1.20 (SD). Tonsillar FDG uptakes in the remaining 8 patients were not remarkable, and their SUVs ranged from 1.93 to 3.31, with a mean of 2.46±0.45. Head and neck disease does not appear to have been responsible for the increase in tonsillar FDG uptake. Differences among tonsillar FDG uptake in these 17 patients without head and neck disease appear to reflect differences in activity of ''physiological'' inflammation of the palatine tonsils. (author)

  3. Development of an effective valve packing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-12-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV`s and AOV`s, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance.

  4. Development of an effective valve packing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV's and AOV's, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance

  5. Packing Degenerate Graphs Greedily

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allen, P.; Böttcher, J.; Hladký, J.; Piguet, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, August (2017), s. 45-51 ISSN 1571-0653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-07822Y Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : tree packing conjecture * graph packing * graph processes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics

  6. Flat Pack Toy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  7. TLC Pack Unpacked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Margret; Colpaert, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    TLC Pack stands for Teaching Languages to Caregivers and is a course designed to support migrants working or hoping to work in the caregiving sector. The TLC Pack resources range from A2 to B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), and will be made available online in the six project languages: Dutch, English,…

  8. Packing force data correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiman, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the issues facing valve maintenance personnel today deals with an appropriate methodology for installing and setting valve packing that will minimize leak rates, yet ensure functionality of the the valve under all anticipated operating conditions. Several variables can affect a valve packing's ability to seal, such as packing bolt torque, stem finish, and lubrication. Stem frictional force can be an excellent overall indicator of some of the underlying conditions that affect the sealing characteristics of the packing and the best parameter to use when adjusting the packing. This paper addresses stem friction forces, analytically derives the equations related to these forces, presents a methodology for measuring these forces on valve stems, and attempts to correlate the data directly to the underlying variables

  9. Optimal Packed String Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben-Kiki, Oren; Bille, Philip; Breslauer, Dany

    2011-01-01

    In the packed string matching problem, each machine word accommodates – characters, thus an n-character text occupies n/– memory words. We extend the Crochemore-Perrin constantspace O(n)-time string matching algorithm to run in optimal O(n/–) time and even in real-time, achieving a factor – speedup...... over traditional algorithms that examine each character individually. Our solution can be efficiently implemented, unlike prior theoretical packed string matching work. We adapt the standard RAM model and only use its AC0 instructions (i.e., no multiplication) plus two specialized AC0 packed string...

  10. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  11. Optimized packings with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pintér, János

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents a selection of case studies that address a substantial range of optimized object packings (OOP) and their applications. The contributing authors are well-recognized researchers and practitioners. The mathematical modelling and numerical solution aspects of each application case study are presented in sufficient detail. A broad range of OOP problems are discussed: these include various specific and non-standard container loading and object packing problems, as well as the stowing of hazardous and other materials on container ships, data centre resource management, automotive engineering design, space station logistic support, cutting and packing problems with placement constraints, the optimal design of LED street lighting, robust sensor deployment strategies, spatial scheduling problems, and graph coloring models and metaheuristics for packing applications. Novel points of view related to model development and to computational nonlinear, global, mixed integer optimization and heuristic st...

  12. HPLC and TLC methods for analysis of [18F]FDG and its metabolites from biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokka, Johanna; Grönroos, Tove J; Viljanen, Tapio; Solin, Olof; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja

    2017-03-24

    The most used positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG), is a glucose analogue that is used to measure tissue glucose consumption. Traditionally, the Sokoloff model is the basis for [ 18 F]FDG modeling. According to this model, [ 18 F]FDG is expected to be trapped in a cell in the form of [ 18 F]FDG-6-phosphate ([ 18 F]FDG-6-P). However, several studies have shown that in tissues, [ 18 F]FDG metabolism goes beyond [ 18 F]FDG-6-P. Our aim was to develop radioHPLC and radioTLC methods for analysis of [ 18 F]FDG metabolites from tissue samples. The radioHPLC method uses a sensitive on-line scintillation detector to detect radioactivity, and the radioTLC method employs digital autoradiography to detect the radioactivity distribution on a TLC plate. The HPLC and TLC methods were developed using enzymatically in vitro-produced metabolites of [ 18 F]FDG as reference standards. For this purpose, three [ 18 F]FDG metabolites were synthesized: [ 18 F]FDG-6-P, [ 18 F]FD-PGL, and [ 18 F]FDG-1,6-P2. The two methods were evaluated by analyzing the [ 18 F]FDG metabolic profile from rodent ex vivo tissue homogenates. The HPLC method with an on-line scintillation detector had a wide linearity in a range of 5Bq-5kBq (LOD 46Bq, LOQ 139Bq) and a good resolution (Rs ≥1.9), and separated [ 18 F]FDG and its metabolites clearly. The TLC method combined with digital autoradiography had a high sensitivity in a wide range of radioactivity (0.1Bq-2kBq, LOD 0.24Bq, LOQ 0.31Bq), and multiple samples could be analyzed simultaneously. As our test and the method validation with ex vivo samples showed, both methods are useful, and at best they complement each other in analysis of [ 18 F]FDG and its radioactive metabolites from biological samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination of Radiation and Burn Injury Alters FDG Uptake in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Edward A.; Winter, David; Tolman, Crystal; Paul, Kasie; Hamrahi, Victoria; Tompkins, Ronald; Fischman, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and burn injury have both been shown to alter glucose utilization in vivo. The present study was designed to study the effect of burn injury combined with radiation exposure, on glucose metabolism in mice using [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG). Groups of male mice weighing approximately 30g were studied. Group 1 was irradiated with a 137Cs source (9 Gy). Group 2 received full thickness burn injury on 25% total body surface area followed by resuscitated with saline (2mL, IP). Group 3 received radiation followed 10 minutes later by burn injury. Group 4 were sham treated controls. After treatment, the mice were fasted for 23 hours and then injected (IV) with 50 µCi of 18FDG. One hour post injection, the mice were sacrificed and biodistribution was measured. Positive blood cultures were observed in all groups of animals compared to the shams. Increased mortality was observed after 6 days in the burn plus radiated group as compared to the other groups. Radiation and burn treatments separately or in combination produced major changes in 18FDG uptake by many tissues. In the heart, brown adipose tissue (BAT) and spleen, radiation plus burn produced a much greater increase (p<0.0001) in 18FDG accumulation than either treatment separately. All three treatments produced moderate decreases in 18FDG accumulation (p<0.01) in the brain and gonads. Burn injury, but not irradiation, increased 18FDG accumulation in skeletal muscle; however the combination of burn plus radiation decreased 18FDG accumulation in skeletal muscle. This model may be useful for understanding the effects of burns + irradiation injury on glucose metabolism and in developing treatments for victims of injuries produced by the combination of burn plus irradiation. PMID:23143615

  14. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  15. FDG uptake in the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, M. J.; Cho, H. J.; Cho, E. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Lee, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate histopathologic features of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) to predict FDG uptake on PET. 153 patients(102 men; mean age, 55 y) were diagnosed with AGC by surgery were included in this study. PET images were evaluated by visual and semi-quantitative analysis of FDG uptake in primary tumors. Primary tumors size were measured and divided according to Borrmann classification. Tumor histology was classified under WHO classification, depth of invasion and Iymphovascular invasion. The tumors were also grouped by high cellular(cellularity = 50%) and low cellular group (<50%). Microscopic growth type was based on Lauren classification. Stromal fibrosis degree and inflammatory cell infiltration amount was graded as low(none∼mild), or high(moderate∼severe). Lymph node metastases was assessed in all patients. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate differences in SUV as to histopathologic factors. Of the 153 patients, 21 patients(14%) had primary tumor invisible on initial whole body images. After water ingestion, the tumors became visible in 15 of the 21 patients due to disappearance of physiologic stomach uptake. Polypoid or ulcerofungating tumors, high cellularity, intestinal growth pattern, and larger tumors significantly predicted increased tumor SUVs. Well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma tended to show high cellularity and intestinal growth pattern. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma had diverse spectrum of histopathology. Signet ring cell carcinomas were mostly ulceroinfiltrative or diffusely infiltrative in macroscopic type and diffuse in microscopic tumor growth. Mucinous adenocarcinomas were mostly low in cellularity. FDG uptake patterns are useful in representing histopathologic characteristics of the entire tumor in gastric cancers. The degree of FDG uptake depends on tumor size, macroscopic type, cellularity, and microscopic growth pattern and it shows no association with well known important prognostic

  16. A clinical positron emission tomography facility. 2-{sup 18}FDG studies: Development and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, Tomas

    1996-10-01

    Two different types of accelerators have been used for production of ({sup 18}F)fluoride, and the isotope produced has been used for radiolabelling of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-{sup 18}FDG). A rotating PET scanner, based on two scintillation camera heads, has been developed and used for human 2-{sup 18}FDG studies. The suitability of an energy window in the Compton region for imaging 511 keV photons in scintillation camera systems has been evaluated. A new simplified method for normalizing clinical 2-{sup 18}FDG results has been developed and validated, using erythrocytes as a reference tissue, requiring only one blood sample in the middle of the PET scan to calculate the integrated 2-{sup 18}FDG input function with an accuracy better than 8 percent. An investigation using 2-{sup 18}FDG PET to monitor the effect of therapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients has been performed. We found that low initial metabolic rate of glucose (MRG) predicted a complete local response. The second PET examination gave no further information for this group. In the group of primary tumours and lymph node metastases representing a combination of high initial MRG and small decrease in MRG at he second PET examination, the outcome was unfavourable. An accurate normalization of 2-{sup 18}FDG uptake was essential to evaluate the results of this study. 239 refs, 10 tabs.

  17. A clinical positron emission tomography facility. 2-18FDG studies: Development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Tomas.

    1996-10-01

    Two different types of accelerators have been used for production of ( 18 F)fluoride, and the isotope produced has been used for radiolabelling of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2- 18 FDG). A rotating PET scanner, based on two scintillation camera heads, has been developed and used for human 2- 18 FDG studies. The suitability of an energy window in the Compton region for imaging 511 keV photons in scintillation camera systems has been evaluated. A new simplified method for normalizing clinical 2- 18 FDG results has been developed and validated, using erythrocytes as a reference tissue, requiring only one blood sample in the middle of the PET scan to calculate the integrated 2- 18 FDG input function with an accuracy better than 8 percent. An investigation using 2- 18 FDG PET to monitor the effect of therapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients has been performed. We found that low initial metabolic rate of glucose (MRG) predicted a complete local response. The second PET examination gave no further information for this group. In the group of primary tumours and lymph node metastases representing a combination of high initial MRG and small decrease in MRG at he second PET examination, the outcome was unfavourable. An accurate normalization of 2- 18 FDG uptake was essential to evaluate the results of this study. 239 refs, 10 tabs

  18. Heuristics for Multidimensional Packing Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Jens

    costs significantly. For packing problems in general are given a set of items and one of more containers. The items must be placed within the container such that some objective is optimized and the items do not overlap. Items and container may be rectangular or irregular (e.g. polygons and polyhedra...... methods. Two important problem variants are the knapsack packing problem and the strip-packing problem. In the knapsack packing problem, each item is given a profit value, and the problem asks for the subset with maximal profit that can be placed within one container. The strip-packing problem asks...... for a minimum height container required for the items. The main contributions of the thesis are three new heuristics for strip-packing and knapsack packing problems where items are both rectangular and irregular. In the two first papers we describe a heuristic for the multidimensional strip-packing problem...

  19. Argo packing friction research update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanTassell, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of valve packing friction and its affect on the operability of motor- and air-operated valves (MOVs and AOVs). At this time, most nuclear power plants are required to perform postmaintenance testing following a packing adjustment or replacement. In many cases, the friction generated by the packing does not impact the operability window of a valve. However, to date there has not been a concerted effort to substantiate this claim. To quantify the effects of packing friction, it has become necessary to develop a formula to predict the friction effects accurately. This formula provides a much more accurate method of predicting packing friction than previously used factors based strictly on stem diameter. Over the past 5 years, Argo Packing Company has been developing and testing improved graphite packing systems at research facilities, such as AECL Chalk River and Wyle Laboratories. Much of this testing has centered around reducing and predicting friction that is related to packing. In addition, diagnostic testing for Generic Letter 89-10 MOVs and AOVs has created a significant data base. In July 1992 Argo asked several utilities to provide running load data that could be used to quantify packing friction repeatability and predictability. This technical paper provides the basis to predict packing friction, which will improve calculations for thrust requirements for Generic Leter 89-10 and future AOV programs. In addition, having an accurate packing friction formula will improve packing performance when low running loads are identified that would indicate insufficient sealing force

  20. The Six Pack Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Ritter, Thomas

    Ever seen a growth strategies fail because it was not connect ed to the firm’s customer base? Or a customer relationship strategy falters just because it was the wrong thing to do with that given customer? This article presents the six pack model, a tool that makes growth profitable and predictable....... Not all customers can and should grow – thus a firm needs to classify its customers in order to implement the right customer strategy....

  1. Study to master 18F-FDG radiopharmaceutical production process by Korean Cyclotron KOTRONS 13 MeV at Hanoi Irradiation Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quang Anh; Tran Manh Thang; Dam Thi Tam; Mai Van Vinh

    2016-01-01

    A PET Cyclotron center is built in Hanoi Irradiation Center (HIC), VINATOM and expectation put in operation in the middle of 2016. Three main processes in 18 F-FDG synthesis general process of Samyoung Unitech synthesizer module were studied as: effect of time to water removal process, effect of time to nucleophilic substitution reaction, and effect of temperature and time to hydrolysis process. The optimum parameters are collected and re-installed for 18 F-FDG synthesizer module to achieve highest yield. The human resource was trained basic to advanced theoretical and practical training programs of 18F-FDG Radiopharmaceutical Production by Vietnamese and Korean senior experts in HICs facility for this project. After training courses, the human resource is able to produce and quality control 18 F-FDG Radiopharmaceutical in different modules and quality control systems such as GE-MX (GE), Synthera (IBA), and Samyoung Unitech (SYU). 18 F-FDG Radiopharmaceutical was produced in HIC achieves British Pharmacopeia (BP) standards and tested in animals. Animal PET/CT scanner images show clearly distribution of FDG according to physiological characters. Besides, this project were establishing 18 F-FDG Radiopharmaceutical Production Process by cyclotron KOTRONS13 and Samyoung Unitech synthesizer module and Quality Assurance, Quality Control Process attain BP standards at Hanoi Irradiation Center; and establishing the training documents for practical production human resource training, 18 F-FDG radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Process, Quality Control Process which attain BP standards. (author)

  2. Dependence of FDG uptake on tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei; Ruan, Shutian; Carlin, Sean; Larson, Steven M.; Campa, Jose; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the factors affecting the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake in tumors at a microscopic level, by correlating it with tumor hypoxia, cellular proliferation, and blood perfusion. Methods and Materials: Nude mice bearing Dunning prostate tumors (R3327-AT) were injected with 18 F-FDG and pimonidazole, bromodeoxyuridine, and, 1 min before sacrifice, with Hoechst 33342. Selected tumor sections were imaged by phosphor plate autoradiography, while adjacent sections were used to obtain the images of the spatial distribution of Hoechst 33342, pimonidazole, and bromodeoxyuridine. The images were co-registered and analyzed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained from these tumors demonstrated that 18 F-FDG uptake was positively correlated with pimonidazole staining intensity in each data set studied. Correlation of FDG uptake with bromodeoxyuridine staining intensity was always negative. In addition, FDG uptake was always negatively correlated with the staining intensity of Hoechst 33342. Conclusions: For the Dunning prostate tumors studied, FDG uptake was always positively correlated with hypoxia and negatively correlated with both cellular proliferation and blood flow. Therefore, for the tumor model studied, higher FDG uptake is indicative of tumor hypoxia, but neither blood flow nor cellular proliferation

  3. To Pack or Not to Pack? A Randomized Trial of Vaginal Packing After Vaginal Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Lauren B; Crisp, Catrina C; Oakley, Susan H; Mazloomdoost, Donna; Kleeman, Steven D; Benbouajili, Janine M; Ghodsi, Vivian; Pauls, Rachel N

    2016-01-01

    Placement of vaginal packing after pelvic reconstructive surgery is common; however, little evidence exists to support the practice. Furthermore, patients have reported discomfort from the packs. We describe pain and satisfaction in women treated with and without vaginal packing. This institutional review board-approved randomized-controlled trial enrolled patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy with prolapse repairs. The primary outcome was visual analog scales (VASs) for pain on postoperative day 1. Allocation to "packing" ("P") or "no-packing" ("NP") arms occurred intraoperatively at the end of surgery. Visual analog scales regarding pain and satisfaction were completed early on postoperative day 1 before packing removal. Visual analog scale scores for pain, satisfaction, and bother attributable to packing were recorded before discharge. All packing and perineal pads were weighed to calculate a "postoperative vaginal blood loss." Perioperative data were collected from the hospital record. Our sample size estimation required 74 subjects. Ninety-three women were enrolled. After exclusions, 77 were randomized (P, 37; NP, 40). No differences were found in surgical information, hemoglobin levels, or narcotic use between groups. However, "postoperative vaginal blood loss" was greater in packed subjects (P discharge (P, 35.0 vs NP, 40.0; P = 0.43] were not significantly different between treatment arms. Likewise, VAS scores for satisfaction before removal of packing (P, 81.0 vs NP, 90.0; P = 0.08] and before discharge (P, 90.0 vs NP, 90.5; P = 0.60] were not significantly different. Packed patients noted lower nursing verbal pain scores (P = 0.04) and used less ketorolac (P = 0.01). Bother from packing was low overall. Although there was no difference based on VAS, women receiving vaginal packing had lower nursing documented pain and used less ketorolac than packed women. Vaginal packing may provide benefit and can remain part of the surgical practice.

  4. New bounds for multi-dimensional packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Seiden; R. van Stee (Rob)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractNew upper and lower bounds are presented for a multi-dimensional generalization of bin packing called box packing. Several variants of this problem, including bounded space box packing, square packing, variable sized box packing and resource augmented box packing are also studied. The

  5. ExactPack Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Robert Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doebling, Scott William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woods, Charles Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walter, John William Jr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rogers, Michael Lloyd [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-05-09

    For code verification, one compares the code output against known exact solutions. There are many standard test problems used in this capacity, such as the Noh and Sedov problems. ExactPack is a utility that integrates many of these exact solution codes into a common API (application program interface), and can be used as a stand-alone code or as a python package. ExactPack consists of python driver scripts that access a library of exact solutions written in Fortran or Python. The spatial profiles of the relevant physical quantities, such as the density, fluid velocity, sound speed, or internal energy, are returned at a time specified by the user. The solution profiles can be viewed and examined by a command line interface or a graphical user interface, and a number of analysis tools and unit tests are also provided. We have documented the physics of each problem in the solution library, and provided complete documentation on how to extend the library to include additional exact solutions. ExactPack’s code architecture makes it easy to extend the solution-code library to include additional exact solutions in a robust, reliable, and maintainable manner.

  6. Cell packing structures

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-03-03

    This paper is an overview of architectural structures which are either composed of polyhedral cells or closely related to them. We introduce the concept of a support structure of such a polyhedral cell packing. It is formed by planar quads and obtained by connecting corresponding vertices in two combinatorially equivalent meshes whose corresponding edges are coplanar and thus determine planar quads. Since corresponding triangle meshes only yield trivial structures, we focus on support structures associated with quad meshes or hex-dominant meshes. For the quadrilateral case, we provide a short survey of recent research which reveals beautiful relations to discrete differential geometry. Those are essential for successfully initializing numerical optimization schemes for the computation of quad-based support structures. Hex-dominant structures may be designed via Voronoi tessellations, power diagrams, sphere packings and various extensions of these concepts. Apart from the obvious application as load-bearing structures, we illustrate here a new application to shading and indirect lighting. On a higher level, our work emphasizes the interplay between geometry, optimization, statics, and manufacturing, with the overall aim of combining form, function and fabrication into novel integrated design tools.

  7. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV max , and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV max with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  8. Normal cerebral FDG uptake during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Disciplines of Imaging and Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Current understanding of cerebral FDG uptake during childhood originates from a small number of studies in patients with neurological abnormalities. Our aim was to describe cerebral FDG uptake in a dataset of FDG PET scans in children more likely to represent a normal population. We reviewed cerebral FDG PET scans in children up to 16 years of age with suspected/proven extracranial malignancies and the following exclusions: central nervous system metastases, previous malignancies, previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy, development of cerebral metastases during therapy, neurological conditions, taking antiepileptic medication or medications likely to interfere with cerebral metabolism, and general anaesthesia within 24 h. White matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and the cerebellar cortex were analysed using regional SUV{sub max}, and the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum were analysed using a regional relative uptake analysis in comparison to maximal cortical uptake. Scans from 30 patients (age range 11 months to 16 years, mean age 10 years 5 months) were included. All regions showed increasing SUV{sub max} with age. The parietal, occipital, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobes showed lower rates of increasing FDG uptake causing changing patterns of regional FDG uptake during childhood. The cortical regions showing the most intense uptake in early childhood were the parietal and occipital lobes. At approximately 7 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the frontal lobes and at approximately 10 years of age these regions had relatively less uptake than the thalamus. Relative FDG uptake in the brain has not reached an adult pattern by 1 year of age, but continues to change up to 16 years of age. The changing pattern is due to different regional rates of increasing cortical FDG uptake, which is less rapid in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes than in the frontal lobes. (orig.)

  9. Solving the Granular Inverse Packing Problem with Artificial Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-03-01

    If a collection of identical particles is poured into a container, it is obvious that different shapes will fill to different densities. But what is the shape that fills a container as close as possible to a pre-specified, desired density? We demonstrate a solution to this inverse-packing problem by framing it in the context of artificial evolution. By representing shapes as bonded spheres, we show how particles may be mutated, simulated, and selected to produce particularly dense or loose packing aggregates, both with and without friction. Moreover, we show how motifs emerge linking these shapes together. The result is a set of design rules that function as an effective solution to the inverse packing problem for given packing procedures and boundary conditions. Finally, we show that these results may be verified by experiments on 3d printed prototypes used to make packings in the real world.

  10. Chilean experience in production of 18F-FDG from 18F in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandia, M.; Godoy, N.; Errazu, X.; Hernandez; Figols, M.; Firnau, G.; Tronsoco, F.

    2000-01-01

    18 F-FDG (fluorine-deoxy-D-glucose) is an important and useful radiopharmaceutical for imaging and study of myocardial viability. Usually cyclotron-produced 18 F is used to label 18 F-FDG. The availability of a 5 MW Nuclear Reactor in Chile and the absence of a quality cyclotron to produce 18 F required that we developed a method in order to obtain suitable 18 F to label 18 F-FDG using the facilities we have at the Nuclear Center of La Reina, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The nuclear reactions involved are: 6 Li(n,aα) 3 H and 16 O( 3 H,n) 18 F. Enriched Li 2 CO 3 ( 6 Li = 95 %) was irradiated in a 5 MW swimming pool type nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 5. 7 x 10 13 n cm -2 s -1 for 4 hours. The irradiated Li 2 CO 3 was dissolved in H 2 SO 4 (1:1) and distilled as trimethylsilyl( 18 F)fluoride ( 18 F-TMS). The labelling of the sugar was carried out using the method described by Hamacker. The 18 F-TMS was trapped in a solution of acetonitrile, water, potassium carbonate, and kriptofix and hydrolysed to form 18 F fluoride. The nucleophilic complex reacts with 1,3,4,6, tetra-O-acetyl- 2-O-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-bβ-D-mannopyranose. The acetylated carbohydrate by acid hydrolysis produces 18 F-FDG. The final product was purified using an ion retarding resin (AG11-A8) and a system two Sep Pak Plus: Alumina and C-18 cartridge and sterilised by Millipore 0.22 μm filter. The 18 F-FDG was obtained in an apyrogenic and sterile solution. The 18 F radionuclide purity was higher than 99.9% and the radiochemical purity ofthe 18 F-FDG obtained was over than 99%. Residual 3 H content was as low as 20 (Bq 3 H/MBq 18 F-FDG.). The yield of the process 18 F-FDG was 13.2 %. (authors)

  11. FDG and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the imaging of prosthetic joint infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Asa, Sertac; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, M.S.; Halac, Metin; Kabasakal, Levent; Soenmezoglu, Kerim; Kanmaz, Bedii [University of Istanbul, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [University of Istanbul, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul (Turkey); Erkan, Melih Engin [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Duzce (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing as a result of the ageing of the population. Although complications such as heterotrophic ossification, fracture and dislocation are relatively rare, differentiating aseptic loosening, the most common complication of arthroplasty from infection, is a major challenge for clinicians. Radionuclide imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice since it is not affected by orthopaedic hardware. Whereas FDG PET/CT imaging has been widely used in periprosthetic infection, it cannot discriminate aseptic from septic inflammation. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of FDG PET/CT and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. Of 54 patients with painful joint arthroplasty who were imaged by FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection examined, 46 (36 women, 10 men; mean age 61.04 ± 12.2 years, range 32 - 89 years) with 54 painful joint prostheses (19 hip, 35 knee) with grade 2 (above liver uptake) FDG accumulation on FDG PET/CT were included in the study and these 46 patients also underwent FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT. Final diagnoses were made by histopathological-microbiological culture or clinical follow-up. The final diagnosis showed infection in 15 (28 %) and aseptic loosening in 39 (72 %) of the 54 prostheses. FDG PET/CT was found to have a positive predictive value of 28 % (15/54). Since patients with no FDG uptake on FDG PET/CT were excluded from the study, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy could not be calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT were 93.3 % (14/15), 97.4 % (38/39), 93.3 % and 97.4 %, respectively. Since FDG is not specific to infection, the specificity of FDG PET/CT was very low. FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT with its high specificity may be a useful method and better than labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in periprosthetic infection

  12. Packing for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee approved the use of radiation treatment of foods. Nowadays food packaging are mostly made of plastics, natural or synthetic, therefore effect of irradiation on these materials is crucial for packing engineering for food irradiation technology. By selecting the right polymer materials for food packaging it can be ensured that the critical elements of material and product performance are not compromised. When packaging materials are in contact with food at the time of irradiation that regulatory approvals sometimes apply. The review of the R-and-D and technical papers regarding material selection, testing and approval is presented in the report. The most information come from the USA where this subject is well elaborated, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reports are reviewed as well. The report can be useful for scientists and food irradiation plants operators. (author)

  13. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acute and subacute toxicity of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Danielle Maia

    2013-01-01

    Before starting clinical trials of a new drug, it is necessary to perform a battery of safety tests for assessing human risk. Radiopharmaceuticals like any new drug must be tested taking into account its specificity, duration of treatment and especially the toxicity of both parties, the unlabeled molecule and its radionuclide, apart from impurities emanating from radiolysis. Regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration - USA (FDA) and the European Medicine Agency (EMEA), establish guidelines for the regulation of production and research of radiopharmaceuticals. In Brazil the production of radiopharmaceuticals was not regulated until the end of 2009, when were established by the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) resolutions No. 63, which refers to the Good Manufacturing Practices of Radiopharmaceuticals and No. 64 which seeks the registration of record radiopharmaceuticals. To obtain registration of radiopharmaceuticals are necessary to prove the quality, safety, efficacy and specificity of the drug . For the safety of radiopharmaceuticals must be presented studies of acute toxicity, subacute and chronic toxicity as well as reproductive, mutagenic and carcinogenic. Nowadays IPEN-CNEN/SP produces one of the most important radiopharmaceutical of nuclear medicine, the 18 F-FDG, which is used in many clinical applications, particularly in the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the systemic toxicity (acute/ subacute) radiopharmaceutical 18 F-FDG in an in vivo test system, as recommended by the RDC No. 64, which will serve as a model for protocols toxicity of radiopharmaceuticals produced at IPEN. The following tests were performed: tests of acute and subacute toxicity, biodistribution studies of 18 F-FDG, comet assay and reproductive toxicity. In acute toxicity, healthy rats were injected . (author)

  15. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  16. Packing parameters effect on injection molding of polypropylene nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    In today´s industry, applications involving surface patterning of sub-μm to nanometer scale structures have shown a high growth potential. To investigate the injection molding capability of replicating sub-μm surface texture on a large scale area, a 30x80 mm2 tool insert with surface structures...... having a diameter of 500 nm was employed. The tool insert surface was produced using chemical-based-batch techniques such aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. During the injection molding process, polypropylene (PP) was employed as material and packing phase parameters (packing time, packing...

  17. Theory of amorphous packings of binary mixtures of hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazzo, Indaco; Caltagirone, Francesco; Parisi, Giorgio; Zamponi, Francesco

    2009-05-15

    We extend our theory of amorphous packings of hard spheres to binary mixtures and more generally to multicomponent systems. The theory is based on the assumption that amorphous packings produced by typical experimental or numerical protocols can be identified with the infinite pressure limit of long-lived metastable glassy states. We test this assumption against numerical and experimental data and show that the theory correctly reproduces the variation with mixture composition of structural observables, such as the total packing fraction and the partial coordination numbers.

  18. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the clinical diagnosis in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, Javier; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Rivolta, Jasmine; Orini, Stefania; Barthel, Henryk; Agosta, Federica; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-04-27

    We aim to report the quality of accuracy studies investigating the utility of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in supporting the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and the corresponding recommendations made by a panel of experts. Seven panellist, four from the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, and three from the European Academy of Neurology, produced recommendations taking into consideration the incremental value of FDG-PET, as added on clinical-neuropsychological examination, to ascertain the aetiology of MCI (AD, FTLD or DLB). A literature search using harmonized population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) strings was performed, and an evidence assessment consistent with the European Federation of Neurological Societies guidance was provided. The consensual recommendation was achieved based on Delphi rounds. Fifty-four papers reported the comparison of interest. The selected papers allowed the identification of FDG patterns that characterized MCI due to AD, FTLD and DLB. While clinical outcome studies supporting the diagnosis of MCI due to AD showed varying accuracies (ranging from 58 to 100%) and varying areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (0.66 to 0.97), no respective data were identified for MCI due to FTLD or for MCI due to DLB. However, the high negative predictive value of FDG-PET and the existence of different disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism support the consensus recommendations for the clinical use of this imaging technique in MCI subjects. FDG-PET has clinical utility on a fair level of evidence in detecting MCI due to AD. Although promising also in detecting MCI due to FTLD and MCI due to DLB, more research is needed to ultimately judge the clinical utility of FDG-PET in these entities.

  19. Nasal packing with ventilated nasal packs; a comparison with traditional vaseline nasal pack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.; Siddiqui, M.W.; Abbas, A.; Sami, M.; Ayub, Z.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the benefits of ventilated nasal packing with traditional vaseline guaze nasal packing. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at CMH Multan, from Jun 2014 to Dec 2014. Material and Methods: In this study, sample size of 80 patients was calculated using WHO calculator. Patients were divided in two groups using lottery method endotracheal tube and piece of surgical glove filled with ribbon guaze was utilized for fabricated ventilated nasal pack and compared with traditional nasal packs. Nasal obstruction and sleep disturbance were studied at eight hours and twenty-four hours following surgery using visual analog scale. Results: Mean nasal obstruction with ventilated nasal pack was 45.62 +- 6.17 and with Vaseline nasal pack was 77.67 +- 4.85 which was statistically significant (p=0.001) in both the groups. Mean sleep disturbance in both the groups was 46.32 +- 5.23 and 68.75 +- 2.70 respectively which was statistically significant (p=0.001) in both the groups. Conclusion: Patients with ventilated nasal packs were found to have better tolerance to nasal packs due to less nasal obstruction and sleep disturbance

  20. FROM THE PACKED TOWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderi D. Leite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About 245 thousand tones of municipal solid w aste are collected daily in Brazil. Nearly 32 thousand tones of the collected amount are treated in sanitary landfill, which generates biogas and leachate as byproduct. The leachate resulting from sanitary landfill contains high concentration of carbonaceous and nitrogenized material. The crucial question is that the biodegradation of the carbonaceous material is difficult as long as the nitrogenized material is presen t in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4 + , which compromises performance of biological tr eatment process. Therefore, a physical and chemical treatment of the leachate should be done before its biological treatment, especially for reduction of ammoniacal nitr ogen concentration and for propitiating the realization of application of biological treatment. The treatment of leachate requires specific consideration, which is not needed fo r other types of waste. In the specific case in this study, where ammoniacal nitrogen concentration was about 2,200 mgN L -1 and the BOD 5 /COD ratio was 0.3, the study of ammonia stripping process was performed. Ammonia stripping process was studied in pack ed towers of 35 L capacity each and the parameters investigated were pH, ratio of contact area/leach volume and the aeration time. One of the parameters that influenced most in efficiency of ammonia stripping process was pH of the leachate since it contributes in conversion of ammoniacal nitrogen from NH 4 + to NH 3 .

  1. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.......0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...

  2. FDG-SPECT and hibernation: an interim review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.; Schaefer, A.; Trampert, L.; Oberhausen, E.; Kirsch, C.M.; Berberich, R.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: The present investigation demonstrates an intraindividual comparison of FDG-PET and FDG-SPECT. Material and Methods: Thirty patients with CHD and planed revascularisation underwent both modalities. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT. The myocardium was divided into 25 segments and the results were compared by two experienced observers. Results: Segmental concordance of FDG-PET and -SPECT was 94.1%. PET indicated a higher percentage of hibernating myocardium (8.9% vs. 5.7%) and a lower rate of matched defects (11.5% vs. 16.0%). In 22 cases the need for revascularisation was assessed identically. In the remaining 8 patients FDG-PET and FDG-SPECT required an intervention in 6 and 2 cases, respectively. Conclusion: The results of FDG-PET and FDG-SPECT showed a high segmental concordance, but the individual assessment of hibernation worthwhile for revascularisation demonstrated important differences in patient management. (orig.) [de

  3. Predictors of Pathologic Outcome of Focal FDG Uptake in the Parotid Gland Identified on Whole Body FDG PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Behr, Spencer C.; Naeger, David M.; Flavell, Robert R.; Glastonbury, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test whether patient's primary malignancy type and presence of FDG-avid cervical lymph node(s) are predictors of pathologic outcome of incidental focal FDG-avid parotid lesions. Basic Procedures Retrospective cohort study of pathologically proven incidental cases. Main Findings Focal parotid FDG uptake in the setting of head and neck cancer/melanoma(OR=24.6,pparotid tumors were incidentally discovered. Principal Conclusions In patients with head and neck cancer/melanoma, lymphoma, or FDG-avid cervical lymph node(s) there was a higher odds that focal parotid FDG uptake was a metastasis. PMID:26324219

  4. Domain Discretization and Circle Packings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    A circle packing is a configuration of circles which are tangent with one another in a prescribed pattern determined by a combinatorial triangulation, where the configuration fills a planar domain or a two-dimensional surface. The vertices in the triangulation correspond to centers of circles......, and edges correspond to two circles (having centers corresponding to the endpoints of the edge) being tangent to each other. This circle packing creates a rigid structure having an underlying geometric triangulation, where the centers of circles again correspond to vertices in the triangulation......, and the edges are geodesic segments (Euclidean, hyperbolic, or spherical) connecting centers of circles that are tangent to each other. Three circles that are mutually tangent form a face of the triangulation. Since circle packing is closely related to triangulation, circle packing methods can be applied...

  5. The pursuit of perfect packing

    CERN Document Server

    Weaire, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Coauthored by one of the creators of the most efficient space packing solution, the Weaire-Phelan structure, The Pursuit of Perfect Packing, Second Edition explores a problem of importance in physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and engineering: the packing of structures. Maintaining its mathematical core, this edition continues and revises some of the stories from its predecessor while adding several new examples and applications. The book focuses on both scientific and everyday problems ranging from atoms to honeycombs. It describes packing models, such as the Kepler conjecture, Voronoï decomposition, and Delaunay decomposition, as well as actual structure models, such as the Kelvin cell and the Weaire-Phelan structure. The authors discuss numerous historical aspects and provide biographical details on influential contributors to the field, including emails from Thomas Hales and Ken Brakke. With examples from physics, crystallography, engineering, and biology, this accessible and whimsical bo...

  6. The art and science of forming packed analytical high-performance liquid chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, J J; Destefano, J J

    2006-09-08

    Columns of packed particles still are the most popular devices for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separations because of their great utility, excellent performance and wide variety. However, the forming of packed beds for efficient, stable columns traditionally has been an art where the basics of how to form optimum beds generally was not well understood. The recent development of monolith rods was introduced in part to overcome the difficulty of producing stable beds of packing particles. However, these materials are less versatile than packed particle columns. Technology developments in recent years have produced a better understanding among those skilled in the practice of how to form optimized packed beds, and this has led to widely available, high-quality commercial columns. This presentation discusses the developments that led to the present state of column packing technology. Important steps in the packing of efficient, stable beds are described. The key step of selecting the best solvent for the slurry packing method is emphasized. Factors affecting the mechanical stability of packed columns also are discussed. The early art of packing columns now has evolved into a more scientific approach that allows the packing of good columns with a minimum of effort and time.

  7. Disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings attain an anomalously large range of densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Adam B.; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-08-01

    Previous attempts to simulate disordered binary sphere packings have been limited in producing mechanically stable, isostatic packings across a broad spectrum of packing fractions. Here we report that disordered strictly jammed binary packings (packings that remain mechanically stable under general shear deformations and compressions) can be produced with an anomalously large range of average packing fractions 0.634≤ϕ≤0.829 for small to large sphere radius ratios α restricted to α≥0.100. Surprisingly, this range of average packing fractions is obtained for packings containing a subset of spheres (called the backbone) that are exactly strictly jammed, exactly isostatic, and also generated from random initial conditions. Additionally, the average packing fractions of these packings at certain α and small sphere relative number concentrations x approach those of the corresponding densest known ordered packings. These findings suggest for entropic reasons that these high-density disordered packings should be good glass formers and that they may be easy to prepare experimentally. We also identify an unusual feature of the packing fraction of jammed backbones (packings with rattlers excluded). The backbone packing fraction is about 0.624 over the majority of the α-x plane, even when large numbers of small spheres are present in the backbone. Over the (relatively small) area of the α-x plane where the backbone is not roughly constant, we find that backbone packing fractions range from about 0.606 to 0.829, with the volume of rattler spheres comprising between 1.6% and 26.9% of total sphere volume. To generate isostatic strictly jammed packings, we use an implementation of the Torquato-Jiao sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302 82, 061302 (2010)], which is an efficient producer of inherent structures (mechanically stable configurations at the local maxima in the density landscape). The identification and

  8. Disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings attain an anomalously large range of densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Adam B; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-08-01

    Previous attempts to simulate disordered binary sphere packings have been limited in producing mechanically stable, isostatic packings across a broad spectrum of packing fractions. Here we report that disordered strictly jammed binary packings (packings that remain mechanically stable under general shear deformations and compressions) can be produced with an anomalously large range of average packing fractions 0.634≤φ≤0.829 for small to large sphere radius ratios α restricted to α≥0.100. Surprisingly, this range of average packing fractions is obtained for packings containing a subset of spheres (called the backbone) that are exactly strictly jammed, exactly isostatic, and also generated from random initial conditions. Additionally, the average packing fractions of these packings at certain α and small sphere relative number concentrations x approach those of the corresponding densest known ordered packings. These findings suggest for entropic reasons that these high-density disordered packings should be good glass formers and that they may be easy to prepare experimentally. We also identify an unusual feature of the packing fraction of jammed backbones (packings with rattlers excluded). The backbone packing fraction is about 0.624 over the majority of the α-x plane, even when large numbers of small spheres are present in the backbone. Over the (relatively small) area of the α-x plane where the backbone is not roughly constant, we find that backbone packing fractions range from about 0.606 to 0.829, with the volume of rattler spheres comprising between 1.6% and 26.9% of total sphere volume. To generate isostatic strictly jammed packings, we use an implementation of the Torquato-Jiao sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010)], which is an efficient producer of inherent structures (mechanically stable configurations at the local maxima in the density landscape). The identification and explicit construction of binary packings

  9. Packing of sedimenting equiaxed dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedilla, Antonio; Založnik, Miha; Rouat, Bernard; Combeau, Hervé

    2018-01-01

    The packing of free-floating crystal grains during solidification has a strong impact on the phase-change process as well as on the structure and the defects in the solidified material. The packing fraction is affected by the particular dendritic morphology of the grains and by their low inertia resulting from the small density difference between solid and liquid. Understanding the grain packing phenomenon during metal alloy solidification is not experimentally possible since packing is coupled to many other phenomena. We therefore investigate the packing of equiaxed dendrites on a model system, consisting of fixed-shape nonconvex model particles sedimenting in conditions hydrodynamically similar to those encountered in solidifying metals. We perform numerical simulations by a discrete-element model and experiments with transparent liquids in a sedimentation column. The combination of experiments and simulations enables us to determine the packing fraction as a function of (i) the grain morphology, expressed by a shape parameter, and (ii) the hydrodynamic conditions, expressed by the particle Stokes number.

  10. Acute and subacute toxicity of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Danielle M.; Silva, Natanael G. da; Manetta, Ana Paula; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2013-01-01

    Before initiating clinical trials of a new drug, it is necessary to perform a battery of safety tests, for evaluating the risk in humans. Radiopharmaceuticals must be tested taking into account its specificity, duration of treatment and especially the toxicity of both, the unlabelled molecule and its radionuclide, apart from impurities emanating from radiolysis. In Brazil the production of radiopharmaceuticals was not regulated until the end of 2009, when ANVISA established the Resolutions No. 63, which refers to the Good Manufacturing Practices of radiopharmaceuticals and No. 64 which seeks the registration of radiopharmaceuticals. Nowadays IPEN produces one of the most important radiopharmaceutical for nuclear medicine, the 18 F-FDG, which is used in the diagnosis. The objective of this study is to assess systemic toxicity (acute / subacute) of 18 F-FDG in an in vivo test system, as recommended by the RDC No. 64. In acute tests the administration occurred on the first day, healthy rats were observed for 14 days reporting their clinical signs and water consumption, and on the 15th day they were euthanized and necropsied. The assay of subacute toxicity observations were made over a period of 28 days and the first dose was administered at the beginning of the test and after a fortnight a second dose was administered. The parameters evaluated were the necropsy, histopathology of target organs, hematology studies and liver and kidney function. The results are being processed and evaluated. Initial observations did not show any acute toxicity in animals when compared to control animals. (author)

  11. Packing Density Approach for Sustainable Development of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Dattatraya KORE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the details of optimized mix design for normal strength concrete using particle packing density method. Also the concrete mixes were designed as per BIS: 10262-2009. Different water-cement ratios were used and kept same in both design methods. An attempt has been made to obtain sustainable and cost effective concrete product by use of particle packing density method. The parameters such as workability, compressive strength, cost analysis and carbon di oxide emission were discussed. The results of the study showed that, the compressive strength of the concrete produced by packing density method are closer to that of design compressive strength of BIS code method. By adopting the packing density method for design of concrete mixes, resulted in 11% cost saving with 12% reduction in carbon di oxide emission.

  12. Clinical use of 11C-methionine and 18F-FDG-PET for germinoma in central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Yoshiyuki; Nihashi, Takashi; Fujii, Masazumi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 11 C-methionine (MET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings of central nervous system (CNS) germinoma and the diagnostic utility of these findings. We retrospectively evaluated the cases of 10 patients who were diagnosed with CNS germinoma according to their histopathological or clinical findings. All the patients underwent pretreatment MET and/or FDG-PET scans, and the resultant images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. In the qualitative assessments, we used 3- and 5-grade visual scoring systems for the MET- and FDG-PET images, respectively. In the quantitative assessments, the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and the ratio of the SUV max of the tumor (T) divided by the mean SUV for the normal white or gray matter [T/N (WM), T/N (GM)], was calculated. The mean and SD values of SUV max, T/N (WM), and T/N(GM) were 1.9 ± 1.4, 2.5 ± 1.3, and 1.7 ± 0.9 on MET-PET and 5.8 ± 2.2, 1.6 ± 0.5, and 0.8 ± 0.2 on FDG-PET, respectively. On MET-PET, only one lesion was not detected. On the other hand, on FDG-PET all of the lesions exhibited uptake values that were intermediate between those of the normal white matter and gray matter. In terms of its tumor-contouring ability, MET is a good tracer for diagnosing CNS germinomas; therefore, MET-PET is considered to be useful for planning biopsies or surgery. Although FDG-PET is capable of detecting CNS germinomas, it produced insufficient image contrast in the present study. Further studies are needed before FDG-PET can be used in clinical examinations of CNS germinoma. (author)

  13. Quantifying murine bone marrow and blood radiation dose response following {sup 18}F-FDG PET with DNA damage biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Grainne [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Finnon, Paul [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Badie, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.badie@phe.gov.uk [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Mice received either a range of {sup 18}F-FDG activities or whole body X-ray doses. • Blood samples were collected at 24 and 43 h for MN-RET and QPCR analysis. • Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response. • BM doses of 33 mGy ({sup 18}F-FDG) and 25 mGy X-rays were significantly higher than controls. • No significant difference between internal ({sup 18}F-FDG) and external (X-ray) was found. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to quantify the poorly understood radiation doses to murine bone marrow and blood from whole-body fluorine 18 ({sup 18}F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), by using specific biomarkers and comparing with whole body external low dose exposures. Groups of 3–5 mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups, each receiving either a different activity of {sup 18}F-FDG: 0–37 MBq or whole body irradiated with corresponding doses of 0–300 mGy X-rays. Blood samples were collected at 24 h and at 43 h for reticulocyte micronucleus assays and QPCR analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Blood and bone marrow dose estimates were calculated from injected activities of {sup 18}F-FDG and were based on a recommended ICRP model. Doses to the bone marrow corresponding to 33.43 mGy and above for internal {sup 18}F-FDG exposure and to 25 mGy and above for external X-ray exposure, showed significant increases in radiation-induced MN-RET formation relative to controls (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response with linear regression analysis giving R{sup 2} of 0.992 and 0.999 for respectively internal and external exposure. No significant difference between the two data sets was found with a P-value of 0.493. In vivo gene expression dose–responses at 24 h for Bbc3 and Cdkn1 were similar for {sup 18}F-FDG and X-ray exposures, with significant modifications occurring for doses over 300 mGy for Bbc3

  14. Hardness of approximation for strip packing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamaszek, Anna Maria; Kociumaka, Tomasz; Pilipczuk, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Strip packing is a classical packing problem, where the goal is to pack a set of rectangular objects into a strip of a given width, while minimizing the total height of the packing. The problem has multiple applications, for example, in scheduling and stock-cutting, and has been studied extensive...

  15. Deterministic indexing for packed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Skjoldjensen, Frederik Rye

    2017-01-01

    Given a string S of length n, the classic string indexing problem is to preprocess S into a compact data structure that supports efficient subsequent pattern queries. In the deterministic variant the goal is to solve the string indexing problem without any randomization (at preprocessing time...... or query time). In the packed variant the strings are stored with several character in a single word, giving us the opportunity to read multiple characters simultaneously. Our main result is a new string index in the deterministic and packed setting. Given a packed string S of length n over an alphabet σ......, we show how to preprocess S in O(n) (deterministic) time and space O(n) such that given a packed pattern string of length m we can support queries in (deterministic) time O (m/α + log m + log log σ), where α = w/log σ is the number of characters packed in a word of size w = θ(log n). Our query time...

  16. Effects of blood glucose level on FDG uptake by liver: a FDG-PET/CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kazuo, E-mail: kkubota@cpost.plala.or.j [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshige; Murata, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Yukihiro, Masashi; Ito, Kimiteru; Morooka, Miyako; Minamimoto, Ryogo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Hori, Ai [Department of Epidemiology and International Health, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    In FDG-PET for abdominal malignancy, the liver may be assumed as an internal standard for grading abnormal FDG uptake both in early images and in delayed images. However, physiological variables of FDG uptake by the liver, especially the effects of blood glucose level, have not yet been elucidated. Methods: FDG-PET studies of 70 patients examined at 50 to 70 min after injection (60{+-}10 min: early images) and of 68 patients examined at 80 to 100 min after injection (90{+-}10 min: delayed images) were analyzed for liver FDG uptake. Patients having lesions in the liver, spleen and pancreas; patients having bulk tumor in other areas; and patients early after chemotherapy or radiotherapy were excluded; also, patients with blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl were excluded. Results: Mean standardized uptake value (SUV) of the liver, blood glucose level and sex showed no significant differences between early images and delayed images. However, liver SUV in the delayed image showed a larger variation than that in the early image and showed significant correlation to blood glucose level. The partial correlation coefficient between liver SUV and blood glucose level in the delayed image with adjustment for sex and age was 0.73 (P<.0001). Multivariate regression coefficient (95% confidence interval) of blood glucose was 0.017 (0.013-0.021). Conclusion: Blood glucose level is an important factor affecting the normal liver FDG uptake in nondiabetic patients. In the case of higher glucose level, liver FDG uptake is elevated especially in the delayed image. This may be due to the fact that the liver is the key organ responsible for glucose metabolism through gluconeogenesis and glycogen storage.

  17. Spectrum of neurocognitive dysfunction in Indian population on FDG PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajnish; Tripathi, Madhavi; D’Souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Varshney, Raunak; Panwar, Puja; Kaushik, Aruna; Saw, Sanjeev; Seher, Romana; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Mishra, Anil K; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, RP

    2011-01-01

    A variety of neurodegenerative disorders produce significant abnormal brain function which can be detected using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan even when structural changes are not detected on CT or MRI Scan. A study was undertaken at our institute to evaluate the FDG PET/CT findings in Indian population suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), dementia with lewy body disease (DLBD) and other miscellaneous causes of dementia. 117 subjects having neurocognitive deficits and 36 normals were included in our study. All patients underwent a detailed history and clinical examination. This was followed by a mini mental state examination. Subsequently an FDG brain PET scan and an MRI were done. In the patient population included in our study group 36 were normal, 39 had MCI, 40 had AD, 14 had FTD, and 13 had DLBD and 11 dementia due to other miscellaneous causes. MCI patients showed primarily reduced tracer uptake in the mesio-temporal cortex. AD patients showed reduced tracer concentration in temporo-parietal lobes, while patients with advanced diseases showed frontal lobe disease additionally. In subjects of FTD, reduced radiotracer uptake in the fronto-temporal lobes was noted. In addition, FTD patients also showed basal ganglia defects. In contrast the DLBD patients showed globally reduced FDG uptake including severely affecting the occipital cortices. In the current study the F18-FDG PET scans have been shown to be highly useful in the diagnosis of various neurocognitive disorders of the brain. AD was found to be the most common dementia in the Indian population followed by MCI. Diffuse Lewy body disease, FTD and other miscellaneous categories of dementia had a near similar incidence

  18. Demand of radiopharmaceutical Fluoride 18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) in the Sao Paulo State metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Renato C.; Zouain, Desiree M.

    2005-01-01

    This research presents partial results from the development of a Masters Dissertation for the Post-Graduation in Nuclear Technology Program - IPEN/USP, aiming to study the demand of radiopharmaceutical Fluoride 18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) in the Sao Paulo State metropolitan area, as a subsidiary for the establishment of distribution strategy within the State. This study presented the results of a bibliographic review as well as the market evolution for FDG in Sao Paulo. Studies pointed to a tendency of an increase in the international and national nuclear medicine market; while the United States of America participate in 47% of the world profit, South America shares only 2.5% of the global market. This market will tend to grow in 2006 to 2020 up to 776% for diagnosis and 760% for therapy. Partial results are presented in this study from researching medical centers that use PET in the city of Sao Paulo, as well as companies that commercialize the equipment and the manufacturer center. There is an increase of sales for IPEN's Fluoride 18-FDG and its representation on the total radiopharmaceutical profit surpassed 5.3% in 2003 to 8.2% in 2004. The dissemination of this technology in Brazil is lately being discussed especially due to the acquisition price of the equipment as well as the viability of the resources (Fluoride 18- FDG; implementation strategies of regional cyclotron accelerators) and the question of remuneration of the PET produced exams for health care plans and national health care system (SUS). IPEN is developing yet another study to grasp possible demand for this product in the Southern and Southeastern regions, allowing better view of the necessity of the supplement, and in study the implementation of a new cyclotron in the institute dedicated for the production of Fluoride 18-FDG. (author)

  19. The pursuit of perfect packing

    CERN Document Server

    Weaire, Denis

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 Thomas Hales dramatically announced the solution of a problem that has long teased eminent mathematicians: what is the densest possible arrangement of identical spheres? The Pursuit of Perfect Packing recounts the story of this problem and many others that have to do with packing things together. The examples are taken from mathematics, physics, biology, and engineering, including the arrangement of soap bubbles in foam, atoms in a crystal, the architecture of the bee''s honeycomb, and the structure of the Giant''s Causeway. Using an informal style and with key references, the book also includes brief accounts of the lives of many of the scientists who devoted themselves to problems of packing over many centuries, together with wry comments on their efforts. It is an entertaining introduction to the field for both specialists and the more general public.

  20. Factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Seiei; Takahashi, Wakoh; Takagi, Shigeharu; Fujii, Hirofumi; Ide, Michiru; Shohtsu, Akira

    1998-01-01

    The intestine is a well-known site of physiological 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation in positron emission tomography (PET). To identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the intestine, the intensity of FDG uptake was evaluated in a total of 1,068 healthy adults. Non-attenuation-corrected whole-body PET images were obtained for all subjects and visually evaluated. Subjects were then classified into two groups according to the intensity of intestinal FDG uptake. Sex, age, presence or absence of constipation, and serum glucose, hemoglobin A 1 c, and free fatty acid levels were compared between the two groups. High intestinal FDG uptake was observed at an overall rate of 11.0%. Sex (female), age, and bowel condition (constipation) were found to affect intestinal FDG uptake. The factors we identified lead to further questions the relationship between intestinal motility and glucose uptake that warrant further study. (author)

  1. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  2. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on FDG PET: correlation with endoscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Seong Eun; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-nine patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in our study. In all of them, FDG PET and gastrofibroscopy were performed within one week. One man who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy was excluded. We reviewed 38 cases (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32{approx}79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. On interpretation of FDG PET scan, two nuclear physician evaluated five parameters on FDG-PET findings of stomach with a concensus : 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (SUVmax), 3) focality, 4) asymmetry, and 5) gross appearance. We correlated FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. On endoscopy, six of 38 patients were proven as gastric cancer, and others had inflammatory lesion (ulcer in 3, chronic gastritis in 12, uncommon from gastritis in 5) or benign noninflammatory lesions (polyp and varix in 3, and normal limit). On the visual analysis, FDG uptake of stomach cancer had the tendency of higher uptake than the other lesions. SUVmax of gastric cancer was 7.95{+-}4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9{+-}0.69 in ulcer, 3.08{+-}1.2 in chronic gastritis 3.2{+-}1.49 in uncommon from gastritis). In the appearance of stomach on PET, gastric cancer was shown as focal lesion (5 of 6), and those of benign inflammatory lesions were asymmetric (14 of 20), and diffuse (9 of 20). Some cases of chronic inflammatory lesions, such as ulcer, and chronic gastritis, showed focal appearance and mimicked cancerous lesion (4 of 15). On FDG PET, the lesions of stomach cancer had higher FDG uptake and focal appearance comparing with the other benign inflammatory lesions. However, ulcer, and chronic gastritis showed focal appearance on PET, which could be mimicked as cancerous

  3. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on FDG PET: correlation with endoscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Seong Eun; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-nine patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in our study. In all of them, FDG PET and gastrofibroscopy were performed within one week. One man who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy was excluded. We reviewed 38 cases (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32∼79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. On interpretation of FDG PET scan, two nuclear physician evaluated five parameters on FDG-PET findings of stomach with a concensus : 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (SUVmax), 3) focality, 4) asymmetry, and 5) gross appearance. We correlated FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. On endoscopy, six of 38 patients were proven as gastric cancer, and others had inflammatory lesion (ulcer in 3, chronic gastritis in 12, uncommon from gastritis in 5) or benign noninflammatory lesions (polyp and varix in 3, and normal limit). On the visual analysis, FDG uptake of stomach cancer had the tendency of higher uptake than the other lesions. SUVmax of gastric cancer was 7.95±4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9±0.69 in ulcer, 3.08±1.2 in chronic gastritis 3.2±1.49 in uncommon from gastritis). In the appearance of stomach on PET, gastric cancer was shown as focal lesion (5 of 6), and those of benign inflammatory lesions were asymmetric (14 of 20), and diffuse (9 of 20). Some cases of chronic inflammatory lesions, such as ulcer, and chronic gastritis, showed focal appearance and mimicked cancerous lesion (4 of 15). On FDG PET, the lesions of stomach cancer had higher FDG uptake and focal appearance comparing with the other benign inflammatory lesions. However, ulcer, and chronic gastritis showed focal appearance on PET, which could be mimicked as cancerous lesion on PET

  4. Simple devices for dispensing [18F]FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O Park, Jong; Lee, Hyuk; Shin, Young Soon; Shin, Yong Hwan; Jin, Kwang Ho; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2005-01-01

    High dose [ 18 F]FDG is prepared routinely using an automated synthesizer. Accordingly, an automated dispenser is needed to dispense [ 18 F]FDG at the desired dose while reducing the operator's radiation exposure, and no dispenser capable of vial-to-vial and vial-to-syringe dispensing in one system is commercially available. Here, we describe simple devices for the vial-to-vial and vial-to-syringe dispensing of [ 18 F]FDG

  5. Oncological applications of 18F-FDG PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    2000-01-01

    Considering normal distribution of 18 F-FDG in human body, 18 F-FDG imaging using PET can be applied to brain tumors, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The author briefly focuses on application of 18 F-FDG PET imaging to breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, musculoskeletal neoplasms, endocrine neoplasms, genitourinary neoplasms, esophageal and gastric carcinomas

  6. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  7. Dual time-point FDG PET/CT and FDG uptake and related enzymes in lymphadenopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christlieb, Sofie Bæk; Nørgaard Strandholdt, Casper; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann

    2016-01-01

    ) was not able to discriminate between malignant and benign lesions. Volume, SUVmax, TLG and cTLG for both scans were able to discriminate between the two groups statistically, but without complete separation. Glucose metabolism/hypoxia markers were assessed in 15 lesions. TLG and cTLG were correlated with GLUT...... with immunohistochemistry and enzyme activity was determined for HK and G6Pase. RESULTS: FDG uptake was assessed in 203 lesions (146 malignant and 57 benign). Besides volume, there were significant increases over time for all parameters, with generally higher levels in the malignant lesions. The retention index (RI......PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of dual time-point (DTP) PET/CT with (18)F-FDG to discriminate between malignant and benign lymphadenopathies. The relationship between DTP FDG uptake and glucose metabolism/hypoxia markers in lymphadenopathies was also assessed...

  8. Incorporation study of 18FDG through its uptake into tumour-derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia M.; Nascimento, Leonardo T.C.; Santos, Raquel G.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro tests of radiopharmaceuticals are an important instrument to study their mechanisms of action, binding and incorporation. 18 FDG is the most used radiopharmaceutical for diagnostics positron emission tomography (PET) on oncology, on the basis of accelerated rates of absorption of glucose in cell malignancies. This radiotracer has been routinely produced at CDTN; and therefore, it was selected for preliminary assays due to its availability. Nowadays, UPPR at CDTN produces routinely 18 FDG for the local PET Centers but others PET radiopharmaceuticals are in development such as 18 F-Fluorocholine and 18 F-Fluorothymidine. According to the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA) it is necessary to validate and register these new radiopharmaceuticals in order to get the approval for their commercialization. Targeting efficacy is one of the important issues to be evaluated during radiopharmaceutical validation. The aim of this study was to develop a standard protocol to determine tumor targeting efficacy of PET radiopharmaceuticals in vitro. Therefore it was developed a protocol based on the incorporation og 18 FDG through the uptake in different tumor-derived cell lines. Three variables were investigated for the standardization of the test: the number of cells to be seeded in 96-well plates, the time of incubation with the radiopharmaceutical and the radiotracer concentration. The standardized protocol was considered suitable for 18 FDG incorporation assay and showed reproductive results. The protocol developed in this work will pave the way for the in vitro studies of incorporation of the new PET radiopharmaceuticals to be produced at UPPR-CDTN, such as: 18 F-Fluorocholine and 18 F-Fluorothymidine. (author)

  9. Incorporation study of {sup 18}FDG through its uptake into tumour-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Flavia M.; Nascimento, Leonardo T.C.; Santos, Raquel G., E-mail: fnc@cdtn.br, E-mail: raqueou@uol.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In vitro tests of radiopharmaceuticals are an important instrument to study their mechanisms of action, binding and incorporation. {sup 18}FDG is the most used radiopharmaceutical for diagnostics positron emission tomography (PET) on oncology, on the basis of accelerated rates of absorption of glucose in cell malignancies. This radiotracer has been routinely produced at CDTN; and therefore, it was selected for preliminary assays due to its availability. Nowadays, UPPR at CDTN produces routinely {sup 18}FDG for the local PET Centers but others PET radiopharmaceuticals are in development such as {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine and {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine. According to the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA) it is necessary to validate and register these new radiopharmaceuticals in order to get the approval for their commercialization. Targeting efficacy is one of the important issues to be evaluated during radiopharmaceutical validation. The aim of this study was to develop a standard protocol to determine tumor targeting efficacy of PET radiopharmaceuticals in vitro. Therefore it was developed a protocol based on the incorporation og {sup 18} FDG through the uptake in different tumor-derived cell lines. Three variables were investigated for the standardization of the test: the number of cells to be seeded in 96-well plates, the time of incubation with the radiopharmaceutical and the radiotracer concentration. The standardized protocol was considered suitable for {sup 18}FDG incorporation assay and showed reproductive results. The protocol developed in this work will pave the way for the in vitro studies of incorporation of the new PET radiopharmaceuticals to be produced at UPPR-CDTN, such as: {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine and {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine. (author)

  10. Coking technology using packed coal mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznichenko, V.M.; Shteinberg, Eh.A.; Tolstoi, A.P. (Khar' kovskii Nauchno-Issledovatel' skii Uglekhimicheskii Institut, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR))

    1991-08-01

    Discusses coking of packed coal charges in the FRG, USSR, France, India, Poland and Czechoslovakia. The following aspects are evaluated: types of weakly caking coals that are used as components of packed mixtures, energy consumption of packing, effects of coal mixture packing on coke oven design, number of coke ovens in a battery, heating temperature, coking time, coke properties, investment and operating cost. Statistical data that characterize the Saarberg packing process used in the FRG are analyzed. Packing coal mixtures for coking improves coke quality and reduces environmental pollution. 4 refs.

  11. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  12. FDG-PET evaluation of vaginal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Zoberi, Imran; Powell, Matthew A.; Gibb, Randall K.; Rader, Janet S.; Mutch, David G.; Siegel, Barry A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the results of CT and positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the detection of the primary tumor and lymph node metastases in carcinoma of the vagina. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective registry study of 23 consecutive patients with carcinoma of the vagina, in which we respectively compared the results of CT and whole-body FDG-PET. The tumor was clinical Stage II in 16 patients, Stage III in 6, and Stage IVa in 1 patient. The primary tumor ranged in size from 2 to 10 cm (mean 4.9), and 4 patients had palpable groin lymph nodes. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, 14 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 2 underwent primary tumor excision before the imaging evaluation. The median follow-up was 21 months in those patients alive without disease. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 21 patients with an intact primary tumor, CT visualized it in 9 (43%). CT also demonstrated abnormally enlarged groin lymph nodes in 3 patients and both groin and pelvic lymph nodes in 1 patient (4 of 23, 17%). FDG-PET identified abnormal uptake in all 21 intact primary tumors (100%). Abnormal uptake was found in the groin lymph nodes in 4 patients, pelvic lymph nodes in 2, and both groin and pelvic lymph nodes in 2 patients (8 of 23, 35%). The 3-year progression-free and overall survival estimate was 73% and 68%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated that FDG-PET detects the primary tumor and abnormal lymph nodes more often than does CT

  13. Logistics of long distance FDG supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.G.; Young, K.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Rowe, C.C.; Scott, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The short half-life of 18 F-FDG (110 mins) presents a logistical problem when transport over long distances is involved. Our facility was presented with such a problem when we were contracted to supply FDG on a regular basis to the Royal Adelaide Hospital over 700 km away. The principal difficulties to be overcome were providing a quick, reliable and efficient transport system, the development of a safe and efficacious transport packaging system, production and supply of sufficient product and the scheduling of the operations of the cyclotron, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy services, so as not to interfere with the existing clinical program of the PET centre. Together with the assistance of Gammasonics, an FDG transport and packaging system was developed which complied with transport regulations and was recyclable. A door-to-door courier system was established which, on average, takes four hours but has occasionally been hampered by the unreliability of the airline service. A schedule for early operation of the cyclotron and radio-chemistry was established to meet with transport schedules. A system of quality control of the FDG was instituted (while the product is in transit) with the QC release results being faxed to the recipient prior to the product's arrival. We have supplied 51 deliveries since mid-September 2000 to the end of February 2001. During this period there have been 6 (11.7%) delayed deliveries of which 2 (3.9%) have been due to cyclotron operational problems and 4 (7.8%) have been due to flight delays beyond our control. There have been no completely failed deliveries. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  14. Quantitative characterization of brain β-amyloid in 718 normal subjects using a joint PiB/FDG PET image histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J.; Hanson, Dennis P.; Lowe, Val J.; Kemp, Bradley J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We have previously described an automated system for the co-registration of PiB and FDG PET images with structural MRI and a neurological anatomy atlas to produce region-specific quantization of cortical activity and amyloid burden. We also reported a global joint PiB/FDG histogram-based measure (FDG-Associated PiB Uptake Ratio - FAPUR) that performed as well as regional PiB ratio in stratifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) patients from normal subjects in an autopsy-verified cohort of 31. In this paper we examine results of this analysis on a clinically-verified cohort of 718 normal volunteers. We found that the global FDG ratio correlated negatively with age (r2 = 0.044) and global PiB ratio correlated positively with age (r2=0.038). FAPUR also correlated negatively with age (r2-.025), and in addition, we introduce a new metric - the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r2) of the joint PiB/FDG histogram which correlates positively (r2=0.014) with age. We then used these measurements to construct age-weighted Z-scores for all measurements made on the original autopsy cohort. We found similar stratification using Z-scores compared to raw values; however, the joint PiB/FDG r2 Z-score showed the greatest stratification ability.

  15. Safeway Supermarkets Resource Pack: A Partnership between Industry and Schools to Produce a Resource Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Suzanne; Hand, Tony

    1993-01-01

    Examines a teacher education project involving second-year education majors, teacher educators, and business partners from local Safeway supermarkets undertaken by Newman and Westhill College in Birmingham, England. One of the results of the project was the creation of a worksheet packet for primary school students designed to promote nutrition,…

  16. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jiayin [School of Electronics Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang, Jiangsu 222005, China and IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shi, Feng [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lalush, David S. [Joint UNC-NCSU Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Lin, Weili [MRI Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

  17. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [18F]FDG PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jiayin; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [ 18 F]FDG PET image and substantially

  18. Valve packing manual. A maintenance application guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, J.A.; McCutcheon, R.G.; Cumming, D.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1970, AECL Chalk River Mechanical Equipment Development (MED) branch has invested over 175 person years in testing related to improving valve packing performance. Successful developments, including, 'live-loading', reduced packing heights, and performance-based packing qualification testing have been implemented. Since 1986, MED and the Integrated Valve Actuator Program Task Force - Valve Packing Steering Committee (IVAP-VPSC) have been involved in the development of combination die-formed graphite packing for use in CANDU plants. Many reports, articles, and specifications have been issued. Due to the large amount of test data and reports, a more user-friendly document has been prepared for everyday use. The Valve Packing Manual is based on many years of MED research and testing, as well as operating experience from CANDU nuclear generating stations (NGS). Since 1986, packing research and testing has been funded by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and participating valve packing manufacturers. The Valve Packing Manual (VPM) provides topical summaries of all work related to valve packing done since 1985. It includes advances in configuration design, stem packing friction, materials specifications, and installation procedures. This paper provides an overview on the application of the VPM with a focus on qualification testing, packing configuration, and stem packing friction. (author)

  19. Effects of grain size distribution on the packing fraction and shear strength of frictionless disk packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Using discrete element methods, the effects of the grain size distribution on the density and the shear strength of frictionless disk packings are analyzed. Specifically, two recent findings on the relationship between the system's grain size distribution and its rheology are revisited, and their validity is tested across a broader range of distributions than what has been used in previous studies. First, the effects of the distribution on the solid fraction are explored. It is found that the distribution that produces the densest packing is not the uniform distribution by volume fractions as suggested in a recent publication. In fact, the maximal packing fraction is obtained when the grading curve follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.5 as suggested by Fuller and Thompson in 1907 and 1919 [Trans Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 59, 1 (1907) and A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (1919), respectively] while studying mixtures of cement and stone aggregates. Second, the effects of the distribution on the shear strength are analyzed. It is confirmed that these systems exhibit a small shear strength, even if composed of frictionless particles as has been shown recently in several works. It is also found that this shear strength is independent of the grain size distribution. This counterintuitive result has previously been shown for the uniform distribution by volume fractions. In this paper, it is shown that this observation keeps true for different shapes of the grain size distribution.

  20. The influence of bamboo-packed configuration to mixing characteristics in a fixed-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detalina, M.; Pradanawati, S. A.; Widyarani; Mamat; Nilawati, D.; Sintawardani, N.

    2018-03-01

    Fixed-bed reactors are commonly used as bioreactors for various applications, including chemicals production and organic wastewater treatment. Bioreactors are fixed with packing materials for attaching microorganisms. Packing materials should have high surface area and enable sufficient fluid flow in the reactor. Natural materials e.g. rocks and fibres are often used as packing materials. Commercially, packing materials are also produced from polymer with the advantage of customizable shapes. The objective of this research was to study the mixing pattern in a packed-bed reactor using bamboo as packing material. Bamboo was selected for its pipe-like and porous form, as well as its abundant availability in Indonesia. The cut bamboo sticks were installed in a reactor in different configurations namely vertical, horizontal, and random. Textile dye was used as a tracer. Our results show that the vertical configuration gave the least liquid resistant flow. Yet, the random configuration was the best configuration during mixing process.

  1. Comparison of simplified quantitative analyses of FDG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.M.; Peterson, L.M.; Hayward, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of [ 18 F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake is important in oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) studies to be able to set an objective threshold in determining if a tissue is malignant or benign, in assessing response to therapy, and in attempting to predict the aggressiveness of an individual tumor. The most common method used today for simple, clinical quantitation is standardized uptake value (SUV). SUV is normalized for body weight. Other potential normalization factors are lean body mass (LBM) or body surface area (BSA). More complex quantitation schemes include simplified kinetic analysis (SKA), Patlak graphical analysis (PGA), and parameter optimization of the complete kinetic model to determine FDG metabolic rate (FDGMR). These various methods were compared in a group of 40 patients with colon cancer metastatic to the liver. The methods were assessed by (1) correlation with FDGMR, (2) ability to predict survival using Kaplan-Meier plots, and (3) area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for distinguishing between tumor and normal liver. The best normalization scheme appears to be BSA with minor differences depending on the specific formula used to calculate BSA. Overall, PGA is the best predictor of outcome and best discriminator between normal tissue and tumor. SKA is almost as good. In conventional PET imaging it is worthwhile to normalize SUV using BSA. If a single blood sample is available, it is possible to use the SKA method, which is distinctly better. If more than one image is available, along with at least one blood sample, PGA is feasible and should produce the most accurate results

  2. Hypostatic jammed packings of frictionless nonspherical particles

    OpenAIRE

    VanderWerf, Kyle; Jin, Weiwei; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2017-01-01

    We perform computational studies of static packings of a variety of nonspherical particles including circulo-lines, circulo-polygons, ellipses, asymmetric dimers, and dumbbells to determine which shapes form hypostatic versus isostatic packings and to understand why hypostatic packings of nonspherical particles can be mechanically stable despite having fewer contacts than that predicted from na\\"ive constraint counting. To generate highly accurate force- and torque-balanced packings of circul...

  3. Selection of packing materials for gas absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Arachchige, Udara Sampath P.; Melaaen, Morten Christian

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is the most viable option to minimize the environmental impact by CO2 emissions. Amine scrubbing process is the well-known technology to achieve that. There are several packing types available for gas absorption. Both random and structured packing were considered in the simulation studies. The main idea behind this study was to select the best packing material which gives lowest re-boiler duty. Complete removal model was developed for selected packing materials. T...

  4. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  5. FDG-PET template MNI152 1mm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A FDG-PET template in MNI space aligned to the MNI152 atlas This PET-FDG template is provided as is free of charge for all purposes, provided that the following paper is cited......(to appear) when ever the template is used. The authors cannot, under any circumstances, be held responsible for any...

  6. 18FDG CDET in staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, D.; Montravers, F.; Kerrou, K.; Talbot, J.N.; Tofighi, M.; Tamgac, F.; Breau, J.L.; Moretti, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    A clinical study, involving two centres, was promoted by AP-HP Paris. It aimed to evaluate feasibility and detection sensitivity of Coincidence Detection Emission Tomography (CDET) using 18 FDG in the stating of pulmonary cancer, with 2 different dual head y cameras (Vertex ADAC and Prism 2000 Picker, without attenuation correction. Forty patients, including 35 men, with a mean age of 58.6 y were explored by CDET and conventional imaging. Lung cancer was assessed by biopsy during bronchoscopy prior to patient's inclusion. CDET-FDG visualized the primitive lesion in 39 patients (sensitivity: 97.5%). The lesion that was not detected was an bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma. In 26 patients, a histologic evaluation of malignancy invasion of ipsilateral lymph nodes was obtained in 48 lymph node sites. The site-based accuracy of CDET-FDG to detect malignancy in these lymph nodes was 79% versus 65% for CT. The metastatic status in 39 patients (M0 or M1) was evaluated by clinicians and surgeons from the data of conventional imaging and CDET-FDG, before the management of the patient was decided. Then their results were compared to the metastatic status evaluated separately by CDET-FDG and conventional imaging. In this case, the accuracy of CDET-FDG was 95 % versus 90 % for conventional imaging. This clinical study in this indication demonstrated the feasibility of CDET-FDG, with a better performance than conventional imaging and similar to performance of PET-FDG. (authors)

  7. Safer v. Estate of Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-11

    The Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division, recognized "a physician's duty to warn those known to be at risk of avoidable harm from a genetically transmissible condition." During the 1950s, Dr. George Pack treated Donna Shafer's father for a cancerous blockage of the colon and multiple polyposis. In 1990, Safer was diagnosed with the same condition, which she claims is inherited, and, if not diagnosed and treated, invariably will lead to metastic colorectal cancer. Safer alleged that Dr. Pack knew the hereditary nature of the disease, yet failed to warn the immediate family, thus breaching his professional duty to warn. The court did not follow the analysis of the trial court, that a physician has no legal duty to warn the child of a patient of the genetic risk of disease because no physician and patient relationship exists between the doctor and the child.

  8. Fast Searching in Packed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Given strings P and Q the (exact) string matching problem is to find all positions of substrings in Q matching P. The classical Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm [SIAM J. Comput., 1977] solves the string matching problem in linear time which is optimal if we can only read one character at the time....... However, most strings are stored in a computer in a packed representation with several characters in a single word, giving us the opportunity to read multiple characters simultaneously. In this paper we study the worst-case complexity of string matching on strings given in packed representation. Let m...... word-RAM with logarithmic word size we present an algorithm using time O(n/log(sigma) n + m + occ) Here occ is the number of occurrences of P in Q. For m = o(n) this improves the O(n) bound...

  9. Random packing of colloids and granular matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the random packing of colloids and granular matter. A random packing is a stable disordered collection of touching particles, without long-range positional and orientational order. Experimental random packings of particles with the same shape but made of different materials

  10. Complications of balloon packing in epistaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Derks, Wynia; Fokkens, Wytske; Menger, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Although balloon packing appears to be efficient to control epistaxis, severe local complications can occur. We describe four patients with local lesions after balloon packing. Prolonged balloon packing can cause damage to nasal mucosa, septum and alar skin (nasal mucosa, the cartilaginous skeleton

  11. Possibilities of FDG-PET in diagnosis of urological tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in evaluating patients with urological tumors. FDG-PET scans were taken in 116 patients with urological diseases. The number of patients with prostatic disease, renal disease and adrenal disease was 86 (74.1%), 10 and 10, respectively. Seven patients with bladder tumors who had previously undergone either cystectomy or transurethral resection of bladder cancer (TUR-Bt) received FDG-PET scan for medical check-up. Three patients with testicular disease were also included in this series. In patients with prostatic disease, 41 patients were already diagnosed as having prostate cancer and FDG-PET was performed for medical check-up. Forty-five patients were suspected of having prostate cancer because of the FDG accumulation and/or a rise in serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA). Of these patients, 9 were diagnosed as having prostate cancer by biopsy. Serum PSA levels were elevated in all 9 patients, however FDG-PET findings were false-negative in 4 of the 9 patients. In patients with renal disease, 2 of the 4 patients suspected of having renal cell carcinoma actually had benign diseases. In one patient with a renal mass, FDG-PET was false-negative. All 6 patients with metastatic adrenal tumors showed positive findings in FDG-PET, and the patients with nonhypersecreting adrenal masses showed negative findings in FDG-PET. In three patients with seminoma, viable metastatic foci were successfully detected by FDG-PET after chemotherapy. In the present study, FDG-PET was not superior to tumor markers, such as serum PSA and conventional imaging modalities for the detection of prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma. However, in patients with nonhypersecreting adrenal masses or a metastatic adrenal tumor, FDG-PET may provide significant functional information for tissue characterization. Moreover FDG-PET can be useful for the detection of residual viable carcinoma

  12. Towards optimal packed string matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben-Kiki, Oren; Bille, Philip; Breslauer, Dany

    2014-01-01

    In the packed string matching problem, it is assumed that each machine word can accommodate up to α characters, thus an n-character string occupies n/α memory words.(a) We extend the Crochemore–Perrin constant-space O(n)-time string-matching algorithm to run in optimal O(n/α) time and even in real......-time, achieving a factor α speedup over traditional algorithms that examine each character individually. Our macro-level algorithm only uses the standard AC0 instructions of the word-RAM model (i.e. no integer multiplication) plus two specialized micro-level AC0 word-size packed-string instructions. The main word...... matching work.(b) We also consider the complexity of the packed string matching problem in the classical word-RAM model in the absence of the specialized micro-level instructions wssm and wslm. We propose micro-level algorithms for the theoretically efficient emulation using parallel algorithms techniques...

  13. System immune response to vaccination on FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giaclone, Micholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan.

  14. FDG-PET in the clinical management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Eigtved, Annika I; Specht, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a molecular functional imaging technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the localization and activity of pathophysiological processes. The most commonly used tracer for oncological purposes is 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG......-PET detects more disease sites and involved organs than conventional staging procedures including computerized tomography (CT) and has a large influence on staging. FDG-PET during and after therapy appears to provide considerable prognostic information. However, the impact on patient outcome is not clear......). FDG-PET has within recent years become the most important nuclear medicine imaging modality in the management of lymphoma. This review summarizes the data published so far concerning the value of FDG-PET in staging, treatment monitoring, therapy planning, and follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). FDG...

  15. FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT for therapy monitoring and restaging in malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, F.M.; Krause, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET allows to assess residual masses in patients with malignant lymphoma differentiating vital tumor from scar tissue. This approach is not applicable with conventional imaging methods (CDM) such as CT or MRI. On the other hand circumscribed results often cannot be definitely allocated in PET, therefore the combined morphological-biochemical approach using the now available PET/CT systems promises to be a pathbreaking technical progress. There is no doubt that stand alone PET is superior to CDM differentiating residual scar tissue from vital tumor as has been shown in 15 recently published studies. The median sensitivity for detecting active disease with FDG PET across the studies was 91%; the corresponding specificity was 89%. As a result FDG PET had a high negative predictive value of 94%. In contrast, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of CDM in the 9 studies were a direct comparison was available were low (31% and 46%, one study 82%). PET positive residual masses were associated with a progression-free survival of 0 - 55%. Only a few studies have included FDG-PET in therapy response monitoring studies, however also these results are promising. At the moment FDG-PET seems to be the best possibility to characterize and qualitatively visualize vitality of tumor masses and also hold promises for efficient therapy response monitoring in patients with malignant lymphoma. Therefore it should be included in standard diagnostic protocols in lymphoma patients. The combined PET/CT has to be ranked superior to conventional PET studies as in many cases the combined structural and functional imaging brings a clearer diagnostic statement. (orig.) [de

  16. Generation of Random Particle Packings for Discrete Element Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S.; Weatherley, D.; Ayton, T.

    2012-04-01

    An important step in the setup process of Discrete Element Model (DEM) simulations is the generation of a suitable particle packing. There are quite a number of properties such a granular material specimen should ideally have, such as high coordination number, isotropy, the ability to fill arbitrary bounding volumes and the absence of locked-in stresses. An algorithm which is able to produce specimens fulfilling these requirements is the insertion based sphere packing algorithm originally proposed by Place and Mora, 2001 [2] and extended in this work. The algorithm works in two stages. First a number of "seed" spheres are inserted into the bounding volume. In the second stage the gaps between the "seed" spheres are filled by inserting new spheres in a way so they have D+1 (i.e. 3 in 2D, 4 in 3D) touching contacts with either other spheres or the boundaries of the enclosing volume. Here we present an implementation of the algorithm and a systematic statistical analysis of the generated sphere packings. The analysis of the particle radius distribution shows that they follow a power-law with an exponent ≈ D (i.e. ≈3 for a 3D packing and ≈2 for 2D). Although the algorithm intrinsically guarantees coordination numbers of at least 4 in 3D and 3 in 2D, the coordination numbers realized in the generated packings can be significantly higher, reaching beyond 50 if the range of particle radii is sufficiently large. Even for relatively small ranges of particle sizes (e.g. Rmin = 0.5Rmax) the maximum coordination number may exceed 10. The degree of isotropy of the generated sphere packing is also analysed in both 2D and 3D, by measuring the distribution of orientations of vectors joining the centres of adjacent particles. If the range of particle sizes is small, the packing algorithm yields moderate anisotropy approaching that expected for a face-centred cubic packing of equal-sized particles. However, once Rmin Python[3] scripting language and provides the capacity to

  17. FDG-PET in Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Sabri, O.; Kluge, R.; Schober, O.

    2008-01-01

    The high negative predictive value of FDG-PET in therapy control of Hodgkin lymphoma is proven by the data acquired up to now. Thus, the analysis of the HD15 trial has shown that consolidation radiotherapy might be omitted in PET negative patients after effective chemotherapy. Further response adapted therapy guided by PET seems to be a promising approach in reducing the toxicity for patients undergoing chemotherapy. The criteria used for the PET interpretation have been standardized by the German study groups for Hodgkin lymphoma patients and will be reevaluated in the current studies. (orig.)

  18. The FDG-PET diagnosis of head and neck malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, Shinpei; Hayashi, Masahiko; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the utility of whole body FDG-PET in patients with head and neck malignant tumor, retrospectively. Fifty four FDG-PET studies were performed in 45 patients. Regarding the primary tumor and nodal metastasis, we compared the diagnosis of only FDG-PET with diagnosis using CT, MRI, and physical examination without FDG-PET (diagnosis without FDG-PET). These FDG-PET images were evaluated with visual interpretation qualitatively. At the primary tumor, sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET diagnoses were 90% and 93%, and those of the diagnoses without FDG-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively; for nodal metastasis, sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET diagnoses were 90% and 84%, and those of the diagnoses without FDG-PET were 72% and 80%, respectively. In nodal metastasis, the diagnosis of FDG-PET was superior to the diagnosis without FDG-PET. However, it is important to be careful of false positive findings of FDG-PET such as inflammatory lymph nodes, and false negative findings such as very thin tumors. By combining the FDG-PET diagnosis with other examinations, we could achieve almost perfect diagnosis. Farthermore, we perform FDG-PET repeatedly to improve diagnosis accuracy. (author)

  19. Evaluation of organ-specific glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice as a model of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao; Nakamura, Akinobu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shinoda, Kazuaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauchi, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio; Goto, Atsuhi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which the body produces insulin but does not result in a sufficient biological effect. Insulin resistance is usually asymptomatic but is associated with health problems and is a factor in the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to clarify organ-specific insulin resistance in normal daily conditions using [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]-FDG was examined in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice, an animal model of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice with and without insulin loading. Mice received 0.5 MBq of [ 18 F]-FDG injected into the tail vein, immediately followed by nothing (control cohorts) or an intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mU/g body weight of human insulin as an insulin loading test. Blood glucose concentrations for all of the experimental animals were assessed at 0, 20, 40, and 60 min post-injection. The mice were subsequently killed, and tissue was collected for evaluation of [ 18 F]-FDG biodistribution. The radioactivity of each organ was measured using a gamma counter. In the absence of insulin, the blood glucose concentrations of wild-type mice (132±26 mg/dl) and IRS-1 knockout mice (134±18 mg/dl) were not significantly different. Blood glucose concentrations decreased following insulin administration, with lower concentrations in wild-type mice than in knockout mice at 20, 40, and 60 min. A statistically significant difference in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake between wild-type mice and IRS-1 knockout mice was confirmed in the heart, abdominal muscle, and femoral muscle. With insulin loading, [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart, back muscle, and abdominal muscle was significantly increased compared to without insulin loading in both wild-type mice and knockout mice. Our results showed that IR significantly affected [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart in normal daily conditions. IR was associated with

  20. FDG-PET/CT in Skeletal Muscle: Pitfalls and Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-07-01

    FDG-PET/CT is an integral part of modern-day practice of medicine. By detecting increased cellular metabolism, FDG-PET/CT can help us detect infection, inflammatory disorders, or tumors, and also help us in prognostication of patients. However, one of the most important challenges is to correctly differentiate the abnormal uptake that is potentially pathologic from the physiological uptake. So while interpreting a PET/CT, one must be aware of normal biodistribution and different physiological variants of FDG uptake. Skeletal muscles constitute a large part of our body mass and one of the major users of glucose. Naturally, they are often the site of increased FDG uptake in a PET study. We as a nuclear medicine physician must be aware of all the pitfalls of increased skeletal muscle uptake to differentiate between physiological and pathologic causes. In this review, we have discussed the different causes and patterns of physiological FDG uptake in skeletal muscles. This knowledge of normal physiological variants of FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles is essential for differentiating pathologic uptake from the physiological ones. Also, we reviewed the role of FDG-PET/CT in various benign and malignant diseases involving skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FDG PET in early stage cutaneous malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIvor, Jody; Siew, Teck; McCarthy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) is not recommended in early stage melanoma; however, a significant number of cases are referred to our institution for FDG PET. We refer to early stage disease as American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I and II, which includes all cases without metastases. A retrospective review was undertaken to determine the clinical utility of FDG PET in this patient group. A retrospective study of FDG scans on all patients presenting to the WA PET Centre with early stage melanoma over a 5½ year period was undertaken. The positivity rate of the initial study for detection of malignant melanoma was determined. In patients with an initially negative FDG PET, the time from initial diagnosis to a positive surveillance study was determined. Both the initial positivity rate and time to a positive study were correlated with Breslow staging. Three hundred twenty-two patients were included in the study, of which 74 had initial positive FDG PET scans (23%). Adequate follow-up was available in 51 patients with the PET result confirmed as true positive in 37 (positive predictive value 73%). One hundred eight of 248 patients initially negative had follow-up scans during the follow-up period, of which 48 became positive. The 73% of recurrences were over 12 months post-diagnosis. No correlation with Breslow thickness was demonstrated. Despite FDG PET not being recommended for early cutaneous malignant melanoma, 27% of melanoma cases referred for FDG PET during the study period were AJCC stage I or II. Our results suggest FDG PET in early stage melanoma demonstrates occult disease in 17% of cases.

  2. Hypostatic jammed packings of frictionless nonspherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWerf, Kyle; Jin, Weiwei; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2018-01-01

    We perform computational studies of static packings of a variety of nonspherical particles including circulo-lines, circulo-polygons, ellipses, asymmetric dimers, dumbbells, and others to determine which shapes form packings with fewer contacts than degrees of freedom (hypostatic packings) and which have equal numbers of contacts and degrees of freedom (isostatic packings), and to understand why hypostatic packings of nonspherical particles can be mechanically stable despite having fewer contacts than that predicted from naive constraint counting. To generate highly accurate force- and torque-balanced packings of circulo-lines and cir-polygons, we developed an interparticle potential that gives continuous forces and torques as a function of the particle coordinates. We show that the packing fraction and coordination number at jamming onset obey a masterlike form for all of the nonspherical particle packings we studied when plotted versus the particle asphericity A , which is proportional to the ratio of the squared perimeter to the area of the particle. Further, the eigenvalue spectra of the dynamical matrix for packings of different particle shapes collapse when plotted at the same A . For hypostatic packings of nonspherical particles, we verify that the number of "quartic" modes along which the potential energy increases as the fourth power of the perturbation amplitude matches the number of missing contacts relative to the isostatic value. We show that the fourth derivatives of the total potential energy in the directions of the quartic modes remain nonzero as the pressure of the packings is decreased to zero. In addition, we calculate the principal curvatures of the inequality constraints for each contact in circulo-line packings and identify specific types of contacts with inequality constraints that possess convex curvature. These contacts can constrain multiple degrees of freedom and allow hypostatic packings of nonspherical particles to be mechanically

  3. Effect of the dilution factor on 18FDG and Na18F samples for bacterial endotoxin test using PTS (portable test system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Costa, Flavia M.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.

    2011-01-01

    18 FDG and Na 18 F are radiopharmaceuticals produced as sterile solutions suitable for intravenous administration, which must contain no more than 175 EV/V. The most commonly used approach to detect endotoxins is the gelclot technique that requires 60 minutes for results. For radiopharmaceuticals containing short-life radionuclides, such as 18 F, there is an increasing interest for faster quality control methods. FDA licensed the Endosafe, PTS, a kinetic chromogenic endotoxin detection system that takes about 15 minutes for results. As other techniques, PTS test is susceptible to interferences which can be solved by product dilution. The aim of this study was to establish the best dilution of 18 FDG and Na 18 F for PTS analysis. Two different dilution factors for 18 FDG and 1:10 for Na 18 F were essayed: 1:10 and 1:100. 18 FDG and Na 18 solutions were prepared by the addition of LAL reagent water. Considering the assay acceptance criteria, the best dilution factor was 1:100 for 18 FDG and 1:10 for Na 18 F. The recovery of the product positive control was 98-12% for 18 FDG 1:100 and 104-120% for Na 18 F 1:10, which were, in both cases, within the specification (50-200%) and very close to 100%. Results obtained with these dilution studies were important to establish the most appropriate and non-interfering dilution factor for 18 FDG and Na 18 F routine endotoxin test. (author)

  4. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  5. Incidence and characteristics of uterine leiomyomas with FDG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kido, Aki; Miyagawa, Masao; Inoue, Takeshi; Shinohara, Katsura; Kajihara, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas sometimes show focal 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET) images that may result in a false-positive diagnosis for malignant lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the incidence and characteristics of uterine leiomyomas that showed FDG uptake. We reviewed FDG-PET and pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) images of 477 pre-menopausal (pre-MP, age 42.1±7.3 years) and 880 post-MP (age 59.9±6.8 years) healthy women who underwent these tests as parts of cancer screening. Of 1357, 323 underwent annual cancer screening four times, 97 did three times, 191 did twice, and the rest were screened once. Focal FDG uptake (maximal standardized uptake value >3.0) in the pelvis was localized and characterized on co-registered PET/MR images. Uterine leiomyomas were found in 164 pre-MP and 338 post-MP women. FDG uptake was observed in 18 leiomyomas of 17 of the 164 (10.4%) pre-MP women and in 4 leiomyomas of 4 of the 338 (1.2%) post-MP women. The incidence was significantly higher in pre-MP women than in post-MP women (chi-square, P<0.001). Of the 22, 13 showed signal intensity equal to or higher than that of the myometrium on T2-weighted MR images, which suggested abundant cellularity, whereas the majority of leiomyomas without FDG uptake showed low signal intensity. Of the 13 women, 12 examined more than twice showed substantial changes in the level of FDG uptake in leiomyomas each year with FDG uptake disappearing or newly appearing. These changes were observed frequently in relation with menopause or menstrual phases. Leiomyomas with focal FDG uptake were seen in both pre- and post-MP women with a higher incidence in pre-MP women. Abundant cellularity and hormonal dependency may explain a part of the mechanisms of FDG uptake in leiomyomas. It is important to know that the level of FDG uptake in leiomyomas can change and newly appearing FDG uptake does not necessarily mean malignant transformation. (author)

  6. FDG PET/CT in children and adolescents with lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Montravers, Francoise [Hospital Tenon, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mauz-Koerholz, Christine [University Hospital Halle, Department of Paediatrics, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of FDG PET/CT applications in children and adolescents with lymphoma. Today, FDG PET is used for tailoring treatment intensity in children with Hodgkin lymphoma within the framework of international treatment optimisation protocols. In contrast, the role of this method in children with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is not well defined. This paper overviews clinical appearance and metabolic behaviour of the most frequent lymphoma subtypes in childhood. The main focus of the review is to summarise knowledge about the role of FDG PET/CT for initial staging and early response assessment. (orig.)

  7. The “Theoreticals” Pack

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The Particle Zoo is a colourful set of hand-made soft toys representing the particles in the Standard Model and beyond. It includes a “theoreticals” pack where you can find yet undiscovered particles: the best-selling Higgs boson, the graviton, the tachyon, and dark matter. Supersymmetric particle soft toys are also available on demand. But what would happen to the zoo if Nature had prepared some unexpected surprises? Julie Peasley, the zookeeper, is ready to sew new smiling faces…   The "Theoreticals" pack in the Particle Zoo. There is only one place in the world where you can buy a smiling Higgs boson and it’s not at CERN, although this is where scientists hope to observe it. The blue star-shaped particle is the best seller of Julie Peasley’s Particle Zoo – a collection of tens of soft toys representing all sorts of particles, including composite and decaying particles.  Over the years Julie’s zoo ...

  8. Fast searching in packed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Given strings P and Q the (exact) string matching problem is to find all positions of substrings in Q matching P. The classical Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm [SIAM J. Comput. 6 (2) (1977) 323–350] solves the string matching problem in linear time which is optimal if we can only read one character...... at the time. However, most strings are stored in a computer in a packed representation with several characters in a single word, giving us the opportunity to read multiple characters simultaneously. In this paper we study the worst-case complexity of string matching on strings given in packed representation....... Let m⩽n be the lengths P and Q, respectively, and let σ denote the size of the alphabet. On a standard unit-cost word-RAM with logarithmic word size we present an algorithm using timeO(nlogσn+m+occ). Here occ is the number of occurrences of P in Q. For m=o(n) this improves the O(n) bound of the Knuth...

  9. Localization of Epileptogenic Zones using Partical Volume Corrected FDG Uptake on FDG PET and Voxel Based Morphometry on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Univ. of Seoul National, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Partial volume corrected (PVC) FDG uptake yields information about regional metabolic level void of volume change, and voxel based morphometry (VBM) yields objective information regarding gray matter concentration. We investigated the roles of PVC PET and VBM to localize epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. As a control group for PVC, 40 normal volunteers without history of neurologic or psychiatric diseases underwent FDG PET and MRI. Seventeen mTLE patients (M: F=7: 10, age=309 y) and nine neocortical epilepsy patients (M: F=6: 3, age=246, lateral temporal: 5, frontal: 3, occipital: 1) confirmed by surgery or epilepsy board meeting were enrolled. Standard VBM analysis was performed using individual MRI images compared with those of age-matched controls. For PVC, FDG PET was co-registered with its own MRI. PVC PET was obtained by dividing spillover-corrected PET by smoothed gray matter image pixel by pixel. SPAM was applied as a mask of volume of interest (VOI) to calculate gyral FDG uptake on PVC-FDG PET. Hippocampus, amygdala, superior, middle, inferior temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were the gyral SPAM VOIs in mTLE. Globally normalized PVC-FDG counts were compared with those of age-matched controls in mTLE and neocortical epilepsy patients. In mTlE, PVC-FDG PET correctly localized epileptogenic zones with the accuracy of 76% (13/17) in hippocampus and 82% (14/17) in any of six regions. VBM correctly localized 59% (10/17) in mTLE. In neocortical epilepsy, PVC-FDG PET localized epileptogenic zones in 44%, and VBM in 33%, Using VBM and PVC-FDG PET altogether, epileptogenic zones were localized in 66% (6/9). In mTLE, gyral PVC FDG uptake of temporal lobes was useful in localizing epileptogenic zones by demonstrating partial volume-void FDG concentration. In non-lesional cryptogenic neocortical epilepsy, combination of PVC-FDG PET and VBM is recommended to localize epileptogenic zones.

  10. Structured packing: an opportunity for energy savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez T, R.H.; Guadarrama G, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    This work emphasizes the advantages about the use of structured packing. This type of packings allows by its geometry to reduce the processing time giving energy savings and throw down the production costs in several industries such as heavy water production plants, petrochemical industry and all industries involved with separation processes. There is a comparative results of energy consumption utilizing the structured vs. Raschig packings. (Author)

  11. FDG-PET in monitoring therapy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Bender, H.; Palmedo, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been used successfully for the staging and re-staging of breast cancer. Another significant indication is the evaluation of therapy response. Only limited data are available on the use of FDG-PET in breast cancer after radiation therapy. The same holds true for chemotherapy. Only the therapy response in locally advanced breast cancer after chemotherapy has been investigated thoroughly. Histopathological response could be predicted with an accuracy of 88-91% after the first and second courses of therapy. A quantitative evaluation is, of course, a prerequisite when FDG-PET is used for therapy monitoring. Only a small number of studies have focussed on hormone therapy. In this context, a flare phenomenon with increasing standardised uptake values after initiation of tamoxifen therapy has been observed. More prospective multicentre trials will be needed to make FDG-PET a powerful tool in monitoring chemotherapy in breast cancer. (orig.)

  12. Metastasis of the gastrointestinal tract. FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Nihashi, Takashi; Matsuura, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    We assess the usefulness of F-18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of gastrointestinal metastases. Four cases (five lesions) in which metastases from three lung cancers and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the femur were found in the gastrointestinal tract were reviewed (men/women 3:1, age 63-78 years, mean 72 years). The five lesions were duodenal, jejunal metastasis, and two stomach metastases from lung carcinoma, and rectal metastasis from MFH of the femur. FDG-PET was unable to detect small masses, but it was able to detect unforeseen lesions such as gastrointestinal metastases because FDG-PET is a whole-body scan in a single-operation examination. FDG-PET imaging provided valuable information for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal metastasis. (author)

  13. Patient Preparation for Oncological FDG-PET/CT Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevin Ayaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In oncology patients who undergo positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT, radiolabeled [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG is utilized to obtain qualitative and quantitative data about tumour metabolism. The process of patient preparation before FDG-PET/CT imaging (scanning primarily includes acquisition of patient data, fasting before imaging, regulation of blood glucose and insulin levels, administration of FDG and radiologic contrast material, administration of adjunctive agents, scheduling of the imaging in recently treated patients, imaging during pregnancy and lactation, and final arrangements before imaging. Standardization of procedures for patient preparation in oncological FDG-PET/CT imaging is extremely important to obtain high-quality images, to decrease false-negative and false-positive findings and to reduce the patient radiation dose as much as possible.

  14. Minimally packed phases in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Rd., Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Gauntlett, Jerome P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,Prince Consort Rd., London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-21

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D=4 Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled to a pseudoscalar. The solutions are holographically dual to d=3 CFTs at finite chemical potential and in a constant magnetic field, which spontaneously break translation invariance leading to the spontaneous formation of abelian and momentum magnetisation currents flowing around the plaquettes of a periodic Bravais lattice. We analyse the three-dimensional moduli space of lattice solutions, which are generically oblique, and show, for a specific value of the magnetic field, that the free energy is minimised by the triangular lattice, associated with minimal packing of circles in the plane. We show that the average stress tensor for the thermodynamically preferred phase is that of a perfect fluid and that this result applies more generally to spontaneously generated periodic phases. The triangular structure persists at low temperatures indicating the existence of novel crystalline ground states.

  15. Physiological FDG uptake in the ovaries after hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Inubushi, Masayuki; Ozawa, Fukujiro; Kido, Aki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    It is known that focal 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake is physiologically seen in the ovaries and uterus of premenopausal women in correlation with the menstrual cycle, which may cause false-positive diagnoses on the images of FDG positron emission tomography (PET). The objective of this study was to clarify whether women of reproductive age after hysterectomy whose ovaries were preserved, also showed physiological ovarian FDG uptake. We reviewed 26 women after hysterectomy (age 51.1±5.0 years), who underwent annual cancer screening, including FDG-PET and pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, three times. Seven women (age 45.9±5.8 years, range 34-52 years) had at least one ovary, showing changes in its appearance including the size and number of follicles on MR images each year, which suggested that the ovary was functioning. Four of the seven women showed focal FDG uptake (standardized uptake value 4.2±1.1) that corresponded to the normal ovaries on five PET examinations. Another group of 19 women (age 53.1±3.1 years, range 47-59 years) who had small ovaries without changes on MR images each year did not show FDG uptake in the ovaries. Physiological FDG uptake observed in the ovaries of women of reproductive age even after hysterectomy is reasonably common. As it is not easy to determine the hormonal cycle in these women, it is essential to correlate focal FDG uptake in the pelvis with anatomical and morphological findings on MR images to avoid false-positive diagnoses. (author)

  16. FDG PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Chin, Bennett B

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of carcinosarcoma of the prostate. Workup of urinary retention after a previously treated squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate led to a transurethral prostate resection revealing carcinosarcoma of the prostate, which on F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated moderate to high avidity of this atypical prostate cancer, with partial obstruction of the urinary system and lung metastases. While FDG PET is not avid for typical prostatic adenocarcinomas, it should be considered for evaluation of atypical prostate cancers.

  17. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  18. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M D′souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin′s disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique.

  19. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique

  20. The general packed column : an analytical solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, J.L.W.

    2000-01-01

    The transient behaviour of a packed column is considered. The column, uniformly packed on a macroscopic scale, is multi-structured on the microscopic level: the solid phase consists of particles, which may differ in incidence, shape or size, and other relevant physical properties. Transport in the

  1. Protein packing quality using Delaunay complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Winter, Pawel; Karplus, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A new method for estimating the packing quality of protein structures is presented. Atoms in high quality protein crystal structures are very uniformly distributed which is difficult to reproduce using structure prediction methods. Packing quality measures can therefore be used to assess structur...

  2. Does Post Septoplasty Nasal Packing Reduce Complications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Naghibzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not.Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  3. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 982.11 Section 982.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in accordance...

  4. Improved taxation rate for bin packing games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Walter; Qui, X.; Marchetti-Spaccamela, A.; Segal, M.

    2011-01-01

    A cooperative bin packing game is a $N$-person game, where the player set $N$ consists of $k$ bins of capacity 1 each and $n$ items of sizes $a_1,\\dots,a_n$. The value of a coalition of players is defined to be the maximum total size of items in the coalition that can be packed into the bins of the

  5. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... the marketing of raisins or in any container suitable or usable for such marketing. Raisins in the process of being packed or raisins which are partially packed shall be subject to the same requirements as...

  6. On contact numbers in random rod packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.; Luding, Stefan; Philipse, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Random packings of non-spherical granular particles are simulated by combining mechanical contraction and molecular dynamics, to determine contact numbers as a function of density. Particle shapes are varied from spheres to thin rods. The observed contact numbers (and packing densities) agree well

  7. Practical Aspects of 18F-FDG PET When Receiving 18F-FDG from a Distant Supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Jaylene; Goertzen, Andrew L; Patterson, Judy; Demeter, Sandor

    2009-09-01

    With PET becoming more widely used, there is an increase in the number of imaging centers being forced to rely on distant suppliers of (18)F-FDG. Because of the large distances between major urban centers, this is particularly true for PET centers in Canada. Our PET center, located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, currently purchases (18)F-FDG from a commercial vendor located more than 1,000 km from Winnipeg, necessitating transport by commercial airline cargo. This dependence on air transport and a distant supplier creates a situation in which our (18)F-FDG supply is less reliable than it would be with onsite production. In this article, we offer insight into the obstacles we have encountered in imaging with a distant supplier of (18)F-FDG and the solutions we have implemented to minimize the disruption to our patients and maximize the number of scans performed each year. The development of contingency plans and protocols designed to suit our operating environment has allowed us to increase the number of patient scans obtained from 659 in year 1 to 993 in year 3, an increase of 51%, despite an increase in our actual number of scan days of only 24%. (18)F-FDG injection timetables are presented for a variety of scenarios including normal delivery, low shipped activity, and delayed delivery. Through the careful establishment of contingency protocols and management of (18)F-FDG shipments, patient throughput can be increased and disruptions minimized.

  8. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  9. Schedulability-Driven Frame Packing for Multi-Cluster Distributed Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Eles, Petru; Peng, Zebo

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to frame packing for multi-cluster distributed embedded systems consisting of time-triggered and event-triggered clusters, interconnected via gateways. In our approach, the application messages are packed into frames such that the application is schedulable. Thus, we have...... also proposed a schedulability analysis for applications consisting of mixed event-triggered and time-triggered processes and messages, and a worst case queuing delay analysis for the gateways, responsible for routing inter-cluster traffic. Optimization heuristics for frame packing aiming at producing...

  10. Solitary pulmonary nodules: cost-savings indicated by Australian experience with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, C.J.; Miles, K.A.; Pitman, A.G.; Hicks, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To date, decision tree analyses demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of PET in Australia have been constrained by the need to use overseas values for diagnostic performance and disease prevalence. This study uses Australian PET experience to estimate the cost-savings produced by incorporation of FDG-PET into diagnostic algorithms for characterisation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Values for disease prevalence and diagnostic accuracy of PET from a combined series of 89 SPNs from the Wesley Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute were applied to two previously published decision tree models. Procedure costs were derived from the Medicare Benefits Schedule and DRG Cost Weights for Australian public hospitals. A cost of $1200 was assigned to PET. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of disease prevalence and PET cost on the cost savings produced by each strategy. The values for disease prevalence (0.54), PET sensitivity (92%) and specificity (95%) from the combined series indicated cost savings per patient of $774 and $554 for the two decision trees. PET would remain cost-saving for values of prevalence up to 0.90 and 0.76, and PET costs of $1974 and $1967, for each model respectively. FDG-PET evaluation of SPNs would produce cost-savings within Australia even with substantial variations in disease prevalence and PET costs. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Brown adipose tissue {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in pediatric PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Terence S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Zukotynski, Katherine A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Drubach, Laura A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Lim, Ruth [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) fused with CT ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) has been widely adopted in oncological imaging. However, it is known that benign lesions and other metabolically active tissues, such as brown adipose tissue (BAT), can accumulate {sup 18}F-FDG, potentially resulting in false-positive interpretation. Previous studies have reported that {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in BAT is more common in children than in adults. We illustrate BAT FDG uptake in various anatomical locations in children and adolescents. We also review what is known about the effects of patient-related physical attributes and environmental temperatures on BAT FDG uptake, and discuss methods used to reduce BAT FDG uptake on {sup 18}F-FDG PET. (orig.)

  12. Hawking Colloquium Packed CERN Auditoriums

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Hawking's week long visit to CERN included an 'exceptional CERN colloquium' which filled six auditoriums. Stephen Hawking during his visit to the ATLAS experiment. Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Cambridge University, visited the Theory Unit of the Physics Department from 24 September to 1 October 2006. As part of his visit, he gave two lectures in the main auditorium - a theoretical seminar on 'The Semi-Classical Birth of The Universe', attended by about 120 specialists; and a colloquium titled 'The Origin of The Universe'. As a key public figure in theoretical physics, his presence was eagerly awaited on both occasions. Those who wanted to attend the colloquium had to arrive early and be equipped with plenty of patience. An hour before it was due to begin, the 400 capacity of the main auditorium was already full. The lecture, simultaneously broadcast to five other fully packed CERN auditoriums, was attended by an estimated total of 850. Stephen Hawking attracted a large CERN crowd, filling ...

  13. Agglomeration techniques for the production of spheres for packed beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.D.

    1988-03-01

    One attractive fusion-breeder-blanket design features a lithium bearing ceramic in the form of spheres packed into a random array. The spheres have diameters of 3 mm and 0.3 mm. This report surveys techniques used to produce ceramic spheres on an industrial scale. The methods examined include tumbling and mixing granulation, extrusion, briquetting and pelletizing. It is concluded that the required quantities of 0.3 mm diameter spheres can be produced by the tumbling agglomeration of a feed powder. The 3 mm diameter spheres will be made using a process of extrusion, chopping and rolling

  14. F-18 FDG PET in Detecting Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ak, I.; Can, C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of F-18 FDG imaging with a dual head coincidence mode gamma camera (Co-PET) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with renal masses. Material and Methods: An F-18 FDG Co-PET study was performed in 19 patients (7 F, 12 M; mean age 58.15±2.5 years, age range 45-79 years) with suspected primary renal tumors based on conventional imaging techniques, including computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) before nephrectomy or surgical resection of the mass. Results: Histologically documented RCC was present in 15 patients. Of the 19 patients with suspected primary renal tumors, F-18 FDG Co-PET was true-positive in 13, false-negative in 2, true-negative in 3, and false-positive in 1 patient. Twangiomyolipomas and one renal mass due to infarction and hemorrhage showed a true-negative Co-PET result. The patient with false-positive FDG Co-PET study was diagnosed as xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG Co-PET for RCC were 86% (13/15), 75% (3/4), and 84% (16/19), respectively. Positive predictive value for RCC was 92% and negative predictive value 60%. Conclusion: These findings suggest that F-18 FDG Co-PET may have a role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with RCC and primary staging of disease. Positive F-18 FDG study may be predictive of the presence of RCC. However, a negative study does not exclude the RCC

  15. Joint accumulations of FDG in whole body PET scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, G.K. von; Meier, N.; Stumpe, K.D.M. [Dept. of Medical Radiology: Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG accumulations in major joints in a large series of non-absorption corrected partial body and whole body FDG-PET scans, and to determine the frequency and intensity of accumulation. Materials and methods: 354 consecutive PET partial- and whole body non-transmission corrected scans of patients obtained for tumor staging were examined with respect to FDG accumulations in the acromio-clavicular (AC)-, gleno-humeral-, hip,, knee- and talo-tibial joints. FDG-uptake was graded using a semi-quantitative scale from 0 (no accumulation) to 4 (very strong accumulation comparable to brain uptake). Results: Joint activity of grade 1-2 was noted frequently, while grade 3 was rare, occurring only in the knee and shoulder joints, and grade 4 was inexistent. The 43 patients with grade 3 accumulations or with at least 4 joints showing grade 2 uptake were interviewed, but all denied pain specifically referred to a joint. Joint accumulations were seen in 50% of the acromio-clavicular-, 80% in the gleno-humeral-, 50% in the hip-, 90% in the knee and 80% in the talo-tibial joints. The intensities of joint accumulations correlated positively and significantly with patient age, ranging from r = 0.7 and p <0.05 in the knee to r = 0.96 and p <0.0001 in the AC joint. Conclusions: FDG accumulations in the joints in whole body FDG-PET scans are frequent and are very likely not related to symptoms. As there is a strong age correlation, and FDG is known to accumulate in inflammatory lesions, the findings are most likely a result of sub-clinical inflammatory synovial proliferation or other chronic inflammatory processes occurring in aging joints. (orig.)

  16. FDG PET in the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y. H.; Zuo, C.T.; Zhao, J.; Hua, F.C.; Lin, X.T.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Meningeal involvement is frequent in metastatic lymphoma, leukemia, and other metastatic tumor. Functional signs may be misleading and the neurological examination may be normal or non-specific. Certain diagnosis requires identification of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid. CSF cytology is however sometimes negative and MRI maybe help in providing the diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to assess the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis. Patients and Methods: The diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis was made in 5 patients between 1999 and 2001. Two of the patients were suffer from lymphoma, two were lung cancer patients, and another was a breast cancer patient. Cytology examination of the cerebrospinal fluid provided the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis in these 5 patients. All the patients had signs of neurological function impairment, but the neurological examination cannot demonstrate the site of lesions. Therefore, All the patients had MRI examination, but only 1 case was diagnosis correctly (the MRI showing meningeal enhancement). 3 patients' MRI results show normal .Another MRI was suspicious of ischemic change. Results: A brain FDG PET using an ECAT HR + PET examined all the 5 patients. All the FDG PET results show the hypermetabolic foci respectively. The foci were diffused on the brain meninges. Their size is bigger than the foci detected by MRI . 3 of the patients repeated the FDG PET scan after treatment (chemotherapy and radiotherapy). The therapeutic effect can be reflecting by FDG PET (the foci dismissed as the neurological symptoms disappeared), although the simultaneity MRI shows no change before and after treatment. Conclusion: 5 patients proven meningeal carcinomatosis FDG PET has better sensitivity than brain MRI scans and other anatomic modality. The patients who suffer from metastatic lymphoma, leukemia, and other metastatic tumor with nonspecific neurological signs should be explored

  17. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on F-18 FDG positron emission tomography: correlation with endoscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Sang Woo; Byun, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yu Chul; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2005-01-01

    We often find variable degrees of FDG uptake and patterns in stomach, which can make difficult to distinguish physiologic uptake from pathologic uptake on FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-eight patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy within one week from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in this study. We reviewed 38 patients (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32 ∼ 79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. Two nuclear physicians evaluated five parameters on FDG PET findings of stomach with a consensus: 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (max.SUV) 3) focal 4) diffuse and 5) asymmetric patterns. We correlated the lesions of FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. We considered more than equivocal findings on FDG PET as positive. The six of 38 patients were proven as malignant lesions by endoscopic biopsy and others were inflammatory lesions (ulcer in 3, chronic atrophic gastritis in 12, uncommon forms of gastritis in 5), non-inflammatory lesions (n=3), and normal stomach (n=9). By the visual analysis, malignant lesions had higher FDG uptake than the others. The max.SUV of malignant lesions was 7.95 ± 4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9 ± 0.69 in ulcer, 3.08 ± 1.2 in chronic atrophic gastritis, 3.2 ± 1.49 in uncommon forms of gastritis ( ρ =0.044). In the appearance of stomach on FDG PET, malignant lesions were shown focal (5 of 6) and benign inflammatory lesions were shown diffuse (9 of 20) and asymmetric (14 of 20). Benign lesions and normal stomach were shown variable degrees of uptake and patterns. Some cases of benign inflammatory lesions such as ulcer and gastritis were shown focal and mimicked cancerous lesions (4 of 15). Gastric malignant lesions had higher FDG uptake and focal pattern. However, benign

  18. Patterns of FDG uptake in stomach on F-18 FDG positron emission tomography: correlation with endoscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Sang Woo; Byun, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yu Chul; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    We often find variable degrees of FDG uptake and patterns in stomach, which can make difficult to distinguish physiologic uptake from pathologic uptake on FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to find out the significant findings of stomach on FDG PET. Thirty-eight patients who underwent both FDG PET and endoscopy within one week from Jun. 2003, to Aug. 2004 were included in this study. We reviewed 38 patients (18 for medical check up, 15 for work up of other malignancies, and 5 for the evaluation of stomach lesion). Their mean age was 56 years old (range:32 {approx} 79), men and women were 28 and 10, respectively. Two nuclear physicians evaluated five parameters on FDG PET findings of stomach with a consensus: 1) visual grades 2) maximum SUV (max.SUV) 3) focal 4) diffuse and 5) asymmetric patterns. We correlated the lesions of FDG PET findings of stomach with those of endoscopy. We considered more than equivocal findings on FDG PET as positive. The six of 38 patients were proven as malignant lesions by endoscopic biopsy and others were inflammatory lesions (ulcer in 3, chronic atrophic gastritis in 12, uncommon forms of gastritis in 5), non-inflammatory lesions (n=3), and normal stomach (n=9). By the visual analysis, malignant lesions had higher FDG uptake than the others. The max.SUV of malignant lesions was 7.95 {+-} 4.83 which was significantly higher than the other benign lesions (2.9 {+-} 0.69 in ulcer, 3.08 {+-} 1.2 in chronic atrophic gastritis, 3.2 {+-} 1.49 in uncommon forms of gastritis ( {rho} =0.044). In the appearance of stomach on FDG PET, malignant lesions were shown focal (5 of 6) and benign inflammatory lesions were shown diffuse (9 of 20) and asymmetric (14 of 20). Benign lesions and normal stomach were shown variable degrees of uptake and patterns. Some cases of benign inflammatory lesions such as ulcer and gastritis were shown focal and mimicked cancerous lesions (4 of 15). Gastric malignant lesions had higher FDG uptake and focal pattern

  19. An unusual case of predation: dog pack or cougar attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel M; Palacios, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Injuries produced by animals are capable of leaving severe patterns and in some cases may result in the death of the attacked individual. Law enforcement authorities may come to erroneous conclusions about the source of the bites based on their awareness of animals present and similarities of the injuries to the untrained eye, with dreadful consequences. Expertise of a carnivore biologist and an odontologist that indentifies the particularities of bite marks may be useful for identifying the attacking species. We present the investigation of a fatal dog pack attack involving a 43-year-old man in Bell Ville (Argentina) where the evidence provided by a forensic dentist and a biologist was categorical for establishing the animal species involved. Because of the unusual characteristics of the wounds and the initial hypothesis made by local authorities of a cougar attack, habits and specific patterns of both dog pack and cougar predation on humans are discussed. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Packing configuration performance for small stem diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, J.A.; Spence, C.G.; Cumming, D.

    1997-01-01

    The extensive use of graphite packing and its excellent track record for large isolating valves in CANDU, Primary Heat Transfer (PHT) systems has resulted in an increased application of graphite packing on the conventional side. Many of these applications are in air operated valves (AOVs) where the packing sets are used on small stem diameters (<1 inch) with frequent short-cycling strokes (± 10% of full stroke). The direct application of the proven packing configurations for large isolated valves to control valve application has generated problems such as stiction, packing wear and, in isolated cases, stem stall. To address this issue, a test program was conducted at AECL, CRL by MED branch. The testing showed that by reconfiguring the packing sets and using PTFE wafers reductions in stem friction of 50% at ambient conditions, a 3 fold at hot conditions are achievable. The test program also demonstrated benefits gained in packing wear with different stem roughness finishes and the potential need to exercise small stems valves that see less than full stroke cycling. The paper describes the tests results and provides field support experience. (author)

  1. Benign Bone Conditions That May Be FDG-avid and Mimic Malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwee, Thomas C.; de Klerk, John M. H.; Nix, Maarten; Heggelman, Ben G. F.; Dubois, Stefan V.; Adams, Hugo J. A.

    Positron emission tomography with the radiotracer F-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) plays an important role in the evaluation of bone pathology. However, FDG is not a cancer-specific agent, and knowledge of the differential diagnosis of benign FDG-avid bone alterations that may resemble malignancy

  2. Comparison of F-18-FLT PET and F-18-FDG PET in esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westreenen, HL; Cobben, DCP; Jager, PL; van Dullemen, HM; Wesseling, J; Elsinga, PH; Plukker, JT

    F-18-FDG PET has gained acceptance for staging of esophageal cancer. However, FDG is not tumor specific and false-positive results may occur by accumulation of FDG in benign tissue. The tracer F-18-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L-fluorothymidine (F-18-FLT) might not have these drawbacks. The aim of this study

  3. Hepatosplenic Cat-Scratch Disease in Children and the Positive Contribution of F-18-FDG Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraft, Karianne E.; Doedens, Rienus A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    Two patients were referred to our hospital because of suspected malignancy. In patient 1, a 4-year-old boy, a F-18-FDG PET scan showed an enlarged liver with multiple FDG-positive nodular lesions. In patient 2, a 16-year-old boy, a FDG PET-(low-dose) CT showed an enlarged liver and spleen with

  4. Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 has the potential for use as a protective culture for vacuum-packed meats: culture isolation, bacteriocin identification, and meat application experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budde, B.B.; Hornbæk, T.; Jacobsen, T.

    2003-01-01

    A new culture, Leuconostoc carnosum 4010, for biopreservation of vacuum-packed meats is described. The culture originated from bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) naturally present in vacuum-packed meat products. Approximately, 72,000 colonies were isolated from 48 different vacuum...... culture for cold-stored, cooked, sliced, and vacuum-packed meat products.......-packed meat products and examined for antibacterial activity. Bacteriocin-producing colonies were isolated from 46% of the packages examined. Leuc. carnosum was the predominant bacteriocin-producing strain and Leuc. carnosum 4010 was selected for further experiments because it showed strong antilisterial...

  5. Hashish Body Packing: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jesus Soriano-Perez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old African male was brought by the police to the emergency department under suspicion of drug smuggling by body-packing. Plain abdominal radiograph showed multiple foreign bodies within the gastrointestinal tract. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT confirmed the findings, and the patient admitted to have swallowed “balls” of hashish. Body-packing is a recognized method of smuggling drugs across international borders. Body packers may present to the emergency department because of drug toxicity, intestinal obstruction, or more commonly, requested by law-enforcement officers for medical confirmation or exclusion of suspected body packing.

  6. Comparing the efficacy of mature mud pack and hot pack treatments for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsan, Ayşe; Akkaya, Nuray; Ozgen, Merih; Yildiz, Necmettin; Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Ardic, Fusun

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of mature mud pack and hot pack therapies on patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study was designed as a prospective, randomized-controlled, and single-blinded clinical trial. Twenty-seven patients with clinical and radiologic evidence of knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into two groups and were treated with mature mud packs (n 15) or hot packs (n=12). Patients were evaluated for pain [based on the visual analog scale (VAS)], function (WOMAC, 6 min walking distance), quality of life [Short Form-36 (SF-36)], and serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) at baseline, post-treatment, and 3 and 6~months after treatment. The mud pack group shows a significant improvement in VAS, pain, stifness, and physical function domains of WOMAC. The difference between groups of pain and physical activity domains is significant at post-treatment in favor of mud pack. For a 6 min walking distance, mud pack shows significant improvement, and the difference is significant between groups in favor of mud pack at post-treatment and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Mud pack shows significant improvement in the pain subscale of SF-36 at the third month continuing until the sixth month after the treatment. Significant improvements are found for the social function, vitality/energy, physical role disability, and general health subscales of SF-36 in favor of the mud pack compared with the hot pack group at post-treatment. A significant increase is detected for IGF-1 in the mud pack group 3 months after treatment compared with the baseline, and the difference is significant between groups 3 months after the treatment. Mud pack is a favorable option compared with hotpack for pain relief and for the improvement of functional conditions in treating patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  7. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Joo [Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Endometrial carcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies and which is predominant in postmenopausal women. Clinically many patients are hospitalized in early stage due to clinical sign and symptom such as vaginal bleeding and in this case, patient's prognosis is known to be good. However, considerable number of patients with advanced and relapsed disease reveal poor prognosis. Therefore, exact staging work up is essential for proper treatment as is primary lesion detection. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET has been widely used for the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies such as cervical carcinoma and ovarian cancer. In contrast, FDG PET application to endometrial carcinoma is limited until now and there is no sufficient data to validate the usefulness of FDG PET for this disease yet. However, several studies showed promising results that FDG PET is sensitive and specific in detection of recurrent or metastatic lesions. Therefore further active investigation in this field can facilitate the use of FDG PET for endometrial carcinoma.

  8. Effect of glucose level on brain FDG-PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Young; Lee, Yong Ki; Ahn, Sung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In addition to tumors, normal tissues, such as the brain and myocardium can intake {sup 18}F-FDG, and the amount of {sup 18}F-FDG intake by normal tissues can be altered by the surrounding environment. Therefore, a process is necessary during which the contrasts of the tumor and normal tissues can be enhanced. Thus, this study examines the effects of glucose levels on FDG PET images of brain tissues, which features high glucose activity at all times, in small animals. Micro PET scan was performed on fourteen mice after injecting {sup 18}F-FDG. The images were compared in relation to fasting. The findings showed that the mean SUV value w as 0 .84 higher in fasted mice than in non-fasted mice. During observation, the images from non-fasted mice showed high accumulation in organs other than the brain with increased surrounding noise. In addition, compared to the non-fasted mice, the fasted mice showed higher early intake and curve increase. The findings of this study suggest that fasting is important in assessing brain functions in brain PET using {sup 18}F-FDG. Additional studies to investigate whether caffeine levels and other preprocessing items have an impact on the acquired images would contribute to reducing radiation exposure in patients.

  9. Evaluation of prostate cancer using FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Akino, Hironobu; Okada, Kenichiro [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The clinical usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was examined in 54 patients with prostate cancer. FDG accumulation was positive in 38 of 54 the prostates (70%), 3 of 8 the lymph node metastases (38%) and 10 of 16 the bone metastases (63%), which suggested that FDG-PET is not superior to other conventional imaging methods as a tool for tumor detection. On the other hand, a quantitative value for FDG uptake in the prostate, expressed as a standardized uptake value (SUV), significantly correlated to the histological grade, clinical stage and serum PSA of the patients. A decrease of SUV was observed in all the patients who responded to endocrine treatment, and the patients with high pre-treatment SUV were shown to be at the risk for disease progression after initial treatment. The present results indicated that FDG-PET could provide us with useful prognostic information for the patients with prostate cancer by evaluating the malignant potential of the tumor. (author)

  10. Logistics for evaluation of doses received by IOE due to handling 18FDG-radiopharmaceutical during processing (IEN/CNEN) and in radiodiagnostic (clinical)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Osvaldir P. dos; Silva, Joao Carlos P.; Silva, Luiz Carlos Reina P.; Cortines, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose an improvement in radiological practices involving production, transportation and application of radiopharmaceutical 18 F, by tracking the radiation doses received by occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) that develop production practices, transportation and application of some patients in hospitals and clinics in Rio de Janeiro, the radiopharmaceutical 18 FDG. In light of the results and observations of how these practices are developed, it's necessary to evaluate and suggest a logistics to minimize the doses received by OEI during these practices, seeking improvements in the actions and procedures for radiological protection. In practice the production of the radiopharmaceutical, the study focuses on the time of withdrawal of 18 FDG cell processing, where the technician is exposed to higher dose rates. At this stage, we take to accomplish, yet two other reviews: the first is the placement of electronic dosimeters inside and outside the lead apron, whose objective is to assess the attenuation capacity of the apron. This last procedure refers to the use of a phantom cylindrical containing TLD 700 dosimeter in order to evaluate, using a mathematical model (MCNP), the doses ends (hand) of the technician, the process of removing the radiopharmaceutical of the cell and to compare the dosimetric dose recorded in the ring. Regarding the transport of 18 FDG, we take into account the doses recorded in the cabin of the vehicle and the doses recorded in the dosimeter of the carrier. Finally, the doses received by health professionals who handle 18 FDG are analyzed, since its withdrawal from the packing until administration to the patient. (author)

  11. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da, E-mail: katiadvitall@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to {sup 18}F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since {sup 18}F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 {sup x}3{sup s}cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of {sup 18}F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  12. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of 18F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da

    2017-01-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to 18 F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since 18 F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of 18 F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 x 3 s cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in 18 F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of 18 F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  13. Solitary pulmonary nodules: impact of functional CT on the cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.; Keith, C.J.; Wong, D.C.; Griffiths, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: FDG-PET has been shown to be cost-effective for the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) in Australia. This study evaluates the impact on cost-effectiveness produced by incorporating a novel CT technique, functional CT, into diagnostic algorithms for characterisation of SPNs. Four diagnostic strategies were evaluated using decision tree sensitivity analysis. The first strategy comprised patients undergoing conventional CT alone (CT). The second comprised conventional CT followed by functional CT study (FCT), when the SPN was not benign on conventional CT. The third strategy comprised conventional CT, which if positive is followed by FDG-PET (PET) and a fourth strategy where patients with a positive conventional CT undergo functional CT, which if positive also undergo FDG-PET (FCT+PET). Values for disease prevalence and diagnostic accuracy of PET, CT and functional CT were obtained from a literature review, using Australia values where available. Procedure costs were derived from the Medicare Benefits Schedule and DRG Cost Weights for Australian public hospitals. The cost per patient, accuracy and Incremental Cost-Accuracy Ratio (ICAR) were determined for each strategy. Sensitivity analysis evaluated the effect of disease prevalence on cost-effectiveness. Results: At the prevalence of malignancy reported from Australian series (54%), the FCT strategy incurs the least cost ($5560/patient), followed by the FCT+PET ($5910/patient). The FCT+PET strategy is the most cost-effective strategy with an ICAR of $12059/patient, followed by the PET strategy with an ICAR of $12300/patient. At levels of disease prevalence below 54% the above relationship for cost-effectiveness remains the same. For high levels of disease prevalence, CT or FCT are found to be more cost-effective. At typical prevalence of malignancy the cost-effectiveness of PET is enhanced by the addition of functional CT, but at high prevalence functional CT alone is most cost

  14. 5 Reasons to Pack Your Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ready for a change. A packed lunch a couple of times a week means you can enjoy ... cafeteria, what's important is that you make healthy choices. If you're concerned that your cafeteria doesn' ...

  15. Packing circles and spheres on surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Schiftner, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we introduce a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' incircles form a packing. As it turns out, such meshes have a rich geometry and allow us to cover surfaces with circle patterns, sphere packings, approximate circle packings, hexagonal meshes which carry a torsion-free support structure, hybrid tri-hex meshes, and others. We show how triangle meshes can be optimized so as to have the incircle packing property. We explain their relation to conformal geometry and implications on solvability of optimization. The examples we give confirm that this kind of meshes is a rich source of geometric structures relevant to architectural geometry.

  16. Packing circles and spheres on surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Schiftner, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we introduce a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' incircles form a packing. As it turns out, such meshes have a rich geometry and allow us to cover surfaces with circle patterns, sphere packings, approximate circle packings, hexagonal meshes which carry a torsion-free support structure, hybrid tri-hex meshes, and others. We show how triangle meshes can be optimized so as to have the incircle packing property. We explain their relation to conformal geometry and implications on solvability of optimization. The examples we give confirm that this kind of meshes is a rich source of geometric structures relevant to architectural geometry. © 2009 ACM.

  17. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [ 18 F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  18. Granular packing as model glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories. (paper)

  19. Guidance for reading FDG PET scans in dementia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2014-01-01

    18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful method for detection of disease-related impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neuro degenerative diseases. It is of particular interest for early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Reading FDG PET scans requires training to recognise deviations from normal functional brain anatomy and its variations. This paper provides guidance for displaying FDG PET brain scans in a reproducible manner that allows reliable recognition of characteristic disease-related metabolic changes. It also describes typical findings in Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies and possible confounding factors, such as vascular changes and brain atrophy. It provides a brief overview on findings in other neuro degenerative diseases and addresses the potential and limitations of software packages for comparison of individual scans with reference data.

  20. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Graebe, Martin; Fisker Hag, Anne Mette

    2010-01-01

    ) and an additional ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis of greater than 60% were recruited. FDG uptake in the carotids was determined by PET/computed tomography and expressed as mean and maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax). The atherosclerotic plaques were subsequently recovered...... by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68, cathepsin K, and HK2 gene...... expression remained in the final model as predictive variables of FDG accumulation calculated as SUVmean (R=0.26, PK, and HK2 gene expression as independent predictive variables of FDG accumulation calculated...

  1. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metter, E.J.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hanson, W.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia

  2. Hardfacing and packings for improved valve performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, J.A.; Patrick, J.N.F.; Inglis, I.

    2003-01-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG), Chemistry, Materials and Components (CMC) Program has supported an ongoing program on valve maintenance and performance for several years. An overview is presented of recent work on iron-based hardfacing, packing qualification, friction testing of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) packings, and an investigation of re-torquing valve packing. Based on this program, two new valve-packing materials have been qualified for use in CANDU stations. By doing this, CANDU maintenance can avoid having only one packing qualified for station use, as well as assess the potential impact of the industry trend towards using lower gland loads. The results from corrosion tests by AECL and the coefficient of friction studies at Battelle' s tribology testing facilities on Delcrome 910, an iron-based hardfacing alloy, indicate it is an acceptable replacement for Stellite 6 under certain conditions. This information can be used to update in-line valve purchasing specifications. The renewed interest in friction characteristics, and environmental qualification (EQ) of packing containing PTFE has resulted in a new test program in these areas. The COG-funded valve programs have resulted in modifications to design specifications for nuclear station in-line valves and have led to better maintenance practices and valve reliability. In the end, this means lower costs and cheaper electricity. (author)

  3. Decontamination of pesticide packing using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, C. L.; Mori, M. N.; Kodama, Yasko; Oikawa, H.; Sampa, M. H. O.

    2007-11-01

    The Brazilian agriculture activities have consumed about 288,000 tons of pesticides per year conditioned in about 107,000,000 packing with weight of approximately 23,000 tons. The discharge of empty plastic packing of pesticides can be an environmental concern causing problems to human health, animals, and plants if done without inspection and monitoring. The objective of this work is to study the ionizing radiation effect in the main pesticides used in Brazil for plastic packing decontamination. Among the commercial pesticides, chlorpyrifos has significant importance because of its wide distribution and extensive use and persistence. The radiation-induced degradation of chlorpyrifos in liquid samples and in polyethylene pack was studied by gamma radiolysis. Packing of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) three layer coextruded, named COEX, contaminated with chlorpyrifos, were irradiated using both a multipurpose Co-60 gamma irradiator and a gamma source with 5000 Ci total activity Gamma cell type. The chemical analysis of the chlorpyrifos was made using a gas chromatography associated to the Mass Spectrometry—GCMS from Shimadzu Model QP 5000. Gamma radiation was efficient for removing chlorpyrifos from the plastic packing, in all studied cases.

  4. Decontamination of pesticide packing using ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, C.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Lineu Prestes 2.242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: clduarte@ipen.br; Mori, M.N.; Kodama, Yasko; Oikawa, H.; Sampa, M.H.O. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Lineu Prestes 2.242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    The Brazilian agriculture activities have consumed about 288,000 tons of pesticides per year conditioned in about 107,000,000 packing with weight of approximately 23,000 tons. The discharge of empty plastic packing of pesticides can be an environmental concern causing problems to human health, animals, and plants if done without inspection and monitoring. The objective of this work is to study the ionizing radiation effect in the main pesticides used in Brazil for plastic packing decontamination. Among the commercial pesticides, chlorpyrifos has significant importance because of its wide distribution and extensive use and persistence. The radiation-induced degradation of chlorpyrifos in liquid samples and in polyethylene pack was studied by gamma radiolysis. Packing of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) three layer coextruded, named COEX, contaminated with chlorpyrifos, were irradiated using both a multipurpose Co-60 gamma irradiator and a gamma source with 5000 Ci total activity Gamma cell type. The chemical analysis of the chlorpyrifos was made using a gas chromatography associated to the Mass Spectrometry-GCMS from Shimadzu Model QP 5000. Gamma radiation was efficient for removing chlorpyrifos from the plastic packing, in all studied cases.

  5. Packing and size determination of colloidal nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Leonard F; Tsai, De-Hao; Hertz, Joshua L; Zangmeister, Rebecca A; Zachariah, Michael R; Tarlov, Michael J

    2010-07-06

    Here we demonstrate a rapid and quantitative means to characterize the size and packing structure of small clusters of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension. Clustering and aggregation play important roles in a wide variety of phenomena of both scientific and technical importance, yet characterizing the packing of nanoparticles within small clusters and predicting their aerodynamic size remains challenging because available techniques can lack adequate resolution and sensitivity for clusters smaller than 100 nm (optical techniques), perturb the packing arrangement (electron microscopies), or provide only an ensemble average (light scattering techniques). In this article, we use electrospray-differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA), a technique that exerts electrical and drag forces on the clusters, to determine the size and packing of small clusters. We provide an analytical model to determine the mobility size of various packing geometries based on the projected area of the clusters. Data for clusters aggregated from nominally 10 nm gold particles and nonenveloped viruses of various sizes show good agreement between measured and predicted cluster sizes for close-packed spheres.

  6. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation can be improved by delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Hildebrandt, Malene

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Blood pool FDG activity can cloud the atherosclerotic plaque FDG signal. Over time, blood pool FDG activity declines. Therefore, delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging can potentially enhance the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers...... without traditional cardiovascular risk factors and three subjects with angina pectoris were prospectively assessed by dual time point 18-FDG PET CT imaging at 90 and 180 minutes after tracer injection. The ratio between aortic SUVmax and the blood pool SUVmean (TBR) was calculated to show the change...

  7. Metabolites of (18)F-FDG and 3-O-(11)C-methylglucose in pig liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, D; Munk, O L; Feng, H Q

    2001-01-01

    of radio-HLPC measurements of the products of in vitro enzymatic reactions. RESULTS: The applied extraction technique provided almost quantitative recovery of the radioactivity from tissue. After MG injection, only MG was detectable in the liver tissue; no labeled metabolites were found. After FDG...... injection, 2 metabolites were identified, FDG-6-P and 2-(18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (FD-6-PG1). The tissue content of FDG increased rapidly, and, after 5 min, only FDG was identified; hereafter, the fraction of FDG decreased to approximately 40% of the tissue radioactivity after 180 min. After...

  8. Perirenal (18)F-FDG Uptake in a Patient with a Pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihyun; Byun, Byung Hyun; Jung, Chang Won; Moon, Hansol; Chang, Kyoung Jin; Lim, Ilhan; Kim, Byung Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2014-09-01

    Increased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake of brown fat on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) originating from physiological activation is a common incidental finding and is usually located in the neck, shoulder, and supraclavicular areas. We present a case of an incidental pheochromocytoma showing diffusely increased (18)F-FDG uptake in bilateral perirenal fat tissue as well as supraclavicular and paravertebral fat tissue on (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The patient had no clinical symptoms except hypertension, and a pheochromocytoma was confirmed in a postsurgical specimen. A pheochromocytoma should be considered a cause in cases of increased (18)F-FDG uptake of perirenal brown fat.

  9. How much can a negative FDG-PET be trusted?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuxia

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: False-negative FDG-PET constituted 22.7% of all clinically identified negative PET in a ten year retrospective review about FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour. Uncovering possible influencing factors of false-negative FDG-PET may have significant value. Material and methods: 10 patients with a first negative and then a second positive PET during very short time separation and 6 patients with surgically confirmed false-negative PET were traced. Histological type, irradiation parameter, steroids effect were discussed. To define temporary irradiation effect on FDG uptake, interval between radiation treatment to PET examination of these two groups were compared with 24 surgically confirmed true-positive PET, 5 surgically confirmed true-negative PET Results: 80% negative-positive PET transformation happened within 31 weeks. No statistically significant difference with regard to time from irradiation could be found between groups. Steroids medication closely before PET examination was about the same before the first negative and second positive PET scan. 5/6 surgically confirmed false-negative PET patients did not take steroids before PET examination. Conclusion: Tumour histology type, temporary irradiation effect and steroids medication did not constitute the reasons for false negative PET in our patient series. PET could not identify tumour relapse in the very early stage. Therefore, if clinically indicated, second FDG-PET might be a better selection to pick up tumour relapse instead of exploratory surgery or biopsy. In that case, the suitable time point for the second PET could be within 31 weeks after the first PET examination. Keywords: false-negative, FDG-PET, influencing factor, irradiation effect, steroids. (author)

  10. FDG PET in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Yeung, H.W.D.; Pui, J.; Macapinlac, H.; Liebovitz, E.; Rusch, V.; Goy, A.; Larson, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate the role of PET in the diagnosis of vasculitis. Methods: We report a case of giant cell arteritis diagnosed by FDG-PET in a 75-year-old woman with a fever of unknown origin. The patient presented with a 3 month history of fatigue, fevers, headaches, visual disturbance and jaw claudication. Diagnosis of temporal arteritis was initially excluded because of a normal ESR. CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass, suspicious for malignancy. An FDG-PET scan for pre-operative evaluation was acquired 45 minutes after intravenous injection of 10 mCi F18-FDG, on a dedicated PET scanner. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. The study identified striking localisation of FDG to the entire aorta, left main coronary artery, and subclavian, carotid and common iliac arteries bilaterally (SUV max range 4-4.5 g/ml), suggestive of large vessel arteritis. Subsequent excisional biopsy of the mediastinal mass confirmed giant cell vasculitis of a large muscular artery in thymic tissue. No malignancy was detected. A repeat ESR was 129 mm/hr. The patient was commenced on oral Prednisone, with prompt improvement of symptoms, ESR and anaemia and complete normalisation of the FDG-PET scan within two weeks. This case suggests a potential role of FDG-PET in the non-invasive diagnosis, classification and follow-up of giant cell arteritis, and possibly other vasculitides, so far notoriously difficult to diagnose, relying usually on a constellation of non-specific symptoms, laboratory investigations or invasive pathologic and angiographic means. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. Characterisation of Wear Resistant Boride Layers on a Tool Steel by Activity Controlled Pack Boronising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the production and characterisation of iron boride layers by pack boronising of a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The boride layers were produced at 900°C for 2h using different pack compositions in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer. The layers were characterized...... in the applied pack. The boronised layers result in hardness values of about 2000HV for the layers containing the FeB phase and around 1750HV for those composed of the Fe2B phase. Additionally, a very significant improvement of the wear performance, in terms of worn volume and friction coefficient, was obtained...... by pack boronising for all conditions as compared to the heat treated tool steel....

  12. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical 18FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-01-01

    The production of 18 F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide 18 F as 18 FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of 18 FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of 22 Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of 22 Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since this is the period of higher retention fraction

  13. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). When SPN or mass without calcification is found on chest X-ray or CT, 18 F-FDG PET is an effective modality to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. For initial staging of NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET is useful, and proved to be cost-effective in several countries. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for detecting recurrence, restaging and evaluating residual tumor after curative therapy in NSCLC. For therapy response assessment, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 18 F-FDG PET is useful to predict pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in NSCLC. For radiation therapy planning, 18 F-FDG PET may be helpful, but requires further investigations. PET/CT is better for evaluating NSCLC than conventional PET

  14. Advances on the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Cyclotron Laboratory Program for the production of 18F and 18FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, M.J; Bustos, Rosario; Pinto, Luis; Ahumada, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) Cyclotron's Laboratory has begun to produce short-lived positron's emitter radionuclides need for positron emitter tomography (PET) and intended for clinical prognosis. Production trials took place back on February 2003 to calibrate the only existing camera PET in the country at the Hospital Militar. Subsequently, a complex stage of adjustment, corrections and optimizations on the camera itself, as well as, on the accelerator were performed with solely intention to introduce PET technique as clinical tool in the more efficient way as possible. The reported advances on production are linked to the increasing availability of high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity 18 FDG. Because of demand and nuclear medicine declared necessities on this radiopharmaceutical imposes Cyclotron Laboratory to make available 18 FDG as soon as possible, from the earliest production trials. This was accomplished simultaneously with preliminary beam optical and modular synthesis adjustments. During April the availability of 18 FDG for clinical imaging was acceptable to satisfy demand, whereas May actually initiates routinely production (au)

  15. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond shall...

  16. A Harmonic Algorithm for the 3D Strip Packing Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bansal (Nikhil); X. Han; K. Iwama; M. Sviridenko; G. Zhang (Guochuan)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn the three-dimensional (3D) strip packing problem, we are given a set of 3D rectangular items and a 3D box $B$. The goal is to pack all the items in $B$ such that the height of the packing is minimized. We consider the most basic version of the problem, where the items must be packed

  17. Role of FDG PET/CT in Baastrup's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanyam, Padma; Palaniswamy, Shanmuga Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is a benign condition, which presents as chronic low back pain. It is also known as “kissing spine syndrome” and refers to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes producing inflammation and back pain. This condition is often misdiagnosed, resulting in incorrect treatment and persistence of symptoms. Diagnosis of Baastrup's disease is verified with clinical examination and imaging studies. Conventionally, clinicians resort to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine rather than X-ray or computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of back pain. MRI can additionally identify flattening, sclerosis, enlargement, cystic lesions, and bone edema at the articulating surfaces of the two affected spinous processes. Studies have reported that 18 Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) can detect a bursitis or an inflammation as a form of stress reaction despite a negative MRI and 99m Tc Methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan. PET/CT is usually not a recommended investigation for this condition. However, this case report highlights the benefit of FDG-PET/CT in identifying the site of inflammatory pathology. It is also known to identify the exact site of inflammation where steroid or local anesthetic injection can be administered to alleviate pain, especially in patients with multilevel vertebral involvement

  18. Direct contact condensation in packed beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Klausner, James F.; Mei, Renwei; Knight, Jessica [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A diffusion driven desalination process was recently described where a very effective direct contact condenser with a packed bed is used to condense water vapor out of an air/vapor mixture. A laboratory scale direct contact condenser has been fabricated as a twin tower structure with two stages, co-current and countercurrent. Experiments have been operated in each stage with respective saturated air inlet temperatures of 36, 40 and 43{sup o}C. The temperature and humidity data have been collected at the inlet and exit of the packed bed for different water to air mass flow ratios that vary between 0 and 2.5. A one-dimensional model based on conservation principles has been developed, which predicts the variation of temperature, humidity, and condensation rate through the condenser stages. Agreement between the model and experiments is very good. It is observed that the countercurrent flow stage condensation effectiveness is significantly higher than that for the co-current stage. The condensation heat and mass transfer rates were found to decrease when water blockages occur within the packed bed. Using high-speed digital cinematography, it was observed that this problem can occur at any operating condition, and is dependent on the packing surface wetting characteristics. This observation is used to explain the requirement for two different empirical constants, depending on packing diameter, suggested by Onda for the air side mass transfer coefficient correlation. (author)

  19. FDG-PET Contributions to the Pathophysiology of Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segobin, Shailendra; La Joie, Renaud; Ritz, Ludivine; Beaunieux, Hélène; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël; Pitel, Anne Lise; Eustache, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of synaptic activity by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its relation to cognitive functions such as episodic memory, working memory and executive functions in healthy humans and patients with neurocognitive disorders have been well documented. In this review, we introduce the concept of PET imaging that allows the observation of a particular biological process in vivo through the use of radio-labelled compounds, its general use to the medical world and its contributions to the understanding of memory systems. We then focus on [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), the radiotracer that is used to measure local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that is indicative of synaptic activity in the brain. FDG-PET at rest has been at the forefront of functional neuroimaging over the past 3 decades, contributing to the understanding of cognitive functions in healthy humans and how these functional patterns change with cognitive alterations. We discuss methodological considerations that are important for optimizing FDG-PET imaging data prior to analysis. We then highlight the contribution of FDG-PET to the understanding of the patterns of functional differences in non-degenerative pathologies, normal ageing, and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Through reasonable temporal and spatial resolution, its ability to measure synaptic activity in the whole brain, independently of any specific network and disease, makes it ideal to observe regional functional changes associated with memory impairment.

  20. [18F]FDG-PET in large vessel vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, A.S.D.; Walter, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    [ 18 F]FDG-PET is a non-invasive metabolic imaging modality based on the regional distribution of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose that is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis. It has shown to identify more affected vascular regions than morphologic imaging with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in both diseases. A visual grading of vascular [ 18 F]FDG-uptake helps to discriminate arteritis from atherosclerosis und therefore provides high specificity. High sensitivity is reached by scanning during the active inflammatory phase. [ 18 F]FDG-PET has the potential to develop into a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis, respectively, and might become a first-line investigation technique. Therefore consensus regarding the most favorable imaging procedure as well as further clinical evidence is needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize current information on the present clinical data and to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing and interpreting the results of [ 18 F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. (orig.)

  1. A hand-held beta imaging probe for FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bipin; Stack, Brendan C; Thacker, Samta; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Bartel, Twyla; Lowe, Val; Cool, Steven; Entine, Gerald; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2013-04-01

    Advances in radiopharmaceuticals and clinical understanding have escalated the use of intraoperative gamma probes in surgery. However, most probes on the market are non-imaging gamma probes that suffer from the lack of ancillary information of the surveyed tissue area. We have developed a novel, hand-held digital Imaging Beta Probe™ (IBP™) to be used in surgery in conjunction with beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as (18)FDG, (131)I and (32)P for real-time imaging of a surveyed area with higher spatial resolution and sensitivity and greater convenience than existing instruments. We describe the design and validation of a hand-held beta probe intended to be used as a visual mapping device to locate and confirm excision of (18)FDG-avid primary tumors and metastases in an animal model. We have demonstrated a device which can generate beta images from (18)FDG avid lesions in an animal model. It is feasible to image beta irradiation in animal models of cancer given (18)FDG. This technology may be applied to clinical mapping of tumors and/or their metastases in the operating room. Visual image depiction of malignancy may aid the surgeon in localization and excision of lesions of interest.

  2. Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis: CT and FDG-PET Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jonathan H. [National Jewish Health, Denver (United States); Wu, Carol C.; Gilman, Matthew D.; Palmer, Edwin L.; Hasserjian, Robert P.; Sphepar, Jo-Anne O. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LG) is a rare, aggressive extranodal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disease. The purpose of our study was to analyze the CT and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings of pulmonary LG. Between 2000 and 2009, four patients with pathologically proven pulmonary LG and chest CT were identified. Two of these patients also had FDG-PET. Imaging features of LG on CT and PET were reviewed. Pulmonary nodules or masses with peribronchovascular, subpleural, and lower lung zonal preponderance were present in all patients. Central low attenuation (4 of 4 patients), ground-glass halo (3 of 4 patients), and peripheral enhancement (4 of 4 patients) were observed in these nodules and masses. An air-bronchogram and cavitation were seen in three of four patients. FDG-PET scans demonstrated avid FDG uptake in the pulmonary nodules and masses. Pulmonary LG presents with nodules and masses with a lymphatic distribution, as would be expected for a lymphoproliferative disease. However, central low attenuation, ground-glass halo and peripheral enhancement of the nodules/masses are likely related to the angioinvasive nature of this disease. Peripheral enhancement and ground-glass halo, in particular, are valuable characteristic not previously reported that can help radiologists suggest the diagnosis of pulmonary LG.

  3. Pleural FDG Uptake More Than a Decade after Talc Pleurodesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, H.; Bruggen, W. van der; Limonard, G.

    2009-01-01

    Talc pleurodesis induces a strong local inflammatory reaction which can be detected by PET scan for years after the procedure. When patients undergo PET scanning in the workup of a suspected malignancy later in life, pleural FDG uptake may unnecessarily lead to an additional invasive diagnostic

  4. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, K.; Suzuki, K.; Senda, M.; Kita, M.; Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 ± 2.4 (range 1.8 ∼ 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 ± 2.7 and 4.3 ± 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 ± 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 ± 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 ± 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 ± 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  5. FDG PET/CT features of ovarian metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, K., E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.j [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Senda, M. [Department of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kita, M. [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Onishi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sugimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To assess the characteristics of [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in cases of ovarian metastasis using positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Materials and methods: Twelve patients with 16 ovarian metastases arising from colon cancer (n = 6), breast cancer (n = 4), gastric cancer (n = 3), and pancreatic cancer (n = 3) who underwent FDG-PET/CT examination were included in this study. The effect of lesion size and morphological pattern (predominantly solid or cystic) on FDG uptake was evaluated using the quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: The mean maximum SUV for the 16 lesions was 4.6 {+-} 2.4 (range 1.8 {approx} 9.9). The Pearson correlation coefficient test showed no significant correlation between maximum SUV and lesion size (r = 0.21, p = 0.42). The maximum SUV of solid (n = 5) and cystic (n = 11) lesions was 5.5 {+-} 2.7 and 4.3 {+-} 2.2, respectively, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.43). Breast cancer showed the highest maximum SUV (6.4 {+-} 3.6), followed by colon cancer (5.3 {+-} 1.4), gastric cancer (3.3 {+-} 0.5), and pancreatic cancer (2.2 {+-} 0.6). Conclusion: Ovarian metastases show a variable maximum SUV with mild to intense FDG uptake.

  6. Flooding characteristics in pulsed packed extraction columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asadollahzadeh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Flooding behavior of a 76.2 mm diameter pulsed packed column has been determined using four different liquid-liquid systems. The effects of pulsation intensity, flow ratio, interfacial tension, and packing geometry on flood point have been investigated. The results showed that the maximum throughput of the column decreases with an increase in pulsation intensity and flow ratio, while it increases with an increase in interfacial tension. The applicability of the characteristic velocity method to this type of column for the analysis of the flood point was examined and a marked deviation was observed between experimental results and values calculated by this method. Two new empirical correlations for flooding velocity and holdup at flooding are derived in terms of operating variables, packing characteristics, and physical properties of the liquid systems. Good agreement between prediction and experiments has been found for all operating conditions that were investigated.

  7. Generalized network improvement and packing problems

    CERN Document Server

    Holzhauser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Michael Holzhauser discusses generalizations of well-known network flow and packing problems by additional or modified side constraints. By exploiting the inherent connection between the two problem classes, the author investigates the complexity and approximability of several novel network flow and packing problems and presents combinatorial solution and approximation algorithms. Contents Fractional Packing and Parametric Search Frameworks Budget-Constrained Minimum Cost Flows: The Continuous Case Budget-Constrained Minimum Cost Flows: The Discrete Case Generalized Processing Networks Convex Generalized Flows Target Groups Researchers and students in the fields of mathematics, computer science, and economics Practitioners in operations research and logistics The Author Dr. Michael Holzhauser studied computer science at the University of Kaiserslautern and is now a research fellow in the Optimization Research Group at the Department of Mathematics of the University of Kaiserslautern.

  8. Environmental variables in packing houses and their effects on the quality of grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo C. Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to characterize the thermal environment in the selection and packing areas of a packing house and its effects on the quality of table grapes produced in the São Francisco Valley, Brazil. The thermal environment was monitored during the winter and summer seasons. The highest value of air temperature (Tair and the lowest relative humidity (RH observed in the packing house were 35 °C and 40.0%, respectively, obtained during the summer, for 8 h. After observing the thermal environment data of the packing house, simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of the ideal environmental storage conditions and observed thermal conditions on the postharvest quality of “Thompson” grapes. Grapes were harvested and stored directly at the ideal temperature and RH of 0 °C and 90%, respectively, or previously exposed to a temperature of 35 °C and RH of 40% for 8 h, the thermal environment observed in the evaluated packing house, followed by storage at 0 °C and 90% RH. Fruit exposure to high temperature and low RH before the ideal storage conditions resulted in higher loss of berry firmness and weight, along with increased soluble solids and dry matter content of rachis and berry. Based on these results, the environmental conditions observed in the packing house result in berry dehydration, which accelerates the loss of fruit quality during storage.

  9. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, Department of PET Center, Mibu (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV ({+-}SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 {+-} 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  10. FDG-PET/CT imaging of elastofibroma dorsi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kayo; Senda, Michio; Sakamoto, Setsu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the characteristics of FDG uptake in elastofibroma dorsi using integrated PET/CT. From 10,261 oncology FDG-PET/CT scans performed over a 2-year period, findings suggestive of elastofiboma dorsi were observed in 46 FDG-PET/CT scans of 34 patients. As 20 patients had bilateral lesions and 14 had unilateral lesions, a total of 75 elastofibroma dorsi lesions on images were identified in this study. For visual analysis of intensity of FDG uptake, a four-point grading system was used: grade 0 for no uptake, grade 1 for less uptake than the liver, grade 2 for uptake comparable to the liver, and grade 3 for intense uptake greater than the liver. For quantitative analysis, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. The relationships between SUV and age, blood glucose level, lesion size, and related symptoms were also assessed. Among the 75 lesions, 4 had an uptake grade of 0, 41 had grade 1, 25 had grade 2, and 5 had grade 3. The mean SUV (±SD) of the 75 lesions was 2.0 ± 0.63 (range 0-5.1). The Pearson correlation coefficient test indicated a weak positive correlation between SUV and lesion size and no correlation between SUV and either age or blood glucose level. The SUVs of patients with symptoms due to the disease and patients without symptoms were almost the same. Mild and moderate uptake of FDG is frequently observed in elastofibroma dorsi, which should not be misinterpreted as abnormal accumulation observed in malignant lesions. (orig.)

  11. [18F] FDG PET in gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Ahlstroem, H.; Sundin, A.; Rehn, S.; Hagberg, H.; Glimelius, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of using [ 18 F] FDG PET for assessment of tumor extension in primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was studied in 8 patients (6 high-grade and 2 low-grade, one of the MALT type) and in a control group of 7 patients (5 patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement, 1 patient with NHL and benign gastric ulcer and 1 patient with adenocarcinoma of the stomach). All patients with gastric NHL and the two with benign gastric ulcer and adenocarcinoma, respectively, underwent endoscopy including multiple biopsies for histopathological diagnosis. All patients with high-grade and one of the two with low-grade NHL and the patient with adenocarcinoma displayed high gastric uptake of [ 18 F] FDG corresponding to the pathological findings at endoscopy and/or CT. No pathological tracer uptake was seen in the patient with low-grade gastric NHL of the MALT type. In 6/8 patients with gastric NHL, [ 18 F] FDG PET demonstrated larger tumor extension in the stomach than was found at endoscopy, and there was high tracer uptake in the stomach in two patients who were evaluated as normal on CT. [ 18 F] FDG PET correctly excluded gastric NHL in the patient with a benign gastric ulcer and in the patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement. Although the experience is as yet limited, [ 18 F] FDG PET affords a novel possibility for evaluation of gastric NHL and would seem valuable as a complement to endoscopy and CT in selected patients, where the technique can yield additional information decisive for the choice of therapy. (orig.)

  12. Valve packing leakage monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezekoye, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    A device for monitoring leakage of fluid across a seal in a component connected to a pressurized fluid system including a housing having a chamber with an inlet for receiving fluid leaking across the seal and an outlet. A positioning means is connected to an orifice plug so as to move the plug for permitting the fluid to be discharged through the orifice at the same rate at which it enters the first chamber and means for detecting the movement of the plug is provided to produce and output signal corresponding to the distance moved by the plug and thereby indicate flow rate. The positioning means compromise a piston attached to the plug by a hollow tube and springs, which at low flow rates locate the piston. When flow increases sufficiently pressure increases and urges the piston upwards. A magnetic portion of tube actuates a succession of proximity switches to indicate flow rate. (author)

  13. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in large vessel vasculitis; [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET bei Grossgefaess-Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, A.S.D.; Walter, M.A. [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-06-15

    [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET is a non-invasive metabolic imaging modality based on the regional distribution of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose that is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis. It has shown to identify more affected vascular regions than morphologic imaging with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in both diseases. A visual grading of vascular [{sup 18}F]FDG-uptake helps to discriminate arteritis from atherosclerosis und therefore provides high specificity. High sensitivity is reached by scanning during the active inflammatory phase. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET has the potential to develop into a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis, respectively, and might become a first-line investigation technique. Therefore consensus regarding the most favorable imaging procedure as well as further clinical evidence is needed. The purpose of this review is to summarize current information on the present clinical data and to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing and interpreting the results of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. (orig.)

  14. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico ' S. Orsola-Malpighi' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences, Milan (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  15. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  16. Origami, Modular Packing and the Soma Puzzle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 11. Origami, Modular Packing and the Soma Puzzle. Subramania Ranganathan. General Article Volume 8 Issue 11 November 2003 pp 71-77. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop two measures to characterize the geometry of patterns exhibited by the state of spiral defect chaos, a weakly turbulent regime of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. These describe the packing of contiguous stripes within the pattern by quantifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions ...

  18. Wrap-Attack Pack: Product Packaging Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Hoffman, K. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Although many marketing courses discuss traditional concepts pertaining to product strategy, concepts specifically relating to packaging are often glossed over. This exercise, "Wrap-Attack Pack," teaches students about the utilitarian and hedonic design elements of packaging. More specifically, the primary objective is to creatively…

  19. The new generation of packing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malikov, T.S.; Dzhonmurodov, A.S.; Usmanova, S.R.; Teshaev, Kh.I.; Mukhidinov, Z.K.

    2016-01-01

    Present article is devoted to new generation of packing materials. The methods of extraction and investigation of component composition and properties of whey protein, zein, carboxymethylcellulose, hyaluronic acid and pectins were elaborated in order to further application them in pharmaceutical industry as composite materials and for capsulation of medicines.

  20. Computational Modelling of Particle Packing in Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, H.

    2010-01-01

    Physical particle packing is becoming a hot topic in concrete technology as more and more types of granular materials are used in concrete either for ecological or for engineering purposes. Although various analytical methods have been developed for optimum mixture design, comprehensive information

  1. 7 CFR 920.13 - Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 920.13 Section 920.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Definitions...

  2. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  3. The benefits of using customized procedure packs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, R; Colquhoun, G; Jones, N; Bateman, R

    2001-01-01

    Discrete item purchasing is the traditional approach for hospitals to obtain consumable supplies for theatre procedures. Although most items are relatively low cost, the management and co-ordination of the supply chain, raising orders, controlling stock, picking and delivering to each operating theatre can be complex and costly. Customized procedure packs provide a solution.

  4. The analysis of radiolysis impurities in 18F-FDG and methods of repurification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinming Zhang; Yungang Li; Jian Liu; Xiaojun Zhang; Jiahe Tian

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the radio impurity in the radiolysis of 18 F-FDG at high radiodose and radioconcentrated solutions and develop methods of repurification. The radiolysis of 18 F-FDG was analyzed by TLC. The radio-impurity was confirmed by biodistribution and small animal PET/CT studies. 18 F-FDG was unstable at high radioconcentration over 37 GBq/mL or under basic condition. TLC, biodistribution and PET/CT all indicated that the main autoradiolysis byproduct was free fluoride ion. The radiolyzed 18 F-FDG was repurified by solid-phase extraction (SPE) column. The repurified 18 F-FDG had a radiochemical purity (RCP) of over 99% and significantly lower bone uptake than that was before repurification (P = 0.0003). There was a positive correlation between the recovery yield and the purity of 18 F-FDG (R 2 = 0.66). (author)

  5. Diagnostic usefulness of FDG PET for pancreatic mass lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Koichi; Okamura, Terue; Kawabe, Joji; Nakata, Bunzo; Hirakawa, Kosei; Chung, Y.S.; Ochi, Hironobu; Yamada, Ryusaku [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of [{sup 18}F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with a pancreatic mass by comparing the results with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Eighty-six patients with pancreatic lesions, included 65 malignant tumors and 21 benign masses (55 masses were proven histologically and the others were diagnosed clinically), were studied. The diagnostic factors of CT and MR imaging were evaluated, and those of FDG PET were also evaluated for malignant and benign masses by visual interpretation and quantitative interpretation with the standardized uptake value (SUV) and SUVgluc which was designed to reduce the effects of a high blood sugar level. Visual interpretations were evaluated only in FDG PET images, and quantitative interpretations were evaluated by referring to CT and/or MR imaging. The correlation between SUV and the degree of histological differentiation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was investigated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy for CT imaging were 91, 62, 88, 68 and 84%, and for MR imaging 78, 70, 88, 54 and 76%, respectively. In visual interpretation of FDG PET images, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 82, 81, 93, 59 and 81%, respectively. Significant differences between malignant and benign lesions existed in SUV and SUVgluc (p<0.0001, each). With the cutoff value of SUV as 2.1 and SUVgluc as 2.2, the accuracy of diagnosis was maximal. With that cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for SUV were 89, 76, 92, 70 and 86%, and for SUVgluc 91, 76, 92, 73 and 87%, respectively. The sensitivity and NPV of SUVgluc were higher than those of SUV, which suggests that SUVgluc may be more useful in reducing the number of overlooked malignant tumors. The specificity and PPV of FDG PET were superior to

  6. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Brest University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brest (France); Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Surgical Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  7. Incremental diagnostic utility of gastric distension FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Duong, Cuong P.; Cabalag, Carlos S.; Parameswaran, Bimal K.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic utility of gastric distension (GD) FDG PET/CT in both patients with known gastric malignancy and those not known to have gastric malignancy but with incidental focal FDG uptake in the stomach. This retrospective analysis included 88 patients who underwent FDG PET/CT following GD with hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan registered) and water ingestion as part of routine clinical evaluation between 2004 and 2014. FDG PET/CT scans before and after GD were reported blinded to the patient clinical details in 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy and 39 patients who underwent GD following incidental suspicious gastric uptake. The PET findings were validated by a composite clinical standard. In the 49 patients undergoing pretreatment staging of gastric malignancy, GD improved PET detection of the primary tumour (from 80 % to 90 %). PET evaluation of tumour extent was concordant with endoscopic/surgical reports in 31 % (interpreter 1) and 45 % (interpreter 2) using pre-GD images and 73 % and 76 % using GD images. Interobserver agreement also improved with GD (κ = 0.29 to 0.69). Metabolic and morphological quantitative analysis demonstrated a major impact of GD in normal gastric wall but no significant effect in tumour, except a minor increase in SUV related to a delayed acquisition time. The tumour to normal stomach SUVmax ratio increased from 3.8 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 8.6 (mean ± SD) with GD (p < 0.0001), facilitating detection and improved assessment of the primary tumour. In 25 (64 %) of the 39 patients with incidental suspicious gastric uptake, acquisition after GD correctly excluded a malignant process. In 10 (71 %) of the remaining 14 patients with persistent suspicious FDG uptake despite GD, malignancy was confirmed and in 3 (21 %) an active but benign pathology was diagnosed. GD is a simple way to improve local staging with FDG PET in patients with gastric malignancy. In the setting of incidental suspicious gastric

  8. Characterizing bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma by FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kagna, Olga; Dann, Eldad J.; Ben-Barak, Ayelet; Israel, Ora

    2014-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is superior to iliac bone marrow biopsy (iBMB) for detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI) in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The present study aims to characterize the patterns and distribution of BMI in HL as determined by FDG-PET/CT. Reports of FDG-PET/CT studies performed for staging of HL were reviewed. BMI was defined as positive iBMB and/or foci of pathological FDG uptake in the skeleton that behaved in concordance with other sites of lymphoma in studies following chemotherapy. Number of FDG uptake foci, their specific location in the skeleton and the presence of corresponding lesions in the CT component of the study, and stage according to the Ann Arbor staging system, were recorded. The study included 473 patients. iBMB was performed in 336 patients. Nine patients had positive iBMB (9/336, 3 %). Seventy-three patients (73/473, 15 %) had FDG-PET/CT-defined BMI. The BM was the only extranodal site of HL in 52/473 patients (11 %). Forty-five patients had three or more foci of pathological skeletal FDG uptake (45/73, 62 %). Sixty-four patients (64/73, 88 %) had at least one uptake focus in the pelvis or vertebrae. In 60 patients (60/73, 82 %), the number of skeletal FDG uptake foci without corresponding CT lesions was equal to or higher than the number of foci with morphological abnormalities. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated BMI in 15 % of patients with newly diagnosed HL. Diagnosis of BMI in HL by FDG-PET/CT was more sensitive than iBMB with potential upstage in 11 % of patients. The most common pattern of FDG-PET/CT BMI was multifocal (at least three foci) skeletal FDG uptake, with at least one focus in the pelvis or vertebrae and no corresponding CT lesions. (orig.)

  9. The pivotal role of FDG-PET/CT in modern medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Zhu, Hongyun June

    2014-01-01

    to the emergence of hybrid scanners combining PET with computed tomography (PET/CT). Molecular imaging has enormous potential for advancing biological research and patient care, and FDG-PET/CT is currently the most widely used technology in this domain. In this review, we discuss contemporary applications of FDG......-PET and FDG-PET/CT as well as novel developments in quantification and potential future indications including the emerging new modality PET/magnetic resonance imaging....

  10. Analysis of the radiochemical purity of 18F-FDG by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liguang; Tang Anwu; He Shanzhen; Chen Yulong

    2001-01-01

    The radiochemical purity (RCP) of 18 F-FDG is analyzed by HPLC. Eighty-five percent acetonitrile is used as the eluting solution. Carbon hydrate column is used as separation column. The t R of 18 F - is 6.50 min and 18 F-FDG is 9.00 min. HPLC take less time and has higher sensitivity than TLC for the same sample at the same time. So HPLC excels TLC in analyzing RCP of 18 F-FDG

  11. Modified strip packing heuristics for the rectangular variable-sized bin packing problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FG Ortmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Two packing problems are considered in this paper, namely the well-known strip packing problem (SPP and the variable-sized bin packing problem (VSBPP. A total of 252 strip packing heuristics (and variations thereof from the literature, as well as novel heuristics proposed by the authors, are compared statistically by means of 1170 SPP benchmark instances in order to identify the best heuristics in various classes. A combination of new heuristics with a new sorting method yields the best results. These heuristics are combined with a previous heuristic for the VSBPP by the authors to find good feasible solutions to 1357 VSBPP benchmark instances. This is the largest statistical comparison of algorithms for the SPP and the VSBPP to the best knowledge of the authors.

  12. Continuous Production of Structured Phospholipids in a Packed Red Reactor with Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Peng, Lifeng; Mu, Huiling

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of producing structured phospholipids by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between soybean phospholipids and caprylic acid were examined in continuous packed bed enzyme reactors. Acidolysis reactions were performed in both a solvent system and a solvent-free system with the commercial...

  13. GENETIC DIVERSITY AMONG YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA ISOLATED FROM SEWAGE, RAW MILK AND PACKED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmuga Priya Seshadhri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 isolates (40 from sewage, 30 from raw milk and 20 from packed foods collected to study the incidence of Yersinia enterocolitica. It was observed that 61 isolates (32 from sewage, 19 from raw milk and 10 from packed foods were found contaminated with the bacterium. All the isolated strains were confirmed to Yersinia enterocolitica, by using 16S rRNA PCR. Of 61 strains, only five strains (two from sewage and two from packed foods and one from raw milk were found to be the producers of haemolysin at 37 oC, while among the five strains only two strains from packed foods produced haemolysin at 28 oC. All the isolates showed resistance to amoxicillin and found sensitive to chloramphenicol. Seven strains were producer of High molecular weight proteins (HMWP. 53 strains have produced rough LPS, while the smooth LPS has been observed for 8 isolates. Eleven and six different profiles observed in outermembrane proteins and lipopolysaccaride respectively. Combined primer 1 and 2 RAPD-PCR dendogram shows eight different genotypic patterns.

  14. Column-to-column packing variation of disposable pre-packed columns for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Susanne; Hinterberger, Stephan; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-12-08

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, pre-packed columns are the standard for process development, but they must be qualified before use in experimental studies to confirm the required performance of the packed bed. Column qualification is commonly done by pulse response experiments and depends highly on the experimental testing conditions. Additionally, the peak analysis method, the variation in the 3D packing structure of the bed, and the measurement precision of the workstation influence the outcome of qualification runs. While a full body of literature on these factors is available for HPLC columns, no comparable studies exist for preparative columns for protein chromatography. We quantified the influence of these parameters for commercially available pre-packed and self-packed columns of disposable and non-disposable design. Pulse response experiments were performed on 105 preparative chromatography columns with volumes of 0.2-20ml. The analyte acetone was studied at six different superficial velocities (30, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 500cm/h). The column-to-column packing variation between disposable pre-packed columns of different diameter-length combinations varied by 10-15%, which was acceptable for the intended use. The column-to-column variation cannot be explained by the packing density, but is interpreted as a difference in particle arrangement in the column. Since it was possible to determine differences in the column-to-column performance, we concluded that the columns were well-packed. The measurement precision of the chromatography workstation was independent of the column volume and was in a range of±0.01ml for the first peak moment and±0.007 ml 2 for the second moment. The measurement precision must be considered for small columns in the range of 2ml or less. The efficiency of disposable pre-packed columns was equal or better than that of self-packed columns. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Emerging role of FDG-PET/CT in assessing atherosclerosis in large arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wengen; Bural, Gonca G.; Torigian, Drew A.; Alavi, Abass; Rader, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a dynamic inflammatory disorder. The biological composition and inflammatory state of an atherosclerotic plaque, rather than the degree of stenosis or its size are the major determinants of acute clinical events. A noninvasive technique to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque is critically needed. FDG-PET/CT, a combined functional and structural whole-body imaging modality, holds great potential for this purpose. FDG uptake in large arteries has been frequently observed and is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. FDG accumulates in plaque macrophages and uptake is correlated with macrophage density. It is known that vascular FDG uptake and calcification do not overlap significantly and changes of FDG uptake are common, suggesting that FDG uptake may represent a dynamic inflammatory process. It has been reported that vascular FDG uptake can be attenuated by simvastatin in patients, and by the antiinflammatory drug probucol in rabbits. Vascular FDG uptake has been linked to cardiovascular events in some preliminary studies. Data from basic sciences, and animal and clinical studies support the emerging role of FDG-PET/CT in assessing atherosclerosis in large arteries in humans. (orig.)

  16. Suture Granuloma Showing False-Positive Findings on FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Takahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 33-year-old male with a mixed germ-cell testicular tumor. Postoperative follow-up FDG-PET revealed concentration of FDG in the left inguinal area which is not tumor metastasis or local recurrence but suture reactivity granuloma. In this paper, we reviewed suture granulomas associated with false-positive findings on FDG-PET after surgery. If FDG-PET will be used more frequently in the future, it will be necessary to refrain from using silk thread in order to prevent any unnecessary surgery.

  17. Focal FDG Activity in the Region of Right Atrium: Coregistered CT Identifies Three Benign Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Murali; Depuey, E Gordon; Bhargava, Peeyush

    2008-01-01

    We present the whole body FDG PET-CT images on 3 different patients with benign focal activity in the region of the right atrium. Co-registered CT correctly identified the cause of focal FDG activity as: right atrial appendage, lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum, and catheter-related activity. Although all these have been reported separately in the literature, we are presenting them together to emphasize the importance of recognizing the benign causes of FDG uptake in the region of right atrium and the role of co-registered CT in improving the accuracy and specificity of the FDG PET.

  18. Excretion of FDG into saliva and its significance for PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, A.; Dzewas, B.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Aim: Assessment of the salivary excretion of FDG and its significance during PET imaging. Methods: Salivary samples from 16 patients were obtained during the first three hours after FDG injection and their activity concentrations were measured. Furthermore, regional FDG accumulations in whole body PET scans (60 min p.i., ROI technique) were determined in the following locations: vestibulum oris, floor of the mouth, hypopharynx, parotid gland, submandibular gland. This ROI analysis was repeated after drinking water (0.2 l) and a second scan (120 min p.i.). Results: The salivary FDG concentrations (SUV) at the first, second and third hour p.i. were 0.2 {+-} 0.1, 0.4 {+-} 0.2, and 0.3 {+-} 0.2, respectively. The FDG uptake in the investigated cranial and cervical sites ranged from SUV 1.2 {+-} 0.5 in the major salivary glands to 2.1 {+-} 0.5 in the floor of the mouth. These values remained unchanged after drinking of water. Conclusion: The salivary FDG concentration is higher than expected from the low physiologic content of glucose. This may - similarly to renal excretion - reflect a different behavior of FDG and glucose during reabsorption processes. Nevertheless, the salivary concentration of FDG is so low that no relevant influence on PET imaging is to be expected. Accordingly, the drinking of water prior to the scan is of no benefit for FDG PET imaging of the head and the neck. (orig.)

  19. Excretion of FDG into saliva and its significance for PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, A; Dzewas, B; Schwaiger, M; Weber, W A

    2002-10-01

    Assessment of the salivary excretion of FDG and its significance during PET imaging. Salivary samples from 16 patients were obtained during the first three hours after FDG injection and their activity concentrations were measured. Furthermore, regional FDG accumulations in whole body PET scans (60 min p.i., ROI technique) were determined in the following locations: vestibulum oris, floor of the mouth, hypopharynx, parotid gland, submandibular gland. This ROI analysis was repeated after drinking water (0.2 l) and a second scan (120 min p.i.). The salivary FDG concentrations (SUV) at the first, second and third hour p.i. were 0.2 +/- 0.1, 0.4 +/- 0.2, and 0.3 +/- 0.2, respectively. The FDG uptake in the investigated cranial and cervical sites ranged from SUV 1.2 +/- 0.5 in the major salivary glands to 2.1 +/- 0.5 in the floor of the mouth. These values remained unchanged after drinking of water. The salivary FDG concentration is higher than expected from the low physiologic content of glucose. This may--similarly to renal excretion--reflect a different behavior of FDG and glucose during reabsorption processes. Nevertheless, the salivary concentration of FDG is so low that no relevant influence on PET imaging is to be expected. Accordingly, the drinking of water prior to the scan is of no benefit for FDG PET imaging of the head and the neck.

  20. F-18-FDG-PET in autonomous goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Gain-of-function mutations of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene have been invoked as one of the major causes of toxic thyroid adenomas. This study evaluates F-18-FDG-PET in these patients. Methods: Twenty patients with focal autonomous nodules and ten with disseminated autonomy were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG-Uptake was higher in patients than in controls. Focal autonomous nodules were associated with focally enhanced glucose metabolism. Disseminated autonomous goiters showed various patterns of focal or global hypermetabolism. Conclusion: Autonomous thyroid tissue caused by constitutive mutations of the TSH receptor is characterised by simultaneous increases in glucose and iodine metabolism which are correlated. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of Packed Distillation Columns I - Atmospheric Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynolds, Thaine

    1951-01-01

    .... Four column-packing combinations of the glass columns and four column-packing combinations of the steel columns were investigated at atmospheric pressure using a test mixture of methylcyclohexane...

  2. Heavy metals in the snow pack of Semey town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panin, M.S.; Esenzholova, A.Zh.; Toropov, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The data about the maintenance of heavy metals in the snow pack in various zones of Semey and biogeochemical operation factors of snow pack in Semey are presented in this work. Also the correlation connection between elements is calculated.

  3. Radiative-Transfer Modeling of Spectra of Densely Packed Particulate Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, G.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Glotch, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing measurements over a wide range of wavelengths from both ground- and space-based platforms have provided a wealth of data regarding the surfaces and atmospheres of various solar system bodies. With proper interpretations, important properties, such as composition and particle size, can be inferred. However, proper interpretation of such datasets can often be difficult, especially for densely packed particulate media with particle sizes on the order of wavelength of light being used for remote sensing. Radiative transfer theory has often been applied to the study of densely packed particulate media like planetary regoliths and snow, but with difficulty, and here we continue to investigate radiative transfer modeling of spectra of densely packed media. We use the superposition T-matrix method to compute scattering properties of clusters of particles and capture the near-field effects important for dense packing. Then, the scattering parameters from the T-matrix computations are modified with the static structure factor correction, accounting for the dense packing of the clusters themselves. Using these corrected scattering parameters, reflectance (or emissivity via Kirchhoff's Law) is computed with the method of invariance imbedding solution to the radiative transfer equation. For this work we modeled the emissivity spectrum of the 3.3 µm particle size fraction of enstatite, representing some common mineralogical and particle size components of regoliths, in the mid-infrared wavelengths (5 - 50 µm). The modeled spectrum from the T-matrix method with static structure factor correction using moderate packing densities (filling factors of 0.1 - 0.2) produced better fits to the laboratory measurement of corresponding spectrum than the spectrum modeled by the equivalent method without static structure factor correction. Future work will test the method of the superposition T-matrix and static structure factor correction combination for larger particles

  4. From Global Stresses to Local Cell Packing During Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, David

    2011-03-01

    To perform their functions, cells in epithelial tissues must often adopt highly regular packings. It is still not fully understood how these ordered arrangements of cells arise from disordered, proliferative epithelia during development. I will use experimental and theoretical studies on an attractive model system, the cone cell mosaic in fish retina, to illustrate some ways that mechanical forces and cell signaling can interact to produce this transformation. Experiments examining the response to surgical lesions suggest that the correct mechanical environment at the tissue scale is essential to induce cone cells to rearrange into a rectangular lattice. Starting from this observation, I will argue that large-scale mechanical stresses naturally couple to and orient cell polarization and that this coupling can lead cells to line up in regular rows, as observed in the fish retina. This model predicts that cells in the rows will adopt characteristic trapezoidal shapes and that fragments of rows will persist even in tissue where the mosaic pattern is disrupted by lesions; these predictions are borne out by an analysis of cell packings at the level of the zonula occludens in wildtype and lesioned retinas. Supported by NSF grant IOS-0952873.

  5. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative

  6. The gender difference in the brain FDG distribution with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Jinguji, Megumi; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masayuki; Nakajo, M.; Tateno, T.; Jinnouchi, S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the change in brain fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution with aging. Subjects were 85 men and 116 women who had no mental abnormality and no evidence of cancer in the whole body FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) study for cancer checkup. The brain data were extracted from whole body data, and stratified according to the age: 30-39 (M: 10, F: 18), 40-49 (M: 11, F: 14), 50-59 (M: 10, F: 27), 60-64 (M: 11, F: 13), 65-69 (M: 11, F: 11), 70-74 (M: 11, F: 10), 75-79 (M: 13, F: 11), over 80 (M: 8, F: 12) years. Forties or more male and female stratified age groups were compared with each gender 30's age data using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM)2. In the man, the FDG activity of the bilateral temporal and frontal lobes decreased and the decreased domains were expanded with aging. But in the females, the decreased domains were complicated in 40-69 years old. Dynamic changes of sex hormones in the individual female menopause may affect the complicated results in the females. Further studies are needed to confirm it. (author)

  7. Labelling of leucocytes with 18 F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas, M.B.; Tronco, G.G.; Palestro, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To investigate the effect of blood glucose levels on in-vitro 18 F-FDG labeling of autologous leucocytes. Methods: Seventeen volunteers, 11 men and 6 women, 20 - 54 years old, participated in this study. Using standard techniques, a mixed leucocyte suspension was prepared from 40 ml of blood withdrawn from each volunteer. Blood glucose levels were also measured for each blood sample. After resuspension in 3 ml heparinized saline, the leucocytes were incubated with 11.03 (± 4.48) mCi 18 F-FDG for 30 minutes at 370 C. The labeled cell suspension was then centrifuged for 5 min (150 g). Activity in the cell pellet and supernatant were measured and labelling efficiency calculated. Results: Blood glucose levels ranged from 80 to 178 mg% with a mean of 113 mg%. The overall labelling efficiency was 61.2% (±7.3%). The mean labelling efficiency for blood glucose levels 100 mg%. There is no statistically significant difference between the labeling efficiencies obtained at blood glucose levels 100 mg% (p =0.72). Blood Glucose Level (mg%) Labelling Efficiency (%) 100 61. Conclusion: In summary, no correlation between blood glucose levels and labeling efficiency was observed. Blood glucose levels up to 178 mg% do not affect 18 F-FDG in-vitro labelling of autologous leucocytes. (author)

  8. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity, the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of mixed ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers was investigated at the air-water interface. Mixed monolayers of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mol% ganglioside GM, and the phospholipid...... dipaimitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) were studied in the solid phase at 23 degreesC and a surface pressure of 45 mN/m. At these concentrations and conditions the two components do not phase-separate and no evidence for domain formation was observed. X-ray scattering measurements reveal that GM, is accommodated within the host...... monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic...

  9. Imaging of drug smuggling by body packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Giacomo; Guida, Franco; Bocchini, Giorgio; Iaselli, Francesco; Iadevito, Isabella; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-02-01

    Body packing, pushing, and stuffing are hazardous practices with complex medicolegal and social implications. A radiologist plays both a social and a medicolegal role in their assessment, and it should not be limited only to the identification of the packages but must also provide accurate information about their number and their exact location so as to prevent any package remains in the body packer. Radiologists must also be able to recognize the complications associated with these risky practices. Imaging assessment of body packing is performed essentially through plain abdominal X-ray and computed tomography scans. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, although with some advantages, actually have a limited use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah E; Meier, Thomas J.; Geffen, Eli; Mech, L. David; Burch, John W.; Adams, Layne G.; Wayne, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves is often short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measured relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs, and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and its offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  11. Packing and Disorder in Substituted Fullerenes

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2016-07-15

    Fullerenes are ubiquitous as electron-acceptor and electron-transport materials in organic solar cells. Recent synthetic strategies to improve the solubility and electronic characteristics of these molecules have translated into a tremendous increase in the variety of derivatives employed in these applications. Here, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the impact of going from mono-adducts to bis- and tris-adducts on the structural, cohesive, and packing characteristics of [6,6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and indene-C60. The packing configurations obtained at the MD level then serve as input for density functional theory calculations that examine the solid-state energetic disorder (distribution of site energies) as a function of chemical substitution. The variations in structural and site-energy disorders reflect the fundamental materials differences among the derivatives and impact the performance of these materials in thin-film electronic devices.

  12. Body Packing: From Seizures to Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Janczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Physiologic uptake of 18F-FDG in transposed ovaries may mimic metastasis on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Tima; Komisar, Orna; Korach, Jacob; Felder, Shira; Apter, Sara; Ben-Haim, Simona; Perri, Tamar

    2018-02-01

    Ovarian transposition is aimed at preserving ovarian function before irradiation in pelvic malignancies. The extrapelvic location of the ovaries and their physiologic fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG)-uptake is a potential source of misdiagnosis as metastasis on F-FDG PET/CT. We describe the F-FDG PET/CT characteristics of transposed ovaries and their changes over time. We reviewed F-FDG PET/CT studies of all consecutive women with pelvic malignancies who underwent ovarian transposition between 2007 and 2013. Studies were grouped according to the time period over which they were carried out. Findings were categorized by location, size, appearance (solid/mixed/cystic), presence of surgical clips, ovarian F-FDG uptake (maximum standardized uptake value), and attenuation values on CT (Hounsfield units). Group time-period differences were assessed. Seventy-nine F-FDG PET/CT studies were reviewed, 30 before and 49 after transposition. Time-period groups after transposition were up to 4 months (18 studies), 4.1-12 months (n=14), and more than 12 months (n=17). After transposition, ovaries were located mainly in the paracolic gutter (n=32) and subhepatic regions (n=18). Surgical clips were present in 67%. Both ovaries appeared more solid 1 year after surgery than preoperatively (13.7% before vs. 61.3% after surgery; P<0.001). Transient F-FDG-avidity was observed in 11 ovaries. Hounsfield unit values were higher within 4 months after surgery than preoperatively, reverting thereafter to preoperative values. After ovarian transposition, nonanatomic location, loss of cysts formation in favor of solid appearance over time, and intermittent F-FDG uptake of functioning transposed ovaries might mimic metastatic lesions. Careful interpretation of F-FDG PET/CT findings is mandatory in women with pelvic malignancies who have undergone ovarian transposition.

  14. 21 CFR 890.5710 - Hot or cold disposable pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot or cold disposable pack. 890.5710 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5710 Hot or cold disposable pack. (a) Identification. A hot or cold disposable pack is a device intended for medical purposes...

  15. An efficient block-discriminant identification of packed malware

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Advanced persistent attacks, incorporated by sophisticated malware, are on the rise against hosts, user applications and utility software. Modern malware hide their malicious payload by applying packing mechanism. Packing tools instigate code encryption to protect the original malicious payload. Packing is ...

  16. 7 CFR 905.10 - Carton or standard packed carton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carton or standard packed carton. 905.10 Section 905..., GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 905.10 Carton or standard packed carton. Carton or standard packed carton means a unit of measure equivalent to...

  17. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting...

  18. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use of...

  19. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent. ...

  20. 48 CFR 552.211-87 - Export packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Export packing. 552.211-87... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.211-87 Export packing. As prescribed in 511.204(b)(7), insert the following clause: Export Packing (JAN 2010) (a...

  1. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the food...

  2. CoolPack – Simulation tools for refrigeration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.; Andersen, Simon Engedal

    1999-01-01

    CoolPack is a collection of programs used for energy analysis and optimisation of refrigeration systems. CoolPack is developed at the Department of Energy Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. The Danish Energy Agency finances the project. CoolPack is freeware and can be downloaded...

  3. Pack nitriding of aluminium using cassava waste | Shitta | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pack Nitriding is a process analogous to pack carbonizing. In this work, cassava leaves were employed as a source of nitrogen. Upon heating, slow decomposition of the compound provides Nitrogen, the Nitrogen was allowed to interact with aluminium metal surfaces, which were packed nitrided at temperature of 350°c.

  4. Maximum Bounded Rooted-Tree Packing Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kerivin, Herve; Leblet, Jimmy; Simon, Gwendal; Zhou, Fen

    2011-01-01

    Given a graph and a root, the Maximum Bounded Rooted-Tree Packing (MBRTP) problem aims at finding K rooted-trees that span the largest subset of vertices, when each vertex has a limited outdegree. This problem is motivated by peer-to-peer streaming overlays in under-provisioned systems. We prove that the MBRTP problem is NP-complete. We present two polynomial-time algorithms that computes an optimal solution on complete graphs and trees respectively.

  5. Inulinase production in a packed bed reactor by solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilipkumar, M; Rajamohan, N; Rajasimman, M

    2013-07-01

    In this work, production of inulinase was carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR) under solid state fermentation. Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus was used to produce the inulinase using pressmud as substrate. The parameters like air flow rate, packing density and particle size were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximize the inulinase production. The optimum conditions for the maximum inulinase production were: air flow rate - 0.82 L/min, packing density - 40 g/L and particle size - 0.0044 mm (mesh - 14/20). At these optimized conditions, the production of inulinase was found to be 300.5 unit/gram of dry substrate (U/gds). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of Wear Resistant Boride Layers on a Tool Steel by Activity Controlled Pack Boronising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the production and characterisation of iron boride layers by pack boronising of a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The boride layers were produced at 900°C for 2h using different pack compositions in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer. The layers were characterized...... by electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Vickers hardness tests and wear testing with a pin-on-disc tribometer. It was found that the type of boride phases (FeB and/or Fe2B) present in the treated layer can be controlled by changing the boron activity...... by pack boronising for all conditions as compared to the heat treated tool steel....

  7. Altered biodistribution of FDG in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozguven, M.A.; Karacalioglu, A.O.; Ince, S.; Emer, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging of patients with diabetes can be problematic because elevated glucose levels may cause competitive inhibition of [F-18]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in different tissues. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the biodistribution of FDG in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Two hundred forty patients were retrospectively enrolled to the study. Study population was divided into three subgroups, named as the normal (group 1), the insulin (group 2) and the oral anti-diabetic (group 3). Unenhanced low-dose CT and PET emission data were acquired from the mid-thigh to the vertex of the skull. FDG uptakes in different organs were evaluated qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. In the diabetic groups, diffuse FDG uptake of the colon was increased (p > 0.001) but segmental FDG uptake was decreased (p > 0.001). Intestinal FDG uptake was detected in 20% of the study population and only 3% of these uptakes were in diffuse pattern. Segmental FDG uptake in the bowel was increased significantly in the groups of patients with diabetes (p = 0.002). Maximum standardized uptake values of the liver in the groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.66 ± 0.6, 3.25 ± 0.9 and 3.16 ± 0.8, respectively, and the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.083). Cardiac FDG uptake was decreased significantly in the groups of patients with diabetes (p < 0.001). According to our results, whole body bio-distribution of FDG uptake seems to be changed in patients with type-2 diabetes who were using insulin or oral anti-diabetic drugs. Although the use of oral antidiabetic drugs was known to change the biodistribution of FDG, insulin use also seems to change FDG uptake in different organs of diabetic patients. (author)

  8. FDG PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Susan E.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shulkin, Barry L.; McCarville, M.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric malignant bone tumor, frequently surgically managed with limb salvage rather than amputation. Local recurrences are seen in up to 9% of osteosarcoma patients, with CT and MRI imaging often limited by metal artifacts. To describe the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT appearance of local osteosarcoma recurrences with correlation to findings on other imaging modalities. A retrospective review of pediatric osteosarcoma patients imaged with FDG PET/CT was performed in patients with pathologically proven local recurrences. FDG PET/CT findings were reviewed and correlated with available comparison imaging studies. Ten local osteosarcoma recurrences in eight pediatric osteosarcoma patients were imaged with FDG PET/CT. All eight patients had a local recurrence after limb salvage; two patients had a second local recurrence after amputation. All local recurrences were seen with FDG PET/CT, demonstrating solid (n=5) or peripheral/nodular (n=5) FDG uptake patterns. Maximum standard uptake values (SUVs) ranged from 3.0 to 15.7. In five recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and MRI, MRI was limited or nondiagnostic in three. In four recurrences imaged with FDG PET/CT and bone scan, the bone scan was negative in three. Local osteosarcoma recurrences are well visualized by FDG PET/CT, demonstrating either solid or peripheral/nodular FDG uptake with a wide range of maximum SUVs. FDG PET/CT demonstrates the full extent of local recurrences, while MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic hardware. PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than bone scan in detecting local osteosarcoma recurrences. (orig.)

  9. Physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Inubushi, Masayuki; Okada, Hiroyuki [Hamamatsu Medical Photonics Foundation, Hamamatsu Medical Imaging Center, Hamakita, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    Good knowledge of physiological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in the healthy population is of great importance for the correct interpretation of {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) images of pathological processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers. One hundred and 33 healthy females, 78 of whom were premenopausal (age 37.2{+-}6.9 years) and 55 postmenopausal (age 55.0{+-}2.7 years), were examined using whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET and pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus was evaluated visually and using standardised uptake value (SUVs). Anatomical and morphological information was obtained from MR images. Distinct ovarian {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with an SUV of 3.9{+-}0.7 was observed in 26 premenopausal women out of 32 examined during the late follicular to early luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Eighteen of the 32 women also showed focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 3.3{+-}0.3. On the other hand, all nine women in the first 3 days of the menstrual cycle demonstrated intense {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 4.6{+-}1.0. No physiological {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed in the ovaries or uterus of any postmenopausal women. In women of reproductive age, {sup 18}F-FDG imaging should preferably be done within a week before or a few days after the menstrual flow phase to avoid any misinterpretation of pelvic {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. (orig.)

  10. Anesthesia condition for 18F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2008-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal 18 F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on 18 F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of 18 F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The 18 F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of 18 F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased 18 F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest 18 F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by 18 F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal 18 F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire 18 F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model

  11. Physiological 18F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Inubushi, Masayuki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    Good knowledge of physiological 18 F-fluorodeoxglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake in the healthy population is of great importance for the correct interpretation of 18 F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) images of pathological processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological 18 F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus of healthy female volunteers. One hundred and 33 healthy females, 78 of whom were premenopausal (age 37.2±6.9 years) and 55 postmenopausal (age 55.0±2.7 years), were examined using whole-body 18 F-FDG PET and pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Focal 18 F-FDG uptake in the ovaries and uterus was evaluated visually and using standardised uptake value (SUVs). Anatomical and morphological information was obtained from MR images. Distinct ovarian 18 F-FDG uptake with an SUV of 3.9±0.7 was observed in 26 premenopausal women out of 32 examined during the late follicular to early luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Eighteen of the 32 women also showed focal 18 F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 3.3±0.3. On the other hand, all nine women in the first 3 days of the menstrual cycle demonstrated intense 18 F-FDG uptake in the endometrium, with an SUV of 4.6±1.0. No physiological 18 F-FDG uptake was observed in the ovaries or uterus of any postmenopausal women. In women of reproductive age, 18 F-FDG imaging should preferably be done within a week before or a few days after the menstrual flow phase to avoid any misinterpretation of pelvic 18 F-FDG PET images. (orig.)

  12. F-18 FDG PET scan findings in patients with pulmonary involvement in the hypereosinophilic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin

    2005-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an infiltrative disease of eosinophils affecting multiple organs including the lung. F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection, making interpretation of whole body PET scan difficult in patients with cancer. This study was to evaluate the PET findings of HES with lung involvement and to find out differential PET features between lung malignancy and HES with lung involvement. F-18 FDG PET and low dose chest CT scan was performed for screening of lung cancer. Eight patients who showed ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and consolidation on chest CT scan with peripheral blood eosinophilia were included in this study. The patients with history of parasite infection, allergy and collagen vascular disease were excluded. CT features and FDG PET findings were meticulously evaluated for the distribution of GGA and consolidation and nodules on CT scan and mean and maximal SUV of abnormalities depicted on F-18 FDG PET scan. In eight patients, follow-up chest CT scan and FDG PET scan were done one or two weeks after initial study. F-18 FDG PET scan identified metabolically active lesions in seven out of eight patients. Maximal SUV was ranged from 2.8 to 10.6 and mean SUV was ranged from 2.2 to 7.2. Remaining one patient had maximal SUV of 1.3. On follow-up FDG PET scan taken on from one to four weeks later showed decreased degree of initially noted FDG uptakes or migration of previously noted abnormal FDG uptakes. Lung involvement in the HES might be identified as abnormal uptake foci on FDG PET scan mimicking lung cancer. Follow-up FDG PET and CT scan for the identification of migration or resolution of abnormalities and decrement of SUV would be of help for the differentiation between lung cancer and HES with lung involvement

  13. X-ray computed tomography of packed bed chromatography columns for three dimensional imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T F; Levison, P R; Shearing, P R; Bracewell, D G

    2017-03-03

    Physical characteristics critical to chromatography including geometric porosity and tortuosity within the packed column were analysed based upon three dimensional reconstructions of bed structure in-situ. Image acquisition was performed using two X-ray computed tomography systems, with optimisation of column imaging performed for each sample in order to produce three dimensional representations of packed beds at 3μm resolution. Two bead materials, cellulose and ceramic, were studied using the same optimisation strategy but resulted in differing parameters required for X-ray computed tomography image generation. After image reconstruction and processing into a digital three dimensional format, physical characteristics of each packed bed were analysed, including geometric porosity, tortuosity, surface area to volume ratio as well as inter-bead void diameters. Average porosities of 34.0% and 36.1% were found for ceramic and cellulose samples and average tortuosity readings at 1.40 and 1.79 respectively, with greater porosity and reduced tortuosity overall values at the centre compared to the column edges found in each case. X-ray computed tomography is demonstrated to be a viable method for three dimensional imaging of packed bed chromatography systems, enabling geometry based analysis of column axial and radial heterogeneity that is not feasible using traditional techniques for packing quality which provide an ensemble measure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  15. F 18 FDG PET/CT of a Gastric Schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Il Ki; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are tumors originating from nervous tissue; they have Schwann cell sheaths. According to a recent classification, about 80% of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Gastrointestinal (GI) Schwannomas have been reported to represent only 3% of all GI mesenchymal tumors. These tumors make up only 0.2% of all gastric neoplasms. Schwannomas of the GI tract are distinctive from conventional Schwannomas that arise in soft tissue of the central nervous system. GI Schwannomas are hypothesized to arise from the myenteric plexus within the GI tract wall. These tumors are usually benign, slow growing and asymptomatic, and therefore most are discovered incidentally. The differentiation of Schwannomas from other submucosal tumors is very difficult. The main differential diagnosis for a mass arising in the wall of the gastointestinal tract is a GIST, which is a potentially malignant mesenchymal GI tumor that arises from the interstitial cells of Cajal, which help regulate peristalsis. The diagnostic determination of Schwannomas requires positive histological tests for S 100 protein and vimentin, but negative histological tests for smooth muscle actin and c KIT. In contrast, GISTs are C KIT positive and can be S 100 positive if they are located in small bowel. Because most patients with Schwannomas have excellent prognoses, surgical removal is sufficient for treatment. Gastric Schwannomas are normally benign, and malignant transformation is extremely rare. However, the current case illustrates that these tumors may exhibit avid F 18 FDG uptake. It remains unclear why high F 18 FDG uptake is found in benign tumors such as Schwannomas. F 18 FDG uptake in soft tissue and neural Schwannomas is variable but is frequently high, possibly due to over expression of the glucose transporter by tumor cells. In particular, glucose transporter type 3 is found in all human tissues and is the major glucose

  16. F 18 FDG PET/CT of a Gastric Schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Il Ki; Kim, Deog Yoon

    2011-01-01

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are tumors originating from nervous tissue; they have Schwann cell sheaths. According to a recent classification, about 80% of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Gastrointestinal (GI) Schwannomas have been reported to represent only 3% of all GI mesenchymal tumors. These tumors make up only 0.2% of all gastric neoplasms. Schwannomas of the GI tract are distinctive from conventional Schwannomas that arise in soft tissue of the central nervous system. GI Schwannomas are hypothesized to arise from the myenteric plexus within the GI tract wall. These tumors are usually benign, slow growing and asymptomatic, and therefore most are discovered incidentally. The differentiation of Schwannomas from other submucosal tumors is very difficult. The main differential diagnosis for a mass arising in the wall of the gastointestinal tract is a GIST, which is a potentially malignant mesenchymal GI tumor that arises from the interstitial cells of Cajal, which help regulate peristalsis. The diagnostic determination of Schwannomas requires positive histological tests for S 100 protein and vimentin, but negative histological tests for smooth muscle actin and c KIT. In contrast, GISTs are C KIT positive and can be S 100 positive if they are located in small bowel. Because most patients with Schwannomas have excellent prognoses, surgical removal is sufficient for treatment. Gastric Schwannomas are normally benign, and malignant transformation is extremely rare. However, the current case illustrates that these tumors may exhibit avid F 18 FDG uptake. It remains unclear why high F 18 FDG uptake is found in benign tumors such as Schwannomas. F 18 FDG uptake in soft tissue and neural Schwannomas is variable but is frequently high, possibly due to over expression of the glucose transporter by tumor cells. In particular, glucose transporter type 3 is found in all human tissues and is the major glucose

  17. HETP evaluation of structured packing distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Orlando Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Several tests with a hydrocarbon mixture of known composition (C8-C14, obtained from DETEN Chemistry S.A., have been performed in a laboratory distillation column, having 40mm of nominal diameter and 2.2m high, with internals of Sulzer DX gauze stainless steel structured packing. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate HETP of a structured packing laboratory scale distillation column, operating continuously. Six HETP correlations available in the literature were compared in order to find out which is the most appropriate for structured packing columns working with medium distillates. Prior to the experimental tests, simulation studies using commercial software PRO/II® were performed in order to establish the optimum operational conditions for the distillation, especially concerning operating pressure, top and bottom temperatures, feed location and reflux ratio. The results of PRO/II® were very similar to the analysis of the products obtained during continuous operation, therefore permitting the use of the properties calculated by that software on the theoretical models investigated. The theoretical models chosen for HETP evaluation were: Bravo, Rocha and Fair (1985; Rocha, Bravo and Fair (1993, 1996; Brunazzi and Pagliant (1997; Carlo, Olujić and Pagliant (2006; Olujić et al., (2004. Modifications concerning calculation of specific areas were performed on the correlations in order to fit them for gauze packing HETP evaluation. As the laboratory distillation column was operated continuously, different HETP values were found by the models investigated for each section of the column. The low liquid flow rates in the top section of the column are a source of error for HETP evaluation by the models; therefore, more reliable HETP values were found in the bottom section, in which liquid flow rates were much greater. Among the theoretical models, Olujić et al. (2004 has shown good results relative to the experimental tests. In addition, the

  18. The mechanical behaviour of packed particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, R

    1998-01-01

    Within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program, the central concept is to package used fuel in containers that would be deposited in an underground vault in a plutonic rock formation. To provide internal mechanical support for the container, the reference design specifies it to be filled with a matrix of compacted particulate material (called 'packed particulate'), such as quartz sand granules. The focus of this report is on the mechanical properties of the packed-particulate material, based on information drawn from the extant literature. We first consider the packing density of particulate matrices to minimize the remnant porosity and maximize mechanical stability under conditions of external pressure. Practical methods, involving vibratory packing, are reviewed and recommendations made to select techniques to achieve optimum packing density. The behaviour of particulates under compressive loading has been of interest to the powder metallurgy industry (i.e., the manufacture of products from pressed/sintered metal and ceramic powders) since the early decades of this century. We review the evidence showing that in short timescales, stress induced compaction occurs by particle shuffling and rearrangement, elastic distortion, plastic yielding and microfracturing. Analytical expressions are available to describe these processes in a semiquantitative fashion. Time-dependent compaction, mainly via creep mechanisms, is more complex. Much of the theoretical and experimental information is confined to higher temperatures (> 500 degrees C), where deformation rates are more rapid. Thus, for the relatively low ambient temperatures of the waste container ({approx}100 degrees C), we require analytical techniques to extrapolate the collective particulate creep behaviour. This is largely accomplished by employing current theories of creep deformation, particularly in the form of Deformation Mechanism Maps, which allow estimation of creep rates over a wide

  19. The mechanical behaviour of packed particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program, the central concept is to package used fuel in containers that would be deposited in an underground vault in a plutonic rock formation. To provide internal mechanical support for the container, the reference design specifies it to be filled with a matrix of compacted particulate material (called 'packed particulate'), such as quartz sand granules. The focus of this report is on the mechanical properties of the packed-particulate material, based on information drawn from the extant literature. We first consider the packing density of particulate matrices to minimize the remnant porosity and maximize mechanical stability under conditions of external pressure. Practical methods, involving vibratory packing, are reviewed and recommendations made to select techniques to achieve optimum packing density. The behaviour of particulates under compressive loading has been of interest to the powder metallurgy industry (i.e., the manufacture of products from pressed/sintered metal and ceramic powders) since the early decades of this century. We review the evidence showing that in short timescales, stress induced compaction occurs by particle shuffling and rearrangement, elastic distortion, plastic yielding and microfracturing. Analytical expressions are available to describe these processes in a semiquantitative fashion. Time-dependent compaction, mainly via creep mechanisms, is more complex. Much of the theoretical and experimental information is confined to higher temperatures (> 500 degrees C), where deformation rates are more rapid. Thus, for the relatively low ambient temperatures of the waste container (∼100 degrees C), we require analytical techniques to extrapolate the collective particulate creep behaviour. This is largely accomplished by employing current theories of creep deformation, particularly in the form of Deformation Mechanism Maps, which allow estimation of creep rates over a wide range of stress

  20. Effects of Different Packing Materials on Cotton Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanzhao; Liu, Wanfu; Ni, Zhaopeng; Wang, Lu; Gao, Bo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different packing materials on cotton fires. After the cotton bale is ignited, the caving area, the mass loss rate and the temperature variation of cotton bales were measured. Through the experiment, it was found that Cotton bale packed with Plastic belt has the phenomenon of collapse, but the cotton bale packed with Steel ribbon does not happen to collapse. The mass loss rate of the Cotton bale packed with Plastic belt is faster than that of the cotton bale packed with Steel ribbon, and the temperature is higher.

  1. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in a Patient with Chikungunya Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Michala Vaaben; Kjaer, Anna Sophie L; Markova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with Chikungunya infection. An (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed four weeks after debut of symptoms revealed pathological (18)F-FDG uptake in enlarged lymph nodes on both side of the diaphragm, and inflammation of both...

  2. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.

    2008-01-01

    tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in paediatric oncology. The Oncology Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has published excellent procedure guidelines on tumour imaging with (18)F-FDG PET (Bombardieri et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 30:BP115-24, 2003). These guidelines, published...

  3. FDG-PET for imaging of non-osseous infection and inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, F.J.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    FDG-PET is emerging as a promising imaging technique in non-osseous infectious and inflammatory diseases, as an increasing number of reports are appearing in literature. In general, sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing non-osseous infections compares favorably to other diagnostic modalities. Lower

  4. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  5. Detection of histologically proven peritoneal carcinomatosis with fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirisamer, Albert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: albert.dirisamer@meduniwien.ac.at; Schima, Wolfgang [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Heinisch, Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Lehner, Hans Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Krankenhaus, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse 30, 1140 Vienna (Austria); Langsteger, Werner [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies and to assess the diagnostic role for 18-FDG-PET and MDCT alone in comparison to the diagnostic accuracy of fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT by using surgical and histopathological findings as the standard of reference. Methods and subjects: Sixty-two patients (13 males, 49 females; age range 43-81; mean age, 62 years with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis were reviewed for the presence of peritoneal lesions on 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT scans (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems). The results were compared with the histological findings at laparatomy. Thirty-one patients had peritoneal metastases, while 31 patients had negative histological findings at laparotomy. Results: CT detected peritoneal seeding in 26/31 patients, 18F-FDG-PET in 25/31 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT in 30/31 patients, for a sensitivity of 88%, 88%, and 100%, respectively. False-positive findings were seen in MDCT in one patient, in 18F-FDG-PET in two patients, and in 18F-MDCT-PET/MDCT in one patient, for a specificity of 97%, 94%, and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT is superior to MDCT and 18F-FDG-PET alone for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis especially in small lesions and it offers exact anatomic information for surgical treatment.

  6. Efficacy of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Venous Thromboembolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning; Iversen, Else Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In recent years, several case reports have described venous thromboembolism (VTE) on FDG PET/CT. In this short communication, we present results from a proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at providing some preliminary data on the efficacy of FDG PET/CT in prospective patients with suspected...

  7. Malignancy rate of biopsied suspicious bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; de Klerk, John M H; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Kwee, Thomas C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314079394

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the malignancy rate of bone lesions identified on FDG PET/CT in patients who have undergone CT-guided biopsy because of the suspicion of malignancy. Methods: This single-centre retrospective study spanned eight consecutive years and included all patients who underwent both FDG

  8. Comparative study of FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT in the diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, T.; Ozawa, K.; Oriuchi, N.; Khan, N.; Endo, K.; Otake, H.; Matsubara, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: FDG-PET is reported to be more accurate in preoperative localization of hyper functioning parathyroid gland of primary hyperparathyroidism in comparison with sestamibi-SPECT by Neumann et al. However, its usefulness in the diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism has not been reported yet. In this study, we've performed the direct comparison of the usefulness of FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT in the detection of abnormal parathyroid tissue in the patients of secondary hyperparathyroidism under hemodilysis. Material and Methods: One primary and 5 secondary hyperparathyroidism patients underwent FDG-PET and sestamibi-SPECT. After overnight fasting, 300 to 400 MBq of FDG was intravenously injected, followed by whole body PET image acquisition after 50 minutes. In the same day before FDG-PET, 600 MBq of sestamibi was injected and early and delayed planar image and delayed SPECT image has been obtained. Visual interpretation of the abnormal parathyroid uptake has been performed by 2 experienced nuclear physician independently. Results: In the secondary cases, FDG-PET shows no hyper functioning gland in all 5 cases, whereas sestamibi-SPECT shows 8 hyper functioning glands. In contrast, hyper functioning gland of the primary hyperparathyroidism case has been clearly visualized only by FDG-PET. Conclusion: Although FDG-PET is very useful in detecting hyper functioning gland in primary hyperparathyroidism, it is not useful in secondary hyperparathyroidism. Further pathological analysis about the different glucose metabolism of primary and secondary hyper functioning gland should be added in the future study

  9. Factors Associated with Diffusely Increased Splenic F-18 FDG Uptake in Patients with Cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keunyoung; Kim, Seongjang; Kim, Injoo; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Sojung; Ahn, Sang Hyun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Although diffuse splenic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) uptake exceeding hepatic activity, is considered abnormal, its clinical significance is rarely discussed in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the contributing factors causing diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. From January 2010 to March 2013, 140 patients (84 men, 56 women) were enrolled in this study. All patients had been diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma and underwent F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the pretreatment staging work up. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Various hematological parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, CEA, CA19-9, pancreatic enzymes and liver function tests were conducted within 2 days after the F-18 FDG PET/CT study. Diffuse splenic uptake was observed in 23 patients (16.4%). Of those, 19 patients (82.6%) underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreastography (ERCP) 7 days before F-18 FDG PET/CT. The CRP level (p <0.001) and white blood cell count (p =0.023) were significantly higher in the group of patients with diffuse splenic FDG uptake. The hemoglobin (p <0.001) and the hematocrit (p <0.001) were significantly lower in patients with diffuse splenic FDG uptake. Pancreatic enzymes, liver function test results, and tumor markers were not significantly different between the patients who did or did not have diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake. The significant factors for diffuse splenic F-18 FDG uptake exceeding hepatic F-18 FDG uptake on multivariate analysis included: performing ERCP before F-18 FDG PET-CT (odds ratio [OR], 77.510; 95% CI, 7.624-132.105), and the presence of leukocytosis (OR, 12.436; 95% CI, 2.438-63.445) or anemia (OR, 1.211; 95% CI, 1.051-1.871). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that concurrent inflammation could be associated with diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake. We suggest that performing ERCP before F-18 FDG PET

  10. Giant cell tumor of the rib: Two cases of F-18 FDG PET/CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Le Ryung; Lee, Yeong Joo; Jung, Chan Kwon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sonya Young Ju [Molecular Imaging Program, Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We report two cases of giant cell tumor arising from the rib and their F-18 FDG PET/CT findings. The two patients complained of chest wall pain, and large lobulated soft tissue masses with intense FDG uptake were seen on F-18 FDG PET/CT. A malignant tumor such as osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma was suspected due to the large size of the mass, bony destruction, and intense FDG uptake. En bloc resection was performed and final pathologic results revealed giant cell tumor of the rib. Giant cell tumor of the rib is very rare, and larger lesions with high FDG uptake can be misdiagnosed as an intrathoracic malignancy arising from the rib, pleura, or chest wall.

  11. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation can be improved by delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Hildebrandt, Malene

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Blood pool FDG activity can cloud the atherosclerotic plaque FDG signal. Over time, blood pool FDG activity declines. Therefore, delayed time point FDG PET CT imaging can potentially enhance the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers...... without traditional cardiovascular risk factors and three subjects with angina pectoris were prospectively assessed by dual time point 18-FDG PET CT imaging at 90 and 180 minutes after tracer injection. The ratio between aortic SUVmax and the blood pool SUVmean (TBR) was calculated to show the change...... the data. Results: At 90 minutes, the aortic TBR was 2.072 ± 0.599. At 180 minutes, the aortic TBR significantly increased to 3.488 ± 1.138 (P = relationship was observed between aortic cSUV, aging (β = 0.019; t = 2.79; df = 12; P...

  12. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  13. Clinical value of FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: is there an impact of FDG PET/CT on patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Ahmet; Ustaalioglu, Bala Basak Oven; Seker, Mesut; Salepci, Taflan; Gumus, Mahmut; Canpolat, Nesrin; Tekinsoy, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence as compared with diagnostic CT, and to assess the impact of the results of FDG PET/CT on treatment planning. Included in this retrospective study were 60 patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer who had previously undergone primary debulking surgery and had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Diagnostic CT and FDG PET/CT imaging were performed for all patients as clinically indicated. The changes in the clinical management of patients according to the results of FDG PET/CT were also analysed. FDG PET/CT was performed in 21 patients with a previously negative or indeterminate diagnostic CT scan, but an elevated CA-125 level, and provided a sensitivity of 95% in the detection of recurrent disease. FDG PET/CT revealed recurrent disease in 19 patients. In 17 of 60 patients, the indication for FDG PET/CT was an elevated CA-125 level and an abnormal diagnostic CT scan to localize accurately the extent of disease. FDG PET/CT scans correctly identified recurrent disease in 16 of the 17 patients, a sensitivity of 94.1%. Moreover, FDG PET/CT was performed in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of ovarian cancer recurrence, an abnormal diagnostic CT scan, but a normal CA-125 level. In this setting, FDG PET/CT correctly confirmed recurrent disease in seven patients providing a sensitivity of 100% in determining recurrence. In four patients, FDG PET/CT was carried out for the assessment of treatment response. Three of four scans were classified as true-negative indicating a complete response. In the other patient, FDG PET/CT identified progression of disease. In total, 45 (75%) of the 60 patients had recurrent disease, in 14 (31.1%) documented by histopathology and in 31 (68.9%) on clinical follow-up, while 15 (25%) had no evidence of recurrent disease. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value

  14. Clinical Significance of 18F-FDG-PET in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takaaki; Yajima, Reina; Kurozumi, Sasagu; Higuchi, Toru; Obayashi, Sayaka; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Rin; Takata, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Jun; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The diagnostic utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) for breast cancer is controversial. The histological type or tumor size of breast cancer has been reported to be associated with a greater likelihood of positive FDG uptake. Compared to invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs), invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs) have a lower level of FDG uptake and are detected at a significantly lower sensitivity. The role of preoperative FDG-PET for ILCs may, thus, be limited. Few data evaluating the significance of FDG-PET in ILCs are available. Here, we evaluated the clinical significance of FDG-PET for ILC patients. We retrospectively investigated the cases of 196 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who were diagnosed as having ILC (n=15) or IDC (n=181) and underwent FDG-PET preoperatively. Fifteen (7.7%) of patients were histopathologically diagnosed as ILC. A univariate analysis revealed that tumor size, extent of tumor, estrogen receptor (ER) expression and progesterone receptor (PgR) expression were significantly different between the ILC and IDC groups. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) values of the primary tumors were not significantly different between the two groups but, regardless of the larger size of tumor or ductal spread, the SUV max was relatively lower in the ILC group compared to the IDC group. The tumors in two ILC cases showed no FDG uptake. Among the ILC cases, there were linear associations between SUV max and tumor size and between SUV max and the nuclear grade by Pearson correlation (r=0.447, p=0.048 and r=0.519, p=0.024, respectively). Our findings imply that the preoperative FDG uptake in ILC may be reflective of the tumor size and the nuclear grade of the tumor. FDG uptake may be useful and predictive of aggressive features or prognosis in ILC patients. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios; Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P.; Georgiou, Evangelos; Johnston, Patrick B.; Wiseman, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of 18 F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  16. FDG-PET and ultrasound as complementary modalities in malignant melanoma restaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, T.; Aigner, R.M.; Wolf, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Both FDG-PET and ultrasound are common modalities for restaging malignant melanoma patients although ultrasound is still the first quality in restaging lymph nodes (neck, axilla, inguen) and liver. The aim of our study was to show the benefit of complementary use of these modalities in patients with suspicious findings. In our study 37 patients were included. All of them were alter surgical and additionally zytostatic and/or Interferon therapy. Ultrasound and FDG-PET examination happened within 9 weeks. In 19 cases first ultrasound was done and afterwards FDG-PET, in 18 cases FDG-PET was the first examination. Criterion for suspiciousness in ultrasound was size and sonographic texture of lymph nodes and liver lesions relatively. Criterion for suspiciousness in FDG-PET was pathological FDG uptake. The results were verified by histology and /or CT, MR, long-term follow-up. In 22 cases highly suspicious (11) or non suspicious (11) findings in one examination were confirmed by the other one. FDG-PET showed additionally findings in 5 cases (lung/1, lien/2, liver/2) ultrasound in one case (suprarenal gland). In 8 cases suspicious findings in one examination (ultrasound 1/ FDG-PET 7) had been cleared up by the other one. Only 7 cases showed completely different findings (liver/3, lymph nodes/2) or in both modalities not clear findings (liver/1, lymph node/1). Complementary use of FDG-PET and ultrasound for restaging in malignant melanoma patients is a good chance to clear up suspect findings. FDG-PET as whole body examination in a higher rate than ultrasound has the opportunity of additional findings although ultrasound is even out of cost - effectiveness the first quality in restaging. (author)

  17. Concordance between brain 18F-FDG PET and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, S; Noguera, A; Tarongí, S; Oporto, M; García, A; Vico, H; Espino, A; Picado, M J; Mas, A; Peña, C; Amer, G

    Cortical posterior hypometabolism on PET imaging with 18 F-FDG (FDG-PET), and altered levels of Aß 1-42 peptide, total Tau (tTau) and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established diagnostic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An evaluation has been made of the concordance and relationship between the results of FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers in symptomatic patients with suspected AD. A retrospective review was carried out on 120 patients with cognitive impairment referred to our Cognitive Neurology Unit, and who were evaluated by brain FDG-PET and a lumbar puncture for CSF biomarkers. In order to calculate their Kappa coefficient of concordance, the result of the FDG-PET and the set of the three CSF biomarkers in each patient was classified as normal, inconclusive, or AD-compatible. The relationship between the results of both methods was further assessed using logistic regression analysis, including the Aß 1-42 , tTau and pTau levels as quantitative predictors, and the FDG-PET result as the dependent variable. The weighted Kappa coefficient between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.35-0.57). Logistic regression analysis showed that the Aß 1-42 and tTau values together were capable of discriminating an FDG-PET result metabolically suggestive of AD from one non-suggestive of AD, with a 91% sensitivity and 93% specificity at the cut-off line Aß 1-42 =44+1.3×tTau. The level of concordance between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was moderate, indicating their complementary value in diagnosing AD. The Aß 1-42 and tTau levels in CSF help to predict the patient FDG-PET cortical metabolic status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. [18F]FDG PET monitoring of tumour response to chemotherapy: does [18F]FDG uptake correlate with the viable tumour cell fraction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaepen, Karoline; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dupont, Patrick; Bormans, Guy; Mortelmans, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Verhoef, Gregor; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Because metabolic changes induced by chemotherapy precede the morphological changes, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([ 18 F]FDG PET) is thought to predict response to therapy earlier and more accurately than other modalities. To be a reliable predictor of response, changes in tumour [ 18 F]FDG uptake should reflect changes in viable cell fraction, but little is known about the contribution of apoptotic and necrotic cancer cells and inflammatory tissue to the [ 18 F]FDG signal. In a tumour mouse model we investigated the relation between chemotherapy-induced changes in various tumoral components and tumour uptake and size. SCID mice were subcutaneously inoculated in the right thigh with 5 x 10 6 Daudi cells. When the tumour measured 15-20 mm, Endoxan was given intravenously. At different time points [1-15 days (d1-d15) after the injection of Endoxan], ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology were performed in two mice and [ 18 F]FDG uptake in the tumour and tumour size were correlated with the different cell fractions measured with flow cytometry in five mice. At d1/d3, similar reductions in [ 18 F]FDG uptake and viable tumoral cell fraction were observed and these reductions preceded changes in tumour size. By d8/d10, [ 18 F]FDG uptake had stabilised despite a further reduction in viable tumoral cell fraction. At these time points a major inflammatory response was observed. At d15, an increase in viable tumour cells was again observed and this was accurately predicted by an increase in [ 18 F]FDG uptake, while the tumour volume remained unchanged. In contrast with variations in tumour volume, [ 18 F]FDG is a good marker for chemotherapy response monitoring. However, optimal timing seems crucial since a transient increase in stromal reaction may result in overestimation of the fraction of viable cells. (orig.)

  19. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}FDG; Desenvolvimento de metodologias para avaliacao da exposicao ocupational interna devido ao radiofarmaco {sup 18}FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-07-01

    The production of {sup 18}F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of {sup 18}F- fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide {sup 18}F as {sup 18}FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of {sup 18}FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of {sup 22}Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of {sup 22}Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since

  20. Viscoelastic gravel-pack carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmer, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a fluid to flow adequately into the formation during gravel-pack treatments is critical to achieving a good pack. Recent studies have indicated ''fish-eyes'' and/or ''microgels'' present in many polymer gelled carrier fluids will plug pore throats, leading to impaired leakoff and causing formation damage. Intensive manipulation of the polymer gelled fluid using shear and filter devices will help remove the particles, but it adds to the cost of the treatment in terms of equipment and manpower. Excessive shear will degrade the polymer leading to poor gravel suspension, while too little shear will cause filtration problems. A gelled carried fluid using a viscoelastic surfactant system has been found to leak off very efficiently to the formation, and cause no formation damage, without the use of shear/filter devices. Viscoelastic surfactant-base gelled fluids develop viscosity because of the association of surfactant moloecules into large rod-shaped aggregates. There is no hydration of polymer involved, so fish-eyes and microgels will not be formed in the viscoelastic fluid. A surfactant-base system having a yield point allows the gravel carrying properties to be much better than fluids gelled with conventional polymer systems (hydroxyethylcellulose [HEC]). For example, a gravel carried fluid gelled with 80 lb HEC/1,000 gal has a viscosity of about 400 cp at 170 sec/sup -1/; a viscoelastic surfactant-base system having only one-half the viscosity still flows into cores about four times more efficiently than the HEC-base fluid. The rheology, leakoff, formation damage and mixing properties of a viscoelastic, surfactant-base, gravel-pack carrier fluid are discussed

  1. "Quasi-symmetric" FDG avidity of bilateral salivary glands in Mikulicz disease yielding false-positive staging in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Fan; Shen, Daniel Hy; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Hou, Cheng-Han; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Ching-Yuan

    2012-11-01

    A 77-year-old man with lung cancer underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Cervical FDG uptake of variable intensity was detected corresponding to enlarged masses in the bilateral parotid and left submandibular regions. We suspected metastases from primary lung cancer or coexisting salivary gland neoplasms. Histopathological examination of the FDG-avid parotid mass revealed Mikulicz disease, an uncommon autoimmune disease involving the salivary glands. We present this case of Mikulicz disease with "quasi-symmetric" FDG avidity in the major salivary glands. We believe that salivary FDG uptake can lead to erroneous interpretation of tumor staging using PET.

  2. Gas Distribution in Shallow Packed Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Ian Miles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Packed beds have many industrial applications and are increasingly used in the process industries due to their low pressure drop. Obtaining uniform gas distribution in such beds is of crucial importance in minimising operating costs and optimising plant performance. Since to some extent a packed bed acts as its own distributor the importance of obtaining uniform gas distribution has increased as aspect ratios (bed height to diameter) decrease. There is no rigorous design method for distributors due to a limited understanding of the fluid flow phenomena and in particular of the effect of the bed base/free fluid interface. This study is based on a combined theoretical and modelling approach. The Ergun Equation is used to determine the pressure drop over a bed where the flow is uni-directional. This equation has been used in a vectorial form so that it can be applied to maldistributed and multi -directional flows and has been realised in the Computational Fluid Dynamics code PHOENICS. The use of this equation and its application has been verified by modelling experimental measurements of maldistributed gas flows, where there is no free fluid/bed base interface. A novel, two-dimensional experiment has been designed to investigate the fluid mechanics of maldistributed gas flows in shallow packed beds. The results from this apparatus provide useful insights into the fluid mechanics of flow in and around a shallow packed bed and show the critical effect of the bed base. The PHOENICS/vectorial Ergun Equation model has been adapted to model this situation. The model has been improved by the inclusion of spatial voidage variations in the bed and the prescription of a novel bed base boundary condition. The flow in a curved bed section, which is three -dimensional in nature, is examined experimentally. The effect of the walls and the changes in gas direction on the gas flow are shown to be particularly significant

  3. Compressed Subsequence Matching and Packed Tree Coloring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for subsequence matching in grammar compressed strings. Given a grammar of size n compressing a string of size N and a pattern string of size m over an alphabet of size \\(\\sigma \\), our algorithm uses \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w})\\) space and \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w}+m\\log ...... a new data structure that allows us to efficiently find the next occurrence of a given character after a given position in a compressed string. This data structure in turn is based on a new data structure for the tree color problem, where the node colors are packed in bit strings....

  4. Characteristic of {sup 18}F-FDG Excretion According to Use Diuretics in {sup 18}F-FDG of PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun; Yang, Seoung Oh; Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Lim [Dept. of Physics, Daegu University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) causes a significant amount of radioactivity retention in kidneys and urinary tract and degrades image quality and diagnostic performance. Diuretics are used to perform tests and prevent the urinary tract retention of {sup 18}F-FDG. The purpose of the study is to investigate how the diuretics affect images and excretion rates of {sup 18}F-FDG. The study consists of a group using diuretics for patients with no primary tumors or transfer lesions in kidneys according to PET/CT images, a group using physiological saline and the control group injecting only {sup 18}F-FDG and SUVs are measured by configuring interested areas for each group. Also, SUVs are compared and evaluated depending on the lasix injection after basic inspection and injecting {sup 18}F-FDG for quantitative analysis. The study shows that images with decreased background radioactivity and increased urine excretion due to using diuretics. However, an opposite result that there is no change in the amount of radioactivity in urine appears. The study concludes that the diuretics may decrease background radioactivity in the images but may not affect the {sup 18}F-FDG excretion.

  5. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic–inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie–Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol–gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a ‘green’ product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie–Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating. (paper)

  6. Producing superhydrophobic roof tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Luis A M; Facio, Dario S; Mosquera, Maria J

    2016-03-04

    Superhydrophobic materials can find promising applications in the field of building. However, their application has been very limited because the synthesis routes involve tedious processes, preventing large-scale application. A second drawback is related to their short-term life under outdoor conditions. A simple and low-cost synthesis route for producing superhydrophobic surfaces on building materials is developed and their effectiveness and their durability on clay roof tiles are evaluated. Specifically, an organic-inorganic hybrid gel containing silica nanoparticles is produced. The nanoparticles create a densely packed coating on the roof tile surface in which air is trapped. This roughness produces a Cassie-Baxter regime, promoting superhydrophobicity. A surfactant, n-octylamine, was also added to the starting sol to catalyze the sol-gel process and to coarsen the pore structure of the gel network, preventing cracking. The application of ultrasound obviates the need to use volatile organic compounds in the synthesis, thereby making a 'green' product. It was also demonstrated that a co-condensation process effective between the organic and inorganic species is crucial to obtain durable and effective coatings. After an aging test, high hydrophobicity was maintained and water absorption was completely prevented for the roof tile samples under study. However, a transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state regime was observed as a consequence of the increase in the distance between the roughness pitches produced by the aging of the coating.

  7. Statistical characterization of microstructure of packings of polydisperse hard cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2017-05-01

    Polydisperse packings of cubic particles arise in several important problems. Examples include zeolite microcubes that represent catalytic materials, fluidization of such microcubes in catalytic reactors, fabrication of new classes of porous materials with precise control of their morphology, and several others. We present the results of detailed and extensive simulation and microstructural characterization of packings of nonoverlapping polydisperse cubic particles. The packings are generated via a modified random sequential-addition algorithm. Two probability density functions (PDFs) for the particle-size distribution, the Schulz and log-normal PDFs, are used. The packings are analyzed, and their random close-packing density is computed as a function of the parameters of the two PDFs. The maximum packing fraction for the highest degree of polydispersivity is estimated to be about 0.81, much higher than 0.57 for the monodisperse packings. In addition, a variety of microstructural descriptors have been calculated and analyzed. In particular, we show that (i) an approximate analytical expression for the structure factor of Percus-Yevick fluids of polydisperse hard spheres with the Schulz PDF also predicts all the qualitative features of the structure factor of the packings that we study; (ii) as the packings become more polydisperse, their behavior resembles increasingly that of an ideal system—"ideal gas"—with little or no correlations; and (iii) the mean survival time and mean relaxation time of a diffusing species in the packings increase with increasing degrees of polydispersivity.

  8. Evaluation of gross tumor size using CT, 18F-FDG PET, integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT and pathological analysis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huiming; Liu Yunfang; Hou Ming; Liu Jie; Li Xiaonan; Yu Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation of gross tumor sizes between combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and macroscopic surgical samples has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we compared CT, 18 F-FDG PET and combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and validated the results through examination of the macroscopic surgical specimen. Methods: Fifty-two operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients had integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans preoperatively and pathological examination post-operation. Four separate maximal tumor sizes at X (lateral direction), Y (ventro-dorsal direction) and Z (cranio-caudal direction) axis were measured on 18 F-FDG PET, CT, combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and surgical specimen, respectively. Linear regression was calculated for each of the three imaging measurements versus pathological measurement. Results: No significant differences were observed among the tumor sizes measured by three images and pathological method. Compared with pathological measurement, CT size at X, Y, Z axis was larger, whereas combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FDG PET size were smaller. Combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT size was more similar to the pathological size than that of 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Results of linear regressions showed that integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT was the most accurate modality in measuring the size of cancer. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT correlates more faithfully with pathological findings than 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT is an effective tool to define the target of GTV in radiotherapy.

  9. Heating capacity of rebound shortwave diathermy and moist hot packs at superficial depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Amanda R; Draper, David O; Johnson, A Wayne; Diede, Mike T; Rigby, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a new continuous diathermy unit, ReBound, as a heating modality is unknown. To compare the effects of ReBound diathermy with silicate-gel moist hot packs on tissue temperature in the human triceps surae muscle. Crossover study. University research laboratory. A total of 12 healthy, college-aged volunteers (4 men, 8 women; age = 22.2 ± 2.25 years, calf subcutaneous fat thickness = 7.2 ± 1.9 mm). On 2 different days, 1 of 2 modalities (ReBound diathermy, silicate-gel moist hot pack) was applied to the triceps surae muscle of each participant for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, the modality was removed, and temperature decay was recorded for 20 minutes. Medial triceps surae intramuscular tissue temperature at a depth of 1 cm was measured using an implantable thermocouple inserted horizontally into the muscle. Measurements were taken every 5 minutes during the 30-minute treatment and every minute during the 20-minute temperature decay, for a total of 50 minutes. Treatment was analyzed through a 2 × 7 mixed-model analysis of variance with repeated measures. Temperature decay was analyzed through a 2 × 21 mixed-model analysis of variance with repeated measures. During the 30-minute application, tissue temperatures at a depth of 1 cm increased more with the ReBound diathermy than with the moist hot pack (F6,66 = 7.14, P hot packs increased tissue temperatures 3.69°C ± 1.50°C and 2.82°C ± 0.90°C, respectively, from baseline. Throughout the temperature decay, ReBound diathermy produced a greater rate of heat dissipation than the moist hot pack (F20,222 = 4.42, P hot packs.

  10. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat; Naser, Jamal

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO2 emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can't model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  11. Horizontal single-trip gravel pack and selective simulation system for deep water extended reach wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, Francisco [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Vilela, Alvaro; Montanha, Roberto; Acosta, Marco; Farias, Rodrigo [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Most of the reservoirs located in the deep water and ultra-deep water offshore South America are described as unconsolidated sandstone that require sand control on both producers and water injection wells. Horizontal Open Hole Gravel Pack completions are the preferred method of development. If completing heavy oil reservoirs, there is a necessity of longer horizontal open hole sections. Low fracture gradients may limit the length of gravel pack in the open hole section because of the pressure increase during the Beta wave proppant deposition phase. This system allows the gravel pack assembly to be installed and the gravel pack to be pumped during the alpha and beta wave deposition phases without the limitation of high pressures that could fracture the well. The benefits of the Horizontal Single-Trip Gravel Pack and Selective Stimulation System (HSTSSS) using the differential valve include the ability to complete longer horizontal intervals, valuable rig-time savings and, efficient mechanical diversion of the stimulation fluid. This paper outlines the application of the HSTSSS system using a differential valve to complete a horizontal well in offshore deep waters. The need for a differential valve is primarily in horizontal gravel packing operations when normal circulating rates and pressures around the open hole would exceed formation break down pressure. The valve is intended to be easily spaced out and run in the wash pipe. At a predetermined differential pressure the valve opens and the return flow path distance around the bottom of the tailpipe is shortened, thus reducing back pressure preventing filter cake damage without slowing the pump rate. In addition the said valve has to close to allow the selective stimulation to take place. Economic considerations along with completion efficiencies are especially important on deep water, subsea completions. The utilization of differential valves allows completion of extended-reach open hole wells and/or low fracture

  12. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia); Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat [Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Naser, Jamal, E-mail: jnaser@swin.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2016-07-12

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO{sub 2} emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can’t model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  13. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT Findings in a Breast Cancer Patient with Concomitant Tuberculous Axillary Lymphadenitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Jeju National Univ. Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Hyuck [Jeju National Univ. School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Although {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18F} FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive modality for detecting a malignant lesion, increased {sup 18F} FDG uptake is also seen in infected or inflammatory processes. Here, we report the case of a a breast cancer patient with concomitant tuberculous axillary lymphadenitis that showed increased {sup 18F} FDG uptake. A 39 year old woman underwent preoperative {sup 18F} FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) as a part of the work up for right breast cancer. {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT images showed a malignant lesion in the right breast with moderate {sup 18F} FDG uptake, and multiple enlarged right axillary lymph nodes with intense {sup 18F} FDG uptake. Subsequently, the patient underwent right mastectomy and right axillary lymph node dissection. Histopathological examination confirmed breast cancer and tuberculous lymphadenitis, and the patient was treated concomitantly with anti tuberculous therapy.

  14. Improved clinical staging of esophageal cancer with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Yong Soo; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Han; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Byung Tae

    2004-01-01

    Since preoperative staging in esophageal cancer is important in both therapy and prognosis, there had been many efforts to improve its accuracy. Recent studies indicate that whole body FDG-PET has high sensitivity in detection of metastasis in esophageal cancer. Therefore, we added FDG-PET to other conventional methods in staging esophageal cancer to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Subjects were 142 esophageal cancer patients (average 62.3±8.3 yrs) who received CT and PET just before operation. First, we compared N stage and M stage of the CT or PET with those of the post-operative results. Then we compared the stage according to the EUS (T stage) and CT (N and M stage) or EUS (T stage) and CT and PET (N and M stage) to that according to the post-operative results. Among 142 patients, surgical staging of 69 were N0 and 73 were N1. In M staging, 128 were M0 and 14 were M1. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of N staging were 35.6%, 89.9%, 62.0% with CT and 58.9%, 71.0%, 64.7% with PET, respectively. In M staging, 14.3%, 96.9%, 88.7% with CT and 50.0%, 94.5%, 90.1% with PET, respectively. The concordances of [EUS+CT] and [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative results were 41.2% and 54.6%, respectively and there was significant improvement of staging with additional PET scan (p<0.005). The concordance of [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative result was significantly increased compared to that of [EUS+CT]. Thus, the addition of FDG-PET with other conventional methods may enable more accurate preoperative staging

  15. Principal component analysis of FDG PET in amnestic MCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobili, Flavio; Girtler, Nicola; Brugnolo, Andrea; Dessi, Barbara; Rodriguez, Guido; Salmaso, Dario; Morbelli, Silvia; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Larsson, Stig A.; Pagani, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the combined accuracy of episodic memory performance and 18 F-FDG PET in identifying patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) converting to Alzheimer's disease (AD), aMCI non-converters, and controls. Thirty-three patients with aMCI and 15 controls (CTR) were followed up for a mean of 21 months. Eleven patients developed AD (MCI/AD) and 22 remained with aMCI (MCI/MCI). 18 F-FDG PET volumetric regions of interest underwent principal component analysis (PCA) that identified 12 principal components (PC), expressed by coarse component scores (CCS). Discriminant analysis was performed using the significant PCs and episodic memory scores. PCA highlighted relative hypometabolism in PC5, including bilateral posterior cingulate and left temporal pole, and in PC7, including the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, both in MCI/MCI and MCI/AD vs CTR. PC5 itself plus PC12, including the left lateral frontal cortex (LFC: BAs 44, 45, 46, 47), were significantly different between MCI/AD and MCI/MCI. By a three-group discriminant analysis, CTR were more accurately identified by PET-CCS + delayed recall score (100%), MCI/MCI by PET-CCS + either immediate or delayed recall scores (91%), while MCI/AD was identified by PET-CCS alone (82%). PET increased by 25% the correct allocations achieved by memory scores, while memory scores increased by 15% the correct allocations achieved by PET. Combining memory performance and 18 F-FDG PET yielded a higher accuracy than each single tool in identifying CTR and MCI/MCI. The PC containing bilateral posterior cingulate and left temporal pole was the hallmark of MCI/MCI patients, while the PC including the left LFC was the hallmark of conversion to AD. (orig.)

  16. Patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis on FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, Michael; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Mekinian, Arsène; Khafagy, Abrahim; Nicolas, Patrick; Vessieres, Annie; Brauner, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to describe patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on FDG-PET/CT. Methods: All patients with a diagnosis of TB and who underwent FDG-PET/CT between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed. TB was proven either on bacteriological or histopathological studies (n = 13) or on a clinical and imaging basis (n = 3). Results: Sixteen patients (11 men; median age 56, range 22–84 years) were included. Two distinct patterns were identified. In the lung pattern (9/16), patients had predominantly pulmonary symptoms (6/9 patients, 67%) with a parenchymal involvement: uptakes on lung consolidation ± cavitation surrounded by micronodules. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were slightly enlarged (15 mm, 10–27) with moderate uptake (3.9, 2.5–13.4). In the lymphatic pattern (7/16), patients had predominantly systemic symptoms (5/7 cases, 71%) and all had extra-thoracic involvement. Mediastino-hilar lymph nodes were more enlarged (30 mm, 18–35, p = 0.03) and with higher uptake (6.8, 5.7–16.8, p = 0.034) than in the lung pattern. Conclusion: We identified two distinct patterns of pulmonary TB on FDG-PET/CT. The lung pattern related to a restricted and slight hypermetabolic infection and the lymphatic pattern related to a systemic and intense infection. Combined interpretation of PET and CT findings improves the specificity of images, especially for the lung pattern

  17. FDG gamma camera PET equipped with one inch crystal and XCT. Assessment of myocardial viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheshti, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET CT Centre, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Linz (Austria); Khorsand, A.; Graf, S. [Dept. of Cardiology, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Dobrozemsky, G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria); Oezer, S.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ., General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Pirich, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine und Endocrinology, Paracelsus Private Medical Univ., SALK, Salzburg (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Metabolic imaging with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is actually considered as the best method to detect and quantitatively assess myocordial tissue viability. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FDG gamma camera positron emission tomography (GCPET) imaging equipped with one inch NaI crystals in comparison to FDG dedicated PET (dPET) imaging as a ''gold standard'' in phantom and clinical studies. Patients, methods: nineteen patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent both imaging modalities. Phantom and clinical GCPET imaging were performed with a dual-headed, coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystals and an X-ray tube (XCT) for attenuation correction (AC), as well as with a dedicated PET scanner with AC. {sup 99m}Tc tetrofosmin single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies were performed for assessment of myocardial perfusion, with AC. Results: phantom studies showed a significant relation in segmental activity between FDG imaging with AC using GCPET and dPET (r = 0.91, p < 0.001). In clinical studies with AC correlation coefficients of mean segmental FDG uptake and regional defect size were r = 0.87 (p < 0.0001) and r = 0.83 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In regional analysis close agreement was even found in the most attenuated regions of the heart if AC was used in GCPET imaging. The overall agreement for detection of viable myocardium was 81% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) and 74% between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (NC). Conclusions: suggests that the assessment of myocardial metabolism by means of FDG is feasible with a coincidence based gamma camera equipped with 1 inch thick NaI crystal if AC is performed. The results reveal a close concordance and agreement between FDG-dPET (AC) and FDG-GCPET (AC) as compared to FDG-GCPET (NC). (orig.)

  18. FDG-PET imaging in HIV-infected subjects: relation with therapy and immunovirological variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Orunesu, Eva; Cesari, Miriam; Marzo, Katia; Chiti, Arturo; Pacei, Michela; Bechi, Giulia; Gori, Andrea; Gaito, Sabrina; Clerici, Mario

    2009-01-01

    To characterise tissue sites of immune activation and HIV replication we performed FDG-PET in ART-treated and ART-naive HIV-infected individuals. Specific aims were to establish whether HIV-infected patients can be differentiated on the basis of the detection of specific locations of viral replication, even in the presence of an apparently optimal immunovirological response to ART, and whether these FDG-PET findings can be related to immunovirological variables and AIDS history status. Patients were divided into five groups as follows: subgroup A1 (full responders, n=8): current ART treatment, CD4+ T lymphocytes >500/mL, viral load 50,000 copies/mL; group C (ART-naive, n=5): no current or previous ART treatment, increased viral load. PET images revealed different patterns of FDG uptake. All ART-treated patients with either suppressed (<50 copies/mL; Group A) or high viremia (group B) showed a normal pattern of FDG uptake. On the contrary, the ART-naive subjects with high viraemia (group C) displayed multiple foci of increased glucose metabolism in the lymph nodes. In the ART-naive subjects, FDG uptake, apparently related to viraemia level, was observed in the upper torso mainly in the axillary nodes bilaterally in patients with viraemia below 100,000 copies/mL; in those with viraemia higher than 100,000 copies/mL, FDG uptake was also observed in the inguinal lymph nodes. The emergence, in our study, of a correlation between the percentage of CD8+/CD38+/RO+ T cells (well established markers of progression to AIDS independently of CD4+ T lymphocytes) and positive FDG-PET in ART-naive patients is a novel finding that seems to confer prognostic value on FDG uptake. FDG uptake is strongly associated with response to ART independently of a previous AIDS diagnosis. Notably, no differences were observed between ART-treated subjects classed as immunological responders and those classed as non responders. Data herewith indicate that FDG uptake and immunological variables are

  19. The packing saturation rule and the packing centre rule: structural characteristics in lanthanide coordination compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xi-Zhang; Guo Ao-Ling; Xu Ying-Ting; Li Xing-Fu; Sun Peng-Nian

    1987-01-01

    The concepts of the Cone Packing Model, namely the Solid Angle Factor (SAF), Fan Angle (FA), Coordination Vector (r-bar), Gap and Hole have been introduced to describe steric packing around the metal centre. In a treatment of more than 160 structures of lanthanide coordination compounds, it was found that the sums of the ligand SAFs (SAS) are mainly in the region SAS=0.78, σ=0.05. This result provides concrete evidence that ''coordination saturation'' in the lanthanide compounds is actually saturation in the coordination space. The Packing Centre Rule has shown for the first time that the vector sum of the ligand SAFs, i.e. ΣSAF.r-bar, of each structure closely approaches zero with an average ΣSAF.r-bar of 0.02 and a standard deviation of 0.015. The Packing Centre Rule indicates that there is a clear tendency for the ligands to distribute themselves so that the non-bonding repulsions are at a minimum. (author)

  20. Packing material formulation for odorous emission biofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, François; Andres, Yves; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In biological gas treatment, like biofiltration of volatile organic compounds or odorous substances, the microbial nutritional needs could be a key factor of the process. The aim of this work is to propose a new packing material able to provide the lacking nutrients. In the first part of this study, two kinds of material composed of calcium carbonate, an organic binder and two different nitrogen sources, ammonium phosphate and urea phosphate (UP), were compared. The new supports present bulk densities between 0.88 and 1.15g cm(-3), moisture retention capacities close to 50% and 70%, and water cohesion capacities greater than six months for the material with 20% binder. In the second part, oxygen consumption measurements in liquid experiments show that these packing materials could enhance bacterial growth compared to pine bark or pozzolan and have no inhibitory effect. The biodegradation of different substrates (sodium sulfide and ammonia) and the support colonization by the biomass were evaluated. Finally, UP 20 was chosen and tested in a hydrogen sulfide or ammoniac biofiltration process. This showed that, for H2S concentrations greater than 100mg m(-3), UP 20 has a real advantage over pine bark or pozzolan.

  1. Olive and olive pomace oil packing and marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berzosa, Juan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the industrial installations and equipments used by the olive oil sector for olive oil packing, the different types of containers used (plastic, glass, tin, and carton, and the diverse technologies applied for filling, stoppering, labelling, and packing as well as the trend and new technologies developed according to the material of the containers and the markets’ demands.Some logistic aspects such as palletization, storage, and shipment of final products are also discussed. The use of modern tools and codification systems like EAN 128 permits to follow the product distribution and assure the traceability of packed oils.The last part of the article includes the world and EU production and consumption of olive oil, paying special attention to the peculiarities of the main EU producers (Spain, Italy, Greece, and Portugal. Finally, the olive oil consumption in third countries is analysed and the consumption and its trend in merging markets like USA, Australia, and Japan commented.En este artículo se describen los equipos e instalaciones industriales que utiliza el sector del aceite de oliva para el envasado de los aceites de oliva, los tipos de envases más empleados (plástico, vidrio, metálicos y cartón y las diferentes tecnologías de llenado, taponado, etiquetado y embalado, así como las tendencias y nuevas tecnologías en función del material de los envases y la demanda de los mercados.Se contemplan también aspectos logísticos como el paletizado, el almacenamiento y la expedición del producto terminado. El uso de modernas herramientas y sistemas de codificación como el EAN 128 permite el seguimiento del producto y la trazabilidad de los aceites envasados a lo largo de la cadena de distribución.En la última parte del artículo, se indican cifras de producción y consumo de aceite de oliva en el mundo y en la Unión Europea. Se comentan especialmente las peculiaridades de los principales países productores de la

  2. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD.

  3. Modelling of FDG metabolism in liver voxels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C; Dowson, N; Thomas, P; Rose, S

    2015-01-21

    Kinetic analysis is a tool used to glean additional information from positron emission tomography (PET) data by exploiting the dynamics of tissue metabolism. The standard irreversible and reversible two compartment models used in kinetic analysis were initially developed to analyse brain PET data. The application of kinetic analysis to PET of the liver presents the opportunity to move beyond the generic standard models and develop physiologically informed pharmacokinetic models that incorporate structural and functional features in particular to the liver. In this paper, we develop a new compartment model, called the tubes model, which is informed by the liver׳s sinusoidal architecture, high fractional blood volume, high perfusion rate, and large hepatocyte surface area facing the space of Disse. The tubes model distributes tracer between the blood and intracellular compartments in more physiologically faithful proportions than the standard model, producing parametric images with improved contrast between healthy and neoplastic tissue. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical significance of FDG-PET/CT at the postoperative surveillance in the breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Na Young; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Chae, Byung Joo; Seo, Ye Young

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical role of [(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) compared with conventional imaging (CI) to detect locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis during postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer. We included 1,819 examinations of 1,161 patients, who underwent FDG-PET/CT and CI, including mammography, breast ultrasound, whole-body bone scintigraphy, and chest radiography for postoperative surveillance. All patients had a history of surgery with or without adjuvant treatment due to more than stage II breast cancer between November 2003 and November 2009. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of CI, FDG-PET/CT, and combined CI and FDG-PET/CT for detecting locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, and incidental cancer. We also analyzed false-positive and false-negative results in both FDG-PET/CT and CI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CI were 75.4, 98.7, 93.4, and 94.3 %. Those of FDG-PET/CT were 97.5, 98.8, 95.4, and 99.4 %. Those of the combined results were 98.6, 98.2, 96.7, and 99.7 %. Sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was significantly higher than that of CI (P diagnostic imaging modality for postoperative surveillance of patients with breast cancer.

  5. Evaluation of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of head and neck tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takane, Yoko; Sakamoto, Kikuo; Miyajima, Yoshimi; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the diagnostic value of FDG-PET for malignant head and neck tumor in 179 patients who received FDG-PET at our hospital in 2004. In the analyses, we compared diagnoses of the primary lesion, nodal and distant metastases obtained from FDG-PET with those from echogram, CT, MRI and scintigram. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94% (92/98), 86% (70/81), and 91% (162/179), respectively. The present analyses indicate that FDG-PET diagnoses of the primary tumor, nodal and distant metastases can be accurately achieved in head and neck tumors. Furthermore, as FDG-PET conducts systemic tomographing, it is useful not only for the diagnosis of distant metastasis but also for the reccurence cancer. However, careful attention should be paid to false positive findings on FDG-PET by such as reactive lymph nodes or inflammation after radiotherapy. In order to acquire better diagnostic results, combined examination by FDG-PET, CT and MRI are highly recommended. (author)

  6. Internal state of granular assemblies near random close packing

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Jean-Noël

    2004-01-01

    March 12, 2004; The structure of random sphere packings in mechanical equilibrium in prescribed stress states, as studied by molecular dynamics simulations, strongly depends on the assembling procedure. Frictionless packings in the limit of low pressure are devoid of dilatancy, and consequently share the same random close packing density, but exhibit fabric anisotropy related to stress anisotropy. Efficient compaction methods can be viewed as routes to circumvent the influence of friction. Si...

  7. Incidental benign parotid lesions on FDG-PET: prevalence and clinico-pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Il Han; Lee, Won Woo; Chung, Jin Haeng; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Incidental parotid lesions on F-18 FDG-PET can mimic distant metastasis of underlying malignancy. The prevalence and the clinico-pathologic findings of PET positive parotid lesions have not been known. We investigated how often incidental parotid lesions are found on clinical FDG-PET studies and what the clinico-pathologic characteristics of those parotid lesions are in the present study. We retrospectively reviewed 3, 344 cases of FDG-PET which had been obtained in our hospital from May 2003 to Dec 2006. The indications of FDG-PET were: evaluation of known/suspected cancer (n=3, 212) or screening of cancer in healthy subjects (n=132). Incidental parotid lesion on FDG-PET was defined as an un-expected FDG uptake in one of parotid glands which was not primary target lesion of current FDG-PET. FDG uptake was represented by maximum standardized uptake value (maxSUV). Final diagnosis was made by pathologic analysis or clinical follow-up assessment. Fifteen (0.45% = 15/3, 344) incidental parotid lesions were found and they were all benign lesions. The maxSUV ranged from 1.7 to 8.6 (means.d.=3.71.9). Final diagnoses of the incidental parotid lesions were; Warthin's tumor (n=2), pleomorphic adenoma (n=1), other un-specified benign lesion (n=1), and benign lesions under bases of imaging studies (n=3) and of clinical follow-up (n=8). All of incidentally found parotid lesions in clinical FDG-PET studies were confirmed as benign lesions with prevalence of 0.45%. Close follow up using PET or CT might be a reasonable approach for determining the nature of incidentally found parotid lesions

  8. Role of [18F]FDG-PET/CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travaini, Laura L.; Trifiro, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Giovanni; Ravasi, Laura; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Della Vigna, Paolo; Bonomo, Guido; Orsi, Franco; Chiappa, Antonio; Mallia, Andrew; Ferrari, Mahila

    2008-01-01

    Focal metastasis may be treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a low invasive method yet limited by the lack of direct evidence of radicality of treatment. We, hereby, aimed at assessing the role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with fluoride radiolabeled deoxy-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) in RFA treatment success evaluation and early diagnosis of local relapse of liver metastasis after RFA procedure. RFA was performed in nine patients on 12 liver metastasis, serially imaged through [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and multidetector CT (MDCT) at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment. Eight lesions were also scanned with [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT at 1 week after treatment. Imaging analyses were performed on 47 [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and 51 MDCT. Imaging reading outcomes were compared to each other and to biopsy tissue results when available. In one case, [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT revealed radiotracer uptake at RFA site a week after procedure. Negative concordant outcome was obtained on eight lesions at 1 month after RFA, on eight cases at 3 months, on four at 6 months, and on two cases at 9 months. Extra-liver (peritoneal) disease was detected in one case by both [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT and MDCT. In seven cases, [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT revealed the presence of local recurrence earlier than MDCT. In no cases did MDCT detect local relapse earlier than [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT. [ 18 F]FDG-PET/CT may detect RFA treatment failure as well as local relapse after RFA earlier than MDCT. (orig.)

  9. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry; Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 ± 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 ± 2 years, and autopsy 6 ± 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 ± 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 ± 2 years, and autopsy 7 ± 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Max–min Bin Packing Algorithm and its application in nano-particles filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Dingju

    2016-01-01

    With regard to existing bin packing algorithms, higher packing efficiency often leads to lower packing speed while higher packing speed leads to lower packing efficiency. Packing speed and packing efficiency of existing bin packing algorithms including NFD, NF, FF, FFD, BF and BFD correlates negatively with each other, thus resulting in the failure of existing bin packing algorithms to satisfy the demand of nano-particles filling for both high speed and high efficiency. The paper provides a new bin packing algorithm, Max–min Bin Packing Algorithm (MM), which realizes both high packing speed and high packing efficiency. MM has the same packing speed as NFD (whose packing speed ranks no. 1 among existing bin packing algorithms); in case that the size repetition rate of objects to be packed is over 5, MM can realize almost the same packing efficiency as BFD (whose packing efficiency ranks No. 1 among existing bin packing algorithms), and in case that the size repetition rate of objects to be packed is over 500, MM can achieve exactly the same packing efficiency as BFD. With respect to application of nano-particles filling, the size repetition rate of nano particles to be packed is usually in thousands or ten thousands, far higher than 5 or 500. Consequently, in application of nano-particles filling, the packing efficiency of MM is exactly equal to that of BFD. Thus the irreconcilable conflict between packing speed and packing efficiency is successfully removed by MM, which leads to MM having better packing effect than any existing bin packing algorithm. In practice, there are few cases when the size repetition of objects to be packed is lower than 5. Therefore the MM is not necessarily limited to nano-particles filling, and can also be widely used in other applications besides nano-particles filling. Especially, MM has significant value in application of nano-particles filling such as nano printing and nano tooth filling.

  11. MO-DE-206-01: Cellular Metabolism of FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratx, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this symposium jointly sponsored by the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM, luminary speakers on imaging metabolism will discuss three impactful topics. The first presentation on Cellular Metabolism of FDG will be given by Guillem Pratx (Stanford). This presentation will detail new work on looking at how the most common molecular imaging agent, fluoro-deoxy-glucose is metabolized at a cellular level. This will be followed by a talk on an improved approach to whole-body PET imaging by Simon Cherry (UC Davis). Simon’s work on a new whole-body PET imaging system promises to have dramatic improvement in our ability to detect and characterize cancer using PET. Finally, Jim Bankson (MD Anderson) will discuss extremely sophisticated approaches to quantifying hyperpolarized-13-C pyruvate metabolism using MR imaging. This technology promises to compliment the exquisite sensitivity of PET with an ability to measure not just uptake, but tumor metabolism. Learning Objectives: Understand the metabolism of FDG at a cellular level. Appreciate the engineering related to a novel new high-sensitivity whole-body PET imaging system. Understand the process of hyperpolarization, how pyruvate relates to metabolism and how advanced modeling can be used to better quantify this data. G. Pratx, Funding: 5R01CA186275, 1R21CA193001, and Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation. S. Cherry, National Institutes of Health; University of California, Davis; Siemens Medical SolutionsJ. Bankson, GE Healthcare; NCI P30-CA016672; CPRIT PR140021-P5

  12. Monitoring Vasculitis with 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan BUCERIUS, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Whereas in the past the term “vasculitis” was most frequently used in context with systemic vasculitides, such as the large vessel vasculitides (LVV) Takayasa arteritis and giant cell arteritis, characterized by inflammation of blood vessel walls, it nowadays comprises also inflammatory changes of the vessel wall as a substantial part of the atherosclerotic disease process. Implementing non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnostic algorithm of atherosclerosis and LVV, depicts a promising step towards an earlier detection with a, consecutively, improved therapeutic approach and potentially prognostic benefit in patients suffering from vasculitis. Mainly molecular imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET seems to be promising in offering an early and sensitive identification of inflammatory changes in both, atherosclerosis and LVV. This review will therefore provide an overview on the diagnostic performance and clinical relevance of FDG-PET in monitoring vasculitis in atherosclerosis and LVV, with a focus on LVV.

  13. MO-DE-206-02: Cellular Metabolism of FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, S. [University of California-Davis (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In this symposium jointly sponsored by the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM, luminary speakers on imaging metabolism will discuss three impactful topics. The first presentation on Cellular Metabolism of FDG will be given by Guillem Pratx (Stanford). This presentation will detail new work on looking at how the most common molecular imaging agent, fluoro-deoxy-glucose is metabolized at a cellular level. This will be followed by a talk on an improved approach to whole-body PET imaging by Simon Cherry (UC Davis). Simon’s work on a new whole-body PET imaging system promises to have dramatic improvement in our ability to detect and characterize cancer using PET. Finally, Jim Bankson (MD Anderson) will discuss extremely sophisticated approaches to quantifying hyperpolarized-13-C pyruvate metabolism using MR imaging. This technology promises to compliment the exquisite sensitivity of PET with an ability to measure not just uptake, but tumor metabolism. Learning Objectives: Understand the metabolism of FDG at a cellular level. Appreciate the engineering related to a novel new high-sensitivity whole-body PET imaging system. Understand the process of hyperpolarization, how pyruvate relates to metabolism and how advanced modeling can be used to better quantify this data. G. Pratx, Funding: 5R01CA186275, 1R21CA193001, and Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation. S. Cherry, National Institutes of Health; University of California, Davis; Siemens Medical SolutionsJ. Bankson, GE Healthcare; NCI P30-CA016672; CPRIT PR140021-P5.

  14. Utilization of CT images for the quantification of FDG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karidioula, I.; De Freitas, D.; Cachin, F.; Geissler, B.; Jullien, Ph.; Maublant, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an automatic method based on a computed tomography (CT) derived region of interest (ROI) to quantify the mean standardized uptake value (SUVm) of 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) in pulmonary lesions detected by positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 164 pairs of slices were selected in a series of PET/CT studies performed in 26 patients presenting lung tumours of various forms and complexities. On each matched CT slice, a ROI was obtained by growth-region segmentation starting from a pixel contained in the tumour. The obtained ROI was then applied to the PET image to calculate SUVm. Results were compared with the conventional manual method using a geometric ROI positioned directly on the PET lesion. The automatic delineation of the tumour from the CT image was successful in 136 sections (83%). The SUVm calculated by the manual and automatic method were respectively (mean±standard deviation) 5.05±2.39 and 6.70±3.18 (p<0.05). The ROI size (in number of pixels) was respectively 28±23 and 21±17 (p<0.05). The variability of the automatic method was 0% versus 20% for the manual method. SUV of FDG in PET/CT can be calculated with an excellent reproducibility by using the CT-derived limits of the lesion

  15. F-18 FDG PET in the initial evaluation of high risk melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, T.; Zerdoud, S.; Faurie, C.; Chevreau, C.; Courbon, F. [Institut Claudius Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction. - Localized melanoma is a potentially aggressive tumor. Its prognosis depends mainly on pathologic factors, namely: thickness (Breslow index), presence of ulceration and microscopic nodal metastasis. FDG PET is the modality of choice for evaluation of advanced melanoma and has proven its superiority in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy compared to conventional imaging. Early stages of melanoma do not seem to benefit from PET FDG. However the value of PET FDG in staging localized high risk melanoma is yet to be determined. Patients and methods. - We have evaluated 87 patients with high risk melanoma with PET FDG. 32 patients presented with a Breslow index superior or equal to 4 mm, 21 with a Breslow index inferior to 4 mm and ulceration and 34 with a positive sentinel lymphadenectomy. PET FDG was realized after at least 6 h of fasting on a hybrid PET-CT G.E. Discovery S.T. scan for 65 of them. The rest of the patients were evaluated on a Siemens Ecat H.R. + scan. Scans were interpreted by an experimented nuclear medicine physician and were classified as positive or negative. All equivocal scans or cases for which there was discordance between the scan result and follow up were reviewed by 2 experimented nuclear medicine physicians and a consensus was reached. Results. - FDG PET was positive in seven patients, four scans were true positive and identified regional metastatic disease. No distant metastatic visceral disease was found. The three false positive scans consisted of a cyst adeno-lymphoma in one case, mediastinal and axillary uptake in the other two cases and no sign of evolution more than six months after the scan. Four patients with a negative scan showed metastatic disease in the six months following the PET scan. FDG PET had an impact on therapeutic management on two patients (2%). When evaluating FDG PET for regional disease with sentinel node biopsy as a reference, we found values of sensitivity, specificity, predictive

  16. Characterizing bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin's lymphoma by FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kagna, Olga [Rambam Health Care Campus, Nuclear Medicine Department, Haifa (Israel); Dann, Eldad J. [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Hematology Department, Haifa (Israel); Ben-Barak, Ayelet [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Department, Haifa (Israel); Israel, Ora [Rambam Health Care Campus and B. and R. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Nuclear Medicine Department, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-06-15

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is superior to iliac bone marrow biopsy (iBMB) for detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI) in staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The present study aims to characterize the patterns and distribution of BMI in HL as determined by FDG-PET/CT. Reports of FDG-PET/CT studies performed for staging of HL were reviewed. BMI was defined as positive iBMB and/or foci of pathological FDG uptake in the skeleton that behaved in concordance with other sites of lymphoma in studies following chemotherapy. Number of FDG uptake foci, their specific location in the skeleton and the presence of corresponding lesions in the CT component of the study, and stage according to the Ann Arbor staging system, were recorded. The study included 473 patients. iBMB was performed in 336 patients. Nine patients had positive iBMB (9/336, 3 %). Seventy-three patients (73/473, 15 %) had FDG-PET/CT-defined BMI. The BM was the only extranodal site of HL in 52/473 patients (11 %). Forty-five patients had three or more foci of pathological skeletal FDG uptake (45/73, 62 %). Sixty-four patients (64/73, 88 %) had at least one uptake focus in the pelvis or vertebrae. In 60 patients (60/73, 82 %), the number of skeletal FDG uptake foci without corresponding CT lesions was equal to or higher than the number of foci with morphological abnormalities. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated BMI in 15 % of patients with newly diagnosed HL. Diagnosis of BMI in HL by FDG-PET/CT was more sensitive than iBMB with potential upstage in 11 % of patients. The most common pattern of FDG-PET/CT BMI was multifocal (at least three foci) skeletal FDG uptake, with at least one focus in the pelvis or vertebrae and no corresponding CT lesions. (orig.)

  17. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  18. Food residue granuloma mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Antonio; Grossi, Ugo; Leccisotti, Lucia; Maggi, Fabio; Ricci, Riccardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Giordano, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    A 31-year-old woman presenting with acute abdomen underwent an emergency Hartmann's procedure for fecal peritonitis due to perforated adenocarcinoma of the left colon. Shortly after a 7-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy, follow-up contrast-enhanced CT showed multiple peritoneal and hepatic nodules, showing focal intense and homogeneous FDG uptake on FDG-PET/CT, highly suspected for recurrence of disease. Excisional biopsy of the nodules revealed foreign body granulomas made up of alimentary materials surrounded by a fibrous wall. We report a unique case of a false-positive finding secondary to food residues mimicking metastatic disease on FDG-PET in a patient with colon cancer.

  19. When to image carotid plaque inflammation with FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græbe, Martin; Borgwardt, Lise; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in inflamed high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques is challenged by the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and luminal blood activity. Late acquisition protocols have been used to overcome these challenges to enhance...... the contrast between the plaque and blood-pool FDG activity. However, for prospective studies the late acquisition is inconvenient for the patient and staff, and most retrospective studies of plaque uptake use data from early acquisition protocols. The objective was to evaluate changes in the quantification...... methods of FDG uptake in carotid artery plaques between early and late PET scans....

  20. Research progress in radiolabeling imaging mechanism and clinical applications of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Shizhen; Yang Zhi; Du Jin

    2011-01-01

    PET/CT is one of the most advanced technologies contemporarily, achieving the combination of anatomical imaging and functional imaging. 18 F-FDG is the most important positron radiopharmaceutical, which was used over 95% in total PET/CT imaging. FDG- PET has been extensively used in diagnosis of several kinds of diseases such as tumor, cardiac disease and epilepsy. The present review provides the history, the quality control, the imaging mechanisms as well as the research progress of the clinical applications of 18 F-FDG. (authors)

  1. FDG-PET/CT findings in systemic mastocytosis: a French multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djelbani-Ahmed, S. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (France); Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Bobigny (France); Chandesris, M.O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Haematology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Mekinian, A.; Fain, O. [Saint Antoine Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Inflammation-Immunopathology-Biotherapy Department (DHU i2B), AP-HP, Paris (France); Canioni, D. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Brouzes, C. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (France); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Laboratory of Haematology, Paris (France); Hanssens, K. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (France); Aix-Marseille University, INSERM U1068, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Marseille (Signaling, Hematopoiesis and Mechanism of Oncogenesis), Paoli Calmettes Institute, Marseille (France); Pop, G.; Eder, V. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (France); Durieu, I.; Durupt, S. [Universite de Lyon, Department of Internal and Vascular Medicine, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Groupe Hopitalier Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Grosbois, B.; Besnard, S. [Rennes University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Rennes (France); Tournilhac, O. [Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Beyne-Rauzy, O. [Purpan University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Toulouse (France); Agape, P. [Saint-Denis University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Haematology, Saint-Denis de la Reunion (France); Delmer, A. [Reims University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Reims (France); Ranta, D. [Brabois University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Jeandel, P.Y. [Nice University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Nice (France); Georgin-Lavialle, S. [Tenon Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Paris (France); Frenzel, L.; Hermine, O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Department of Haematology, Paris (FR); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (FR); Damaj, G. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Caen University Hospital, Department of Haematology, Caen (FR); Lortholary, O. [Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, French Reference center for Mastocytosis (Centre de Reference des Mastocytoses, CEREMAST), Paris (FR); Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris (FR); Pasteur Institute, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Necker Children' s Hospital, APHP, Paris (FR); Soussan, M. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (FR); Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Bobigny (FR)

    2015-12-15

    Mastocytosis is a clonal haematological disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and the activation of mast cells. The value of FDG-PET/CT (FDG-PET) in mastocytosis has yet to be determined. We retrospectively identified patients with an established diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis (SM), according to the WHO criteria, who underwent PET using the French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. Semi-quantitative and visual analysis of FDG-PET was performed and compared to the clinico-biological data. Our cohort included 19 adult patients, median age 65 years [range 58-74], including three with smouldering SM (SSM), three with aggressive SM (ASM), 10 with an associated clonal haematological non-mast-cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD), and three with mast cell sarcoma (MCS). FDG-PET was performed at the time of the SM diagnosis (15/19), to evaluate lymph node (LN) activity (3/19) or the efficacy of therapy (1/19). FDG uptake was observed in the bone marrow (BM) (9/19, 47 %), LN (6/19, 32 %), spleen (12/19, 63 %), or liver (1/19, 5 %). No significant FDG uptake was observed in the SSM and ASM patients. A pathological FDG uptake was observed in the BM of 6/10 patients with SM-AHNMD, appearing as diffuse and homogeneous, and in the LN of 5/10 patients. All 3 MCS patients showed intense and multifocal BM pathological uptake, mimicking metastasis. No correlation was found between the FDG-PET findings and serum tryptase levels, BM mast cell infiltration percentage, and CD30 and CD2 expression by mast cells. FDG uptake does not appear to be a sensitive marker of mast cell activation or proliferation because no significant FDG uptake was observed in most common forms of mastocytosis (notably purely aggressive SM). However, pathological FDG uptake was observed in the SM-AHNMD and in MCS cases, suggesting a role of FDG-PET in their early identification and as a tool of therapeutic assessment in this subgroup of patients. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of 18F-FDG PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depression by SPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liang; Zuo Chuantao; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Shi Shenxun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate brain 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depressive emotion. Methods: 18 F-FDG PET imaging was performed in 21 malignant tumor patients (tumor group) and 21 healthy controls (control group). All were evaluated by self-rating depression scale (SDS)and 24 questions Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD). Results: (1) The standard total score of SDS and HAMD of the tumor group were higher than those of the control group (P 18 F-FDG PET imagings. The abnormalities of glucose metabolism might be related to their depressive emotion. (authors)

  3. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is slowly progressive disease that affects a small area of cells in the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. Gradual degeneration of these cells causes a reduction in a vital chemical known as dopamine. In the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, it has difficulty in biopsy and limits in radiologic modalities. 18F-FDG PET shows various findings from normal to diffuse decrement of FDG uptake. 18 F-FDG PET is expected to be a evaluation tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  4. FDG-PET/CT findings in systemic mastocytosis: a French multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djelbani-Ahmed, S.; Chandesris, M.O.; Mekinian, A.; Fain, O.; Canioni, D.; Brouzes, C.; Hanssens, K.; Pop, G.; Eder, V.; Durieu, I.; Durupt, S.; Grosbois, B.; Besnard, S.; Tournilhac, O.; Beyne-Rauzy, O.; Agape, P.; Delmer, A.; Ranta, D.; Jeandel, P.Y.; Georgin-Lavialle, S.; Frenzel, L.; Hermine, O.; Damaj, G.; Lortholary, O.; Soussan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal haematological disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation and the activation of mast cells. The value of FDG-PET/CT (FDG-PET) in mastocytosis has yet to be determined. We retrospectively identified patients with an established diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis (SM), according to the WHO criteria, who underwent PET using the French Reference Centre for Mastocytosis database. Semi-quantitative and visual analysis of FDG-PET was performed and compared to the clinico-biological data. Our cohort included 19 adult patients, median age 65 years [range 58-74], including three with smouldering SM (SSM), three with aggressive SM (ASM), 10 with an associated clonal haematological non-mast-cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD), and three with mast cell sarcoma (MCS). FDG-PET was performed at the time of the SM diagnosis (15/19), to evaluate lymph node (LN) activity (3/19) or the efficacy of therapy (1/19). FDG uptake was observed in the bone marrow (BM) (9/19, 47 %), LN (6/19, 32 %), spleen (12/19, 63 %), or liver (1/19, 5 %). No significant FDG uptake was observed in the SSM and ASM patients. A pathological FDG uptake was observed in the BM of 6/10 patients with SM-AHNMD, appearing as diffuse and homogeneous, and in the LN of 5/10 patients. All 3 MCS patients showed intense and multifocal BM pathological uptake, mimicking metastasis. No correlation was found between the FDG-PET findings and serum tryptase levels, BM mast cell infiltration percentage, and CD30 and CD2 expression by mast cells. FDG uptake does not appear to be a sensitive marker of mast cell activation or proliferation because no significant FDG uptake was observed in most common forms of mastocytosis (notably purely aggressive SM). However, pathological FDG uptake was observed in the SM-AHNMD and in MCS cases, suggesting a role of FDG-PET in their early identification and as a tool of therapeutic assessment in this subgroup of patients. (orig.)

  5. Influence of packing and dispersion of particles on the cement content of concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. DAMINELI

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to environmental issues, the concrete chain seeks to reduce CO2 emissions. However, growing demand from developing countries causes the increase of CO2 emissions in production to exceed decreases generated by industrial actions, such as improving kilns and clinker replacement. New strategies are important. Changes in the concrete formulation, making it more efficient, can help if these changes produce concrete with the same performance and lower cement consumption. In this regard, the improvement of packing and dispersion of particles increases this efficiency. The better the packing, the lower the volume of voids between particles, thereby requiring lower fluid content (water to permit flow. The dispersion of the particles also decreases the water content for the same fluidity. The less the water content, the smaller the water/cement (w/c ratio, and the greater the resistance. Thus, both strategies increase the efficiency by uncoupling obtaining fluidity from the water content. This study investigated the influence of packing and dispersion on the efficiency of cement use in concrete. The increase of packing and the complete dispersion of fine particles has been shown to improve efficiency, as measured by the ratio between binder consumption and compressive strength (the performance parameter used in most practical applications.

  6. Quantitative analysis of packed and compacted granular systems by x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Milroy, Georgina E.; Dutt, Meenakshi; Bentham, A. Craig; Hancock, Bruno C.; Elliott, James A.

    2005-04-01

    The packing and compaction of powders are general processes in pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and powder metallurgy industries. Understanding how particles pack in a confined space and how powders behave during compaction is crucial for producing high quality products. This paper outlines a new technique, based on modern desktop X-ray tomography and image processing, to quantitatively investigate the packing of particles in the process of powder compaction and provide great insights on how powder densify during powder compaction, which relate in terms of materials properties and processing conditions to tablet manufacture by compaction. A variety of powder systems were considered, which include glass, sugar, NaCl, with a typical particle size of 200-300 mm and binary mixtures of NaCl-Glass Spheres. The results are new and have been validated by SEM observation and numerical simulations using discrete element methods (DEM). The research demonstrates that XMT technique has the potential in further investigating of pharmaceutical processing and even verifying other physical models on complex packing.

  7. Slow creep in soft granular packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ishan; Fisher, Timothy S

    2017-05-14

    Transient creep mechanisms in soft granular packings are studied numerically using a constant pressure and constant stress simulation method. Rapid compression followed by slow dilation is predicted on the basis of a logarithmic creep phenomenon. Characteristic scales of creep strain and time exhibit a power-law dependence on jamming pressure, and they diverge at the jamming point. Microscopic analysis indicates the existence of a correlation between rheology and nonaffine fluctuations. Localized regions of large strain appear during creep and grow in magnitude and size at short times. At long times, the spatial structure of highly correlated local deformation becomes time-invariant. Finally, a microscale connection between local rheology and local fluctuations is demonstrated in the form of a linear scaling between granular fluidity and nonaffine velocity.

  8. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  9. Meromorphic Vector Fields and Circle Packings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The objective of the Ph.D. project is to initiate a classification of bifurcations of meromorphic vector fields and to clarify their relation to circle packings. Technological applications are to image analysis and to effective grid generation using discrete conformal mappings. The two branches...... problems. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...... of parameter spaces into structurally stable domains, and a description of the bifurcations. The same holds true for questions related to vector fields on the Riemann sphere and Riemann surfaces of higher genus. The overall objectives of this Ph.D.-study are to characterize the decomposition of parameter...

  10. Citrus postharvest diseases and injuries related to impact on packing lines

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer,Ivan Herman; Ferreira,Marcos David; Spósito,Marcel Bellato; Amorim,Lilian

    2009-01-01

    Brazilian exports of fresh citrus represent less than 1% of the overall Brazilian production. Phytosanitary barriers and poor appearance stand out among the several reasons contributing to such low exporting/production ratio. The purpose of this work was to characterize postharvest injuries in 'Valencia' sweet oranges and 'Murcott' tangors produced for foreign markets after different processing stages in a packinghouse, as well as to identify critical points and impact extent on packing lines...

  11. Continuous Production of Structured Phospholipids in a Packed Red Reactor with Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Peng, Lifeng; Mu, Huiling

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of producing structured phospholipids by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between soybean phospholipids and caprylic acid were examined in continuous packed bed enzyme reactors. Acidolysis reactions were performed in both a solvent system and a solvent-free system with the commercial...... was favored by high substrate ratio between acyl donor and phospholipids, longer residence time, and higher reaction temperature. Under certain conditions, an incorporation of around 30% caprylic acid can be obtained in continuous operation with hexane as the solvent....

  12. Handbook of fresh produce transportation to Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Borbon-Galvez, Yari

    1998-01-01

    This handbook presents the current logistics operations for fresh produce exports and lists relevant service providers. For each logistics section such as packing, transportation, insurance, customs brokerage, and other related services, there is a list of quoting firms and those related with the investigation. The handbook was designed not only to identify the cheapest routes to move cargo from Mexico to Europe, but also provided various alternatives according to the fresh produce shelf-life.

  13. A packed bed membrane reactor for production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed K; Raman, Abdul Aziz A; Sulaiman, Nik M N

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel continuous reactor has been developed to produce high quality methyl esters (biodiesel) from palm oil. A microporous TiO2/Al2O3 membrane was packed with potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon. The central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst amount and cross flow circulation velocity on the production of biodiesel in the packed bed membrane reactor. The highest conversion of palm oil to biodiesel in the reactor was obtained at 70 °C employing 157.04 g catalyst per unit volume of the reactor and 0.21 cm/s cross flow circulation velocity. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel were determined and compared with the standard specifications. High quality palm oil biodiesel was produced by combination of heterogeneous alkali transesterification and separation processes in the packed bed membrane reactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Discussion on the alteration of FDG uptake by the breast according to the menstrual cycle in 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. H.; Park, M. S.; Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.

    2012-09-01

    18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) PET (positron emission tomography)/CT (computed tomography) is a useful modality for identifying high-glucose-consuming cells, such as cancer cells, by the glucose metabolism of FDG. FDG is taken up by cancer and inflammatory cells, but occasionally there is also some FDG uptake by normal tissues as a result of their individual physiological characteristics. In particular, in fertile females, unusual FDG uptake in the breast changes according to the stages in the menstrual cycle, which can adversely affect a diagnosis. Therefore, this study examined the change in breast FDG uptake in the menstrual cycle on 18F-FDG PET/CT. One hundred and sixty females (34±3.5 years old), who had not undergone a gynecologic anamnesis and had a regular menstrual cycle over the previous 6 months, were examined from March 2010 to February 2011. The subjects were divided into the following four groups (each with 40 patients): flow phase, proliferative phase, ovulatory phase and secretory phase using Pregnancy Calculator Ver. 0.14 and history taking. Discovery Ste was used as the PET/CT. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) on the accumulated region on the breast were analyzed, and three nuclear medicine specialists performed a blind test. The SUVs on the breast were the flow phase (1.64±0.25), proliferative phase (0.93±0.28), ovulatory phase (1.66±0.26) and secretory phase (1.77±0.28). A high uptake value was observed in the secretory, flow and ovulatory phases. The FDG accumulation of the breast was divided into the following three grades compared with the lung and liver by gross analysis: the breast uptake was equal to the lung (Grade I), between the lung and liver (Grade II) and equal to or greater than the liver (Grade III). These results showed a high uptake value in the secretory, flow and ovulatory phases. In fertile females, the FDG uptake of the breast showed changes according to the menstrual cycle, which can be used to improve the diagnosis

  15. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Westfaelische Wilhelms University Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [{sup 18}F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast

  16. Significance of FDG-PET in Identification of Diseases of the Appendix – Based on Experience of Two Cases Falsely Positive for FDG Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Ogawa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of the significance of F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET in the identification of diseases of the appendix is presented based on two cases falsely positive for FDG accumulation. Both cases were palpable for a tumor in the lower right abdominal region and a prominently enlarged appendix was depicted by CT. Although the patients underwent ileocecal resection based on a strong suspicion of appendiceal cancer rather than appendicitis since abnormal accumulation exhibiting maximum standard uptake values (SUVs of 7.27 and 17.11, respectively, was observed at the same site in FDG-PET examination and since there no malignant findings observed histologically, the patients were diagnosed with appendicitis. Although FDG specifically accumulates not only in malignant tumors, but also in diseases such as acute or chronic inflammation, abscesses and lymphadenitis, and identification based on SUVs has been reported to be used as a method of identification, the two cases reported here were both false-positive cases exhibiting high maximum SUVs. At the present time, although the significance of FDG-PET in the identification of diseases of the appendix is somewhat low and there are limitations on its application, various research is currently being conducted with the aim of improving diagnostic accuracy, and it is hoped that additional studies will be conducted in the future.

  17. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  18. New series of paper pack vending machines; Paper pack jido hanbaiki no shin series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, M. [Fuji Denki Reiki Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Umino, S. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-10

    This paper presents series of paper pack vending machines. These machines may be broadly classified into those of cold drinks and of hot and cold drinks depending on the storage temperature of products. The former is the machine for cooling dairy products at 10{degree}C with a combined stacking by direct-stacked racks and chain-multiracks. The latter is provided with divided storing chambers with each chamber selectively cooled or heated. Products in the hot chamber are canned coffee and the like set at 55{degree}C. The temperature control is performed by a microcomputer. The chain-multiracks are provided with advantages such as capability of handling various kinds of container shapes, storing drinks and foods vertically, replacing products by the change of a shelf attachment with one operation, and storing one liter packs by setting pair columns. The direct-stacked racks are provided with advantages such as versatility of handling various kinds of containers and miniaturization of the mechanism other than the storage part. The installation space was reduced by devising the opening and closing of the door. The control part is capable of setting temperatures differently for cans and paper packs. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Characterization of metallic surfaces in phosphorous-bronze ordered packings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandru, Claudia; Titescu, Gh.

    1997-01-01

    Copper and its alloys, particularly the phosphorous bronze, are characterized by a high water wettability as compared with other materials. This feature led to utilization of phosphorous bronze in fabrication of contact elements, a packing type equipping the distillation columns. For heavy water separation by isotopic distillation under vacuum, ordered packings of phosphorous bronze networks were fabricated. The superior performances of these packings are determined by the material and also by the geometrical form and the state of the metallic surface. Thus, a procedure of evaluating the wettability has been developed, based on tests of the network material. The results of the tests constitute a criterion of rating the functional performances of packings, particularly of their efficiencies. Also, investigation techniques of the chemical composition and of the thickness of superficial layer on the packing were developed. It was found that the packing surface presents a layer of about 5-20 μm formed mainly by oxides of copper, tin, and, depending on the packing treatment, of oxides of other elements coming from the treatment agent. The paper presents characterization of phosphorous bronze treated with potassium permanganate, a specific treatment for improving the functional performances of the packings used in the heavy water concentration and re-concentration installations

  20. Duration of Nasal Packs in the Management of Epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundi, N. A.; Raza, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the efficacy of nasal packs for 12 and 24 hours in the management of epistaxis. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Nowshera and Heavy Industries Taxilla Hospital, from October 2012 to April 2013. Methodology: A total of 60 patients presenting with epistaxis were selected and were divided into two groups of 30 patients each. Patients in both the groups were managed by nasal packs. In group-A packs were removed after 12 hours while in group-B after 24 hours. Symptoms of headache, lacrimation and recurrence of bleeding were recorded. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis and p-value less than 0.01 was considered significant. Results: There was significant difference for headache between removal of nasal packs after 12 hours and 24 hours (p < 0.001). There was significant difference for excessive lacrimation at 12 and 24 hours (p = 0.001). No significant difference was observed for recurrence of bleed when nasal packs were removed at 12 and 24 hours (p = 0.317). Conclusion: Duration in removal of nasal packs after 12 or 24 hours made a difference in the management of epistaxis. Symptoms of headache and excessive lacrimation were significantly higher when nasal packs were removed after 24 hours. It is recommended that patient could be managed with lesser duration of packs after episode of epistaxis to avoid inconvenience. (author)

  1. Softening of stressed granular packings with resonant sound waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C J Olson; Lopatina, L M; Jia, X; Johnson, P A

    2015-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number Zc at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation.

  2. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine. 24.255 Section 24.255 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or...

  3. Predicting the Liquid Phase Mass Transfer Resistance of Structured Packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olujic, Z.; Seibert, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Published correlations for estimating the liquid phase mass transfer coefficients of structured packings are compared using experimental evidence on the efficiency of Montz-Pak B1–250MN and B1–500MN structured packings as measured in total reflux distillation tests using the

  4. Modified strip packing heuristics for the rectangular variable-sized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frank G Ortmann

    †(Fellow of the Operations Research Society of South Africa), Department of Logistics, Uni- versity of ... packing iteration before the next packing iteration takes place, inducing a new order of items. ...... [47] Kantorovich LV, 1960, Mathematical methods for organising planning production (translated from a report in Russian, ...

  5. Online Variable-Sized Bin Packing with Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, Leah; Favrholdt, Lene Monrad; Levin, Asaf

    2011-01-01

    We study a new kind of on-line bin packing with conflicts, motivated by a problem arising when scheduling jobs on the Grid. In this bin packing problem, the set of items is given at the beginning, together with a set of conflicts on pairs of items. A conflict on a pair of items implies...

  6. Evaluation of microbial quality of selected blister-packed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten brands of blister-packed paracetamol tablet and twenty brands of paracetamol syrup marketed in Nigeria were evaluated for their microbial quality. While no microbial contaminant was isolated from all blistered-packed paracetamol tablets, ten of syrups were contaminated with organisms such as Escherichia coli, ...

  7. Packing and Cohesive Properties of Some Locally Extracted Starches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... properties of the particles affect the packing and cohesive properties of the starches, and are important in predicting the behaviour of the starches during handling and use in pharmaceutical preparations. These properties need to be closely controlled in pre-formulation studies. Keywords: Packing and cohesive properties, ...

  8. Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume following administration of Aloe barbadensis Juice Extract in Rats. ... Abstract. Aloe barbadensis is a popular house plant that has a long history of a multipurpose folk remedy. ... Keywords: osmotic fragility, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, Aloe vera ...

  9. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing... product in containers, such as boxes, crates, bags, and barrels. Activities such as washing, grading, sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed...

  10. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  11. The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2012-01-01

    The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres is investigated using a numerical model. The investigated systems are the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close-packed spheres (hcp). The sintering behavior is found to be ideal, with no grain growth until full dens...

  12. Demonstrating close-packing of atoms using spherical bubble gums ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the use of spherical bubble gums (Gum Balls) to demonstrate the close-packing of atoms and ions is presented. Spherical bubble gums having distinctive colours were used to illustrate the different layers in variety of crystalline packing and the formation of tetrahedral and octahedral holes. Students with ...

  13. Experimental validation of packed bed chemical-looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion has emerged as a promising alternative technology, intrinsically integrating CO2 capture in power production. A novel reactor concept based on dynamically operated packed beds has been proposed [Noorman, S., van Sint Annaland, M., Kuipers, J.A.M., 2007. Packed bed reactor

  14. Packing of Renal Fossa: Useful Technique for Intractable Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Packing of the renal fossa with laparotomy pads in unstable patients, and transferring the patient to the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) is also described in ... is simple and worth trying especially for surgeons who are contemplating nephrectomy as prolonged packing has not lead to any compromise in renal functions.

  15. Complexity in Surfaces of Densest Packings for Families of Polyhedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Packings of hard polyhedra have been studied for centuries due to their mathematical aesthetic and more recently for their applications in fields such as nanoscience, granular and colloidal matter, and biology. In all these fields, particle shape is important for structure and properties, especially upon crowding. Here, we explore packing as a function of shape. By combining simulations and analytic calculations, we study three two-parameter families of hard polyhedra and report an extensive and systematic analysis of the densest known packings of more than 55 000 convex shapes. The three families have the symmetries of triangle groups (icosahedral, octahedral, tetrahedral and interpolate between various symmetric solids (Platonic, Archimedean, Catalan. We find optimal (maximum packing-density surfaces that reveal unexpected richness and complexity, containing as many as 132 different structures within a single family. Our results demonstrate the importance of thinking about shape not as a static property of an object, in the context of packings, but rather as but one point in a higher-dimensional shape space whose neighbors in that space may have identical or markedly different packings. Finally, we present and interpret our packing results in a consistent and generally applicable way by proposing a method to distinguish regions of packings and classify types of transitions between them.

  16. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    child's learning ability and school performance.[1] Access to a nutritious mid-day ... Background: Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of school children. ... of the lunch packs of primary school pupils contain poor quality food especially in public schools. Mother's educational ...

  17. demonstrating close-packing of atoms using spherical bubble gums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the use of spherical bubble gums (Gum Balls) to demonstrate the close-packing of atoms and ions is presented. Spherical bubble gums having distinctive colours were used to illustrate the different layers in variety of crystalline packing and the formation of tetrahedral and octahedral holes.

  18. Evaluation of thymic tumors with 18F-FDG PET-CT - A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Singhal, Abhinav; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)], e-mail: rkphulia@yahoo.com; Kumar, Arvind [Dept. of Surgical Disciplines, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2013-02-15

    Thymic tumors represent a broad spectrum of neoplastic disorders and pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A non-invasive imaging study to determine the nature of thymic lesions can have significant impact on management of such tumors. 18F-flurorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has shown promising results in characterization of thymic tumors. The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in patients with thymic tumors. We have pictorially depicted the 18F-FDG PET-CT salient imaging characteristics of various thymic tumors, both epithelial and non-epithelial. Also discussed is the dynamic physiology of thymus gland which is to be kept in mind when evaluating thymic pathology on 18F-FDG PET-CT, as it can lead to interpretative pitfalls.

  19. Role of FDG-PET imaging in assessing the response to theralymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natasha Singh; Krishna, B.A.; Hinduja, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of FDG-PET imaging in assessing the response to therapy in Lymphoma. Totally 61 patients with lymphoma, 17 of Hodgkins disease and 44 of Non-Hodgkins lymphoma were included in the study. The FDG-PET imaging was done after completion of therapy in 43 patients (post 6 courses of chemotherapy) and during therapy in 18 patients (post 1,2,3,4 courses of chemotherapy). In 13 patients FDG-PET was done as a follow up after 1 year of therapy. Results: In 22 out of 61 patients there was evidence of active disease suggesting poor response to therapy, while in the rest of 39 out of 61 patients there was no active disease either at the primary site or rest of the body. Conclusions: Our study highlights the role of FDG-PET scan in assessing the response to chemotherapy in lymphoma. (authors)

  20. Persistent non-specific FDG uptake on PET imaging following hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Hongming; Chacko, Thomas K.; Hickeson, Marc; Stevenson, Karen; Feng, Qi; Ponzo, Fabio; Alavi, Abass [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, The Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, 110 Donner Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Garino, Jonathan P. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19802 (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Hip arthroplasty is a common surgical procedure, but the diagnosis of infection associated with hip arthroplasty remains challenging. Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be a promising imaging modality in settings where infection is suspected. However, inflammatory reaction to surgery can result in increased FDG uptake at various anatomic locations, which may erroneously be interpreted as sites of infection. The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and time course of FDG accumulation following total hip replacement over an extended period of time. Firstly, in a prospective study nine patients with total hip replacement were investigated to determine the patterns of FDG uptake over time. Three FDG-PET scans were performed in each patient at about 3, 6 and 12 months post arthroplasty. Secondly, in a retrospective analysis, the medical and surgical history and FDG-PET imaging results of 710 patients who had undergone whole-body scans for the evaluation of possible malignant disorders were reviewed. The history of arthroplasty and FDG-PET findings in the hip region were reviewed for this study. Patients with symptomatic arthroplasties or related complaints during FDG-PET scanning were excluded from the analysis. During the entire study period, all nine patients enrolled in the prospective study were demonstrated to have increased FDG uptake around the femoral head or neck portion of the prosthesis that extended to the soft tissues surrounding the femur. Among the patients reviewed in the retrospective study, 18 patients with a history of 21 hip arthroplasties who were asymptomatic at the time of FDG-PET scan met the criteria for inclusion. The time interval between the hip arthroplasty and the FDG-PET study ranged from 3 months to 288 months (mean{+-}SD: 80.4{+-}86.2 months). In 81% (17 of 21) of these prostheses, increased FDG uptake could be noted around the femoral head or neck portion of the

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT in detection of gynecomastia in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Yi; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lin, Ming-Chia; Chao, Chih-Hao; Lin, Wan-Yu; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively investigate the prevalence of gynecomastia as false-positive 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among the 127 male HCC patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, the 18FDG uptakes at the bilateral breasts in 9 patients with gynecomastia were recorded as standard uptake value (SUVmax) and the visual interpretation in both early and delayed images. The mean early SUVmax was 1.58/1.57 (right/left breast) in nine gynecomastia patients. The three patients with early visual score of 3 had higher early SUVmaxs. Gynecomastia is a possible cause of false-positive uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications....

  3. The Semi-automatic Synthesis of 18F-fluoroethyl-choline by Domestic FDG Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Ming

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As an important complementary imaging agent for 18F-FDG, 18F-fluoroethyl-choline (18F-FECH has been demonstrated to be promising in brain and prostate cancer imaging. By using domestic PET-FDG-TI-I CPCU synthesizer, 18F-FECH was synthesized by different reagents and consumable supplies. The C18 column was added before the product collection bottle to remove K2.2.2. The 18F-FECH was synthesized by PET-FDG-IT-I synthesizer efficiently about 30 minutes by radiochemical yield of 42.0% (no decay corrected, n=5, and the radiochemical purity was still more than 99.0% after 6 hours. The results showed the domestic PET-FDG-IT-I synthesizer could semi-automatically synthesize injectable 18F-FECH in high efficiency and radiochemical purity

  4. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Persistent non-specific FDG uptake on PET imaging following hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Hongming; Chacko, Thomas K.; Hickeson, Marc; Stevenson, Karen; Feng, Qi; Ponzo, Fabio; Alavi, Abass; Garino, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty is a common surgical procedure, but the diagnosis of infection associated with hip arthroplasty remains challenging. Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be a promising imaging modality in settings where infection is suspected. However, inflammatory reaction to surgery can result in increased FDG uptake at various anatomic locations, which may erroneously be interpreted as sites of infection. The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and time course of FDG accumulation following total hip replacement over an extended period of time. Firstly, in a prospective study nine patients with total hip replacement were investigated to determine the patterns of FDG uptake over time. Three FDG-PET scans were performed in each patient at about 3, 6 and 12 months post arthroplasty. Secondly, in a retrospective analysis, the medical and surgical history and FDG-PET imaging results of 710 patients who had undergone whole-body scans for the evaluation of possible malignant disorders were reviewed. The history of arthroplasty and FDG-PET findings in the hip region were reviewed for this study. Patients with symptomatic arthroplasties or related complaints during FDG-PET scanning were excluded from the analysis. During the entire study period, all nine patients enrolled in the prospective study were demonstrated to have increased FDG uptake around the femoral head or neck portion of the prosthesis that extended to the soft tissues surrounding the femur. Among the patients reviewed in the retrospective study, 18 patients with a history of 21 hip arthroplasties who were asymptomatic at the time of FDG-PET scan met the criteria for inclusion. The time interval between the hip arthroplasty and the FDG-PET study ranged from 3 months to 288 months (mean±SD: 80.4±86.2 months). In 81% (17 of 21) of these prostheses, increased FDG uptake could be noted around the femoral head or neck portion of the

  6. Diagnostic value of combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Melzer, Henriette I.; Mueller, Wolfgang P.; Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Albert, Michael H.; Schmid, Irene [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Munich (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The present study compares the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI to combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology. Over 8 years and 2 months, 270 {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 270 MRI examinations (mean interval 5 days) were performed in 132 patients with proven (n = 117) or suspected (n = 15) malignant disease: solid tumours (n = 64), systemic malignancy (n = 53) and benign disease (n = 15). A total of 259 suspected tumour lesions were analysed retrospectively during primary diagnosis and 554 lesions during follow-up. Image analysis was performed separately on each modality, followed by analysis of combined and registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI imaging. A total of 813 lesions were evaluated and confirmed by histopathology (n = 158) and/or imaging follow-up (n = 655) after 6 months. In the separate analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI, sensitivity was 86 %/94 % and specificity 85 %/38 %. Combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI led to a sensitivity of 97 %/97 % and specificity of 81 %/82 %. False-positive results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 69, MRI n = 281, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 85, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 80) were due to physiological uptake or post-therapeutic changes. False-negative results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 50, MRI n = 20, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11) were based on low uptake or minimal morphological changes. Examination-based evaluation during follow-up showed a sensitivity/specificity of 91 %/81 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET, 93 %/30 % for MRI and 96 %/72 % for combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI. For the detection of single tumour lesions, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI proved to be the methodology of choice for adequate tumour staging. In the examination-based evaluation, MRI alone performed better than {sup 18}F-FDG PET and combined/registered imaging during primary diagnosis. At follow

  7. FDG uptake after intraarterial chemotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doebert, N.; Kovacs, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: the intraarterial chemotherapy (i.a.CHT) using high dose cisplatin combined with systemic neutralization in patients with head and neck cancer (HNSCC) is used to reduce the tumor volume preoperatively. Aim of the study is the evaluation of the influence of i.a.CHT on the metabolism of fluor-18-deoxyglucose (FDG) in the primary and lymph nodes (LN). The value of FDG positron emission tomography (PET) preoperative and as follow-up method otter i.a.CHT is examined. Patients, methods: altogether 16 patients with HNSCC underwent two preoperative FDG PET examinations: the baseline examination one week before and the follow-up three weeks after i.a.CHT. The SUVmax values of the primary and the IN and LN metastases were evaluated and compared with each other and the histopathology. Results: the SUVmax value of the primary decreased after i.a.CHT significantly from a median (25 th percentile/ 75 th percentile) of 6.4 (4.1/ 7.8) to 3.6 (2.4/ 6.7) (p = 0.01). In 11 out of 16 patients cervical LN metastases were detected. The cervical LN metastases showed a decrease of the SUVmax value from 3.6 (2.3/ 4.8) in the pretreatment examination to 2.3 (1.7/ 3.6) after i.a.CHT (p = 0,008). Only in one patient with LN metastases the SUVmax of the nodes increased. The histopathologically measured size of the LN metastases ranged from 2 to 30 mm. Non malignant LN did not reveal a significant SUVmax decrease after i.a.CHT (p = 0.13). Conclusions: as expected, primaries of HNSCC showed a significant reduction of SUV after i.a.CHT. Compared to the primary the SUVmax decrease in LN metastases was less, but also significant. Since cytotoxic levels of cisplatin do not occur systemic, postinflammatory reactions of the LN or a lymphatic drainage of the chemotherapeutic drug into the LN could be an explanation. PET for staging of HNSCC must thus be performed prior to i.a.CHT. (orig.)

  8. Influence of mild hyperglycemia on cerebral FDG distribution patterns calculated by statistical parametric mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Keiichi; Ishii, Kenji; Saito, Yoko; Oda, Keiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2008-01-01

    In clinical cerebral 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies, we sometimes encounter hyperglycemic patients with diabetes mellitus or patients who have not adhered to the fasting requirement. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of mild hyperglycemia (plasma glucose range 110-160 mg/dl) on the cerebral FDG distribution patterns calculated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We studied 19 healthy subjects (mean age 66.2 years). First, all the subjects underwent FDG-PET scans in the fasting condition. Then, 9 of the 19 subjects (mean age 64.3 years) underwent the second FDG-PET scans in the mild hyperglycemic condition. The alterations in the FDG-PET scans were investigated using SPM- and region of interest (ROI)-based analyses. We used three reference regions: SPM global brain (SPMgb) used for SPM global mean calculation, the gray and white matter region computed from magnetic resonance image (MRIgw), and the cerebellar cortex (Cbll). The FDG uptake calculated as the standardized uptake value (average) in SPMgb, MRIgw, and Cbll regions in the mild hyperglycemic condition was 42.7%, 41.3%, and 40.0%, respectively, of that observed in the fasting condition. In SPM analysis, the mild hyperglycemia was found to affect the cerebral distribution patterns of FDG. The FDG uptake was relatively decreased in the gray matter, mainly in the frontal, temporal, and parietal association cortices, posterior cingulate, and precuneus in both SPMgb- and MRIgw-reference-based analyses. When Cbll was adopted as the reference region, those decrease patterns disappeared. The FDG uptake was relatively increased in the white matter, mainly in the centrum semiovale in all the reference-based analyses. It is noteworthy that the FDG distribution patterns were altered under mild hyperglycemia in SPM analysis. The decreased uptake patterns in SPMgb- (SPM default) and MRIgw-reference-based analyses resembled those observed in

  9. Clinical value of FDG-PET in cutaneous malignant melanoma: First experience in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, S.; Niin, M.; Paats, A.; Tonnov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In November 2002 first 18F-FDG-PET was performed in Estonia using a mobile truck-mounted scanning technology (Accel, Siemens) provided by the International Healthcare Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, (Helsinki, Finland). In 2003 this scheme was repeated for further scanning sessions. Evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) using nuclear technique is of particular interest in Estonia as its incidence is on the rise. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in CMM has a well-documented high diagnostic accuracy, especially in staging of the disease. The aim of the current study was to assess the impact of 18F-FDG-PET on detailed staging and clinical management in CMM. 30 patients of CMM, 16 males and 14 females, all non-diabetic, in the age range of 26 to 69 years were studied. Of these 30 patients, 12 were of high risk primary CMM, 7 had regional lymph node metastases and 11 had distant metastases. Patients were asked to consume a low-carbohydrate diet 3 days prior to the FDG-PET scan. 194 to 410 MBq (average 335 MBq) 18F-FDG was administered to the patients who were asked to come fasting for a minimum of 6 hours. Whole body scan was performed 40 to 65 minutes after the administration of FDG on the mobile PET. In 13 of the 30 patients (43%) 18F-FDG-PET changed the staging. In remaining 17 patients (57%) 18F-FDG-PET increased confidence level for the chosen treatment. Lymphadenectomy was planned in 2 patients showing lymph node involvement on FDG-PET. In other 2 patients, one with small pulmonary and other with a liver lesions found on PET but negative on radiological examination 'wait-and-watch' strategy was chosen. An unexpected hypermetabolic lesion seen in 1 case turned out to be a benign focus of connective tissue. One patient shown to have multiple distant metastases was started on chemotherapy. Finally in 8 of the 30 (27%) patients an immediate positive

  10. FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in primary gastric lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radan, Lea [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Fischer, Doron [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Israel, Ora [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rambam Health Care Campus and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Dann, Eldad J. [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Hematology, Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Epelbaum, Ron; Haim, Nissim [Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Gaitini, Diana [Rambam Health Care Campus, and R. and B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel)

    2008-08-15

    The use of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in primary gastric lymphoma (PGL) is challenging due to physiologic FDG activity in the stomach and variability in the degree of uptake in various histologic subtypes. This study assesses FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in newly diagnosed PGL. Sixty-two PET/CT studies of newly diagnosed PGL were reviewed (24 low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue [MALT], 38 aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [AGNHL]). FDG avidity, patterns (focal/diffuse), and intensity (visually vs. the liver and SUVmax) were assessed and compared to 27 controls. Gastric CT abnormalities and extragastric sites were recorded. Gastric FDG uptake was found in 55/62 (89%) PGL (71% MALT vs. 100% AGNHL, p < 0.001) and 63% controls. A diffuse pattern was found in 60% PGL (76% MALT vs. 53% AGNHL, p = NS) and 47% controls. FDG uptake higher than liver was found in 82% PGL (58% MALT vs. 97% AGNHL, p < 0.05) and 63% controls. SUVmax in FDG-avid PGLs was 15.3 {+-} 11.7 (5.4 {+-} 2.9 MALT vs. 19.7 {+-} 11.5 AGNHL, p < 0.001) and 4.6 {+-} 1.4 in controls. CT abnormalities were found in 79% PGL (thickening, n = 49; ulcerations, n = 22). Extra-gastric FDG-avid sites were seen in none of MALT, but 61% of AGNHL (nodal, n = 18; nodal and extranodal, n = 5). FDG avidity was present in 89% of PGLs, including all patients with AGNHL but only 71% of MALT. FDG uptake can be differentiated, in particular in AGNHL-PGL, from physiologic tracer activity by intensity but not by pattern. Extragastric foci on PET and structural CT abnormalities are additional parameters that can improve PET/CT assessment of PGL. Defining FDG avidity and PET/CT patterns in AGNHL and a subgroup of MALT-PGL before treatment may be important for further monitoring therapy response. (orig.)

  11. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT on rheumatoid arthritis of large joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kazuo; Morooka, Miyako; Mitsumoto, Takuya; Kurihara, Kyoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuko; Mimori, Akio; Ito, Kimiteru

    2009-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in joint lesions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) reportedly represents the degree of synovial inflammation. Most previous studies have focused on small joints, and the application of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) (PET/CT) for the evaluation of inflammatory activity in large joints has not been well studied. Eighteen patients with RA underwent FDG-PET/CT. FDG uptake in the knee, hip, carpal, wrist, elbow, shoulder, and atlanto-axial joint (total of 13 joints) and in the axillary lymph nodes was evaluated by calculating the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and the visual uptake scores as follows: 0, no uptake; 1, slight uptake; 2, moderate uptake (same as in liver); 3, higher than in liver; 4, highest uptake. The number of painful/swollen joints, the white blood cell (WBC) count, and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level were also evaluated. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT delineated large-joint lesions in patients with RA, and the metabolic activity of inflammation was accurately overlaid on the joint anatomy. The total FDG score for all 13 joints was significantly correlated with the CRP level (r=0.653, p max and the CRP level were weakly, but not significantly, correlated (r=0.377, p>0.05). The WBC count was not correlated with any other parameter. The mean number of joints per patient with an FDG uptake score of 2 or more was significantly larger than the mean number of painful/swollen joints (6.2±3.3 vs. 3.1±2.7, n=18, p<0.01) and both parameters were strongly correlated (r=0.588, p<0.01, n=18). Also, FDG uptake score and SUV of painful/swollen joints were significantly higher than these of not painful/swollen joints. FDG uptake was significantly different from patients of remission and patients of active arthritis. Uptake in the atlanto-axial joint was observed in five (mostly asymptomatic) patients (5/18, 28%), and the uptake score was significantly correlated

  12. Prognostic value of FDG-PET in patients with ovarian carcinoma following surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Okazaki, Atsushi; Oriuchi, Noboru

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of FDG-PET after surgical resection in patients with ovarian carcinoma, we compared the results of FDG-PET and serum CA-125 level and prognosis of patients. Eighteen patients underwent a total of 32 FDG-PET examinations following surgery for ovarian carcinoma from October 2001 to December 2002 at our hospital (median follow-up period, 31 months). Age of the patients at the time of the initial FDG-PET examination ranged from 31 to 73 years (mean 52 years) and the period from surgery to the initial FDG-PET examination ranged from 5 to 109 months (mean 30 months). Serum CA-125 levels were determined on the occasion of each FDG-PET examination. Recurrent tumors were treated with surgery in 5 cases, radiotherapy in 2 cases, and chemotherapy in 9 cases. The initial FDG-PET examinations revealed that 13 cases had positive and 5 cases had negative findings, which included 2 false positive cases. The survival rate for all patients at 1 year and 2 years after the initial examination was 82% and 63%, respectively. Two-year survival rates in patients with positive and negative FDG-PET findings were 51% and 83%, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.19). Furthermore, 4 patients with normal CA-125 levels and 14 patients with elevated CA-125 levels showed 2-year survival rates of 100% and 51%, respectively, and they were not significantly different (p=0.11). For all 32 examinations, the 2-year survival rates for patients with normal CA-125 levels (100%) were significantly higher (p=0.025) than that for patients with elevated CA-125 levels (47%), however there was no significant difference (p=0.20) between FDG-PET positive cases (53%) and negative cases (83%). The prognosis of patients with positive FDG-PET findings was less favorable than that of patients with negative findings. However, over the mean extended observation period of about 2.5 years, no significant difference in the

  13. Random close packing of hard spheres and disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    A simple definition of random close packing of hard spheres is presented, and the consequences of this definition are explored. According to this definition, random close packing occurs at the minimum packing fraction eta for which the median nearest-neighbor radius equals the diameter of the spheres. Using the radial distribution function at more dilute concentrations to estimate median nearest-neighbor radii, lower bounds on the critical packing fraction eta/sub RCP/ are obtained and the value of eta/sub RCP/ is estimated by extrapolation. Random close packing is predicted to occur for eta/sub RCP/ = 0.64 +- 0.02 in three dimensions and eta/sub RCP/ = 0.82 +- 0.02 in two dimensions. Both of these predictions are shown to be consistent with the available experimental data

  14. [Stability of oral rehydration solutions in various packing materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M I; Hackmann, E R; Moudatsos, K M

    1993-10-01

    The aim of this research was to provide data to select an ideal packing material to preserve the integrity of oral rehydration salts (ORS), a therapeutic formulation that is essential in developing countries. Previous research had verified that water is the factor that most affects ORS stability. For this research, a pharmaceutical industry prepared an ORS batch that was packed in six different types of packing materials. The humidity determination was made after storage of samples during 36 weeks at room temperature, at room temperature with 76% relative humidity, and at 40 degrees C with 80% relative humidity. The moisture in the samples was measured at pre-determined intervals using methods like loss on drying at 50 degrees C and the Karl Fischer method. The results indicated that the most efficient packing material was composed of 18g polyester, 35 g aluminum, and 50 g polyethylene (packing material no. 6).

  15. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Shih, William M.

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry....... Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer...... DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal-lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close-packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology....

  16. Is enteral administration of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) a palatable alternative to IV injection? Pre-clinical evaluation in normal rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, T. E-mail: higashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fisher, S.J.; Nakada, K.; Romain, D.J.; Wahl, R.L

    2002-04-01

    To establish effective methods of enteral 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) administration, the efficiency of FDG absorption in the gastrointestinal tracts following enteral administrations was evaluated using the FDG biodistribution in normal rodents, in combination with various fasting conditions and FDG diluents. The blood FDG curve using hypotonic solution showed a rapid increase, while that in iso- and hypertonic groups showed slow rises. Brain FDG uptake had a close positive correlation with blood AUC (area under curve) and an inverse relationship with the stomach contents.

  17. Is enteral administration of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) a palatable alternative to IV injection? Pre-clinical evaluation in normal rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, T.; Fisher, S.J.; Nakada, K.; Romain, D.J.; Wahl, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    To establish effective methods of enteral 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) administration, the efficiency of FDG absorption in the gastrointestinal tracts following enteral administrations was evaluated using the FDG biodistribution in normal rodents, in combination with various fasting conditions and FDG diluents. The blood FDG curve using hypotonic solution showed a rapid increase, while that in iso- and hypertonic groups showed slow rises. Brain FDG uptake had a close positive correlation with blood AUC (area under curve) and an inverse relationship with the stomach contents

  18. TVB-EduPack - An interactive learning and scripting platform for The Virtual Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eMatzke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Brain (TVB; www.thevirtualbrain.org is a neuroinformatics platform for full brain network simulation based on individual anatomical connectivity data. The framework addresses clinical and neuroscientific questions by simulating multi-scale neural dynamics that range from local population activity to large-scale brain function and related macroscopic signals like electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. TVB is equipped with a graphical and a command-line interface to create models that capture the characteristic biological variability to predict the brain activity of individual subjects. To enable researchers from various backgrounds a quick start into TVB and brain network modelling in general, we developed an educational module: TVB-EduPack. EduPack offers two educational functionalities that seamlessly integrate into TVB’s graphical user interface (GUI: (i interactive tutorials introduce GUI elements, guide through the basic mechanics of software usage and develop complex use-case scenarios; animations, videos and textual descriptions transport essential principles of computational neuroscience and brain modelling; (ii an automatic script generator records model parameters and produces input files for TVB’s Python programming interface; thereby, simulation configurations can be exported as scripts that allow flexible customization of the modelling process and self-defined batch- and post-processing applications while benefitting from the full power of the Python language and its toolboxes. This article covers the implementation of TVB-EduPack and its integration into TVB architecture. Like TVB, EduPack is an open source community project that lives from the participation and contribution of its users. TVB-EduPack can be obtained as part of TVB from thevirtualbrain.org.

  19. TVB-EduPack-An Interactive Learning and Scripting Platform for The Virtual Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Henrik; Schirner, Michael; Vollbrecht, Daniel; Rothmeier, Simon; Llarena, Adalberto; Rojas, Raúl; Triebkorn, Paul; Domide, Lia; Mersmann, Jochen; Solodkin, Ana; Jirsa, Viktor K; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Ritter, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Brain (TVB; thevirtualbrain.org) is a neuroinformatics platform for full brain network simulation based on individual anatomical connectivity data. The framework addresses clinical and neuroscientific questions by simulating multi-scale neural dynamics that range from local population activity to large-scale brain function and related macroscopic signals like electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. TVB is equipped with a graphical and a command-line interface to create models that capture the characteristic biological variability to predict the brain activity of individual subjects. To enable researchers from various backgrounds a quick start into TVB and brain network modeling in general, we developed an educational module: TVB-EduPack. EduPack offers two educational functionalities that seamlessly integrate into TVB's graphical user interface (GUI): (i) interactive tutorials introduce GUI elements, guide through the basic mechanics of software usage and develop complex use-case scenarios; animations, videos and textual descriptions transport essential principles of computational neuroscience and brain modeling; (ii) an automatic script generator records model parameters and produces input files for TVB's Python programming interface; thereby, simulation configurations can be exported as scripts that allow flexible customization of the modeling process and self-defined batch- and post-processing applications while benefitting from the full power of the Python language and its toolboxes. This article covers the implementation of TVB-EduPack and its integration into TVB architecture. Like TVB, EduPack is an open source community project that lives from the participation and contribution of its users. TVB-EduPack can be obtained as part of TVB from thevirtualbrain.org.

  20. Analysis of Metabolism of 6FDG: A PET Glucose Transport Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzic, Raymond F.; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Wu, Chunying; Wang, Yanming; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We are developing 18F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous PET tracer 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon 6 in [18F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [18F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [18F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with 18F as well as the longer-lived radionuclides 3H and 14C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6- and 24-h time-points there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive materials that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [18F]6FDG are negligible. PMID:21718942

  1. Diagnostic value of preoperative SUVmax on FDG-PET/CT for the detection of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Aya; Shiro, Michihisa; Ota, Nami; Takano, Rei; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Yagi, Shigetaka; Minami, Sawako; Terada, Masaki; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the preoperative diagnostic value of F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with ovarian cancer. One hundred sixty patients suspected of having malignant ovarian tumors were included in this study. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before operation, and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SUVmax for detecting malignancy and its relationship with histological findings. Postoperative pathological diagnoses showed that 67 were malignant, 14 were borderline malignant, and 79 were benign tumors. With the use of a cutoff SUVmax of 2.9 obtained from the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detecting malignancy were 80.6%, 94.6%, 91.5%, and 87.1%, respectively. Positive FDG accumulation (SUVmax ≥ 2.9) was shown in 89.5% of serous adenocarcinoma and in 92.3% of endometrioid adenocarcinoma. In contrast, lower frequencies of positive FDG accumulation were shown in clear cell adenocarcinoma (54.5%), mucinous adenocarcinoma (66.7%), and metastatic carcinoma (66.7%), and the median SUVmax of these 3 histological types were significantly lower than those of serous and endometrioid types. In addition, a positive FDG accumulation was shown in all patients with malignant transformation of mature cystic teratoma. Finally, of the 14 borderline malignant tumors, only 2 (14.3%) showed positive FDG accumulation. The SUVmax on FDG-PET/CT is useful for differentiating ovarian cancer from borderline or benign tumor with a high specificity and positive predictive value. However, our data also demonstrated a lower FDG uptake value in clear cell or mucinous histological finding, suggesting that SUVmax may vary depending on the tumor histological subtype.

  2. Molecular pathology in vulnerable carotid plaques: correlation with [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, M; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Borgwardt, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Atherosclerosis is recognised as an inflammatory disease, and new diagnostic tools are warranted to evaluate plaque inflammatory activity and risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in vulnerable carotid plaques visualised by positron emission...... tomography (PET). Uptake was correlated to quantitative gene expression of known markers of inflammation and plaque vulnerability. METHODS: Ten patients with recent transient ischaemic attack and carotid artery stenosis (>50%) underwent combined FDG-PET and computed tomography angiography (CTA) the day...

  3. Steam sterilization and automatic dispensing of [{sup 18}F]fludeoxyglucose (FDG) for injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwath, Pascal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany) and MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: p.karwath@uni-bonn.de; Sartor, Johannes [MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany); Gries, Wolfgang [MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany); Wodarski, Christine [MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany); Dittmar, Claus [MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany); Biersack, Hans J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Guhlke, Stefan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany) and MC-Pharma GmbH (MCP), Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: stefan.guhlke@ukb.uni-bonn.de

    2005-04-01

    For the purpose of implementing steam sterilization of 2-[{sup 18}F]FDG (FDG) in the final container into routine production, we have validated and established a fully automated dispensing and sterilization system, thereby considerably reducing the radiation burden to the personnel. Methods: The commercially available system combines aseptic dispensing of the product solution under a miniaturized laminar flow unit with subsequent steam sterilization, realized by heating of the product in the final containers by an autoclave included in the dispensing unit, thus incorporating current pharmaceutical manufacturing standards for the production of parental radiopharmaceuticals. The efficiency of the used sterilization cycle, the stability of FDG under the conditions of sterilization and the stability of the final product towards radiolysis was investigated with respect to various pH-formulations. Results: The system was found to be fully valid for filling of vials in a laminar flow class A (US-class 100) environment and for sterilization of FDG in the final container. The pH for sterilizing FDG solutions must be slightly acidic to avoid decomposition. A pH of 5.5 appears to be optimal and gives FDG of very high radiochemical purity ({approx}99%). In addition, radiolysis of FDG in solutions of high activity concentration was significantly lower at pH 5.5 than at neutral pH. Conclusion: Terminal sterilization enables the production of FDG in full compliance with GMP-regulations even in Class C or D (US class 10,000 or 100,000) laboratories.

  4. Steam sterilization and automatic dispensing of [18F]fludeoxyglucose (FDG) for injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwath, Pascal; Sartor, Johannes; Gries, Wolfgang; Wodarski, Christine; Dittmar, Claus; Biersack, Hans J.; Guhlke, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    For the purpose of implementing steam sterilization of 2-[ 18 F]FDG (FDG) in the final container into routine production, we have validated and established a fully automated dispensing and sterilization system, thereby considerably reducing the radiation burden to the personnel. Methods: The commercially available system combines aseptic dispensing of the product solution under a miniaturized laminar flow unit with subsequent steam sterilization, realized by heating of the product in the final containers by an autoclave included in the dispensing unit, thus incorporating current pharmaceutical manufacturing standards for the production of parental radiopharmaceuticals. The efficiency of the used sterilization cycle, the stability of FDG under the conditions of sterilization and the stability of the final product towards radiolysis was investigated with respect to various pH-formulations. Results: The system was found to be fully valid for filling of vials in a laminar flow class A (US-class 100) environment and for sterilization of FDG in the final container. The pH for sterilizing FDG solutions must be slightly acidic to avoid decomposition. A pH of 5.5 appears to be optimal and gives FDG of very high radiochemical purity (∼99%). In addition, radiolysis of FDG in solutions of high activity concentration was significantly lower at pH 5.5 than at neutral pH. Conclusion: Terminal sterilization enables the production of FDG in full compliance with GMP-regulations even in Class C or D (US class 10,000 or 100,000) laboratories

  5. Analysis of metabolism of 6FDG: a PET glucose transport tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzic, Raymond F., E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Chandramouli, Visvanathan [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Huang, Hsuan-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Wu Chunying; Wang Yanming [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz [Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: We are developing {sup 18}F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 18}F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon-6 in [{sup 18}F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [{sup 18}F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [{sup 18}F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods: Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with {sup 18}F or with the longer-lived radionuclides {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results: At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6-h and 24-h time points, there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive material that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion: On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [{sup 18}F]6FDG are negligible.

  6. Myocardial glucose metabolism in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; [sup 18]F-FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ishida, Yoshio; Shimonagata, Tsuyoshi; Nagata, Seiki; Miyatake, Kunio; Tokuda, Takahiro

    1994-01-01

    To find a clue to elucidate pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), myocardial glucose metabolism was investigated by using positron computed tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) in 28 HCM patients and 9 hypetensive (H) patients. The degree of F-18 FDG uptake in the myocardium was quantitatively determined by %dose uptake per myocardium of 30 g. A group of H patients had almost normal pattern; i.e., fasting F-18 FDG uptake was low (0.13[+-]0.07%/myocardium of 30 g) and was remarkably increased on glucose loading (0.30[+-]0.14%). In all HCM patients but 4 of apical type (AT), however, fasting F-18 FDG uptake was remarkably high (0.20[+-]0.08% for 12 patients with asymmetrical septal hypertrophy (ASH), 0.17[+-]0.07% for 6 of diffuse type (DT) and 0.20[+-]0.07% for 6 of dilated phase (DP)). Decreased uptake of F-18 FDG was seen on glucose loading for DP (0.19[+-]0.08%) and AT (0.17[+-]0.11%), although it was almost normal for ASH (0.33[+-]0.15%). According to regional myocardium, fasting F-18 FDG uptake was decreased in the entire myocardium in all HCM patients but those of AT. F-18 FDG was decreased on glucose loading in bokth DT and DP patients, suggesting the presence of myocardial disturbance. In conclusion, HCM patients were characterized by having increased uptake of F-18 FDG on fasting. This has an important implication for the understanding of its pathophysiology and diagnosis of hyertrophic myocardium. (N.K.).

  7. Pyelo-cystic Reflux in F-18 FDG PET Scan Due to Ureteral Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyhan, Mehmet [Baskent Univ., Adana (Turkmenistan)

    2013-09-15

    A 72-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer was treated with brachytherapy and chemotherapy. Combined F-18 FDG PET/CT performed for restaging demonstrated increased FDG uptake in a hypodense cystic lesion at the posterior part of the right renal cortex and a hypermetabolic soft tissue mass at the right parailiac region suggestive of a metastatic lymph node causing ureteral obstruction. There had been no FDG uptake in the cystic lesion on the FDG PET/CT study performed 1 year before. These findings suggest that the increased FDG uptake in the cystic lesion was caused by pyelocystic reflux due to ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis (Figs. 1 and 2). Several renal lesions may have increased metabolism, such as renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, oncocytoma, adult Wilms' tumor, angiomyolipoma, metastatic lesions, xanthogranulo-matous pyelonephritis and infected cyst. Most of these lesions are solid. Some infected renal cysts may be FDG avid, but in this situation increased FDG uptake is observed on the wall of the cyst. In our case, FDG uptake was seen in the entire cystic lesion. The patient had no symptoms or laboratory findings related to infection. Cysts are the most common space-occupying lesions of the kidney. The vast majority of these are simple cysts that are usually unilateral and solitary. Simple cysts are asymptomatic, except when complications exist such as hemorrhage, infection or rupture. There have been a few reports on spontaneous communications between renal cysts and the pyelocaliceal system, in most cases involving ruptures of the cysts into the pyelocaliceal system due to increased intracystic pressure caused by bleeding or infection of the cyst. In the present case, the cause of the connection between the cystic cavity and the pyelocaliceal system is the increased pressure in the renal pelvic cavity due to the ureteral obstruction secondary to parailiac lymph node metastasis.

  8. In vivo {sup 18}F-FDG tumour uptake measurements in small animals using Cerenkov radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico; Calderan, Laura; Fenzi, Alberto; Sbarbati, Andrea [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Marengo, Mario [S. Orsola - Malpighi University Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Bologna (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo; E Spinelli, Antonello [S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics Department, Milan (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) is a widely used PET radiotracer for the in vivo diagnosis of several diseases such as tumours. The positrons emitted by {sup 18}F-FDG, travelling into tissues faster than the speed of light in the same medium, are responsible for Cerenkov radiation (CR) emission which is prevalently in the visible range. The purpose of this study is to show that CR escaping from tumour tissues of small living animals injected with {sup 18}F-FDG can be detected with optical imaging (OI) techniques using a commercial optical instrument equipped with charge-coupled detectors (CCD). The theory behind the Cerenkov light emission and the source depth measurements using CR is first presented. Mice injected with {sup 18}F-FDG or saline solution underwent dynamic OI acquisition and a comparison between images was performed. Multispectral analysis of the radiation was used to estimate the depth of the source of Cerenkov light. Small animal PET images were also acquired in order to compare the {sup 18}F-FDG bio-distribution measured using OI and PET scanner. Cerenkov in vivo whole-body images of tumour-bearing mice and the measurements of the emission spectrum (560-660 nm range) are presented. Brain, kidneys and tumour were identified as a source of visible light in the animal body: the tissue time-activity curves reflected the physiological accumulation of {sup 18}F-FDG in these organs. The identification is confirmed by the comparison between CR and {sup 18}F-FDG images. These results will allow the use of conventional OI devices for the in vivo study of glucose metabolism in cancer and the assessment, for example, of anti-cancer drugs. Moreover, this demonstrates that {sup 18}F-FDG can be employed as it is a bimodal tracer for PET and OI techniques. (orig.)

  9. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar; Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela; Melamed, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  10. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus; Romero, Jose; Ziegler, Oliver; Kamel, Ehab M.; Hodler, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16), 99m Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  11. F.D.G. PET role in the management of refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papathanassiou, D.; Domange-Testard, A.; Bruna-Muraille, C.; Cuif-Job, A.; Liehn, J.C.; Thiriaux, A.; Motte, J.

    2009-01-01

    The work-up of drug-resistant partial epilepsy is intended to localize epileptogenic foci in the purpose of a possible surgery. We aimed to assess the role of fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (F.D.G. PET) in this scope. This study involved 34 patients who underwent brain F.D.G. PET, with a final diagnosis in 21. The value of F.D.G. PET for lateralization and localisation of the epileptogenic focus was evaluated by a blinded interpretation, and compared with the value of standard investigations. The impact of F.D.G. PET was assessed by the means of questions intended for the neurologist in each case. All the epilepsy types together, F.D.G. PET lateralized and localised the foci in 65 and 47% of the 34 subjects respectively. Among the 19 subjects with final diagnosis (patients with bilateral foci excluded), lateralization was correct in 84% and localisation in 63% (and the values were greater for temporal epilepsy than for extra temporal foci). PET frequently provided additional information compared with MRI, but not with EEG. F.D.G. PET was useful in 82.5% of cases (confirming management in 65% and changing it in 17.5% of the patients). Our experience corroborated the value of F.D.G. PET for lateralization and localisation of epileptogenic foci, and its role in case of normal MRI. However, F.D.G. PET appears as a confirmation tool rather than an examination resulting in a change in management rate. (authors)

  12. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Nonmelanomatous Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Nonmelanomatous skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, merkel cell carcinoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. So far, there have been a few reports that {sup 18}F-FDG PET was useful in the evaluation of metastasis and therapeutic response in nonmelanomatous skin cancer, however, those are very weak evidences. Therefore, further studies on the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in nonmelanomatous skin cancer are required.

  13. Clinical Significance of Myocardial Uptake on F-18 FDG PET/CT Performed in Oncologic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ho Jin; Cho, Eung Hyuck; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake of myocardium is influenced by various factors. Increased glycolysis, and subsequent increased F-18 FDG uptake has been reported in ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, clinical significance of incidentally found myocardial F-18 FDG uptake has not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed the degree and pattern of myocardial uptake in patients without history of ischemic heart disease who underwent torso F-18 FDG PET/CT for evaluation of neoplastic disease. From January 2005 to June 2009, 77 patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sestamibi stress/rest SPECT within 3 months were enrolled. Of 77 patients, 55 (71.4%) showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the myocardium. In this population, 40 showed uniform uptake pattern, while 15 showed focal uptake. In patients with uniform uptake, 17 showed decreased uptake in the septum without perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. Remaining 23 patients showed uniform uptake, with 1 reversible perfusion defect and 1 fixed perfusion defect. In 15 patients with focal uptake, 9 showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the base, and only 1 of them showed reversible perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. In the remaining 6 focal uptake group, 4 had reversible perfusion defect in the corresponding wall, and 1 had apical hypertrophy. We demonstrated that septal defect pattern and basal uptake pattern in the myocardium may represent normal variants. Focal myocardial uptake other than normal variants on oncologic torso F-18 FDG PET/CT with routine fasting protocol may suggest ischemic heart disease, thus further evaluation is warranted.

  14. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, POB 9602, Haifa (Israel); Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Melamed, Eyal [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Orthopedics, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  15. The impact of FDG-PET in the management of patients with salivary gland malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hideaki; Graham, M.M.; Kogame, Masahiro; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in the management of patients with salivary gland malignancy. We performed 45 FDG PET studies in 31 patients with salivary malignant tumors, using PET (33 studies) and PET/CT (12 studies). Patients comprised 21 males and 10 females with a mean age of 69 y (range 38-89). Nineteen patients had a single study, ten patients had 2 and two patients had 3 studies. Twelve studies were performed for initial staging and 33 studies for restaging. Four patients of the initial staging group were restaged with PET after therapy. Histology consisted of 8 adenocarcinomas, 8 squamous cell carcinomas, 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 4 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenomas, 2 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 2 poorly differentiated carcinomas, 1 salivary duct carcinoma, 1 lymphoepithelial carcinoma and 1 melanoma. PET findings were reviewed with the clinical and radiologic findings and the impact of PET on staging and patient management was determined. In the initial staging group, all 12 primary lesions (100%) showed positive FDG uptake (5 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas, 2 poorly differentiated carcinomas, 1 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, 1 salivary duct carcinoma, 1 lymphoepithelial carcinoma). Three patients (25%) had FDG positive distant disease (liver, bone, lymph nodes); surgery was canceled and therapy changed to chemoradiation. One patient (9%) with no FDG uptake in the neck nodes avoided a planned neck dissection. In the restaging group (33 studies in 23 patients), 5 patients (22%) had FDG positive distant disease, which changed the treatment from surgery to chemoradiation or other. A second primary lesion was detected in one patient (4%). One patient (4%) with clinically suspected recurrence was able to avoid other invasive procedures because of the negative PET. Overall, FDG PET resulted in a major change in management in 11 of 31 patients (35%). This study shows that FDG PET has a

  16. The value of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of thromboangiitis obliterans--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Gerald; Milosavljevic, Robert; Belaj, Klara; Gary, Thomas; Rief, Peter; Hafner, Franz; Lipp, Rainer W; Brodmann, Marianne

    2015-04-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) is an inflammatory vascular disease affecting dominantly the vessels of the extremities and is etiologically strongly associated with tobacco consumption. Different imaging techniques are generally used to exclude potential differential diagnoses. We investigated the value of (18) F-flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18) F]FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of TAO. All consecutive patients with diagnosed TAO between Nov 2001 and Nov 2003 at our institution who underwent [(18) F]FDG-PET in the diagnostic workup were analyzed retrospectively. Whole-body scans were conducted after a fasting period of at least 6 h and blood glucose levels lower than 180 mg/dl. The primary endpoint was defined as significantly increased vascular FDG uptake. Tracer uptake was visually determined and, in accordance with strength, divided into grades 0 to 3. In total, ten patients were statistically evaluated. The median patient age at the date of the first [(18) F]FDG-PET was 41.5 years. Repetitive FDG-PET imaging was performed in seven out of ten patients (70 %). The endpoint was objectified in one of the initial examinations (10 %) and in another one out of seven follow-up scans (14.3 %). One positive [(18) F]FDG-PET was observed in the pelvic vessels and the other in the infrapopliteal arteries. Therefore, increased tracer uptake could be observed in two examinations on two different patients (both with grade 3 tracer uptake) out of 17 conducted [(18) F]FDG-PETs in total. The [(18) F]FDG-PET was not a suitable investigative procedure for the diagnosis of TAO in the present patient cohort.

  17. Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 has the potential for use as a protective culture for vacuum-packed meats: culture isolation, bacteriocin identification, and meat application experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budde, B.B.; Hornbæk, T.; Jacobsen, T.

    2003-01-01

    A new culture, Leuconostoc carnosum 4010, for biopreservation of vacuum-packed meats is described. The culture originated from bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) naturally present in vacuum-packed meat products. Approximately, 72,000 colonies were isolated from 48 different vacuum......-packaged meat sausage immediately reduced the number of viable Listeria monocytogenes cells to a level below the detection limit and no increase of L. monocytogenes was observed during storage at 5 degreesC for 21 days. The results presented demonstrate that Leuc. carnosum 4010 is suitable as a new protective...... culture for cold-stored, cooked, sliced, and vacuum-packed meat products....

  18. SEPTOPLASTY WITH AND WITHOUT NASAL PACKING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Septoplasty is one of the most commonly performed surgeries in rhinology to relieve nasal obstruction of patients with distortion in the midline cartilage or septum of the nose to relieve nasal obstruction of patient and findings consistent with nasal endoscopy. The anterior nasal packing routinely done following septoplasty is usually conventional and not evidence based. The purpose of nasal packing is to obtain haemostasis, enhance opposition of septal flaps, avoid septal haematoma formation, close the dead space, avoid synechiae formation, provide support to septal cartilage and prevent its displacement. OBJECTIVE This study intends to evaluate the effects of nasal packing on surgical success and related complications in septoplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present clinical prospective and randomised study was carried out on patients attending Otorhinolaryngology Department of Santhiram Medical College & General Hospital between March 2012 and March 2015. Patients undergoing septoplasty were randomised either to receive anterior nasal packing or to not receive nasal packing postoperatively. RESULTS Levels of pain experienced by patients with nasal packing postoperatively during the initial 24 hours postoperatively and during the removal of the pack were significantly more. Post-operative headache, epiphora, swallowing discomfort and sleep disturbance were more in patients with nasal packing and statistically (p.05. Septal haematoma, adhesions and local infections in both groups were statistically insignificant (p>.05. CONCLUSION Septoplasty enhances the standard of living of patients with septal deviation and nasal obstruction. Our study results suggest that nasal packing after septoplasty is not obligatory. Nasal packing causes considerably more pain and complications, and it should be reserved only for those who have bleeding predisposition.

  19. Evaluation of anesthesia effects on [18F]FDG uptake in mouse brain and heart using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Vines, Douglass C.; Seneca, Nicholas M.; Modell, Kendra J.; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Innis, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates effects of anesthesia on 18 F-FDG (FDG) uptake in mouse brain and heart to establish the basic conditions of small animal PET imaging. Prior to FDG injection, 12 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane gas; 11 mice were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a ketamine/xylazine mixture; and 11 mice were awake. In isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine conditions, FDG brain uptake (%ID/g) was significantly lower than in controls. Conversely, in the isoflurane condition, %ID/g in heart was significantly higher than in controls, whereas heart uptake in ketamine/xylazine mice was significantly lower. Results suggest that anesthesia impedes FDG uptake in mouse brain and affects FDG uptake in heart; however, the effects in the brain and heart differ depending on the type of anesthesia used

  20. Evaluation of anesthesia effects on [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in mouse brain and heart using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi E-mail: htoyama@fujita-hu.ac.jp; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Vines, Douglass C.; Seneca, Nicholas M.; Modell, Kendra J.; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Innis, Robert B

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluates effects of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) uptake in mouse brain and heart to establish the basic conditions of small animal PET imaging. Prior to FDG injection, 12 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane gas; 11 mice were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a ketamine/xylazine mixture; and 11 mice were awake. In isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine conditions, FDG brain uptake (%ID/g) was significantly lower than in controls. Conversely, in the isoflurane condition, %ID/g in heart was significantly higher than in controls, whereas heart uptake in ketamine/xylazine mice was significantly lower. Results suggest that anesthesia impedes FDG uptake in mouse brain and affects FDG uptake in heart; however, the effects in the brain and heart differ depending on the type of anesthesia used.

  1. Rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma with surrounding ductal hyperplasia mimics breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2011-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred for an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to rule out lymphoma, and was found to have an incidental FDG-avid right breast nodule that grew significantly in size and FDG uptake on a subsequent scan, raising suspicion of a growing breast malignancy. Histologic evaluation showed a complex fibroadenoma with adenosis and surrounding ductal hyperplasia. Although variable F-18 FDG uptake in fibroadenomas has been described, a distinction between simple and complex fibroadenomas has not been made in the PET literature, even though complex fibroadenomas have a higher propensity to develop into malignancies. This case shows that a rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma can mimic a breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, showing significant increase in both size and FDG-avidity on follow-up studies.

  2. Toxinotyping of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from packed chicken portions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Poursoltani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Clostridium perfringens are classified into five toxin types A to E, on the basis of production of Alpha, Beta, Epsilon and Iota toxins. Some strains are able to produce enterotoxin, can cause food poisoning in human. The bacteria are able to produce NetB and TpeL toxins which are virulence factors in necrotic enteritis in poultry. The aim of this study was to determine the toxin profile of C. perfringens strains isolated from packed chicken portions using Single and Multiplex PCR assays. Materials and Methods: In a crossectional study, 180 sample of chicken portions including wing (n=50, liver (n=50, neck (n=50 and gizzard (n=30 were collected randomly and examined for C. perfringens contamination. For this purpose all of samples were cultured on the 7% sheep defibrinated blood agar, TSN and TSC culture media. All of the isolates were investigated for the presence of alpha, beta, epsilon, iota toxin and virulence (tpeL and netB genes. Results: In the present study, 6 isolates out of 180 samples, were confirmed as C. perfringens by culture and molecular methods. All of the isolates (100% were confirmed as cpa and cpb positive strains and belong to type C of C. perfringens. The netB gene was detected in 5 isolates (83.33% and tpeL gene in three isolates (50%. Conclusions: Our findings show the majority of C. perfringens in broilers are belong to type C which produce necrotic enteritis in poultry and may be transmitted to human through poultry products.

  3. Use of lasilix to explore pelvis pathologies in F.D.G. PET; Utilisation du lasilix pour l'exploration des pathologies pelviennes en TEP au FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruna-Muraille, C.; Papathanassiou, D.; Cuif-Job, A.; Moussa-Bouharati, K.; Guedec-Ghelfi, R.; Liehn, J.C. [Institut Jean-Godinot, 51 - Reims (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: F.D.G. accumulations in ureters and bladder can be annoying to interpret PET examinations in case of pelvis pathology, especially for uterine cervix tumors and for some ganglions localizations. The aim of this study was to confirm that the injection of furosemide before F.D.G. scintigraphy leads to a noticed concentration reduction of the tracer in urine, what can allow a better analysis of pelvis pathology and to evaluate the possibility of using this technique in practice. Conclusions: the Lasilix injection before a PET with F.D.G. in patients suffering of a pelvis pathology allows a noticed reduction of urine intensity, making easier the interpretation for a number of pelvic disorders. however, on 26 studied patients, 3 presented urged incontinence during examination, that poses a limitation of the technique and requires the selection, when a prior medical examination, of patients susceptible to receive this protocol. (N.C.)

  4. Packing schemes of cavities in selected clathrasils and zeolites and the analogous packings of atoms in crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hem, Caroline Piper; Makovicky, Emil; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2010-01-01

    Sizes of cavities and their packing schemes in selected zeolites and clathrasils were studied by means of least squares fitting of circumscribed spheres to them. Resulting packing of spheres of different diameters was analyzed by the coordinates of their centers, their volumes and sphericity...

  5. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  6. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N

    2004-01-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image

  7. Usefulness of low dose oral contrast media in FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. S.; Yun, J. G.; Lee, M. H.; Cho, C. W.; Yun, S. N [Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Oral contrast media might help in interpreting PET/CT images, allowing better discrimination between physiologic and pathologic abdominal uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low dose oral contrast on FDG PET/CT. A total of 435 cancer patients received 200mL of oral Barium with water(200mL) immediately before FDG injection. PET images were reconstructed using attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction. The FDG uptake in gastrointestinal(GI) tract were analyzed by visual and semiquantitative method in transaxial, coronal and sagittal planes. Seventy patients(16%, 113 sites) of 435 images showed high FDG uptake(pSUV>4.0) : 50(74%, 84 sites) with diffuse uptake and 20(26%, 29sites) with focal uptake. The most common distribution site of oral contrast media was small bowel (n=27, 39%) and others were small bowel with transverse colon(n=6, 8%), small bowel with ascending and sigmoid colon(n=6, 8%) and etc. In PET/CT images, FDG uptake coexisted with oral contrast was showed in 26 patients(54%) with diffuse pattern and 9(45%) with focal pattern, and by sites, those were 38(45%) and 9(31%), respectively. In small bowel regions, the most common distribution site, the proportion of coexistence reached as high as 61% (29 in the total 47 sites). Application of low dose contrast agent can be helpful in the evaluation of intestinal uptake in FDG PET/CT image.

  8. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Marzola, Maria Cristina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy)], E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it; Al-Nahhas, Adil [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  9. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  10. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of prolonged febrile states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaruskova, M.; Belohlavek, O. [Na Homolce Hospital, PET Center, Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    The role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients whose main symptom is prolonged fever has not yet been defined. We addressed this topic in a retrospective study. A total of 124 patients (referred between May 2001 and December 2004) with fever of unknown origin or prolonged fever due to a suspected infection of a joint or vascular prosthesis were included in the study. The patients underwent either FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT scanning. Sixty-seven patients had a negative focal FDG-PET finding; in this group the method was regarded as unhelpful in determining a diagnosis, and no further investigation was pursued. We tried to obtain clinical confirmation for all patients with positive PET findings. Fifty-seven (46%) patients had positive FDG-PET findings. In six of them no further clinical information was available. Fifty-one patients with positive PET findings and 118 patients in total were subsequently evaluated. Systemic connective tissue disease was confirmed in 17 patients, lymphoma in three patients, inflammatory bowel disease in two patients, vascular prosthesis infection in seven patients, infection of a hip or knee replacement in seven patients, mycotic aneurysm in two patients, abscess in four patients and AIDS in one patient. In eight (16%) patients the finding was falsely positive. FDG-PET or PET/CT contributed to establishing a final diagnosis in 84% of the 51 patients with positive PET findings and in 36% of all 118 evaluated patients with prolonged fever. (orig.)

  11. Osteoblastoma is a metabolically active benign bone tumor on 18F-FDG PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M; Al-Omari, Ma'moon H; Audat, Ziad A; Alqudah, Mohammad A

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of a 9-y-old girl who on (18)F-FDG PET imaging was found to have a highly metabolically active sacral tumor with an average standarized uptake value of 6.2. The tumor was proven to be osteoblastoma by pathologic examination. Osteoblastoma is a relatively rare benign primary bone tumor and occurs predominantly in patients younger than 20 y. The most common area of involvement is the spine. Osteoblastoma has been reported to be metabolically active on (18)F-FDG PET imaging, with an average standarized uptake value of 3.2, which renders (18)F-FDG PET imaging unable to differentiate benign from malignant primary bone tumors. To our knowledge, only 5 cases of osteoblastoma evaluated by (18)F-FDG PET imaging have been reported in the literature; all were metabolically active on (18)F-FDG PET imaging. The objective of this case report is to show that a metabolically active primary bone tumor on (18)F-FDG PET imaging might be benign and not necessarily malignant.

  12. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...... to elucidate the potential value of FDG-PET/CT for staging of CRC. Data were retrieved from 67 consecutive patients (24-84 years) with histopathologically proven CRC who had undergone FDG-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for initial staging. Treatment plans before and after FDG-PET/CT were compared...

  13. Natural history of atherosclerotic disease progression as assessed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetterich, Holger; Rominger, Axel; Walter, Lisa; Habs, Maximilian; Volpers, Sarah; Hacker, Marcus; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bartenstein, Peter; Saam, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cardiovascular risk factors and plaque inflammation on the progression of atherosclerosis as assessed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with (18)F-radiolabled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Patients who received a (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan and follow-up scan 9-24 months later without systemic inflammation or steroid medication were eligible for the study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT included a full diagnostic contrast enhanced CT scan. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were documented. Calcified plaque volume, lumen area and (18)F-FDG uptake, quantified by the target-to-background ratio (TBR), were measured in the carotid arteries, aorta and iliac arteries. Influence of cardiovascular risk factors and vessel wall inflammation on atherosclerotic disease progression was analyzed. Ninety-four patients underwent baseline and follow-up whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT (mean follow-up time 14.5 ± 3.5 months). Annualized calcified plaque volume increased by 15.4 % (p history of atherosclerotic disease burden in multiple vascular beds and emphasize the value of morphological and physiologic information provided by (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

  14. Evaluation of malignant solid tumor in childhood with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Amane; Goto, Hiroaki; Kuroki, Fumiko

    2006-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG-PET (18F-deoxyglucose PET) was examined in evaluation of diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy of childhood malignant solid tumors. Subjects were 32 patients (16 males) of the median age of 7 y (1 - 27 y), involving those with neuroblastoma (9 cases), hepatoblastoma (4), chronic granulomatous disorder (4) and others (each ≤2). They underwent 75 FDG-PET examinations for diagnosis before and during treatment in authors' hospital in the period from May 2001 to December 2003. Standard uptake value (SUV), 1 x 1 cm region of interest (ROI) of abnormally high distribution area of radioactivity in the lesion/FDG dose/kg body wt., was used for evaluation: SUV>1.5 was defined positive. In neuroblastoma, FDG was found to be highly distributed and kinetics of SUV, to be useful for evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and early metastasis detection. In some cases of hepatoblastoma, the therapeutic effectiveness and recurrence were not satisfactorily evaluative. The distribution of FDG was not satisfactory in Wilms' tumor relative to other tumors. The PET was thought to be useful, despite their small case number examined, for those evaluations of Ewing's tumor, dysgerminoma and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Thus FDG-PET was found useful for detection, evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and early metastasis detection of pediatric malignant solid tumors. (T.I.)

  15. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  16. Current role of FDG PET/CT in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostakoglu, Lale [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Radiology, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1141, New York, NY (United States); Cheson, Bruce D. [Georgetown University Hospital, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The management approach in Hodgkin's (HL) and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) has shifted towards reducing the toxicity and long-term adverse effects associated with treatment while maintaining favorable outcomes in low-risk patients. The success of an individualized treatment strategy depends largely on accurate diagnostic tests both at staging and during therapy. In this regard, positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) with computed tomography (CT) has proved effective as a metabolic imaging tool with compelling evidence supporting its superiority over conventional modalities, particularly in staging and early evaluation of response. Eventually, this modality was integrated into the routine staging and restaging algorithm of lymphomas. This review will summarize the data on the proven and potential utility of PET/CT imaging for staging, response assessment, and restaging, describing current limitations of this imaging modality. (orig.)

  17. Local transport of 18F FDG: guidelines and practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Transport of radioactive material in India is governed by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) safety code AERB/SC/TR-1 which is based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material. The basic requirement for the transport of radioactive material is that the package containing the material shall be designed and prepared in such a way that during the whole process of transport, the radioactive material remains contained to prevent contamination and remains shielded to avoid unacceptable radiation exposure to cargo handlers and public. The types of packages used for the transport of radioactive materials are Excepted, Industrial, Type A, Type B(U) and Type B(M) packages. Type A packages are used for the transport of dispersible radioactive material of moderate activity such as nuclear medicine sources used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Transport of 18 F FDG comes under this category. The use of PET-CT in India has grown rapidly over the last few years. Currently, in India, there are around 60 PET-CTs and 15 cyclotrons. Most of these PET-CT facilities are supplied with FDG from off-site cyclotrons. The prime responsibility for ensuring safe transport of 18 F FDG lies with the consignor. The consignor needs to ensure that the appropriate packaging is selected for the transport of 18 F FDG and the package is prepared, marked and labeled as per the regulations. A material such as Tungsten or lead of appropriate thickness and design is used in packaging. Once the package is prepared as per the prescribed procedures, it can be transported by any mode of transport i.e. by road, rail, sea or air. Transport documents are very important during transport; they include (1) declaration by the consignor, (2) instructions to the carrier, (3) a Transport Emergency Card (TREMCARD) and (4) Instructions in writing to the carrier for emergency measures. In addition to this, one working radiation survey

  18. The role of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of residual germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballok, Z.E.; Scott, A.M.; Hannah, A.; Berlangieri, S.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Chan, J.G.; Hicks, R.; Burns, I.; McKendrich, J.; Tauro, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The role of FDG-PET is not well established in the assessment of patients with germ cell tumours. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of FDG-PET in detecting residual disease in patients with germ cell tumours, and its potential role in patient management. A total of 34 FDG-PET scans in 29 patients (23 patients (IF:22M) with nonseminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT), and 6 male patients with advanced seminoma) performed over a 4 yr period were evaluated. Results of FDG-PET studies were compared to pathology or follow-up. For NSGCT patients, pathological evidence of residual high grade tumour was seen in 9 patients on subsequent surgical specimens. FDG-PET studies were true positive in all of these patients. In 8 NSGCT patients pathology revealed fibrosis or teratoma at subsequent surgery: all had negative FDG-PET studies. There were no false positive, nor false negative FDG-PET studies. Resection was not performed in the remaining 6 patients, and on follow-up 2 patients had a progressive clinical course after positive FDG-PET scans, and 2 patients were in clinical remission 3 and 29 months after a negative FDG-PET study, respectively. Two patients were not evaluable. Of the 6 seminoma patients, 5 underwent further chemotherapy /radiotherapy after having abnormal FDG-PET studies due to clinical evidence of disease. The 6th pt with a negative FDG-PET study had stable retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement after 3 years follow-up. In our series FDG-PET was able to predict the presence of high grade malignancy within residual masses in patients with NSGCT and seminoma with a high accuracy. These initial results encourage further evaluation

  19. A comparison study of esophageal findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Kwan Hyeong; Kim, So Young; Cha, Jong Tae; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Lee, Narae; Yun, Mi Jin; Kang, Won Jun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the esophageal findings of 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). We retrospectively reviewed {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD findings of 369 subjects who underwent medical examination between January 2014 and December 2014. The range and intensity of esophageal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were visually analyzed. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the esophagus and around the esophagogastric (EG) junction was measured. EGD results were provided by the gastroenterologist. We compared the esophageal findings obtained using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD. There were typical linear FDG uptakes in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT patients who underwent EGD the same day. In visual analysis of the range and intensity of the {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, the patients who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and EGD on the same day showed relatively diffuse and discernible {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the esophagus. Reflux esophagitis was diagnosed in 59 subjects, and 27 of these were classified as higher than Los Angeles classification A. With an increasing degree of reflux esophagitis observed on EGD, the SUV{sub max} in the esophagus and around the EG junction was also increased. Our study showed that FDG uptake at the esophagus or the EG junction might be clinically significantly related to esophagitis. However, EGD performed before {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on the same day may affect the esophageal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake.

  20. Reassessment of FDG uptake in tumor cells: High FDG uptake as a reflection of oxygen-independent glycolysis dominant energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waki, A.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Sadato, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yokoyama, A.

    1997-01-01

    To determine appropriate use of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in the diagnosis of malignant tumors, the mechanism of enhanced FDG uptake in tumor cells was reassessed using in vitro cultured cell lines and 3 H-deoxyglucose (DG), in combination with possible parameters of aerobic and anaerobic energy production. The high DG uptake in the tumor cells reflected the dependency of energy production on anaerobic glycolysis, and paradoxically on low levels of aerobic oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. We discuss here factors underlying anaerobic glycolysis in tumor cells

  1. Assessment of the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis and management of children with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollenberger, Glenn P.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi; Rowe, Christopher C.; Reutens, David C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the results of FDG PET scans in children with refractory epilepsy referred to our centre over an 8-year period, with a view to ascertaining the impact of FDG PET on subsequent patient management. A questionnaire was used to assess the impact of FDG PET scan on diagnosis, management and clinical decision-making processes for epilepsy surgery from the managing clinician's perspective. FDG PET scan results were also compared with MRI, EEG and SPECT results and coded according to whether the FDG PET scan provided independent information and localisation of epileptogenic regions. A total of 118 eligible patients under the age of 14 years were identified, with questionnaires being completed on 113 evaluable patients (96%). The pre-PET management plan consisted of consideration for surgery in 92 patients (81%) and medical therapy for the remaining 21 patients (19%). Managing physicians rated FDG PET as providing information additional to that obtained with other investigations regarding epileptogenic sites in 88 patients (77%). FDG PET had either a minor or a major impact on clinical management in 58 patients (51%), principally with regard to surgical candidacy. FDG PET has a definite role in the assessment of paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy who are being considered for surgery. In the future, analysis of FDG PET data in specific subpopulations of children with refractory epilepsy may lead to novel insights regarding aetiology. (orig.)

  2. Poor predictive value of positive interim FDG-PET/CT in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarovici, Julien; Petrovanu, Cynthia; Danu, Alina; Ferme, Christophe; Ribrag, Vincent; Ghez, David [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Hematology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Terroir, Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Arfi-Rouche, Julia [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Radiology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Michot, Jean-Marie [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Drug Development (DITEP); Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France); Mussot, Sacha; Florea, Valentina [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa [Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Le Plessis Robinson (France). Dept. of Pathology; Dartigues, Peggy [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France). Dept. of Pathology; Paris Saclay Univ., Saint-Aubin (France)

    2017-11-15

    Though commonly used to assess response to therapy, the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET/CT in Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL) is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study on 36 consecutive patients treated at our institution for a PMBCL between 2006 and 2014. All patients with a positive interim FDG-PET/CT had undergone histological restaging consisting either in a surgical debulking of the residual lesion (15 patients) or a CT-guided core needle biopsy (two patients). All FDG-PET/CT were secondarily reviewed according to the more recent Deauville criteria. Interim FDG-PET/CT was considered positive in 17/36 patients using visual evaluation. Among these patients, 14 had a Deauville score of 4. Histological restaging was negative in all but one case, showing inflammation and/or fibrosis. After a median follow-up of 48.5 months, a total of five patients have relapsed, two patients in the positive FDG-PET/CT group, and three patients in the negative FDG-PET/CT group, respectively. These data indicate that a positive interim FDG-PET/CT does not reflect persistence of active disease in the vast majority of PMBCL cases. The relapse rate appears similar regardless of interim FDG-PET/CT results and interpretation criteria. This suggests that interim FDG-PET/CT has a poor positive predictive value, thus kt should be used with caution in PMBCL. (orig.)

  3. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies.18F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  4. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET in acute ischemic stroke. Assessment of hyper accumulation around the lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Seiji; Hata, Takashi; Nakajima, Tooru; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    Although pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease has been reported previously, few clinical studies of glucose metabolism in acute stroke have been published. Purpose of this study is to evaluate glucose metabolism in acute stroke patients by 18 F-FDG PET. Twenty-four patients with acute ischemic stroke were involved in this study. All subjects underwent MRI (conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR angiography), CT and 18 F-FDG PET. 18 F-FDG PET was performed within 1 to 7 days after the first episode. 18 F-FDG PET images were visually evaluated as well as MRI and CT images. Four patients out of 24 showed no abnormal 18 F-FDG accumulation, while MRI demonstrated abnormal signal area and abnormal vascular findings that suggested acute stroke. Decreased 18 F-FDG accumulation corresponding with abnormal signal area on MR images was noted in 20 cases. In 7 cases among these 20 with decreased 18 F-FDG, hyper accumulation of 18 F-FDG was recognized around the decreased accumulation area. Increased 18 F-FDG accumulation (increased glucose metabolization) around the lesion may be due to: acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis, activated repair process of damaged brain tissue, i.e., phagocytosis and gliosis, and neuronal excitation by excito-toxic amino acids which can be released after ischemia. (author)

  5. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Lundgren, J D; Da Cunha-Bang, C

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. (18)F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic...... unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. METHODS: Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET...

  6. Assessment of the role of FDG PET in the diagnosis and management of children with refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollenberger, Glenn P.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); Rowe, Christopher C. [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Reutens, David C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E. [University of Melbourne, Department of Neurology, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Austin Hospital, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Heidelberg, Victoria (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the results of FDG PET scans in children with refractory epilepsy referred to our centre over an 8-year period, with a view to ascertaining the impact of FDG PET on subsequent patient management. A questionnaire was used to assess the impact of FDG PET scan on diagnosis, management and clinical decision-making processes for epilepsy surgery from the managing clinician's perspective. FDG PET scan results were also compared with MRI, EEG and SPECT results and coded according to whether the FDG PET scan provided independent information and localisation of epileptogenic regions. A total of 118 eligible patients under the age of 14 years were identified, with questionnaires being completed on 113 evaluable patients (96%). The pre-PET management plan consisted of consideration for surgery in 92 patients (81%) and medical therapy for the remaining 21 patients (19%). Managing physicians rated FDG PET as providing information additional to that obtained with other investigations regarding epileptogenic sites in 88 patients (77%). FDG PET had either a minor or a major impact on clinical management in 58 patients (51%), principally with regard to surgical candidacy. FDG PET has a definite role in the assessment of paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy who are being considered for surgery. In the future, analysis of FDG PET data in specific subpopulations of children with refractory epilepsy may lead to novel insights regarding aetiology. (orig.)

  7. Application of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG in plant imaging: past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol eFatangare

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review article is to explore and establish the current status of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG applications in plant imaging. In present article, we review all the previous literature on its experimental merits to formulate a consistent and inclusive picture of FDG applications in plant imaging research.FDG is a [18F]fluorine labeled glucose analog in which C-2 hydroxyl group has been replaced by positron emitting [18F] radioisotope. FDG being a positron emitting radiotracer could allow for in vivo imaging. FDG mimics glucose chemically and structurally. Its uptake and distribution is found to be similar to that of glucose in animal models. FDG is commonly used as a radiotracer for glucose in medical diagnostics and in vivo animal imaging studies but rarely in plant imaging. Tsuji et al (2002 first reported FDG uptake and distribution in tomato plants. Later, Hattori et al (2008 described FDG translocation in intact sorghum plants and suggested that it could be used as a tracer for photoassimilate translocation in plants. These findings raised interest among other plant scientists which resulted in recent surge of research papers involving FDG as a tracer in plants. In total, there have been 7 studies describing FDG imaging applications in plants. These studies describe FDG applications ranging from monitoring radiotracer translocation to analyzing solute transport, root uptake, photoassimilates tracing, carbon allocation, or glycoside biosynthesis. Recently, Fatangare et al (2015 characterized FDG metabolism in plants which was a crucial aspect of understanding and validating FDG applications in plant research. Although all of the above studies significantly advanced our understanding of FDG translocation and metabolism in plants, it also raised new questions. Here, we take a look at the previous results cumulatively to form a comprehensive picture of FDG translocation, metabolism, and applications in plants.In conclusion, we

  8. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  9. The codeposition of chromium and aluminum on nickel-based alloys by pack cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, Charles Paul

    Several variables of the pack cementation process were studied to determine their effect on the codeposition of chromium and aluminum on Ni270 and PWA1484. Specifically, the amount and composition of the master alloy (95Cr 5Al and 90Cr 10Al) and activator (NHsb4Cl and CrClsb2) were varied to determine their effect on the composition of the coatings produced. It was found that for coatings on Ni270, three deposition regimes exist, aluminizing, chromizing, and codepositing, which are produced by specific combinations of these variables. The conditions used to produce these coatings are summarized in the form of deposition maps. Corresponding coatings were also produced using PWA1484 as the substrate. In order to elucidate the effect of the amount of master alloy and the composition of the activator, several pack compositions were studied as a function of time. The pack composition as a function of coating time and pack position relative to the sample surface was studied by vacuum impregnating the pack and sample in epoxy resin and analyzing individual particles by microprobe analysis. It was found that decreasing the amount of master alloy increases the overall rate of depletion of aluminum from the pack, which leads to an increase in chromium deposition. An aluminum depletion zone was formed adjacent to the sample at short times for all conditions studied, and was thus not a function of the pack variables studied. Use of CrClsb2 as the activator led to a decrease in the depletion of aluminum relative to NHsb4Cl activated packs containing the same amount of master alloy, which was found to be due to the condensed nature of the CrClsb2 activator. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations were used to support the claims of this study. Three types of coatings on PWA1484, an aluminide, chromide, and codeposited, were developed and evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Two industrial coatings, PWA73 and PWA70/73, were also evaluated for comparison. The conditions

  10. Volatile compounds and odor preferences of ground beef added with garlic and red wine, and irradiated with charcoal pack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Haeng; Yun, Hyejeong; Lee, Ju Woon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation is the most efficient non-thermal technology for improving hygienic quality and extending the shelf-life of food products. One of the adverse effects of food irradiation, however, is off-flavor production, which significantly affects the sensory preferences for certain foods. In this study, garlic (5%, w/w) and red wine (1:1, w/w) were added to ground beef to increase the radiation sensitivity of pathogens and improve meat odor/flavor. Samples were irradiated at 0 or 5 kGy in the presence of charcoal pack. SPME-GC–MS analysis was performed to measure the changes in the volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of the samples. The amount of total volatile compounds produced from ground beef was greater when the sample was irradiated. When garlic and red wine were added to the ground beef, the amount of volatile compounds significantly increased, and the amount of volatile compounds increased even further after irradiation. However, when the samples were irradiated with charcoal pack, the amount of volatile compounds decreased significantly. Sensory evaluation indicated that charcoal pack significantly increased the odor preferences for both irradiated and non-irradiated ground beef added with garlic. These results indicated that addition of charcoal pack to ground beef could reduce off-odor problems induced by irradiation, and this effect was consistent even when certain additives such as garlic and red wine were added. - Highlights: ► Garlic and red wine were added to ground beef and irradiated at 5 kGy in the presence of charcoal pack. ► When the samples were irradiated with charcoal pack, the amount of volatile compounds decreased significantly and it affected sensory score. ► Thus, addition of charcoal pack to ground beef could reduce off-odor problems induced by irradiation. ► This effect was consistent when additives, such as garlic and red wine, were added into ground beef.

  11. Sanitation and Microbiological Quality in Production Field and Fruit-Packing Shed of Persimmon and Satsuma Mandarin in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidemi Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sanitation treatments including chlorination (ca 10 ppm available chlorine of agricultural water and ethyl alcohol (70% spraying on packing shed equipment on microbial contamination on fruits and the environment were determined and compared with those in conventionally managed field and packing shed in persimmon and satsuma mandarin orchards. Chlorinated water reduced the microbial counts to levels below the lower limit of detection (1.4 log CFU/ml for bacteria and 2.0 log CFU/ml for fungi in most agricultural water samples. Microbial counts of pesticide solution, which contained the agricultural water or chlorinated water for the mixture, were lower in sanitary field than in control field in both fruit orchards. The number of bacterial and mold species detected in agricultural water, chlorinated water, and pesticide solution were almost proportional to microbial counts in each sample throughout the year. The chlorination treatment of agricultural water tended to reduce the counts of mesophiles and fungi on the peel of persimmon fruit during production season. The ethyl alcohol spray treatment on packing shed equipment resulted in a substantial microbial reduction on plastic harvest basket and container in persimmon orchard and plastic harvest basket and container, gloves, scissors, and size sorter in satsuma mandarin orchard. The spray application on packing shed equipment reduced the counts of mesophiles and fungi on the peel of persimmon fruit by >1 log CFU/g. The number of satsuma mandarin packing shed equipment containing the species found on fruit peel was higher in control than in sanitary packing shed. No human pathogens such as verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella were detected in any of the fruit and environmental samples. These results indicate that uses of sanitizers such as chlorine for agricultural water and ethyl alcohol for packing shed equipment would be useful in a good agricultural practices

  12. Sanitation and Microbiological Quality in Production Field and Fruit-Packing Shed of Persimmon and Satsuma Mandarin in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidemi Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sanitation treatments including chlorination (ca 10 ppm available chlorine of agricultural water and ethyl alcohol (70% spraying on packing shed equipment on microbial contamination on fruits and the environment were determined and compared with those in conventionally managed field and packing shed in persimmon and satsuma mandarin orchards. Chlorinated water reduced the microbial counts to levels below the lower limit of detection (1.4 log CFU/ml for bacteria and 2.0 log CFU/ml for fungi in most agricultural water samples. Microbial counts of pesticide solution, which contained the agricultural water or chlorinated water for the mixture, were lower in sanitary field than in control field in both fruit orchards. The number of bacterial and mold species detected in agricultural water, chlorinated water, and pesticide solution were almost proportional to microbial counts in each sample throughout the year. The chlorination treatment of agricultural water tended to reduce the counts of mesophiles and fungi on the peel of persimmon fruit during production season. The ethyl alcohol spray treatment on packing shed equipment resulted in a substantial microbial reduction on plastic harvest basket and container in persimmon orchard and plastic harvest basket and container, gloves, scissors, and size sorter in satsuma mandarin orchard. The spray application on packing shed equipment reduced the counts of mesophiles and fungi on the peel of persimmon fruit by 1 log CFU/g. The number of satsuma mandarin packing shed equipment containing the species found on fruit peel was higher in control than in sanitary packing shed. No human pathogens such as verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella were detected in any of the fruit and environmental samples. These results indicate that uses of sanitizers such as chlorine for agricultural water and ethyl alcohol for packing shed equipment would be useful in a good agricultural practices

  13. Fast charge implications: Pack and cell analysis and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanim, Tanvir R.; Shirk, Matthew G.; Bewley, Randy L.; Dufek, Eric J.; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of 50-kW (about 2C) direct current fast charging on a full-size battery electric vehicle's battery pack in comparison to a pack exclusively charged at 3.3 kW, which is the common alternating current Level 2 charging power level. Comparable scaled charging protocols are also independently applied to individual cells at three different temperatures, 20 °C, 30 °C, and 40 °C, to perform a comparative analysis with the packs. Dominant cell-level aging modes were identified through incremental capacity analysis and compared with full packs to gain a clear understanding of additional key factors that affect pack aging. While the cell-level study showed a minor impact on performance due to direct current fast charging, the packs showed a significantly higher rate of capacity fade under similar charging protocols. This indicates that pack-level aging cannot be directly extrapolated from cell evaluation. Delayed fast charging, completing shortly before discharge, was found to have less of an impact on battery degradation than conventional alternating current Level 2 charging.

  14. Packing Nonspherical Particles: All Shapes Are Not Created Equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-02-01

    Over the past decade there has been increasing interest in the effects of particle shape on the characteristics of dense particle packings, since deviations from sphericity can lead to more realistic models of granular media, nanostructured materials, and tissue architecture. It is clear the that the broken rotational symmetry of a nonspherical particle is a crucial aspect in determining its resulting packing characteristics, but given the infinite variety of possible shapes (ellipsoids, superballs, regular and irregular polyhedra, etc.) it is desirable to formulate packing organizing principles based the particle shape. Such principles are beginning to be elucidated; see Refs. 1 and 2 and references therein. Depending upon whether the particle has central symmetry, inequivalent principle axes, and smooth or flat surfaces, we can describe the nature of its densest packing (which is typically periodic) as well as its disordered jammed states (which may or may not be isostatic). Changing the shape of a particle can dramatically alter its packing attributes. This tunability capability via particle shape could be used to tailor many-particle systems (e.g., colloids and granular media) to have designed crystal, liquid and glassy states. [4pt] [1] S. Torquato and F. H. Stillinger, ``Jammed Hard-Particle Packings: From Kepler to Bernal and Beyond," Rev. Modern Phys. 82, 2633 (2010). [0pt] [2] Y. Jiao and S. Torquato, Communication: ``A Packing of Truncated Tetrahedra That Nearly Fills All of Space and its Melting Properties," J. Chem. Phys. 135, 151101 (2011).

  15. Identifying counterfeit cigarette packs using ultraviolet irradiation and light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Marin; He, Yi; von Lampe, Klaus; Li, Yanlei

    2017-01-01

    Develop a method that yields high rates of sensitivity and specificity for determination of counterfeit cigarette packs for three popular brands: Newport, Marlboro ('Red') and Marlboro Gold. Using systematic keyword searches, we identified industry documents from the University of California, San Francisco's Legacy Tobacco Documents Library that describe the use of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and close examination of printing quality to distinguish between counterfeit and genuine cigarette packs. Guided by these documents, we identified six markers for counterfeit cigarettes across three popular brands using counterfeit cigarette packs (N=68) seized by law enforcement agencies in the USA. We assessed the diagnostic test accuracy of these markers and tested it against genuine packs (N=22) using receiver operating characteristic curves analysis. We find that counterfeit cigarette packs fluoresce to long-wave UV irradiation and display poor printing quality. The optimal cut-off value varies among the three brands. For example, counterfeit Newport and Marlboro packaging can be reliably classified with two of six characteristics, while Marlboro Gold requires four. Researchers who conduct littered pack and pack swap studies are urged to include this method to assess the share of counterfeit cigarettes, and compare the result against tobacco industry figures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Enabling Microliquid Chromatography by Microbead Packing of Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvin, Manuel; Zheng, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The microbead packing is the critical element required in the success of on-chip microfabrication of critical microfluidic components for in-situ analysis and detection of chiral amino acids. In order for microliquid chromatography to occur, there must be a stationary phase medium within the microchannel that interacts with the analytes present within flowing fluid. The stationary phase media are the microbeads packed by the process discussed in this work. The purpose of the microliquid chromatography is to provide a lightweight, low-volume, and low-power element to separate amino acids and their chiral partners efficiently to understand better the origin of life. In order to densely pack microbeads into the microchannels, a liquid slurry of microbeads was created. Microbeads were extracted from a commercially available high-performance liquid chromatography column. The silica beads extracted were 5 microns in diameter, and had surface coating of phenyl-hexyl. These microbeads were mixed with a 200- proof ethanol solution to create a microbead slurry with the right viscosity for packing. A microfilter is placed at the outlet via of the microchannel and the slurry is injected, then withdrawn across a filter using modified syringes. After each injection, the channel is flushed with ethanol to enhance packing. This cycle is repeated numerous times to allow for a tightly packed channel of microbeads. Typical microbead packing occurs in the macroscale into tubes or channels by using highly pressurized systems. Moreover, these channels are typically long and straight without any turns or curves. On the other hand, this method of microbead packing is completed within a microchannel 75 micrometers in diameter. Moreover, the microbead packing is completed into a serpentine type microchannel, such that it maximizes microchannel length within a microchip. Doing so enhances the interactions of the analytes with the microbeads to separate efficiently amino acids and amino acid

  17. [18F]-FDG positron imaging in clinical management of lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, J N; Haioun, C; Rain, J D; Meignan, M; Wioland, M; Misset, J L; Grahek, D; Kerrou, K; Montravers, F

    2001-06-01

    [18F]-FDG is a glucose analogue labelled with a short-lived positron emitter. During the past decade, it has been proposed to detect in vivo lymphoma lesions with PET, a new non-invasive imaging modality. We aimed at reviewing the current experience with FDG in several clinical settings of lymphoma. Due to the lack of specificity of FDG for lymphoma, histology remains compulsory to establish the diagnosis. Nevertheless, in the case of AIDS, FDG imaging has been proposed to differentiate lymphoma and opportunistic infections in brain lesions. To explore lymphoma extension, FDG-PET highlights more lesions than CT or the clinical examination and results in upstaging 13% of cases. It could also be used for selecting a site for biopsy when the location considered first clinically is difficult to access. Staging lymphoma with FDG-PET also provides baseline images for subsequent evaluation of therapy, which is one of the most promising indications: a negative scan predicts response to therapy and subsequent remission with a predictive value of 89%, and a positive scan either reflects resistance or predicts relapse with a predictive value of 83%. The current achievement of FDG imaging is the early detection of recurrence or of viable tissue in residual masses that remain several months after treatment. Both its sensitivity (84%) and its specificity (95%) overwhelm the values of conventional imaging, mainly CT and gallium-67 scintigraphy. When PET, as a new clinical imaging modality, is not yet widely demanded by clinicians and/or the number of FDG examinations is less than 500 per year, a 'hybrid' gamma-camera or CDET can be an alternative to dedicated PET. For 3 years, we have been using FDG-CDET in the 2D mode without attenuation correction, and obtained the following accuracy in a total of 40 examinations that could be evaluated: 85% for assessment of chemotherapy and 92% to detect recurrences and evaluate residual masses. Our preliminary results also stress the

  18. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Nishidai Clinic Diagnostic Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects

  19. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects with high

  20. Defining optimal tracer activities in pediatric oncologic whole-body18F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schäfer, Jürgen F

    2016-12-01

    To explore the feasibility of reducing administered tracer activities and to assess optimal activities for combined 18 F-FDG-PET/MRI in pediatric oncology. 30 18 F-FDG-PET/MRI examinations were performed on 24 patients with known or suspected solid tumors (10 girls, 14 boys, age 12 ± 5.6 [1-18] years; PET scan duration: 4 min per bed position). Low-activity PET images were retrospectively simulated from the originally acquired data sets using randomized undersampling of list mode data. PET data of different simulated administered activities (0.25-2.5 MBq/kg body weight) were reconstructed with or without point spread function (PSF) modeling. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV mean and SUV max ) as well as SUV variation (SUV var ) were measured in physiologic organs and focal FDG-avid lesions. Detectability of organ structures and of focal 18 F-FDG-avid lesions as well as the occurrence of false-positive PET lesions were assessed at different simulated tracer activities. Subjective image quality steadily declined with decreasing tracer activities. Compared to the originally acquired data sets, mean relative deviations of SUV mean and SUV max were below 5 % at 18 F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg or higher. Over 95 % of anatomic structures and all pathologic focal lesions were detectable at 1.5 MBq/kg 18 F-FDG. Detectability of anatomic structures and focal lesions was significantly improved using PSF. No false-positive focal lesions were observed at tracer activities of 1 MBq/kg 18 F-FDG or higher. Administration of 18 F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg is, thus, feasible without obvious diagnostic shortcomings, which is equivalent to a dose reduction of more than 50 % compared to current recommendations. Significant reduction in administered 18 F-FDG tracer activities is feasible in pediatric oncologic PET/MRI. Appropriate activities of 18 F-FDG or other tracers for specific clinical questions have to be further established in selected patient

  1. Carbon-11 choline or FDG-PET for staging of oesophageal cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, P.L.; Que, T.H.; Vaalburg, W.; Pruim, J.; Elsinga, P.; Plukker, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using carbon-11 choline (CHOL) positron emission tomography (PET) for the staging of oesophageal cancer, in comparison with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, using histopathological findings as the gold standard. Eighteen patients were studied: 16 patients with cancer of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction and two with in situ carcinoma/high-grade dysplasia. PET imaging was performed 5 min (CHOL) or 90 min (FDG) after injection of 370 MBq of the tracer. PET images were analysed by two independent and blinded physicians using visual and standardised uptake value (SUV) analysis. PET results were compared with surgical and histopathological findings. FDG-PET was able to detect all (100%) of the 16 malignant primary lesions, while CHOL-PET detected 73%. In situ carcinoma (n=1) and high-grade dysplasia (n=1) were not visualised with either tracer. Diffuse uptake of the tracers was noted in areas of Barrett's oesophagitis. Twelve patients had locoregional metastases (N1) that were not detected with either FDG or CHOL. Six patients had additional distant nodal (M1a) metastases; four of six (66%) were visualised by FDG, and three of five (60%) by CHOL-PET. On a lesion basis, FDG-PET detected 10/12 non-regional metastases (sensitivity 83%), while CHOL-PET detected 5/12 (sensitivity 42%). Haematogenous distant metastases (M1b) were positive on FDG-PET in three of four patients, and on CHOL-PET in two of four. SUV values were significantly higher for FDG (FDG 6.6±3.5, CHOL 5.5±2.5, P=0.04). CHOL-PET is able to visualise oesophageal carcinoma and its metastases, but appears to be inferior to FDG-PET. Presumably this is the result of lower tumoural uptake and considerable non-specific uptake of CHOL in liver, stomach wall, pancreas and small intestine. Further studies are needed to confirm these data. (orig.)

  2. FDG-PET/CT in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with suspected cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Jordy Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Kwee, Thomas Christian

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: To determine the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing renal or hepatic cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: This retrospective single-center study included all patients with ADPKD who underwent FDG-PET/CT because of suspected cyst infection between 2010 and 2017. Results: Thirty FDG-PET/CT scans of thirty individual patients were included, of which 19 were positive for cyst infection. According to a previously established clinical and biochemical reference standard, FDG-PET/CT achieved sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 75.0%, positive predictive value of 84.2%, and negative predictive value of 81.8% for the diagnosis of cyst infection. In 5 cases, FDG-PET/CT suggested a different pathologic process that explained the symptoms, including pneumonia ( n = 1), generalized peritonitis ( n = 1), pancreatitis ( n = 1), colitis ( n = 1), and cholangitis ( n = 1). Total duration of hospital stay and duration between FDG-PET/CT scan and hospital discharge of patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection were significantly longer than those with a negative scan ( P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively). Creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection than in patients with a negative scan ( P = 0.015). Other comparisons of clinical parameters (age, gender, presence of fever (>38.5°C) for more than 3 days, abdominal pain, history of solid organ transplantation and nephrectomy, immune status), laboratory values (C-reactive protein level (CRP), leukocyte count, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and microbiologic results (blood and urine cultures) were not significantly different ( P = 0.13-1.00) between FDG-PET/CT-positive and -negative patients. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is a useful and recommendable (upfront) imaging modality for the evaluation of

  3. FDG uptake in the fatty tissues of supraclavicular and the vascular structure of the lung hilum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Yaping; Liu Gang; Li Miao

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate FDG uptake on the sites of supraclavicular region (SR) and the lung hilum (LH) and find out the exact tissues of the uptake. Methods: Supraclavicular region (SR) and lung hilum (LH) are common sites for lymph node metastases. A commonly reported site of non-malignant FDG uptake on PET imaging in the SR is muscular uptake. PET/CT offers a unique technique to correlate PET findings with CT anatomy in the SR and EH. From September 2002 to March 2003, 147 consecutive clinical patients imaged by FDG PET/CT whole-body scan (GE Discovery LS, CT attenuation correction, OSEM reconstruction) were retrospectively reviewed. The presence of abnormal FDG uptake on PET images in the sites of SR and LH regions was evaluated and the corresponding CT findings on the same regions were also assessed. Results: Of 147 patients, 8 cases (2M, 6F and mean age 44 years) were found with increased symmetrical FDG uptake in the regions of the lower neck and shoulder as well as costo-vertebral articulations, the positive rates were 2.1% and 11.3 % for men and women respectively, and the average rate was 5.4%. However, no FDG uptake was seen in the greater muscular structures of the cervical or thoracic spine. FDG uptake was seen in the fatty tissue between the shoulder muscle and the dorsal thoracic wall, but not within the muscles itself. Five patients (3M, 2F, age 56-74 years,3.4%) showed abnormal LH FDG uptake, which were definitely localized in the vascular structure of the lung hilum by CT Conclusion: Co-registered PET/CT imaging shows that the FDG uptake been well known in the SR and LH regions are not fully located in greater muscular structures and lymph nodes, but in the costo-vertebral articulation complex of the thoracic spine and fatty tissue of the shoulders as well as in the vascular structure of both lung hilum. The FDG uptake in the fatty tissue of the shoulders was mostly seen in women, while the uptake in vascular structure of the lung hilum were

  4. Association between {sup 18}F-FDG avidity and the BRAF mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Hyun; Han, Sang Won; Lee, Hyo Sang; Chae, Sun Young; Lee, Jong Jin; Song, Dong Eun; Ryu, Jin Sook [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The BRAF mutation, a potential prognostic factor in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), is associated with a high expression of the glucose transporter gene. We investigated which clinicopathologic factors, including BRAF mutation status, influence {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) avidity. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients who underwent BRAF analysis from biopsy-confirmed PTC and {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography within 6 months before undergoing thyroid surgery from September 2008 to August 2014. Tumors were considered to be {sup 18}F-FDG avid if the uptake was greater than that of the liver. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake of PTCs was also analyzed semiquantitatively using SUV{sub max}. The association between {sup 18}F-FDG avidity and clinicopathologic variables (age, tumor size, perithyroidal extension, cervical lymph node status, and BRAF mutation status) was investigated. Twenty-nine (52.7 %) of 55 patients had {sup 18}F-FDG-avid PTCs. PTCs with the BRAF mutation showed higher {sup 18}F-FDG avidity (24/38, 63.2 %) than those without (5/17, 29.4 %). The BRAF mutation (p = 0.025) and tumor size (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with {sup 18}F-FDG avidity in univariate analysis, and the BRAF mutation status remained significant after adjusting for tumor size in multivariate analysis (p = 0.015). In the subgroup of tumor size ≥ 1 cm, the BRAF mutation was the only factor significantly associated with {sup 18}F-FDG avidity (p = 0.021). The mean SUV{sub max} of PTCs with the BRAF mutation was significantly higher than that of those without (4.89 ± 6.12 vs. 1.96 ± 1.10, p = 0.039). The BRAF mutation must be one of the most important factors influencing {sup 18}F-FDG avidity in PTCs, especially in those with a tumor size ≥ 1 cm.

  5. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; Jasilionis, Andrius; Domagalski, Marcin J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Kuisiene, Nomeda; Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported

  6. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jasilionis, Andrius [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Kuisiene, Nomeda [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier, E-mail: xgrcri@ibmb.csic.es [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported.

  7. SU-D-201-03: Imaging Cellular Pharmacokinetics of 18F-FDG in Inflammatory/Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaman, R; Tuerkcan, S; Mahmoudi, M; Toshinobu, T; Kosuge, H; Yang, P; Chin, F; McConnell, M; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is a progressive inflammatory condition that underlies coronary artery disease (CAD)—the leading cause of death in the USA. Thus, understating the metabolism of inflammatory cells can be a valuable tool for investigating CAD. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to successfully investigate the pharmacokinetics of [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake in a single macrophages and compared with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with a novel imaging technique, radioluminescence microscopy, initially developed for cancer imaging. Methods: Live cells were cultured sparsely on Matrigel in a glass-bottom dish and starved for 1 hour before incubation with 250 microCi of 18F-FDG for 45 minutes. Excess radiotracer was removed using DMEM medium without glucose. Before imaging, DMEM (1 mL) was added to the cell culture and a 100 microm-thin CdWO4 scintillator plate was placed on top of the cells. Light produced following beta decay was imaged with a highly sensitive inverted microscope (LV200, Olympus) fitted with a 40x/1.3 high-NA oil objective, and an EM-CCD camera. The images were collected over 18,000 frames with 4×4 binning (1200 MHz EM Gain, 300ms exposure). Custom-written software was developed in MATLAB for image processing (Figure 1). For statistical analysis 10 different region-of-interests (ROIs) were selected for each cell type. Results: Figures 2A–2B show bright-field/fusion images for all three different cell types. The relationship between cell-to-cell comparisons was found to be linear for macrophages unlike iPSCs and MSCs, which were best fitted with moving or rolling average (Figure 2C). The average observed decay of 18F-FDG in a single cell of MSCs per second (0.067) was 20% and 36% higher compared to iPSCs (0.054) and macrophages (0.043), respectively (Figure 2D). Conclusion: MSCs was found to be 2–3x more sensitive to glucose molecule despite constant parameters for each

  8. FDG uptake in vaginal tampons is caused by urinary contamination and related to tampon position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Irene A.; Crook, David W.; Treyer, Valerie; Hany, Thomas F.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scheiner, David A. [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the study was to determine the aetiology of FDG uptake in vaginal tampons (VT), a known artefact in premenopausal women evaluated by PET/CT. This Institutional Review Board approved study consisted of retrospective and prospective parts. The retrospective analysis included 685 women examined between January 2008 and December 2009 regarding VT presence. PET/CT images were analysed to determine the localization and the standardized uptake value (SUV) of VTs. We prospectively recruited 24 women (20-48 years old) referred for staging or follow-up in an oncology setting between February and April 2010, who were provided a commercial VT to be used during the entire examination after obtaining written informed consent. After image acquisition, VTs were individually analysed for creatinine concentration and blood traces. Statistical significance was tested with the Mann-Whitney U test. In the retrospective part, 38 of 685 women were found to have a VT of which 17 (45%) were FDG positive. A statistically significant correlation was found between FDG activity and VT position below the pubococcygeal line (PCL) (13 {+-} 11.2 mm). In the prospective study, 7 of 24 (29%) women had increased FDG activity in their VTs (SUV 18.8 {+-} 11 g/ml) but were not menstruating. FDG-positive VTs were significantly lower in position (14.6 {+-} 11.4 mm,below the PCL) than FDG-negative VTs (p = 0.039). The creatinine concentration was significantly increased in all seven positive VTs (931 {+-} 615 {mu}mol/l). FDG uptake in VTs is caused by urine contamination, which is likely related to localization below the PCL resulting in contact with urine during voiding. (orig.)

  9. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold stand