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Sample records for fatty acid effect

  1. Effects of varying levels of n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio on plasma fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of varying dietary levels of n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio on plasma fatty acid composition and prostanoid synthesis in pregnant rats. Four groups consisting of seven rats per group of non pregnant rats were fed diets with either a very low n-6:n-3 ratio of 50% soybean oil (SBO): 50% cod liver oil ...

  2. Fatty acid effects on fibroblast cholesterol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shireman, R.B.; Muth, J.; Lopez, C.

    1987-01-01

    Two cell lines of normal (CRL 1475, GM5565) and of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (CM 486,488) fibroblasts were preincubated with medium containing the growth factor ITS, 2.5 mg/ml fatty acid-free BSA, or 35.2 μmol/ml of these fatty acids complexed with 2.5 mg BSA/ml: stearic (18:0), caprylic (8:0), oleic (18:1;9), linoleic (18:2;9,12), linolenic (18:3;9,12,15), docosahexaenoic (22:6;4,7,10,13,16,19)(DHA) or eicosapentaenoic (20:5;5,8,11,14,17)(EPA). After 20 h, cells were incubated for 2 h with 0.2 μCi [ 14 C]acetate/ml. Cells were hydrolyzed; an aliquot was quantitated for radioactivity and protein. After saponification and extraction with hexane, radioactivity in the aqueous and organic phases was determined. The FH cells always incorporated 30-90% more acetate/mg protein than normal cells but the pattern of the fatty acid effects was similar in both types. When the values were normalized to 1 for the BSA-only group, cells with ITS had the greatest [ 14 C]acetate incorporation (1.45) followed by the caprylic group (1.14). Cells incubated with 18:3, 20:6 or 22:6 incorporated about the same amount as BSA-only. Those preincubated with 18:2, 18:1, 18:0 showed the least acetate incorporation (0.87, 0.59 and 0.52, respectively). The percentage of total 14 C counts which extracted into hexane was much greater in FH cells; however, these values varied with the fatty acid, e.g., 1.31(18:0) and 0.84(8:0) relative to 1

  3. Dietary effects on fatty acid metabolism of common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csengeri, I

    1996-01-01

    The paper summarises experimental data demonstrating effects of various dietary factors exerting changes in the fatty acid composition and fatty acid metabolism of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). Among the dietary factors (1) supplementary feeding in fish ponds, (2) absence of essential fatty acids (EFA) in the diet, (3) starvation, and (4) ration level were studied. It was concluded that supplementary feeding in carp rearing ponds is frequently excessive in the Hungarian carp culture practice, inducing slight EFA-deficiency and enhancing de novo fatty acid synthesis. This latter caused enlarged fat depots with high oleic acid contents in the fish organs and tissues. EFA-deficient diets enhanced the synthesis of oleic acid except when high rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis was suppressed by dietary fatty acids. Feeding EFA-deficient diets caused gradual decrease in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and gradual increase in that of Mead's acid: 20:3(n-9), an indicator of the EFA-deficiency. At prolonged starvation, polyunsaturated fatty acids of the structural lipids were somehow protected and mainly oleic acid was utilised for energy production. At high ration levels, excessive exogenous polyunsaturates were decomposed, and probably converted to oleic acid or energy. Starvation subsequent to the feeding the fish at various ration levels, reflected adaptive changes in the fatty acid metabolism: Below and above the ration level required for the most efficient feed utilisation for growth, decomposition processes of the fatty acid metabolism were accelerated.

  4. Effect of cottonseed and canola seed on unsaturated fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    student

    biohydrogenation in the rumen and showed that the type of dietary fat has a marked impact on lipid ... Keywords: Extruded oil seed, fatty acid, lamb plasma, liver, Mehraban lambs ..... Effects of diets low in fat or essential fatty acids on the fatty ... Review: Erythrocyte membrane: structure, function, and pathophysiology. Vet.

  5. The effect of conjugated linoleic acid on the fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rahim aydin

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was reported to increase the levels of saturated fatty ... Hence, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary CLA on the fatty acid ..... silver ion-high performance liquid chromatography.

  6. Effect of dietary fatty acids on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in healthy male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Anette; Holmer, G.; Lund, Pia

    2005-01-01

    interesterified test fats with equal amounts of palmitic acid ( P fat), stearic acid (S fat), trans-18: 1 isomers (T fat), oleic acid (O fat), or linoleic acid (L fat) were tested. Subjects: A total of 16 healthy, normolipidaemic males ( age 23 +/- 2 y) were recruited. Interventions: The participants ingested fat......Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of trans-18: 1 isomers compared to other fatty acids, especially saturates, on the postprandial fatty acid composition of triacylglycerols ( TAG) in chylomicrons and VLDL. Design: A randomised crossover experiment where five......-rich test meals ( 1 g fat per kg body weight) and the fatty acid profiles of chylomicron and VLDL TAG were followed for 8 h. Results: The postprandial fatty acid composition of chylomicron TAG resembled that of the ingested fats. The fatty acids in chylomicron TAG were randomly distributed among the three...

  7. Effects of fatty acid activation on photosynthetic production of fatty acid-based biofuels in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Qianqian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to drop in fuel molecules in a single biological system can be achieved from fatty acid-based biofuels such as fatty alcohols and alkanes. These molecules have similar properties to fossil fuels but can be produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Results Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strains containing either overexpression or deletion of the slr1609 gene, which encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AAS, have been constructed. The complete segregation and deletion in all mutant strains was confirmed by PCR analysis. Blocking fatty acid activation by deleting slr1609 gene in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 led to a doubling of the amount of free fatty acids and a decrease of alkane production by up to 90 percent. Overexpression of slr1609 gene in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 had no effect on the production of either free fatty acids or alkanes. Overexpression or deletion of slr1609 gene in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strain with the capability of making fatty alcohols by genetically introducing fatty acyl-CoA reductase respectively enhanced or reduced fatty alcohol production by 60 percent. Conclusions Fatty acid activation functionalized by the slr1609 gene is metabolically crucial for biosynthesis of fatty acid derivatives in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. It is necessary but not sufficient for efficient production of alkanes. Fatty alcohol production can be significantly improved by the overexpression of slr1609 gene.

  8. Effect of altitude on fatty acid composition in Turkish hazelnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the change of fatty acid composition in Delisava, Yomra, Sivri and Karayaglı Turkish hazelnut varieties with altitude. Fatty acid composition were determined by gas chromatography (GC) equiped with flame ionisation detector (FID) after obtained fatty acid methyl esters from crude ...

  9. Effects of commercial enrichment products on fatty acid components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of enrichment products. Red pepper paste (ZA), AlgaMac 3050 (ZB) and Spresso (ZC) on fatty acid compositions in rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) which were intensively cultured on a mixture of ω3 algae and ω3 yeast. Enriched rotifers were seen to have higher level of ...

  10. The effects of seasons on cholesterol content and fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the present study is the determination of the effects of seasonal variations on the proximate analysis, cholesterol content and fatty acid compositions of Helix aspersa. Materials and Methods: Garden snails (Helix aspersa) were picked up by hand from the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey, in autumn ...

  11. The effect of conjugated linoleic acid on the fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of conjugated linoleic acid on the fatty acid composition of different tissues and yolk lipids in pigeons. ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... Eight established breeding pairs per group were fed either a commercially pelleted pigeon diet mixed with 0.5% safflower oil (SFO) or 0.5% CLA for 12 weeks. For fatty ...

  12. Antiatherogenic effects of n-3 fatty acids - evidence and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Zampolli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available N-3 (omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought to display a variety of beneficial effects for human health. Clues to the occurrence of cardiovascular protective effects have been, however, the spur for the first biomedical interest in these compounds, and are the best documented. Historically, the epidemiologic association between dietary consumption of n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular protection was first suggested by Bang and Dyerberg, who identified the high consumption of fish, and therefore, of fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids, as the likely explanation for the strikingly low rate of coronary heart disease events reported in the Inuit population. Since their initial reports, research has proceeded in parallel to provide further evidence for their cardioprotection and to understand underlying mechanisms. Decreased atherogenesis is currently thought to be a part of the cardiovascular protection by n-3 fatty acids. This article summarizes the evidence for such a claim and the mechanisms putatively involved. (Heart International 2006; 3-4: 141-54

  13. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid and linoleic:linolenic acid ratio on polyunsaturated fatty acid status in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, M; Ahn, D U; Sell, J L

    2000-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the ratio of linoleic:linolenic acid on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status. Thirty-two 31-wk-old White Leghorn hens were randomly assigned to four diets containing 8.2% soy oil, 4.1% soy oil + 2.5% CLA (4.1% CLA source), 4.1% flax oil + 2.5% CLA, or 4.1% soy oil + 4.1% flax oil. Hens were fed the diets for 3 wk before eggs and tissues were collected for the study. Lipids were extracted from egg yolk and tissues, classes of egg yolk lipids were separated, and fatty acid concentrations of total lipids, triglyceride, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine were analyzed by gas chromatography. The concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids and non-CLA polyunsaturated fatty acids were reduced after CLA feeding. The amount of arachidonic acid was decreased after CLA feeding in linoleic acid- and linolenic acid-rich diets, but amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were increased in the linolenic-rich diet, indicating that the synthesis or deposition of long-chain n-3 fatty acids was accelerated after CLA feeding. The increased docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in lipid may be compensation for the decreased arachidonic acid content. Dietary supplementation of linoleic acid increased n-6 fatty acid levels in lipids, whereas linolenic acid increased n-3 fatty acid levels. Results also suggest that CLA might not be elongated to synthesize long-chain fatty acids in significant amounts. The effect of CLA in reducing the level of n-6 fatty acids and promoting the level of n-3 fatty acids could be related to the biological effects of CLA.

  14. Effects of varying levels of n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio on plasma fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... omega 3 (n-3), omega 6 (n-6) and omega 9 (n-9) fatty acids and are essential in the ... the maintenance of different physiological functions. (Aaes-Jorgensen .... was easier to recognize each one of these cellular types. Mating.

  15. Reciprocal effects of 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid on fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, D A; Chatzidakis, C; Kasziba, E; Cook, G A

    1985-10-01

    Under certain incubation conditions 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) stimulated the oxidation of palmitate by hepatocytes, as observed by others. A decrease in malonyl-CoA concentration accompanied the stimulation of oxidation. Under other conditions, however, TOFA inhibited fatty acid oxidation. The observed effects of TOFA depended on the TOFA and fatty acid concentrations, the cell concentration, the time of TOFA addition relative to the addition of fatty acid, and the nutritional state of the animal (fed or starved). The data indicate that only under limited incubation conditions may TOFA be used as an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis without inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. When rat liver mitochondria were preincubated with TOFA, ketogenesis from palmitate was slightly inhibited (up to 20%) at TOFA concentrations that were less than that of CoA, but the inhibition became almost complete (up to 90%) when TOFA was greater than or equal to the CoA concentration. TOFA had only slight or no inhibitory effects on the oxidation of palmitoyl-CoA, palmitoyl(-)carnitine, or butyrate. Since TOFA can be converted to TOFyl-CoA, the data suggest that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation from palmitate results from the decreased availability of CoA for extramitochondrial activation of fatty acids. These data, along with previous data of others, indicate that inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by CoA sequestration is a common mechanism of a group of carboxylic acid inhibitors. A general caution is appropriate with regard to the interpretation of results when using TOFA in studies of fatty acid oxidation.

  16. Effect of intravenous omega-3 fatty acid infusion and hemodialysis on fatty acid composition of free fatty acids and phospholipids in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup; Toft, Egon; Aardestrup, Inge; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Schmidt, Erik B

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) have been reported to have decreased levels of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in plasma and cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ω-3 PUFAs administered intravenously during HD, as well as the effect of HD treatment, on the fatty acid composition of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs), plasma phospholipids, and platelet phospholipids. Forty-four HD patients were randomized to groups receiving either a single dose of a lipid emulsion containing 4.1 g of ω-3 PUFAs or placebo (saline) administered intravenously during HD. Blood was drawn immediately before (baseline) and after (4 hours) HD and before the next HD session (48 hours). Fatty acid composition was measured using gas chromatography. The increase in ω-3 FFAs was greater in the ω-3 PUFA group compared with the placebo group, whereas the increase in total FFAs was similar between the 2 groups. In the ω-3 PUFA group, ω-3 PUFAs in plasma phospholipids were higher after 48 hours than at baseline, and in platelet phospholipids, ω-3 PUFAs increased after 4 hours. In the placebo group, no changes were observed in ω-3 PUFAs in plasma and platelet phospholipids. Intravenous ω-3 PUFAs administered during HD caused a transient selective increase in ω-3 FFA concentration. Furthermore, ω-3 PUFAs were rapidly incorporated into platelets, and the content of ω-3 PUFAs in plasma phospholipids increased after 48 hours.

  17. Effects of Fatty Acid Inclusion in a DMPC Bilayer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Møller, Martin S.

    2009-01-01

    Free fatty acids in biomembranes have been proposed to be a central component in several cellular control and regulatory mechanisms. To elucidate some fundamental elements underlying this, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations and experimental density measurements to study the molecular...... packing and structure of oleic acid (HOA) and stearic acid (HSA) in fluid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The experimental data show a small but consistent positive excess volume for fatty acid concentrations below 10 mol %. At higher concentrations the fatty acids mix ideally...... with fluid DMPC. The simulations, which were benchmarked against the densitometric data, revealed interesting differences in the structure and location of the fatty acids depending on their protonation status. Thus, the protonated (uncharged) acid is located rather deeply in the membrane with an average...

  18. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-02-23

    Agilent Auto Analyzer 7683 B series, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, Calif, USA) into ..... laboratory facilities and financial support. ... supplementation on fatty acid composition and gene expression in adipose tissue of growing ...

  20. Effects of commercial enrichment products on fatty acid components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... 3050 (ZB) and Spresso (ZC) on fatty acid compositions in rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) which were intensively ... docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the ratio of n–3/n–6 in enriched rotifers groups were higher (p < 0.05). The level of ...... acid profiles and bacterial load in cultured rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis ...

  1. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Lytic effects of mixed micelles of fatty acids and bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapré, J. A.; Termont, D. S.; Groen, A. K.; van der Meer, R.

    1992-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bile acids and fatty acids promote colon cancer. A proposed mechanism is a lytic effect of these surfactants on colonic epithelium, resulting in a compensatory proliferation of colonic cells. To investigate the first step of this hypothesis, we studied the lytic

  3. Effect of Non-Esterified Fatty Acids on Fatty Acid Metabolism-Related Genes in Calf Hepatocytes Cultured in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: NEFA plays numerous roles in the metabolism of glucose, lipids, and proteins. A number of experimental studies have shown that NEFA may have an important role in fatty acid metabolism in the liver, especially in dairy cows that experience negative energy balance (NEB during early lactation. Methods: In this study, using fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and primary hepatocytes cultured in vitro, we examined the effect of NEFA (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, and 3.2 mmol/L on fatty acid metabolism by monitoring the mRNA and protein expression of the following key enzymes: long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL, carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT IA, long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC. Results: The mRNA and protein expression levels of ACSL and ACADL markedly increased as the concentration of NEFA in the media was increased. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CPT IA were enhanced significantly when the NEFA concentrations increased from 0 to 1.6 mmol/L and decreased significantly when the NEFA concentrations increased from 1.6 to 3.2 mmol/L. The mRNA and protein expression of ACC decreased gradually with increasing concentrations of NEFA. Conclusion: These findings indicate that increased NEFA significantly promote the activation and β-oxidation of fatty acids, but very high NEFA concentrations may inhibit the translocation of fatty acids into mitochondria of hepatocytes. This may explain the development of ketosis or liver lipidosis in dairy cows. CPT IA might be the key control enzyme of the fatty acid oxidation process in hepatocytes.

  4. Synergistic effects of squalene and polyunsaturated fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA,. C22:6n-3) present in ... is secreted in human serum, where it protects the skin from ultraviolet radiation ..... Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils and cardiovascular disease. Mol.

  5. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  6. The effect of chronic exposure to fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, J.; Gregersen, S.; Kruhøffer, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    Fatty acids affect insulin secretion of pancreatic beta-cells. Investigating gene expression profiles may help to characterize the underlying mechanism. INS-1 cells were cultured with palmitate (0, 50, and 200 microM) for up to 44 d. Insulin secretion and expressions of 8740 genes were studied. We...... 44, respectively. Genes involved in fatty acid oxidation were up-regulated, whereas those involved in glycolysis were down-regulated with 200 microM palmitate. A suppression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substate-2 gene expression was found on d 44 in cells cultured at 200 microM palmitate....... In conclusion, chronic exposure to low palmitate alters insulin secretion as well as gene expression. The number of genes that changed expression was palmitate dose and exposure time dependent. Randle's fatty acid-glucose cycle seems to be operative on the gene transcription level. A modification of expression...

  7. Effect of exogenous fatty acids on biotin deprived death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shoji; Kuraishi, Hiroshi; Aida, Ko

    1978-01-01

    The effect of exogeneous fatty acids on cell growth and death of the biotin-requiring yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae BA-1 was examined with respect to the mechanism of synthetic pathway of fatty acid under biotin starvation. At a growth temperature of 30 0 C, exogeneous unsaturated fatty acids, such as palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids which promote the cell growth and suppress death effectively, were incorporated intactly into the cellular fatty acids, whereas the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, which supports growth but some what inhibits death, was once incorporated, and about 60% of incorporated palmitic acid was found to be desaturated. However, at an elevated temperature of 36 0 C, even palmitic acid showed similar effects to unsaturated fatty acids in cell growth and death; following by an increased desaturation of palmitic acid. Thus the data indicate that palmitic aicd, as well as unsaturated fatty acids directly compensate for the deficiency of endogenously synthesized fatty acids caused by biotin starvation. (auth.)

  8. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  9. [The effects of Omega-3 fatty acids in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Martin F; Stivala, Simona; Camici, Giovanni G; Beer, Jürg H

    2014-03-12

    Effects of Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) in particular on the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are of major interest. Many experimental studies reported their anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-atherosclerotic properties and suggested favourable effects on the prevention of CVD. While the majority of former studies showed a benefit of n-3 FA acid intake, recent clinical trials using n-3 supplements on top of established medication and prudent nutrition did not confirm these findings. The conflicting data may be due to several factors such as the selection of study population with different sizes or characteristics as well as choosing different doses or types of n-3 FA. The most recent meta-analyses observed clear benefits of fish consumption, but not of n-3 capsules intake. Furthermore, a nutrition rich in plant-derived n-3 FA alpha-linolenic acid has been found to have beneficial effects on the development of cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases.

  10. Effect of lipid supplementation on milk fatty acid focus on rumenic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Prieto-Manrique

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the effect of the lipid supplementation on the concentration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA-c9t11 or rumenic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids in bovine milk. The study addressed the concept and origin of the CLA-c9t11 in ruminants. There is an international trend to improve nutrition quality , which implies an increase in consumption of animal protein, including the healthy and rich in CLA-c9t11 dairy products. CLA-c9t11 has proved to have anticancer effects in animal models. CLA-c9t11 in the bovine milk results from the consumption of unsaturated fatty acids and from the extent of rumen biohydrogenation. Supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable origin allows to increase the concentration of CLA-c9t11 and to decrease the proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk, but the response varies depending on the source of fat used, its level, and its interaction with basal diet

  11. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Effects of exogenous fatty acids and inhibition of de novo fatty acid synthesis on disaturated phosphatidylcholine production by fetal lung cells and adult type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, W M; Finkelstein, J N; Parkhurst, A B

    1989-05-01

    De novo fatty acid synthesis may be an important source of saturated fatty acids for fetal lung disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) production. To investigate the roles of de novo fatty acid synthesis and exogenous fatty acids, we incubated dispersed fetal lung cells and freshly isolated adult type II cells with exogenous palmitate and oleate and measured DSPC synthesis. Unlike adult type II cells, fetal lung cells did not increase DSPC synthesis when exogenous palmitate was available; adult type II cells increased DSPC synthesis by 70% in the presence of palmitate. Exogenous oleate decreased DSPC synthesis by 48% in fetal cells but not in adult type II cells. Incubation of fetal lung cells with TOFA [2-furancarboxylate, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-sodium], a metabolic inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, decreased fatty acid synthesis by 65%. There was a simultaneous 56% inhibition of DSPC production, but no effect on protein, DNA, or glyceride-glycerol production, measured by precursor incorporation. The inhibition of DSPC synthesis associated with TOFA was partially prevented by exogenous palmitate but not oleate. Fetal cells prepared from explants that had been cultured in dexamethasone also had TOFA-associated inhibition of DSPC synthesis that was similar to non-dexamethasone-exposed cells. These studies suggest that under baseline conditions of low fatty acid availability, such as in the fetus, de novo fatty acid synthesis in fetal cells, but not in adult type II cells, provides sufficient saturated fatty acids to support maximal DSPC production. Inhibition of de novo fatty acid synthesis resulting in decreased DSPC production in fetal lung cells in conditions of low fatty acid availability suggests that fatty acid synthesis may be central to maintain DSPC synthesis in the fetus.

  13. Physiological effects of γ-linolenic acid and sesamin on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Takashi; Iwase, Haruka; Amano, Saaya; Sunahara, Saki; Tachihara, Ayuka; Yagi, Minako; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Interrelated effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and sesamin, a sesame lignan, on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were examined. Rats were fed experimental diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g/kg sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamin) and containing 100 g/kg of palm oil (saturated fat), safflower oil rich in linoleic acid, or oil of evening primrose origin containing 43% GLA (GLA oil) for 18 days. In rats fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, increased the activity and mRNA levels of various enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation, except for some instances. Sesamin greatly increased these parameters, and the enhancing effects of sesamin on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation rate and acyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities were more exaggerated in rats fed GLA oil than in the animals fed other oils. The combination of sesamin and GLA oil also synergistically increased the mRNA levels of some peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation enzymes and of several enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism located in other cell organelles. In the groups fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, markedly reduced the activity and mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes. Sesamin reduced all these parameters, except for malic enzyme, in rats fed palm and safflower oils, but the effects were attenuated in the animals fed GLA oil. These changes by sesamin and fat type accompanied profound alterations in serum lipid levels. This may be ascribable to the changes in apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of fatty acids on self-assembly of soybean lecithin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, C A; Valiente, M; Pons, R; Montalvo, G

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing interest in natural formulations for drug administration and functional foods, it is desirable a good knowledge of the phase behavior of lecithin/fatty acid formulations. Phase structure and properties of ternary lecithin/fatty acids/water systems are studied at 37°C, making emphasis in regions with relatively low water and fatty acid content. The effect of fatty acid saturation degree on the phase microstructure is studied by comparing a fully saturated (palmitic acid, C16:0), monounsaturated (oleic acid, C18:1), and diunsaturated (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids. Phase determinations are based on a combination of polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements. Interestingly, unsaturated (oleic acid and linoleic acid) fatty acid destabilizes the lamellar bilayer. Slight differences are observed between the phase diagrams produced by the unsaturated ones: small lamellar, medium cubic and large hexagonal regions. A narrow isotropic fluid region also appears on the lecithin-fatty acid axis, up to 8wt% water. In contrast, a marked difference in phase microsctructure was observed between unsaturated and saturated systems in which the cubic and isotropic fluid phases are not formed. These differences are, probably, a consequence of the high Krafft point of the C16 saturated chains that imply rather rigid chains. However, unsaturated fatty acids result in more flexible tails. The frequent presence of, at least, one unsaturated chain in phospholipids makes it very likely a better mixing situation than in the case of more rigid chains. This swelling potential favors the formation of reverse hexagonal, cubic, and micellar phases. Both unsaturated fatty acid systems evolve by aging, with a reduction of the extension of reverse hexagonal phase and migration of the cubic phase to lower fatty acid and water contents. The kinetic stability of the systems seems to be controlled by the unsaturation of fatty acids. Copyright © 2015

  15. Effect of temperature on growth and fatty acids profile of the biodiesel producing microalga Scenedesmus acutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sheekh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. The present study examined the effect of temperature (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 °C on biomass, esterified fatty acids content and fatty acid productivity of Scenedesmus acutus. Objectives. This work aimed to study the effect of variation in temperature on lipid productivity and fatty acid profiles of S. acutus as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Method. The alga was grown under different temperatures and its biomass, as well as fatty acid content and composition, were determined. Results. The maximum growth rate of S. acutus was achieved at 30 °C , but there was no significant difference in biomass productivity at 25 and 30 °C (0.41 and 0.42 g·l-1·d-1, respectively. The highest fatty acid content (104.1 mg·g-1 CDW was recorded at low temperature (15 °C and decreased with increasing temperature. As a result of high biomass production, fatty acids productivity showed the highest values (41.27 and 42.10 mg·l-1·d-1 at 25 and 30 °C, respectively. The proportion of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids increased from 13.72 to 23.79% and from 11.13 to 33.10% of total fatty acids when the incubation temperature was raised from 15 to 40 °C, respectively. The increase of temperature from 15 to 40 °C decreased the poly-unsaturated fatty acids from 75.15% to 43.10% of total fatty acids, respectively. Conclusions. The present study concluded that incubation temperature was a critical parameter for quantitative and qualitative fatty acid compositions of S. acutus. In addition, the type and proportion of individual fatty acids, which interfere with biodiesel quality, can be modified using different incubation temperatures in order to meet the biodiesel international standards.

  16. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Treatment on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Insulin resistance (IR is a common pathogenic factor of several diseases: diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, etc. There are many therapeutic factors involved in decreasing IR. Among them we mention metformin, pioglitazone, physical activity, weight loss, diet, etc. In the last decade, there are more observations of the influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on IR. The most powerful seem to be omega-3 fatty acids. In our study, we wanted to asses if the administration of omega-3 fatty acids is involved in modifying IR. Materials and methods: We evaluated 126 diabetic patients with IR from January 2011 until July 2014. The study was open-label and non-randomized. For the determination of IR we used the HOMA-IR method. Results: For both males and females there was a regression of HOMA-IR during the 4 weeks of treatment with omega-3 and also after 2 weeks after stopping the administration of these fatty acids. The decrease of HOMA-IR was statistically significant (p<0.05. The statistic result observed in the next 2 weeks after stopping administration of omega-3 was also significant (p<0.05.

  17. Effects of Fermentation on the Fatty Acids, Sterols and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Walnut contains fatty acids that are essential for infants' growth and development. This study explored the possibility of fermenting walnuts for use as a complementary food. Raw fermented (RF), cooked fermented (CF), raw unfermented (RUF) and cooked unfermented (CUF) samples of walnuts products were analyzed for ...

  18. Effects of smoking on fatty acids composition of croaker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... smoked croakers analysed without skin (skinless).The relationship of PUFA to SFA for fresh and smoked croakers were greater than 0.4 and the omega-6 to omega-3 ratios of both the fresh and smoked croaker were far less than one (1) thus constituting an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and a highly healthy food.

  19. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-02-23

    Feb 23, 2015 ... FA, total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6PUFA contents were observed in the subcutaneous adipose .... frozen at −20 ºC, pending FA analysis. Samples of the .... The synthesis and metabolism of FAs in the ruminant ...

  20. Effects of bovine pregnancy on the fatty acid composition of milk: the significance for humans needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, R; Regal, P; Díaz-Bao, M; Vázquez, B I; Cepeda, A

    2017-04-01

    Milk from 40 Holstein dairy cows was collected from two different farms in Galicia (Spain). The differences in the fatty acid composition of two groups of cows, 20 pregnant and 20 non-pregnant, was studied to determine whether pregnancy status is a determinant factor that can alter the fatty acid profile of milk. Gas-chromatography (GC) coupled to flame ionisation detection (FID) was used for the determination of the fatty acids. Differences in the milk fatty acids between pregnant and non-pregnant cows were pronounced showing statistically significant differences for some fatty acids and the total saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Milk from non-pregnant cows was lower in saturated fatty acids and higher in monounsaturated fatty acids (unlike milk from pregnant cows). The effects of the consumption of bovine milk, particularly milk fat, on human health have been studied in depth and sometimes are associated with negative effects, but milk has also several beneficial characteristics linked to some fatty acids.

  1. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  2. Beneficial effect(s) of n-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular diseases: but, why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, U N

    2000-12-01

    Low rates of coronary heart disease was found in Greenland Eskimos and Japanese who are exposed to a diet rich in fish oil. Suggested mechanisms for this cardio-protective effect focused on the effects of n-3 fatty acids on eicosanoid metabolism, inflammation, beta oxidation, endothelial dysfunction, cytokine growth factors, and gene expression of adhesion molecules; But, none of these mechanisms could adequately explain the beneficial actions of n-3 fatty acids. One attractive suggestion is a direct cardiac effect of n-3 fatty acids on arrhythmogenesis. N-3 fatty acids can modify Na+ channels by directly binding to the channel proteins and thus, prevent ischemia-induced ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Though this is an attractive explanation, there could be other actions as well. N-3 fatty acids can inhibit the synthesis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-2 that are released during the early course of ischemic heart disease. These cytokines decrease myocardial contractility and induce myocardial damage, enhance the production of free radicals, which can also suppress myocardial function. Further, n-3 fatty acids can increase parasympathetic tone leading to an increase in heart rate variability and thus, protect the myocardium against ventricular arrhythmias. Increased parasympathetic tone and acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuate the release of TNF, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-18. Exercise enhances parasympathetic tone, and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 which may explain the beneficial action of exercise in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. TNFalpha has neurotoxic actions, where as n-3 fatty acids are potent neuroprotectors and brain is rich in these fatty acids. Based on this, it is suggested that the principle mechanism of cardioprotective and neuroprotective action(s) of n-3

  3. The effect of fish oil supplementation on brain DHA and EPA content and fatty acid profile in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Kelly J; Pickens, C Austin; Wiesinger, Jason A; Fenton, Jenifer I

    2017-12-18

    Supplementation with omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids may improve cognitive performance and protect against cognitive decline. However, changes in brain phospholipid fatty acid composition after supplementation with n-3 fatty acids are poorly described. The purpose of this study was to feed increasing n-3 fatty acids and characterise the changes in brain phospholipid fatty acid composition and correlate the changes with red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma in mice. Increasing dietary docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) did not alter brain DHA. Brain EPA increased and total n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased across treatment groups, and correlated with fatty acid changes in the RBC (r > 0.7). Brain cis-monounsaturated fatty acids oleic and nervonic acid (p acids arachidic, behenic, and lignoceric acid (p acid changes upon increasing n-3 intake should be further investigated to determine their effects on cognition and neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Effects of diets containing hemp seeds or hemp cake on fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... (seeds or cake) on milk production, fatty acid (FA) profile, and .... PUFAs, which are rich in two essential FAs, namely LA (18:2 n-6) and ALA. ...... Study on safety assessment and antioxidant function in serum of ... Dietary effect of silage type and combination with camelina seed on milk fatty acid profile.

  5. Effects of cooking techniques on fatty acid and oxylipin content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow trout is an excellent source of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) which have beneficial health effects. We determined the fatty acid and oxylipin content of 2-year old rainbow trout fillets that were raw, baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in corn (CO), canola (CaO...

  6. EFFECT OF FERTILIZER ELEMENTS ON LIPIDS ACCUMULATION AND FATTY ACIDS COMPOSITION OF PUMPKIN SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Nadezhkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of organic and mineral fertilizers on pumpkin seeds lipids accumulation and their fatty acids com position is investigated. The influence of nutrition's composition on the seeds size, lipids content and concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids was shown.

  7. Effect of 6 dietary fatty acids on the postprandial lipid profile, plasma fatty acids, lipoprotein lipase, and cholesterol ester transfer activities in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Sandstrøm, B.; Bysted, Anette

    2001-01-01

    , plasma fatty acids, and preheparin lipoprotein lipase and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activities. Design: Six test fats high (approximate to 43% by wt) in stearic acid, palmitic acid, palmitic + myristic acid, oleic acid, elaidic acid (trans 18:1), and linoleic acid were produced...... to the test-fat meals were observed for plasma lipoprotein triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations, plasma fatty acid concentrations, and lipoprotein lipase and CETP activities (diet x time interaction: 0.001 acids stearic and palmitic acids resulted......Background: There is increasing evidence that postprandial triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins may be related to atherogenic risk. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of individual fatty acid intakes on postprandial plasma lipoprotein triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations...

  8. Effects of water on the esterification of free fatty acids by acid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Deog-Keun; Lee, Jin-Suk [Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2, Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Wang, Zhong-Ming [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, No. 2 Nengyuan Rd, Wushan, Tianhe, Guangzhou 510-640 (China)

    2010-03-15

    To maximize the production of biodiesel from soybean soapstock, the effects of water on the esterification of high-FFA (free fatty acid) oils were investigated. Oleic acid and high acid acid oil (HAAO) were esterified by reaction with methanol in the presence of Amberlyst-15 as a heterogeneous catalyst or sulfuric acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was studied at oil to methanol molar ratios of 1:3 and 1:6 and reaction temperatures of 60 and 80 C. The rate of esterification of oleic acid significantly decreased as the initial water content increased to 20% of the oil. The activity of Amberlyst-15 decreased more rapidly than that of sulfuric acid, due to the direct poisoning of acid sites by water. Esterification using sulfuric acid was not affected by water until there was a 5% water addition at a 1:6 molar ratio of oil to methanol. FAME content of HAAO prepared from soapstock rapidly increased for the first 30 min of esterification. Following the 30-min mark, the rate of FAME production decreased significantly due to the accumulation of water. When methanol and Amberlyst-15 were removed from the HAAO after 30 min of esterification and fresh methanol and a catalyst were added, the time required to reach 85% FAME content was reduced from 6 h to 1.8 h. (author)

  9. Effect of the preparation of canned "crumbled anchovy" (Engraulis ringens) on polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Ordoñez, Lenny R.; Hernánde, Eloisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The anchoveta (Engraulis ringens) is a major fishery resources exploited in Peru. It is rich source of proteins of high biological value and polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The objective was to determine the effect of the process of preparing the canned "crumbled anchovy" with emphasis on polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids and true content of them in canning. It was developed following the standardized technology by the Institu...

  10. The effect of breed on fatty acid composition of subcutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the fatty acid (FA) profile of subcutaneous adipose tissue and tailfat of two fat-tailed sheep breeds under identical feeding conditions. Twelve male lambs from two breeds, Sanjabi (n = 6), weighing 23.3 ± 0.48 kg, and Mehraban (n = 6), weighing 26.1 ± 2.14 kg, were used in this ...

  11. Effects of Ramadan fasting on plasma free fatty acids in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Arabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a global disease which its prevalence is about 10-35%. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fasting during Ramadan on plasma free fatty acids in patients with NAFLD.Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed during the month of Ramadan in June-July, 2014 (Islamic year: 1435 with 50 patients who were living in Mashhad, Iran. The participants were recruited from 18-65 years old patients. The inclusion criteria were 1 patients with NAFLD that diagnosed fatty liver by ultrasonography and 2 being at least 10 hours fasting. Levels of plasma free fatty acids (Palmitic, Elaidic and Oleic fatty acid were analyzed in blood sample of all patients by gas chromatography apparatus equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID.Result: results indicated that there was no significant changes were observed in plasma levels of Palmitic, Elaidic and Oleic fatty acids in overweight patients (BMI 25-30 , but plasma levels of Elaidic acid significantly increased in obese patients (P

  12. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 μM concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with [U- 1 $C]oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of 14 C label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine

  13. Effect of impaired fatty acid oxidation on myocardial kinetics of 11C- and 123I-labelled fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.

    1986-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with palmitate 11 C and single photon imaging with terminally radioiodinated fatty acid analogues (FFA 123 I) were evaluated for the noninvasive assessment of regional myocardial fatty acid metabolism during ischaemia. Decreased uptake of tracer and delayed clearance of activity in the ischaemic myocardium were reported for both 11 C- and 123 I-labelled compounds. However, since during ischaemia both myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism are reduced concomitantly, either factor can be responsible for the changes observed. Experimental preparations in which fatty acid metabolism can be modified independently of flow are helpful for the characterization of the relationship between metabolism and myocardial kinetics of labelled fatty acids. Results obtained during flow-independent inhibition of fatty acid oxidation include the following observations: - In dogs with controlled coronary perfusion the rate of clearance of palmitate 11 C-activity is decreased during diminished delivery of oxygen, regardless of whether myocardial perfusion is concomitantly reduced or not. - In isolated rabbit hearts perfused at normal flow, the extraction of FFA 123 I is decreased during hypoxia. - During pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid oxidation the deiodination of FFA 123 I is markedly reduced in rat hearts in vivo and in vitro. (orig.)

  14. The effect of n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios on broiler breeder performance, hatchability, fatty acid profile and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibjoo, A; Kermanshahi, H; Golian, A; Zaghari, M

    2018-04-20

    This experiment was conducted to study the effect of dietary omega6 (n-6) to omega3 (n-3) fatty acid (FA) ratios on performance and reproduction of broiler breeders. In experiment 1, 400 females and 40 males (30 week age) of Ross 308 broiler breeder (20 females and two males in each pen) were randomly assigned to one of the four diets with n-6/n-3 FA ratios of 4, 6, 8 and 16 (control). As a measure of hatchability, fertility of eggs and general incubation traits, 1,200 eggs (60 eggs from each pen) were collected and incubated for 21 days and embryo liver and brain fatty acid profile in 14 and 21 days were determined. In experiment 2, 48 males (three males in each pen) randomly assigned to one of the four diets with n-6/n-3 FA ratios of 4, 6, 8 and 16 (control). Semen was collected twice weekly, and semen volume, spermatozoa concentration and motility and alive and dead spermatozoa were estimated. Egg production and egg mass were decreased by n-6/n-3 FA ratios of 4:1 and 6:1 (p n-3 of egg yolk, semen, testis and liver and brain of embryo and day-old chicken were increased while concentration of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosatetraenoic acid of mentioned tissues were decreased by increasing n-6/n-3 FA ratios (p > .05). In conclusion, absolute amount of n-3 and n-6 FAs in broiler breeder diet may be more important than n-6/n-3 FA ratios and to consider reproductive and performance traits of breeders, it is necessary to supply higher levels of n-3 and n-6 FA with respect to n-6/n-3 FA ratios. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S; Fieseler, K V; Fettman, M J; Zabel, S; Rosychuk, R A W; Ogilvie, G K; Greenwalt, T L

    2004-06-01

    Twenty-nine dogs were included in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised trial and were orally supplemented for 10 weeks with either flax oil (200 mg/kg/day), eicosapentaenoic acid (50 mg/kg/day) and docosahexaenoic acid (35 mg/kg/day) in a commercial preparation, or mineral oil as a placebo. For each dog, clinical scores were determined based on a scoring system developed prior to the trial. Total omega-6 and omega-3 intake and the ratio of omega-6:omega-3 (omega-6:3) were calculated before and after the trial. The dogs' clinical scores improved in those supplemented with flax oil and the commercial preparation, but not in the placebo group. No correlation was identified between total fatty acid intake or omega-6:3 ratio and clinical scores. Based on the results of this study, the total intake of fatty acids or the omega-6:3 ratio do not seem to be the main factors in determining the clinical response.

  16. EFFECT OF SOME PLANT OILS ON THE FATTY ACIDS OF HUMP BEETLE GIBBIUM PSYLLOIDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABBASY, S.A.; ALY, W.M.; REZK, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of some plant oils (sesame oil, camphor oil, castor oil and camomile oil) as insecticides were studied on newly emerged males and females Gibbium psylloids and also the effect of LC50 of each plant oils on fatty acids composition and relative concentration were determined. The obtained results showed that sesame oil had proved to be more effective with it's advantage over other tested oils of being used at lower concentration and it followed by chamomile oil then camphor oil and finally castor oil. The susceptibility of the males and females to plant oils was the same. There were differences in the number and relative concentration of fatty acids between males and females. Nine fatty acids were detected by the analysis of the whole body of untreated males , these fatty acids are capric (C10) , lauric (C12) , myristic (C14), palmiloleic (C16), margic (C17), stearic (C18) , oleic (C18:1) , linoleic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) . Treatments of males with LC50 sesame oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids with increase of caprylic acid (C8) while LC50 chamomile oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids and fatty acid with C10 , C18:1 and C18:2 were disappeared as compared to control. LC50 of camphor oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids and castor oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids. In untreated females, five fatty acids with C12 , C16 , C17 , C18 and C18:1 were detected. Treatments with sesame oil lead to the appearance of new fatty acid with C18:2 and chamomile oil lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of C8 , C10 , C14 and C18:2 as compared with untreated females. Camphor oil treatment lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of four fatty acids with C6 , C8 , C10 and C18:2 as compared to untreated females and fatty acid with C18:1 was disappeared in the treatments. Castor oil leads to the appearance of seven fatty acids. The relative concentration of C12 was the highest fatty acid in

  17. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also...

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  19. Dynamics of the anaerobic process: Effects of volatile fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    A complex and fast dynamic response of the anaerobic biogas system was observed when the system was subjected to pulses of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). It was shown that a pulse of specific VFAs into a well-functioning continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system operating on cow manure affected...... and the history of the reactor process. It should be pointed out that the observed dynamics of VFA responses were based on hourly measurements, meaning that the response duration was much lower than the hydraulic retention time, which exceeds several days in anaerobic CSTR systems....

  20. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael R; King, Rebecca A

    2012-12-01

    Clinical studies have shown that progestins increase breast cancer risk in hormone replacement therapy, while we and others have previously reported that progestins stimulate invasive properties in progesterone receptor (PR)-rich human breast cancer cell lines. Based on others' reports that omega-3 fatty acids inhibit metastatic properties of breast cancer, we have reviewed the literature for possible connections between omega-3 fatty-acid-driven pathways and progestin-stimulated pathways in an attempt to suggest theoretical mechanisms for possible omega-3 fatty acid inhibition of progestin stimulation of breast cancer invasion. We also present some data suggesting that fatty acids regulate progestin stimulation of invasive properties in PR-rich T47D human breast cancer cells, and that an appropriate concentration of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits progestin stimulation of invasive properties. It is hoped that focus on the inter-relationship between pathways by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit and progestins stimulate breast cancer invasive properties will lead to further in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies testing the hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer, and ameliorate harmful effects of progestins which occur in combined progestin-estrogen hormone replacement therapy.

  1. Unsaturated fatty acids protect trophoblast cells from saturated fatty acid-induced autophagy defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ye-Ji; Ahn, Hyo-Ju; Shin, Jongdae; Lee, Joon H; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Hwan-Woo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2018-02-01

    Dysregulated serum fatty acids are associated with a lipotoxic placental environment, which contributes to increased pregnancy complications via altered trophoblast invasion. However, the role of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in trophoblastic autophagy has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrated that prolonged exposure of saturated fatty acids interferes with the invasiveness of human extravillous trophoblasts. Saturated fatty acids (but not unsaturated fatty acids) inhibited the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the formation of intracellular protein aggregates. Furthermore, when the trophoblast cells were exposed to saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids counteracted the effects of saturated fatty acids by increasing degradation of autophagic vacuoles. Saturated fatty acids reduced the levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, while unsaturated fatty acids maintained their levels. In conclusion, saturated fatty acids induced decreased trophoblast invasion, of which autophagy dysfunction plays a major role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of γ irradiation on the fatty acid composition of soybean and soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Ikuko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Todoriki, Setsuko; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is a form of food processing to extend the shelf life and reduce spoilage of food. We examined the effects of γ radiation on the fatty acid composition, lipid peroxidation level, and antioxidative activity of soybean and soybean oil which both contain a large amount of unsaturated fatty acids. Irradiation at 10 to 80 kGy under aerobic conditions did not markedly change the fatty acid composition of soybean. While 10-kGy irradiation did not markedly affect the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, 40-kGy irradiation considerably altered the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, 40-kGy irradiation produced a significant amount of trans fatty acids under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Irradiating soybean oil induced lipid peroxidation and reduced the radical scavenging activity under aerobic conditions, but had no effect under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the fatty acid composition of soybean was not markedly affected by radiation at 10 kGy, and that anaerobic conditions reduced the degradation of soybean oil that occurred with high doses of γ radiation.

  3. Effects of Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Associated Gene Expression in Microalga Tetraselmis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Catalina Adarme-Vega

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the depletion of global fish stocks, caused by high demand and effective fishing techniques, alternative sources for long chain omega-3 fatty acids are required for human nutrition and aquaculture feeds. Recent research has focused on land-based cultivation of microalgae, the primary producers of omega-3 fatty acids in the marine food web. The effect of salinity on fatty acids and related gene expression was studied in the model marine microalga, Tetraselmis sp. M8. Correlations were found for specific fatty acid biosynthesis and gene expression according to salinity and the growth phase. Low salinity was found to increase the conversion of C18:4 stearidonic acid (SDA to C20:4 eicosatetraenoic acid (ETA, correlating with increased transcript abundance of the Δ-6-elongase-encoding gene in salinities of 5 and 10 ppt compared to higher salinity levels. The expression of the gene encoding β-ketoacyl-coenzyme was also found to increase at lower salinities during the nutrient deprivation phase (Day 4, but decreased with further nutrient stress. Nutrient deprivation also triggered fatty acids synthesis at all salinities, and C20:5 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA increased relative to total fatty acids, with nutrient starvation achieving a maximum of 7% EPA at Day 6 at a salinity of 40 ppt.

  4. Effects of soya fatty acids on cassava ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongguang; Wu, Shuai; Zhu, Xudong; Chen, Yefu; Guo, Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol tolerance is a key trait of microbes in bioethanol production. Previous studies have shown that soya flour contributed to the increase of ethanol tolerance of yeast cells. In this paper, the mechanism of this ethanol tolerance improvement was investigated in cassava ethanol fermentation supplemented with soya flour or defatted soya flour, respectively. Experiment results showed that ethanol tolerance of cells from soya flour supplemented medium increased by 4-6% (v/v) than the control with defatted soya flour. Microscopic observation found that soya flour can retain the cell shape while dramatic elongations of cells were observed with the defatted soya flour supplemented medium. Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) compositions of cell membrane were analyzed and the UFAs amounts increased significantly in all tested strains grown in soya flour supplemented medium. Growth study also showed that soya flour stimulated the cell growth rate by approximately tenfolds at 72-h fermentation. All these results suggested that soya fatty acids play an important role to protect yeast cells from ethanol stress during fermentation process.

  5. Binding of acyl CoA by fatty acid binding protein and the effect on fatty acid activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrier, R.E.; Manson, C.R.; Brecher, P.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of purified rat liver and heart fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) to bind oleoyl CoA and modulate acyl CoA synthesis by microsomal membranes was investigated. Using binding assays employing either Lipidex 1000 or multilamellar liposomes to sequester unbound ligand, rat liver but not rat heart FABP was shown to bind radiolabeled acyl CoA. Binding studies suggest that liver FABP has a single binding site for acyl CoA which is separate from the two binding sites for fatty acids. Experiments were then performed to determine how binding may influence acyl CoA metabolism by liver microsomes or heart sarcoplasmic reticulum. Using liposomes as fatty acid donors, liver FABP stimulated acyl CoA production whereas heart FABP did not stimulate production over control values. 14 C-Fatty acid-FABP complexes were prepared, incubated with membranes and acyl CoA synthetase activity was determined. Up to 70% of the fatty acid could be converted to acyl CoA in the presence of liver FABP but in the presence of heart FABP, only 45% of the fatty acid was converted. The amount of product formed was not changed by additional membrane, enzyme cofactor, or incubation time. Liver but not heart FABP bound the acyl CoA formed and removed it from the membranes. These studies suggest that liver FABP can increase the amount of acyl CoA by binding this ligand thereby removing it from the membrane and possibly aiding transport within the cell

  6. Binding of acyl CoA by fatty acid binding protein and the effect on fatty acid activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrier, R.E.; Manson, C.R.; Brecher, P.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of purified rat liver and heart fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) to bind oleoyl CoA and modulate acyl CoA synthesis by microsomal membranes was investigated. Using binding assays employing either Lipidex 1000 or multilamellar liposomes to sequester unbound ligand, rat liver but not rat heart FABP was shown to bind radiolabeled acyl CoA. Binding studies suggest that liver FABP has a single binding site for acyl CoA which is separate from the two binding sites for fatty acids. Experiments were then performed to determine how binding may influence acyl CoA metabolism by liver microsomes or heart sarcoplasmic reticulum. Using liposomes as fatty acid donors, liver FABP stimulated acyl CoA production whereas heart FABP did not stimulate production over control values. /sup 14/C-Fatty acid-FABP complexes were prepared, incubated with membranes and acyl CoA synthetase activity was determined. Up to 70% of the fatty acid could be converted to acyl CoA in the presence of liver FABP but in the presence of heart FABP, only 45% of the fatty acid was converted. The amount of product formed was not changed by additional membrane, enzyme cofactor, or incubation time. Liver but not heart FABP bound the acyl CoA formed and removed it from the membranes. These studies suggest that liver FABP can increase the amount of acyl CoA by binding this ligand thereby removing it from the membrane and possibly aiding transport within the cell.

  7. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effect of pregnancy and lactation on the nutritional status of essential fatty acids in rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, J; Barriga, C

    1996-08-01

    Pregnancy and lactation could be high risk situations for the development of essential fatty acid deficiencies. To study the effect of pregnancy and lactation on red blood cell phospholipids percentual fatty acid composition of virgin, pregnant and lactating rats. Twenty four pregnant rats of 50 +/- 1 days of age were supplement with soy and 24 with fish oil during 21 days. Twelve rats of each group were sacrificed after 18 days of lactation, twenty four non pregnant rats received soy oil and acted as controls of pregnant and lactating rats. Red blood cell phospholipid fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. The percentage of total omega-6 fatty acids of red blood cell phospholipid was 37.8 +/- 5.9, 32.6 +/- 0.6 and 38.3 +/- 3.5% in non pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats respectively (p oil reverted the decrease in omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid percentage of pregnant and lactating rats. Pregnancy and lactation decrease the capacity to transform precursors of essential fatty acids in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  9. The effects of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G L; Faarvang, K L; Thomsen, B S

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on disease variables in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized, placebo controlled, double blind. SETTING: Three Danish hospital Departments of Rheumato......STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on disease variables in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized, placebo controlled, double blind. SETTING: Three Danish hospital Departments...

  10. Effect of sugar fatty acid esters on rumen fermentation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, M; Hoshino, S

    1987-11-01

    1. The effect of sugar fatty acid esters (SFEs; currently used as food additives for human consumption) on rumen volatile fatty acids (VFA) and gas production was studied with sheep rumen contents in vitro. 2. Some SFEs having monoester contents of more than 70% increased the molar proportion of propionate in conjunction with reduction in the acetate:propionate ratio when the individual SFE was added to rumen contents in a final concentration of 4 g/l. Laurate sugar ester was the most potent propionate enhancer and rumen gas depressor, the effective dose being as low as 1 g/l in a final concentration. Fatty acid esters other than SFEs had little, if any, effect on rumen VFA production and their molar proportions. 3. Approximately 50% of laurate sugar ester was hydrolysed by in vitro incubation with rumen fluid for 2 h. The addition of fatty acids and sucrose was also effective in the alterations of rumen VFA and gas production. However, the effect of SFEs on in vitro rumen fermentation was significantly greater than that of their constituent fatty acids or sucrose, or both. Accordingly, the effect appeared to be ascribed to the complex action of SFE itself and to its constituents, free fatty acids and sucrose. 4. SFEs, at the level of 4 g/l, reduced substantially the froth formation (ingesta volume increase) and seemed to be effective for the prevention of bloat.

  11. Cardiology Centre Patients’ Awareness of the Negative Effects of Trans Fatty Acids on Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plociņa Lāsma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to promote public awareness of the negative effects on health — trans fatty acid effects on cardiovascular disease. The study included 70 patients of the Latvian Centre of Cardiology, Pauls Stradiņš Clinical University Hospital (PSCUH. The PSCUH research institute gave permission to conduct the study. The patients answered questions about their awareness of trans fatty acids. The questionnaire used was obtained from the study “Use of Trans Fat Information on Food Labels and Its Determinants in a Multiethnic College Student Population” and modified for survey of the cardiology unit patients. The majority (74% of the respondents had heard and read something about trans fatty acids, but 62% women and 54% men were poorly informed about trans fatty acids and their negative effect on cardiovascular diseases. Unclear issues for patients were discussed after the questionnaire.

  12. Effect of growing area on tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid composition of Pistacia lentiscus edible oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezni, F; Khouja, M L; Gregoire, S; Martine, L; Khaldi, A; Berdeaux, O

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we aim to study, for the first time, the effect of the growing area on tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid content of Pistacia lentiscus fixed oil. Fruits were harvested from eight different sites located in the north and the centre of Tunisia. Tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid content of the fixed oils were determined. The highest carotenoid content was exhibited by Feija oil (10.57 mg/kg of oil). Oueslatia and Tabarka oils displayed the highest α-tocopherol content (96.79 and 92.79 mg/kg of oil, respectively). Three major fatty acids were determined: oleic, palmitic and linoleic acids. Oleic acid was the main fatty acid presenting more than 50% of the total fatty acid content. Kebouche oil presented the highest oleic acid content (55.66%). All these results highlight the richness of carotenoids, tocopherols and unsaturated fatty acids in P. lentiscus seed oil and underscore the nutritional value of this natural product.

  13. Ameliorative effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids against palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Keisuke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake activity in muscle cells are fundamental events in the development of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. There is an increasing demand for compounds including drugs and functional foods that can prevent myocellular insulin resistance. Methods In this study, we established a high-throughput assay to screen for compounds that can improve myocellular insulin resistance, which was based on a previously reported non-radioisotope 2-deoxyglucose (2DG uptake assay. Insulin-resistant muscle cells were prepared by treating rat L6 skeletal muscle cells with 750 μM palmitic acid for 14 h. Using the established assay, the impacts of several fatty acids on myocellular insulin resistance were determined. Results In normal L6 cells, treatment with saturated palmitic or stearic acid alone decreased 2DG uptake, whereas unsaturated fatty acids did not. Moreover, co-treatment with oleic acid canceled the palmitic acid-induced decrease in 2DG uptake activity. Using the developed assay with palmitic acid-induced insulin-resistant L6 cells, we determined the effects of other unsaturated fatty acids. We found that arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids improved palmitic acid-decreased 2DG uptake at lower concentrations than the other unsaturated fatty acids, including oleic acid, as 10 μM arachidonic acid showed similar effects to 750 μM oleic acid. Conclusions We have found that polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids prevent palmitic acid-induced myocellular insulin resistance.

  14. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Erythrocyte Membrane in Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Jihan; Mostafa, Ehab; El-Waseef, Maha; El-Khayat, Zakarya; Badawy, Ehsan; Medhat, Dalia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, almost always with a major contribution from insulin resistance which may be affected by cell membrane fatty acids and phospholipids fractions.Aim: To evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on erythrocyte membrane and also in decreasing oxidative stress in diabetic rats.Material and Methods: Sixty healthy male albino rats weighting 180-200 g divided int...

  15. Effects of dietary vitamin B6 supplementation on fillet fatty acid composition and fatty acid metabolism of rainbow trout fed vegetable oil based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadheera, Shyamalie D; Turchini, Giovanni M; Thanuthong, Thanongsak; Francis, David S

    2012-03-07

    Fish oil replacement in aquaculture feeds results in major modifications to the fatty acid makeup of cultured fish. Therefore, in vivo fatty acid biosynthesis has been a topic of considerable research interest. Evidence suggests that pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)) plays a role in fatty acid metabolism, and in particular, the biosynthesis of LC-PUFA has been demonstrated in mammals. However, there is little information on the effects of dietary pyridoxine availability in fish fed diets lacking LC-PUFA. This study demonstrates a relationship between dietary pyridoxine supplementation and fatty acid metabolism in rainbow trout. In particular, the dietary pyridoxine level was shown to modulate and positively stimulate the activity of the fatty acid elongase and Δ-6 and Δ-5 desaturase enzymes, deduced by the whole-body fatty acid balance method. This activity was insufficient to compensate for a diet lacking in LC-PUFA but does highlight potential strategies to maximize this activity in cultured fish, especially when fish oil is replaced with vegetable oils.

  16. Effect of Enriched Feed by n-3 fatty acids and 2% of n-6 fatty acid on Danio rerio Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B.P Utomo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the optimum n-3 fatty acid level in the diet containing 2 % of n-6 fatty acid on the reproductive performance of zebra fish (Danio rerio. There experimental diets containing 0.0; 1.0; 1.5 % n-3 fatty acid with 2.0 % n-6 fatty acid was fed to the fish, three times daily, at satiation, for two months. In order to evaluate the gonadal development of the broodstock, two gonads og fish was used for histologis preparation in every 7 days. At the end of the second month, reproductive performance was evaluated through parameters of gonad somato indeks, fecundity, fertilization rate, hatching rate, yolk egg absorbtion rate, survival rate of 3 days old larvae. Sample of fish also was taken for proximate composition as the end of this experiment. Results shows that at the fifth weeks of this experiment, gonad of fish fed on 1.0 % of n-3 fatty acid and 2.0 % n-6 fatty acid already produce eggs with the some size, while others. Still produce small size of eggs. It was found also that the whole body of fish fed an diet with 1.0% n-3 fatty acid contain the highest protein level compare to two other diets. Based on the evaluation of reproduction performance parameters, it was concluded that the optimum dietary level of n-3 fatty acid with 2.0 % n-6 fatty acid for Danio rerio was 0.81 - 0.90 %. Keywords: essential fatty, acids, reproduction, zebra fish, Danio rerio   ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan kadar asam lemak n-3 optimum dalam pakan yang mempunyai kadar asam lemak n-6 tetap. Tiga macam pakan dengan kadar asam lemak n-3 berbeda yaitu 0.0; 1.0; dan 2.0 % diberikan pada ikan dengan bobot rata-rata 0.12 g. Pakan diberikan secara at satiation, 4 kali sehari selama 60 hari. Setiap 7 hari sekali diambil sampel ikan untuk pembentukan preparat histologi gonad dengan tujuan untuk mengevaluasi perkembangan gonad. Pada akhir penelitian, induk dipijahkan dan dievaluasi performan reproduksi berdasarkan

  17. Effects on physicochemical characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream with fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, M.; Ullah, R.; Arif, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal on physico-chemical characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream. Fatty acid profile of milk fat was modified by feeding calcium salts of soybean oil fatty acids to cows and cholesterol was removed by b-cyclodextrin b-cyclodextrin removed 76% and 60% cholesterol from yoghurt and ice cream. Modification of fatty acid composition did not have a significant effect on a-tocopherol content; while b-cyclodextrin treated milk had substantially lower a-tocopherol content. The concentration of a-tocopherol in control and b-cyclodextrin treated yoghurt was 45.62, 32.73 mg/g and 210.34, 185.56 mg/g for ice cream, respectively. Fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal significantly decreased the overrun in ice cream (P<0.05), with no effect on sensory characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream. These results evidenced that milk with higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and low cholesterol can be used in the formulation of yoghurt and ice cream with improved health benefits and suitable sensory features. (author)

  18. Effect of gamma sterilization on the fatty acid profile of lyophilized buffalo cheese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.; Loginovska, K.; Tsvetkov, Ts.

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the fatty acid profile of buffalo cheese after lyophilization and gamma rays treatment at 2 kGy and 4 kGy doses have been studied with the objective of its shelf-live prolongation. The results of the experiments show a decrease of the content of the saturated fatty acids after irradiation at the aforesaid gamma rays doses. A favorable effect on human organism has the decrease of the quantity of the short-chain fatty acids – by 13.16 % on irradiation at 2 kGy and by 18.73% on irradiation at 4 kGy, compared to the control sample. A satisfactory correlation between the essential fatty acids omega-6/omega3 has been observed in the lyophilized buffalo cheese. In the process of irradiation this balanced correlation changes and increases up to 7.32 and 8.31 at 2 kGy and 4 kGy respectively

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of conjugated linoleic acid isomers and essential fatty acids in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, D; Basiricò, L; Morera, P; Primi, R; Tröscher, A; Bernabucci, U

    2018-01-09

    Fatty acids are important modulators of inflammatory responses, in particular, n-3 and n-6 essential fatty acids and CLA have received particular attention for their ability to modulate inflammation. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of CLA and essential fatty acids on the expression of pro and anti- inflammatory cytokines and their protective efficacy against inflammatory status in mammary gland by an in vitro model based on bovine mammary epithelial cells (BME-UV1). Bovine mammary epithelial cells were treated with complete medium containing either 50 µM of cis-9, trans-11 CLA (c9,t11 CLA) or trans-10, cis-12 CLA (t10,c12 CLA) or (α)-linolenic acid (aLnA) or (γ)-linolenic acid (gLnA) or linoleic acid (LA). After 48 h by fatty acids administration the cells were treated for 3 h with 20 µM of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammatory stimulus. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production after treatments was assessed to verify and to compare the potential protection of different fatty acids against LPS-induced oxidative stress. The messenger RNA abundance of bovine pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukine-10 (IL-10)) and peroxisome proliferator receptor-α/γ (PPARγ/α) were determined in BME-UV1 by real-time PCR. The results showed that cells treated with fatty acids and LPS increased ROS production compared with control cells. Among treatments, cells treated with c9,t11 CLA and t10,c12 CLA isomers revealed significant lower levels of ROS production compared with other fatty acids. All fatty acids reduced the gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Among fatty acids, t10,c12 CLA, LA and gLnA showed an homogeneous reduction of the three pro-inflammatory cytokines and this may correspond to more balanced and efficient physiological activity and may trigger a better protective effect. The PPARγ gene expression was

  20. Effects of simple rain-shelter cultivation on fatty acid and amino acid accumulation in 'Chardonnay' grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Nan; Ren, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Pan, Qiu-Hong

    2018-02-01

    Fatty acids and amino acids are the precursors of aliphatic and aromatic volatile compounds, higher alcohols and esters. They are also nutrition for yeast metabolism during fermentation. However, few reports have been concerned about the effect of viticulture practices on the accumulation of fatty acids and amino acids in wine grapes. This study aimed to explore the accumulation of these compounds in developing Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay grape berries under two vintages, and compare the influences of the rain-shelter cultivation and open-field cultivation. Fifteen fatty acids and 21 amino acids were detected in total. The rain-shelter cultivation led to an increase in the total concentration of fatty acids, and a decrease in the total concentration of amino acids compared with the open-field cultivation in 2012, while no significant difference was observed between two cultivation modes in 2013 vintage. Concentrations of palmitoleic acid, isoleucine and cysteine were significantly promoted in the rain-shelter grape berries, whereas those of tyrosine and ornithine were markedly reduced in both vintages. The rain-shelter cultivation of wine grapes in the rainy region is beneficial for improving grape quality and fermentation activity by influence on the concentration of fatty acids and amino acids. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Effects of Fatty Acids at Different Positions in the Triglycerides on Cholesterol Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, S.S.; Voon, P.T.; Ng, Y.T.; Ong, S.H.; Augustine, S.H.O.; Choo, Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies established a series of regression equations for predicting the risk factor effects from serum cholesterol concentrations. However, the degree of saturation was solely based on total fatty acid composition in triglycerides. Our article is focused on the relationships between the published human nutrition studies and predicted values of serum cholesterol levels based on total fatty acid compositions and at sn-2 position in triglycerides. Twenty-two published human nutrition studies were chosen to assess the effects of palm olein, olive oil, cocoa butter, sunflower seed oil, corn oil, soyabean oil, grape seed oil, groundnut oil and rice bran oil diets on serum cholesterol levels. There were no statistically significant differences between the predicted values of serum cholesterol levels based on fatty acids at sn-2 position and the published human nutrition studies as proven by the statistical analyses with p values more than 0.05. In contrast, there were statistically significant differences between the predicted values of serum cholesterol levels based on total fatty acids and the published human nutritional studies with p values less than 0.05. Fatty acids at sn-2 position appear to influence the cholesterol levels rather than total fatty acids of the triglyceride. (author)

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on fatty acids of tomato seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S.A.; Raouf, M.S.; Morad, M.M.; Rady, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    Since gamma irradiation of tomatoes is investigated as a tool for increasing tomato shelf-lefe, in this study the tomato seed oil produced from irradiated tomatoes was compared with that produced from industrial tomato seeds and with cotton seeds. Fatty acid contents of tomato seed oil, produced from industrial tomato seed waste and from tomato seeds (Variety Ace), were found nearly the same as in the edible cotton seed oil. Hence, both tomato seed oils may be considered as an additional source of essential fatty acids especially linoleic. Gamma irradiation doses ranged from 50-200 Krad had no significant effect on total saturated and total unsaturated fatty acids. 200 Krad led to significant increases in lenolic acid on the account of insignificant decrease in palmatic acid. Essentail and non essential amino acids of tomato seed meal seem to be equivalent to these of cotton seed meal. This suggests the possible use of tomato seed meal in animal feeding

  3. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  4. Effects of feeding omega-3-fatty acids on fatty acid composition and quality of bovine sperm and on antioxidative capacity of bovine seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürler, Hakan; Calisici, Oguz; Calisici, Duygu; Bollwein, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of feeding alpha-linolenic (ALA) acid on fatty acid composition and quality of bovine sperm and on antioxidative capacity of seminal plasma. Nine bulls (ALA bulls) were fed with 800 g rumen-resistant linseed oil with a content of 50% linolenic acid and eight bulls with 400 g palmitic acid (PA bulls). Sperm quality was evaluated for plasma membrane and acrosome intact sperm (PMAI), the amount of membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO), and the percentage of sperm with a high DNA fragmentation index (DFI). Fatty acid content of sperm was determined using gas chromatography. Total antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activity were determined in seminal plasma. Feeding ALA increased (P acid (DHA) content in bulls whereas in PA bulls did not change. PMAI increased after cryopreservation in ALA bulls as well as in PA bulls during the experiment period (P fatty acids affect the antioxidant levels in seminal plasma. Both saturated as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids had positive effects on quality of cryopreserved bovine sperm, although the content of docosahexaenoic acid in sperm membranes increased only in ALA bulls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetland Harald

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle. The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5, DPA (22:5 and DHA (22:6, thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle.

  6. Synergistic Effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Fatty Acids on Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Kermanizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The ZnO NPs exposure concentration dependently induced cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells showing as reduced proliferation and activity measured by 3 different assays. PA exposure induced cytotoxicity, and coexposure to ZnO NPs and PA showed the largest cytotoxic effects. The presence......Fatty acids exposure may increase sensitivity of intestinal epithelial cells to cytotoxic effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs). This study evaluated the synergistic effects of ZnO NPs and palmitic acid (PA) or free fatty acids (FFAs) mixture (oleic/PA 2:1) on toxicity to human colon...

  7. Muscle and genotype effects on fatty acid composition of goat kid intramuscular fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriano Domenech

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the fatty acid composition of the major muscles in goats from different breeds. Forty entire male suckling kids, 20 Criollo Cordobes and 20 Anglo Nubian, were slaughtered at 75 days of age and the fatty acid composition of their longissimus thoracis (LT and semitendinosus (ST muscles was analysed to clarify the effects of genotype and muscle type on goat kid meat. Genotype had a great influence on the fatty acid composition of goat kid meat. Meat from Criollo Cordobes had greater saturated (P<0.001 and lower monounsaturated (P<0.001 and polyunsaturated fatty acids (P=0.002 concentration than meat from Anglo Nubian, showing higher saturated fatty acids (SFA. On the other hand, intramuscular fat content from both genotypes was higher (P=0.042 in ST muscle, while the lowest cholesterol levels were observed in ST of Criollo Cordobes (P=0.038. That higher fat content resulted in lower relative contents of total polyunsaturated (P<0.001 and n-3 (P=0.002 fatty acids due to the lower contribution of the membrane phospholipids.

  8. Effect of the fatty acid composition of acclimated oenological Lactobacillus plantarum on the resistance to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Ferrada, B M; Gómez-Zavaglia, A; Semorile, L; Tymczyszyn, E E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the changes due to acclimation to ethanol on the fatty acid composition of three oenological Lactobacillus plantarum strains and their effect on the resistance to ethanol and malic acid consumption (MAC). Lactobacillus plantarum UNQLp 133, UNQLp 65.3 and UNQLp 155 were acclimated in the presence of 6 or 10% v/v ethanol, for 48 h at 28°C. Lipids were extracted to obtain fatty acid methyl esters and analysed by gas chromatography interfaced with mass spectroscopy. The influence of change in fatty acid composition on the viability and MAC in synthetic wine was analysed by determining the Pearson correlation coefficient. Acclimated strains showed a significant change in the fatty composition with regard to the nonacclimated strains. Adaptation to ethanol led to a decrease in the unsaturated/saturated ratio, mainly resulting from an increase in the contribution of short-length fatty acid C12:0 and a decrease of C18:1. The content of C12:0 was related to a higher viability after inoculation of synthetic wine. The MAC increased at higher contents in saturated fatty acid, but its efficiency was strain dependent. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Effects of ethanol on pancreatic beta-cell death: interaction with glucose and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Korami; Nguyen, K Hoa; Hernandez, Tiffany A; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2009-04-01

    Western lifestyle plays an important role in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by causing insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. High fat diet and alcohol are major components of the western diet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ethanol and fatty acids on beta-cell survival and metabolism. We treated the rat beta-cell line RINm5F with ethanol, a mixture of palmitic and oleic acids, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescence assay, and mitochondrial activity was assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and by determining ATP production. Cell viability was assessed with a cell counter and trypan blue exclusion, and the mode of cell death by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. With both ethanol and fatty acid treatments, MTT reduction and ATP production decreased, whereas ROS production increased. Ethanol treatment had no effect on cell number, whereas fatty acid treatment reduced the cell number. Cell incubation with ethanol, fatty acids, or both increased the number of Hoechst 33342-positive nuclei. However, the majority of nuclei from fatty acid-treated cells were stained with propidium iodide, indicating a loss of plasma membrane integrity. We conclude that both ethanol and fatty acids generate cellular oxidative stress, and affect mitochondrial function in RINm5F beta-cells. However, ethanol causes beta-cell death by apoptosis, whereas fatty acids cause cell death predominantly by necrosis. It is not known whether these results are applicable to human beta-cells.

  10. The effect of dietary fatty acid composition on the hepatic fatty acid content and plasma lipid profile in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Komprda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate in a model organism the effect of different dietary lipids on plasma concentration of total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and triacylglycerols (TAG. One hundred adult male rats (Wistar Albino were divided into 10 groups with 10 animals each and fed for 7 weeks either basic feed mixture (control diet, C or basic feed mixture with 5% of palm oil (P, safflower oil (SF, salmon oil (S, fish oil (F, Schizochytrium microalga oil (A, and 20% of beef tallow (T; four groups, respectively. The T-groups were fed for another 7 weeks T-, SF-, F- and A-diet, respectively. At the end of both the first and the second 7-week fattening period, plasma lipid concentration and hepatic fatty acid content was determined. Both A and F diets fed for 7 weeks decreased (P -1 compared to control (1.19 mmol∙l-1. The highest (P -1. A-diet had the most positive (decreasing effect on TAG concentrations (0.68–0.86 mmol∙l-1 compared to 1.22 and 2.88 mmol∙l-1 found in the C and T diets, respectively; P P Schizochytrium microalga oil (with high DHA content may have the potential for decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Effects of breed on milk fatty acid profile in dairy ewes, with particular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine and compare the fatty acid profile of milk fat, with particular reference to cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), in two indigenous Romanian sheep breeds (Spanca and Turcana), irrespective of the effects of diet and season. The ewes (n = 25 for each breed) received the ...

  12. Effect of dietary fat source on fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of supplementary dietary lipid sources on the fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of eggs. Five isoenergetic (12.6 MJ AME/kg DM) and isonitrogenous (170 g CP/kg DM) diets were formulated, using a control diet (50 : 50 blend of fish- and linseed oil), fish oil, sunflower oil, high oleic acid ...

  13. A Comparative Study of Effects of Omega‑3 Fatty Acids, Alpha Lipoic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism. Various modes of adjuvant therapy have been advocated to ameliorate insulin resistance. Aim: This study was intended to assess the effects of antioxidants; alpha lipoic acid (ALA), omega 3 fatty acid and vitamin ...

  14. Combined Effects of Ocean Warming and Acidification on Copepod Abundance, Body Size and Fatty Acid Content.

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    Jessica Garzke

    Full Text Available Concerns about increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global warming have initiated studies on the consequences of multiple-stressor interactions on marine organisms and ecosystems. We present a fully-crossed factorial mesocosm study and assess how warming and acidification affect the abundance, body size, and fatty acid composition of copepods as a measure of nutritional quality. The experimental set-up allowed us to determine whether the effects of warming and acidification act additively, synergistically, or antagonistically on the abundance, body size, and fatty acid content of copepods, a major group of lower level consumers in marine food webs. Copepodite (developmental stages 1-5 and nauplii abundance were antagonistically affected by warming and acidification. Higher temperature decreased copepodite and nauplii abundance, while acidification partially compensated for the temperature effect. The abundance of adult copepods was negatively affected by warming. The prosome length of copepods was significantly reduced by warming, and the interaction of warming and CO2 antagonistically affected prosome length. Fatty acid composition was also significantly affected by warming. The content of saturated fatty acids increased, and the ratios of the polyunsaturated essential fatty acids docosahexaenoic- (DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA to total fatty acid content increased with higher temperatures. Additionally, here was a significant additive interaction effect of both parameters on arachidonic acid. Our results indicate that in a future ocean scenario, acidification might partially counteract some observed effects of increased temperature on zooplankton, while adding to others. These may be results of a fertilizing effect on phytoplankton as a copepod food source. In summary, copepod populations will be more strongly affected by warming rather than by acidifying oceans, but ocean acidification effects can modify some temperature impacts.

  15. Combined Effects of Ocean Warming and Acidification on Copepod Abundance, Body Size and Fatty Acid Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzke, Jessica; Hansen, Thomas; Ismar, Stefanie M H; Sommer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global warming have initiated studies on the consequences of multiple-stressor interactions on marine organisms and ecosystems. We present a fully-crossed factorial mesocosm study and assess how warming and acidification affect the abundance, body size, and fatty acid composition of copepods as a measure of nutritional quality. The experimental set-up allowed us to determine whether the effects of warming and acidification act additively, synergistically, or antagonistically on the abundance, body size, and fatty acid content of copepods, a major group of lower level consumers in marine food webs. Copepodite (developmental stages 1-5) and nauplii abundance were antagonistically affected by warming and acidification. Higher temperature decreased copepodite and nauplii abundance, while acidification partially compensated for the temperature effect. The abundance of adult copepods was negatively affected by warming. The prosome length of copepods was significantly reduced by warming, and the interaction of warming and CO2 antagonistically affected prosome length. Fatty acid composition was also significantly affected by warming. The content of saturated fatty acids increased, and the ratios of the polyunsaturated essential fatty acids docosahexaenoic- (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) to total fatty acid content increased with higher temperatures. Additionally, here was a significant additive interaction effect of both parameters on arachidonic acid. Our results indicate that in a future ocean scenario, acidification might partially counteract some observed effects of increased temperature on zooplankton, while adding to others. These may be results of a fertilizing effect on phytoplankton as a copepod food source. In summary, copepod populations will be more strongly affected by warming rather than by acidifying oceans, but ocean acidification effects can modify some temperature impacts.

  16. Effect of nutrients on total lipid content and fatty acids profile of Scenedesmus obliquus

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    Behrouz Zarei Darki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The effect of nutrients on the total lipid content and fatty acid profile of Scenedesmus obliquus isolated from the south coast of the Caspian Sea was evaluated. The nutritional compositions of the media impacted the growth rate and biomass of S. obliquus that ranged from 0.175 day-1 to 0.209 day-1and 0.92 gr·l-1 to 1.79 gr·l-1, respectively. The alga grew better in the medium which was characterized by higher levels of sodium and trace elements such as Fe, Mn, Mo, and Co and poor in N and P as compared with the other media. The highest level of the total lipid (32% and the highest values of saturated fatty acids, in particular palmitic acid also were positively correlated with these nutrients. Peaks in polyunsaturated fatty acids (43.7 %, especially α-linolenic acid (28.4% were related to N and P, but its correlation with K and Mg was more evident. The most important factors correlated with high amount of monounsaturated fatty acids were also N and P, followed by K and Mg to a lesser extent. This study demonstrated that the same algal strain may be a source of different amount of fatty acids, depending on the composition of the culture medium.

  17. Effect of postharvest methyl jasmonate treatment on fatty acid composition and phenolic acid content in olive fruits during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gema; Blanch, Gracia Patricia; Del Castillo, María Luisa Ruiz

    2017-07-01

    The nutritional effects of both table olives and olive oil are attributed not only to their fatty acids but also to antioxidant phenolics such as phenolic acids. Delays in oil processing usually result in undesirable oxidation and hydrolysis processes leading to formation of free fatty acids. These alterations create the need to process oil immediately after olive harvest. However, phenolic content decreases drastically during olive storage resulting in lower quality oil. In the present study we propose postharvest methyl jasmonate treatment as a mean to avoid changes in fatty acid composition and losses of phenolic acids during olive storage. Contents of fatty acids and phenolic acids were estimated in methyl jasmonate treated olives throughout 30-day storage, as compared with those of untreated olives. Significant decreases of saturated fatty acids were observed in treated samples whereas increases of oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids were respectively measured (i.e. from 50.8% to 64.5%, from 7.2% to 9.1% and from 1.5% to 9.3%). Also, phenolic acid contents increased significantly in treated olives. Particularly, increases of gallic acid from 1.35 to 6.29 mg kg -1 , chlorogenic acid from 9.18 to 16.21 mg kg -1 , vanillic acid from 9.61 to 16.99 mg kg -1 , caffeic acid from 5.12 to 12.55 mg kg -1 , p-coumaric acid from 0.96 to 5.31 mg kg -1 and ferulic acid from 4.05 to 10.43 mg kg -1 were obtained. Methyl jasmonate treatment is proposed as an alternative postharvest technique to traditional methods to guarantee olive oil quality when oil processing is delayed and olive fruits have to necessarily to be stored. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on the fatty acids profile of Mortierella vinacea

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    Mina Mohammadi Nasr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial lipids attract attention of many researchers due to their therapeutic effects. The goal of this study is the production and optimization of lipids and fatty acids in Mortierella vinaceaby applying different media to achieve invaluable fatty acids in pharmaceutical and food industry. Materials and methods: Mortierella vinacea was cultured on potato dextrose agar. Then the spores were inoculated to the production medium. After 72 hours, the lipids were extracted and they were analyzedby gas chromatography. To optimize lipid and important fatty acids production in medium, various carbon and nitrogen sources were substituted with glucose and yeast extract respectively. Results: The effect of some carbon and nitrogen sources on biomass, lipid and fatty acids production were assayed. The highest level of lipid production was in a medium which contains lactose and yeast extract (26.66%. Linoleic acid was only produced in presence of lactose and yeast extract (25.7%. While, M. vinacea yielded the highest level of linoleic acid (52.76% in a medium containing peptone, linolenic acid was achieved only in presence of lactose and triptone. Discussion and conclusion: In this study, lactose as a carbon source was the most effective one in the production of lipids. In addition, linoleic acid was produced in presence of lactose, so lactose was selected as the best carbon source. Peptone and triptone as a nitrogen source were chosen for the production of linoleic acid and linolenic acid in M. vinacea respectively. All of these findings reveal that Mortierella strain is a potential candidate for enhancement of linoleic acid and linolenic acid production. Furthermore, this simple media can be used in production of linoleic acid and linolenic acid for industrial goals in large scales.

  19. Effect on days of lactation and methionine hydroxy analog on incorporation of plasma fatty acids into plasma triglycerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullen, D.L.; Emergy, R.S.; Palmquist, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Methionine hydroxy analog has been proposed to stimulate hepatic lipoprotein synthesis and incorporation of plasma fatty acids into plasma triglyceride. Seven cows were fed diets containing 0 to 30 g analog/d starting 14 d prepartum. At approximately 30 and 60 d postpartum, cows were continuously infused intravenously with 1-[ 14 C]palmitic acid for 160 min to achieve steady-state labeling of plasma fatty acid and triglyceride. Turnover of fatty acid and transfer quotients for triglyceride and CO 2 were 3.3 an 2.7 mmol min -1 ; 13.0 and 10.0%; and 8.0 and 5.0%, for control and analog, respectively. Proportion of fatty acid turnover incorporated into triglyceride and CO 2 were 14.0 and 15.0%; and 21.0 and 18.0, respectively, for control and analog. Analog increased 14 C recovered in milk fat (52 vs. 36%). Plasma concentration of fatty acids, percent oxidized to CO 2 , and percent of CO 2 from fatty acids decreased with increasing lactation days. Milk fat percent and yield fatty acid turnover, and oxidation were positively correlated with concentration of plasma fatty acids, whereas fatty acid incorporated into plasma triglyceride was negatively correlated with fatty acid concentration. The data suggest that hepatic triglyceride secretion is not increased in early lactation; further, no effects of analog on lipid metabolism were detected

  20. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Catalá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others.

  1. Effects of photoperiod, growth temperature and cold acclimatisation on glucosinolates, sugars and fatty acids in kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindal, Anne Linn Hykkerud; Rødven, Rolf; Hansen, Espen; Mølmann, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Curly kale is a robust, cold tolerant plant with a high content of health-promoting compounds, grown at a range of latitudes. To assess the effects of temperature, photoperiod and cold acclimatisation on levels of glucosinolates, fatty acids and soluble sugars in kale, an experiment was set up under controlled conditions. Treatments consisted of combinations of the temperatures 15/9 or 21/15 °C, and photoperiods of 12 or 24h, followed by a cold acclimatisation period. Levels of glucosinolates and fatty acid types in leaves were affected by growth conditions and cold acclimatisation, being generally highest before acclimatisation. The effects of growth temperature and photoperiod on freezing tolerance were most pronounced in plants grown without cold acclimatisation. The results indicate that cold acclimatisation can increase the content of soluble sugar and can thereby improve the taste, whilst the content of unsaturated fatty and glucosinolates acids may decrease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the lipidic profile of healthy Mexican volunteers

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    CARVAJAL OCTAVIO

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the serum lipid profile in a Mexican population was evaluated. Material and methods. Three g of salmon oil was the daily intake during four weeks. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins and erythrocyte fatty acid composition were analyzed. Results. The hypertriglyceridemic group showed a statistically significant (p< 0.05 reduction of triglycerides and significant (p< 0.01 elevation of high density lipoproteins. The hypercholesterolemic group reduced significantly the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides; high density lipoproteins were augmented by 11.6%. Conclusions. The hipolipidemic effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was manifest in the Mexican volunteers under the conditions here evaluated.

  3. Aspirin increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppala, Radha; Dudiak, Brianne; Beck, Megan E.; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Stolz, Donna B.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic effects of salicylates are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. Aspirin increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, but inhibited peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, in two different cell lines. Aspirin increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and was found to be a stronger acetylating agent in vitro than acetyl-CoA. However, aspirin-induced acetylation did not alter the activity of fatty acid oxidation proteins, and knocking out the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 did not affect the induction of long-chain fatty acid oxidation by aspirin. Aspirin did not change oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids, which can freely traverse the mitochondrial membrane. Together, these data indicate that aspirin does not directly alter mitochondrial matrix fatty acid oxidation enzymes, but most likely exerts its effects at the level of long-chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. The drive on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may be a compensatory response to altered mitochondrial morphology and inhibited electron transport chain function, both of which were observed after 24 h incubation of cells with aspirin. These studies provide insight into the pathophysiology of Reye Syndrome, which is known to be triggered by aspirin ingestion in patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders. - Highlights: • Aspirin increases mitochondrial—but inhibits peroxisomal—fatty acid oxidation. • Aspirin acetylates mitochondrial proteins including fatty acid oxidation enzymes. • SIRT3 does not influence the effect of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. • Increased fatty acid oxidation is likely due to altered mitochondrial morphology and respiration.

  4. Effect of Toxicants on Fatty Acid Metabolism in HepG2 Cells

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    David Grünig

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of hepatic fatty acid metabolism can lead to liver steatosis and injury. Testing drugs for interference with hepatic fatty acid metabolism is therefore important. To find out whether HepG2 cells are suitable for this purpose, we investigated the effect of three established fatty acid metabolism inhibitors and of three test compounds on triglyceride accumulation, palmitate metabolism, the acylcarnitine pool and dicarboxylic acid accumulation in the cell supernatant and on ApoB-100 excretion in HepG2 cells. The three established inhibitors [etomoxir, methylenecyclopropylacetic acid (MCPA, and 4-bromocrotonic acid (4-BCA] depleted mitochondrial ATP at lower concentrations than cytotoxicity occurred, suggesting mitochondrial toxicity. They inhibited palmitate metabolism at similar or lower concentrations than ATP depletion, and 4-BCA was associated with cellular fat accumulation. They caused specific changes in the acylcarnitine pattern and etomoxir an increase of thapsic (C18 dicarboxylic acid in the cell supernatant, and did not interfere with ApoB-100 excretion (marker of VLDL export. The three test compounds (amiodarone, tamoxifen, and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 depleted the cellular ATP content at lower concentrations than cytotoxicity occurred. They all caused cellular fat accumulation and inhibited palmitate metabolism at similar or higher concentrations than ATP depletion. They suppressed medium-chain acylcarnitines in the cell supernatant and amiodarone and tamoxifen impaired thapsic acid production. Tamoxifen and WIN 55,212-2 decreased cellular ApoB-100 excretion. In conclusion, the established inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism caused the expected effects in HepG2 cells. HepG cells proved to be useful for the detection of drug-associated toxicities on hepatocellular fatty acid metabolism.

  5. Effect of heat processing on the profiles of trans fatty acids and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SFA). Meanwhile, published information about trans fatty acids (TFAs) content in TBO remains unexplored. Therefore, a comparison of the fatty acid (FA) composition of traditional butter (TB) and (TBO) with emphasis on geometric and conjugated ...

  6. Chemoprotective effect of omega-3 fatty acids on thioacetamide induced hepatic fibrosis in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atef M. Al-Attar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate the possible protective effect of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil on hepatic fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA in male rats. The experimental animals were divided into four groups. The first group was received saline solution and served as control. The second group was given 250 mg/kg body weight of TAA. The third group was treated with omega-3 fatty acids and TAA. The fourth group was given saline solution and supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids. Treatment of rats with TAA for three and six weeks resulted in a significant decrease in body weight gain, while the value of liver/body weight ratio was statistically increased. Furthermore, the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transferase and total bilirubin were significantly increased. After three weeks of exposure to only TAA, liver sections showed an abnormal morphology characterized by noticeable fibrosis with the extracellular matrix collagen contents and damage of liver cells’ structure. Liver sections from rats treated with only TAA for six weeks revealed an obvious increase in extracellular matrix collagen content and bridging fibrosis. Treating TAA-intoxicated rats with omega-3 fatty acids significantly attenuated the severe physiological and histopathological changes. Finally, the present investigation suggests that omega-3 fatty acids could act against hepatic fibrosis induced by TAA due to its antioxidant properties, thus supporting its use in hepatic fibrosis therapy.

  7. Effect of vegetable oils on fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of chicken frankfurters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belichovska, D.; Pejkovski, Z.; Belichovska, K.; Uzunoska, Z.; Silovska-Nikolova, A.

    2017-09-01

    To study the effect of pork adipose tissue substitution with vegetable oils in chicken frankfurters, six frankfurter formulations were produced: control; with pork backfat; with olive oil; with rapeseed oil; with sunflower oil; with palm oil, and; with a mixture of 12% rapeseed oil and 8% palm oil. Fatty acid composition and cholesterol content and some oxides thereof were determined in the final products. The use of vegetable oils resulted in improvement of the fatty acid composition and nutritional of frankfurters. Frankfurters with vegetable oils contained significantly less cholesterol and some of its oxides, compared to the frankfurters with pork fat. The formulation with palm oil had the least favourable fatty acid composition. The use of 12% rapeseed oil improved the ratio of fatty acids in frankfurters with a mixture of rapeseed and palm oils. Complete pork fat replacement with vegetable oils in chicken frankfurter production is technologically possible. The mixture of 12% rapeseed oil and 8% palm oil is a good alternative to pork fat from health aspects. Further research is needed to find the most appropriate mixture of vegetable oils, which will produce frankfurters with good sensory characteristics, a more desirable fatty acid ratio and high nutritional value.

  8. Effect of Animal and Industrial Trans Fatty Acids on HDL and LDL Cholesterol Levels in Humans - A Quantitative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, I.A.; Wanders, A.J.; Katan, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Trans fatty acids are produced either by industrial hydrogenation or by biohydrogenation in the rumens of cows and sheep. Industrial trans fatty acids lower HDL cholesterol, raise LDL cholesterol, and increase the risk of coronary heart disease. The effects of conjugated linoleic acid

  9. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  10. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, E.; Daase, M.; Schulz, K. G.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway) at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm), yielding pH values (on the total scale) from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1) prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2) first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3) second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): 44-60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes) increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  11. Effect of extracellular fatty acids on lipid metabolism in cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, M.; Ishii, S.; Murata, Y.; Akino, T.

    1991-01-01

    Rabbit articular chondrocytes were cultured for 8 h in the presence of various concentrations (5-500 microM) of 14 C oleic, 14 C linoleic, and 3H arachidonic acids. The radioactive unsaturated fatty acids were incorporated into triacylglycerol (TG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in a concentration-dependent manner; more fatty acids were incorporated into TG than into PC, at higher concentrations of extracellular fatty acids. Among these fatty acids, arachidonic acid was incorporated into TG much more than into PC, in spite of a very low concentration of arachidonic acid in TG. After transfer of the labeled cells to maintenance medium, the radioactivity in TG declined rapidly and 3 H arachidonic acid radioactivity in PC increased continuously during the chase time periods. Palmitoyl-unsaturated species were mainly formed in PC when cultured at a concentration of 5 microM of each fatty acid. However, when cultured at 500 microM, unsaturated-unsaturated species, specific for each unsaturated fatty acid were actively formed. These findings indicate that (1) fatty acid composition of TG and PC in articular chondrocytes is influenced by the degree of fatty acid supply, (2) formation and turnover of TG plays a role in fatty acid metabolism of cells, and (3) fatty acid pairing in PC is modulated by extracellular fatty acid concentrations

  12. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), the effective electron density, N-el, and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCo...

  13. In Vitro Effect of Fatty Acids Identified in the Plasma of Obese Adolescents on the Function of Pancreatic ?-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Claudia; Vasquez, Juan Sebastian; Balcazar, Norman

    2017-01-01

    Background The increase in circulating free fatty acid (FFA) levels is a major factor that induces malfunction in pancreatic ?-cells. We evaluated the effect of FFAs reconstituted according to the profile of circulating fatty acids found in obese adolescents on the viability and function of the murine insulinoma cell line (mouse insulinoma [MIN6]). Methods From fatty acids obtained commercially, plasma-FFA profiles of three different youth populations were reconstituted: obese with metabolic ...

  14. Drought and heat stress effects on soybean fatty acid composition and oil stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that oil concentration and fatty acid profile (composition) change with genotype, environment (mainly heat and drought), and geographical location. The changes in fatty acid composition under these conditions affect fatty acid stability, creating a challenge to oil proces...

  15. Effect of sugar fatty acid esters on rumen fermentation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Wakita, M.; Hoshino, S.

    1987-01-01

    1.The effect of sugar fatty acid esters (SFEs; currently used as food additives for human consumption) on rumen volatile fatty acids (VFA) and gas production was studied with sheep rumen contents in vitro.2. Some SFEs having monoester contents of more than 70% increased the molar proportion of propionate in conjunction with reduction in the acetate: propionate ratio when the individual SFE was added to rumen contents in a final concentration of 4 g/l. Laurate sugar ester was the most potent p...

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  17. Effects of global change factors on fatty acids and mycosporine-like amino acid production in Chroothece richteriana (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Silvera, Daniel; Pérez, Sandra; Korbee, Nathalie; Figueroa, Félix L; Asencio, Antonia D; Aboal, Marina; López-Jiménez, José Ángel

    2017-10-01

    Under natural conditions, Chroothece richteriana synthesizes a fairly high proportion of fatty acids. However, nothing is known about how environmental changes affect their production, or about the production of protective compounds, when colonies develop under full sunshine with high levels of UV radiation. In this study, wild colonies of C. richteriana were subjected to increasing temperature, conductivity, ammonium concentrations and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and UV radiations to assess the potential changes in lipid composition and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) concentration. The PERMANOVA analysis detected no differences for the whole fatty acid profile among treatments, but the percentages of α-linolenic acid and total polyunsaturated fatty acids increased at the lowest assayed temperature. The percentages of linoleic and α-linolenic acids increased with lowering temperature. γ-linolenic and arachidonic acids decreased with increasing conductivity, and a high arachidonic acid concentration was related with increased conductivity. The samples exposed to UVB radiation showed higher percentages of eicosapentaenoic acid and total monounsaturated fatty acids, at the expense of saturated fatty acids. MAAs accumulation increased but not significantly at the lowest conductivity, and also with the highest PAR and UVR exposure, while ammonium and temperature had no effect. The observed changes are probably related with adaptations of both membrane fluidity to low temperature, and metabolism to protect cells against UV radiation damage. The results suggest the potential to change lipid composition and MAAs concentration in response to environmental stressful conditions due to climate change, and highlight the interest of the species in future research about the biotechnological production of both compound types. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Origin of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    The appearance of fatty acids and membranes is one of the most important events of the prebiotic world because genesis of life required the compartmentalization of molecules. Membranes allowed cells to become enriched with molecules relevant for their evolution and gave rise to gradients convertible into energy. By virtue of their hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface, membranes developed certain enzymatic activities impossible in the aqueous phase. A prebiotic cell is an energy unit but it is also an information unit. It has a past, a present and a future. The biochemistry of fatty acids involves acetylCoA, malonylCoA and an enzyme, acyl synthetase, which joins both molecules. After substitution of the acetyl group in place of the carboxyl group of malonyl derivatives, the chain is reduced and dehydrated to crotonyl derivatives. These molecules can again react with malonylCoA to form unsaturated chain; they can also undergo a new reduction step to form butyryl derivatives which can react with malonylCoA to form a longer aliphatic chain. The formation of malonylCoA consumes ATP. The reduction step needs NADPH and proton. Dehydration requires structural information because the reduction product is chiral (D configuration). It is unlikely that these steps were possible in a prebiotic environment. Thus we have to understand how fatty acids could appear in the prebiotic era. This hypothesis about the origin of fatty acids is based on the chemistry of sulfonium ylides and sulfonium salts. The most well-known among these molecules are S-melthyl-methionine and S-adenosyl methionine. The simplest sulfonium cation is the trimethylsulfonium cation. Chemists have evidence that these products can produce olefin when they are heated or flashed with UV light in some conditions. I suggest that these volatile products can allow the formation of fatty acids chains in atmospheric phase with UV and temperature using methanol as starting material. Different synthetic pathways will be

  19. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Denitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1995-01-01

    The effect of volatile fatty acids and trimethylamine on denitrification activity of activated sludge was studied in laboratory batch experiments. Formic acid had no effect on the denitrification rates. Acetic acid, n-butyric acid and trimethylamine all enhanced the rates. Acetate is the compound...... wastewaters from fish, potato and onion industries all stimulated denitrification. Reject water from anaerobic treatment of excess sludge had no significant effect on the denitrification processes. For isobutyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acid the undissociated compounds appear to act as the inhibitor...... with the strongest effect, n-butyric acid has a moderate effect, while TMA only have a small effect in stimulating the rates. Propionic, isobutyric, n-valeric, isovaleric and caproic acid inhibit denitrification, nitrate reduction being more inhibited than nitrite reduction. The inhibitor concentration, KI, at which...

  20. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on regulatory T cells in hematologic neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne da Silva Borges Betiati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of leukemia and lymphomas is related to the increase in inflammatory process modulators. These, in turn, have divergent actions on the neoplastic process. Populations of T cells have different roles in the neoplastic environment; while interferon-gamma positive T cells have antitumor activity, the FoxP3+interleukin-10 positive population present a pro-tumor activity. Simultaneously, the inflammatory process promotes the mobilization of fatty acids from the cell membrane to produce lipid mediators, which also participate of the inflammatory response. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic (DHA omega-3 fatty acids, when incorporated in the plasmatic membrane, decrease the arachidonic acid (AA metabolism and the production of eicosanoids derived from it. Thus, an alternative family of lipid mediators are produced that are often less inflammatory than those produced from arachidonic acid. Fatty acids can also influence the production of peptide mediators such as cytokines, and the expression of transcription factors, which can determine the production patterns of eicosanoids and cytokines as well as cell differentiation. Due to these properties, the objective of this literature review was to investigate studies published over the last 15 years on the effects of using omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory markers in leukemia and lymphomas.

  1. Effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on microbial decontamination and fatty acid compositions of aloe and pollen powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, H.S.; Chung, Y.J.; Kim, J.O.; Kwon, O.J.; Byun, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    The comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial inactivation and fatty acid composition were investigated for improving hygienic quality of aloe and pollen powders. Gamma irradiation at 10 kGy resulted in sterilizing total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of aloe and pollen powders. The compositions of fatty acid were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation up to 10 kGy. However, ozone treatment markedly decreased unsaturated fatty acids by approximately 20-80% in contents, whereas it significantly increased saturated fatty acids (p<0.05)

  2. Effects of n-3 fatty acids from fish on premature ventricular complexes and heart rate in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, A.; Brouwer, I.A.; Katan, M.B.; Schouten, E.G.; Maan, A.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A large body of evidence suggests that n-3 fatty acids from fish prevent fatal heart disease. They may be an effective and safe alternative to drug treatment for reducing the risk of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Objective: We investigated the effect of n-3 fatty acids on heart

  3. Effects of dietary flaxseed oil on the muscle fatty acid composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary flaxseed oil on the fatty acid (FA) composition of two types of muscles, longissimus dorsi (LD) and semitendinosus (ST), of Mangalitsa pigs reared in an extensive system. Fourteen Mangalitsa castrated pigs, 55 ± 8 kg, 240 ± 12 days of age, were randomly assigned ...

  4. The effects of various preservation methods on fatty acid content of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of various preservation methods on fatty acid content of African catfish, (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was investigated. Fresh fish samples were obtained from swimming pool end (Gamji Gate) of River Rino, Kaduna. Preservation methods investigated were: straight smoking (SS), ...

  5. The effect of carbohydrate and fat variation in euenergetic diets on postabsorptive free fatty acid release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Ruiter, AFC; Meijer, AJ; Kuipers, F; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    Diet composition and energy content modulate free fatty acid (FFA) release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-response effects of euenergetic variations in dietary carbohydrate and fat content on postabsorptive FFA release. The rate of appearance (R-a) of palmitate was measured by

  6. Effect of dietary vegetable oils on the fatty acid profile of plasma lipoproteins in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Cancino-Padilla, Nathaly

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary supplementation of soybean oil (SO) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO) on the transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Three lactating and three non-lactating Holstein cows were...

  7. [Research update of effectiveness and mechanism of essential fatty acids in treating dry eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Liang, Q F

    2017-03-11

    Topical anti-inflammatory therapy has become the significant way of treating dry eye so far. However, as the long-term use of routine anti-inflammatory medications are restricted from their side effects, it is inevitable to explore safer and more effective alternatives. Essential fatty acids have proven to be anti-inflammatory systemically, which makes it possible to treat dry eye. Clinical trials have demonstrated that supplementation with either ω-3 or ω-6 essential fatty acids or both has multifactorial efficacies including improvement of subjective symptoms, alleviation of inflammation of ocular surface and eyelid margin, prolongation of tear break-up time and increase of tear flow secretion. Besides anti-inflammation effects, several basic researches have revealed that other mechanisms of essential fatty acids treating dry eye might lie in the corneal epithelial healing and tear secretion promotion. This review puts emphasis on the effectiveness, feasibility and mechanism of treating dry eye with essential fatty acids. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 225-229) .

  8. Self-assembly of long chain fatty acids: Effect of a methyl branch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F. D.; Tyrode, Eric; Thormann, Esben

    2014-01-01

    chains of the straight chain fatty acids appear to be oriented perpendicular to the sample surface, based on an orientational analysis of VSFS data and the odd/even effect. In addition, the selection of the subphase (neat water or CdCl2 containing water buffered to pH 6.0) used for the LB-deposition has...

  9. Effects of free fatty acids per se on glucose production, gluconeogenesis, and glycogenolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, Peter; Hother-Nielsen, Ole; Landau, Bernard R

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-independent effects of a physiological increase in free fatty acid (FFA) levels on fasting glucose production, gluconeogenesis, and glycogenolysis were assessed by administering [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose and deuteriated water ((2)H(2)O) in 12 type 1 diabetic patients, during 6-h infusions...

  10. Effects of persimmon peel supplementation on pork quality, palatability, fatty acid composition, and cholesterol level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Moo Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of persimmon peel (PPM supplementation on carcass performance, pork quality, eating quality, fatty acid composition, and cholesterol concentration of the porcine longissimus dorsi muscle. Results No adverse effects of PPM supplementation were observed on carcass and meat quality characteristics among the treatment groups (P > 0.05, whereas pork loins from pigs fed a diet supplemented with 0.9 % persimmon peel (T3 showed more tender meat than did pork loins from pigs fed a control diet (P < 0.01, even though no significant difference was observed between the control and T1 group. The T3 group had higher ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids relative to saturated fatty acids (0.33 vs. 0.28, P < 0.05 and lower total cholesterol concentration (94.4 vs. 99.1 mg/g, P < 0.05 compared to the control group. Persimmon peel appeared to have beneficial effects on fatty acid composition and cholesterol concentration, probably leading to a hypocholesterolemic effect. Conclusions Animal diets fortified with persimmon peel represents an efficient and useful method for improving the nutritional quality of pork without impairing growth performance and eating quality properties.

  11. Effects of mixed volatile fatty acid sodium salt on insulin-like growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of mixed volatile fatty acid sodium salt on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in plasma and rumen tissue, and rumen epithelium development in lambs.

  12. Effects of dietary oil sources on egg quality, fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study demonstrated that olive oil improved egg weight and egg shell quality compared to the other oils tested; fish and soyabean oil increased the omega-3 fatty acid level of egg yolk, and soyabean oil had positive effects on serum lipid concentrations. Incorporation of these oils into the diets of Japanese ...

  13. cAMP-dependent signaling regulates the adipogenic effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Liaset, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    The effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFAs) on adipogenesis and obesity is controversial. Using in vitro cell culture models, we show that n-6 PUFAs was pro-adipogenic under conditions with base-line levels of cAMP, but anti-adipogenic when the levels of cAMP were elevated. The anti...

  14. Carbohydrate fatty acid monosulphate esters are safe and effective adjuvants for humoral responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, L.A.T.; Platenburg, P.; Bajramovic, J.; Veth, J.; Sauerwein, R.; Roeffen, W.; Pohl, M.; Amerongen, G. van; Stittelaar, K.J.; Bosch, J.F. van den

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate fatty acid sulphate esters (CFASEs) formulated in a squalane-in-water emulsion are effective adjuvants for humoral responses to a wide range of antigens in various animal species but rise in body temperature and local reactions albeit mild or minimal hampers application in humans. In

  15. Effects of age/weight and castration on fatty acids composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the effects of age/weight and castration on the fatty acid composition and the qualities of pork and pork fat. Thirty hybrid male pigs (50% Meishan x 50% Large White) were used. Fifteen were castrated within the first two days of age and the other fifteen remained entire. At 12 weeks of age, the pigs ...

  16. Effect of fatty acids on the synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein B by rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, N.; Abraham, Rita; Suresh Kumar, G.; Sudhakaran, P.R.; Kurup, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The modulation of apolipoprotein B synthesis and secretion by fatty acids in rat hepatocytes was studied. Maximum apolipoprotein B production was obtained in the case of oleic acid followed by linoleic, stearic and palmitic/linolenic acid when compared to control which was not supplemented with any fatty acids. Oleic acid was found to exert a concentration dependent increase in the secretion of [ 3 H] apolipoprotein B into the medium while that associated with the cell layer was not affected. Pulse chase experiments in the presence of oleic acid showed that it caused an increase in the secretion of apolipoprotein B into the medium. 14 C-acetate incorporation into cholesterol and cholesteryl ester associated with the cell layer and secreted very low density lipoproteins also showed an increase in the presence of oleic acid indicating an increase in cholesterogenesis. The effect of oleic acid on [ 3 H] apolipoprotein B and very low density lipoprotein secretion appeared to be mediated through cholesterol as (i)ketoconazole, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis caused significant reduction in the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on apolipoprotein secretion and (ii) mevinolin, another inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis also reversed the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on apolipoprotein B secretion. These results indicated that oleic acid may influence apolipoprotein B synthesis and secretion in hepatocytes probably by affecting cholesterol/cholesteryl ester formation which may be a critical component in the secretion of apolipoprotein B as lipoproteins. (author). 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Effect of environmental conditions on the fatty acid fingerprint of microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Mikhail; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Lipid biomarkers, especially phospholipids, are routinely used to characterize microbial community structure in environmental samples. Interpretations of these fingerprints mainly depend on rare results of pure cultures which were cultivated under standardized batch conditions. However, membrane lipids (e.g. phopholipid biomarker) build up the interface between microorganisms and their environment and consequently are prone to be adapted according to the environmental conditions. We cultivated several bacteria, isolated from soil (gram-positive and gram-negative) under various conditions e.g. C supply and temperature regimes. Effect of growth conditions on phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) as well as neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) and glycolipid fatty acids (GLFA) was investigated by conventional method of extraction and derivatization, followed by assessments with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, phospholipids were measured as intact molecules by ultra high performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC-Q-ToF) to further assess the composition of headgroups with fatty acids residues and their response on changing environmental conditions. PLFA fingerprints revealed a strong effect of growth stage, C supply and temperature e.g. decrease of temperature increased the amount of branched and/or unsaturated fatty acids to maintain the membrane fluidity. This strongly changes the ratio of specific to unspecific fatty acids depending on environmental conditions. Therefore, amounts of specific fatty acids cannot be used to assess biomass of a functional microbial group in soil. Intracellular neutral lipids depended less on environmental conditions reflecting a more stable biomarker group but also showed less specific fatty acids then PLFA. Therefore, combination of several lipid classes is suggested as more powerful tool to assess amounts and functionality of environmental microbial communities. Further

  18. Effect of obesity and metabolic syndrome on plasma oxysterols and fatty acids in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Zerbinati, Chiara; Pacelli, Antonio; Palmaccio, Giuseppina; Lubrano, Carla; Ducheix, Simon; Guillou, Hervé; Iuliano, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and the related entity metabolic syndrome are characterized by altered lipid metabolism and associated with increased morbidity risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Oxysterols belong to a large family of cholesterol-derived molecules known to play crucial role in many signaling pathways underlying several diseases. Little is known on the potential effect of obesity and metabolic syndrome on oxysterols in human. In this work, we questioned whether circulating oxysterols might be significantly altered in obese patients and in patients with metabolic syndrome. We also tested the potential correlation between circulating oxysterols and fatty acids. 60 obese patients and 75 patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in the study along with 210 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects, used as control group. Plasma oxysterols were analyzed by isotope dilution GC/MS, and plasma fatty acids profiling was assessed by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection. We found considerable differences in oxysterols profiling in the two disease groups that were gender-related. Compared to controls, males showed significant differences only in 4α- and 4β-hydroxycholesterol levels in obese and metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, females showed consistent differences in 7-oxocholesterol, 4α-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and triol. Concerning fatty acids, we found minor differences in the levels of these variables in males of the three groups. Significant changes were observed in plasma fatty acid profile of female patients with obesity or metabolic syndrome. We found significant correlations between various oxysterols and fatty acids. In particular, 4β-hydroxycholesterol, which is reduced in obesity and metabolic syndrome, correlated with a number of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that are end-products of de novo lipogenesis. Our data provide the first evidence that obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with

  19. Effect of Fatty acids and beeswax addition on properties of sodium caseinate dispersions and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabra, M J; Jiménez, A; Atarés, L; Talens, P; Chiralt, A

    2009-06-08

    Edible films based on sodium caseinate and different saturated fatty acids, oleic acid, or beeswax were formulated. Film-forming emulsions were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, rheological behavior and surface tension. In order to evaluate the influence of lipids on sodium caseinate matrices, mechanical, optical, and water vapor barrier properties were studied, taking into account the effect of water content and film structure on such properties. Saturated fatty acids affected the film properties in a particular way due to the formation of bilayer structures which limited water vapor permeability, giving rise to nonflexible and more opaque films. Oleic acid and beeswax were less effective as water vapor barriers, although the former imparted more flexibility to the caseinate films and did not reduce the film transparency notably.

  20. Effect of supplementation of arachidonic acid (AA) or a combination of AA plus docosahexaenoic acid on breastmilk fatty acid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Koopmann, M; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    We investigated whether supplementation with arachidonic acid (20:4 omega 6; AA), ora combination of AA and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3; DHA) would affect human milk polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition. Ten women were daily supplemented with 300 mg AA, eight with 300 mg AA, 110 mg

  1. The Effects of Fatty Acids on Retinoid Signaling in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langton, Simne; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2005-01-01

    ...) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are diet-derived fatty acids that bind to rexinoid X receptors (RXR). Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibitory effects on cell proliferation may be enhanced by the addition of PA and DHA to RA- treated cells...

  2. Effect of fatty acids on functional properties of normal wheat and waxy wheat starches: A structural basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujun; Wang, Jinrong; Yu, Jinglin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of three saturated fatty acids on functional properties of normal wheat and waxy wheat starches were investigated. The complexing index (CI) of normal wheat starch-fatty acid complexes decreased with increasing carbon chain length. In contrast, waxy wheat starch-fatty acid complexes presented much lower CI. V-type crystalline polymorphs were formed between normal wheat starch and three fatty acids, with shorter chain fatty acids producing more crystalline structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy presented the similar results with XRD. The formation of amylose-fatty acid complex inhibited granule swelling, gelatinization progression, retrogradation and pasting development of normal wheat starch, with longer chain fatty acids showing greater inhibition. Amylopectin can also form complexes with fatty acids, but the amount of complex was too little to be detected by XRD, FTIR, Raman and DSC. As a consequence, small changes were observed in the functional properties of waxy wheat starch with the addition of fatty acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Three Fatty Acids from Royal Jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trans-10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-H2DA, 10-hydroxydecanoic acid (10-HDAA, and sebacic acid (SEA are the three major fatty acids in royal jelly (RJ. Previous studies have revealed several pharmacological activities of 10-H2DA and 10-HDAA, although the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying mechanisms by which SEA acts are poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated and compared the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of these RJ fatty acids in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results showed that 10-H2DA, 10-HDAA, and SEA had potent, dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the release of the major inflammatory-mediators, nitric oxide, and interleukin-10, and only SEA decreased TNF-α production. Several key inflammatory genes have also been modulated by these RJ fatty acids, with 10-H2DA showing distinct modulating effects as compared to the other two FAs. Furthermore, we found that these three FAs regulated several proteins involved in MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Taken together, these findings provide additional references for using RJ against inflammatory diseases.

  4. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetta, Iara [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: rocchetta@bg.fcen.uba.ar; Mazzuca, Marcia [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Conforti, Visitacion [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ruiz, Laura [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Balzaretti, Vilma [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Rios de Molina, Maria del Carmen [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC{sub 5}. The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC{sub 5}, suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC{sub 5}, whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions.

  5. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchetta, Iara; Mazzuca, Marcia; Conforti, Visitacion; Ruiz, Laura; Balzaretti, Vilma; Rios de Molina, Maria del Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC 5 . The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC 5 , suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC 5 , whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in THP-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guixiang; Etherton, Terry D.; Martin, Keith R.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.; Gillies, Peter J.; West, Sheila G.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of linoleic acid (LA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were compared to that of palmitic acid (PA), on inflammatory responses in human monocytic THP-1 cells. When cells were pre-incubated with fatty acids for 2-h and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide for 24-h in the presence of fatty acids, secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) was significantly decreased after treatment with LA, ALA, and DHA versus PA (P 12,14 -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) and were dose-dependent. In addition, LA, ALA, and DHA decreased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα gene expression (P < 0.05 for all) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB DNA-binding activity, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) DNA-binding activity was increased. The results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids may be, in part, due to the inhibition of NF-κB activation via activation of PPARγ

  7. Analysis of embryo, cytoplasm and maternal effects on fatty acid components in soybean (Glycine max Merill.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Hailong; LI Wenxia; LI Wenbin

    2007-01-01

    The quality of oil determined by the constituents and proportion of fatty acid components,and the understanding of heredity of fatty acid components are of importance to breeding good quality soybean varieties.Embryo,cytoplasmic and maternal effects and genotype×environment interaction effects for quality traits of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill.] seeds were analyzed using a general genetic model for quantitative traits of seeds with parents,F1 and F2,of 20 crosses from a diallel mating design of five parents planted in the field in 2003 and 2004 in Harbin,China.The interaction effects of palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acid contents were larger than the genetic main effects,while the genetic main effects were equal to interaction effects for linolenic and oleic acid content.Among all kinds of genetic main effects,the embryo effects were the largest for palmitic,stearic,and linoleic acids,while the cytoplasm effects were the largest for oleic and linolenic acids.Among all kinds of interaction effects,the embryo interaction effects were the largest for fatty acids.The sum of additive and additive× environment effects were larger than that of dominance and dominance×environment effects for the linolenic acid content,but not for other quality traits.The general heritabilities were the main parts of heritabilities for palmitic and oleic acid contents,but the interaction was more important for stearic,linoleic,and linolenic acid contents.For the general heritability,maternal and cytoplasm heritabilities were the main components for palmitic,oleic,and linolenic acid contents.It was shown for the interaction heritabilities that the embryo interaction heritabilities were more important for oleic and linolenic acid contents,while the maternal interaction heritabilities were more important for linoleic acid content.Among selection response components,the maternal and cytoplasm general responses and/or interaction responses were more important for palmitic

  8. Do fatty acids affect fetal programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaran, Seray; Besler, H Tanju

    2015-08-13

    In this study discussed the primary and regulatory roles of fatty acids, and investigated the affects of fatty acids on metabolic programming. Review of the literature was carried out on three electronic databases to assess the roles of fatty acids in metabolic programming. All abstracts and full-text articles were examined, and the most relevant articles were selected for screening and inclusion in this review. The mother's nutritional environment during fetal period has important effects on long term health. Fatty acids play a primary role in growth and development. Alterations in fatty acid intake in the fetal period may increase the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in later life. Maternal fatty acid intakes during pregnancy and lactation are passed to the fetus and the newborn via the placenta and breast milk, respectively. Imbalances in fatty acid intake during the fetal period change the fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, which can cause structural and functional problems in cells. Additionally, the metabolic and neuroendocrine environments of the fetus and the newborn play key roles in the regulation of energy balance. Imbalances in fatty acid intake during pregnancy and lactation may result in permanent changes in appetite control, neuroendocrine function and energy metabolism in the fetus, leading to metabolic programming. Further studies are needed to determine the role of fatty acid intake in metabolic programming.

  9. The effect of endogenous essential and nonessential fatty acids on the uptake and subsequent agonist-induced release of arachidonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, E.E.; Hurtubise, V.; Schott, M.A.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the uptake and agonist-induced release of a pulse of arachidonate are influenced by the size and composition of preexisting endogenous fatty acid pools. EFD-1 cells, an essential fatty acid-deficient mouse fibrosarcoma cell line, were incubated with radiolabeled (14C or 3H) arachidonate, linoleate, eicosapentaenoate (EPA), palmitate, or oleate in concentrations of 0-33 microM for 24 h. After 24 h, the cells were pulsed with 0.67 microM radiolabeled (3H or 14C, opposite first label) arachidonate for 15 min and then stimulated with 10 microM bradykinin for 4 min. Because EFD-1 cells contain no endogenous essential fatty acids, we were able to create essential fatty acid-repleted cells for which the specific activity of the newly constructed endogenous essential fatty acid pool was known. Loading the endogenous pool with the essential fatty acids arachidonate, eicosapentaenoate, or linoleate (15-20 nmol of fatty acid incorporated/10(6) cells) decreased the uptake of a pulse of arachidonate from 200 to 100 pmol/10(6) cells but had no effect on palmitate uptake. The percent of arachidonate incorporated during the pulse which was released upon agonist stimulation increased 2-fold (4-8%) as the endogenous pool of essential fatty acids was increased from 0 to 15-20 nmol/10(6) cells. This 8% release was at least 3-fold greater than the percent release from the various endogenous essential fatty acid pools. In contrast, loading the endogenous pool with the nonessential fatty acids oleate or palmitate to more than 2-3 times their preexisting cellular level had no effect on the uptake of an arachidonate pulse. Like the essential fatty acids, increasing endogenous oleate increased (by 2-fold) the percent release of arachidonate incorporated during the pulse, whereas endogenous palmitate had no effect on subsequent agonist-induced release from this arachidonate pool

  10. Cytoprotective effect of tocopherols in hepatocytes cultured with polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, L.; Hansen, Harald S.; Grunnet, N.

    1994-01-01

    When highly unsaturated fatty acids are added to cell cultures, it can become important to include antioxidants in the culture medium to prevent cytotoxic peroxidation. To find an optimal antioxidant for this purpose, the effect of 50 µM a-tocopherol, ¿-tocopherol, a-tocopheryl acetate, a...... of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the cultures was also measured. a-Tocopheryl acid succinate was found to be the most effective cytoprotective compound, followed by N,N'-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine, a- tocopherol, ¿-tocopherol and a-tocopheryl acetate, and a-tocopheryl phosphate was without effect....

  11. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. (Unite de Recherches de Physiolopathologie Hepatique (INSERM U-24), Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  12. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]palmitic acid but not that of [1- 14 C]palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]octanoic acid and [1- 14 C]butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of [ 14 C]CO 2 from [1- 14 C]fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids

  13. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  14. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation......), atomic emission spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. For most environmental samples, chlorinated FAMEs must be enriched prior to GC. ELCD is a useful detection method for indicating halogenated FAMEs in the chromatograms, and tentative identification of the halogenated species can be obtained...

  15. Effect of micro-encapsulated n-3 fatty acids on quality properties of two types of dry sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Pavlík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry sausages are popular traditional meat products. As these products are a rich source of animal fat, there is an effort to improve their fatty acid ratio. The aim of this work was to study the effect of micro-encapsulated n-3 fatty acids added into dry sausages. Samples of dry sausages (Poličan and Vysočina enriched with unsaturated fatty acids (36 g for 6 kg of mixture and rosemary extract (0.3 g·kg-1 were made along with control samples. Physicochemical, instrumental analyses were performed, fatty acid profile was measured by gas chromatography, and oxidation processes were monitored by determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. No significant differences (P ≥ 0.05 in quality indicators were found between samples, however, there were differences in oxidation processes. Sausages enriched with unsaturated fatty acids showed an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (> 2 mg·kg-1 and > 3 mg·kg-1 in Poličan and Vysočina, respectively, compared to control. Sausages enriched with unsaturated fatty acids and also with rosemary extract have the similar concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances as the control. An increase in the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids was seen in samples of Poličan supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids in combination with rosemary extract. The addition of rosemary extract had also a significant effect in increasing the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in samples of Vysočina. From the viewpoint of quality indicators, changes in the properties of the product were not seen in any samples.

  16. Genetic effects of sterol regulatory element binding proteins and fatty acid-binding protein4 on the fatty acid composition of Korean cattle (Hanwoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Yep Oh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study identifies single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP or gene combinations that affect the flavor and quality of Korean cattle (Hanwoo by using the SNP Harvester method. Methods Four economic traits (oleic acid [C18:1], saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and marbling score were adjusted for environmental factors in order to focus solely on genetic effects. The SNP Harvester method was used to investigate gene combinations (two-way gene interactions associated with these economic traits. Further, a multifactor dimensionality reduction method was used to identify superior genotypes in gene combinations. Results Table 3 to 4 show the analysis results for differences between superior genotypes and others for selected major gene combinations using the multifactor dimensionality reduction method. Environmental factors were adjusted for in order to evaluate only the genetic effect. Table 5 shows the adjustment effect by comparing the accuracy before and after correction in two-way gene interactions. Conclusion The g.3977-325 T>C and (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C combinations of fatty acid-binding protein4 were the superior gene, and the superior genotype combinations across all economic traits were the CC genotype at g.3977-325 T>C and the AACC, GACC, GGCC genotypes of (g.2988 A>G, g.3977-325 T>C.

  17. Characterization of cellular fatty acids of listeria species and their effect on circulating blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omm-e-Hany; Khan, M.A.; Khan, M.A.; Shahzad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Siddiqi, R.; Atta-ur-Rehman

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 7973, L. ivanovii SLCC 2379 and L. seeligeri SLCC 3954 were found to contain 5 - 7.8 % (dry weight) chloroform- soluble lipids. All species exhibited, nearly similar fatty acid esters profile with little difference when grown at 37 deg. C. The study revealed the abundance of odd chain saturated fatty acids in all the three species of Listeria. Among all, in particular ante-iso are more prevalent than iso- forms. The high percentage of the C15 fatty acid ester was characteristic of each species but with some differences in the relative amounts were observed. C19 and C22 fatty acid esters were characteristic of L. monocytogenes. Whole cells of L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii induced strong monocytosis in the infected animals (rabbits, mice, and rats) of varying degree of susceptibility. Similar effect was observed with crude lipid extract of L.moncytogenes. No such response was observed even when live L. seeligri cells or crude lipid of L. ivanovii were injected. (author)

  18. Effect of Different Fatty Acid Sources of Diet on Growth Performance of Botia Botia macracanthus Bleeker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Sunarto

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish requires essential fatty acid for growth. Freshwater fish needs linoleat fatty acid (n-6 or combination of linoleat and a-linolenat acids (n-3.  Fish oil contains higher level of n-3, corn oil is rich of n-6, while coconut oil is rich of saturated fatty acids.  This study was conducted to determine the effect of fatty acid sources in diet on growth performance of botia Botia macracanthus. Sources of fatty acid examined were coconut oil (control, corn oil, fish oil, and corn oil + fish oil + coconut oil. The results of study show that daily growth rate of fish fed on diet containing mix of corn-coconut-fish oils (8.39% and only corn oil (8.15% was higher (p0.05.  Survival rate of fish at all treatments was similar, ranged from 90.00 to 93.33%.  Thus, the results suggested that diet containing only corn oil is suitable for botia to obtain higher growth rate and lower feed conversion rate. Keywords: fatty acid, growth performance, botia, Botia macracanthus ABSTRAK Ikan membutuhkan asam lemak essensial (EFA = Essential Fatty Acid untuk pertumbuhannya.  Ikan air tawar memerlukan asam lemak linoleat (n-6 atau gabungan asam lemak linoleat (n-6 dan alfa-linolenat (n-3.  Minyak ikan banyak mengandung asam lemak n-3, minyak jagung kaya akan asam lemak n-6, sementara minyak kelapa banyak mengandung asam lemak jenuh.  Sumber asam lemak yang diuji adalah minyak kelapa  (kontrol, minyak jagung, minyak ikan, dan minyak jagung + minyak ikan + minyak kelapa. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa laju pertumbuhan harian ikan botia yang diberi pakan yang mengandung campuran minyak jagung-kelapa-ikan (8,39% dan minyak jagung (8,15% saja lebih tinggi (p0,05.  Kelangsungan hidup ikan pada semua perlakuan relatif sama, yaitu berkisar antara 90,00-93,33%. Dengan demikian, pakan untuk ikan botia cukup mengandung minyak jagung saja untuk mendapatkan laju pertumbuhan yang tinggi dengan konversi pakan yang rendah. Kata kunci: asam lemak, kinerja pertumbuhan

  19. Effects of volatile fatty acids on propionate metabolism and gluconeogenesis in caprine hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated caprine hepatocytes were incubated with fatty acids of various chain lengths. Short-chain fatty acids effects on rates of gluconeogenesis and oxidation from [2- 14 C] propionate were determined. Additions of glucose (2.5 mM) had no effect on hepatic [2- 14 C]-propionate metabolism in the presence and absence of amino acids. A complete mixture of amino acids increased label incorporation from [2- 14 C] propionate into [ 14 C] glucose by 22%. Butyrate inhibited [2- 14 C] propionate metabolism and increased the apparent Michaelis constant for [2- 14 C] propionate incorporation into [ 14 C] glucose from 2.4 +/- 1.5 to 5.6 +/- .9 mM. Butyrate's effects on propionate were similar in the presence and absence of L-carnitine (1 mM). Isobutyrate, 2-methylbutyrate, and valerate (1.25 mM) had no effect on [ 14 C] glucose production but decreased 14 CO 2 production to 57, 61, and 54% of the control [2- 14 C] propionate (1.25 mM). This inhibition on 14 CO 2 was not competitive. Isovalerate had no effect on either [2- 14 C] propionate incorporation into glucose of CO 2 . An increase in ratio of [ 14 C] glucose to 14 CO 2 from [2- 14 C]-propionate demonstrated that short-chain fatty acids other than butyrate do not inhibit gluconeogenesis from propionate. In addition, fatty acids that generate a net synthesis of intracellular oxaloacetate may partition propionate carbons toward gluconeogenic rather than oxidative pathways in goat hepatocytes

  20. Effect of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid supplementation on bio-plastic production under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S K; Tripathi, Abhishek Dutt

    2013-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are intracellular reserve material stored by gram-negative bacteria under nutrient-limited condition. PHAs are utilized in biodegradable plastics (bio-plastics) synthesis due to their similarity with conventional synthetic plastic. In the present study, the effect of addition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid) on the production of PHAs by the soil bacterium Alcaligenes sp. NCIM 5085 was studied. Fatty acid supplementation in basal media produced saturated and unsaturated PHAs of medium and short chain length. Gas chromatography analysis of palmitic acid-supplemented media showed the presence of short chain length (scl) PHAs which could potentially serve as precursors for bio-plastic production. The scl PHA was subsequently characterized as PHB by NMR and FTIR. On the other hand, oleic acid and linoleic acid addition showed both saturated and unsaturated PHAs of different chain lengths. Palmitic acid showed maximum PHB content of 70.8 % at concentration of 15 g l -1 under shake flask cultivation. When shake flask cultivation was scaled up in a 7.5-l bioreactor (working volume 3 l), 7.6 g l -1 PHA was produced with a PHB yield (Y P/X ) and productivity of 75.89 % and 0.14 g l -1  h, respectively.

  1. Fatty acid synthesis by spinach chloroplasts, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Yasunori

    1975-01-01

    By incorporation of 3 H 2 O into the fatty acid chain in the presence of unlabelled precursor, we showed that fatty acids are synthesized from PGA, PEP and pyruvate by intact spinach chloroplasts in the light. 13 C-tracer experiments confirmed that 1-C of pyruvate is decarboxylated and 2-C is incorporated into fatty acids by the chloroplasts. The patterns of fatty acids synthesized from PGA and pyruvate were the same as that from acetate. The highest rate of fatty acid synthesis was reached at the physiological concentration of PGA (3 mM) and pyruvate (1 mM). These results indicate the operation of the following path in the chloroplasts in light: PGA→PEP→pyruvate→acetylCoA→fatty acids. Since citrate and OAA were much less active and malate and glyoxylate were inert as precursors for fatty acid synthesis, PEP or pyruvate carboxylation, citrate lyase reaction and malate synthetase reaction are not involved in the formation of acetylCoA and fatty acids. Since pyruvate was much more effective as a substrate for fatty acid synthesis than lactate, acetaldehyde or acetate, direct decarboxylation path is considered to be the primary path from pyruvate to acetylCoA. The insignificant effect of chloroplast-washing on fatty acid synthesis from PGA and pyruvate indicates that the glycolytic path from PGA to pyruvate is associated with the chloroplasts. Since pyruvate was more effectively incorporated into fatty acids than acetylCoA, it is unlikely that pyruvate decarboxylation to acetylCoA is due to mitochondria contaminating the chloroplast preparation. On the basis of measurements of 3 H 2 O incorporation in the light and dark, the activity of fatty acid synthesis in spincah leaves appears to be shared by the activities in chloroplasts (87%) and other organelles (13%). (author)

  2. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on depression and quality of life in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Gharekhani, Afshin; Khatami, Mohammad-Reza; Miri, Elham-Sadat; Khalili, Hossein; Razeghi, Effat; Hashemi-Nazari, Seyed-Saeed; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-01-01

    Depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are closely interrelated among hemodialysis (HD) patients and associated with negative impacts on patients' clinical outcomes. Considering previous reports on clinical benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in major depression and HRQoL in other patient populations, this study examined effects of omega-3 fatty acids on depression and HRQoL in chronic HD patients. In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, 40 adult patients with a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of ≥16 and HD vintage of at least 3 months were randomized to ingest 6 soft-gel capsules of either omega-3 fatty acids (180 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 120 mg docosahexaenoic acid in each capsule) or corresponding placebo, daily for 4 months. At baseline and after 4 months, 2 questionnaires of BDI and the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were completed by each patient. Although baseline BDI score was comparable between the 2 groups, it was significantly lower in the omega-3 group compared with the placebo group at the end of the study (P = 0.008). Except for mental health, social functioning, and general health, other domains of HRQoL showed significant improvement in the omega-3 group compared with the placebo group at month 4 of the study (P acids in HD patients with depressive symptoms seems to be efficacious in improving depressive symptoms and HRQoL.

  3. The Effect of Meal Frequency on the Fatty Acid Composition of Serum Phospholipids in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahleova, Hana; Malinska, Hana; Kazdova, Ludmila; Belinova, Lenka; Tura, Andrea; Hill, Martin; Pelikanova, Terezie

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids are important cellular constituents that can affect many metabolic processes relevant for the development of diabetes and its complications. We previously demonstrated a positive effect of eating just 2 meals a day, breakfast and lunch, compared to 6 small meals. The aim of this secondary analysis was to explore the effect of meal frequency on the fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In a randomized, crossover study, we assigned 54 patients with T2D to follow one of 2 regimens of a hypocaloric diet (-500 kcal/day), each for 12 weeks: 6 meals (A6) or 2 meals a day, breakfast and lunch (B2). The diet in both regimens had the same macronutrient and energy content. The fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids was measured at weeks 0, 12, and 24, using gas liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was derived as an oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS) index. Saturated fatty acids (mainly myristic and palmitic acids) decreased (p meal frequency affects the fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids. The B2 regimen had more marked positive effects, with saturated fatty acids and the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids decreasing more. The increase in linoleic acid could partly explain the insulin-sensitizing effect of B2 in T2D.

  4. Effect of salinity on growth, biochemical parameters and fatty acid composition in safflower (carthamus tinctorius l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, S.; Bukhari, S.A.; Mahmood, S.; Iftikhar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present project is to investigate the effect of salinity on growth, biochemical parameters and fatty acid composition in six varieties of safflower as well as identification of stress tolerant variety under saline (8 d Sm-1) condition. It was observed that salinity significantly decreased the dry weight and fresh weight of safflower varieties. Nitrate reductase (NRA) and nitrite reductase (NiRA) activities were also reduced in response to salinity in all safflower genotypes but Thori-78 and PI-387820 showed less reduction which could be a useful marker for selecting salt tolerant varieties. Under salinity stress, total free amino acids, reducing, non reducing sugars and total sugars increased in all varieties. Accumulation of sugars and total free amino acids might reflect a salt protective mechanism and could be a useful criterion for selecting salt tolerant variety. Comparison among safflower genotypes indicated that Thori-78 and PI-387820 performed better than the others and successful in maintaining higher NRA, NiRA and other metabolites thus were tolerant to salinity. Differential effect upon fatty acid synthesis was observed by different varieties under salinity stress but PI-170274 and PI-387821 varieties better maintained their fatty acid composition. It can be concluded from present studies that biochemical markers can be used to select salinity tolerant safflower varieties. (author)

  5. The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten H.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are capable of modulating immune function. Some studies have shown that these PUFAs might have a beneficial effect in patients suffering form multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). This could be due to increased n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. In the present study we tested the effect...

  6. Dietary omega 6 fatty acids and the effects of hyperthyroidism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, N; Hulbert, A J

    1995-03-01

    The influence of the type of dietary fat on the effects of thyroid hormones was investigated in mice. Hyperthyroidism was achieved by providing thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) in the drinking water. Both hyperthyroid and euthyroid mice (Mus musculus) were fed isoenergetic diets containing 18% (w/w) total lipid but differing in fatty acid composition. Diets were either low in the polyunsaturated linoleic acid (18:2, omega 6) and high in saturated fatty acids (SFAs) or low in saturated fats and high in the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), linoleic acid. Treatments were maintained for 21-22 days. Plasma thyroid hormone levels, standard metabolic rate (SMR), changes in body mass, specific activities of malic enzyme (ME), Na-K-ATPase and glycerolphosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) of the liver were measured. Fatty acid composition of the liver phospholipids was also determined. Levels of T3 (15-17 nM) and T4 (250-255 nM) were significantly higher in the respective hyperthyroid groups. There was no significant influence of the diet on hormone levels. Hyperthyroidism increased the SMR 37-44% above the euthyroid levels. A significant body weight loss of 14-18% was observed in hyperthyroid mice on the PUFA diet but not in those on the SFA diet. PUFA diet significantly reduced the activity of ME but had no effect on Na-K-ATPase or GPDH activity. Activities of Na-K-ATPase and GPDH were significantly elevated in all hyperthyroid groups. Mice on T4 and PUFA diet showed a highly significant 399% increase in GPDH activity above the euthyroid level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A proteomic analysis of the functional effects of fatty acids in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Magdalon, Juliana

    2011-11-24

    Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that long chain fatty acids influence fibroblast function at sub-lethal concentrations. This study is the first to assess the effects of oleic, linoleic or palmitic acids on protein expression of fibroblasts, as determined by standard proteomic techniques. The fatty acids were not cytotoxic at the concentration used in this work as assessed by membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation and the MTT assay but significantly increased cell proliferation. Subsequently, a proteomic analysis was performed using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and MS based identification. Cells treated with 50 μM oleic, linoleic or palmitic acid for 24 h were associated with 24, 22, 16 spots differentially expressed, respectively. Among the identified proteins, α-enolase and far upstream element binding protein 1 (FBP-1) are of importance due to their function in fibroblast-associated diseases. However, modulation of α-enolase and FBP-1 expression by fatty acids was not validated by the Western blot technique.

  8. Effects of rice bran on performance, egg quality, oxidative status, yolk fatty acid composition, and fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression in laying ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, D; Lin, Y C; Chen, W; Wang, S; Xia, W G; Fouad, A M; Zheng, C T

    2015-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effects of different dietary levels of rice bran (RB) in laying duck diets on performance, egg quality, oxidation status, egg yolk fatty acid composition, and hepatic expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes. Longyan females (1080) with similar BW at 19 wk of age were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments, each consisting of 6 replicates of 30 birds. The basal diet (I) was a typical corn-soybean ration while the experimental diets (II to VI) substituted RB for corn and wheat bran and a small reduction of soybean meal. The level of substitution in diets (II to VI) was 6%, 12%, 18%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. The experiment lasted for 12 wks. Average egg weight and daily egg mass decreased linearly as the level of RB inclusion increased (Pegg yolk linearly decreased with increasing RB, and many of the key polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), like C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3, linearly increased (Pegg yolk cholesterol or triglyceride content (P>0.05). In conclusion, the current study suggests that ducks from 19 to 31 wk could be fed diets with up to about 18% RB without effect on the number of eggs produced, egg quality, and oxidative status. Increasing amounts of RB linearly increased egg yolk concentrations of key fatty acids like C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 and decreased the hepatic abundance of FAS and SREBP-1 transcripts. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Interference effects from coexisting fatty acids on elaidic acid separation by fractionating crystallization: A model study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng; Bjerring, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating...

  10. Effects of dietary intake of red palm oil on fatty acid composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about the effects of the dietary intake of red palm oil (RPO) on fatty acid composition in the liver of rats. Male Wistar rats randomly divided into four groups were fed with different doses of red palm oil. The control group received no red palm oil; while the experimental groups were fed with 1 ml, 2 ml and 4 ml of ...

  11. In vitro effects of fatty acids on goat, calf and guinea pig hepatic gluconeogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated hepatocytes from male guinea pigs, ruminating goats and bull calves were incubated at 39 C for 1h. Fatty acids C18:1, C16, and C8 (.5, 1, 2 mM) were added as albumin complexes (3:1 molar ratio), C2 and C4 (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mM) were added as Na salts. In ruminant cells C2 had no effect on [2- 14 C]-propionate (PROP) (2.5 mM) or [U- 14 C]-L-lactate (LACT) (2.5 mM) metabolism. C4 (2.5 or 5 mM) decreased [ 14 C]-glucose (GLU) (P < .01) from PROP (48% goats, 68% calves) and decreased LACT conversion to GLU, (27% goats, 50% calves), C8, C16 and C18:1 effects depended on gluconeogenic substrate and species. In goat cells conversion of PROP to GLU was increased (P < .01) by C18:1 (30%) and C8 (52%) with C16 showing a similar trend. There were no interactions between the effects of fatty acids and lactation state (lactating does vs wethers). In goat cells C8 increased PROP conversion to GLU relative to oxidation, other fatty acids did not change relative rates. In calf cells C18:1, C16 and C8 had no effect on PROP metabolism. C8 inhibited gluconeogenesis from LACT in goats (24%) (P < .07) and calves (47%) (P < .01). In contrast fatty acids decreased (P < .01) GLU production from PROP (C18:1 90%, C8 80%) and LACT (C18:1 75%, C8 75%) in cells from guinea pigs. They have established a clear difference in the regulation of gluconeogenesis among species which contain similar intracellular distribution of P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase

  12. Zinc absorption in experimental osmotic diarrhea: effect of long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Y; Wapnir, R A

    1993-03-01

    The effect of free fatty acids on zinc absorption was studied in a rat model of chronic osmotic diarrhea induced with magnesium citrate and phenolphthalein. In vivo rates of zinc removal from the lumen and analysis of tissue for zinc uptake and metallothionein alterations were monitored. One mmol/L stearate enhanced zinc absorption in rats with or without diarrhea, from 207 +/- 22 and 353 +/- 13 pmol/min x cm to 676 +/- 34 and 610 +/- 26 pmol/min x cm, respectively. Palmitate was only effective in normal rats. Zinc absorption inversely correlated with mucosal zinc content in the perfused intestinal segments, in both type of rats. Hepatic metallothionein was enhanced by zinc and even more by oleate plus zinc in both groups; kidney metallothionein in animals with diarrhea was normalized by either oleate or zinc. The data support previous reports on the effect of long-chain fatty acids on the enhancement of zinc absorption: saturation and a longer chain appear to be positive factors. A membrane modification role of long-chain fatty acids could have nutritional implications in the formulation of special diets.

  13. Substrate modulation of fatty acid effects on energization and respiration of kidney proximal tubules during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Bienholz

    Full Text Available Kidney proximal tubules subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation develop a nonesterified fatty acid-induced energetic deficit characterized by persistent partial mitochondrial deenergization that can be prevented and reversed by citric acid cycle substrates. To further assess the role of competition between fatty acids and substrates on inner membrane substrate carriers in the deenergization and the contribution to deenergization of fatty acid effects on respiratory function, digitonin-permeabilized rabbit and mouse tubules were studied using either addition of exogenous oleate after control normoxic incubation or increases of endogenous fatty acids produced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. The results demonstrated major effects of matrix oxaloacetate accumulation on succinate-supported energization and respiration and their modification by fatty acids. Improvements of energization in the presence of fatty acids by glutamate were shown to result predominantly from lowering matrix oxaloacetate rather than from amelioration of transmembrane cycling of fatty acids and uncoupling. Mouse tubules had 2.5 fold higher rates of succinate utilization, which resulted in stronger effects of oxaloacetate accumulation than rabbit tubules. Hypoxia/reoxygenation induced respiratory inhibition that was more severe for complex I-dependent substrates. Fatty acids themselves did not acutely contribute to this respiratory inhibition, but lowering them during 60 min. reoxygenation to allow recovery of ATP during that period alleviated it. These data clarify the basis for the nonesterified fatty acid-induced mitochondrial energetic deficit in kidney proximal tubules that impairs structural and functional recovery and provide insight into interactions that need to be considered in the design of substrate-based interventions to improve mitochondrial function.

  14. Effect of cassava wastewater on physicochemical characteristics and fatty acids composition of meat from feedlot-finished lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Adelson Santana Neto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of includingcassava wastewater (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 L animal-1 day-1 in diets of feedlot-finished lambs on the physicochemical characteristics and fatty acid composition of their meat. Thirty-two uncastrated lambs atan average age of 167 days and an average body weight of 24.76 ± 3.00 kg were distributed into four groups in a completely randomized design with eight animals per group for each treatment. Inclusion of cassava wastewater linearly reduced cooking losses, shear force, and yellow intensity and linearly increased the fat content of the meat. The amounts of myristic, stearic, linoleic, and total fatty acids were changed. Additionally, an effect of cassava wastewater was observed on the amounts of saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, desirable fatty acids, and n-6:n-3ratio. A positive quadratic effect was observed for the following nutritional quality indices: Δ9 desaturase 16, elongase, at herogenicity, and thrombogenicity. Cassava wastewater changesthe physicochemical characteristics and fatty acid composition of lamb meat. Furtherstudies should be carried outto more accurately determine the fatty acid composition of cassava wastewater to better understand its effectson animal nutrition.

  15. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ammann

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3, an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g. The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5–50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15, which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12 and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  16. Effects of the traditional method and an alternative parboiling process on the fatty acids, vitamin E, γ-oryzanol and phenolic acids of glutinous rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammapat, Pornpisanu; Meeso, Naret; Siriamornpun, Sirithon

    2016-03-01

    The impacts of traditional and alternative parboiling processes on the concentrations of fatty acids, tocopherol, tocotrienol, γ-oryzanol and phenolic acids in glutinous rice were investigated. Differences between the two methods were the soaking temperatures and the steaming methods. Results showed that parboiling processes significantly increased the concentrations of saturated fatty acids (SFA), mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), γ-oryzanol, γ-tocotrienol and total phenolic acids (TPA) in glutinous rice, while α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) decreased (p-oryzanol by three or fourfold compared with the level of γ-oryzanol in raw rice. Parboiling caused both adverse and favorable effects on phenolic acids content (p-oryzanol, hydrobenzoic acid, hydroxycinnamic acid and TPA compared to the traditional method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Fatty acids in confectionery products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniewski, M; Mielniczuk, E; Jacórzyński, B; Pawlicka, M; Balas, J; Filipek, A; Górnicka, M

    2000-01-01

    The content of fat and fatty acids in 144 different confectionery products purchased on the market in Warsaw region during 1997-1999 have been investigated. In examined confectionery products considerable variability of both fat and fatty acids content have been found. The content of fat varied from 6.6% (coconut cookies) up to 40% (chocolate wafers). Saturated fatty acids were present in both cis and trans form. Especially trans fatty acids reach (above 50%) were fats extracted from nut wafers, coconuts wafers.

  18. Effect of Free Fatty Acids Supplementation on Digestibility, Nutritive Value and Rumen Fermentation in Local Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Foly, H.A.; Mohamed, A.K.; Mustafa, M.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Twelve mature local sheep, with a mean body weight of 49.2±3 kg were randomly distributed into three digestibility trail groups to evaluate the effects of inclusion some oils industry by-products, soft fatty acid (SFA) and hard fatty acid (HFA) on dry matter intake, digestibility coefficients, nutritive values, nitrogen and energy utilization and some rumen and blood parameters. The experimental diets were basal diet un-supplemented (control) or supplemented 3% SFA (T1) and 3% HFA (T2). The results showed that non-significant differences in total dry matter intake and water consumption among the tested diets were observed.The digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and nitrogen free extract (NFE) were significantly increased (P<0.05) by addition of SFA while digestibility of crude protein (CP) and ether extract (EE) was significantly increased (P<0.05) by addition of HFA as compared with control. However, digestibility of crude fiber (CF) was significantly decreased (P<0.05) in T2 as compared with control and T1. Fatty acids supplementation significantly increased (P<0.05) the nutritive values such as TDN, SV and DCP as compared with control.The nitrogen utilization was significantly improved (P<0.05) by the addition of both additives. The values of total volatile fatty acid concentrations (TVFA) and pH values after feeding were significantly increased (P<0.05) with HFA supplementation as compared with the values of other groups. However, the rumina l ammonia-N concentrations after feeding significantly decreased (P<0.05) with fatty acids supplementation as compared with control. The results of digestible and metabolizable energy showed non-significant differences between the tested groups. Blood serum urea, albumen, cholesterol, triglycerides and phosphorus values were significantly increased (P<0.05) with HFA as compared with the values of other groups.The mean values of serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST

  19. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmöcker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA is the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, especially in Western diet. A high omega-6/omega-3 ratio in Western diets is implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes. Studies in animal models and in humans have demonstrated beneficial effects of omega-3 PUFA (n-3 PUFA in a variety of diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias and inflammatory diseases, as well as breast and colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of n-3 PUFA are still not well understood. Possible mechanisms include competition between n-3 and n-6 PUFAs at the cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and cytochrome P450 levels, and subsequent formation of oxylipins with specific anti-inflammatory or anti-arrhythmic effects. In this study, we report the impact of routine long-term treatment with prescription-grade n-3 PUFA (either 840 mg or 1680 mg per day on blood cell membrane fatty acid composition, as well as plasma oxylipin patterns, in a patient population with severe hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease who are on standard lipid-lowering and cardioprotective medications. Lipidomics analyses were performed by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Supplementation led to a dose-dependent increase in n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in the blood cell fraction. We also observed a dose-dependent increase in EPA- and DHA-derived epoxy metabolites, whereas the effect of n-3 PUFA supplementation on LOX-dependent EPA- and DHA-derived hydroxy metabolites was less pronounced, with a tendency towards lower metabolites in subjects with higher n-3 PUFA levels. These data thus generally confirm effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation observed previously in healthy individuals. Additionally, they indicate a suppressive effect of high n-3 PUFA supplementation on the formation of LOX metabolites in the context of concomitant aspirin medication.

  20. Effect of Cooking Method on the Proximate, Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Compositions of Clarias gariepinus and Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolara Olusola Oluwaniyi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proximate, amino acid and fatty acid compositions of the fillet and oil from Clarias gariepinus (Catfish and Oreochromis niloticus (Tilapia were determined. The moisture content ranged from 76.27 % for catfish to 79.97 % for tilapia while the oil content ranged from 7.80 % for tilapia and 11.00 % for catfish. Ash content was in the range 8.03 – 9.16 % and the protein content was 15.83 - 18.48 %. Cooking – boiling, roasting or frying – resulted in a variation in the nutrient composition but with no significant effect on the amino acid composition except for the samples fried with palm oil which resulted in significantly reduced essential amino acids contents. All the fish samples – both fresh and processed – have amino acid scores less than 100, with lysine, threonine and the sulphur-containing amino acids being among the limiting amino acids. Both fish samples contain more unsaturated than saturated fatty acids.

  1. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z eff , the effective electron density, N el , and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCom program. The significant variation of Z eff and N el is due to the variations in the dominance of different interaction processes in different energy regions. The maximum values of Z eff and N el are found in the low-energy range, where photoelectric absorption is the main interaction process. The minimum values of Z eff and N el are found at intermediate energies, typically 0.05 MeV eff is equal to the mean atomic number of the bio-molecule. Wherever possible, the calculations are compared with experimental results. A comparison is also made with the single values of the Z eff and N el provided by the program XMuDat. It is also observed that carbohydrates have a larger kerma than fatty acids in the low-energy region, where photoelectric absorption dominates. In contrast, fatty acids have a larger kerma than carbohydrates in the MeV range, where Compton scattering is the main interaction process. (note)

  2. Effects of oils rich in linoleic and α-linolenic acids on fatty acid profile and gene expression in goat meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Goh, Yong Meng

    2014-09-24

    Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.

  3. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  4. Effect of gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorella vulgaris had the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3) which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or to convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of this study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally expressed in mammalian cells and ...

  5. Antiarrhythmic effects of n-3 fatty acids: evidence from human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, A.; Brouwer, I.A.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review N-3 fatty acids from fish reduce cardiovascular mortality including sudden cardiac death. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of human studies with regard to the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of fatal coronary heart disease through antiarrhythmic

  6. Effects of dietary flaxseed oil on the muscle fatty acid composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... fatty acids (PUFA) in the LD muscle (4.60 : 1 in the flaxseed diet, compared with ... reducing the consumption of linoleic fatty acid (LA), and increasing the ..... inflammatory potential because of their traditional properties of ...

  7. What do we really know about the health effects of natural sources of trans fatty acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the food industry remains actively engaged in the development of alternatives for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in order to reduce intake of trans fatty acids, intake of these fatty acids from natural sources remains as a small part of our diet. The question remains, are there differ...

  8. FACTS ABOUT TRANS FATTY ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Asgary

    2010-12-01

    appropriate because it will increase SFAs.8 In addition, processes such as edible oil refining, meat irradiation, food frying, also contribute to increase the daily intake of TFA.9,10      Intake of TFAs has been consistently shown in multiple and rigorous randomized trials to have adverse effects on blood lipids, most notably on the LDL: HDL cholesterol ratio, which is a strong cardiovascular risk factor.11-13 When a mixture of TFA isomers, obtained by partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, is used to replace oleic acid, there is a dose-dependent increase in the LDL: HDL ratio. The relationship between amount of TFA as the percent of energy and the increase in the LDL: HDL ratio appears to be approximately linear (figure 1,12 with no evidence of a threshold at low levels of intake, and with slope twice as steep as that observed by replacing oleic with saturated fats. The average impact of TFA induces changes in the LDL: HDL ratio corresponds to tens of thousands premature deaths in the US alone. Although dramatic, this effect is substantially smaller than the increase in cardiovascular mortality associated with TFA intake in epidemiological studies, suggesting that other mechanisms are likely to be contributing in the toxicity of TFA.11   Figure 1: Results of randomized studies of the influence of industrially produced trans fatty acids (circles and saturated fat (squares on the LDL: HDL cholesterol ratio (y-axis. A diet with isocaloric levels of unsaturated fatty acids was used as a comparative basis.12 The x-axis indicates in per cent energy a replacement of unsaturated fat with either saturated fatty acids or industrially produced trans fatty acids.   Besides the increase of the LDL: HDL ratio, TFA increase lipo-protein (a and triglycerides when substitute saturated fat.13-16 Other reported effects of TFA on blood lipids include alterations in the LDL particle size profile and in the composition of postprandial lipoproteins. The mechanisms mediating the effects of

  9. Effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haibo; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Zhou, Jishu; Ye, Zhi; Lan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to understand the effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and the immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka). Five experimental diets were prepared, containing graded levels of n-3 HUFAs (0.46%, 0.85%, 1.25%, 1.61% and 1.95%, respectively), and the 0.46% group was used as control group. The specific growth rates, fatty acid profiles, activities and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes and lysozyme of the sea cucumbers that were fed with the 5 experimental diets were determined. The results showed that the specific growth rate of sea cucumbers in all the treatment groups significantly increased compared to the control group (P sea cucumbers. The contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) in the body wall of the sea cucumbers gradually increased with the increasing levels of n-3 HUFAs in the diets. The suitable supplement of n-3 HUFAs in diets improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of sea cucumbers by up-regulating the expression of SOD and CAT mRNA in sea cucumbers. However, excess n-3 HUFAs in diets caused lipid peroxidation, inhibited the expression of lysozyme (LSZ) mRNA and decreased the activities of LSZ in sea cucumbers. In summary, the suitable supplement levels of n-3 HUFAs in diets of sea cucumbers A. japonicus were estimated between 0.85% and 1.25% considering the growth performance, cost and the indicators of antioxidant capacity and immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of ionizing radiation on the fatty acid composition of natural fats and on lipid peroxide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.T.; Wills, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of irradiation doses of 200 to 1000 krad on the fatty acid composition of saturated and unsaturated natural food fats have been studied. Lard, coconut oil, corn oil, methyl linoleate and herring oil have been analysed before and after irradiation for lipid peroxide content and fatty acid composition. The effects of storage under varied conditions after irradiation have also been investigated. Irradiation doses of 200 to 1000 krad had little effect on the fatty acid compositions of saturated fats (lard and coconut oil) or of fats with a high antioxidant content (corn oil) but caused destruction of 98 per cent of the highly unsaturated acids (18:4, 20:5, 22:6) and 46 per cent of the diene acids (18:2) in herring oil. The destruction of the polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with increasing storage temperature and storage time. The destruction of polyunsaturated fatty acids was accompanied by an increase in lipid peroxide formation. It is considered that changes in fatty acid composition in natural foods after irradiation are important in consideration of the use of irradiation of food preservation. (author)

  11. Effect of storage temperature in a Cambodian field setting on the fatty acid composition in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nurhasan, Mulia; Roos, Nanna; Aristizabal Henao, J J

    2015-01-01

    and -80°C samples did not differ, but there was relatively more highly unsaturated fatty acids (15.8±2.7 vs. 14.4±2.5%, p4, p...Fatty acid analysis requires standardized collection and storage of samples, which can be a challenge under field conditions. This study describes the effect of storage temperature on fatty acid composition in two sets of whole blood samples collected from 66 children in a rural area in Cambodia...

  12. Effects of irradiation on trans fatty acids formation in ground beef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, M.S.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.; Mancini-filho, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    In order to give the consumer the assurance that meat processed by irradiation is a safe product, a great deal of research has been developed in the world. The effect of irradiation on the hygienic quality of meat and meat products is considered as related to the control of meat-borne parasites of humans; elimination of pathogens from fresh meat and poultry; and elimination of pathogens from processed meat. Lipid oxidation and associated changes are the major causes of the quality deterioration of meat during storage. Irradiation of lipids induces the production of free radicals, which react with oxygen, leading to the formation of carbonyls, responsible for alterations in food nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Trans fatty acids are present in ground beef and can also be formed during its processing. Interestingly, the trans fatty acids, due to their chemical and physical characteristics, show more resistance to the oxidizing process. This property motivated us to investigate the level of the trans fatty acids, as well as the level of oxidation in irradiated ground beef. Irradiation of ground beef was performed by gamma rays from a 60 Co source. The applied radiation doses were 0; 1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.0; 5.0; 6.0; 7.0 and 8.0 kGy. Lipid peroxidation in terms of TBA number and carbonyl content was monitored during storage. The sample characteristics and trans fatty acids composition were measured, following irradiation and after 60 and 90 days of storage at -10 deg. C

  13. Effects of different cooking methods on fatty acid profiles in four freshwater fishes from the Laurentian Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Margaret R; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Braekevelt, Eric; Arts, Michael T

    2014-12-01

    Fish is often promoted as a healthy part of the human diet due its high content of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Previous studies have shown that cooked fish can have different fatty acid profiles than raw fillets, depending on the cooking method and fish species. In this study, the fatty acid content of broiled, baked or fried skinless, boneless fillets of four fish species from the tributaries of the Great Lakes, or connecting rivers, was compared to fatty acid profiles in raw sections from the same fillet. Cooking treatments had little effect on n-3 fatty acid content; however, fried treatments generally had higher n-6 and MUFA content, which is likely a result of the cooking oil used (canola). Broiling or baking is generally the most healthy option presented in this study, as these methods result in lower levels of less-favourable fatty acids; however, the choice of cooking oil may also influence the overall fatty acid content in cooked fish. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Supplementation with n-3 Fatty Acids Extracted from Microalgae on Inflammation Biomarkers from Two Different Strains of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Gutiérrez-Pliego

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetes mellitus is considered a chronic noncommunicable disease in which inflammation plays a main role in the progression of the disease and it is known that n-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties. One of the most recent approaches is the study of the fatty acids of microalgae as a substitute for fish oil and a source rich in fatty acids EPA and DHA. Objective. To analyze the effect of supplementation with n-3 fatty acids extracted from microalgae on the inflammatory markers from two different strains of mice. Methods. Mice of two strains, db/db and CD1, were supplemented with n-3 fatty acids extracted from microalgae in lyophilized form and added to food; the experiment was carried out from week 8 to 16 of life. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the percentage of TCD4+ cells producing Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Results. Supplementation with microalgae fatty acids decreased the percentage of TCD4+ cells producing IFN-γ and TNF-α and increased the ones producing IL-17A and IL-12 in both strains; on the other hand, supplementation decreased percentage of TCD4+ cells producing IL-4 and increased the ones producing TGF-β. Conclusions. Microalgae n-3 fatty acids could be a useful tool in the treatment of diabetes as well as in the prevention of the appearance of health complications caused by inflammatory states.

  15. Effect of Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate on Anthocyanin Composition, Fatty Acids, and Volatile Compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.) Grape Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yan-Lun; Liu, Min; Zhao, Hui; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Fang, Yu-Lin

    2016-10-12

    The anthocyanin composition, fatty acids, and volatile aromas are important for Cabernet Sauvignon grape quality. This study evaluated the effect of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on the anthocyanin composition, fatty acids, lipoxygenase activity, and the volatile compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon grape berries. Exogenous ABA and MeJA improved the content of total anthocyanins (TAC) and individual anthocyanins. Lipoxygenase (LOX) activity also increased after treatment. Furthermore, 16 fatty acids were detected. The linoleic acid concentration gradually increased with ABA concentration. The fatty acid content decreased with increasing MeJA concentration and then increased again, with the exception of linoleic acid. After exogenous ABA and MeJA treatment, the C6 aroma content increased significantly. Interestingly, the exogenous ABA and MeJA treatments improved mainly the content of 1-hexanol, hexanal, and 2-heptanol. These results provide insight into the effect of plant hormones on wine grapes, which is useful for grape quality improvement.

  16. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  17. The effect of replacing fat with oat bran on fatty acid composition and physicochemical properties of meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, İsmail; Dağlıoğlu, Orhan

    2003-10-01

    Oat bran was used as a fat substitute in the production of meatballs. The effect of oat bran addition on the fatty acid composition, trans fatty acids, total fat, some physicochemical and sensory properties of the samples was studied. Meatballs were produced with four different formulations; the addition of 5, 10, 15 and 20% oat bran. Control samples were formulated with 25% fat addition as in commercial production. The major fatty acids were cis-oleic, palmitic and stearic acid in all the meatball samples, those with oat bran added as well as the control. Meatballs containing oat bran had lower concentrations of total fat and total trans fatty acids than the control samples. Meatballs made with 20% oat bran had the highest protein, salt and ash contents, L value (lightness), b value (yellowness), and the lowest moisture content and a value (redness). There was no significant difference among the meatball samples with respect to sensory properties, and all samples had high acceptability.

  18. Effect of essential fatty acids on glucose-induced cytotoxicity to retinal vascular endothelial cells

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    Shen Junhui

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of dysregulated hyperglycemia. Retinal vascular endothelial cell dysfunction is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Studies showed that hyperglycemia-induced excess proliferation of retinal vascular endothelial cells can be abrogated by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 ω-3 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 ω-3. The influence of dietary omega-3 PUFA on brain zinc metabolism has been previously implied. Zn2+ is essential for the activity of Δ6 desaturase as a co-factor that, in turn, converts essential fatty acids to their respective long chain metabolites. Whether essential fatty acids (EFAs α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid have similar beneficial effect remains poorly understood. Methods RF/6A cells were treated with different concentrations of high glucose, α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid and Zn2+. The alterations in mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase enzyme activity, cell membrane fluidity, reactive oxygen species generation, SOD enzyme and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion were evaluated. Results Studies showed that hyperglycemia-induced excess proliferation of retinal vascular endothelial cells can be abrogated by both linoleic acid (LA and α-linolenic acid (ALA, while the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid was ineffective. A dose–response study with ALA showed that the activity of the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase enzyme was suppressed at all concentrations of glucose tested to a significant degree. High glucose enhanced fluorescence polarization and microviscocity reverted to normal by treatment with Zn2+ and ALA. ALA was more potent that Zn2+. Increased level of high glucose caused slightly increased ROS generation that correlated with corresponding decrease in SOD activity. ALA suppressed ROS generation to a significant degree in a dose dependent fashion and raised SOD activity significantly. ALA suppressed

  19. Acute effects of dietary fatty acids on osteclastogenesis via RANKL/RANK/OPG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, M Carmen; Garcia, Indara; Bermudez, Beatriz; Lopez, Sergio; Cardelo, Magdalena P; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Postprandial state is directly linked with chronic diseases. We hypothesized that dietary fats may have acute effects on health status by modulating osteoclast differentiation and activation in a fatty acid-dependent manner. In healthy subjects, a fat-enriched meal increased plasma levels of the RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand)/OPG (osteoprotegerin) ratio (SFAs > MUFAs = PUFAs) in the postprandial state. Postprandial TRL-SFAs enhanced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, OSCAR, RANK, and CATHK) while downregulated the expression of OPG gene in human monocyte-derived osteoclasts. These effects were not observed with monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-enriched postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs). Moreover, postprandial TRL-SFAs increased the release of osteoclastogenic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) meanwhile TRL-MUFAs and TRL-PUFAs increased the release of anti-osteoclastogenic cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in the medium of human monocyte-derived osteoclasts. For the first time, we show that postprandial TRLs are metabolic entities with osteoclastogenic activity and that this property is related to the type of dietary fatty acid in the meal. The osteoclastogenic potency was as follows: SFAs > MUFAs = PUFAs. These exciting findings open opportunities for developing nutritional strategies with olive oil as the principal dietary source of MUFAs, notably oleic acid, to prevent development and progression of osteoclast-related diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Amphiphile-induced heart muscle-cell (myocyte) injury: effects of intracellular fatty acid overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, D R; Burghardt, C; Feldman, D

    1988-10-01

    Lipid amphiphile toxicity may be an important contributor to myocardial injury, especially during ischemia/reperfusion. In order to investigate directly the potential biochemical and metabolic effects of amphiphile overload on the functioning heart muscle cell (myocyte), a novel model of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA)-induced myocyte damage has been defined. The model uses intact, beating neonatal rat myocytes in primary monolayer culture as a study object and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) as a nonmetabolizable fatty acid. Myocytes incubated with TOFA accumulated it as NEFA, and the consequent NEFA amphiphile overload elicited a variety of cellular defects (including decreased beating rate, depletion of high-energy stores and glycogen pools, and breakdown of myocyte membrane phospholipid) and culminated in cell death. The amphiphile-induced cellular pathology could be reversed by removing TOFA from the culture medium, which resulted in intracellular TOFA "wash-out." Although the development and severity of amphiphile-induced myocyte injury could be correlated with both the intracellular TOFA/NEFA content (i.e., the level of TOFA to which the cells were exposed) and the duration of this exposure, removal of amphiphile overload did not inevitably lead to myocyte recovery. TOFA had adverse effects on myocyte mitochondrial function in situ (decoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, impairing respiratory control) and on myocyte oxidative catabolism (transiently increasing fatty acid beta oxidation, citric acid cycle flux, and glucose oxidation). The amphiphile-induced bioenergetic abnormalities appeared to constitute a state of "metabolic anoxia" underlying the progression of myocyte injury to cell death. This anoxic state could be ameliorated to some extent, but not prevented, by carbohydrate catabolism.

  1. Trans monounsaturated fatty acids and saturated fatty acids have similar effects on postprandial flow-mediated vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de N.M.; Siebelink, E.; Bots, M.L.; Tol, van A.; Schouten, E.G.; Katan, M.B.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Several studies suggest that a fatty meal impairs flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), a measur9e of endothelial function. We tested whether the impairment was greater for trans fats than for saturated fats. We did this because we previously showed that replacement of saturated fats by trans

  2. Polymorphisms in Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) Gene Cluster: Effects on Glycemic Controls Following an Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA) Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Hubert; Rudkowska, Iwona; Thifault, Elisabeth; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Changes in desaturase activity are associated with insulin sensitivity and may be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster have been associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS) and serum fatty acid composition. Objective: To investigate whether common genetic variations in the FADS gene cluster influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) responses following a 6-week n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) supplementation. Methods: 210 subjects completed a 2-week run-in period followed by a 6-week supplementation with 5 g/d of fish oil (providing 1.9 g–2.2 g of EPA + 1.1 g of DHA). Genotyping of 18 SNPs of the FADS gene cluster covering 90% of all common genetic variations (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.03) was performed. Results: Carriers of the minor allele for rs482548 (FADS2) had increased plasma FG levels after the n-3 PUFA supplementation in a model adjusted for FG levels at baseline, age, sex, and BMI. A significant genotype*supplementation interaction effect on FG levels was observed for rs482548 (p = 0.008). For FI levels, a genotype effect was observed with one SNP (rs174456). For HOMA-IS, several genotype*supplementation interaction effects were observed for rs7394871, rs174602, rs174570, rs7482316 and rs482548 (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, p = 0.03, p = 0.05 and p = 0.07; respectively). Conclusion: Results suggest that SNPs in the FADS gene cluster may modulate plasma FG, FI and HOMA-IS levels in response to n-3 PUFA supplementation. PMID:24705214

  3. Polymorphisms in Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS Gene Cluster: Effects on Glycemic Controls Following an Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Couture

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in desaturase activity are associated with insulin sensitivity and may be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Polymorphisms (SNPs in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS gene cluster have been associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS and serum fatty acid composition. Objective: To investigate whether common genetic variations in the FADS gene cluster influence fasting glucose (FG and fasting insulin (FI responses following a 6-week n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA supplementation. Methods: 210 subjects completed a 2-week run-in period followed by a 6-week supplementation with 5 g/d of fish oil (providing 1.9 g–2.2 g of EPA + 1.1 g of DHA. Genotyping of 18 SNPs of the FADS gene cluster covering 90% of all common genetic variations (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.03 was performed. Results: Carriers of the minor allele for rs482548 (FADS2 had increased plasma FG levels after the n-3 PUFA supplementation in a model adjusted for FG levels at baseline, age, sex, and BMI. A significant genotype*supplementation interaction effect on FG levels was observed for rs482548 (p = 0.008. For FI levels, a genotype effect was observed with one SNP (rs174456. For HOMA-IS, several genotype*supplementation interaction effects were observed for rs7394871, rs174602, rs174570, rs7482316 and rs482548 (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, p = 0.03, p = 0.05 and p = 0.07; respectively. Conclusion: Results suggest that SNPs in the FADS gene cluster may modulate plasma FG, FI and HOMA-IS levels in response to n-3 PUFA supplementation.

  4. Immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Calder

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Fish oils are rich in the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3 acids. Linseed oil and green plant tissues are rich in the precursor fatty acid, a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3. Most vegetable oils are rich in the n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (18:2n-6, the precursor of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6. 2. Arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids such as prostaglandin E2 are pro-inflammatory and regulate the functions of cells of the immune system. Consumption of fish oils leads to replacement of arachidonic acid in cell membranes by eicosapentaenoic acid. This changes the amount and alters the balance of eicosanoids produced. 3. Consumption of fish oils diminishes lymphocyte proliferation, T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, natural killer cell activity, macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis, major histocompatibility class II expression and antigen presentation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 1 and 6, tumour necrosis factor and adhesion molecule expression. 4. Feeding laboratory animals fish oil reduces acute and chronic inflammatory responses, improves survival to endotoxin and in models of autoimmunity and prolongs the survival of grafted organs. 5. Feeding fish oil reduces cell-mediated immune responses. 6. Fish oil supplementation may be clinically useful in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and following transplantation. 7. n-3 PUFAs may exert their effects by modulating signal transduction and/or gene expression within inflammatory and immune cells.

  5. Treatment of Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Fatty acid oxidation disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  6. Effects of induced subacute ruminal acidosis on milk fat content and milk fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjalbert, F; Videau, Y; Nicot, M C; Troegeler-Meynadier, A

    2008-06-01

    Two lactating dairy cows fitted with a rumen cannula received successively diets containing 0%, 20%, 34% and again 0% of wheat on a dry matter basis. After 5, 10 and 11 days, ruminal pH was measured between 8:00 and 16:00 hours, and milk was analysed for fat content and fatty acid profile. Diets with 20% and 34% wheat induced a marginal and a severe subacute ruminal acidosis respectively. After 11 days, diets with wheat strongly reduced the milk yield and milk fat content, increased the proportions of C8:0 to C13:0 even- or odd-chain fatty acids, C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids but decreased the proportions of C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1 fatty acids. Wheat also increased the proportions of trans-5 to trans-10 C18:1, the latter exhibiting a 10-fold increase with 34% of wheat compared with value during the initial 0% wheat period. There was also an increase of trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 fatty acid and a decrease of trans-11 to trans-16 C18:1 fatty acids. The evolution during adaptation or after return to a 0% wheat diet was rapid for pH but much slower for the fatty acid profile. The mean ruminal pH was closely related to milk fat content, the proportion of odd-chain fatty acids (linear relationship) and the ratio of trans-10 C18:1/trans-11 C18:1 (nonlinear relationship). Such changes in fatty acid profile suggested a possible use for non-invasive diagnosis of subacute ruminal acidosis.

  7. Effect of oilseed type on milk fatty acid composition of individual cows, and also bulk tank milk fatty acid composition from commercial farms

    OpenAIRE

    Kliem, K. E.; Humphries, D. J.; Reynolds, C. K.; Morgan, R.; Givens, D. I.

    2016-01-01

    Supplementing dairy cow diets with oilseed preparations has been shown to replace milk saturated fatty acids (SFA) with mono- and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA), which may reduce risk factors associated with cardio-metabolic diseases in humans consuming milk and dairy products. Previous studies demonstrating this are largely detailed, highly controlled experiments involving small numbers of animals, but in order to transfer this feeding strategy to commercial situations further s...

  8. Effect of dietary fat type on the fatty acids composition of irradiated and frozen storage japanese quails meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd EI-Wahab, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of substitution of dietary cotton seed oil (CSO) by used restaurant oil (URO) with different percentages 25% group 2 (G2), 50% group 3 (G3) and 100% group 4 (G4) in Japanese quail diets on the fatty acids composition of their meat especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The effect of gamma irradiation doses (1.5, 3 and 5 kGy) at frozen storage -18 C (degree) for 2 and 4 months in comparison with unirradiated and un storage were studied. The total saturated fatty acids (SFA) in quail meat fed G4 diet (100% URO) increased significantly in comparison with SFA in G2 (25% URO) and G3 (50% URO) but there is no significant effect with G2 and G3 in comparison with G1 (100% CSO).The monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were not affected by G2 and G3 diet. Also, linoleic acid (C 18:2, n-6) had the same trend in those groups with range (32.75% to 33.35%). It is concluded that feeding a diet with URO 25% and 50% conserve the content of linoleic acid and the content of PUFA in quail meat. The irradiation doses and storage periods had no significant effect on the linoleic acid, MUFA and PUFA content.

  9. Fatty acid synthesis by spinach chloroplasts, 2. The path from PGA to fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Yasunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1975-02-01

    By incorporation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O into the fatty acid chain in the presence of unlabelled precursor, we showed that fatty acids are synthesized from PGA, PEP and pyruvate by intact spinach chloroplasts in the light. /sup 13/C-tracer experiments confirmed that 1-C of pyruvate is decarboxylated and 2-C is incorporated into fatty acids by the chloroplasts. The patterns of fatty acids synthesized from PGA and pyruvate were the same as that from acetate. The highest rate of fatty acid synthesis was reached at the physiological concentration of PGA (3 mM) and pyruvate (1 mM). These results indicate the operation of the following path in the chloroplasts in light: PGA..-->..PEP..-->..pyruvate..-->..acetylCoA..-->..fatty acids. Since citrate and OAA were much less active and malate and glyoxylate were inert as precursors for fatty acid synthesis, PEP or pyruvate carboxylation, citrate lyase reaction and malate synthetase reaction are not involved in the formation of acetylCoA and fatty acids. Since pyruvate was much more effective as a substrate for fatty acid synthesis than lactate, acetaldehyde or acetate, direct decarboxylation path is considered to be the primary path from pyruvate to acetylCoA. The insignificant effect of chloroplast-washing on fatty acid synthesis from PGA and pyruvate indicates that the glycolytic path from PGA to pyruvate is associated with the chloroplasts. Since pyruvate was more effectively incorporated into fatty acids than acetylCoA, it is unlikely that pyruvate decarboxylation to acetylCoA is due to mitochondria contaminating the chloroplast preparation. On the basis of measurements of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O incorporation in the light and dark, the activity of fatty acid synthesis in spincah leaves appears to be shared by the activities in chloroplasts (87%) and other organelles (13%).

  10. Effect of dietary incorporation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids rich oil sources on fatty acid profile, keeping quality and sensory attributes of broiler chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Kalakuntla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of dietary replacement of commonly used vegetable oil (sunflower oil, SFO with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA rich oil sources on broiler chicken performance, carcass yield, meat fatty acid composition, keeping quality and sensory attributes of meat. In the current experiment, 300 day-old Krishibro broiler chicks were randomly distributed to 5 dietary groups (50 replicates with 6 chicks in each prepared by replacing SFO (2% and 3% of diet during starter and finisher periods, respectively with n-3 PUFA rich soybean oil (SO, mustard oil (MO, linseed oil (LO or fish oil (FO on weight basis. Variation in oil sources had no influence (P > 0.05 on performance and carcass yield. Supplementation of MO, LO or FO significantly (P < 0.01 increased the n-3 PUFA, lowered the n-6 PUFA deposition and n-6:n-3 ratio in breast and thigh without affecting the organoleptic characters (appearance, flavour, juiciness, tenderness and overall acceptability of meat. However, thiobarbituric acid reacting substances concentration in meat was increased (P < 0.01 with LO and FO supplementation compared with SFO. It is concluded that, dietary incorporation of MO, LO or FO at 2% and 3% levels during starter and finisher phase can enrich broiler chicken meat with n-3 PUFA without affecting the bird's performance and sensory characters of meat.

  11. Effects of feeding whole linseed on ruminal fatty acid composition and microbial population in goats

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    Kamaleldin Abuelfatah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of feeding different levels of whole linseed, as a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, on ruminal fatty acid composition and microbial population in the goat. Twenty-four crossbred Boer goats were assigned to 3 dietary treatments: L0 (control, L10 and L20 containing 0, 10%, or 20% whole linseed, respectively. The ruminal pH and concentration of total volatile fatty acids (VFA were not affected by dietary treatments. The feeding of L10 and L20 diets produced higher (P < 0.05 molar proportions of acetate and lower (P < 0.05 molar proportions of butyrate and valerate than the L0 diet. Molar proportions of myristic acid (C14:0 and palmitic acid (C16:0 were lower (P < 0.05 in the rumen of goats offered L10 and L20 diets than the control diet. However, stearic acid (C18:0, vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans-11, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, C18:2 trans-10, cis-12 and α-lenolenic acid (C18:3 n-3 were higher (P < 0.05 in the rumen of goats fed L10 and L20 than L0. Both inclusion levels of linseed in the diet (L10 and L20 reduced the ruminal total bacteria, methanogens, and protozoa compared with L0 (P < 0.05. The effect of the dietary treatments on cellulolytic bacteria, varied between the individual species. Both inclusion levels of linseed resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in the population of Fibrobacter succinogenes, and Rumunococus flavefaciens compared with L0, with no significant difference between the groups fed linseed diets. The population of Rumunococus albus was not affected by the different dietary treatments. It was concluded that inclusion of whole linseed in the diet of goats could increase the concentration of PUFA in the rumen, and decrease the population of F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens, methanogens and protozoa in rumen liquid of goats.

  12. Assessment of myocardial metabolism with iodine-123 heptadecanoic acid: effect of decreased fatty acid oxidation on deiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luethy, P.C.; Chatelain, P.; Papageorgiou, I.; Schubiger, A.; Lerch, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Terminally radioiodinated fatty acid analogs are of potential use for the noninvasive delineation of regional alterations of fatty acid metabolism by gamma imaging. Since radioactivity from extracted iodine-123 heptadecanoic acid [( 123I]HDA) is released from the myocardium in form of free radioiodide (123I-) the present study was performed to determine whether deiodination of [123I]HDA is related to free fatty acid metabolism. Myocardial production of free radioiodide was measured in rat hearts in vitro and in vivo both under control conditions and after inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. In isolated rat hearts perfused at constant flow with a medium containing [123I]HDA, release of 123I- was markedly reduced during cardioplegia and pharmacologic inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid transfer with POCA by 67% (p less than 0.005) and 72% (p less than 0.005), respectively. In fasted rats in vivo, 1 min after i.v. injection of [123I]HDA, 51 +/- 5% of myocardial radioactivity was recovered in the aqueous phase, containing free iodide, of myocardial lipid extracts. Aqueous activity was significantly decreased in fed (20 +/- 2%; p less than 0.002) and POCA pretreated (30 +/- 3.7%; p less than 0.05) animals exhibiting reduced oxidation of [14C]palmitate. Thus, deiodination of [123I]HDA was consistently reduced during inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in vitro and in vivo. The results apply to the interpretation of myocardial clearance curves of terminally radioiodinated fatty acid analogs

  13. The effects of phosphatidylserine and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement on late life depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhisa Komori

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Late life depression is often associated with a poor response to antidepressants; therefore an alternative strategy for therapy is required. Although several studies have reported that phosphatidylserine (PS may be effective for late life depression and that omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA have also proven beneficial for many higher mental functions, including depression, no concrete conclusion has been reached. This study was performed to clarify the effect of PS and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement for late life depression by not only clinical evaluation but also salivary cortisol levels. Eighteen elderly subjects with major depression were selected for the study. In all, insufficient improvement had been obtained by antidepressant therapy for at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria from prior brain magnetic resonance images (MRI included the presence of structural MRI findings compatible with stroke or other gross brain lesions or malformations, but not white matter hypersensitivities. They took a supplement containing PS 100 mg, DHA 119 mg and EPA 70 mg three times a day for 12 weeks. The effects of the supplement were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D17 and the basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol. The study adopted them as indices because: salivary cortisol levels are high in patients with depression, their circadian rhythm related to salivary cortisol is often irregular, and these symptoms are alleviated as depression improves. The mean HAM-D17 in all subjects taking the supplement was significantly improved after 12 weeks of taking the supplement. These subjects were divided into 10 non-responders and 8 responders. The basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol were normalized in the responders while not in non-responders. PS and omega-3 fatty acids, or other elements of the supplement, may be effective for late life depression, associated with the correction of basal

  14. Effects of a normolipidic diet containing trans fatty acids during perinatal period on the growth, hippocampus fatty acid profile, and memory of young rats according to sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Amanda Santos; Rocha, Mônica Santos; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2012-04-01

    To investigate whether dietary trans fatty acids (TFAs) are incorporated in the hippocampus and its effects on the growth and aversive and spatial memories of young rats. Wistar rat offspring whose mothers were fed with normolipidic diets containing soybean oil (soy group) or hydrogenated vegetable oil (trans group) during gestation and lactation were used. Male and female pups received the same diets as their mothers until the end of behavioral testing. The composition of fatty acids in the total lipids of the diets and hippocampus was quantified by gas chromatography. The results were evaluated by Student's t test or analysis of variance followed by the Bonferroni correction. The trans male and female body weights were higher during lactation and after weaning, with trans males having the lower body weight of the two. There was incorporation of 0.11% and 0.17% of TFAs in the hippocampi of male and female rats, respectively. During passive avoidance test, there was no significant difference. In the water maze test, there was no significant difference between male groups in the training and retention phases, except on day 4, when there was a significant decrease in latency in trans males. Trans females were worse on day 2 only and showed an improvement in spatial memory during the probe trial. The TFAs were incorporated in small amounts in the hippocampus and did not affect aversive memory. However, spatial memory was modified in young rats fed with a diet rich in TFAs. These findings suggested that, in addition to the TFA content of the diet provided, it is important to consider the provision of essential fatty acids and the ω-6/ω-3 ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Participation of GABAA Chloride Channels in the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of a Fatty Acid Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Rodríguez-Landa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic fluid and a mixture of eight fatty acids (FAT-M identified in this maternal fluid (C12:0, lauric acid, 0.9 μg%; C14:0, myristic acid, 6.9 μg%; C16:0, palmitic acid, 35.3 μg%; C16:1, palmitoleic acid, 16.4 μg%; C18:0, stearic acid, 8.5 μg%; C18:1cis, oleic acid, 18.4 μg%; C18:1trans, elaidic acid, 3.5 μg%; C18:2, linoleic acid, 10.1 μg% produce anxiolytic-like effects that are comparable to diazepam in Wistar rats, suggesting the involvement of γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA receptors, a possibility not yet explored. Wistar rats were subjected to the defensive burying test, elevated plus maze, and open field test. In different groups, three GABAA receptor antagonists were administered 30 min before FAT-M administration, including the competitive GABA binding antagonist bicuculline (1 mg/kg, GABAA benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (5 mg/kg, and noncompetitive GABAA chloride channel antagonist picrotoxin (1 mg/kg. The FAT-M exerted anxiolytic-like effects in the defensive burying test and elevated plus maze, without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test. The GABAA antagonists alone did not produce significant changes in the behavioral tests. Picrotoxin but not bicuculline or flumazenil blocked the anxiolytic-like effect of the FAT-M. Based on the specific blocking action of picrotoxin on the effects of the FAT-M, we conclude that the FAT-M exerted its anxiolytic-like effects through GABAA receptor chloride channels.

  16. Synthesis of new fatty acids amides from aminolysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Carolina R.; Montes D'Oca, Caroline da Ros; Duarte, Rodrigo da C.; Kurz, Marcia H.S.; Primel, Ednei G.; Clementin, Rosilene M.; Villarreyes, Joaquin Ariel M.; Montes D'Oca, Marcelo G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent biochemical and pharmacological studies have led to the characterization of different fatty acid amides as a new family of biologically active lipids. Here, we describe the synthesis of new amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:1, OH fatty acids (FFA) families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time that these compounds produce cytotoxic effects. Application of this method to the synthesis of fatty acid amides was performed using the esters aminolysis as a key step and various carboxylic amides were prepared in good yield from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). (author)

  17. Effects of Saline and Sodic Stress on Yield and Fatty Acid Profile in Sunflower Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cucci

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the objectives concerned in this research, much importance has been attached to the assessment of the influence of soil type, irrigation water quality and leaching requirement on the production and composition in fatty acids of sunflower oil. The trial was run in 2001 on a sunflower crop (cv. HS 90 grown in cylindrical pots at the Campus of Bari University (Italy. 36 treatments obtained from the factorial combination of two clay soils with nine types of brackish water and two leaching fractions (10 and 20% were compared. The nine types of irrigation water were obtained by dissolving the proper amounts of NaCl and CaCl2 in de-ionized water, according to the factorial combination of three salt concentration levels (0.01, 0.032 and 0.064 M with three sodium levels (SAR = 5, 15 and 45. At ripening the main yield traits, oil yield and acid composition of seeds were analysed. At the highest salinity level about 70% yield reduction, in terms of seeds per plant was observed. The oil yield and the final acid composition of seeds were significantly affected by soil type, leaching requirement, salinity and the SAR levels of irrigation water. A progressive decline in oil yield was recorded as the salt concentration and sodium level of irrigation solutions increased. As to the fatty acid composition, a gradual increase in oleic and linolenic acid content and a corresponding decrease in the other fatty acids were found as the salinity and sodium levels of irrigation water increased. The oleic/linoleic acid ratio too increased as the salinity increased. The salt and sodium-induced stresses of irrigation water reduced the seed and oil yields while still favouring a progressive increase in the oleic acid content and a slight decrease of linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids, thus improving oil quality. The results point out both the influence of the soil and the positive effect of sodium and salt stress and of the leaching fraction on the food quality of

  18. Effects of Saline and Sodic Stress on Yield and Fatty Acid Profile in Sunflower Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Tarantino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the objectives concerned in this research, much importance has been attached to the assessment of the influence of soil type, irrigation water quality and leaching requirement on the production and composition in fatty acids of sunflower oil. The trial was run in 2001 on a sunflower crop (cv. HS 90 grown in cylindrical pots at the Campus of Bari University (Italy. 36 treatments obtained from the factorial combination of two clay soils with nine types of brackish water and two leaching fractions (10 and 20% were compared. The nine types of irrigation water were obtained by dissolving the proper amounts of NaCl and CaCl2 in de-ionized water, according to the factorial combination of three salt concentration levels (0.01, 0.032 and 0.064 M with three sodium levels (SAR = 5, 15 and 45. At ripening the main yield traits, oil yield and acid composition of seeds were analysed. At the highest salinity level about 70% yield reduction, in terms of seeds per plant was observed. The oil yield and the final acid composition of seeds were significantly affected by soil type, leaching requirement, salinity and the SAR levels of irrigation water. A progressive decline in oil yield was recorded as the salt concentration and sodium level of irrigation solutions increased. As to the fatty acid composition, a gradual increase in oleic and linolenic acid content and a corresponding decrease in the other fatty acids were found as the salinity and sodium levels of irrigation water increased. The oleic/linoleic acid ratio too increased as the salinity increased. The salt and sodium-induced stresses of irrigation water reduced the seed and oil yields while still favouring a progressive increase in the oleic acid content and a slight decrease of linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids, thus improving oil quality. The results point out both the influence of the soil and the positive effect of sodium and salt stress and of the leaching fraction on the food quality of

  19. Effect of phenolic extracts on trans fatty acid formation during frying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamel, TH

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil (blend of refined and virgin and sunflower oil containing added methanol phenolic extracts of dry rosemary and olive vegetable water or the synthetic antioxidant BHA in combination with the extracts, were used in a frying process. Eight frying operations were performed at 180 °C with 24 hr intervals between fryings. During the frying period the trans fatty acids (TFA by capillary column gas chromatography (CC-GC were determined. Trans fatty acids of oleic and linoleic were increased with frying time in both the control oil samples. The rosemary additives (extracts alone and in combination with BHA decreased the level of trans fatty acids (mainly elaidic acid, while the addition of olive vegetable water did not have any effect.

    Aceite de oliva (mezcla de virgen y refinado y aceite de girasol con extractos fenólicos de romero seco y aguas de vegetación de aceituna, o con el antioxidante sintético BHA en combinación con los extractos, se usaron en proceso de fritura. Se realizaron 8 operaciones de fritura a 180°C con intervalos de 24 h. Se determinaron los ácidos grasos trans (TFA por cromatografía de gases en columna capilar (CC-GC. Los ácidos grasos trans de oleico y linoleico aumentaron con el tiempo de fritura en las muestras de aceite control. Los extractos de romero, solos y en combinación con BHA, disminuyeron los niveles de ácidos grasos trans (principalmente ácido elaídico mientras que la adicción de aguas de vegetación de aceituna no tuvo ningún efecto.

  20. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damitha De Mel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (ω-3 fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  1. Fishy business: effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-08-15

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  2. Effects of Harvest Times on the Fatty Acids Composition of Rose Hip (Rosa sp. Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güneş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the change of fatty acids ratios of some rose hip species seeds in different harvest times. Seeds of five genotypes belonging to rose hip species (Rosa sp. were used in the study. The fruits of species were harvested in six different ripening times and analyzed. Total oil analysis was performed for the fifth harvest only, which was determined as the optimal harvest time. As a result; total oil ratio of rose hip seeds varied as 5.22 and 6.62 g/100g respectively for accessions of Rosa dumalis (MR-12 and MR-15, 6.37 g/100g for R. canina (MR-26, 5.00 g/100g for R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and 5.29 g/100g for R. villosa (MR-84. Eleven fatty acids were determined in rose hip seeds. Among these fatty acids linoleic, oleic, linolenic, palmitic and stearic acids respectively had high ratio. Saturated fatty acids ratio (SFAs was the highest in R. canina (MR-26 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12; monounsaturated fatty acids ratio (MUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis (MR-12 and the lowest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46; polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio (PUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12. Mono and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents obtained in this study was high; the change of fatty acid profile in the studied species in relation to harvest time was significant for some species and insignificant for others. A conclusion was reached that it is important to pay attention to qualitative and quantitative properties of seeds when conducting studies about rose hip improvement.

  3. The effect of the regulation on trans fatty acid content in Danish food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jensen, Henrik G.; Mikkelsen, Aase Ærendahl

    2006-01-01

    foods. A broader range of food was monitored with 253 samples in 2003 and 148 samples in 2005 after the Danish regulation was in effect. The investigations show that the TFA content has been reduced or removed from the products with high TFA content originally, like French fries, microwave oven popcorn......The content of trans fatty acids (TFA) in Danish food has been monitored for the last 30 years. In margarines and shortenings the content of TFA has steadily declined from about 10 g/100 g margarine in the seventies to practically no TFA in margarines in 1999. In order to efficiently reduce...

  4. Effects of storage conditions on the fatty acid composition of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-08-31

    Aug 31, 2015 ... Key words: Pentadesma butyracea, oil seed, storage, butter, fatty acid. INTRODUCTION ... oil, in skin and hair care and in the manufacturing of soap because of its ..... study of Ozonized olive oil and ozonized sunflower oil.

  5. Effects of high pressure processing on fatty acid composition and volatile compounds in Korean native black goat meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Geunho; Cho, Soohyun; Seong, Pilnam; Park, Beomyoung; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Donghun; Kim, Youngjun; Kang, Sunmun; Park, Kyoungmi

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of high pressure processing (HPP) on fatty acid composition and volatile compounds in Korean native black goat (KNBG) meat. Fatty acid content in KNBG meat was not significantly (p > 0.05) different among the control goats and those subjected HPP. The 9,12-octadecadienoic acid and octadecanoic acid, well-known causes of off-flavors, were detected from meat of some KNBG. A difference between the control and HPP treatment was observed in the discriminated function analysis using an electronic nose. The results suggest that the volatile compounds in KNBG meat were affected by HPP.

  6. Effect of copper on performance, carcass characteristics, and muscle fatty acid composition of meat goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Wang, Y; Spears, J W; Lin, X; Guo, C H

    2013-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary Cu on performance, carcass characteristics, and muscle fatty acid composition in meat goats. Thirty five Jianyang Big-ear goat (JYB) kids (average BW 20.3 ± 0.6 kg and age 3 to 4 mo) were stratified by weight and randomly assigned to 1 of 7 experimental treatments (n = 5 goats per treatment). Treatments consisted of: 1) control (no supplemental Cu; 14.3 mg Cu/kg DM), 2) 20 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 3) 40 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 4) 80 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 5) 160 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 6) 320 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, and 7) 640 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM. Copper was supplemented from CuSO4•5H2O (25.2% Cu). Goats were individually fed a concentrate-hay based diet for 96 d. Performance was not affected by Cu concentration. Liver Cu concentration was increased (P Goats supplemented with 0 or 20 mg Cu/kg DM had lower (P goats had lower (P = 0.04) longissimus muscle area (LMA) compared with control. Dietary Cu supplementation increased the percentage of C14:0 (P 0.10). These results indicate that JYB goats can tolerate up to 640 mg Cu/kg DM for 96 d without adverse effects on performance, but fat deposition and fatty acid composition in the body could be altered by Cu supplementation as low as 20 mg/kg of diet with high concentrate-hay. Copper supplementation increased backfat depth, IMF, and percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids in LM and decreased LMA in the carcass of JYB goats.

  7. Effect of different drying techniques on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and volatile profile of robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Hu, Rongsuo; Chu, Zhong; Zhao, Jianping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different drying techniques, namely, room-temperature drying (RTD), solar drying (SD), heat-pump drying (HPD), hot-air drying (HAD), and freeze drying (FD), on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and the volatile compound profile of robusta coffee beans. The data showed that FD was an effective method to preserve fat, organic acids, and monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, HAD was ideal for retaining polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids. Sixty-two volatile compounds were identified in the differently dried coffee beans, representing 90% of the volatile compounds. HPD of the coffee beans produced the largest number of volatiles, whereas FD resulted in the highest volatile content. A principal component analysis demonstrated a close relationship between the HPD, SD, and RTD methods whereas the FD and HAD methods were significantly different. Overall, the results provide a basis for potential application to other similar thermal sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of

  9. The effects of hydroxy fatty acids on the hyphal branching of germinated spores of AM fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahashi, Gerald; Douds, David D

    2011-01-01

    Two hydroxy fatty acids, tentatively identified previously in carrot root exudates, were tested for their effects on hyphal growth of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Gigaspora gigantea (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe. Best results were achieved with a long-term bioassay (7-8d) with nanomolar concentrations throughout the Petri dish in contrast to the rapid microinjection bioassay (16-24h) in which nanogram quantities were injected near growing hyphal tips. When 5nM 2-hydroxy fatty acids of various chain length were tested, the length of the hydroxyl fatty acid was significant since only 2-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (2OH-TDA) and to a slightly lesser degree, 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid (2OH-DDA) induced a hyphal growth response while 2-hydroxydecanoic acid (2OH-DA) and 2-hydroxyhexadecanoic (2OH-HDA) acid did not. The position of the hydroxyl group was critical since 5nM 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (3OH-TDA) had no effect on hyphal growth. The length of the non-hydroxy containing straight chain fatty acid, per se, did not appear significant since none of these fatty acids had an effect on hyphal growth. The morphological growth response promoted by 2OH-TDA consisted of multiple lateral branches, spaced fairly regularly apart, along the primary germ tubes as well as some lateral branch formation off the major secondary hyphae. This growth response was identical to that observed when germinated spores were allowed to grow towards cultured carrot roots in vitro. This response to 2OH-TDA also was observed with an unidentified Gigaspora species but no morphological response was observed with Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith. The results indicate that 2-hydroxy fatty acids are another putative category of root exudate signals perceived by Gigaspora species, stimulating an increase in elongated lateral branches. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Effects of partial hydrogenation, epoxidation, and hydroxylation on the fuel properties of fatty acid methyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadumesthrige, Kapila; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K.Y. Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    The properties of biodiesel depend on the chemical structure of individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In this work the chemical structure of fatty acid chains was modified by catalytic hydrogenation, epoxidation and hydroxylation under controlled conditions. Hydrolysis of ester functionality or oxidation of fatty acid chain was not observed during these reactions. The properties of hydrogenated FAME strongly depend on the hydrogenation time. The total saturated fatty acid (SFA) percentage increased from 29.3% to 76.2% after 2 h of hydrogenation. This hydrogenated FAME showed higher oxidation stability and higher cetane number but poor cold flow properties. Formation of trans FAME was observed during hydrogenation. Both hydroxylation and epoxidation resulted in a decrease of unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester (UFA) fraction. The percentages of total unsaturated FAME decreased 39% in the epoxidation reaction and 44% in the hydroxylation reaction. The addition of hydroxyl groups to the unsaturated regions of the fatty acid chain yields biodiesel with better cold flow properties, increased lubricity and slightly increased oxidative stability. However, epoxy FAME shows some interesting properties such as higher oxidation stability, higher cetane number and acceptable cold flow properties, which met the limits of ASTM D6751 biodiesel specifications. (author)

  11. Effect of penicillin on fatty acid synthesis and excretion in Streptococcus mutans BHT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissette, J.L.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans BHT with growth-inhibitory concentrations (0.2 microgram/ml) of benzylpenicillin stimulates the incorporation of [2- 14 C] acetate into lipids excreted by the cells by as much as 69-fold, but does not change the amount of 14 C incorporated into intracellular lipids. At this concentration of penicillin cellular lysis does not occur. The radioactive label is incorporated exclusively into the fatty acid moieties of the glycerolipids. During a 4-hr incubation in the presence of penicillin, the extracellular fatty acid ester concentration increases 1.5 fold, even though there is no growth or cellular lysis. An indication of the relative rate of fatty acid synthesis was most readily obtained by placing S. mutans BHT in a buffer containing 14 C-acetate. Under these nongrowing conditions free fatty acids are the only lipids labeled, a factor which simplifies the assay. The addition of glycerol to the buffer causes all of the nonesterified fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipid. The cells excrete much of the lipid whether glycerol is present or not. Addition of penicillin to the nongrowth supporting buffer system does not stimulate the incorporation of [ 14 C]-acetate into fatty acids

  12. Conjugated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ9,11,13, lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ9,12,15). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13cis) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13trans). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation. PMID:22451660

  13. Intake of Fish and Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids: Effect on Humans During Actual and Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Zwart, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Space flight has many negative effects on human physiology, including bone and muscle loss. Bone and muscle are two systems that are positively affected by dietary intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids. The mechanism is likely to be related to inhibition by n-3 fatty acids of inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF) and thus inhibition of downstream NF-kB activation. We have documented this effect in a 3-dimensional cell culture model, where NF-kB activation in osteoclasts was inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 fatty acid. We have also indentified that NF-kB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Space Shuttle crews. We found that after Shuttle flights of 2 wk, expression of the protein p65 (evidence of NF-kB activation) was increased at landing (P less than 0.001). When evaluating the effects of n-3 fatty acid intake on bone breakdown after 60 d of bed rest (a weightlessness analog). We found that after 60 d of bed rest, greater intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with less N-telopeptide excretion (Pearson r = -0.62, P less than 0.05). We also evaluated the relationship of fish intake and bone loss in astronauts after 4 to 6 mo missions on the International Space Station. Higher consumption of fish during flight was associated with higher bone mineral density (Pearson r = 0.46, P less than 0.05). Together, these findings provide evidence of the cellular mechanism by which n-3 fatty acids can inhibit bone loss, and preliminary human evidence of the potential for n-3 fatty acids to counteract bone loss associated with space flight. This study was supported by the NASA Human Research Program.

  14. Effects of dietary omega-3 and -6 supplementations on phospholipid fatty acid composition in mice uterus during window of pre-implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Amir; Darabi, Masoud; Farzadi, Laya; Salmassi, Ali; Latifi, Zeinab; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shaaker, Maghsood; Ghasemnejad, Tohid; Roshangar, Leila; Nouri, Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Since fatty acid composition of uterus phospholipids is likely to influence embryo implantation, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary omega-3 and -6 fatty acids on implantation rate as well as uterine phospholipid fatty acids composition during mice pre-implantation period. Sixty female mice were randomly distributed into:1) control (standard pellet), 2) omega-3 (standard pellet + 10% w/w of omega-3 fatty acids) and 3) omega-6 (standard pellet + 10% w/w of omega-6 fatty acids). Uterine phospholipid fatty acid composition during the pre-implantation window (days 1-5 of pregnancy) was analyzed using gas-chromatography. The implantation rate on the fifth day of pregnancy was also determined. Our results showed that on days 1, 2 and 3 of pregnancy, the levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) as well as total omega-6 fatty acids were significantly higher and the levels of linolenic acid and total omega-3 fatty acids were statistically lower in the omega-6 group compared to the omega-3 group (p omega-6 fatty acids, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids levels were significantly different between the two dietary supplemented groups (p omega-6 fatty acids, especially ARA, with the implantation rate. The present study showed that diets rich in omega-3 and -6 fatty acids could differently modify uterine phospholipid fatty acid composition and uterine levels of phospholipid ARA, and that the total omega-6 fatty acids had a positive association with the implantation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of ammonia exposure on carcass traits and fatty acid composition of broiler meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to study the effects of ammonia on carcass traits, organ indices and fatty acid composition of broilers. Four hundred 21-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers with initial weight 563.52 ± 2.82 g were randomly allotted to 1 of 4 groups treated with ammonia at <3 mg/kg (control, 25 ± 3, 50 ± 3, and 75 ± 3 mg/kg concentrations. Each group consisted of 4 replicates of 25 birds. Broilers from 21 to 42 d were reared on the net floor in the respiration-metabolism chambers where similar environmental conditions were maintained. At 32 and 42 d of age, carcass traits and organ indices were determined for 4 birds per pen. At 42 d of age, fatty acid composition in the breast and thigh muscle of broilers was measured. Results showed as follows: 1 At 32 d, the dressing percentage of broilers exposed to 25 and 75 mg/kg ammonia were lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05; eviscerated yield percentage of broilers in the 25 mg/kg ammonia group was also lower (P < 0.05. At 42 d, the dressing percentage of broilers in the ammonia treatments and the thigh muscle percentage of broilers in the 50 and 75 mg/kg ammonia groups were lower (P < 0.05 than those in the control. Breast muscle percentage of broilers exposed to 25 and 50 mg/kg ammonia and eviscerated yield percentage exposed to 50 mg/kg ammonia were lower than those in the control (P < 0.05. 2 The kidney index of broilers (d 32 exposed to ammonia was greater (P < 0.05 than that of the control. At 42 d, hepatic index of broilers exposed to ammonia was increased (P < 0.05, and spleen index was decreased (P < 0.05. 3 At 42 d, stearic (C18:0 and saturated fatty acids (SFA in the thigh muscle of broilers were higher, while the unsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid (U:F ratio and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA were lower in the 50 mg/kg ammonia treatment than in the control group (P < 0.05. In conclusion, ammonia over 25 mg/kg could decline carcass traits

  16. Effects of Chain Length and Degree of Unsaturation of Fatty Acids on Structure and in Vitro Digestibility of Starch-Protein-Fatty Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mengge; Chao, Chen; Yu, Jinglin; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Shujun

    2018-02-28

    The effects of chain length and degree of unsaturation of fatty acids (FAs) on structure and in vitro digestibility of starch-protein-FA complexes were investigated in model systems. Studies with the rapid visco analyzer (RVA) showed that the formation of ternary complex resulted in higher viscosities than those of binary complex during the cooling and holding stages. The results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the structural differences for ternary complexes were much less than those for binary complexes. Starch-protein-FA complexes presented lower in vitro enzymatic digestibility compared with starch-FAs complexes. We conclude that shorter chain and lower unsaturation FAs favor the formation of ternary complexes but decrease the thermal stability of these complexes. FAs had a smaller effect on the ordered structures of ternary complexes than on those of binary complexes and little effect on enzymatic digestibility of both binary and ternary complexes.

  17. Effects of dietary fat on lipid composition of serum and erythrocytes of the swine and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    1974-01-01

    Changes in ftty acid patterns of lipids in serum and erythrocytes induced by dietary fats and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes were investigated with pigs. On feeding various diets, it was found that fatty acid composition of serum and erythrocytes could be modified and altered toward the fatty acid pattern of the diet. In vitro, the incorporation of labelled fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes was accelerated by the addition of cofactors such as lysolecithin, CoA and ATP. Dietary fats also had certain effects on the incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes. Erythrocytes, collected from the blood of pigs fed corn oil, incorporated and also released more labelled linoleate than those of pigs fed hydrogenated soybean oil. Palmitic acid was more slowly incorporated into erythrocyte membranes than linoleic acid in the pigs fed both a commercial chow and scheduled meals, indicating selective esterification of fatty acids in the erythrocyte membranes. (author)

  18. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Markers of Inflammation in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Controversial Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chun; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Xuejing; Gao, Peng; Yang, Shikun; Han, Yachun; Chen, Xianghui; Xiao, Li; Yuan, Shuguang; Liu, Fuyou; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Sun, Lin

    2018-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem which contributes to a significant morbidity and mortality in China. Concomitant inflammatory state further boosts the mortality due to cardiovascular events in patients with CKD undergoing dialysis. There is a general notion that Omega-3 fatty acids including docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) have certain health benefits perhaps via the regulation of inflammation. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of omega-3 fatty acids in patients with CKD is controversial. We analyzed the data of oral supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in CKD patients by searching literature on database from inception to August 2016. The analysis included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) derived from multiple databases, and the effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation versus the control cohorts were compared. All of the data analysis was calculated by RevMan 5.2. A total of 12 RCTs involving 487 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Among them 254 patients received omega-3 fatty acids and 233 patients served as controls who received placebo. The meta-analysis revealed no statistical significance in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD, -0.20; 95% CI, -0.44 to 0.05; P = 0.11), IL-6 (SMD, 0.00; 95% CI, -0.33 to 0.33; P = 0.99) and TNF-α (SMD, 0.14; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.44; P = 0.38) between the omega-3 fatty acids supplementation group and control. This suggested that there is insufficient evidence to conclude the benefit of omega-3 fatty acids oral supplementation in reducing serum levels of CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with CKD. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  19. The Effects of Fatty Acids on Retinoid Signaling in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langton, Simne; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2004-01-01

    ...) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are diet-derived fatty acids that bind to rexinoid X receptors (RXR). Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibitory effects on cell proliferation may be enhanced by the addition of PA and DHA to RA-treated cells...

  20. Protective effects of glycyrrhizic acid against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Duan, Xingping; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Zhihao; Sun, Pengyuan; Huo, Xiaokui; Ma, Xiaodong; Sun, Huijun; Liu, Kexin; Meng, Qiang

    2017-07-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural triterpene glycoside, on NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) in mice, and further to elucidate the mechanisms underlying GA protection. GA treatment significantly reduced the relative liver weight, serum ALT, AST activities, levels of serum lipid, blood glucose and insulin. GA suppressed lipid accumulation in liver. Further mechanism investigation indicated that GA reduced hepatic lipogenesis via downregulating SREBP-1c, FAS and SCD1 expression, increased fatty acids β-oxidation via an increase in PPARα, CPT1α and ACADS, and promoted triglyceride metabolism through inducing LPL activity. Furthermore, GA reduced gluconeogenesis through repressing PEPCK and G6Pase, and increased glycogen synthesis through an induction in gene expression of PDase and GSK3β. In addition, GA increased insulin sensitivity through upregulating phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2. In conclusion, GA produces protective effect against NAFLD, due to regulation of genes involved in lipid, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty acids. The food additive fatty acids may be safely used in food and in... and their associated fatty acids manufactured from fats and oils derived from edible sources: Capric...

  2. Unsaturated fatty acids in the diet of inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    KONHEFROVÁ, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    The thesis with the name "Unsaturated fatty acids in the diet of inpatients" is divided into a theoretical and a research parts. The theoretical part is focused on sorting out lipids and the recommended daily dosing. Next there are described the chemical structure of fatty acids and basic differences between saturated (SFA) and unsaturated (trans and cis) fatty acids. The biggest part of the theory is formed by the unsaturated fatty acids, their characteristics, food source and their effect o...

  3. Effect of fatty acid interaction on myoglobin oxygen affinity and triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Thomas; Simond, Gregory; Wright, Traver J; Shih, Lifan; Chung, Youngran; Sriram, Renuka; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Davis, Randall W

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested myoglobin (Mb) may have other cellular functions in addition to storing and transporting O 2 . Indeed, NMR experiments have shown that the saturated fatty acid (FA) palmitate (PA) can interact with myoglobin (Mb) in its ligated state (MbCO and MbCN) but does not interact with Mb in its deoxygenated state. The observation has led to the hypothesis that Mb can also serve as a fatty acid transporter. The present study further investigates fatty acid interaction with the physiological states of Mb using the more soluble but unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid (OA). OA binds to MbCO but does not bind to deoxy Mb. OA binding to Mb, however, does not alter its O 2 affinity. Without any Mb, muscle has a significantly lower level of triglyceride (TG). In Mb knock-out (MbKO) mice, both heart and skeletal muscles have lower level of TG relative to the control mice. Training further decreases the relative TG in the MbKO skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, the absence of Mb and lower TG level in muscle does not impair the MbKO mouse performance as evidenced by voluntary wheel running measurements. The results support the hypothesis of a complex physiological role for Mb, especially with respect to fatty acid metabolism.

  4. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Effects of Trace Elements on the Lipid Productivity and Fatty Acid Composition of Nannochloropis oculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of trace elements on the lipid productivity and fatty acid composition of Nannochloropis oculata (N. oculata were studied. The results showed that trace elements had a strong influence on not only the lipid productivity but also the fatty acid composition. The addition of Fe3+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mo6+, and EDTA and the deletion of Cu2+ and Co2+ can increase the lipid productivity. The optimum concentrations of the trace elements in the culture medium are 6 times of Fe3+ and EDTA, the same concentration of Zn2+, Mn2+, and Mo6+ as the control group, but the optimum medium has no Cu2+ or Co2+. Fe3+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mo6+, and EDTA are indispensable during the EPA formation of N. oculata. The addition of Fe3+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Mo6+, and EDTA can strongly increase the content of EPA in the lipid of N. oculata, but the concentration of the trace elements had little influence on the level of EPA.

  6. Effects of hybrid and bacterial inoculation on fermentation quality and fatty acid profile of barley silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyeon; Amanullah, Sadar M; Lee, Hyuk Jun; Joo, Young Ho; Han, Ouk Kyu; Adesogan, Adegbola T; Kim, Sam Churl

    2018-01-01

    This study estimated the effects of hybrid and bacterial inoculant on fermentation quality and fatty acid profile of barley silages. Yuyeon (Silkless) and Youngyang (Silking) barley hybrids were harvested at 24.9 and 27.1% dry matter, respectively, and chopped to 10 cm lengths. Each hybrid was treated with or without an inoculant (2 × 10 4  colony-forming units/g of Lactobacillus plantarum). A total of 48 silos were prepared in an experiment with a 2 × 2 (hybrid × inoculant) treatment arrangement with four replications and three ensiling durations (2, 7 and 100 days). After 100 days of ensiling, Yuyeon silage had higher (P hybrids and increased (P hybrid might have better potential benefits on animal performances due to its smooth awn and silkless nature, and higher in vitro dry matter digestibility. Its higher C18:3n-3 would be better for improving fatty acid profile of meat or milk than Youngyang hybrid. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Effect of biodiesel unsaturated fatty acid on combustion characteristics of a DI compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puhan, Sukumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Veltech Engineering college, Avadi, Chennai (India); Saravanan, N. [ERC Engines, Tata Motors, Pimpri, Pune (India); Nagarajan, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai (India); Vedaraman, N. [Chemical Engineering Division, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai (India)

    2010-08-15

    Several research works have been carried out on biodiesel combustion, performance and emissions till today. But very few studies have been made about the chemistry of biodiesel that affects the diesel engine operation. Biodiesel is derived from vegetable oil or animal fats, which comprises of several fatty acids with different chain length and bonding. The present work focuses on the effect of biodiesel molecular weight, structure (Cis and Trans), and the number of double bonds on the diesel engine operation characteristics. Three types of biodiesel with different molecular weight and number of double bond were selected for the experimental studies. The biodiesels were prepared and analyzed for fuel properties according to the standards. A constant speed diesel engine, which develops 4.4 kW of power, was run with biodiesels and its performance was compared with diesel fuel. The results show that Linseed oil methyl ester with high linolenic (unsaturated fatty acid ester) does not suit best for diesel engine due to high oxides of nitrogen emission and low thermal efficiency. (author)

  8. Effects of Diets Enriched in Omega-9 or Omega-6 Fatty Acids on Reproductive Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Neda Mousavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal type and amounts of dietary fatty acids affect on reproductive process in the mice. The present study investigated the effects of maternal supplementation with different amounts of omega-6 or omega-9 during pregnancy on the number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of gestation.Materials and methods: Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into four dietary groups including low omega-6 (16%; LO6, low omega-9 (16%; LO9, high omega-6 (45%; HO6 and high omega-9 (45%; HO9 during gestation. Number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of pregnancy were compared among four dietary groups.Results: There was significant difference between LO6 and HO6 (p < 0.0001, LO9 and HO9 (p < 0.0001 groups in total number of pups. The number of female and male offspring were significantly different between LO6 and LO9 (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001, respectively, LO9 and HO9 (p = 0.01 and p = 0.025 groups. Duration of pregnancy was significantly higher in low fat diet than high fat diet groups (< 0.001.Conclusion: High fat diet reduced number of pups, gestation duration and lead to early labor. Omega-9 fatty acids shifted sex of offspring to females.

  9. Potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant-like effects with low non-antidepressant doses of fluoxetine and mirtazapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Fonseca, Cristina; Sterin-Speziale, Norma; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2010-12-01

    Despite the advances in psychopharmacology, the treatment of depressive disorders is still not satisfactory. Side effects and resistance to antidepressant drugs are the greatest complications during treatment. Based on recent evidence, omega-3 fatty acids may influence vulnerability and outcome in depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to further characterize the omega-3 antidepressant-like effect in rats in terms of its behavioral features in the depression model forced swimming test either alone or in combination with antidepressants fluoxetine or mirtazapine. Ultimately, we prompted to determine the lowest dose at which omega-3 fatty acids and antidepressant drugs may still represent a pharmacological advantage when employed in combined treatments. Chronic diet supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids produced concentration-dependent antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test displaying a behavioral profile similar to fluoxetine but different from mirtazapine. Fluoxetine or mirtazapine at antidepressant doses (10 and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively) rendered additive effects in combination with omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (720 mg/kg/day). Beneficial effects of combined treatment were also observed at sub-effective doses (1 mg/kg/day) of fluoxetine or mirtazapine, since in combination with omega-3 fatty acids (720 mg/kg/day), antidepressants potentiated omega-3 antidepressant-like effects. The antidepressant-like effects occurred in the absence of changes in brain phospholipid classes. The therapeutic approach of combining omega-3 fatty acids with low ineffective doses of antidepressants might represent benefits in the treatment of depression, especially in patients with depression resistant to conventional treatments and even may contribute to patient compliance by decreasing the magnitude of some antidepressant dose-dependent side effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Marine Derived n-3 Fatty Acids on Adipose Tissue Metabolism and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Todorčević

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue function is key determinant of metabolic health, with specific nutrients being suggested to play a role in tissue metabolism. One such group of nutrients are the n-3 fatty acids, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3. Results from studies where human, animal and cellular models have been utilised to investigate the effects of EPA and/or DHA on white adipose tissue/adipocytes suggest anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects. We review here evidence for these effects, specifically focusing on studies that provide some insight into metabolic pathways or processes. Of note, limited work has been undertaken investigating the effects of EPA and DHA on white adipose tissue in humans whilst more work has been undertaken using animal and cellular models. Taken together it would appear that EPA and DHA have a positive effect on lowering lipogenesis, increasing lipolysis and decreasing inflammation, all of which would be beneficial for adipose tissue biology. What remains to be elucidated is the duration and dose required to see a favourable effect of EPA and DHA in vivo in humans, across a range of adiposity.

  11. Effect of intermittent frying on fatty acids, vitamin E, lipid oxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality parameters determined in this study were: fatty acid composition of the oils, ... quality were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography in isocratic mode. ... Conjugated dienes, Anisidine value and viscosity as markers of lipid ... In soybean oils, about 57% and 62.5% of linoleic and linolenic acids were lost ...

  12. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA...

  13. Clustering effects on postprandial insulin secretion and sensitivity in response to meals with different fatty acid compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Beatriz; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; Villar, Jose; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Lopez, Sergio

    2014-07-25

    Dietary fatty acids play a role in glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to assess the individual relationship between dietary saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids with postprandial β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides. We assessed postprandial β-cell function (by the insulinogenic index and the ratio of the insulin to glucose areas under the time-concentration curve) and insulin sensitivity (by the oral glucose and the minimal model insulin sensitivity indices) over four nonconsecutive, randomly assigned, high-fat meals containing a panel of SFA (palmitic and stearic acids), MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) and PUFA (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) in 14 subjects with normal and in 14 subjects with high fasting triglycerides. The proportions of each fatty acid in the meals and the values for surrogate measures of postprandial β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were subjected to a Pearson correlation and hierarchical cluster analysis, which revealed two classes of dietary fatty acids for regulating postprandial glucose homeostasis. We successfully discriminated the adverse effects of SFA palmitic acid from the beneficial effects of MUFA oleic acid on postprandial β-cell function (r ≥ 0.84 for SFA palmitic acid and r ≥ -0.71 for MUFA oleic acid; P < 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (r ≥ -0.92 for SFA palmitic acid and r ≥ 0.89 for MUFA oleic acid; P < 0.001) both in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides. In conclusion, dietary MUFA oleic acid, in contrast to SFA palmitic acid, favours the tuning towards better postprandial glycaemic control in subjects with normal and high fasting triglycerides.

  14. Dietary verbascoside supplementation in donkeys: effects on milk fatty acid profile during lactation, and serum biochemical parameters and oxidative markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, A G; Vizzarri, F; Palazzo, M; Martemucci, G

    2017-09-01

    Various uses of donkeys' milk have been recently proposed for human consumption on the basis of its nutritional characteristics. Improvements in milk fatty acid profile and animal oxidative status can be induced through dietary supplementation of phenolic compounds. The study aimed to evaluate in donkeys the effects of dietary supplementation with verbascoside (VB) on: (i) the fatty acid profile and vitamins A and E contents of milk during a whole lactation, and (ii) blood biochemical parameters and markers of oxidative status of the animals. At foaling, 12 lactating jennies were subdivided into two groups (n 6): control, without VB supplement; VB, receiving a lipid-encapsulated VB supplement. Gross composition, fatty acid profile and vitamins A and E contents in milk were assessed monthly over the 6 months of lactation. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins cholesterol, tryglicerides, non-esterified fatty acid, bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, reactive oxygen metabolites, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs), vitamin A and vitamin E were evaluated at 8 days after foaling (D0) and then at D90, D105 and D120 of lactation. In milk, the VB supplementation decreased the saturated fatty acids (Pdonkey's milk with a benefit on the oxidative status and serum lipidic profile of the animals.

  15. Determination of Fatty Acid in Asparagus by Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra HAJRULAI-MUSLIU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Asparagus contain a lot of macronutrients and micronutrients including folate, dietary fibre (soluble and insoluble and phenolic compounds. Also asparagus is a good source of unsaturated linoleic and linolenic fatty acids which are precursors for Eicosapentanoic acid (EPA and Docosahexanoic acid (DHA. Unsaturated fatty acids have important biological effects and they have important role in human health. The objective of this study was to analyze fatty acid composition of asparagus as a potential source of linoleic and linolenic acid - a precursor for EPA and DHA. For this reason we analyzed fifty seven samples of asparagus collected from the local market. We used AOAC 996.06 method and analyses were performed with gas chromatograph with flame-ionization detector (GC-FID. The highest concentration of fatty acid in the asparagus was linoleic acid (C18:2n6 which content in asparagus is 25.620±1.0%. Also, asparagus is good source of -linolenic fatty acid (C18:3n3 and content of this fatty acid in asparagus is 8.840±0.3%. The omega-6 to omega-3 (n6/n3 ratio in asparagus was 3.19. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs were higher than monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs, and from saturated fatty acids, palmitic acid was most frequent with 24.324±1.0%. From our study we can conclude that asparagus is very good source of unsaturated fatty acids, especially linoleic and linolenic fatty acids.

  16. The effects of exogenous fatty acids and niacin on human monocyte-macrophage plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Rodriguez, Dolores; Cardelo, Magdalena P; Naranjo, Maria C; Bermudez, Beatriz; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Lopez, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Macrophage plasticity allows adapting to different environments, having a dual activity in inflammatory-related diseases. Our hypothesis is that the type of dietary fatty acids into human postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), alone or in combination with niacin (vitamin B3), could modulate the plasticity of monocytes-macrophages. We isolated TRLs at the postprandial peak from blood samples of healthy volunteers after the ingestion of a meal rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or MUFAs plus omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs). Autologous monocytes isolated at fasting were first induced to differentiate into naïve macrophages. We observed that postprandial TRL-MUFAs, particularly in combination with niacin, enhance competence to monocytes to differentiate and polarise into M2 macrophages. Postprandial TRL-SFAs made polarised macrophages prone to an M1 phenotype. In contrast to dietary SFAs, dietary MUFAs in the meals plus immediate-release niacin primed circulating monocytes for a reduced postprandial pro-inflammatory profile. Our study underlines a role of postprandial TRLs as a metabolic entity in regulating the plasticity of the monocyte-macrophage lineage and also brings an understanding of the mechanisms by which dietary fatty acids are environmental factors fostering the innate immune responsiveness in humans. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The effect of parity on the proportion of important healthy fatty acids in raw milk of Holstein cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luděk Stádník

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine and evaluate the effect of parity on the fatty acids groups’ proportion in Holstein cows’ milk during the first phase of lactations, with an emphasis on its potential importance for consumer health. A total of 25 Holstein cows, 9 primiparous, 9 in the 2nd, and 7 in the 3rd and subsequent parity, were observed and sampled at 7-day intervals through the first 17 weeks of lactation. The percentage proportion of saturated (hypercholesterolemic and volatile as its components and unsaturated (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated as its components fatty acids in the samples of milk fat (n=425 was determined. The effects of parity and negative energy balance, as well as regression, on the lactation week and the fat to protein ratio were evaluated using SAS 9.3. A significantly (P<0.01 lower proportion of unhealthy hypercholesterolemic fatty acids was detected in primiparous cows (-2.67 % and those in the 3rd and subsequent lactation (-2.94 % compared to the 2nd lactation, as well as a simultaneously higher proportion of healthy unsaturated fatty acids (+2.07, respectively +3.08 %. The determined relationships corresponded to organism stress evoked by the initiation of milk production and its maintenance in higher parities. Therefore, the generally required prolongation of dairy cows’ longevity can influence on the quality of raw milk, especially considering composition of fatty acids.

  18. Effect of weight, sex and hunting period on fatty acid composition of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat from wild boar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artūras Šiukščius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the influence of weight, sex and month of hunting on the fatty acid composition of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat from 49 free ranging wild boars hunted in Lithuania during the winter season. A total number of 27 and 25 fatty acids were identified in the intramuscular fat and subcutaneous tissue of wild boars, respectively. The weight of the wild boar had mainly affected only the levels of separate fatty acids both in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat. Higher levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA were found in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat of males compared with females. The effect of both weight and sex on the levels of fatty acids was higher in the subcutaneous fat than in the intramuscular fat. Weight, sex and hunting month had no effect on PUFA/SFA and n-6 PUFA/n-3 PUFA ratios in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat. The atherogenic (AI and thrombogenic (TI indexes and hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic ratio in subcutaneous fat were more favorable in females compared with males and in the January hunting season than in November and December.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency Does Not Alter the Effects of Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment on Central Serotonin Turnover or Behavior in the Forced Swim Test in Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids d...

  20. Ameliorative potential of S-allylcysteine: effect on lipid profile and changes in tissue fatty acid composition in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Ganapathy; Ponmurugan, Ponnusamy

    2012-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC) in STZ induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids, phospholipids and fatty acid composition were estimated in the liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of SAC at a dose of 150 mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 45 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, TC, TG, free fatty acids, phospholipids, LDL-C, VLDL-C and elevation of HDL-C in comparison with diabetic control group. Oral administration of SAC to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1), and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of SAC was compared with glyclazide; a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that SAC showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary fatty acids and membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M G

    1990-02-01

    In recent years, there has been growing public awareness of the potential health benefits of dietary fatty acids, and of the distinction between the effects of the omega6 and omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that are concentrated in vegetable and fish oils, respectively. A part of the biologic effectiveness of the two families of polyunsaturated fatty acids resides in their relative roles as precursors of the eicosanoids. However, we are also beginning to appreciate that as the major components of the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, they can interact with and directly influence the functioning of select integral membrane proteins. Among the most important of these are the enzymes, receptors, and ion channels that are situated in the plasma membrane of the cell, since they carry out the communication and homeostatic processes that are necessary for normal cell function. This review examines current information regarding the effects of diet-induced changes in plasma membrane fatty acid composition on several specific enzymes (adenylate cyclase, 5'-nucleotidase, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) and cell-surface receptors (opiate, adrenergic, insulin). Dietary manipulation studies have demonstrated a sensitivity of each to a fatty acid environment that is variably dependent on the nature of the fatty acid(s) and/or source of the membrane. The molecular mechanisms appear to involve fatty acid-dependent effects on protein conformation, on the "fluidity" and/or thickness of the membrane, or on protein synthesis. Together, the results of these studies reinforce the concept that dietary fats have the potential to regulate physiologic function and to further our understanding of how this occurs at a membrane level.

  2. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné

    2015-01-01

    negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly......The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood....... The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted...

  3. Corn oil versus lard: Metabolic effects of omega-3 fatty acids in mice fed obesogenic diets with different fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlisova, Jana; Bardova, Kristina; Stankova, Barbora; Tvrzicka, Eva; Kopecky, Jan; Rossmeisl, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Mixed results have been obtained regarding the level of insulin resistance induced by high-fat diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) when compared to those enriched by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and how metabolic effects of marine PUFA of n-3 series, i.e. docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), depend on dietary lipid background. Here we compared two high-fat diets, in which the major lipid constituent was based either on SFA in the form of pork lard (LHF diet) or PUFA of n-6 series (Omega-6) as corn oil (cHF diet). Both cHF and LHF parental diets were also supplemented with EPA+DHA (∼30 g/kg diet) to produce cHF+F and LHF+F diet, respectively. Male C57BL/6N mice were fed the experimental diets for 8 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in mice fed LHF and cHF diets, and then metabolic effects of cHF+F and LHF+F diets were assessed focusing on the liver and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). Both LHF and cHF induced comparable weight gain and the level of insulin resistance, however LHF-fed mice showed increased hepatic steatosis associated with elevated activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and lower plasma triacylglycerol levels when compared to cHF. Despite lowering hepatic SCD1 activity, which was concomitant with reduced hepatic steatosis reaching the level observed in cHF+F mice, LHF+F did not decrease adiposity and the weight of eWAT, and rather further impaired insulin sensitivity relative to cHF+F, that tended to improve it. In conclusion, high-fat diets containing as much as ∼35 weight% as lipids induce similar weight gain and impairment of insulin sensitivity irrespective whether they are based on SFA or Omega-6. Although the SFA-rich diet containing EPA+DHA efficiently reduced hepatic steatosis, it did so without a corresponding improvement in insulin sensitivity and in the absence of effect on adiposity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Fran

  4. Lipotoxic effect of p21 on free fatty acid-induced steatosis in L02 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-wei Wang

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasingly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Though with high prevalence, the mechanism is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the effects of p21 on free fatty acid (FFA-induced steatosis in L02 cells. We therefore analyzed the L02 cells with MG132 and siRNA treatment for different expression of p21 related to lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. Cellular total lipid was stained by Oil Red O, while triglyceride content, cytotoxicity assays, lipid peroxidation markers and anti-oxidation levels were measured by enzymatic kits. Treatment with 1 mM FFA for 48 hr induced magnificent intracellular lipid accumulation and increased oxidative stress in p21 overload L02 cells compared to that in p21 knockdown L02 cells. By increasing oxidative stress and peroxidation, p21 accelerates FFA-induced lipotoxic effect in L02 cells and might provide information about potentially new targets for drug development and treatments of NAFLD.

  5. The effect of natural and synthetic fatty acids on membrane structure, microdomain organization, cellular functions and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2014-06-01

    This review deals with the effects of synthetic and natural fatty acids on the biophysical properties of membranes, and on their implication on cell function. Natural fatty acids are constituents of more complex lipids, like triacylglycerides or phospholipids, which are used by cells to store and obtain energy, as well as for structural purposes. Accordingly, natural and synthetic fatty acids may modify the structure of the lipid membrane, altering its microdomain organization and other physical properties, and provoking changes in cell signaling. Therefore, by modulating fatty acids it is possible to regulate the structure of the membrane, influencing the cell processes that are reliant on this structure and potentially reverting pathological cell dysfunctions that may provoke cancer, diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The so-called Membrane Lipid Therapy offers a strategy to regulate the membrane composition through drug administration, potentially reverting pathological processes by re-adapting cell membrane structure. Certain fatty acids and their synthetic derivatives are described here that may potentially be used in such therapies, where the cell membrane itself can be considered as a target to combat disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of fatty acids in Ghee and olive oil and their probable causal effect in lipoid pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein Mirghani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze and identify the fatty acids found in homemade ghee and in olive oil and compare those to fatty acids found in bronchoalevolar lavage of children with lipoid pneumonia.Methods: The fatty acids found in homemade fat ”Ghee” and olive oil were analyzed by gas chromatography. Methyl ester derivatives suitable for GC analysis were prepared directly from olive oil or from Ghee using anhydrous methanolic-HCl. Bronchoscopy and bronchoalevolar lavage was performed in eight children aged between 2 and 4 years, all with history of using homemade ghee and/or olive oil in the recumbent position.Results: The analysis of fatty acids in Ghee and olive oil show similar gas chromatographic pattern as those of bronchoalevolar lavage.Conclusion: The three fatty acids responsible for the deleterious effects of lipoid pneumonia were identified. Lipoid pneumonia should be one of the differentials diagnosis in children  presenting with respiratory distress. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:252-7Keywords: Bronchoalevolar lavage, gas chromatography, Ghee, methyl esters, lipoid pneumonia

  7. A Review of the Metabolic Origins of Milk Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria COZMA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk fat and its fatty acid profile are important determinants of the technological, sensorial, and nutritional properties of milk and dairy products. The two major processes contributing to the presence of fatty acids in ruminant milk are the mammary lipogenesis and the lipid metabolism in the rumen. Among fatty acids, 4:0 to 12:0, almost all 14:0 and about a half of 16:0 in milk fat derive from de novo synthesis within the mammary gland. De novo synthesis utilizes as precursors acetate and butyrate produced through carbohydrates ruminal fermentation and involves acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase as key enzymes. The rest of 16:0 and all of the long-chain fatty acids derive from mammary uptake of circulating lipoproteins and nonesterified fatty acids that originate from digestive absorption of lipids and body fat mobilization. Further, long-chain fatty acids as well as medium-chain fatty acids entering the mammary gland can be desaturated via Δ-9 desaturase, an enzyme that acts by adding a cis-9-double bond on the fatty acid chain. Moreover, ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated fatty acids results in the formation of numerous fatty acids available for incorporation into milk fat. Ruminal biohydrogenation is performed by rumen microbial population as a means of protection against the toxic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Within the rumen microorganisms, bacteria are principally responsible for ruminal biohydrogenation when compared to protozoa and anaerobic fungi.

  8. Assessment of the effect of the technological processing and the storage term on the fatty acid composition of buffalo yoghurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Miteva, D.; Tsvetkov, Ts.

    2011-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of the milk fat of buffalo yoghurt after lyophilization and gamma ray treatment with dozes 2 and 4 kGy has been investigated.It has been established that the fatty acid spectrums of these fat contain a considerable number of short, medium and long chain fatty acids.The buffalo milk fat after treatment has fatty acid composition a typical specific quantitative balancing

  9. Thyroid Hormone Effects on Whole-Body Energy Homeostasis and Tissue-Specific Fatty Acid Uptake in Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klieverik, Lars P.; Coomans, Claudia P.; Endert, Erik; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Havekes, Louis M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Fliers, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone (TH) status on energy metabolism and tissue-specific substrate supply in vivo are incompletely understood. To study the effects of TH status on energy metabolism and tissue-specific fatty acid (FA) fluxes, we used metabolic cages as well as C-14-labeled FA and

  10. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  11. Effect of previous ascorbic acid treatment on the fatty acid profile of cobia (Rachycentron canadum fillets during frozen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftabsavar, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research focuses on the nutritional value of the lipid retention associated with frozen cobia (Rachycentron canadum. The effect of a previous soaking in an aqueous ascorbic acid (AA solution on the fatty acid profile of fish fillets during a further frozen storage period (–18 °C was investigated. Two different AA concentrations were tested (0.25% and 0.50% and compared to control conditions. As a result of the frozen storage period (up to 6 months, marked decreases were found in the contents of fatty acid groups such as monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated, as well as in the n-3/n-6 ratio. However, a preserving effect on such fatty acid parameters could be observed resulting from the previous AA treatment, which was greater when applying the 0.50% AA concentration. Assessment of the polyene index indicated an increased lipid oxidation development during the frozen storage time; this increase was partially inhibited by the previous AA soaking.Este estudio se centra en el valor nutricional lipídico de cobia (Rachycentron canadum congelada. Para ello, se investiga el efecto que un tratamiento previo con ácido ascórbico (AA puede tener sobre el perfil de ácidos grasos de filete de pescado durante su conservación en congelación (–18 °C; seis meses. Se aplicaron dos concentraciones de AA (0.25% y 0.50% que fueron comparadas con muestras control. Como resultado de la conservación en congelación, se observó un descenso importante en grupos de ácidos grasos monoinsaturados, poliinsaturados y poliinsaturados de las serie n-3, así como en la relación n-3/n-6. Sin embargo, el tratamiento previo con AA produjo un efecto protector en estos parámetros, siendo mayor al aplicar AA en la concentración superior. La medida del índice de polienos reflejó un incremento de la oxidación lipídica durante la conservación en congelación; este incremento fue parcialmente inhibido como resultado del tratamiento

  12. Effect of salinity stress on growth, lipid productivity, fatty acid composition, and biodiesel properties in Acutodesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Priti Raj; Fulekar, Madhusudan H; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi

    2017-05-01

    Two microalgae strains including Chlorella vulgaris and Acutodesmus obliquus were grown on BG11 medium with salinity stress ranging from 0.06 to 0.4 M NaCl. Highest lipid content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 49 and 43% in BG11 amended with 0.4 M NaCl. The microalgal strains C. vulgaris and A. obliquus grow better at 0.06 M NaCl concentration than control condition. At 0.06 M NaCl, improved dry biomass content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 0.92 and 0.68 gL -1 , respectively. Stress biomarkers like reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were also lowest at 0.06 M NaCl concentration revealing that both the microalgal strains are well acclimatized at 0.06 M NaCl concentration. The fatty acid composition of the investigated microalgal strains was also improved by increased NaCl concentration. At 0.4 M NaCl, palmitic acid (37%), oleic acid (15.5%), and linoleic acid (20%) were the dominant fatty acids in C. vulgaris while palmitic acid (54%) and stearic acid (26.6%) were major fatty acids found in A. obliquus. Fatty acid profiling of C. vulgaris and A. obliquus significantly varied with salinity concentration. Therefore, the study showed that salt stress is an effective stress that could increase not only the lipid content but also improved the fatty acid composition which could make C. vulgaris and A. obliquus potential strains for biodiesel production.

  13. Fatty acids from high rate algal pond's microalgal biomass and osmotic stress effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drira, Neila; Dhouibi, Nedra; Hammami, Saoussen; Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Porcedda, Silvia; Dhaouadi, Hatem

    2017-11-01

    The extraction of oil from a wild microalgae biomass collected from a domestic wastewater treatment facility's high rate algal pond (HRAP) was investigated. An experiment plan was used to determine the most efficient extraction method, the optimal temperature, time and solvent system based on total lipids yield. Microwave-assisted extraction was the most efficient method whether in n-hexane or in a mixture of chloroform/methanol compared to Soxhlet, homogenization, and ultrasounds assisted extractions. This same wild biomass was cultivated in a photobioreactor (PBR) and the effect of osmotic stress was studied. The lipids extraction yield after 3days of stress increased by more than four folds without any significant loss of biomass, however, the quality of extracted total lipids in terms of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids was not affected by salinity change in the culture medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D on growth and bone mineralization in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and vitamin D are important for fat and bone metabolism but the intake is declining in Western societies with a potential deleterious effect on growth and bone health. Dietary PUFA composition favors the intake of omega-6 (n-6 PUFA) compared to omega-3 (n-3 PUFA...... early in life is essential for preventive steps against development of overweight and obesity. Vitamin D promotes bone mineralization and growth through regulation of the calcium homeostasis, and via activation of vitamin D receptors on bone and cartilage forming cells. However vitamin D insufficiency...... development, and fat percentage; serum vitamin D status in cord blood and height development and bone mineralization; and serum vitamin D status at 4 years and bone mineralization. This is performed in the Copenhagen Prospective Study of Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000). In Study 1, breast-milk n-3 PUFA...

  15. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the fatty acid composition of salted, semi-dried Vietnamese scad and Bombay duck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh, P.Q.; Rao, V.S.; Adhikar, H.R.; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Effect of gamma irradiation on the lipid and fatty acid composition of semi-dried Bombay duck (Harpodon nehcreus) and Vietnamese scad (Alepes mate) was studied. In both these dried fishes, c16:0 aand c18:1 were the predominant fatty acids and the fishes contained ignificant quantities of the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), C20:5 and C22:6. Irradiation at a dose of 3 kGy, did not cause any alterations in the total lipid content and he overall lipid class profile in these fishes. However, in the Vietnamese scad, C18:3, C20:4 and C22:6 were significantly decreased in the irradiated samples. In spite of this decrease the irradiated semi-dried scad retained 82% of the initial amount of n-3 PUFAs

  16. Effects of rye bran addition on fatty acid composition and quality characteristics of low-fat meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Ismail

    2004-06-01

    Rye bran was used as a fat substitute in the production of meatballs. The effect of rye bran addition on the fatty acid composition, trans fatty acids, total fat, some physico-chemical and sensory properties of the samples was studied. Meatballs were produced with four different formulations including 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% rye bran addition. Control samples were formulated with 10% fat addition. Meatballs containing rye bran had lower concentrations of total fat and total trans fatty acids than the control samples. Meatballs made with addition of 20% rye bran had the highest protein, ash contents, L value (lightness), b value (yellowness), and the lowest moisture, salt content and weight losses and a value (redness). There was a significant difference among the meatball samples in respect to sensory properties and 5%, 10% rye bran added meatballs and control samples had high acceptability.

  17. Effect of unsaturated fatty acids on myocardial performance, metabolism and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Pinotti

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Diets rich in saturated fatty acids are one of the most important causes of atherosclerosis in men, and have been replaced with diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids (UFA for the prevention of this disorder. However, the effect of UFA on myocardial performance, metabolism and morphology has not been completely characterized. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of a UFA-rich diet on cardiac muscle function, oxidative stress, and morphology. Sixty-day-old male Wistar rats were fed a control (N = 8 or a UFA-rich diet (N = 8 for 60 days. Myocardial performance was studied in isolated papillary muscle by isometric and isotonic contractions under basal conditions after calcium chloride (5.2 mM and ß-adrenergic stimulation with 1.0 µM isoproterenol. Fragments of the left ventricle free wall were used to study oxidative stress and were analyzed by light microscopy, and the myocardial ultrastructure was examined in left ventricle papillary muscle. After 60 days the UFA-rich diet did not change myocardial function. However, it caused high lipid hydroperoxide (176 ± 5 vs 158 ± 5, P < 0.0005 and low catalase (7 ± 1 vs 9 ± 1, P < 0.005 and superoxide-dismutase (18 ± 2 vs 27 ± 5, P < 0.005 levels, and discrete morphological changes in UFA-rich diet hearts such as lipid deposits and mitochondrial membrane alterations compared to control rats. These data show that a UFA-rich diet caused myocardial oxidative stress and mild structural alterations, but did not change mechanical function.

  18. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-[ 14 C]palmitate to 14 CO 2 and total [ 14 C]acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO 2 and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 μM). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 μM and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine

  19. Effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites and rumen fatty acids in Sannan Lactating dairy goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Safari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites, rumen and blood plasma fatty acids concentrations twelve Sannan dairy goats with 30 ± 5 days in milk (DIM were allocated to 3 treatments in a 3×2 change over design with 2 periods of 30 days. Treatments were: 1 the control (without fish oil, 2 microencapsulated fish oil (2% fish oil capsulated in 6% treated whey protein concentrate, 3 fish oil (2% fish oil and 6% whey protein concentrate. Concentration of C18:0 in the rumen for microencapsulated fish oil decreased significantly in comparison with the control. The same manner was observed in goat’s blood plasma for microencapsulated fish oil. Microencapsulated fish oil led to a significant increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids concentration, hence concentration of C18:3, C20:5 EPA, C22:5 DPA and C22:6 DHA as a source of ω3 fatty acids increased 10, 20, 10 and 13 folds in comparison with the control and 10, 20, 2 and 2.5 folds in comparison with the fish oil treatment, respectively. HDL concentration in protected fish oil was significantly higher than that for the control and unprotected fish oil treatments. It seems that fish oil supplementation caused significant changes in blood fatty acids composition of ruminants as well as ω3 fatty acids in their products. Significant increase of ω3 fatty acids in blood plasma of microencapsulated fish oil treatment showed the protective effect of capsulation against rumen microbial biohydrogenation.

  20. Skeletal Effects of the Saturated 3-Thia Fatty Acid Tetradecylthioacetic Acid in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Kamilla Stunes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the skeletal effects of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARpan agonist tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA. Rats, without (Study I and with ovariectomy (OVX or sham operation (Study II, were given TTA or vehicle daily for 4 months. Bone markers in plasma, whole body and femoral bone mineral density and content (BMD and BMC, and body composition were examined. Histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses (Study I and biomechanical and μCT analyses (Study II of the femur were performed. Normal rats fed TTA had higher femoral BMD and increased total and cortical area in femur compared to controls. The ovariectomized groups had decreased BMD and impaired microarchitecture parameters compared to SHAM. However, the TTA OVX group maintained femoral BMC, trabecular thickness in the femoral head, and cortical volume in the femoral metaphysis as SHAM. TTA might increase BMD and exert a light preventive effect on estrogen-related bone loss in rats.

  1. Fatty Acid Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System and the Effect on Food Intake and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaan S. Naughton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR are a current research focus in the area of obesity due to the system’s role in food intake and glucose and lipid metabolism. Importantly, overweight and obese individuals often have higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG and an altered pattern of receptor expression. Consequently, this leads to an increase in orexigenic stimuli, changes in fatty acid synthesis, insulin sensitivity, and glucose utilisation, with preferential energy storage in adipose tissue. As endocannabinoids are products of dietary fats, modification of dietary intake may modulate their levels, with eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid based endocannabinoids being able to displace arachidonic acid from cell membranes, reducing AEA and 2-AG production. Similarly, oleoyl ethanolamide, a product of oleic acid, induces satiety, decreases circulating fatty acid concentrations, increases the capacity for β-oxidation, and is capable of inhibiting the action of AEA and 2-AG in adipose tissue. Thus, understanding how dietary fats alter endocannabinoid system activity is a pertinent area of research due to public health messages promoting a shift towards plant-derived fats, which are rich sources of AEA and 2-AG precursor fatty acids, possibly encouraging excessive energy intake and weight gain.

  2. Effects of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, EPA and DHA, on hematological malignancies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloudizargari, Milad; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Adcock, Ian M; Redegeld, Frank A; Garssen, Johan

    2018-02-20

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have well established anti-cancer properties. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are among this biologically active family of macromolecules for which various anti-cancer effects have been explained. These PUFAs have a high safety profile and can induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo , following a partially selective manner. They also increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents by increasing the sensitivity of different cell lines to specific anti-neoplastic drugs. Various mechanisms have been proposed for the anti-cancer effects of these omega-3 PUFAs; however, the exact mechanisms still remain unknown. While numerous studies have investigated the effects of DHA and EPA on solid tumors and the responsible mechanisms, there is no consensus regarding the effects and mechanisms of action of these two FAs in hematological malignancies. Here, we performed a systematic review of the beneficial effects of EPA and DHA on hematological cell lines as well as the findings of related in vivo studies and clinical trials. We summarize the key underlying mechanisms and the therapeutic potential of these PUFAs in the treatment of hematological cancers. Differential expression of apoptosis-regulating genes and Glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gp-x4), varying abilities of different cancerous and healthy cells to metabolize EPA into its more active metabolites and to uptake PUFAS are among the major factors that determine the sensitivity of cells to DHA and EPA. Considering the abundance of data on the safety of these FAs and their proven anti-cancer effects in hematological cell lines and the lack of related human studies, further research is warranted to find ways of exploiting the anticancer effects of DHA and EPA in clinical settings both in isolation and in combination with other therapeutic regimens.

  3. Intake of Fish and Omega-3 (N-3) Fatty Acid: Effect on Humans during Actual and Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has many negative effects on human physiology, including bone and muscle loss. These are some of the systems on which intakes of fish and n-3 fatty acids have positive effects. These effects are likely to occur through inhibition of inflammatory cytokines (such as TNFalpha) and thus inhibition of downstream NF-KB activation. We documented this effect in a 3D cell culture model, where NF-KB activation in osteoclasts was inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 fatty acid. We have extended these studies and report here (a) NF-KB expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Space Shuttle crews on 2-wk missions, (b) the effects of n-3 fatty acid intake after 60 d of bed rest (a weightlessness analog), and (c) the effects of fish intake in astronauts after 4 to 6 mo on the International Space Station. After Shuttle flights of 2 wk, NFKB p65 expression at landing was increased (P less than 0.001). After 60 d of bed rest, higher intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with less N-telopeptide excretion (Pearson r = -0.62, P less than 0.05). Higher consumption of fish during flight was associated with higher bone mineral density (Pearson r = -0.46, P less than 0.05). Together with our earlier findings, these data provide mechanistic cellular and preliminary human evidence of the potential for n-3 fatty acids to counteract bone loss associated with spaceflight. This study was supported by the NASA Human Research Program.

  4. Effect of Nitrogen and biological Fertilizers on Seed Yield and Fatty acid Composition of Sesame cultivars under Yazd conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shakeri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of different levels of nitrogen fertilizer and biofertilizers Azotobacter sp. and Azosprillum sp. on seed yield, oil yield and its percent and fatty acid composition in three sesame (Sesamum indicum L. cultivars an experiment was conducted using splite plot factorial arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural and Natural Resources Reasearch Center of Yazd in 2009 cropping season. The treatments included : cultivars ( Darab-14, Jiroft and Yazdi assigned to main plots, nitrogen fertilizer (0, 25 and 50 kg ha-1 and biofertilizer (inoculation and no-inoculation as factorial were randomized in sub-plots. Oil percent was measured using the Soxhlet method and fatty acid composition was measured using GC method. Results showed the significant differenc among three varieties concerning seed yield, oil yield and four fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, palmetic and stearis acid. Seed yield, oil yield, Oleic, Linolenic and Arasshidic acid significantly increased with applying N fertilizer. Seed yield, oil yield and linolenic acid percent significantly increased with applying biofertilizer. Oleic acid percent had negative and significant correlation with Linoleic acid (r = -0.759** and stearic acid (r=-0.774** percent. Generally, results showed the importance of applying biofertilizers against chemical fertilizers to protect the environment from harmful chemical pollution.

  5. Effect of L-carnitine on fatty acid oxidation of the muscle in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siami, G.; Clinton, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-01-01

    Muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on long term hemodialysis (HD). Carnitine (C) is important for transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. The kidney is a major site of C biosynthesis which may be compromised in ESRD. C is lost during dialysis and is reduced in plasma and muscle. Although the cause of muscle weakness is multifactorial, the effect of supplemental C was tested on a group of ESRD patients on HD. C (1 gm I.V. 3 x/wk) or placebo was given to HD patients for 6 months. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after C supplementation and from control subjects. Muscle pathology was examined by histochemical light microscopy. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by homogenate of the biopsied muscle was measured using [ 14 C] palmitate. Plasma aluminum (AL) and parthyroid hormone (PTH) were also measured and patients were evaluated for the degree of muscle weakness. All Pts had abnormal muscle pathology and C supplementation did not improve it. FAO by 3 HD Pts who had received placebo was 639 +/- 285 (S.D.) dpm/mg protein while control subjects were 1487 +/- 267 and was statistically different (p < .003). FAO by 8 HD Pts receiving C was not different from placebo. Addition of C in vitro stimulated FAO 70 to 80%, but there was not difference between groups. The degree of FAO was inversely correlated with the severity of the muscle pathology, and was directly correlated with the concentration of C in muscle. Pts with high plasma AL had lower FAO, but there was no correlation between FAO and PTH

  6. Effect of Roasting on Fatty Acid Profile of Brown and Yellow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To monitor changes in fatty acid profiles of brown and yellow varieties of flaxseeds in the raw and roasted states using gas chromatography .... The ratio of SFAs to USFAs is a useful index to measure edible oil quality. ..... roasting, powdering and storing irradiated soybeans on hydrocarbon detection for identifying ...

  7. The effect of oxygen on fatty acid composition of soil micromycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirout, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, June (2015), s. 125-128 ISSN 1470-160X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP504/12/P752 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil micromycetes * oxygen depletion * fatty acids Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.190, year: 2015

  8. In vitro effect of C2-C18 fatty acids salmonellas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savka, Oksana; Skřivanová, E.; Marounek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2004), s. 199-202 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/02/0460 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : fatty acids Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  9. Effect of n-3 and n-6 fatty acid supplementation on fetal, gestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-18

    Jul 18, 2011 ... Essential fatty acids (EFAs) include two series of prostaglandin ... functions such as ovulation, luteolysis and parturition. Actions of PGF2α are ..... cations vary according to the type of polyunsaturated fat and the ratio of n-6: n-3 ...

  10. Effects of microencapsulation on bioavailability of fish oil omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten B; Yang, Mingshi; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Increased research interest in the health benefits of fish oils and the wide publicity of these studies have led to the marketing and launch of a wide array of new and traditional food and beverage products enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. This chapter focuses on the impact of microencapsulation...

  11. The effect of n-3 fatty acids on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecký, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S93-S118 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13763 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : diabetes * obesity * inflammation * metabolic syndrome * omega-3 fatty acids Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  12. Effects of β-carotene on the thermal oxidation of fatty acids | Zeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    β-Carotene is one of the most important fat soluble pigment with well known antioxidant and provitamin A activities. It is used in industries as food colorant and a source of vitamin A. The thermal induced degradation during processing leads to color and properties losses. The thermal stability of the fatty acids composition of ...

  13. The effect of environmental factors on fatty acid composition of Chromera velia (Chromeridae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Martin; Giordano, Mario; Prášil, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2017), s. 1791-1799 ISSN 0921-8971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15728S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chromera velia * Chromeridae * Fatty acids Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.616, year: 2016

  14. Effect of trans fatty acid intake on LC-MS and NMR plasma profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Rago, Daniela; Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of high levels of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) has been related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and sudden cardiac death but the causal mechanisms are not well known. In this study, NMR and LC-MS untargeted metabolomics has been used as an approach to explore the impact...

  15. Effects of rough handling on short chain fatty acid production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of stress due to rough handling (RH) on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) environmental pH, concentration of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and modulatory roles of two Lactobacillus strains was investigated in broiler chickens. Equal number of chicks was randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups; ...

  16. Effects of β-carotene on the thermal oxidation of fatty acids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alamzeb

    food colorant and a source of vitamin A, the thermally induced ... temperature of the heating block was set to 110°C for 1 to 14 h. The samples were ... After cooling, phases were separated using water ... saturated fatty acid in different oil behaves relatively ..... of lutein and zeaxanthin in corn germ oil, corn fiber oil and corn.

  17. The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on central nervous system remyelination in fat-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Elise; Paul, Friedemann; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2017-01-24

    There is a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are capable of modulating immune function. Some studies have shown that these PUFAs might have a beneficial effect in patients suffering form multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). This could be due to increased n-3 PUFA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. In the present study we tested the effect of an endogenously increased n-3 PUFA status on cuprizone-induced CNS demyelination and remyelination in fat-1 mice versus their wild-type (wt) littermates. Fat-1 mice express an n-3 desaturase, which allows them to convert n-6 PUFAs into n-3 PUFAs. CNS lipid profiles in fat-1 mice showed a significant increase of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels but similar docosahexaenoic acid levels compared to wt littermates. This was also reflected in significantly higher levels of monohydroxy EPA metabolites such as 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) in fat-1 brain tissue. Feeding fat-1 mice and wt littermates 0.2% cuprizone for 5 weeks caused a similar degree of CNS demyelination in both groups; remyelination was increased in the fat-1 group after a recovery period of 2 weeks. However, at p = 0.07 this difference missed statistical significance. These results indicate that n-3 PUFAs might have a role in promotion of remyelination after toxic injury to CNS oligodendrocytes. This might occur either via modulation of the immune system or via a direct effect on oligodendrocytes or neurons through EPA-derived lipid metabolites such as 18-HEPE.

  18. The combination of vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids has an enhanced anti-inflammatory effect on microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtys, E.; Eisel, U. L. M.; Verkuyl, J. M.; Broersen, L. M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; de Vries, E. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common phenomenon in the pathology of many brain diseases. In this paper we explore whether selected vitamins and fatty acids known to modulate inflammation exert an effect on microglia, the key cell type involved in neuroinflammation. Previously these nutrients have been

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Rate and Regrowth Interval on Perennial Ryegrass Fatty Acid Content during the Growing Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkowska, I.M.; Wever, C.J.G.; Gort, G.; Elgersma, A.

    2008-01-01

    The content of fatty acids (FA) in herbage is important for forage quality and animal-source foods, but there is a lack of knowledge on effects of agronomic practices, and on environmental factors related to seasonal variation in FA concentrations and FA composition. This research investigated the

  20. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Iacobazzi, Francesco [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Bari, Piazza Giulio Cesare 11, Policlinico, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Liu, Aiping [ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Longo, Nicola, E-mail: Nicola.Longo@hsc.utah.edu [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  1. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Liu, Aiping; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP + ) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP + accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [ 14 C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [ 14 C]O 2 release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency

  2. Curcumin improves alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang; Ma, Jingfan; Zhong, Qionghong; Zhao, Mengyuan; Hu, Tianxing; Chen, Tong; Qiu, Longxin; Wen, Longping

    2017-08-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a threat to human health. It has been long known that abstinence from alcohol is the most effective therapy, other effective therapies are not available for the treatment in humans. Curcumin has a great potential for anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, but the effect on metabolic reconstruction remains little known. Here we performed metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and explored ethanol pathogenic insight as well as curcumin action pattern. We identified seventy-one metabolites in mouse liver. Carbohydrates and lipids were characteristic categories. Pathway analysis results revealed that ethanol-induced pathways including biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid biosynthesis and pentose and glucuronate interconversions were suppressed by curcumin. Additionally, ethanol enhanced galactose metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. Glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism and pyruvate metabolism were inhibited in mice fed ethanol diet plus curcumin. Stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid were disease biomarkers and therapical biomarkers. These results reflect the landscape of hepatic metabolism regulation. Our findings illustrate ethanol pathological pathway and metabolic mechanism of curcumin therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Trimethylamine (fishy odor) adsorption by biomaterials: effect of fatty acids, alkanes, and aromatic compounds in waxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraphech, Phattara; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2015-03-02

    Thirteen plant leaf materials were selected to be applied as dried biomaterial adsorbents for polar gaseous trimethylamine (TMA) adsorption. Biomaterial adsorbents were efficient in adsorbing gaseous TMA up to 100% of total TMA (100 ppm) within 24 h. Sansevieria trifasciata is the most effective plant leaf material while Plerocarpus indicus was the least effective in TMA adsorption. Activated carbon (AC) was found to be lower potential adsorbent to adsorb TMA when compared to biomaterial adsorbents. As adsorption data, the Langmuir isotherm supported that the gaseous TMA adsorbed monolayer on the adsorbent surface and was followed pseudo-second order kinetic model. Wax extracted from plant leaf could also adsorb gaseous TMA up to 69% of total TMA within 24 h. Another 27-63% of TMA was adsorbed by cellulose and lignin that naturally occur in high amounts in plant leaf. Subsequently, the composition appearing in biomaterial wax showed a large quantity of short-chain fatty acids (≤C18) especially octadecanoic acid (C18), and short-chain alkanes (C12-C18) as well as total aromatic components dominated in the wax, which affected TMA adsorption. Hence, it has been demonstrated that plant biomaterial is a superior biosorbent for TMA removal.

  4. A review on effects of conjugated linoleic fatty acid (CLA) upon body composition and energetic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnen, Tatiana Ederich; da Silva, Marcondes Ramos; Camacho, Augusto; Marcadenti, Aline; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is highly found in fats from ruminants and it appears to favorably modify the body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. The capacity of CLA to reduce the body fat levels as well as its benefic actions on glycemic profile, atherosclerosis and cancer has already been proved in experimental models. Furthermore, CLA supplementation may modulate the immune function, help re-synthetize of glycogen and potentiate the bone mineralization. CLA supplementation also could increase the lipolysis and reduce the accumulation of fatty acids on the adipose tissue; the putative mechanisms involved may be its action in reducing the lipase lipoprotein activity and to increase the carnitine-palmitoil-transferase-1 (CAT-1) activity, its interaction with PPARγ, and to raise the expression of UCP-1. Although studies made in human have shown some benefits of CLA supplementation as the weight loss, the results are still discordant. Moreover, some have shown adverse effects, such as negative effects on glucose metabolism and lipid profile. The purpose of this article is to review the available data regarding the benefits of CLA on the energetic metabolism and body composition, emphasizing action mechanisms.

  5. Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA and α-linolenic acid (LNA for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05 the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3 concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05 decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6 and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05 upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.

  6. Effect of chitosan enriched with lycopene coating on fatty acid profile and fat oxidation parameters of rainbow trout fillet during refrigerated storage(orginal reserch article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Samane Naghibi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fish are the major dietary source of the polyunsaturated fatty acid for humans. Therefore, protection of fish against all types of oxidative corruption seems to be necessary. Lycopene is the source of natural antioxidant. The present study was conducted to evaluate antioxidant properties of lycopene (using the method of DPPH and the combined effect of its various doses (1.5 and 3% and chitosan on fat oxidation parameters and fatty acids composition of Rainbow trout fillet. The analysis was performed after 0, 8 and 16 days of storage of the samples at 4°C to determine peroxide value (PV and free fatty acid content (FFA. In addition, fatty acid compositions was determined by Gas chromatography assay. In control treatment, the fatty acid composition of Rainbow trout fillet was consisted of %20.6±0.03 saturated fatty acids (SFA, %43.81±0.04 monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA and %32.83±0.03 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in 0 day. Statistical analysis showed that there were fewer changes in PV, FFA and proportion of fatty acids between chitosan and lycopene-chitosan treatment in regard to control sample during 16 days of refrigeration storage. Chitosan coated samples enriched with lycopene exhibited less rapidly lipid damages than all the other samples (p

  7. Effect of Supplementation of Branched Chain Fatty Acid on Colony of Ruminal Bacteria and Cell of Protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Suryapratama

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the potential of branched-chain volatile fatty acids (isobutyric, α-methylbutyric and β-methylbutiric that supplemented into the diet on the colony of ruminal bacteria and the cell of protozoa population. Five progeny Friesian Holstein males with initial weight 348±29 kg were used in a 5x5 Latin square design (30-d periods. The basal diet composed of 55% forage and 45% concentrate containing 10.5 MJ ME/kg and 15% crude protein (CP. There were five dietary treatments where A: basal diet, B: A+139 mg urea/kg W0.75, C: B+28 mg CaSO4/kg W0.75, D: C+0.05 mM isobutyric acid+0.05 mM β-methylbutyric acid, and E: D+0.05 mM α-methylbutyric acid. Rearing period was 30 days, consists of feed adaptation period 20 days, then growth observation was done within the last 10 days. Collection of ruminal fluid was done within the last day of observation period, and took 3-4 h after the feeding. The results showed that supplementation branched chain volatile fatty acids did not significant affect on the number of colonies of bacteria and protozoa population, but the significant effect (P<0.05 on the concentration of branched chain volatile fatty acids in the rumen fluid. The supplementation of α-methylbutyric (P <0.05 decreased of concentration of isobutyric and isovaleric in rumen fluid than the other treatments. It is concluded that supplementation of branched chain volatile fatty acids not used by rumen bacteria for their growth but for the elongation of fatty acid synthesis. The supplementation of branched chain volatile fatty acids was 0.05 mM not enough strong influence on the growth of colony of rumen bacteria. (Animal Production 11(2: 129-134 (2009 Key Words: rumen fermentation, branched-chain fatty acid, ruminal bacteria, protozoa

  8. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    ) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement......The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2...

  9. ω-3 Fatty acids reverse lipotoxity through induction of autophagy in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Tianlian; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease concerning hepatocyte lipid accumulation as well as apoptosis induced by free fatty acids (FFAs) and to explore the underlying mechanism involving autophagy. Hepatocytes were incubated with a mixture of free fatty acids (FFAs) to mimic in vitro lipotoxicity in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, presented by lipid accumulation and cellular apoptosis. Chemical inhibitor or inducer of autophagy and genetic deficit cells, as well as ω-3 fatty acids were used as intervention. The autophagic role of ω-3 fatty acids was investigated using Western blot and immunofluorescence. The underlying mechanism of ω-3 fatty acids involving autophagy was preliminarily explored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. FFAs induce lipid accumulation and apoptosis in hepatocytes. Inhibition or genetic defect of autophagy increases lipid accumulation induced by FFA, whereas induction acts inversely. ω-3 Fatty acids reduced lipid accumulation and inhibited apoptosis induced by FFA. ω-3 Fatty acids induced autophagy by downregulating stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 expression in hepatocytes. ω-3 Fatty acids exert protective effects on hepatocytes against lipotoxicity through induction of autophagy, as demonstrated by inhibition of lipid accumulation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Can polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster alter the effects of fish oil supplementation on plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profiles? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Suzanne J; Li, Yuchun; Zhang, Guicheng; Heaton, Alexandra E M; D'Vaz, Nina; Manz, Judith; Reischl, Eva; Koletzko, Berthold V; Prescott, Susan L; Simmer, Karen

    2017-09-19

    The enzymes encoded by fatty acid desaturases (FADS) genes determine the desaturation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). We investigated if haplotype and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FADS gene cluster can influence LCPUFA status in infants who received either fish oil or placebo supplementation. Children enrolled in the Infant Fish Oil Supplementation Study (IFOS) were randomly allocated to receive either fish oil or placebo from birth to 6 months of age. Blood was collected at 6 months of age for the measurement of fatty acids and for DNA extraction. A total of 276 participant DNA samples underwent genotyping, and 126 erythrocyte and 133 plasma fatty acid measurements were available for analysis. Twenty-two FADS SNPs were selected on the basis of literature and linkage disequilibrium patterns identified from the HapMap data. Haplotype construction was completed using PHASE. For participants allocated to the fish oil group who had two copies of the FADS1 haplotype consisting of SNP minor alleles, DHA levels were significantly higher compared to other haplotypes. This finding was not observed for the placebo group. Furthermore, for members of the fish oil group only, the minor homozygous carriers of all the FADS1 SNPs investigated had significantly higher DHA than other genotypes (rs174545, rs174546, rs174548, rs174553, rs174556, rs174537, rs174448, and rs174455). Overall results of this preliminary study suggest that supplementation with fish oil may only significantly increase DHA in minor allele carriers of FADS1 SNPs. Further research is required to confirm this novel finding.

  11. Corn oil versus lard: Metabolic effects of omega-3 fatty acids in mice fed obesogenic diets with different fatty acid composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlišová, Jana; Bardová, Kristina; Staňková, B.; Tvrzická, E.; Kopecký, Jan; Rossmeisl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 124, May (2016), s. 150-162 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00871S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09347S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Omega-3 fatty acids * hepatic steatosis * obesity * insulin resistance * Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  12. Investigation of the effects of the fatty acid profile on fuel properties using a multi-criteria decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Muhammad Aminul; Brown, Richard J.; Brooks, P.R.; Jahirul, M.I.; Bockhorn, H.; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Long chain mono-unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1, C18:1) have positive impact on CN. • Very long chain unsaturated fatty acids (C20:5, C22:5, C22:6) increase the fuel density and decrease the cetane number. • Calculated CN overestimated the impact of very long chain unsaturated fatty acids. - Abstract: The structural features of fatty acids in biodiesel, including degree of unsaturation, percentage of saturated fatty acids and average chain length, influence important fuel properties such as cetane number, iodine value, density, kinematic viscosity, higher heating value and oxidation stability. The composition of fatty acid esters within the fuel should therefore be in the correct ratio to ensure fuel properties are within international biodiesel standards such as ASTM 6751 or EN 14214. This study scrutinises the influence of fatty acid composition and individual fatty acids on fuel properties. Fuel properties were estimated based on published equations, and measured according to standard procedure ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 to confirm the influences of the fatty acid profile. Based on fatty acid profile-derived calculations, the cetane number of the microalgal biodiesel was estimated to be 11.6, but measured 46.5, which emphasises the uncertainty of the method used for cetane number calculation. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), PROMETHEE–GAIA, was used to determine the influence of individual fatty acids on fuel properties in the GAIA plane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids increased the iodine value and had a negative influence on cetane number. Kinematic viscosity was negatively influenced by some long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as C20:5 and C22:6 and some of the more common saturated fatty acids C14:0 and C18:0. The positive impact of average chain length on higher heating value was also confirmed in the GAIA plane

  13. The effect of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids on acute reflux esophagitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ze-Hao; Xie, Jing-Jing; Wei, Jing-Jing; Tang, Du-Peng; Yang, Li-Yong

    2016-10-04

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play various roles in inflammation. However, the effect of PUFAs in the development of reflux esophagitis (RE) is unclear. This study is to investigate the potential effect of n-3/n-6 PUFAs on acute RE in rats along with the underlying protective mechanisms. Forty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 in each group). RE model was established by pyloric clip and section ligation. Fish oil- and soybean oil-based fatty emulsion (n-3 and n-6 groups), or normal saline (control and sham operation groups) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h prior to surgery and 24 h postoperatively (2 mL/kg, respectively). The expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, IL-6 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in esophageal tissues were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry after 72 h. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression in the esophageal tissues were determined to assess the oxidative stress. The mildest macroscopic/microscopic esophagitis was found in the n-3 group (P < 0.05). The expression of IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6 and MyD88 were increased in all RE groups, while the lowest and highest expression were found in n-3 and n-6 group, respectively (P < 0.05). The MDA levels were increased in all groups (P < 0.05), in an ascending trend from n-3, n-6 groups to control group. The lowest and highest SOD levels were found in the control and n-3 group, respectively (P < 0.05). n-3 PUFAs may reduce acute RE in rats, which may be due to inhibition of the MyD88-NF-kB pathway and limit oxidative damage.

  14. Effect of Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate on Anthocyanin Composition, Fatty Acids, and Volatile Compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L. Grape Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lun Ju

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The anthocyanin composition, fatty acids, and volatile aromas are important for Cabernet Sauvignon grape quality. This study evaluated the effect of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA on the anthocyanin composition, fatty acids, lipoxygenase activity, and the volatile compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon grape berries. Exogenous ABA and MeJA improved the content of total anthocyanins (TAC and individual anthocyanins. Lipoxygenase (LOX activity also increased after treatment. Furthermore, 16 fatty acids were detected. The linoleic acid concentration gradually increased with ABA concentration. The fatty acid content decreased with increasing MeJA concentration and then increased again, with the exception of linoleic acid. After exogenous ABA and MeJA treatment, the C6 aroma content increased significantly. Interestingly, the exogenous ABA and MeJA treatments improved mainly the content of 1-hexanol, hexanal, and 2-heptanol. These results provide insight into the effect of plant hormones on wine grapes, which is useful for grape quality improvement.

  15. Effect of processing on nutrients and fatty acid composition of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tanu; Grover, Kiran; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2016-12-15

    Garden cress seeds were undergone for different processing methods and analyzed for its nutritional composition. Effect of processing on nutrient retention was evaluated to attain the best processed form of seeds with maximum amount of nutrients. Soaking improved protein and ash by 2.10 and 2.48 percent respectively. Boiling improved fat and fibre by 1.66 and 8.32 percent respectively. Maximum retention of iron and zinc was found with roasting. It also improved calcium by 3.18 percent. Percent ionizable iron and bioavailability was found maximum with boiling (13.59 and 6.88% respectively). In vitro starch and protein digestibility were found maximum on boiling (57.98 and 32.39% respectively) with a decrease of 9.65 and 14.13 percent in phytin phosphorus and oxalate respectively. Amino acids and fatty acids were decreased with heat treatment and maximum retention was found with soaking. Overall improvement in nutrient composition and maximum nutrient retention was found with boiling method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2017-11-02

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and CVDs has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of CVDs, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese/overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of CVD risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in CVDs and metabolic syndrome.

  17. Effects of fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on product quality and fatty acids of goat milk yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Chen, Han; Chen, Hui; Ding, Wu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on the product quality of goat milk yogurt using traditional yogurt starter was studied through single-factor experiments and orthogonal experiments. The optimum fermentation condition was evaluated by the titratable acidity of goat milk yogurt, water-retaining capability, sensory score, and texture properties; the fatty acids of the fermented goat milk were determined by a gas chromatograph. Results indicate that high product quality of goat milk yogurt can be obtained and the content of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids can be decreased significantly when amount of sugar added was 7%, inoculation amount was 3%, the ratio of 3 lactic acid bacteria--Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and L. rhamnosus GG--was 1:1:3, and fermentation temperature was 42°C. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the cytoskeleton: an open-label intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simone; Willers, Janina; Riecker, Sabine; Möller, Katharina; Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Hahn, Andreas

    2015-02-14

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) show beneficial effects on cardiovascular health and cognitive functions, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Because of the fact that cytoskeleton dynamics affect almost every cellular process, the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics could be a new pathway by which n-3 PUFAs exert their effects on cellular level. A 12-week open-label intervention study with 12 healthy men was conducted to determine the effects of 2.7 g/d n-3 PUFA on changes in mRNA expression of cytoskeleton-associated genes by quantitative real-time PCR in whole blood. Furthermore, the actin content in red blood cells was analyzed by immunofluorescence imaging. N-3 PUFA supplementation resulted in a significant down-regulation of cytoskeleton-associated genes, in particular three GTPases (RAC1, RHOA, CDC42), three kinases (ROCK1, PAK2, LIMK), two Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins (WASL, WASF2) as well as actin related protein 2/3 complex (ARPC2, ARPC3) and cofilin (CFL1). Variability in F-actin content between subjects was high; reduced actin content was only reduced within group evaluation. Reduced cytoskeleton-associated gene expression after n-3 PUFA supplementation suggests that regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics might be an additional way by which n-3 PUFAs exert their cellular effects. Concerning F-actin, this analysis did not reveal unmistakable results impeding a generalized conclusion.

  19. Effect of high-dose growth hormone and glutamine on body composition, urine creatinine excretion, fatty acid absorption, and essential fatty acids status in short bowel patients - A randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P.B.; Szkudlarek, J.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2001-01-01

    Background: Positive effects of high dose growth hormone and glutamine (GH+GLN) on body composition in short bowel patients have been described. Lack of effects on intestinal absorption found in some studies has been ascribed to concomitant essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency. This study...... describes changes in body weight (BW) and composition, 24-h urine creatinine excretion, intestinal fatty acid absorption (total, saturated, unsaturated and EFA), and EFA status in relation to treatment with GH+GLN in s short bowel patients. Methods: A double-blind, crossover study between placebo and growth...... with baseline. Twenty-four-hour urine creatinine excretion did not differ between study periods. No changes in intestinal absorption of fatty acids were seen, and no changes in EFAs measured in plasma phospholipids were observed. Only 1 of 8 patients, who did not receive parenteral lipids, had a Holman index...

  20. Effect of Copper on Fatty-Acid Composition and Peroxidation of Lipids in the Roots of Copper Tolerant and Sensitive Silene-Cucubalus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, C.H.R.; TenBookum, W.M.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H.; De Kok, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of high copper exposure in vivo on the lipid and fatty acid composition and lipid peroxidation was studied in the roots of plants from one copper sensitive and two copper tolerant genotypes of Silene cucubalus. At 0.5 muM Cu (control treatment) the compositions of lipids and fatty acids

  1. FFAR4 (GPR120) signaling is not required for anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, Simone Isling; Andersen, Marianne Agerholm; Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor-4 (FFAR4), also known as GPR120, has been reported to mediate the beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs) by inducing an anti-inflammatory immune response. Thus, activation of FFAR4 has been reported to ameliorate chronic low-grade inflammation...

  2. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Levels in Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease : The Alpha Omega Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borst, Martin H.; Baia, Leandro C.; Hoogeveen, Ellen K.; Giltay, Erik J.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Kromhout, Daan; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid consumption has been inversely associated with FGF23 levels and with cardiovascular risk. We examined the effect of marine n-3 fatty acids

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids upregulate adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Tlusty, Michael F.; Benton, Jeannie L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play crucial roles in the development and function of the central nervous system. These components, which must be obtained from dietary sources, have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the presence of omega-6 fatty acids may interfere with omega-3 fatty acid metabolism. The present study investigated whether changes in dietary ratios of omega-3:omega-6 fatty acids influence neurogenesis in the lobster (Homarus america...

  4. Effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on the pattern of oxylipins: a short review about the modulation of hydroxy-, dihydroxy-, and epoxy-fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2017-07-19

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the intake of the long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n3-PUFA) eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 n3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n3, DHA) is linked to beneficial health effects, particularly in the prevention of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Although the molecular mode of action of n3-PUFA is still not fully understood, it is not controversial that a significant portion of the (patho)-physiological effects of PUFA are mediated by their oxidative metabolites, i.e. eicosanoids and other oxylipins. Quantitative targeted oxylipin methods allow the comprehensive monitoring of n3-PUFA supplementation induced changes in the pattern of oxylipins in order to understand their biology. In this short review, results from intervention studies are summarized analyzing >30 oxylipins from different PUFAs in response to n3-PUFA supplementation. The results are not only qualitatively compared with respect to the study design, n3-PUFA dose and trends in the lipid mediators, but also quantitatively based on the relative change in the oxylipin level induced by n3-PUFA. The evaluation of the data from the studies shows that the change in oxylipins generally corresponded to the observed changes in their precursor PUFA, i.e. the lower the individual n3-status at the baseline, the higher the increase in EPA and DHA derived oxylipins. The strongest relative increases were found for EPA derived oxylipins, while changes in arachidonic acid (C20:4 n6, ARA) derived eicosanoids were heterogeneous. After 3-12 weeks of supplementation, similar relative changes were observed in free and total (free + esterified) oxylipins in plasma and serum. Regarding EPA derived oxylipins, the results indicate a trend for a linear increase with dose. However, the interpretation of the quantitative oxylipin patterns between studies is hampered by strong inter-individual variances in oxylipin levels between and also within the studies. In the

  5. Effect of Whole-Body X-Irradiation of the Synthesis of Individual Fatty Acids in Liver Slices from Normal and Fasted Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Hansen, Lisbeth Grænge; Faber, M.

    1965-01-01

    (1) Using (2-14C) acetate and (1-14C) butyrate as precursors, rat-liver fatty acids were synthesized in vitro and assayed by paper chromatography. (2) Whole-body x-irradiation induced a change in the synthetic pattern of hepatic fatty acids towards a relatively enhanced synthesis of palmitic acid....... (3) X-irradiation and fasting seem to have opposite effects on fatty-acid synthesis. X-irradiation counteracts the drop in total synthesis and the relatively enhanced synthesis of palmitoleic acid induced by fasting. The relative enhancement of palmitic-acid synthesis mentioned under (2) stands...... in contrast to the effect of fasting, which specifically decreases the hepatic synthesis of palmitic acid. (4) There is a general similarity between corresponding fatty-acid patterns based on synthesis from (2-14C) acetate and (1-14C) butyrate, respectively....

  6. Fatty Acid Oxidation Compensates for Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Warburg Effect in Glucose-Deprived Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Raulien

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes enter sites of microbial or sterile inflammation as the first line of defense of the immune system and initiate pro-inflammatory effector mechanisms. We show that activation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces them to undergo a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis, similar to the Warburg effect observed in cancer cells. At sites of inflammation, however, glucose concentrations are often drastically decreased, which prompted us to study monocyte function under conditions of glucose deprivation and abrogated Warburg effect. Experiments using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer revealed that limited glucose supply shifts monocyte metabolism toward oxidative phosphorylation, fueled largely by fatty acid oxidation at the expense of lipid droplets. While this metabolic state appears to provide sufficient energy to sustain functional properties like cytokine secretion, migration, and phagocytosis, it cannot prevent a rise in the AMP/ATP ratio and a decreased respiratory burst. The molecular trigger mediating the metabolic shift and the functional consequences is activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Taken together, our results indicate that monocytes are sufficiently metabolically flexible to perform pro-inflammatory functions at sites of inflammation despite glucose deprivation and inhibition of the LPS-induced Warburg effect. AMPK seems to play a pivotal role in orchestrating these processes during glucose deprivation in monocytes.

  7. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Structural and Functional Effects on the Vascular Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Zanetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. Increasing evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of n-3 PUFA on arterial wall properties is progressively emerging. We reviewed the recent available evidence for the cardiovascular effects of n-3 PUFA focusing on structural and functional properties of the vascular wall. In experimental studies and clinical trials n-3 PUFA have shown the ability to improve arterial hemodynamics by reducing arterial stiffness, thus explaining some of its cardioprotective properties. Recent studies suggest beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA on endothelial activation, which are likely to improve vascular function. Several molecular, cellular, and physiological pathways influenced by n-3 PUFA can affect arterial wall properties and therefore interfere with the atherosclerotic process. Although the relative weight of different physiological and molecular mechanisms and the dose-response on arterial wall properties have yet to be determined, n-3 PUFA have the potential to beneficially impact arterial wall remodeling and cardiovascular outcomes by targeting arterial wall stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

  8. Effect of acute postinfusion lipemia and free fatty acids on myocardial contractility: Assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, L; Freeman, M L; Barnes, W E; Kaplan, E; Pacold, I; Loeb, H S; Johnson, B; Reid, R W

    1986-08-01

    Equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography was used to valuate the effect of intravenous fat-emulsion overload and excess of free fatty acids (FFA) on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in 20 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen of these patients had normal (>50%) baseline LVEF and 5 had low (<50%) baseline LVEF. From 100 to 150 ml of 20% artificial fat emulsion (Liposyn) was infused over 20-25 min. At the end of the infusion, triglyceridemia reached 820 +- 220 mg% and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from baseline 62 +- 19% (mean +-SD) to 58 +- 16% (P < 0.05, paired t-test). After completion of Liposyn infusion, 5,000 U of heparin was administered intravenously and monitoring of LVEF was continued. One and one-half hours following heparin administration, plasma FFA levels reached 3.7 + 2.0 mmol/l and LVEF rose to 69 +- 19% (P < 0.001, paired t-test). Our data indicate that acute intravenous fat overload can suppress and high pathophysiologic levels of FFA can increase LVEF. This effect is more uniform and statistically more reliable in patients with normal LVEF. The study failed to demonstrate any significant difference in the effect of this pharmacologic intervention between patients with and without CAD.

  9. Early Effect of High Dose of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Plasma Lipids Profile and Liver Fatty Acids Composition in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noaman, E.; Mansour, S.Z.; Ibrahim, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was conducted to analyze the effect of acute gamma-irradiation on rats at supralethal doses of 20 Gy to determine the synthesis and amounts of free fatty acids, neutral lipids and phospholipids of plasma and liver after 24 and 48 h of gamma-irradiation. Male Wistar rats weighing 120+- 20 g were exposed to 20 Gy of gamma radiation (dose rate of 0.59 Gy/min). Exposure of rats to ionizing radiation resulted in significant alterations in the assayed parameters indicating lipid metabolism disturbance. Plasma cholesterol and phospholipid levels increased up to 71.3 and 71.5 %, respectively, after 24 h from radiation exposure and then returned to 28 and 27 % change in-compare with control values after 48 h post-irradiation. Plasma triacylglycerol concentrations increased concomitantly with irradiation, but their values are less high than cholesterol and phospholipid levels recording significant changes at 19 and 9 % comparing with control rats. Lipid peroxidation measured as MDA recorded significant elevation after 24 and 48 h post irradiation. It was shown that the synthesis of free fatty acids, cholesterol, cholesterol ethers and phospholipids was activated 48 h after irradiation at 20 Gy. The amount of free fatty acids of the rat liver decreased at 20 Gy exposures. This is assumed to be a result of the radioresistance to some degree in the system of free fatty acid synthesis of the rat to the gamma-irradiation in the lethal doses

  10. EFFECTS OF Citrus hystryx AS FAT PROTECTOR ON UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS, CHOLESTEROL AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF LAMB MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Tiven

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of Citrus hystrix as fat protector on unsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol and chemical composition of lamb meat. The research design applied was completely randomized design with 3 treatments and 5 replications. Fifteen local male lambs aged 9-12 months weighing 14-17 kg, were divided into 3 groups of different diet treatments (P0 : sheeps were only given a basal diet; P1 : sheeps are given basal diet and 3% cooking oil; P2 : sheeps are given basal diet, 3% cooking oil and protected by 3% Citrus hystrix powder. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance, the differences among treatments were tested by Duncan’s New Multiple Range Test. The results showed meat from sheeps that consume P2 diet has a total fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids content were higher (P<0.01, with lower cholesterol content (P<0.01 than of P0, and has a protein and fat content were higher (P <0.01, but a lower water content (P<0.01 than that of PO. It can be concluded that the use of Citrus hystrix powder as fat protector can increase content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, protein and fat, but decrease cholesterol content.

  11. Chain-modified radioiodinated fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Several carbon chain manipulations have been studied in terms of their effects on myocardial activity levels and residence time. The manipulations examined included: chain length, chain branching, chain unsaturation, and carbon-iodine bond stabilization. It was found that chain length affects myocardial activity levels for both straight-chain alkyl acids and branched chain alkyl and aryl acids. Similar results have been reported for the straight-chain aryl acids. Generally, the longer chain lengths correlated with higher myocardial activity levels and longer residence times. This behavior is attributed to storage as triglycerides. Branched chain acids are designed to be anti-metabolites but only the aryl β-methyl acids possessed the expected time course of constant or very slowly decreasing activity levels. The alkyl β-methyl acids underwent rapid deiodination - a process apparently independent of β-oxidation. Inhibition of β-oxidation by incorporation of carbon-carbon double and triple bonds was studied. Deiodination of ω-iodo alkyl fatty acids prevented an assessment of suicide inhibition using an unsaturated alkynoic acid. Stabilization of the carbon-iodine bond by attachment of iodine to a vinylic or aryl carbon was studied. The low myocardial values and high blood values observed for an eleven carbon ω-iodo vinylic fatty acid were not encouraging but ω-iodo aryl fatty acids appear to avoid the problems of rapid deiodination. (Auth.)

  12. Effects of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuemei; Yu, Yang; Su, Zhuowei; Zhang, Keying

    2017-06-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effect of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens. A total of 960 Lohmann laying hens aged 53 weeks were enrolled, under 4 different treatment diets supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg essential oils (Enviva EO, Dupont Nutrition Biosciences ApS, Denmark), respectively. Each treatment was replicated 8 times with 30 birds each. Birds were fed dietary treatment diets for 12 weeks (54 to 65 weeks). For data recording and analysis, a 12-week period was divided into 3 periods of 4 weeks' duration each: period 1 (54 to 57 weeks), period 2 (58 to 61 weeks), and period 3 (62 to 65 weeks). For the diet supplemented with Enviva EO, hen-day egg production and the feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly improved ( P  digestibility in the 100 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment group was significantly increased ( P  digestibility in the 100 and 150 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment groups was significantly decreased ( P  digestibility. Saturated fatty acid (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) gradually decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) increased with Enviva EO supplementation, but the difference was not significant. The data suggested that the supplementation of essential oils (Enviva EO) in laying hen diet did not show a significant positive effect on performance and yolk fatty acid composition but it tended to increase eggshell thickness and protein digestibility, especially at the dose of 50 mg/kg.

  13. Dynamic regulation of fatty acid pools for improved production of fatty alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, Paulo Goncalves; Ferreira, Raphael; Zhou, Yongjin J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In vivo production of fatty acid-derived chemicals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires strategies to increase the intracellular supply of either acyl-CoA or free fatty acids (FFAs), since their cytosolic concentrations are quite low in a natural state for this organism. Deletion...... of the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase genes FAA1 and FAA4 is an effective and straightforward way to disable re-activation of fatty acids and drastically increase FFA levels. However, this strategy causes FFA over-accumulation and consequential release to the extracellular medium, which results in a significant...... faa4 Delta strain constitutively expressing a carboxylic acid reductase from Mycobacterium marinum (MmCAR) and an endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh5) for in vivo production of fatty alcohols from FFAs. We observed production of fatty acids and fatty alcohols with different rates leading to high...

  14. Simultaneous Inhibition of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase Shares Discriminative Stimulus Effects with Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hruba, Lenka; Seillier, Alexandre; Zaki, Armia; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Giuffrida, Andrea; McMahon, Lance R.

    2015-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors exert preclinical effects indicative of therapeutic potential (i.e., analgesia). However, the extent to which MAGL and FAAH inhibitors produce unwanted effects remains unclear. Here, FAAH and MAGL inhibition was examined separately and together in a Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC; 5.6 mg/kg i.p.) discrimination assay predictive of subjective effects associated with cannabis use, and the relative contribution of N...

  15. EFFECT OF MICROALGAE ON GROWTH AND FATTY ACID PROFILES OF HARPACTICOID COPEPOD, Tisbe holothuriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Suwarthama Sumiarsa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth of marine copepods is influenced by feed. The purposes of this trial were to observe both growth and fatty acid compositions of harpacticoid copepod nauplii, Tisbe holothuriae by feeding with several microalgal species in laboratory: (A Isochrysis tahiti; (B Nannochloropsis oculata; (C Rhodomonas sp., and (D Tetraselmis chuii. The trial was carried out for 35 days with randomized complete design and triplicates in each treatment. The results showed that final copepod nauplii densities were not significantly different (P>0.05 in all treatments. However, lipid content of copepod nauplii fed with T. chuii was significantly higher (P<0.05 compared to that of other treatments while fatty acid profiles of EPA, DHA and DHA/EPA ratios showed both insignificant and significant differences among treatments.

  16. Evaluation of Novel Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Derived Lipid Mediators of Inflammation to Ameliorate the Deleterious Effects of Blast Overpressure on Eye and Brain Visual Processing Centers in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    acid ( DHA ; 22:6ω-3) Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5ω-3) Lipoxin A4 Resolvin E1 Protectin DX Resolvin D1 LOX LOX LOX Structures and Endogenous Source...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0082 TITLE: Evaluation of Novel Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Derived Lipid...Evaluation of Novel Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Derived Lipid Mediators 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER of Inflammation to Ameliorate the Deleterious Effects of

  17. Effect of hydrocarbon radical length of fatty acid collectors on flotation separation process of thorium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Perlova, O.V.; Sazonova, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that the degree of flotation separation of thorium ions collected by their means increases firstly (potassium laurate), then decreases (potassium tridecanate) and after that increases again (potassium palminate) when increasing the length of the hydrocarbon radical of potassium soaps of saturated fatty acids. The first increase of the collector efficiency is due to the decrease of solubility of thorium-containing sublates, and drop and further increase is due to the change in colloidchemical properties of sublates

  18. Awareness of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Possible Health Effects among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roke, Kaitlin; Rattner, Jodi; Brauer, Paula; Mutch, David M

    2018-03-16

    To assess awareness of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) and their possible health effects among young adults. An online survey was deployed to young adults. Questionnaire development involved identification of topic areas by content experts and adaptation of questions from previous consumer surveys. Focus groups and cognitive interviews ensured face validity, feasibility, and clarity of survey questions. Degrees of awareness and self-reported consumption were assessed by descriptive statistics and associations by Cochran's Q tests, Pearson's χ 2 tests, Z-tests, and logistic regression. Of the 834 survey completers (aged 18-25 years), more respondents recognized the abbreviations EPA (∼51%) and DHA (∼66%) relative to ALA (∼40%; P ≤ 0.01). Most respondents (∼83%) recognized that EPA and DHA have been linked to heart and brain health. Respondents who used academic/reputable sources, healthcare professionals, and/or social media to obtain nutritional information were more likely to report awareness of these health effects (P ≤ 0.01). Finally, 48% of respondents reported purchasing or consuming omega-3 foods, while 21% reported taking omega-3 supplements. This baseline survey suggests a high level of awareness of some aspects of omega-3 fats and health in a sample of young adults, and social media has become a prominent source of nutrition and health information.

  19. Post-sampling release of free fatty acids - effects of heat stabilization and methods of euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernerén, Fredrik; Söderquist, Marcus; Karlsson, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    The field of lipid research has made progress and it is now possible to study the lipidome of cells and organelles. A basic requirement of a successful lipid study is adequate pre-analytical sample handling, as some lipids can be unstable and postmortem changes can cause substantial accumulation of free fatty acids (FFAs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of conductive heat stabilization and euthanasia methods on FFA levels in the rat brain and liver using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The analysis of brain homogenates clearly demonstrated phospholipase activity and time-dependent post-sampling changes in the lipid pool of snap frozen non-stabilized tissue. There was a significant increase in FFAs already at 2min, which continued over time. Heat stabilization was shown to be an efficient method to reduce phospholipase activity and ex vivo lipolysis. Post-sampling effects due to tissue thawing and sample preparation induced a massive release of FFAs (up to 3700%) from non-stabilized liver and brain tissues compared to heat stabilized tissue. Furthermore, the choice of euthanasia method significantly influenced the levels of FFAs in the brain. The FFAs were decreased by 15-44% in the group of animals euthanized by pentobarbital injection compared with CO2 inhalation or decapitation. Our results highlight the importance of considering euthanasia methods and pre-analytical treatment in lipid analysis, factors which may otherwise interfere with the outcome of the experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of type of TAG fatty acids on lutein and zeaxanthin bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleize, Béatrice; Tourniaire, Franck; Depezay, Laurence; Bott, Romain; Nowicki, Marion; Albino, Lionel; Lairon, Denis; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Borel, Patrick

    2013-07-14

    The xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin probably play a role in visual function and may participate in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. Although a minimum amount of TAG is required for an optimal bioavailability of these carotenoids, the effect of the type of TAG fatty acids (FA) is less clear. The aim was to assess the effect of the type of TAG FA on bioavailability of these xanthophylls. A total of three complementary models were used: an in vitro digestion model to study bioaccessibility, Caco-2 cells to study uptake efficiency and orally administered rats to study in vivo bioavailability. Results showed that lutein and zeaxanthin bioaccessibility was greater (about 20-30 %, Pxanthophyll uptake by Caco-2 cells, but some compounds present in natural oils significantly affected xanthophyll uptake. Oral administration of rats with spinach and butter over 3 d led to a higher fasting plasma lutein concentration than oral administration with olive or fish oils. In conclusion, dietary fats rich in SFA lead to a higher bioavailability of lutein and zeaxanthin, as compared with fats rich in MUFA and PUFA. This is due partly to the higher bioaccessibility of these xanthophylls in the smaller mixed micelles produced when SFA are incorporated into mixed micelles.

  1. Polyunsaturated fatty acids effect on serum triglycerides concentration in presence of metabolic syndrome components. The Alaska-Siberia Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C.; Ebbesson, Sven O E; Ebbesson, Lars O E; Tejero, M Elizabeth; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2009-01-01

    Serum fatty acids (FA) have wide effects on metabolism: Serum saturated fatty acids (SFA) increase triglyceride (TG) levels in plasma while polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduce them. Traditionally, Eskimos have a high consumption of omega -3 fatty acids (ω–3 FA), but the westernization of their food habits have increased their dietary SFAs, partly reflected in their serum concentrations. We studied the joint effect of serum SFAs and PUFAs on circulating levels of TG in the presence of metabolic syndrome components. We included 212 men and 240 women (age 47.9±15.7 y, BMI 26.9±5.3) from four villages located in Alaska for a cross sectional study. Generalized linear models were employed to build surface responses of TG as in functions of SFAs and PUFAs measured in blood samples adjusting by sex, BMI and village. The effects of individual FAs were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis and partial correlations (r) were calculated. The most important predictors for TG levels were glucose tolerance (r = 0.116, p = 0.018) and BMI (r = 0.42, pstructure. The long chain ω-3, even in presence of high levels of SF, was associated with lower triglyceride levels. Eicosapentanoic acid (20:5ω3) had the strongest effect against palmitic acid on TG. The total FA showed moderate association with levels of TG, while SFA was positively associated, and large chain PUFA negatively. The westernized dietary habits among Eskimos are likely to change their metabolic profile and increase comorbidities related to metabolic disease. PMID:19766268

  2. A randomised trial of the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements on the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Henry; Mitra, Suparna; Croden, Fiona C; Taylor, Morag; Wood, Henry M; Perry, Sarah L; Spencer, Jade A; Quirke, Phil; Toogood, Giles J; Lawton, Clare L; Dye, Louise; Loadman, Paul M; Hull, Mark A

    2017-09-26

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anticolorectal cancer (CRC) activity. The intestinal microbiota has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary omega-3 PUFAs alter the mouse intestinal microbiome compatible with antineoplastic activity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of omega-3 PUFA supplements on the faecal microbiome in middle-aged, healthy volunteers (n=22). A randomised, open-label, cross-over trial of 8 weeks' treatment with 4 g mixed eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid in two formulations (soft-gel capsules and Smartfish drinks), separated by a 12-week 'washout' period. Faecal samples were collected at five time-points for microbiome analysis by 16S ribosomal RNA PCR and Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid analysis was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Both omega-3 PUFA formulations induced similar changes in RBC fatty acid content, except that drinks were associated with a larger, and more prolonged, decrease in omega-6 PUFA arachidonic acid than the capsule intervention (p=0.02). There were no significant changes in α or β diversity, or phyla composition, associated with omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, a reversible increased abundance of several genera, including Bifidobacterium , Roseburia and Lactobacillus was observed with one or both omega-3 PUFA interventions. Microbiome changes did not correlate with RBC omega-3 PUFA incorporation or development of omega-3 PUFA-induced diarrhoea. There were no treatment order effects. Omega-3 PUFA supplementation induces a reversible increase in several short-chain fatty acid-producing bacteria, independently of the method of administration. There is no simple relationship between the intestinal microbiome and systemic omega-3 PUFA exposure. ISRCTN18662143. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  3. Beneficial effects of gamma linolenic acid supplementation on nerve conduction velocity, Na+, K+ ATPase activity, and membrane fatty acid composition in sciatic nerve of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, T; Pierlovisi, M; Leonardi, J; Dufayet, D; Gerbi, A; Lafont, H; Vague, P; Raccah, D

    1999-07-01

    Metabolic and vascular abnormalities are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Two principal metabolic defects are altered lipid metabolism resulting from the impairment of delta-6-desaturase, which converts linoleic acid (LA) into gamma linolenic acid (GLA), and reduced nerve Na+, K+ ATPase activity. This reduction may be caused by a lack of incorporation of (n-6) fatty acids in membrane phospholipids. Because this ubiquitous enzyme maintains the membrane electrical potential and allows repolarization, disturbances in its activity can alter the process of nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We studied the effects of supplementation with GLA (260 mg per day) on NCV, fatty acid phospholipid composition, and Na+, K+ ATPase activity in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Six groups of 10 rats were studied. Two groups served as controls supplemented with GLA or sunflower oil (GLA free). Two groups with different durations of diabetes were studied: 6 weeks with no supplementation and 12 weeks supplemented with sunflower oil. To test the ability of GLA to prevent or reverse the effects of diabetes, two groups of diabetic rats were supplemented with GLA, one group for 12 weeks and one group for 6 weeks, starting 6 weeks after diabetes induction. Diabetes resulted in a 25% decrease in NCV (P < 0.0001), a 45% decrease in Na+, K+ ATPase activity (P < 0.0001), and an abnormal phospholipid fatty acid composition. GLA restored NCV both in the prevention and reversal studies and partially restored Na+, K+ ATPase activity in the preventive treatment group (P < 0.0001). These effects were accompanied by a modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes. Overall, the results suggest that membrane fatty acid composition plays a direct role in NCV and confirm the beneficial effect of GLA supplementation in diabetic neuropathy.

  4. Effect of temperature on fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Broniarek, Izabela; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Ogrodna, Karolina; Majerczak, Joanna; Celichowski, Jan; Szkutnik, Zbigniew; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of various assay temperatures, representing hypothermia (25°C), normothermia (35°C), and hyperthermia (42°C), on the oxidation of lipid-derived fuels in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats. Adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a training group (rats trained on a treadmill for 8 weeks) or a sedentary control group. In skeletal muscle mitochondria of both control and trained rats, an increase in the assay temperature from 25°C to 42°C was accompanied by a consistent increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine and glycerol-3-phosphate. Moreover, endurance training increased mitochondrial capacity to oxidize the lipid-derived fuels at all studied temperatures. The endurance training-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity to oxidize fatty acids was accompanied by an enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis, as shown by the elevated expression levels of Nrf2, PGC1α, and mitochondrial marker and by the elevated expression levels of mitochondrial proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty acid transporter CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADS). We conclude that hyperthermia enhances but hypothermia attenuates the rate of the oxidation of fatty acids and glycerol-3-phosphate in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from both untrained and trained rats. Moreover, our results indicate that endurance training up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis markers, lipid-sustained oxidative capacity, and CD36 and CPT1A proteins involved in fatty acid transport, possibly via PGC1α and Nrf2 signaling pathways.

  5. Effect of temperature on fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A Zoladz

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of various assay temperatures, representing hypothermia (25°C, normothermia (35°C, and hyperthermia (42°C, on the oxidation of lipid-derived fuels in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria of untrained and endurance-trained rats. Adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a training group (rats trained on a treadmill for 8 weeks or a sedentary control group. In skeletal muscle mitochondria of both control and trained rats, an increase in the assay temperature from 25°C to 42°C was accompanied by a consistent increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine and glycerol-3-phosphate. Moreover, endurance training increased mitochondrial capacity to oxidize the lipid-derived fuels at all studied temperatures. The endurance training-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity to oxidize fatty acids was accompanied by an enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis, as shown by the elevated expression levels of Nrf2, PGC1α, and mitochondrial marker and by the elevated expression levels of mitochondrial proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty acid transporter CD36, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A, and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADS. We conclude that hyperthermia enhances but hypothermia attenuates the rate of the oxidation of fatty acids and glycerol-3-phosphate in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from both untrained and trained rats. Moreover, our results indicate that endurance training up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis markers, lipid-sustained oxidative capacity, and CD36 and CPT1A proteins involved in fatty acid transport, possibly via PGC1α and Nrf2 signaling pathways.

  6. Effect of the omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E supplementation on subjective global assessment score, glucose metabolism, and lipid concentrations in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Zatollah; Soleimani, Alireza; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Shakeri, Hossein; Mazroii, Navid; Abedi, Fatemeh; Fallah, Melika; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E supplementation on subjective global assessment (SGA) score and metabolic profiles in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among 120 chronic HD patients. Participants were randomly divided into four groups to receive: (i) 1250 mg/day omega-3 fatty acid containing 600 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 300 mg docosahexaenoic acid + vitamin E placebo (n = 30), (ii) 400 IU/day vitamin E + omega-3 fatty acids placebo (n = 30), (iii) 1250 mg omega-3 fatty acids/day + 400 IU/day vitamin E (n = 30), and (iv) omega-3 fatty acids placebo + vitamin E placebo (n = 30) for 12 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 12-wk intervention to measure metabolic profiles. Patients who received combined omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E supplements compared with vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and placebo had significantly decreased SGA score (p acids plus vitamin E supplementation for 12 wk among HD patients had beneficial effects on SGA score and metabolic profiles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cardiac ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMoreno

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been reported to exhibit antiarrhythmic properties, attributed to their capability to modulate ion channels. In the present review, we will focus on the effects of PUFAs on cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5 and two potassium channels (Kv (Kv1.5 and Kv11.1. n-3 marine (docohexaenoic and eicohexapentaenoic acid and plant origin (alpha-linolenic acid PUFAs block Kv1.5 and Kv11.1 channels at physiological concentrations. Also, DHA and EPA decreased Nav1.5 and calcium channels. These effects on Na and Ca channels theoretically should shorten the cardiac APD, whereas the blocking actions of n-3 PUFAs of Kv channels should lengthen the cardiac action potential. Experiments performed in female rabbits fed with a diet rich in n-3 PUFAs show a longer cardiac action potential and effective refractory period. This study was performed to analyze if their antiarrhythmic effects are due to a reduction of triangulation, reverse use-dependence, instability and dispersion of the cardiac action potential (TRIaD as a measure of proarrhythmic effects. Dietary n-3 PUFAs supplementation markedly reduced dofetilide-induced TRIaD and abolished dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes (TdP. Ultrafast sodium channel block by DHA may account for the antiarrhythmic protection of dietary supplements of n-3 PUFAs against dofetilide induced proarrhythmia observed in this animal model. The cardiac effects of n-3 PUFAs resemble those of amiodarone: both block sodium, calcium and potassium channels, have anti-adrenergic properties, can prolong the cardiac action potential, reverse TRIaD and suppress TdP. The main difference is that sodium channel block by n-3 PUFAs has a much faster onset and offset kinetics. Therefore, the electrophysiological profile of n-3 PUFAs appears more desirable: the duration of reduced sodium current (facilitates re-entry is much shorter. The n-3 PUFAs appear as a safer alternative to other antiarrhythmic

  8. Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in stable myocardial infarction patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Giltay, E.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest a protective effect of n-3 fatty acids derived from fish (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) against cognitive decline. For a-linolenic acid (ALA) obtained from vegetable sources, the effect on cognitive decline is unknown. We

  9. Frictional response of fatty acids on steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R; Biswas, S K

    2009-05-15

    Self-assembled monolayers of fatty acids were formed on stainless steel by room-temperature solution deposition. The acids are covalently bound to the surface as carboxylate in a bidentate manner. To explore the effect of saturation in the carbon backbone on friction in sliding tribology, we study the response of saturated stearic acid (SA) and unsaturated linoleic acid (LA) as self-assembled monolayers using lateral force microscopy and nanotribometry and when the molecules are dispersed in hexadecane, using pin-on-disc tribometry. Over a very wide range (10 MPa-2.5 GPa) of contact pressures it is consistently demonstrated that the unsaturated linoleic acid molecules yield friction which is significantly lower than that of the saturated stearic acid. It is argued, using density functional theory predictions and XPS of slid track, that when the molecular backbone of unsaturated fatty acids are tilted and pressed strongly by a probe, in tribological contact, the high charge density of the double bond region of the backbone allows coupling with the steel substrate. The interaction yields a low friction carboxylate soap film on the substrate. The saturated fatty acid does not show this effect.

  10. Effects of vitamins, fatty acids, minerals, and other dietary supplements on schizophrenic symptoms in people with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Smedslund, Geir; Berg, Rigmor C.

    2011-01-01

    ENGLISH: There is considerable scientific disagreement about the possible effects of dietary supplements on mental health and illness. Do dietary supplements (possibly in megadoses) have an effect on symptoms and consequences of schizophrenia? We critically appraised randomized controlled trials about supplemental vitamins, fatty acids and other dietary supplements given to people diagnosed with schizophrenia. The primary outcome was symptoms of schizophrenia. We evaluated the evidence to be ...

  11. Evaluation of negative and positive health effects of n-3 fatty acids as constituents of food supplements and fortified foods

    OpenAIRE

    Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    2011-01-01

    The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (VKM) has on request from The Norwegian Food Safety Authority evaluated negative and positive human health effects from intake of n-3 fatty acids from food supplements and fortified foods. The evidence presented in this evaluation show that it is possible to obtain positive health effects in the Norwegian population from intake of EPA and DHA, including from food supplements, without any appreciable risk of negative or adverse health ...

  12. Effect of Maternal Obesity on Fetal Growth and Expression of Placental Fatty Acid Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kui; Li, Li; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yi; Wang, Hai Qing; Lai, Han Lin; Hu, Chuan Lai

    2017-12-15

    To explore the effects of maternal high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity on fetal growth and the expression of placental nutrient transporters. Maternal obesity was established in rats by 8 weeks of pre-pregnancy fed HF diet, while rats in the control group were fed normal (CON) diet. Diet-induced obesity (DIO) rats and diet-induced obesity-resistant (DIR) rats were selected according to body weight gain over this period. After copulation, the CON rats were divided into two groups: switched to HF diet (CON-HF group) or maintained on the CON diet (CON-CON group). The DIO rats and DIR rats were maintained on the HF diet throughout pregnancy. Pregnant rats were euthanized at day 21 gestation, fetal and placental weights were recorded, and placental tissue was collected. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA expression of placental nutrient transporters. Protein expression was determined by Western blot. Average fetal weight of DIO dams was reduced by 6.9%, and the placentas of CON-HF and DIO dams were significantly heavier than the placentas of CON-CON and DIR dams at day 21 of gestation (pobesity induced by a HF diet led to intrauterine growth retardation and down-regulated the expression of placental fatty acid transporters.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Insulin-Sensitizing Effects of Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Junki; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation in macrophages and adipose tissues can promote the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) have important roles in various tissues, acting as both essential energy sources and signaling molecules. FFA receptors (FFARs) can modulate inflammation in various types of cells and tissues; however the underlying mechanisms mediating these effects are unclear. FFARs are activated by specific FFAs; for example, GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by medium and long chain FFAs, GPR41 and GPR43 are activated by short chain FFAs, and GPR84 is activated by medium-chain FFAs. To date, a number of studies associated with the physiological functions of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have reported that these GPCRs are expressed in various tissues and involved in inflammatory and metabolic responses. Thus, the development of selective agonists or antagonists for various GPCRs may facilitate the establishment of novel therapies for the treatment of various diseases. In this review, we summarize current literature describing the potential of GPCRs as therapeutic targets for inflammatory and metabolic disorders.

  14. The effect of interesterification on the bioavailability of fatty acids in structured lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, M; Villalón, M J; Ortíz, M E; Nieto, S; Bouchon, P

    2013-08-15

    Fatty acid (FA) profile is a critical factor in the nutritional properties of fats, but, stereochemistry may also play a fundamental role in the rate and extent to which FAs are absorbed and become available. To better understand this phenomenon, we evaluated the bioavailability of FAs in linseed-oil and palm-stearin blends compared to their interesterified mix, using a sn-1,3 stereospecific lipase, to determine if there was any difference in terms of FA availability when using this technology. Test meals were fed through an intragastric feeding tube on Sprague-Dawley male rats after 18 h fasting. Postprandial blood samples were collected after meal or physiological serum (control) administration and the FA profile of plasma lipids was determined. Results showed that modification of the melting profile through interesterification, without altering the bioavailability determined by sn-2 stereochemistry, could delay lipid absorption at the beginning, but had no effect on total lipid absorption. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Potent Inhibitory Effect of Chinese Dietary Spices on Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Liang, Yan; Sun, Xuebing; Liu, Xiaoxin; Tian, Weixi; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Dietary spices have been adopted in cooking since ancient times to enhance flavor and also as food preservatives and disease remedies. In China, the use of spices and other aromatic plants as food flavoring is an integral part of dietary behavior, but relatively little is known about their functions. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been recognized as a remedy target, and its inhibitors might be applied in disease treatment. The present work was designed to assess the inhibitory activities on FAS of spices extracts in Chinese menu. The in vitro inhibitory activities on FAS of 22 extracts of spices were assessed by spectrophotometrically monitoring oxidation of NADPH at 340 nm. Results showed that 20 spices extracts (90.9 %) exhibited inhibitory activities on FAS, with half inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 1.72 to 810.7 μg/ml. Among them, seven spices showed strong inhibitory effect with IC(50) values lower than 10 μg/ml. These findings suggest that a large proportion of the dietary spices studied possess promising inhibitory activities on FAS, and subsequently might be applied in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related human diseases.

  16. Effects of dietary fat on the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid metabolism in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Stanisława; Skiba, Grzegorz; Sobol, Monika; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The effect of dietary fats differing in fatty acid (FA) composition on the metabolism of saturated FA (SFA) and monounsaturated FA (MUFA) in growing pigs was investigated. The deposition of FA in the body and the fate of individual dietary FA were assessed after slaughter. Gilts with an initial body weight (BW) of 60 kg were used as experimental animals. Six pigs were slaughtered at 60 kg BW, while further 18 pigs received three isoenergetic and isonitrogen experimental diets containing linseed oil, rapeseed oil or beef tallow at 50 g/kg diet until they reached 105 kg (six pigs per group). The chemical composition and the content of FA in the whole body were determined and compared across groups. Regardless of dietary treatment, the whole body contained similar amounts of protein, fat and total FA. The total accumulation (percentage of net intake and de novo production) of SFA and MUFA was similar in all groups, but the processes of elongation and desaturation of SFA and MUFA depended upon the type of FA added to the diet. A high dietary content and intake of MUFA inhibits desaturation compared to SFA- and PUFA-rich diets, whereas a high SFA content and intake lowers elongation rate. The increasing net intake of total SFA and MUFA was associated with a lower total de novo production of these FA in the whole body of pigs.

  17. Effect of gamma-radiation treatment on the lipids of meat products during storage.II Fatty acid composition in durable raw-dried products of chopped meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, G.; Bakalivanova, T.; Tsvetkova, E.; Grigorova, S.; Marinova, T.

    2004-01-01

    Studied is the effect of gamma rays treatment with 4 kGy on the total fatty acid composition (FAC) of Karlovska Lukanka and Shumenski Sudzhuk for 30 days and nights from the moment of treatment with gamma-rays. The saturated fatty acids in the Lukanka/flat sausage/ are 42,5-44,7% of the total lipids, and in the Sudzhuk/sausage/ the level of the saturated fatty acids is 45,7-49,7%. The mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the two products are between 44 and 47%. The share of poly-unsaturated fatty acids in the Lukanka is over 10% of the total lipids, and in the Sudzhuk - 7%. It was established that the treatment of Karlovo Lukanka and Shumen Sudzhuk with 4 kGy gamma-rays: does not affect the total fatty acid composition of the tested samples; does not change the balance in the fatty acid composition and the nutritional value of the tested samples; does not change the quantity of the essential fatty acids; quarantees the safety of the treated products

  18. Effects of feeding fatty acid calcium and the interaction of forage quality on production performance and biochemical indexes in early lactation cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z Y; Yin, Z Y; Lin, X Y; Yan, Z G; Wang, Z H

    2015-10-01

    Multiparous early lactation Holstein cows (n = 16) were used in a randomized complete block design to determine the effects of feeding fatty acid calcium and the interaction of forage quality on production performance and biochemical indexes in early lactation cow. Treatments were as follows: (i) feeding low-quality forage without supplying fatty acid calcium (Diet A), (ii) feeding low-quality forage with supplying 400 g fatty acid calcium (Diet B), (iii) feeding high-quality forage without supplying fatty acid calcium (Diet C) and (iv) feeding high-quality forage with supplying 400 g fatty acid calcium. This experiment consisted 30 days. The milk and blood samples were collected in the last day of the trail. Intakes were recorded in the last 2 days of the trail. Supplementation of fatty acid calcium decreased significantly dry matter intake (DMI) (p < 0.01). Addition fatty acid calcium decreased milk protein percentage (p < 0.01) and milk SNF percentage (p < 0.01), but increased MUN (p < 0.05). Supplemented fatty acid decreased concentration of blood BHBA (p < 0.05), but increased TG, NEFA, glucagon, GLP-1, CCK, leptin, ApoA-IV, serotonin and MSH concentration in blood, the CCK concentration and feed intake showed a significant negative correlation (p < 0.05). Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of

  20. Fatty acids in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel M Alikunhi

    2010-06-01

    monounsaturated fatty acids. The branched fatty acids are absent in undecomposed mangrove leaves, but present significantly in the decomposed leaves and in prawns and finfish, representing an important source for them. This revealed that the microbes are dominant producers that contribute significantly to the fishes and prawns in the mangrove ecosystem. This work has proved the fatty acid biomarkers as an effective tool for identifying the trophic interactions among dominant producers and consumers in this mangrove. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (2: 577-587. Epub 2010 June 02.

  1. Effect of almond consumption on the serum fatty acid profile: a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Stephanie; Kendall, Cyril W C; Gascoyne, Ana-Maria; Bazinet, Richard P; Bashyam, Balachandran; Lapsley, Karen G; Augustin, Livia S A; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2014-10-14

    Consumption of almonds has been shown to be associated with a decreased risk of CHD, which may be related to their fatty acid (FA) composition. However, the effect of almond consumption on the serum FA composition is not known. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether almond consumption would alter the serum FA profile and risk of CHD, as calculated using Framingham's 10-year risk score, in a dose-dependent manner in hyperlipidaemic individuals when compared with a higher-carbohydrate control group using dietary interventions incorporating almonds. A total of twenty-seven hyperlipidaemic individuals consumed three isoenergetic (mean 1770 kJ/d) supplements during three 1-month dietary phases: (1) full-dose almonds (50-100 g/d); (2) half-dose almonds with half-dose muffins; (3) full-dose muffins. Fasting blood samples were obtained at weeks 0 and 4 for the determination of FA concentrations. Almond intake (g/d) was found to be inversely associated with the estimated Framingham 10-year CHD risk score (P= 0·026). In both the half-dose and full-dose almond groups, the proportions of oleic acid (OA) and MUFA in the TAG fraction (half-almond: OA P= 0·003; MUFA P= 0·004; full-almond: OA Pconsumption increases OA and MUFA content in serum TAG and NEFA fractions, which are inversely associated with CHD lipid risk factors and overall estimated 10-year CHD risk.

  2. Effect of refrigeration time on the lipid oxidation and fatty acid profiles of catfish (Arius maculatus) commercialized in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenyang, N.; Womeni, H.M.; Tiencheu, B.; Villeneuve, P.; Linder, M.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of refrigeration at 4 °C during 9 days on the quality and stability of catfish oil were evaluated using a change in fatty acid composition by gas chromatography (GC), commonly used analytical indexes (acid and peroxide values), and analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results revealed that lipid deterioration, hydrolysis and oxidation occurred throughout the cold storage (4 °C). Refrigeration induced the lipolysis of triglycerides by lipases and phospholipases. It also affected the fatty acids composition of the catfish. The progressive loss of unsaturation was monitored by the decrease in the absorbance band at 3012 cm−1on FTIR spectra and the lowest value was observed in the catfish muscle at 9 days of refrigeration. Eicosapentaenoic C20:5ω3 (EPA) and docosahexaenoic C22:6ω3 (DHA) acids were the polyunsaturated fatty acids most affected during refrigeration. Refrigeration for less than 5 days was found to be the best conditions for the preservation of the catfish. [es

  3. New radiohalogenated alkenyl tellurium fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Kabalka, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled long-chain fatty acids have diagnostic value as radiopharmaceutical tools in myocardial imaging. Some applications of these fatty acids are limited due to their natural metabolic degradation in vivo with subsequent washout of the radioactivity from the myocardium. The identification of structural features that will increase the myocardial residence time without decreasing the heart uptake of long-chain fatty acids is of interest. Fatty acids containing the tellurium heteroatom were the first modified fatty acids developed that show unique prolonged myocardial retention and low blood levels. Our detailed studies with radioiodinated vinyliodide substituted tellurium fatty acids demonstrate that heart uptake is a function of the tellurium position. New techniques of tellurium and organoborane chemistry have been developed for the synthesis of a variety of radioiodinated iodoalkenyl tellurium fatty acids. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Synthesis of Phosphatidylcholine Containing Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acid by Phospholipase A2 and Effect on Retinoic Acid Induced Differentiation of HL-60 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    細川, 雅史; 大島, 宏哲; 甲野, 裕之; 高橋, 是太郎; 羽田野, 六男; 小田島, 粛夫

    1993-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine containing highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA-PC) was prepared by porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2, which catalyzed esterification between lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA), under a scaled-up reaction system. Fatty acid mixture prepared from sardine oil, purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were used as the substrates of HUFA. The yield of HUFA-PC was 17.0-19.9%. Synthesized phosphatidylcholi...

  5. Effect of postharvest period on sugars, organic acids and fatty acids composition in commercially sold medlar (Mespilus germanica 'Dutch') fruit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glew, R. H.; Ayaz, F. A.; Sanz, C.; VanderJagt, D. J.; Huang, H. S.; Chuang, L. T.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 216, č. 5 (2003), s. 390-394 ISSN 1438-2377 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5038351 Grant - others:Scientific and Research Council of Turkey(TR) TUBITAK-NATO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Fatty acid * Medlar * Mespilus germanica (Rosaceae) Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2003

  6. Different fatty acid metabolism effects of (−-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and C75 in Adenocarcinoma lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relat Joana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid synthase (FASN is overexpressed and hyperactivated in several human carcinomas, including lung cancer. We characterize and compare the anti-cancer effects of the FASN inhibitors C75 and (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG in a lung cancer model. Methods We evaluated in vitro the effects of C75 and EGCG on fatty acid metabolism (FASN and CPT enzymes, cellular proliferation, apoptosis and cell signaling (EGFR, ERK1/2, AKT and mTOR in human A549 lung carcinoma cells. In vivo, we evaluated their anti-tumour activity and their effect on body weight in a mice model of human adenocarcinoma xenograft. Results C75 and EGCG had comparable effects in blocking FASN activity (96,9% and 89,3% of inhibition, respectively. In contrast, EGCG had either no significant effect in CPT activity, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, while C75 stimulated CPT up to 130%. Treating lung cancer cells with EGCG or C75 induced apoptosis and affected EGFR-signaling. While EGCG abolished p-EGFR, p-AKT, p-ERK1/2 and p-mTOR, C75 was less active in decreasing the levels of EGFR and p-AKT. In vivo, EGCG and C75 blocked the growth of lung cancer xenografts but C75 treatment, not EGCG, caused a marked animal weight loss. Conclusions In lung cancer, inhibition of FASN using EGCG can be achieved without parallel stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and this effect is related mainly to EGFR signaling pathway. EGCG reduce the growth of adenocarcinoma human lung cancer xenografts without inducing body weight loss. Taken together, EGCG may be a candidate for future pre-clinical development.

  7. (n-3) fatty acids and cardiovascular health: are effects of EPA and DHA shared or complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Wu, Jason H Y

    2012-03-01

    Considerable research supports cardiovascular benefits of consuming omega-3 PUFA, also known as (n-3) PUFA, from fish or fish oil. Whether individual long-chain (n-3) PUFA have shared or complementary effects is not well established. We reviewed evidence for dietary and endogenous sources and cardiovascular effects on biologic pathways, physiologic risk factors, and clinical endpoints of EPA [20:5(n-3)], docosapentaenoic acid [DPA, 22:5(n-3)], and DHA [22:6(n-3)]. DHA requires direct dietary consumption, with little synthesis from or retroconversion to DPA or EPA. Whereas EPA is also largely derived from direct consumption, EPA can also be synthesized in small amounts from plant (n-3) precursors, especially stearidonic acid. In contrast, DPA appears principally derived from endogenous elongation from EPA, and DPA can also undergo retroconversion back to EPA. In experimental and animal models, both EPA and DHA modulate several relevant biologic pathways, with evidence for some differential benefits. In humans, both fatty acids lower TG levels and, based on more limited studies, favorably affect cardiac diastolic filling, arterial compliance, and some metrics of inflammation and oxidative stress. All three (n-3) PUFA reduce ex vivo platelet aggregation and DHA also modestly increases LDL and HDL particle size; the clinical relevance of such findings is uncertain. Combined EPA+DHA or DPA+DHA levels are associated with lower risk of fatal cardiac events and DHA with lower risk of atrial fibrillation, suggesting direct or indirect benefits of DHA for cardiac arrhythmias (although not excluding similar benefits of EPA or DPA). Conversely, EPA and DPA, but not DHA, are associated with lower risk of nonfatal cardiovascular endpoints in some studies, and purified EPA reduced risk of nonfatal coronary syndromes in one large clinical trial. Overall, for many cardiovascular pathways and outcomes, identified studies of individual (n-3) PUFA were relatively limited, especially

  8. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition heightens anandamide signaling without producing reinforcing effects in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mangieri, Regina A.; Bortolato, Marco; Chefer, Svetlana I.; Mukhin, Alexey G.; Clapper, Jason R.; King, Alvin R.; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Background CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain are known to participate in the regulation of reward-based behaviors, however, the contribution of each of the endocannabinoid transmitters, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), to these behaviors remains undefined. To address this question, we assessed the effects of URB597, a selective anandamide deactivation inhibitor, as a reinforcer of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior in squirrel monkeys. Methods We investigated the reinforcing effects of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 in monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), anandamide or cocaine, and quantified brain endocannabinoid levels using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We measured brain FAAH activity using an ex vivo enzyme assay. Results URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, intravenous) blocked FAAH activity and increased anandamide levels throughout the monkey brain. This effect was accompanied by a marked compensatory decrease in 2-AG levels. Monkeys did not self-administer URB597 and the drug did not promote reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behavior previously maintained by THC, anandamide, or cocaine. Pretreatment with URB597 did not modify self-administration of THC or cocaine even though, as expected, it significantly potentiated anandamide self-administration. Conclusions In the monkey brain, the FAAH inhibitor URB597 increases anandamide levels while causing a compensatory down-regulation in 2-AG levels. These effects are accompanied by a striking lack of reinforcing properties, which distinguishes URB597 from direct-acting cannabinoid agonists such as THC. Our results reveal an unexpected functional heterogeneity within the endocannabinoid signaling system, and suggest that FAAH inhibitors might be used therapeutically without risk of abuse or triggering of relapse to drug abuse. PMID:18814866

  9. Effects of the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid on the growth performance, carcass and meat quality of finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wandee Tartrakoon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects on finishing pigs (80–100 kg BW fed diets supplemented with oil sources containing different ratios of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids (UFA:SFA ratio were evaluated in 15 barrows and 15 gilts (Duroc × Large White × Landrace. Three experimental diets were evaluated using a randomized complete block design, with broken rice, soybean meal and rice bran as the main feedstuffs in the control diet. Diets 2 and 3 consisted of the control diet supplemented with 3% oil, with UFA:SFA ratios of 2.5:1 and 5:1, respectively. Overall, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05 found in the average daily gain (ADG of the pigs fed the treatment diets; however, the pigs fed the control diet and diet 3 had better (P  0.05 among the treatment groups with regard to the carcass quality of the pigs; however, it was found that the gilts had greater (P < 0.01 loin eye areas than the barrows fed diets 2 and 3 and the loin eye area of pig fed diet 2 was the largest (P < 0.05. In the case of the meat quality parameters, it was clearly found that the pigs fed the control diet had a greater (P < 0.05 lightness (L∗ in the meat colour, and the lowest cooking loss was found in the pigs fed the diet supplemented with fat containing the UFA:SFA ratio of 5:1. Overall, the dietary treatment did not significantly affect the drip loss, thawing loss and shear force of the pork. In conclusion, the supplementation of oil with UFA:SFA ratios of 2.5:1 and 5:1 has the potential to improve pork quality.

  10. The effect of linoleic acid on the whole body synthesis rates of polyunsaturated fatty acids from α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in free-living rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichiello, Anthony F; Kitson, Alex P; Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P Mark; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is thought to be important for brain function. The main dietary source of DHA is fish, however, DHA can also be synthesized from precursor omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), the most abundantly consumed being α-linolenic acid (ALA). The enzymes required to synthesize DHA from ALA are also used to synthesize longer chain omega-6 (n-6) PUFA from linoleic acid (LNA). The large increase in LNA consumption that has occurred over the last century has led to concern that LNA and other n-6 PUFA outcompete n-3 PUFA for enzymes involved in DHA synthesis, and therefore, decrease overall DHA synthesis. To assess this, rats were fed diets containing LNA at 53 (high LNA diet), 11 (medium LNA diet) or 1.5% (low LNA diet) of the fatty acids with ALA being constant across all diets (approximately 4% of the fatty acids). Rats were maintained on these diets from weaning for 8 weeks, at which point they were subjected to a steady-state infusion of labeled ALA and LNA to measure DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) synthesis rates. DHA and ARA synthesis rates were generally highest in rats fed the medium and high LNA diets, while the plasma half-life of DHA was longer in rats fed the low LNA diet. Therefore, increasing dietary LNA, in rats, did not impair DHA synthesis; however, low dietary LNA led to a decrease in DHA synthesis with tissue concentrations of DHA possibly being maintained by a longer DHA half-life. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R.

    1991-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 ± 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 ± 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells

  12. Cost-effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in parenteral nutrition therapy in hospitals: a discrete event simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, Lorenzo; Eandi, Mario; Povero, Massimiliano; Mayer, Konstantin; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Heller, Axel R; Fries-Schaffner, Eva

    2014-10-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in parenteral nutrition (PN) regimens is associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in infection rate, and length of hospital stay (LOS) in medical and surgical patients admitted to the ICU and in surgical patients not admitted to the ICU. The objective of this present study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the addition of omega-3 fatty acids to standard PN regimens in four European countries (Italy, France, Germany and the UK) from the healthcare provider perspective. Using a discrete event simulation scheme, a patient-level simulation model was developed, based on outcomes from the Italian ICU patient population and published literature. Comparative efficacy data for PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids versus standard PN regimens was taken from the meta-analysis of published randomised clinical trials (n = 23 studies with a total of 1502 patients), and hospital LOS reduction was further processed in order to split the reduction in ICU stay from that in-ward stays for patients admitted to the ICU. Country-specific cost data was obtained for Italian, French, German and UK healthcare systems. Clinical outcomes included in the model were death rates, nosocomial infection rates, and ICU/hospital LOS. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to test the reliability of results. PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were more effective on average than standard PN both in ICU and in non-ICU patients in the four countries considered, reducing infection rates and overall LOS, and resulting in a lower total cost per patient. Overall costs for patients receiving PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were between €14 144 to €19 825 per ICU patient and €5484 to €14 232 per non-ICU patient, translating into savings of between €3972 and €4897 per ICU patient and savings of between €561 and €1762 per non

  13. Acid fermentation of municipal sludge: the effect of sludge type and origin on the production and composition of volatile fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucisik, A. S.; Schmidit, J. E.; Henze, M.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the more stringent legislations controlling discharges of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and existing problems such as high sludge production, new wastewater treatment processes resulting in considerably reduced sludge production and more effective treatment would be of great value. In this study, the feasibility of implementing acid fermentation process on different types of municipal sludge to increase soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), especially short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was investigated by batch and semi-continuous experiments. (Author)

  14. Blood docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in vegans: Associations with age and gender and effects of an algal-derived omega-3 fatty acid supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, Barbara; Kelsey, Kristine S; Schwartz, Todd A; Harris, William S

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that vegetarians and vegans have much lower plasma concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids) when compared to those who eat fish. The purposes of this study were 1) to define the age and/or sex-specific docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids levels in red blood cell membranes (expressed as a percent of total fatty acids; hereafter the omega-3 index) in long-term vegans, and 2) to determine the effects of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement (254 mg docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids/day for 4 months) on the omega-3 index. A sample (n = 165) of vegans was recruited, and their omega-3 index was determined using a dried blood spot methodology. A subset of 46 subjects with a baseline omega-3 index of vegan cohort, the index was significantly higher in females than males (3.9 ± 1.0% vs. 3.5 ± 1.0%; p = 0.026) and was directly related to age (p for trend = 0.009). The omega-3 index increased from 3.1 ± 0.6% to 4.8 ± 0.8% (p = 0.009) in the supplementation study. We conclude that vegans have low baseline omega-3 levels, but not lower than omnivores who also consume very little docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. The vegans responded robustly to a relatively low dose of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Ashwitha Shruti; Narayana, Sarala; Venkatarathnamma, P N

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants can improve glycemic control, lipid profile, and cognitive functions. We assessed the effect of Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids (OFA) on the above parameters. One hundred patients with type 2 DM receiving metformin 500 mg and glimepiride 1 mg were randomized to receive add-on therapy of Vitamin E 400 mg or OFA once daily for 12 weeks and the third group served as control. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial blood sugar (PPBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), lipid profile, and mini-mental state examination were done at baseline and 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the study. A significant reduction in FBS, PPBS, and HbA1c was observed in all the three groups at 12 weeks. There was significant reduction in total cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) in patients receiving either of the antioxidants and also significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein in patients receiving OFA at 12 weeks compared to baseline. BMI and WHR were significantly increased in control group. Intergroup analysis showed that in patients receiving Vitamin E and OFA, the reduction of FBS, PPBS, and HbA1c were similar. The patients receiving OFA had significant reduction in TG compared to control. There was no significant effect on cognitive function. Vitamin E and OFA had beneficial effects on lipid profile and anthropometric measurements; however, the glycemic control was similar to the patients in control group.

  16. Carbohydrate fatty acid monosulphate esters are safe and effective adjuvants for humoral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, Luuk A Th; Platenburg, Peter Paul L I; Bajramovic, Jeffrey; Veth, Jennifer; Sauerwein, Robert; Roeffen, Will; Pohl, Marie; van Amerongen, Geert; Stittelaar, Koert J; van den Bosch, Johannes F

    2017-05-31

    Carbohydrate fatty acid sulphate esters (CFASEs) formulated in a squalane-in-water emulsion are effective adjuvants for humoral responses to a wide range of antigens in various animal species but rise in body temperature and local reactions albeit mild or minimal hampers application in humans. In rabbits, body temperature increased 1°C one day after intramuscular (IM) injection, which returned to normal during the next day. The effect increased with increasing dose of CFASE but not with the number of injections (up to 5). Antigen enhanced the rise in body temperature after booster immunization (P100-fold after the second immunization. In ferrets immunized with 7.5μg of inactivated influenza virus A/H7N9, CMS adjuvant gave 100-fold increase in HAI antibody titres after the first and 25-fold after the second immunisation, which were 10-20-fold higher than with the MF59-like AddaVax adjuvant. In both models, a single immunisation with CMS adjuvant revealed similar or higher titres than two immunisations with either benchmark, without detectable systemic and local adverse effects. Despite striking chemical similarities with monophospholipid A (MPL), CMS adjuvant did not activate human TLR4 expressed on HEK cells. We concluded that the synthetic CMS adjuvant is a promising candidate for poor immunogens and single-shot vaccines and that rise in body temperature, local reactions or activation of TLR4 is not a pre-requisite for high adjuvanticity. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential effects of omega-3 fatty acids on anemia and inflammatory markers in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhani, Afshin; Khatami, Mohammad-Reza; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Razeghi, Effat; Abdollahi, Alireza; Hashemi-Nazari, Seyed-Saeed; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-01-07

    Anemia is a common complication among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Although intravenous iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents revolutionized anemia treatment, about 10% of HD patients show suboptimal response to these agents. Systemic inflammation and increased serum hepcidin level may contribute to this hyporesponsiveness. Considering the anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids, this study aimed to evaluate potential role of these fatty acids in improving anemia and inflammation of chronic HD patients. In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 54 adult patients with HD duration of at least 3 months were randomized to ingest 1800 mg of either omega-3 fatty acids or matching placebo per day for 4 months. Anemia parameters including blood hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin saturation (TSAT), erythropoietin resistance index, and required dose of intravenous iron and erythropoietin, and serum concentrations of inflammatory/anti-inflammatory markers including interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10, C-reactive protein (CRP), hepcidin, ferritin, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and ratios of IL-10 to IL-6 and IL-10 to TNF-α were measured at baseline and after 4 months of the intervention. 45 subjects (25 in the omega-3 and 20 in the placebo group) completed the study. No significant changes were observed in blood hemoglobin, serum iron, TSAT, and required dose of intravenous iron in either within or between group comparisons. Additionally, erythropoietin resistance index as well as required dose of intravenous erythropoietin showed no significant change in the omega-3 group compared to the placebo group. Although a relative alleviation in inflammatory state appeared in the omega-3 group, the mean differences of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers between the two groups did not reach statistically significant level except for IL-10-to-IL-6 ratio and serum ferritin level which showed significant changes in favor of omega-3

  18. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids levels on egg and larval quality of Eurasian perch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrotte, E.; Overton, Julia Lynne; Kestemont, P.

    2008-01-01

    Three groups of 40 perch breeders were reared in order to study the effects of 3 different levels of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on egg quality. Two experimental diets, R1 and R2 (n-3/n-6 = 0.13 and 35.54, respectively), were compared to one commercial food, R3 (n-3/n-6 = 3.48.). Spawning and...

  20. Effects of nanorod structure and conformation of fatty acid self-assembled layers on superhydrophobicity of zinc oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badre, Chantal; Dubot, P; Lincot, Daniel; Pauporte, Thierry; Turmine, Mireille

    2007-12-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have been prepared from nanostructured zinc oxide layers by a treatment with fatty acid molecules. The layers are electrochemically deposited from an oxygenated aqueous zinc chloride solution. The effects of the layer's structure, from a dense film to that of a nanorod array, as well as that of the properties of the fatty acid molecules based on C18 chains are described. A contact angle (CA) as high as 167 degrees is obtained with the nanorod structure and the linear saturated molecule (stearic acid). Lower values are found with molecules having an unsaturated bond on C9, in particular with a cis conformation (140 degrees ). These results, supplemented by infrared spectroscopy, indicate an enhancement of the sensitivity to the properties of the fatty acid molecules (conformation, flexibility, saturated or not) when moving from the flat surface to the nanostructured surface. This is attributed to a specific influence of the structure of the tops of the rods and lateral wall properties on the adsorption and organization of the molecules. CA measurements show a very good stability of the surface in time if stored in an environment protected from UV radiations.

  1. Effects of feeding Mediterranean buffalo sorghum silage versus maize silage on the rumen microbiota and milk fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann Huws, Sharon; Chiariotti, Antonella; Sarubbi, Fiorella; Carfì, Francesca; Pace, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    Sorghum presents a sustainable feedstock for Mediterranean buffaloes due to its reduced water and nitrogen requirements compared with maize, which is currently fed primarily. We investigated the effects of feeding sorghum as opposed to maize on Mediterranean buffalo rumen microbial diversity and milk fatty acid content. Four cannulated lactating Mediterranean buffalo cows were fed a basal diet for one month before switching either to maize or sorghum-silage based diets for a 3-month period. Buffaloes were then changed over to the contrasting diet for a further one month. Rumen and milk samples were collected at the end of each month. DGGE- and T-RFLP-based dendrograms generated from rumen samples did not show an effect of diet on rumen bacterial diversity. Milk samples also did not differ in terms of their fatty acid content post sorghum feeding as compared with maize feeding. Thus, sorghum provides an environmentally beneficial alternative to maize for feeding Mediterranean buffalo with little effect on rumen microbial diversity or milk fatty acid composition compared with maize feeding.

  2. Parenteral safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn 10%): safety and effectiveness in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivins, B A; Rapp, R P; Record, K; Meng, H C; Griffen, W O

    1980-01-01

    The safety and effectiveness of a 10% safflower oil emulsion in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency was tested in a prospective study of 15 surgical patients requiring total parenteral nutrition for two to four weeks. Three dosage regimens were evaluated including: Group I: 4% of calories as linoleate daily (five patients), Group II: 4% of calories as linoleate every other day (two patients), and Group III: 8% of calories every other day (eight patients). Patients were monitored for laboratory changes from baseline specifically in those areas where previous fat emulsions have caused serious deviations. No significant changes were noted in hematologic parameters, coagulation studies, cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels. Although there were sporadic mild deviations in liver function changes in several patients, no clinically significant adverse effects could be directly attributed to infusion of the fat emulsion. Three patients had baseline triene/tetraene ratios of 0.4 or greater, indicative of essential fatty/acid deficiency, and these ratios dropped to less than 0.4 within eight days of beginning therapy with the parenteral fat emulsion. The remaining 12 patients maintained a normal triene/tetraene ratio of less than 0.4 throughout the 28 day study period. All three dosage regimens were considered effective for treatment and prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6767452

  3. Effect of Dietary n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Macrosomic Offspring of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guermouche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA on oxidant/antioxidant status, in vitro very low and low density lipoprotein (VLDL-LDL, and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition in macrosomic pups of diabetic mothers. We hypothesized that n-3 PUFA would improve oxidative stress in macrosomia. Diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats fed with the ISIO diet (control or with the EPAX diet (enriched in n-3 PUFAs, by streptozotocin. The macrosomic pups were killed at birth (day 0 and at adulthood (day 90. Lipid parameters and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition were investigated. The oxidant/antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, hydroperoxides, carbonyl proteins, and VLDL-LDL oxidation. Macrosomic rats of ISIO fed diabetic mothers showed an increase in plasma and VLDL-LDL-triglycerides and VLDL-LDL-cholesterol levels and altered VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition. Plasma ORAC was low with high hydroperoxide and carbonyl protein levels. The in vitro oxidizability of VLDL-LDL was enhanced in these macrosomic rats. The EPAX diet corrected lipid parameters and improved oxidant/antioxidant status but increased VLDL-LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Macrosomia is associated with lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. n-3 PUFA exerts favorable effects on lipid metabolism and on the oxidant/antioxidant status of macrosomic rats. However, there are no evident effects on VLDL-LDL oxidation.

  4. Effects of Dietary Garlic Extracts on Whole Body Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Composition, Muscle Free Amino Acid Profiles and Blood Plasma Changes in Juvenile Sterlet Sturgeon,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies were carried out to investigate the supplemental effects of dietary garlic extracts (GE on whole body amino acids, whole body and muscle free amino acids, fatty acid composition and blood plasma changes in 6 month old juvenile sterlet sturgeon (Acipenser ruthenus. In the first experiment, fish with an average body weight of 59.6 g were randomly allotted to each of 10 tanks (two groups of five replicates, 20 fish/tank and fed diets with (0.5% or without (control GE respectively, at the level of 2% of fish body weight per day for 5 wks. Whole body amino acid composition between the GE and control groups were not different (p>0.05. Among free amino acids in muscle, L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-phenylalanine were significantly (p0.05 were noticed at 12 h (74.6 vs 73.0. Plasma insulin concentrations (μIU/ml between the two groups were significantly (p<0.05 different at 1 (10.56 vs 5.06 and 24 h (32.56 vs 2.96 after feeding. The present results suggested that dietary garlic extracts could increase dietary glucose utilization through the insulin secretion, which result in improved fish body quality and feed utilization by juvenile sterlet sturgeon.

  5. Effects of fatty acids composition and microstructure properties of fats and oils on textural properties of dough and cookie quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Amita; Khatkar, B S

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of fatty acid composition and microstructure properties of fats and oils on the textural properties of cookie dough and quality attributes of cookies. Fatty acid composition and microstructure properties of six fats and oils (butter, hydrogenated fat, palm oil, coconut oil, groundnut oil, and sunflower oil) were analyzed. Sunflower oil was found to be the most unsaturated oil with 88.39% unsaturated fatty acid content. Coconut oil and palm oil differed from other fats and oils by having an appreciable amount of lauric acid (59.36%) and palmitic acid (42.14%), respectively. Microstructure size of all fats and oils ranged from 1 to 20 μm being the largest for coconut oil and the smallest for palm oil. In palm oil, small rod-shaped and randomly arranged microstructures were observed, whereas sunflower oil and groundnut oil possessed large, scattered ovule shaped microstructures. It was reported that sunflower oil produced the softest dough, the largest cookie spread and the hardest cookie texture, whereas hydrogenated fat produced the stiffest dough, the lowest spread and most tender cookies. Statistical analysis depicted that palmitic acid and oleic acid demonstrated a positive correlation with dough hardness. Linoleic acid exhibited positive link with cookie spread ratio (r = 0.836**) and breaking strength (r = 0.792**). Microstructure size showed a significant positive relationship with dough density (r = 0.792**), cookie density (r = 0.386*), spread ratio (r = 0.312*), and breaking strength (r = 0.303*).

  6. The Effects of a Plant Growth Regulator, Leaf Removal, Bagging, and Harvest Time on the Lipoxygenase Activity and Fatty Acid Composition of Pinot Noir Grapevines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Y.; Zeng, J.; Zhu, M.; Lv, X.; Wang, T.; Zhang, Z.; Li, H.; Fang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important source of grape aromas, and lipoxygenase is a key enzyme involved in the formation of green leaf volatile substances. In addition, fatty acids are the main substrates that compose GLVs and are the main precursor compound utilized in the formation of grape aromas, which are an important index of grape quality. We examined the effects of a plant growth regulator, leaf removal, bagging, and harvest time on the lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, and the fatty acid composition of grapevines were studied. The following four experimental treatments were conducted using Pinot Noir (Vitis vinifera L.) grapevines to study the following variables: treatment with a plant growth regulator, leaf removal, fruit bagging, and harvest time. We obtained the following results. (1) 16 types of fatty acids were detected in the grape skins. The unsaturated fatty acid content consisted mainly of linoleic acid, oleic acid and palmitoleic acid; however, no linolenic acid was detected. In addition, the saturated fatty acid content consisted primarily of palmitic acid, stearic acid, behenic acid and arachidic acid. (2) Abscisic acid (ABA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA), light intensity, and harvest time appeared to effect LOX activity. (3) According to a principal component analysis (PCA) of the four treatments and the fatty acid content of the skins, ABA (concentration of 1000 mg/L), MeJA (concentrations of 100 meu mol/L, 400 meu mol/L and 800 meu mol/L) and early harvest treatment were responsible for the changes in fatty acid content. These results could be helpful in vineyard management and in improving the quality of grapes. (author)

  7. Dietary Fatty Acids and Predementia Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Solfrizzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated saturated fatty acids (SFA could have negative effects on age-related cognitive decline (ARCD. Furthermore, a reduction of risk for cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI has been found in population samples with elevated fish consumption, and high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, particularly n-3 PUFA. However, recent findings from clinical trials with n-3 PUFA supplementation showed efficacy on depressive symptoms in non–Vapolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 carriers, and on cognitive symptoms only in very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD subgroups, MCI patients, and cognitively unimpaired non-APOE ε4 carriers. These data, together with epidemiological evidence, support the idea that n-3 PUFA may play a role in maintaining adequate cognitive functioning in predementia syndromes, but not when the AD process has already taken over. Therefore, at present, no definitive dietary recommendations on fish and unsaturated fatty acids consumption, or lower intake of saturated fat, in relation to the risk for dementia and cognitive decline are possible.

  8. Dietary fatty acids modulate the effects of TNF family apoptotic inducers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Vaculová, Alena; Hýžďalová, Martina; Kočí, Lenka; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2009), s. 353 ISSN 1107-3756. [The 14th World Congress on Advances in Oncology, and 12th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine . 15.10.2009-17.10.2009, Loutraki] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/07/1178; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/1526 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : fatty acids * apoptosis * colon cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Effect of ingredients on rheological, physico-sensory, and nutritional characteristics of omega-3-fatty acid enriched eggless cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhay Kumar, N; Prasada Rao, U J S; Jeyarani, T; Indrani, D

    2017-10-01

    The effect of defatted soya flour (DS), flax seed powder (FS) in combination (DSFS) with emulsifiers such as glycerol monostearate, GMS (DSFSG) and sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate, SSL (DSFSS) on the rheological, physico-sensory, protein subunit composition by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), fatty acid profile, and nutritional characteristics of eggless cake was studied. Use of DSFS, DSFSG, and DSFSS increased the amylograph peak viscosity, hot and cold paste viscosities similar to the egg. Addition of DSFS, DSFSG, and DSFSS increased viscosity of eggless cake batter; cake volume and the overall quality score (OQS) of eggless cake. Among these, highest improvement in OQS was brought about by DSFSG. According to SDS-PAGE results, the improvement by DSFSG is due to crosslinking of wheat-soya-flax proteins similar to wheat-egg proteins crosslinking. The eggless cake with DSFSG was found to be rich in omega-3-fatty acid as it contained 0.6% of linolenic acid compared to 0.1% each of cake with egg and eggless cake. As eggs are significant source of cholesterol, there has been an increased interest in search of ingredients that can replace egg in cakes. Hence, recent trend in the baking industry is to produce eggless cake using a combination of different ingredients and additives. However, there is no scientific information on the interaction of non-egg protein with wheat protein in building up the structure and also to improve the nutritional quality with respect to protein and fatty acids profiles of eggless cake. The information generated on the use of combination of defatted soya flour and flax seed along with emulsifiers will be helpful for the commercial manufacture of omega-3-fatty acid rich eggless cake with desired quality attributes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deleterious effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in the fat-1 mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Shefer-Weinberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD represents a spectrum of pathologies, ranging from hepatocellular steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, fibrosis and cirrhosis. It has been suggested that fish oil containing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA induce beneficial effects in NAFLD. However, n-3 PUFA are sensitive to peroxidation that generate free radicals and reactive aldehydes. We aimed at determining whether changing the tissue ratio of n-3 to n-6 PUFA may be beneficial or alternatively harmful to the etiology of NAFLD. The transgenic Fat-1 mouse model was used to determine whether n-3 PUFA positively or negatively affect the development of NAFLD. fat-1mice express the fat-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans, which encodes an n-3 fatty-acid desaturase that converts n-6 to n-3 fatty acids. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice served as the control group. Both groups of mice were fed methionine and choline deficient (MCD diet, which induces NASH within 4 weeks. The study shows that NASH developed faster and was more severe in mice from the fat-1 group when compared to control C57BL/6 mice. This was due to enhanced lipid peroxidation of PUFA in the liver of the fat-1 mice as compared to the control group. Results of our mice study suggest that supplementing the diet of individuals who develop or have fatty livers with n-3 PUFA should be carefully considered and if recommended adequate antioxidants should be added to the diet in order to reduce such risk.

  11. Esterification of fatty acids using nylon-immobilized lipase in n-hexane: kinetic parameters and chain-length effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, A; Gainer, J L; Carta, G; Mrani, A; Kadiri, T; Belarbi, Y; Mir, A

    2002-02-28

    The esterification of long-chain fatty acids in n-hexane catalyzed by nylon-immobilized lipase from Candida rugosa has been investigated. Butyl oleate (22 carbon atoms), oleyl butyrate (22 carbon atoms) and oleyl oleate (36 carbon atoms) were produced at maximum reaction rates of approximately equal to 60 mmol h(-1) g(-1) immobilized enzyme when the substrates were present in equimolar proportions at an initial concentration of 0.6 mol l(-1). The observed kinetic behavior of all the esterification reactions is found to follow a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism with competitive inhibition by both substrates. The effect of the chain-length of the fatty acids and the alcohols could be correlated to some mechanistic models, in accordance with the calculated kinetic parameters.

  12. Effect of Vegetable Oil Fortified Feeds on the Content of Fatty Acids in Breast and Thigh Muscles in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Krejčí-Treu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to compare the effect of six vegetable oils added to feeding mixtures that were administered to broiler chickens on the content of major fatty acids in chicken meat. The experiment started with 90 one-day-old Ross 308 meat hybrid male chickens that were divided into six groups. Chickens were fed complete feeding mixtures for the prefattening (BR1, fattening (BR2, and post-fattening (BR3 of broiler chickens. The BR1 feeding mixture was administered to chickens aged 1-10 days, the BR2 feeding mixture was given from Day 11 to Day 30, and the BR3 feeding mixture was then administered until Day 42. The BR1 feeding mixture that was administered to all six groups during the first ten days of the experiment was supplemented with soybean oil. BR2 and BR3 feeding mixtures used to feed chickens aged 11-42 days were fortified with soybean oil (SO Group, rapeseed oil (RO Group, sunflower oil (SFO Group, flaxseed oil (FO Group, olive oil (OO Group, and evening primrose oil (EPO Group. The vegetable oils used differed by the composition of fatty acids, particularly by the content of oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid. The use of the above-described experimental diets in young broilers from Day 11 to 42 had a significant effect on the content of fatty acids in the fat from breast and thigh muscles. The content of α-linolenic acid in breast and thigh muscles of broilers that received the feed containing flaxseed oil (21.16 g/100 g of oil and 17.13 g/100 g of oil, respectively significantly increased (p ⪬ 0.01. The highest content of linoleic acid (p ⪬ 0.01 in breast and thigh muscles was found in chickens that were fed the feed containing primrose oil (59.13 g/100 g and 51.71 g/100 g. A significant increase (p ⪬ 0.01 in the level of oleic acid was detected in both breast and thigh muscles of broilers that received olive oil fortified feed (52.44 g/100 g and 43.70 g/100 g of oil. No significant variation was

  13. Effect of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana oil administered by gavage on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stress of mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Silva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of daily intragastric administration of bullfrog oil (oleic, linoleic and palmitoleic acid-rich oil, corresponding to 0.4% of body weight for four weeks, on fatty acid composition and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in mouse liver. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, biomarkers of tissue injury, were determined in liver homogenates and serum. The proportions of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids, from 37 to 60% in the total fatty acid content were increased in the liver of the bullfrog oil-treated group (P < 0.05 compared to control. At the same time, a significant decrease in the relative abundance of 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0 (saturated fatty acids, from 49 to 25% was observed. The hepatic content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was increased from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.3 nmol TBA-MDA/mg protein and catalase activity was increased from 840 ± 32 to 1110 ± 45 µmol reduced H2O2 min-1 mg protein-1 in the treated group. Bullfrog oil administration increased AST and ALP activities in the liver (from 234.10 ± 0.12 to 342.84 ± 0.13 and 9.38 ± 0.60 to 20.06 ± 0.27 U/g, respectively and in serum (from 95.41 ± 6.13 to 120.32 ± 3.15 and 234.75 ± 11.5 to 254.41 ± 2.73 U/l, respectively, suggesting that this treatment induced tissue damage. ALT activity was increased from 287.28 ± 0.29 to 315.98 ± 0.34 U/g in the liver but remained unchanged in serum, whereas the GGT activity was not affected by bullfrog oil treatment. Therefore, despite the interesting modulation of fatty acids by bullfrog oil, a possible therapeutic use requires care since some adverse effects were observed in liver.

  14. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu GH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guo Hao Wu,1 Jian Gao,2 Chun Yan Ji,2 Lorenzo Pradelli,3 Qiu Lei Xi,1 Qiu Lin Zhuang1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Nutrition, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3AdRes Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Piazza Carlo Emanuele II, Torino, Italy Background and objectives: Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN for intensive care unit (ICU patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. Methods: We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. Results: The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven® 10% fish oil emulsion would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB, mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days. The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Conclusion: Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN. Keywords: omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipids, ICU patients, total costs, microsimulation, external validation, length of hospital stay

  15. Effect of dietary vegetable oils on the fatty acid profile of plasma lipoproteins in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Cancino-Padilla, Nathaly; Loor, Juan J; Garnsworthy, Philip C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary supplementation of soybean oil (SO) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO) on the transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Three lactating and three non-lactating Holstein cows were used in two different 3 × 3 Latin square experiments that included three periods of 21 d. Dietary treatments for lactating cows consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (500 g/d per cow) or HPO (500 g/d per cow). For non-lactating cows, dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (170 g/d per cow) or HPO (170 g/d per cow). Compared with the control and SO diet, HPO addition increased (p lipoprotein (HDL). Total saturated FA were increased (p lipoprotein (VLDL). In non-lactating cows, the concentration of C18:0 was increased (p lipoprotein. Overall, it was found that distribution and transport of FA within the bovine plasma lipoproteins may be influenced by chain length and degree of unsaturation of dietary lipids. Also, the distribution of individual FA isomers such as C18:1trans-11 and C18:2cis-9,trans-11 may vary depending on the physiological state of the cow (lactating or non-lactating), and are increased in plasma (lactating cows) and the HDL (non-lactating cows) when cows are fed SO.

  16. Metabolism and fatty acid profile in fat and lean rainbow trout lines fed with vegetable oil: effect of carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Sam Kamalam

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of dietary carbohydrates on metabolism, with special focus on fatty acid bioconversion and flesh lipid composition in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for muscle lipid content and fed with vegetable oils. These lines were chosen based on previously demonstrated potential differences in LC-PUFA synthesis and carbohydrate utilization. Applying a factorial study design, juvenile trout from the lean (L and the fat (F line were fed vegetable oil based diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1% for 12 weeks. Blood, liver, muscle, intestine and adipose tissue were sampled after the last meal. Feed intake and growth was higher in the L line than the F line, irrespective of the diet. Moderate postprandial hyperglycemia, strong induction of hepatic glucokinase and repressed glucose-6-phosphatase transcripts confirmed the metabolic response of both lines to carbohydrate intake. Further at the transcriptional level, dietary carbohydrate in the presence of n-3 LC-PUFA deficient vegetable oils enhanced intestinal chylomicron assembly, disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and importantly elicited a higher response of key desaturase and elongase enzymes in the liver and intestine that endorsed our hypothesis. PPARγ was identified as the factor mediating this dietary regulation of fatty acid bioconversion enzymes in the liver. However, these molecular changes were not sufficient to modify the fatty acid composition of muscle or liver. Concerning the genotype effect, there was no evidence of substantial genotypic difference in lipid metabolism, LC-PUFA synthesis and flesh fatty acid profile when fed with vegetable oils. The minor reduction in plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in the F line was linked to potentially higher glucose and lipid uptake in the muscle. Overall, these data emphasize the importance of dietary macro-nutrient interface in evolving fish nutrition strategies.

  17. Metabolism and fatty acid profile in fat and lean rainbow trout lines fed with vegetable oil: effect of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalam, Biju Sam; Médale, Françoise; Larroquet, Laurence; Corraze, Geneviève; Panserat, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary carbohydrates on metabolism, with special focus on fatty acid bioconversion and flesh lipid composition in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for muscle lipid content and fed with vegetable oils. These lines were chosen based on previously demonstrated potential differences in LC-PUFA synthesis and carbohydrate utilization. Applying a factorial study design, juvenile trout from the lean (L) and the fat (F) line were fed vegetable oil based diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1%) for 12 weeks. Blood, liver, muscle, intestine and adipose tissue were sampled after the last meal. Feed intake and growth was higher in the L line than the F line, irrespective of the diet. Moderate postprandial hyperglycemia, strong induction of hepatic glucokinase and repressed glucose-6-phosphatase transcripts confirmed the metabolic response of both lines to carbohydrate intake. Further at the transcriptional level, dietary carbohydrate in the presence of n-3 LC-PUFA deficient vegetable oils enhanced intestinal chylomicron assembly, disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and importantly elicited a higher response of key desaturase and elongase enzymes in the liver and intestine that endorsed our hypothesis. PPARγ was identified as the factor mediating this dietary regulation of fatty acid bioconversion enzymes in the liver. However, these molecular changes were not sufficient to modify the fatty acid composition of muscle or liver. Concerning the genotype effect, there was no evidence of substantial genotypic difference in lipid metabolism, LC-PUFA synthesis and flesh fatty acid profile when fed with vegetable oils. The minor reduction in plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in the F line was linked to potentially higher glucose and lipid uptake in the muscle. Overall, these data emphasize the importance of dietary macro-nutrient interface in evolving fish nutrition strategies.

  18. Evaluation of cyclosporine-sparing effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M R; Linek, M; Löwenstein, C; Röthig, A; Doucette, K; Thorstensen, K; Mueller, R S

    2016-04-01

    A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled multicentre trial was conducted in 36 dogs with atopic dermatitis to evaluate the cyclosporine-sparing effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dogs were stable on their individual cyclosporine dosage and received either a mainly omega-3 fatty acid product with a minor omega-6 fatty acid fraction or placebo, orally for 12 weeks. Dogs were examined every 4 weeks and the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI-03) was determined by a clinician. Pruritus, quality of life, global condition and coat quality were scored by the owner. If the dog's CADESI-03 and/or pruritus score improved by at least 25% compared with the previous visit, the cyclosporine dosage was decreased by approximately 25%. If the scores deteriorated by at least 25%, the cyclosporine dosage was increased by the same percentage. The median daily cyclosporine dosage/kg bodyweight decreased in the active group from 4.1 mg to 2.6 mg and in the placebo group from 3.5 mg to 3.3 mg over the study period. The difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.009). The improvement in median pruritus score from inclusion to completion was significantly greater in the active group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in CADESI-03 changes between groups (P = 0.38). The results of this study indicate a cyclosporine-sparing effect of a mainly omega-3 fatty acid supplement in dogs with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effect of Inflammatory and Noninflammatory Stress on Beta-Hydroxybutyrate and Free Fatty Acids in Rat Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    fasting plus screen-restraint and fasting plus femoral fracture. Inflammatory stresses caused a marked inhibition of the normal fasting-induced ketosis ...and a reduction in the level of circulating free fatty acids. Noninflammatory stresses caused no inhibition of the normal fasting-induced ketosis but did cause a reduction in the level of circulating free fatty acids. (Author)

  20. Comparison of the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of heterotrophic and photoautotrophic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinzelmann, S.M.; Chivall, David; M'Boule, D.; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Villanueva, Laura; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Schouten, Stefan; Van der Meer, Marcel T J

    2015-01-01

    The core metabolism of microorganisms has a major influence on the hydrogen isotopic composition of their fatty acids. Heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids with a deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio either slightly depleted or enriched in D compared to the growth water, while photo- and

  1. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

  2. Effect of type of suckling and polyunsaturated fatty acid use on lamb production. 2. Chemical and fatty acid composition of raw and cooked meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Toteda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in order to examine the chemical and fatty acid composition of raw and cooked meat obtained fromlambs raised under mothers or reared by artificial suckling with acidified milk replacers with or without polyunsaturated fattyacid (PUFA supplementation. Meat samples were taken from twenty Gentile di Puglia male lambs subjected to the followingfeeding treatments: the control group received only maternal milk (MM, n.=6 while two groups were reared by artificial sucklingwith an acidified milk replacer (MR, n.=7 or with an acidified milk replacer supplemented with 10 ml/l of a PUFA enrichedoil (MR+PUFA, n.=7. Lambs were slaughtered at 45 days of age. After 24 hours of refrigeration at 4 °C, the lumbar regionwas dissected from each right half-carcass and split into pieces, one of which was used raw while the other was cooked in aventilated electric oven at 180 °C until an internal temperature of 75 °C was reached. Chemical and fatty acid analysis wereperformed on raw and cooked meat, while only raw meat was assessed for cholesterol. Cooking losses were also evaluated.Meat obtained from MR+PUFA fed lambs contained more fat (Punder mothers increased the total amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA, compared with both the MR group (Pthe MR+PUFA one (Pcomparison with both MR diets. The highest PUFA/SFA ratio of meat was recorded for the MR+PUFA group (0.27, with statisticaldifferences respect to the MR group (0.21; Pmilk produced meat containing more cholesterol than the MR+PUFA group (85.89 vs 76.26 mg/100 g; Pindex of meat was higher following natural rearing in comparison with the MR+PUFA treatment (1.34 vs 1.05;Pand 0.76, respectively; Pparameters evaluated. In conclusion, artificial suckling with acidified milk replacers improves some meat quality features.Supplementation of milk replacers with PUFAs, although in a limited way, may improve the dietetic properties of lamb meat.

  3. Effect of dietary lignocellulose on ileal and total tract digestibility of fat and fatty acids in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusławska-Tryk, M; Piotrowska, A; Szymeczko, R; Burlikowska, K

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of a lignocellulose supplemented diet on apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of fat and fatty acids (FA) in broiler chickens. A total of 48 21-day-old male Ross 308 chickens were divided into four treatment groups (n = 12) with six replicates per treatment. From 21 to 42 days of age, the broilers were fed experimental diets varied in the amount of lignocellulose: 0%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Total excreta were gathered during the last 3 days of the feeding trial and digesta was collected from the ileum at 42 days of the bird age. Digestibility was determined by the indicator method. The ether extract content in diet/digesta/excreta was determined by the gravimetric method, and fatty acid methyl esters were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fat digestibility measured to the end of the small intestine and in the whole gastrointestinal tract in birds was high and exceeded 90% and 87% respectively. Addition of lignocellulose (1%) increased (p digestibility but had no significant effect on total tract fat digestion. Absorption of total fatty acids (TFA) as well as myristic (C14:0), palmitoleic (C16:1) and α-linolenic (C18:3n-3) acids, estimated by both methods, was significantly higher in birds fed the diets supplemented with lignocellulose, especially at a dose of 1%. Total tract absorption of some dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (C20:2, C20:4n-6) was significantly lower from diet supplemented with 0.5% and 0.25% lignocellulose. There was observed a decrease in apparent digestibility of fat and most examined fatty acids, when measured between terminal ileum and total gastrointestinal tract. The results suggest that lignocellulose can affect digestion and FA absorption in broilers but, as the effect of lignocellulose was not studied previously, further investigations are necessary to confirm the results of the present experiment. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016

  4. Effect of UV-B radiation on the fatty acid composition of the marine phytoplankter Tetraselmis sp.: Relationahip to cellular pigments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goes, J.I.; Handa, N.; Taguchi, S.; Hama, T.

    values or the values of fatty ac~ds recorded when the treated samples were returned to control conditions. Variance ratios (F) presented in Table 4 Goes et a1 Effect of UV-B radiation on Tetraselmis fatty acid compos~tion 267 -- Table 3...

  5. AFSC/RACE/FBEP/Copeman: Effect of temperature and tissue type on fatty acid signatures of two species of North Pacific juvenile gadids: A laboratory feeding study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is from a laboratory study that investigated the effect of temperature and tissue type on fatty acid signatures of Pacific cod and walleye pollock.

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Appears to Attenuate Particulate Air Pollution-induced Cardiac Effects and Lipid Changes in Healthy Middle-aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Air pollution exposure has been associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. A recent epidemiologic study reported that omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation blunted the cardiac responses to air pollution exposure. Objective: To evaluate in a randomized contro...

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Attenuates Cardiovascular Effects in Healthy Older Volunteers Exposed to Concentrated Ambient Fine and UltrafineParticulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure has been associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. A recent epidemiology study reported that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation blunted the response of study participants to PM. Our study was des...

  8. Effects of corn oil on the volatile fatty acids in horses with induced gastric ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetive. To determine the influence of corn oil on the volatile fatty acids (VFA concentrations in the gastric juice in horses with phenylbutazone (PBZ induced gastric ulcers and Correlate the gastroscopic findings with the VFA concentrations. Materials and methods. 15 horses were allotted in 3 groups. Group I (control received placebo during first 6 days (induction period and was treated with sucralfate for 2 weeks (treatment period. Groups II and III received PBZ during the induction phase. After 6 days, horses from group II received 70 mL of corn oil /100 kg of body weight/ po, twice a day, for 2 weeks and horses from group III received 90 mL of corn oil/100 kg of body weight/ po, twice a day, for 2 weeks. All horses were examined by gastroscopy at days 0, 7 and 21. The lesions were recorded and classified according to the number and severity. Samples from gastric fluid were taken to measure the concentrations of the acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic acids. Results. Both PBZ protocols produced lesions in the both non-glandular and glandular areas of the stomach. All the treatments produced healing of the injured mucosa glandular. Neither of the two corn oil treatments affected healing of the gastric ulcers located in the non-glandular area. Conclusions. The concentrations of acetic and butyric acids were highest in the gastric juice. The corn oil and sucralfate did not lead to differences in the concentration of acetic acid and butyric acid.

  9. Effects of branched-chain volatile fatty acids on lactation performance and mRNA expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis in mammary gland of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Wang, C; Guo, G; Huo, W J; Zhang, S L; Pei, C X; Zhang, Y L; Wang, H

    2018-02-12

    Branched-chain volatile fatty acids (BCVFA) supplements could promote lactation performance and milk quality by improving ruminal fermentation and milk fatty acid synthesis. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of BCVFA supplementation on milk performance, ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility and mRNA expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis in mammary gland of dairy cows. A total of 36 multiparous Chinese Holstein cows averaging 606±4.7 kg of BW, 65±5.2 day in milk (DIM) with daily milk production of 30.6±0.72 kg were assigned to one of four groups blocked by lactation number, milk yield and DIM. The treatments were control, low-BCVFA (LBCVFA), medium-BCVFA (MBCVFA) and high-BCVFA (HBCVFA) with 0, 30, 60 and 90 g BCVFA per cow per day, respectively. Experimental periods were 105 days with 15 days of adaptation and 90 days of data collection. Dry matter (DM) intake tended to increase, but BW changes were similar among treatments. Yields of actual milk, 4% fat corrected milk, milk fat and true protein linearly increased, but feed conversion ratio (FCR) linearly decreased with increasing BCVFA supplementation. Milk fat content linearly increased, but true protein content tended to increase. Contents of C4:0, C6:0, C8:0, C10:0, C12:0, C14:0 and C15:0 fatty acids in milk fat linearly increased, whereas other fatty acids were not affected with increasing BCVFA supplementation. Ruminal pH, ammonia N concentration and propionate molar proportion linearly decreased, but total VFA production and molar proportions of acetate and butyrate linearly increased with increasing BCVFA supplementation. Consequently, acetate to propionate ratios linearly increased. Digestibilities of DM, organic matter, CP, NDF and ADF also linearly increased. In addition, mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 and fatty acid-binding protein 3 linearly increased, mRNA expressions of acetyl

  10. Fatty acids, mercury, and methylmercury bioaccessibility in salmon (Salmo salar) using an in vitro model: Effect of culinary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sara; Afonso, Cláudia; Cardoso, Carlos; Batista, Irineu; Chaveiro, Nádia; Nunes, Maria Leonor; Bandarra, Narcisa Maria

    2015-10-15

    The effect of culinary treatments on the fatty acid profile, mercury (Hg), and methylmercury (MeHg) levels of salmon was studied. The bioaccessibility of fatty acids, Hg, and MeHg in raw and grilled salmon was determined. The most intense thermal treatment (grilling) did not alter the relative fatty acid (FA) profile. There were bioaccessibility differences between FAs. To the authors' knowledge, for the first time, higher bioaccessibility of the long-chain FAs than the short- and medium-chain FAs was measured. Chemical interaction phenomena seemed to play a role. On the other hand, higher levels of unsaturation decreased bioaccessibility. Two main alternative hypotheses were put forward, either lower polarity led to higher incorporation of FAs with longer hydrophobic aliphatic chain and lower number of double bonds in the emulsion present in the bioaccessible fraction or enzymatic selectivity preferentially hydrolyzed some FAs on the basis of their structure or position in the triacylglycerol molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride and immunological castration in pigs. Part 2: belly quality characteristics and fatty acid composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Cristina COSTA E SILVA

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of immunocastration and ractopamine in the diet on the belly quality were investigated from two crossbred pigs under different conditions of production, diet, management, and slaughter arranged in factorial design using two levels of addition of ractopamine in the diet, 0 and 7.5 ppm, and three genders (gilts, immunocastrated and barrows. The quality of bellies were analyzed for chemical composition, pH, meat and fat color, backfat thickness and fatty acid profile of the fat. The addition of ractopamine showed no significant influence on pH, color and chemical composition in two crossbred pigs. The immunocastrated had thicker belly backfat compared to the bellies of the gilts. The contents of fatty acids polyunsaturated, linoleic, linoleic, arachidonic, total omega 3 and omega 6 were higher for immunocastrated pigs, as well as presenting values greater than 0.4 for the PUFA:SFA ratio, thus, providing bellies with better nutritional quality. The bellies of the gilts and immunocastrated pigs had higher concentrations of iodine value, indicative of higher unsaturated fat content. The results indicated that the addition of ractopamine and immunocastration had little influence on the quality of bellies as well as in their fatty acid profiles, suggesting the continuity of implementation of these techniques.

  12. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Dietary Supplementation on Ocular Surface and Tear Film in Diabetic Patients with Dry Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Constantine D; Makri, Olga E; Pagoulatos, Dionisios; Vasilakis, Panagiotis; Peristeropoulou, Politimi; Kouli, Vasiliki; Eliopoulou, Maria I; Psachoulia, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids on ocular surface and tear film in patients with type 2 diabetes suffering from dry eye. Thirty-six patients suffering from type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe dry eye syndrome were included in the study. Patients were assigned to receive omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids for 3 months. Tear film break-up time test, Schirmer-I test, and conjunctival impression cytology analysis were performed on all patients at baseline and after 1 and 3 months. The subjective symptoms of dry eye were evaluated with the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire at the same time points. Patients' average age was 65.57 ± 4.27 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 14.85 ± 5.4 years. There was a statistically significant increase in Schirmer-I test results and tear break-up time score after 3 months of supplementary intake of omega-3 fatty acids compared to baseline (p dry eye syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Probiotics Supplemented with Omega-3 Fatty Acids are More Effective for Hepatic Steatosis Reduction in an Animal Model of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobyliak, Nazarii; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana; Bodnar, Petro; Beregova, Tetyana

    2017-06-01

    Today probiotics have been suggested as a treatment for the prevention of NAFLD. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may have beneficial effects in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, adipose tissue function and inflammation. The present study was designed to determine whether probiotics plus omega-3 are superior to probiotics alone on the monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced NAFLD model in rats. We included 60 rats divided into four groups, 15 animals in each. Rats of group I were intact. Newborn rats of groups II-IV were injected with MSG. The III (Symbiter) group received 2.5 ml/kg of multiprobiotic "Symbiter" containing concentrated biomass of 14 probiotic bacteria genera. The IV (Symbiter-Omega) groups received "Symbiter-Omega" combination of probiotic biomass supplemented with flax and wheat germ oil (250 mg of each, concentration of omega-3 fatty acids 1-5 %). In both interventional groups reduction in total NAS score was observed. Supplementation of alive probiotic mixture with omega-3 fatty acids lead to 20 % higher decrease in steatosis score (0.73 ± 0.11 vs 0.93 ± 0.22, p = 0.848) and reduction by 16.6 % of triglycerides content in liver as compared to probiotic alone. Our study demonstrated more pronounced reduction in hepatic steatosis and hepatic lipid accumulation after treatment with combination of alive probiotics and omega-3 as compared to probiotics alone.

  14. Infrared stabilization of rice bran and its effects on γ-oryzanol content, tocopherols and fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Neşe; Tuncel, Necati Barış; Kocabıyık, Habib

    2014-06-01

    Rice bran is a nutritionally valuable by-product of paddy milling. In this study an experimental infrared (IR) stabilization system was developed to prevent rice bran rancidity. The free fatty acid content of raw and IR-stabilized rice bran samples was monitored every 15 days during 6 months of storage. In addition, energy consumption was determined. The free fatty acid content of rice bran stabilized at 600 W IR power for 5 min remained below 5% for 165 days. No significant change in γ-oryzanol content or fatty acid composition but a significant decrease in tocopherol content was observed in stabilized rice bran compared with raw bran. IR stabilization was found to be comparable to extrusion with regard to energy consumption. IR stabilization was effective in preventing hydrolytic rancidity of rice bran. By optimizing the operational parameters of IR stabilization, this by-product has the potential for use in the food industry in various ways as a value-added commodity. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dietary medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are of nutritional interest because they are more easily absorbed from dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) than are long-chain fatty acids from, for example, vegetable oils. It has generally been claimed that MCFAs do not increase plasma...... cholesterol, although this claim is poorly documented. Objective: We compared the effects of a diet rich in either MCFAs or oleic acid on fasting blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities in healthy men. Design: In a study with a double-blind, randomized, crossover...... plasma total triacylglycerol (P = 0.0361), and higher plasma glucose (P = 0.033). Plasma HDL-cholesterol and insulin concentrations and activities of cholesterol ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein did not differ significantly between the diets. Conclusions: Compared with fat high...

  16. Effects of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Ding

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the effect of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens. A total of 960 Lohmann laying hens aged 53 weeks were enrolled, under 4 different treatment diets supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg essential oils (Enviva EO, Dupont Nutrition Biosciences ApS, Denmark, respectively. Each treatment was replicated 8 times with 30 birds each. Birds were fed dietary treatment diets for 12 weeks (54 to 65 weeks. For data recording and analysis, a 12-week period was divided into 3 periods of 4 weeks' duration each: period 1 (54 to 57 weeks, period 2 (58 to 61 weeks, and period 3 (62 to 65 weeks. For the diet supplemented with Enviva EO, hen-day egg production and the feed conversion ratio (FCR were significantly improved (P < 0.05 at weeks 58 to 61, and the eggshell thickness was significantly increased (P < 0.05 at week 65. However, egg production, egg weight, feed intake, FCR and other egg quality parameters (albumen height, Haugh unit, egg yolk color and eggshell strength were not affected by the dietary treatment. In addition, compared with the control diet, protein digestibility in the 100 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment group was significantly increased (P < 0.05, and fat digestibility in the 100 and 150 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment groups was significantly decreased (P < 0.05, but Enviva EO had no effect on energy apparent digestibility. Saturated fatty acid (SFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA gradually decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA increased with Enviva EO supplementation, but the difference was not significant. The data suggested that the supplementation of essential oils (Enviva EO in laying hen diet did not show a significant positive effect on performance and yolk fatty acid composition but it tended to increase eggshell thickness and protein digestibility, especially at the dose of 50 mg/kg.

  17. Exogenous fatty acid metabolism in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) is a target for novel antibiotic development. All bacteria encode for mechanisms to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and some bacteria can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. Bacteria encode three different mechanisms for activating exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipid synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-CoA in Gammaproteobacteria such as E. coli. Acyl-CoA molecules constitute a separate pool from endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Acyl-CoA can be used for phospholipid synthesis or broken down by β-oxidation, but cannot be used for lipopolysaccharide synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-ACP in some Gram-negative bacteria. The resulting acyl-ACP undergoes the same fates as endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-phosphates in Gram-positive bacteria, and can be used for phospholipid synthesis or become acyl-ACP. Only the order Lactobacillales can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. FASII shuts down completely in presence of exogenous fatty acids in Lactobacillales, allowing Lactobacillales to synthesize phospholipids entirely from exogenous fatty acids. Inhibition of FASII cannot be bypassed in other bacteria because FASII is only partially down-regulated in presence of exogenous fatty acid or FASII is required to synthesize essential metabolites such as β-hydroxyacyl-ACP. Certain selective pressures such as FASII inhibition or growth in biofilms can select for naturally occurring one step mutations that attenuate endogenous fatty acid synthesis. Although attempts have been made to estimate the natural prevalence of these mutants, culture-independent metagenomic methods would provide a better estimate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Synergistic and/or additive effects on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FA). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. As well, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte fatty acid composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanic/Latino...

  19. Neonatal fatty acid status and cardiometabolic health at 9 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seggers, Jorien; Kikkert, Hedwig K.; de Jong, Corina; Decsi, Tamas; Boehm, Gunther; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background: Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status is associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. We previously demonstrated no effect of LCPUFA supplementation after birth on BP and anthropometrics. Little is known about the association between fatty acid status at

  20. Effect of Processing on Physiochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia occidentails) Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alademeyin, J. O.; Arawande, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the physicochemical properties and fatty acid composition of the seed oil extracted from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis). The extracted oil was degummed, neutralised and bleached. The oil yield was 42.26±0.20%. The specific gravity (at 25 degree C) of the oil was 0.923±0.003 and the refractive index (at 25 degree C) was 1.475±0.002. Processing of the crude oil resulted in progressive decrease in turbidity, colour, free fatty acid, acid value, peroxide value and saponification value. However, there was increase in smoke point (243.00±0.03 to 253.00±0.03 degree C), flash point (285.00±1.20 to 304.0 1.10 degree C) and fire point (345.001.10 to 358.0 1.55 degree C) as well as iodine value (113.00 to 121.50 g/100 g) and fatty acid composition during the processing of the oil. The fatty acids detected in the oil samples were myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, arachidic, behenic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The predominant fatty acid was oleic acid (47.40-47.90%) followed by linoleic acid (26.36-30.44%) while the least fatty acid was linolenic acid (0.01-0.05%). (author)

  1. Effect of Difference in Fatty Acid Chain Lengths of Medium- Chain Lipids on Lipid/Surfactant/Water Phase Diagrams and Drug Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal N. Prajapati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipids consisting of medium chain fatty acids are commonly used in the development of lipid-based selfemulsifying and self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. However, no systematic approach to selecting one lipid over another has been reported in the literature. In this study, propylene glycol (PG monoester (PG monocaprylate, Capmul PG-8® and PG diester (PG dicaprylocaprate, Captex 200P® of C8-fatty acids were compared with PG monoester (PG monolaurate, Capmul PG-12® and PG diester (PG dilaurate, Capmul PG-2L® of C12-fatty acids with respect to their phase diagrams, and especially for their ability to form microemulsions in the presence of a common surfactant, Cremophor EL®, and water. The solubility of two model drugs, danazol and probucol, in the lipids and lipid/surfactant mixtures were also compared. The effect of the chain length of medium-chain fatty acids (C8 versus C12 on the phase diagrams of the lipids was minimal. Both shorter and longer chain lipids formed essentially similar microemulsion and emulsion regions in the presence of Cremophor EL® and water, although the C12-fatty acid esters formed larger gel regions in the phase diagrams than the C8-fatty acid esters. When monoesters were mixed with their respective diesters at 1:1 ratios, larger microemulsion regions with lower lipid particle sizes were observed compared to those obtained with individual lipids alone. While the solubility of both danazol and probucol increased greatly in all lipids studied, compared to their aqueous solubility, the solubility in C12-fatty acid esters was found to be lower than in C8-fatty acid esters when the lipids were used alone. This difference in solubility due to the difference in fatty acid chain length, practically disappeared when the lipids were combined with the surfactant.

  2. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  3. Effect of inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase on MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros-Paredes, J M; Gonzalez-Castañeda, R E; Escalante-Castañeda, A; Tejeda-Martínez, A R; Castañeda-Achutiguí, F; Flores-Soto, M E

    2017-01-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by balance problems, muscle rigidity, and slow movement due to low dopamine levels and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The endocannabinoid system is known to modulate the nigrostriatal pathway through endogenous ligands such as anandamide (AEA), which is hydrolysed by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The purpose of this study was to increase AEA levels using FAAH inhibitor URB597 to evaluate the modulatory effect of AEA on dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Our study included 4 experimental groups (n = 6 mice per group): a control group receiving no treatment, a group receiving URB597 (0.2mg/kg) every 3 days for 30 days, a group treated with MPTP (30mg/kg) for 5 days, and a group receiving URB597 and subsequently MPTP injections. Three days after the last dose, we conducted a series of behavioural tests (beam test, pole test, and stride length test) to compare motor coordination between groups. We subsequently analysed immunoreactivity of dopaminergic cells and microglia in the SNpc and striatum. Mice treated with URB597 plus MPTP were found to perform better on behavioural tests than mice receiving MPTP only. According to the immunohistochemistry study, mice receiving MPTP showed fewer dopaminergic cells and fibres in the SNpc and striatum. Animals treated with URB597 plus MPTP displayed increased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity compared to those treated with MPTP only. Regarding microglial immunoreactivity, the group receiving MPTP showed higher Iba1 immunoreactivity in the striatum and SNpc than did the group treated with URB597 plus MPTP. Our results show that URB597 exerts a protective effect since it inhibits dopaminergic neuronal death, decreases microglial immunoreactivity, and improves MPTP-induced motor alterations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado

  4. Comparative effects of dietary sea urchin shell powder and feed additives on meat quality and fatty acid profiles of broiler breast meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Churl Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was a small pen trial in which we investigated comparative effects of dietary sea urchin shell powder and feed additives on meat quality and fatty acid profiles of broiler breast meat. A total of 108 male broilers were assigned to 3 groups (control, 1% sea urchin shell powder, and 1% feed additives with 3 replicates of 12 chicks per pen in a completely randomized design for 28 days. The following parameters have been investigated: proximate composition (DM, CP, EE, and ash, physicochemical properties (pH, TBARS, cooking loss and DPPH radical scavenging, meat color and fatty acid profiles. No remarkable effects between treatment and storage day were observed for proximate composition, physicochemical properties, meat color and fatty acid profiles. In conclusion, diets with 1% sea urchin shell powder have the ability to increase DPPH radical scavenging and unsaturated fatty acid, indicating an opportunity for partial diet substitution in comparison with 1% feed additives.

  5. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panyakaew, P.; Boon, N.; Goel, G.; Yuangklang, C.; Schonewille, J.T.; Hendriks, W.H.; Fievez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on

  6. Effect of γ-irradiation on bioactivity, fatty acid compositions and volatile compounds of clary sage seed (Salvia sclarea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Hasan; Ozturk, Ismet; Tulukcu, Eray; Sagdic, Osman

    2011-09-01

    Clary sage seeds (Salvia sclarea L.) were obtained from plants cultivated, and 2.5, 4.0, 5.5, and 7.0 kGy doses of γ-irradiation were applied to the clary sage seeds. They were then analyzed for their protein, ash, oil and dry matter contents, and fatty acid composition. Additionally, the total phenolic contents, antiradical, antioxidant activities, and volatile compounds of the clary sage seed extract were determined. There was no significant difference in protein content. However, the moisture, oil, and ash contents of the samples were affected by irradiation. While the 7 kGy dose had a positive effect on the total phenolic content and antiradical activity of the sage seed extract, all doses have negative effects on the antioxidant activity of the sage seed. The main fatty acid of the sage seed was remarkably found as α-linolenic acid. The four irradiation levels caused significant differences in fatty acid composition by affecting all fatty acids except palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosenoic acids. The dominant volatile compounds of control sage seed were found as β-pinene (18.81%) and limonene (15.60%). Higher doses of the irradiation decreased volatile components of sage seed. Clary sage seed including high omega-3 can be irradiated with low doses (≤ 2.5 kGy) of γ-irradiation. Clary sage is one of the most popular Salvia species in Turkey and many countries. Clary sage seed has approximately 29% oil content and this oil contains >50% of α-linolenic acid. γ-Irradiation is widely applied in the preservation of spice quality. The present study shows that the antioxidant activity of the clary sage seed is decreased by γ-irradiation. Additionally, higher doses of irradiation also decreased the volatile components of sage seed. Therefore, we suggest that clary sage seed which includes high levels of omega-3 should be irradiated with low doses (≤ 2.5 kGy) of γ-irradiation. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Effect of α-linolenic acid and DHA intake on lipogenesis and gene expression involved in fatty acid metabolism in growing-finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tonnac, A; Labussière, E; Vincent, A; Mourot, J

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of lipogenesis mechanisms related to consumption of n-3 PUFA is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to find out whether α-linolenic acid (ALA) or DHA uptake can have an effect on activities and gene expressions of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver, subcutaneous adipose tissue and longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of growing-finishing pigs. Six groups of ten pigs received one of six experimental diets supplemented with rapeseed oil in the control diet, extruded linseed, microalgae or a mixture of both to implement different levels of ALA and DHA with the same content in total n-3. Results were analysed for linear and quadratic effects of DHA intake. The results showed that activities of malic enzyme (ME) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) decreased linearly in the liver with dietary DHA. Although the expression of the genes of these enzymes and their activities were poorly correlated, ME and FAS expressions also decreased linearly with DHA intake. The intake of DHA down-regulates the expressions of other genes involved in fatty acid (FA) metabolism in some tissues of pigs, such as fatty acid desaturase 2 and sterol-regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 in the liver and 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase 2 in the LD muscle. FA oxidation in the LD muscle and FA synthesis decreased in the liver with increasing amount of dietary DHA, whereas a retroconversion of DHA into EPA seems to be set up in this last tissue.

  8. Effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-/nitrate-free fermented sausage made from deer meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Karwowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on the physicochemical characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat and pork fat. Antioxidant interactions between acid whey and cranberry compounds were also explored. Methods Four formulations of fermented venison sausage were prepared: F1 (control, F2 (with 5% liquid acid whey, F3 (with 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries, and F4 (with 5% liquid acid whey and 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries. Each sample was analyzed for pH, water activity (aw, heme iron content, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS value and conjugated dienes at the end of the manufacturing process and at 30 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Fatty acid composition was measured once at the end of the manufacturing process. Results At the end of ripening, all samples presented statistically different values for a pH range of 4.47 to pH 4.59. The sum of the unsaturated fatty acids was higher, while the conjugated diene and the TBARS values were lower in sausages with freeze-dried cranberries as compared to the control sausage. The highest content of heme iron (21.52 mg/kg at day 90 was found in the sausage formulation with the addition of freeze-dried cranberries, which suggests that the addition of cranberries stabilized the porphyrin ring of the heme molecule during storage and thereby reduced the release of iron. The use of liquid acid whey in combination with cranberries appears to not be justified in view of the oxidative stability of the obtained products. Conclusion The results suggest that the application of freeze-dried cranberries can lower the intensity of oxidative changes during the storage of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat.

  9. Effect of DHA on plasma fatty acid availability and oxidative stress during training season and football exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Miquel; Capó, Xavier; Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Joan M; Llompart, Isabel; Argelich, Emma; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of a diet supplemented with 1.14 g per day of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for eight weeks on the plasma oxidative balance and anti-inflammatory markers after training and acute exercise. Fifteen volunteer male football players were randomly assigned to placebo or experimental and supplemented groups. Blood samples were taken under resting conditions at the beginning and after eight weeks of training under resting and post-exercise conditions. The experimental beverage increased the plasma DHA availability in non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and triglyceride fatty acids (TGFAs) and increased the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) fraction of NEFAs but had no effects on the biomarkers for oxidative balance in plasma. During training, plasma protein markers of oxidative damage, the haemolysis degree and the antioxidant enzyme activities increased, but did not affect lipid oxidative damage. Training season and DHA influenced the circulating levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Acute exercise did not alter the basal levels of plasma markers for oxidative and nitrosative damage of proteins and lipids, and the antioxidant enzyme activities, although DHA-diet supplementation significantly increased the PGE2 in plasma after acute exercise. In conclusion, the training season and acute exercise, but not the DHA diet supplementation, altered the pattern of plasma oxidative damage, as the antioxidant system proved sufficient to prevent the oxidative damage induced by the acute exercise in well-trained footballers. The DHA-diet supplementation increased the prostaglandin PGE2 plasma evidencing anti-inflammatory effects of DHA to control inflammation after acute exercise.

  10. Effects of Souvenaid on plasma micronutrient levels and fatty acid profiles in mild and mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpma, Anne; Meulenbroek, Olga; van Hees, Anneke M J; Sijben, John W C; Vellas, Bruno; Shah, Raj C; Bennett, David A; Scheltens, Philip; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2015-01-01

    Circulating levels of uridine, selenium, vitamins B12, E and C, folate, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been shown to be lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) than in healthy individuals. These low levels may affect disease pathways involved in synapse formation and neural functioning. Here, we investigated whether, and to what extent, circulating levels of micronutrients and fatty acids can be affected by oral supplementation with Souvenaid (containing a specific nutrient combination), using data derived from three randomized clinical trials (RCT) and an open-label extension (OLE) study with follow-up data from 12 to 48 weeks. Subjects with mild (RCT1, RCT2) or mild-to-moderate AD (RCT3) received active or control product once daily for 12-24 weeks or active product during the 24-week OLE following RCT2 (n = 212-527). Measurements included plasma levels of B vitamins, choline, vitamin E, selenium, uridine and homocysteine and proportions of DHA, EPA and total n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma and erythrocytes. Between-group comparisons were made using t tests or non-parametric alternatives. We found that 12-24-week active product intake increased plasma and/or erythrocyte micronutrients: uridine; choline; selenium; folate; vitamins B6, B12 and E; and fatty acid levels of DHA and EPA (all p Souvenaid. In addition, to our knowledge, this is the first report of the effects of sustained dietary intake of uridine monophosphate on plasma uridine levels in humans. Uptake of nutrients is observed within 6 weeks, and a plateau phase is reached for most nutrients during prolonged intake, thus increasing the availability of precursors and cofactors in the circulation that may be used for the formation and function of neuronal membranes and synapses in the brain.

  11. Uporabnost maščobnih kislin omega-3 pri obravnavi ran na koži: Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on skin wound healing:

    OpenAIRE

    Langerholc, Tomaž; Pajnkihar, Majda; Vrbnjak, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to analyse the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on wound healing and to demonstrate their usefulness in the wound treatment. Methods: Databases PubMed, CINAHL, Medline and ScienceDirect were searched for the literature review and analysis. A search was performed with keywords in English: omega-3 fish oil, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), wound, wound healing, and Boolean operator AND. Experimental or randomized clinical studies published in English ...

  12. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, K.F.A.M; Erp van - Baart, M.A.; Anttolainen, M.; Becker, W.; Church, S.M.; Couet, C.; Hermann-Kunz, E.; Kesteloot, H.; Leth, T.; Martins, I.; Moreiras, O.; Moschandreas, J.; Pizzoferrato, L.; Rimestad, A.H.; Thorgeirsdottir, H.; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Aro, A.; Kafatos, A.G.; Lanzmann-Petithory, D.; Poppel, G. van

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and other fatty acids in 14 Western European countries. Design and subjects: A maximum of 100 foods per country were sampled and centrally analysed. Each country calculated the intake of individual trans and other fatty acids, clusters of

  13. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulshof, K. F. A. M.; Erp-Baart, M. A. van; Anttolainen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and other fatty acids in 14 Western European countries. Design and subjects: A maximum of 100 foods per country were sampled and centrally analysed. Each country calculated the intake of individual trans and other fatty acids, clusters of...

  14. Cardiovascular diseases, depression disorders and potential effects of omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebatická, J; Dukát, A; Ďuračková, Z; Muchová, J

    2017-07-18

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depressive disorders (DD) are two of the most prevalent health problems in the world. Although CVD and depression have different origin, they share some common pathophysiological characteristics and risk factors, such as the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, blood flow abnormalities, decreased glucose metabolism, elevated plasma homocysteine levels, oxidative stress and disorder in vitamin D metabolism. Current findings confirm the common underlying factors for both pathologies, which are related to dramatic dietary changes in the mid-19th century. By changing dietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids from 1:1 to 15-20:1 some changes in metabolism were induced, such as increased pro-inflammatory mediators and modulations of different signaling pathways following pathophysiological response related to both, cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders.

  15. Effect of high-oleic-acid soybeans on production performance, milk fatty acid composition, and enteric methane emission in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J C; Harper, M T; Giallongo, F; Oh, J; Smith, L; Ortega-Perez, A M; Harper, S A; Melgar, A; Kniffen, D M; Fabin, R A; Hristov, A N

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 3 soybean sources differing in fatty acid profile and processing method on productivity, milk composition, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and enteric methane emission in lactating dairy cows. The soybean sources were conventional, high-linoleic-acid variety extruded soybean meal (ESBM; 8.7% ether extract with 15% oleic and 54% linoleic acids); extruded Plenish (DuPont Pioneer, Johnston, IA), high-oleic-acid variety soybean meal (EPSBM; 8.4% ether extract with 73% oleic and 8% linoleic acids); and whole, heated Plenish soybeans (WPSB; 20.2% ether extract). The study involved 15 Holstein cows in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design experiment with three 28-d periods. The inclusion rate of the soybean sources in the diet was (dry matter basis) 17.1, 17.1, and 7.4% for ESBM, EPSBM, and WPSB, respectively, which resulted in ether extract concentration of the diets of 3.99, 3.94, and 4.18%, respectively. Compared with ESBM, the Plenish diets tended to increase dry matter intake and decreased feed efficiency (but had no effect on energy-corrected milk feed efficiency). The Plenish diets increased milk fat concentration on average by 5.6% and tended to increase milk fat yield, compared with ESBM. The WPSB diet tended to increased milk true protein compared with the extruded soybean meal diets. Treatments had no effect on rumen fermentation and enteric methane or carbon dioxide emissions, except pH was higher for WPSB versus EPSBM. The Plenish diets decreased the prevalence of Ruminococcus and increased that of Eubacterium and Treponema in whole ruminal contents. Total-tract apparent digestibility of organic matter and crude protein were decreased by WPSB compared with ESBM and EPSBM. Compared with the other treatments, urinary N excretion was increased by EPSBM and fecal N excretion was greater for WPSB. Treatments had marked effects on milk fatty acid profile. Generally, the Plenish diets increased mono

  16. The effect of essential fatty acids for the somatic growth in nauplii of Calanus finmarchicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein eLeiknes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Calanus finmarchicus nauplii was studied through three spawning seasons (2007, 2009 and 2011 using flow-through tubes. Natural seston was collected every second day and added as food source using a peristaltic pump. A mixture of cultured microalgae supplied in surplus concentration was used as a control treatment. No significant correlation between growth and food concentration measured as Chlorophyll a (Chla or particulate organic carbon (POC was detected, but the growth rate was significantly related to the content of EPA (20:5n-3 and DHA (22:6n-3 in the seston. The growth rate was overall higher for nauplii fed cultured microalgae compared to the nauplii fed natural seston. Although the nauplii fed algae cultures were fed surplus food, the growth did vary between the growth periods. Furthermore, the growth rate for nauplii fed natural seston and for nauplii fed cultured algae were positively related, suggesting that the maternal condition and the food quality experienced by the mothers could explain some of the variation in naupliar growth rate. We present lipid class data on Calanus finmarchicus eggs from field samples that, contrary to previous studies, showed a high content of wax esters. Fatty acid analyzes of eggs, nauplii stages and copepodites from field samples showed that eggs and nauplii have a similar fatty acid composition and that the main increase in the content and share of DHA and EPA was from nauplii to copepodite. The secondary production measured as naupliar growth was compared to the secondary production measured as carbon specific female egg production rate. The secondary production measured as egg production was generally higher than the secondary production measured as naupliar growth early in the spring, whereas the opposite situation was observed during post-bloom situations in late spring/early summer.

  17. Effects of dietary lipid source on growth, digestibility and tissue fatty acid composition of Heterobranchus longifilis fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Friday Apata

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the major problems facing aquaculture is the inadequate supply of fish oil mostly used for fish feed manufacturing. The continued growth in aquaculture production cannot depend on this finite feed resources, therefore, it is imperative that cheap and readily available substitutes that do not compromise fish growth and fillet quality be found. To achieve this, a 12-week feeding trial with Heterobranchus longifilis fed diets differing in lipid source was conducted. Diets were supplemented with 6% lipid as fish oil, soybean oil, palm oil, coconut oil, groundnut oil and melon seed oil. Triplicate groups of 20 H. longifilis were fed the experimental diets two times a day to apparent satiation, over 84 days. Growth, digestibility, and muscle fatty acid profile were measured to assess diet effects. At the end of the study, survival, feed intake and hepatosomatic index were similar for fish fed experimental diets. However, weight gain, SGR and FCR of fish fed soybean oil-based diet was significantly reduced. Apparent nutrient digestibility coefficients were significantly lower in fish fed soybean, coconut and groundnut oil-based diets. Fillet and hepatic fatty acid compositions differed and reflected the fatty acid compositions of the diets. Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, 20:5n-3 and 20:4n-6 were conserved in vegetable oils-based diets fed fish possibly due to synthesis of HUFA from 18:3n-3 and 18:4n-6. Palm oil diet was the least expensive, and had the best economic conversion ratio. The use of vegetable oils in the diets had positive effect on growth and fillet composition of H. longifilis.

  18. Effects of dietary fatty acid composition on metabolic rate and responses to hypoxia in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, D.J.; Piraccini, G.; Piccolella, M.

    2000-01-01

    European eels (Anguilla anguilla, L.) were fed on a commercial diet supplemented either with 15% by dry feed weight of menhaden oil (MO), an oil rich in highly unsaturated fatty acids of the n-3 series (n-3 HUFA), or with 15% by dry feed weight of coconut oil (CO), an oil composed primarily...... of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Following 90 days of feeding, the mean final masses of eels fed the two different oil supplements were similar, and higher than the mean final mass of a group fed the commercial diet alone. The diets created two distinct phenotypes of eels, distinguished by the fatty acid (FA...

  19. Effects of medium-chain triglycerides, long-chain triglycerides, or 2-monododecanoin on fatty acid composition in the portal vein, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yi-Qian Nancy; Ling, Pei-Ra; Qu, Jason Zhensheng; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid absorption patterns can have a major impact on the fatty acid composition in the portal, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation. This study sought to determine the effects of long-chain triglycerides (LCT), medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), and 2-monododecanoin (2mono) on intestinal fatty acid composition during continuous feeding over a brief period. The lipid sources were 100% LCT, 100% MCT, a 50:50 mixture of LCT and MCT (LCT/MCT), and a 50:50 mixture of LCT and 2mono (LCT/2mono). A total of 27 rats were randomly given 1 of the 4 diets at 200 kcal/kg/d, with 30% of total calories from lipids over 3 hours. MCT significantly increased each of the medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0, C8:0, and C10:0) as free fatty acids in the portal vein and about 10%/mol of C10:0 as triglycerides in the lymph compared with the other groups. There was significantly less C10:0 in lymphatic triglycerides with LCT/MCT than with MCT, but more than in the LCT and LCT/2mono diets. MCT also significantly increased the contents of C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, and C20:4 in the lymphatic triglycerides compared with all other groups including LCT/MCT. The amount of linoleic acid (C18:2) in lymphatic triglycerides followed the relative amounts of this fatty acid in the diet, with the greatest in LCT followed by LCT/MCT and LCT/2mono and least in MCT. A so-called structured lipid composed of the medium-chain fatty acid dodecanoic acid on the 2 position and long-chain fatty acids on the 1 and 3 positions appeared to be endogenously synthesized in response to the LCT/2mono diet. The original differences in MCT and LCT content in the diets were preserved in the fatty acid composition in the intestinal free fatty acids and triglycerides during feeding. In addition, the duration of lipid administration can play a role in altering fatty acid composition in the intestine.

  20. Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides, Long-Chain Triglycerides, or 2-Monododecanoin on Fatty Acid Composition in the Portal Vein, Intestinal Lymph, and Systemic Circulation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy You, Yi-Qian; Ling, Pei-Ra; Qu, Jason Zhensheng; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acid absorption patterns can have a major impact on the fatty acid composition in the portal, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation. This study sought to determine the effects of long-chain triglycerides (LCT), medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), and 2-monododecanoin (2mono) on intestinal fatty acid composition during continuous feeding over a brief period. Methods The lipid sources were 100% LCT, 100% MCT, a 50:50 mixture of LCT and MCT (LCT/MCT), and a 50:50 mixture of LCT and 2mono (LCT/2mono). A total of 27 rats were randomly given 1 of the 4 diets at 200 kcal/kg/d, with 30% of total calories from lipids over 3 hours. Results MCT significantly increased each of the medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0, C8:0, and C10:0) as free fatty acids in the portal vein and about 10%/mol of C10:0 as triglycerides in the lymph compared with the other groups. There was significantly less C10:0 in lymphatic triglycerides with LCT/MCT than with MCT, but more than in the LCT and LCT/2mono diets. MCT also significantly increased the contents of C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, and C20:4 in the lymphatic triglycerides compared with all other groups including LCT/MCT. The amount of linoleic acid (C18:2) in lymphatic triglycerides followed the relative amounts of this fatty acid in the diet, with the greatest in LCT followed by LCT/MCT and LCT/2mono and least in MCT. A so-called structured lipid composed of the medium-chain fatty acid dodecanoic acid on the 2 position and long-chain fatty acids on the 1 and 3 positions appeared to be endogenously synthesized in response to the LCT/2mono diet. Conclusions The original differences in MCT and LCT content in the diets were preserved in the fatty acid composition in the intestinal free fatty acids and triglycerides during feeding. In addition, the duration of lipid administration can play a role in altering fatty acid composition in the intestine. PMID:18407910

  1. Effects of hypoxia and pyruvate infusion on myocardial fatty acid oxidation measured with 123I heptadecanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comans, E.F.I.; Visser, F.C.; Elzinga, Gijs

    1993-01-01

    Radio-iodinated fatty acids like 123 I heptadecanoic acid (HDA) can be used for the non-invasive delineation of myocardial non-esterified fatty acid (FA) metabolism. In this study the quantitative value of HDA was assessed for the measurement of myocardial FA oxidation. In an isolated saline perfused rat heart preparation myocardial time-activity curves were made during control perfusion and after inhibition of FA oxidation by hypoxia and infusion of 10.0 mM pyruvate, respectively. Control experiments were performed using 1- 14 C palmitate as the 'golden standard' for myocardial FA oxidation. Myocardial HDA oxidation was calculated from the amplitude of the third exponential term of the time-activity curve. During control perfusion no differences were observed between the calculated oxygen equivalents (from HDA oxidation) and the measured (A-V oxygen content difference) and the estimated ( 14 CO 2 production) values. Inhibition of palmitate oxidation with pyruvate was accurately detected with HDA. During hypoxic perfusion, an overestimation of palmitate oxidation was calculated on the basic of HDA oxidation. Infusion of pyruvate did not influence the time constants of the time-activity curves, whereas during hypoxic perfusion an increase of the time constant of the third exponential term was observed, probably caused by the presence of back-diffusion of non-metabolized HDA. We conclude that HDA can be used as a quantitative tool for the measurement of myocardial FA oxidation under various metabolic conditions. During periods of a decreased oxygen availability back-diffusion of FA needs to be taken into account for the interpretation of the myocardial time-activity curves. (author)

  2. Dietary Alfalfa and Calcium Salts of Long-Chain Fatty Acids Alter Protein Utilization, Microbial Populations, and Plasma Fatty Acid Profile in Holstein Freemartin Heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Qiu, Qinghua; Shao, Taoqi; Niu, Wenjing; Xia, Chuanqi; Wang, Haibo; Li, Qianwen; Gao, Zhibiao; Yu, Zhantao; Su, Huawei; Cao, Binghai

    2017-12-20

    This study presented the effects of alfalfa and calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids (CSFA) on feed intake, apparent digestibility, rumen fermentation, microbial community, plasma biochemical parameters, and fatty acid profile in Holstein freemartin heifers. Eight Holstein freemartin heifers were randomly divided into a 4 × 4 Latin Square experiment with 2 × 2 factorial diets, with or without alfalfa or CSFA. Dietary supplementation of CSFA significantly increased the apparent digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, organic matter, and significantly reduced N retention (P fatty acids in the plasma, which was expressed in reducing saturated fatty acid (ΣSFA) ratio and C14-C17 fatty acids proportion except C16:0 (P fatty acid (ΣPUFA) and unsaturated fatty acid (ΣUFA) (P fatty acids in plasma. Alfalfa and CSFA had mutual interaction effect on fat digestion and plasma triglycerides.

  3. Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caramia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA as precursors of “lipid mediator” molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body’s inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EETR and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE, whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE. For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as

  4. EFFECTS OF HIGH SOYBEAN OIL FOR GOATS IN LATE LACTATION ON INTAKE, MILK COMPOSITION AND FATTY ACID PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brou Kouakou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal fat and vegetable oils are generally added to livestock diets to increase energy density. Unlike other ruminants, goats can tolerate more than 6% dietary fat. Feeding a diet containing soybean oil (SO, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA to goats can change the milk fat composition, thereby modifying the nutritional quality of the milk. PUFA such as linoleic acids are considered healthier fats since they have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases in humans. Eighteen dairy goats (3 - 4 yr.; BW = 40 kg; 9 Saanen and 9 Alpine in late lactation were used in an experiment to determine the effect of high PUFA (12% soybean oil; 12% SO on feed intake, milk composition and fatty acid profile. Does were group fed once a day (2 pens per treatment a 16% CP and 3.5 Mcal DE/kg diets containing either 6 or 12% SO for 24 d. Feed intake was recorded daily during the trial and milk yield was recorded from d-10 to d-24. Milk samples were collected 3 times a week and analyzed for protein, fat, lactose, and total solids. Milk fat was extracted and prepared for fatty acid methyl esters (FAME. The FAMEs were analyzed using a gas chromatography (GC unit, fitted with a 60 m x 0.25 mm i.d. fused silica SP 2380 (Sigma-Aldrich capillary column. The data were analyzed using MIXED procedures in SAS as a completely randomized design with repeated measures. Dietary treatments did not affect (P > 0.05 pen feed intake, milk yield or milk composition (fat, protein, lactose and total solids. Diet containing 12% SO decreased (P < 0.05 the proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA; C6:0, C8:0, C10:0, C12:0, C14:0, C16:0 and increased (P < 0.01 the proportions of monounsaturated fat (MUFA; C18:1n9; C18:1t, and the predominant PUFA, linoleic acid (C18:2n6. The results indicate that goats consuming diet with 12% SO (high PUFA in late lactation produced milk with higher proportions of PUFA and MUFA and lower proportions of SFA compared to 6% SO.

  5. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy to sertraline in controlling suicidal ideation in patients with depression: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sahoo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan have been gaining attention as promising alternative treatment for depressive illness. These agents are given as as add on treatment to conventional antidepressant drugs. The present study was carried out to evaluate efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy in controlling suicidal ideation in depressive patients on sertraline.Methods: This was a prospective, open label, randomized, parallel group study conducted in department of Psychiatry. Ninety treatment naïve patients (18-65 years age were divided into 3 groups of 30 each. Group I: Sertraline, Group II: Sertraline plus omega-3 fatty acids, Group III: Sertraline plus 5-hydroxytryptophan. Suicidal ideations were assessed with Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation (BSI at weeks 0, 4 and 8. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (SPSS version 20.0. Post hoc analysis was done using Bonferroni test.Results: Baseline parameters in patients of all groups were comparable. Administration of sertraline resulted in reduction of Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation scores as compared to baseline. Addition of omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan also showed reduction in BSI scores. Effect of sertraline monotherapy was more as compared to omega-3 fatty acids or 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy, which was statistically significant (p value < 0.05.Conclusion: Both omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan produce significant effect in controlling suicidal ideations in patients with depression.

  6. Production of extracellular fatty acid using engineered Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hui

    2012-04-01

    product. The strain pACY-‘tesA could also be chosen as the original strain for the next genetic manipulations. Conclusions The general strategy of metabolic engineering for the extracellular fatty acid production should be the cyclic optimization between cultivation performance and strain improvements. On the basis of our cultivation process optimization, strain improvements should be further carried out for the effective and cost-effective production process.

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on the properties of various kinds of milk fat. II. Fatty acids composition of milk fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girgis, E.S.; Rady, A.H.; Kamal, T.H.; Shehata, T.E.; Ibrahim, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    Fresh cow's, buffalo's and goat's milk fat were subjected to ascendent doses of 8-rays of 250, 500 and 750 K.rad as compared to raw milk samples (control). The methyl esters of fats separated from these samples were analyzed using gas liquid chromatographic technique. Total saturated fatty acids (T.S.F.A.) were 70.46%, 67.44% and 72.85%, while total unsaturated fatty acid (T.U.F.A.) were 29.51%, 32.54% and 27.15% for cow's buffalo's and goat's raw milk fats, respectively. Water insoluble volatile fatty acids (W.I.V.F.A.) were much higher in goat's raw milk fat (23.24%) than in cows (6.34%) and buffaloes (5.25%) ones. Palmitic acid represents the predominant saturated fatty acid, while oleic acid represents the major unsaturated fatty acids in the three kinds of milk fat. Linoleic acid was present only in buffalo's and goat's raw milk fat. The exposure of buffalo's and goat's milk to 8-rays doses increased TSFA and decreased TUFA of their fats. Meanwhile the same doses induced a minor change in both TSFA and TUFA of cow's milk one. Also, 8-irradiation increased the relative percentage of Palmitic acid in the three types of milk fat, while linoleic acid decreased in buffalo's and goat's milk fat. Besides, W.I.V.F.A. showed a gradual decrease, when the three types of milk were exposed to ascendent doses of 8-rays

  8. Phylogenomic reconstruction of archaeal fatty acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrova, Daria V.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    2014-01-01

    While certain archaea appear to synthesize and/or metabolize fatty acids, the respective pathways still remain obscure. By analyzing the genomic distribution of the key lipid-related enzymes, we were able to identify the likely components of the archaeal pathway of fatty acid metabolism, namely, a combination of the enzymes of bacterial-type β-oxidation of fatty acids (acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) with paralogs of the archaeal acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase, an enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthesis pathway. These three β-oxidation enzymes working in the reverse direction could potentially catalyze biosynthesis of fatty acids, with paralogs of acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase performing addition of C2 fragments. The presence in archaea of the genes for energy-transducing membrane enzyme complexes, such as cytochrome bc complex, cytochrome c oxidase, and diverse rhodopsins, was found to correlate with the presence of the proposed system of fatty acid biosynthesis. We speculate that because these membrane complexes functionally depend on fatty acid chains, their genes could have been acquired via lateral gene transfer from bacteria only by those archaea that already possessed a system of fatty acid biosynthesis. The proposed pathway of archaeal fatty acid metabolism operates in extreme conditions and therefore might be of interest in the context of biofuel production and other industrial applications. PMID:24818264

  9. Role of Inflammatory Signaling in the Differential Effects of Saturated and Poly-unsaturated Fatty Acids on Peripheral Circadian Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam-Moon Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory signaling may play a role in high-fat diet (HFD-related circadian clock disturbances that contribute to systemic metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, palmitate, the prevalent proinflammatory saturated fatty acid (SFA in HFD and the anti-inflammatory, poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, were analyzed for effects on circadian timekeeping and inflammatory responses in peripheral clocks. Prolonged palmitate, but not DHA, exposure increased the period of fibroblast Bmal1-dLuc rhythms. Acute palmitate treatment produced phase shifts of the Bmal1-dLuc rhythm that were larger in amplitude as compared to DHA. These phase-shifting effects were time-dependent and contemporaneous with rhythmic changes in palmitate-induced inflammatory responses. Fibroblast and differentiated adipocyte clocks exhibited cell-specific differences in the time-dependent nature of palmitate-induced shifts and inflammation. DHA and other inhibitors of inflammatory signaling (AICAR, cardamonin repressed palmitate-induced proinflammatory responses and phase shifts of the fibroblast clock, suggesting that SFA-mediated inflammatory signaling may feed back to modulate circadian timekeeping in peripheral clocks.

  10. Contrasting effects of exercise and NOS inhibition on tissue-specific fatty acid and glucose uptake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Jeffrey N; Bracy, Deanna; Malabanan, Carlo; Yue, Zou; Clanton, Jeff; Wasserman, David H

    2002-07-01

    Isotopic techniques were used to test the hypothesis that exercise and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition have distinct effects on tissue-specific fatty acid and glucose uptakes in a conscious, chronically catheterized mouse model. Uptakes were measured using the radioactive tracers (125)I-labeled beta-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and deoxy-[2-(3)H]glucose (DG) during treadmill exercise with and without inhibition of NOS. [(125)I]BMIPP uptake at rest differed substantially among tissues with the highest levels in heart. With exercise, [(125)I]BMIPP uptake increased in both heart and skeletal muscles. In sedentary mice, NOS inhibition induced by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) feeding increased heart and soleus [(125)I]BMIPP uptake. In contrast, exercise, but not L-NAME feeding, resulted in increased heart and skeletal muscle [2-(3)H]DG uptake. Significant interactions were not observed in the effects of combined exercise and L-NAME feeding on [(125)I]BMIPP and [2-(3)H]DG uptakes. In the conscious mouse, exercise and NOS inhibition produce distinct patterns of tissue-specific fatty acid and glucose uptake; NOS is not required for important components of exercise-associated metabolic signaling, or other mechanisms compensate for the absence of this regulatory mechanism.

  11. Effect of micella interesterification on fatty acids composition and volatile components of soybean and rapeseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi, Sherine M.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Micella interesterification of soybean and rapeseed oils was carried out using 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 percentages of nickel catalyst, each at different temperatures of 60, 90 and 120ºC for 2, 4, and 6 hours. The proposed interesterification reaction conditions to obtain an oil with low linoleic acid level were 0.2 % nickel catalyst at 120ºC for 4 hours, 0.4% nickel catalyst at 90ºC for 4 hours and 0.6% at 60ºC for 4 hours. Fatty acid composition and chemical analysis of the interesterified and non-esterified oils were estimated. Selected samples undergo heating at 180ºC for 4 hours determining the volatile components. The appearance of some components supported the interesterification process for modification of fatty acid constituents of the oils.Se ha llevado a cabo la interesterificación en fase miscelar de aceites de soja y de colza usando un 0.2%, 0.4% y 0.6% de níquel como catalizador, a diferentes temperaturas (60, 90 y 120ºC durante 2, 4 y 6 horas. Las condiciones de reacción de interesterificación propuestas para obtener un aceite con niveles de ácidos linolénicos bajos fueron 0.2 % de níquel a 120ºC durante 4 horas, 0.4 % de níquel a 90ºC durante 4 horas y 0.6 % a 60ºC durante 4 horas. Se han estimado la composición en ácidos grasos y el análisis químico de los aceites interesterificados y no-esterificados. Las muestras seleccionadas se sometieron a calentamiento a 180ºC durante 4 horas determinando los componentes volátiles. La aparición de algunos componentes apoyó el proceso de interesterificación por modificación de los ácidos grasos constituyentes de los aceites.

  12. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  13. The effects of antioxidants on the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the hen's egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, A; Abrams, J T; Sainsbury, D W

    1979-01-01

    In experiments to see whether, in the possible interests of human health, the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of the chicken's egg can be increased by nutritional means, three strains of hen, light, medium, and heavy, each at the peak of lay, were first fed a basal, commercial, low-fat diet. The hens were then transferred to one of the following diets: basal + safflower oil (SO); basal + SO + butylated hydroxytoluene; or basal + SO + dl-a-toco-pheryl acetate. The diets were designated "Blank", "BHT", and "Vitamin E", respectively, the second and third containing the added antioxidants. The eggs produced were weighed, and their yolks weighed and analysed for lipid components. Additional of SO (7.5%) to the basal diet led to the PUFA content of the yolk lipids rising by 15.4% (linoleic acid, 14.1%), the magnitude of the increases being unaffected by the antioxidants. Diet "BHT" produced larger eggs and yolks than the other diets, but the proportion of yolk was the same on the three types of feed. The total cholesterol content of egg yolks was significantly affected neither by diet, nor by strain or age of hen. The implications of these results are discussed.

  14. Alterations of Na,K-ATPase isoenzymes in the rat diabetic neuropathy: protective effect of dietary supplementation with n-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, A; Maixent, J M; Barbey, O; Jamme, I; Pierlovisi, M; Coste, T; Pieroni, G; Nouvelot, A; Vague, P; Raccah, D

    1998-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a degenerative complication of diabetes accompanied by an alteration of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and Na,K-ATPase activity. The present study in rats was designed first to measure diabetes-induced abnormalities in Na,K-ATPase activity, isoenzyme expression, fatty acid content in sciatic nerve membranes, and NCV and second to assess the preventive ability of a fish oil-rich diet (rich in n-3 fatty acids) on these abnormalities. Diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin injection. Diabetic animals (D) and nondiabetic control animals (C) were fed the standard rat chow either without supplementation or supplemented with either fish oil (DM, CM) or olive oil (DO, CO) at a daily dose of 0.5 g/kg by gavage during 8 weeks. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of purified sciatic nerve membranes from diabetic animals showed a decreased incorporation of C16:1(n-7) fatty acids and arachidonic acids. Fish oil supplementation changed the fatty acid content of sciatic nerve membranes, decreasing C18:2(n-6) fatty acids and preventing the decreases of arachidonic acids and C18:1(n-9) fatty acids. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase alpha subunits, Na,K-ATPase activity, and ouabain affinity were assayed in purified sciatic nerve membranes from CO, DO, and DM. Na,K-ATPase activity was significantly lower in sciatic nerve membranes of diabetic rats and significantly restored in diabetic animals that received fish oil supplementation. Diabetes induced a specific decrease of alpha1- and alpha3-isoform activity and protein expression in sciatic nerve membranes. Fish oil supplementation restored partial activity and expression to varying degrees depending on the isoenzyme. These effects were associated with a significant beneficial effect on NCV. This study indicates that fish oil has beneficial effects on diabetes-induced alterations in sciatic nerve Na,K-ATPase activity and function.

  15. Effect of diet chestnut tannin supplementation on meat quality, fatty acid profile and lipid stability in broiler rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Zoccarato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of chestnut tannins on meat quality in broiler rabbits. 72 commercial hybrid rabbits (mean body weight 740 g, 32 days old were fed for 49 days with three diets containing 0%, 0.5% and 1.0% of a commercial chestnut wood extract (ENC®, Sil- vachimica srl, respectively. Eight rabbits per group were slaughtered at 12 weeks of age and at 24h post-mortem pH and colour were measured on the carcass. Moreover, both sides of m. longis- simus thoracis (LT were dissected. Left side was used for cooking losses whereas the other side was used for the determination of fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA. No differences were found in pH, colour and cooking losses, as well as the fatty acid profile of LT muscle and its relative health indexes. Concerning the antioxidant effect, the ENC shows a positive and significant effect at the inclusion level of 0.5%. In conclusion, the ENC has not undesirable side effects on the meat quality of rabbits, although further studies will be necessary to find the optimal diet inclusion level of ENC to elicit a stronger antioxidant effect in the rabbit meat.

  16. Effect of individual dietary fatty acids on postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII and fibrinolysis in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Miller, G.J.; Bysted, Anette

    2003-01-01

    Background: Hypertriglyceridemia may represent a procoagulant state involving disturbances to the hemostatic system. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is increased in the presence of hypertriglyceridemia. Free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma may promote factor VII (FVII) activation...

  17. Effects of trans fatty acids on glucose homeostasis: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials123

    OpenAIRE

    Aronis, Konstantinos N; Khan, Sami M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although evidence from cohort studies has suggested that trans fatty acid (TFA) consumption may be associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded conflicting results.

  18. Autoxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Part I. Effect of ozone on the autoxidation of neat methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, W.A.; Stanley, J.P.; Blair, E.; Cullen, G.B.

    Neat samples of polyunsaturated fatty acids were exposed to ozone in air in a flow system, and the formation of peroxides, conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive material was followed as a function of time. The effect of ozone is to shorten the induction period normally observed in autoxidation studies, but the ozone, at the concentrations used here (0-1.5 ppm), appears to have no effect on the rates of product formation after the induction period. During the induction period, increasing ozone concentrations gives rise to substantially increased rates of peroxide (or materials which titrate like peroxide) formation, a slightly increased rate of conjugated diene formation, and no significant increase in the rate of production of TBA-reactive material. Vitamin E lengthens the induction period but appears to have no other effect. Some of these data are in conflict with earlier reports of Menzel et al.

  19. Effects of structure of fatty acid collectors on the adsorption of fluorapatite (0 0 1) surface: A first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Li, Xianhai; Mao, Song; Li, Longjiang; Ke, Baolin; Zhang, Qin

    2018-06-01

    Effects of carbon chain length, carbon chain isomerism, Cdbnd C double bonds number on fatty acid adsorption on FAP (0 0 1) surface have been investigated based on DFT. The results revealed that fatty acid collector can form stable adsorption configuration at Ca1 (surf) site. Chemical adsorption was formed between O (mole) of fatty acid collector and the Ca1 (surf) of fluorapatite (0 0 1) surface; hydrogen bond adsorption was formed between the H (mole) of fatty acid and the O (surf) of-[PO4]- of FAP (0 0 1) surface. Fatty acid collectors and FAP (0 0 1) surface are bonding by means of the hybridization of O (mole) 2p and Ca (surf) 4d orbitals, H (mole) 1s and O (surf) 2p orbital. The analysis of adsorption energy, DOS, electron density, Mulliken charge population and Mulliken bond population revealed that with the carbon chain growing within certain limits, the absolute value of the adsorption energy and the overlapping area between the DOS curve of O (mole) and Ca (surf) was greater, while that of H (mole) 1s and O (surf) 2p basically remained unchanged. As Cdbnd C double bonds of fatty acids increased within certain limits, the adsorption energy and the overlapping area between the state density curve of O (mole) and Ca (surf), H (mole) and O (surf) basically remained unchanged. The substituent groups of fatty acid changed, the absolute value of the adsorption energy and the overlapping area between the state density curve had a major change. The influence of fatty acids adsorption on FAP (0 0 1) surface depends mainly on the interaction between O (mole) and Ca (surf).

  20. The effect of age on the fatty acids composition in wild boar (Sus scrofa hunted in the southwest region of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Gálik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse the fatty acid profile of wild boar (Sus scrofa meat. The samples were obtained from the mountain Tríbeč (southwest part of the Slovak Republic. A total of 36 samples in 3 age categories of meat were analysed. The effect of age on the intramuscular (IMF fat content was analysed. The highest (P < 0.05 IMF content was found in the samples from the youngest animals (18.07%, the lowest (P < 0.05 in the sub-adult animals. Significant (P < 0.05 differences were found in palmitic acid (C16:0. Significant decrease of heptadecanoic acid (C17:0 as an effect of age was analysed in the samples. Of the important fatty acids, the most abundant in all age categories of wild boar were oleic (C18:1 cis 9, palmitic (C16:0, and linolelaidic acid (C18:2 cis n6. Differences in the content of mentioned acids were significant (P < 0.05. In α-linolenic and γ-linoleic acids, non-significant (P > 0.05 differences were detected. Significant differences (P < 0.05 between age categories were found in cis-11-eicosenoic (C20:1 n9 and cis-11,14-eicosadienoic acids (C20:2 n6. Significant differences (P < 0.05 were found in PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids, MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids, and SFA (saturated fatty acids concentrations. The highest PUFA content was typical for the samples from the oldest animals, MUFA from the sub-adults, and SFA from the youngest wild boar. More significant results were observed in the normalized data with the factor component scores. The wild boar fatty acid profile is significantly affected by age.

  1. Effect of the amount of chestnuts in the diet of Celta pigs on the fatty acid profile of dry-cured lacon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, M.C. de; Dominguez, R.; Cantalapiedra, J.; Iglesias, A.; Lorenzo, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of including chestnuts in the formulation of the feed (0, 15 and 25% chestnut) on the fatty acids of dry-cured lacon from Celta pigs was studied. The inclusion of chestnuts decreases the saturated fatty acid content (SFA) and the monounsaturated fatty acid content (MUFA). With regards to the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the lacon from animals fed with chestnuts presented higher values of total PUFA, n6 PUFAs and n3 PUFAs. This is related to the fact that chestnut diets had the highest amounts of essential fatty acids (C18:2n6 and C18:3n3), therefore the lacon from chestnut-fed animals also presented higher amounts of these fatty acids. According to nutritional ratios, lacon obtained from chestnut-fed pigs was healthier than the one obtained from pigs fed on commercial feed. The main conclusion is that including chestnuts in the diet allows us to obtain healthier dry-cured meat products. (Author)

  2. Whole extruded linseed in the diet of dairy ewes during early lactation: effect on the fatty acid composition of milk and cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Secchiari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In a long term supplementation trial (10 weeks, the effects of the inclusion of whole extruded linseed in the diet of dairy ewes on milk and cheese fatty acid composition were evaluated. Two groups of 24 Sarda ewes in early lactation were randomly assigned to control concentrate (800 g/d concentrate, C or whole extruded linseed concentrate (L, 700 g/d, with 30% of extruded linseed, Omega-Lin®. Results showed that, after 2 weeks on the L diet, the milk content of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA, including rumenic acid (RA, vaccenic acid (VA and alfa-linolenic acid (ALA increased sharply compared to C group, reaching the highest levels after 7-8 weeks (3.06, 7.31 and 2.31 g/100 g milk fat for RA, VA and ALA, respectively. During the last 2 weeks of the experimental period, when pasture was included in the diet of both groups, the content of the above fatty acids slightly decreased in milk from L group, whereas in milk from C group increased. Nevertheless, the average content of these fatty acids in milk from L group remained significantly higher than that of milk from C group. Compared with the control, the L diet resulted in a significant reduction (-17% in the concentration of saturated fatty acid in milk. The fatty acid content of the cheese obtained from milk of the two groups reflected the milk fatty acid composition. The inclusion of extruded linseed in the diet of dairy ewes improved the nutraceutical properties of milk and cheese, but further researches are needed in order to better understand the relationship between basal diet and lipid supplementation in dairy ewes.

  3. Effect of Sunflower and Marine Oils on Ruminal Microbiota, In vitro Fermentation and Digesta Fatty Acid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E. Vargas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC investigated the changes in the ruminal microbiota and anaerobic fermentation in response to the addition of different lipid supplements to a ruminant diet. A basal diet with no oil added was the control, and the treatment diets were supplemented with sunflower oil (2% only, or sunflower oil (2% in combination with fish oil (1% or algae oil (1%. Four fermentation units were used per treatment. RUSITEC fermenters were inoculated with rumen digesta. Substrate degradation, fermentation end-products (volatile fatty acids, lactate, gas, methane, and ammonia, and microbial p