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Sample records for fast x-ray timing

  1. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, H; Yoshida, K; Tsuji, T; Koyama, T; Tsusaka, Y; Kagoshima, Y, E-mail: htakano@sci.u-hyogo.ac.j [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  2. SS 433 Radio\\/X-ray anti-correlation and fast-time variability

    CERN Document Server

    Safi-Harb, S; Safi-Harb, Samar; Kotani, Taro

    2002-01-01

    We briefly review the Galactic microquasar SS 433/W50 and present a new RXTE spectral and timing study. We show that the X-ray flux decreases during radio flares, a behavior seen in other microquasars. We also find short time-scale variability unveiling emission regions from within the binary system.

  3. The fast wavelet X-ray transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Zuidwijk; P.M. de Zeeuw (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe wavelet X-ray transform computes one-dimensional wavelet transforms along lines in Euclidian space in order to perform a directional time-scale analysis of functions in several variables. A fast algorithm is proposed which executes this transformation starting with values given on a

  4. Parametric X-rays at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays (PXR) in the photoinjector at the new FAST facility at Fermilab. Detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance with a diamond crystal are presented. We also report on expected results with PXR generated while the beam is channeling. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays.

  5. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, Lara

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of a subclass of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a blue supergiant companion, the so-called Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), is reviewed. Their number is growing, mainly thanks to the discoveries performed by the INTEGRAL satellite, then followed by soft X-rays observations (both aimed at refining the source position and at monitoring the source behavior) leading to the optical identification of the blue supergiant nature of the donor star. Their defining properties are a transient X-ray activity consisting of sporadic, fast and bright flares, (each with a variable duration between a few minutes and a few hours), reaching 1E36-1E37 erg/s. The quiescence is at a luminosity of 1E32 erg/s, while their more frequent state consists of an intermediate X-ray emission of 1E33-1E34 erg/s (1-10 keV). Only the brightest flares are detected by INTEGRAL (>17 keV) during short pointings, with no detected persistent emission. The physical mechanism driving the short outbursts is still debated, al...

  6. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  7. Invited article: The fast readout low noise camera as a versatile x-ray detector for time resolved dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction studies of dynamic problems in materials science, chemistry, and catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiche, Jean-Claude; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark A.; Ferre, Gemma Guilera; Curfs, Caroline; Vaughan, Gavin; Homs, Alejandro; Carreiras, David Fernandez

    2007-09-01

    Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an "area" detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needs of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors.

  8. High performance diagnostics for Time-Of-Flight and X ray measurements in laser produced plasmas, based on fast diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, R.; Consoli, F.; Verona, C.; Di Giorgio, G.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Ingenito, F.; Marinelli, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-12-01

    The paper reports about the use of single-crystal Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamonds as radiation detectors in laser-matter interaction experiments on the ABC laser in ENEA - Frascati. The detectors have been designed and realized by University of Tor Vergata - Rome. The interdigital configuration and the new design of the bias-tee voltage supply units guarantee a fast time response. The detectors are sensitive to soft-X photons and to particles. A remarkable immunity to electromagnetic noise, associated with the laser-target interaction, makes them especially useful for the measurements of the time of flight of fast particles. A novel diamond assembly has been tested in plasmas generated by the ABC laser in the nanosecond regime at intensities I=1013÷ 14 W/cm2, where contributions from X rays, fast electrons and ions could be observed.

  9. Cumulative luminosity distributions of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients in hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Paizis, A

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed in a systematic way about nine years of INTEGRAL data (17-100 keV) focusing on Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) and three classical High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). Our approach has been twofold: image based analysis, sampled over a ~ks time frame to investigate the long-term properties of the sources, and lightcurve based analysis, sampled over a 100s time frame to seize the fast variability of each source during its ~ks activity. We find that while the prototypical SFXTs (IGR J17544-2619, XTE J1739-302 and SAX J1818.6-1703) are among the sources with the lowest ~ks based duty cycle ($<$1% activity over nine years of data), when studied at the 100s level, they are the ones with the highest detection percentage, meaning that, when active, they tend to have many bright short-term flares with respect to the other SFXTs. To investigate in a coherent and self consistent way all the available results within a physical scenario, we have extracted cumulative luminosity distributions for ...

  10. Fast X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai

    2014-06-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with X-ray. However, challenges remain in dynamic XLCT imaging, where short scan time, good spatial resolution, and whole-body field of view should be considered simultaneously. In this paper, by the use of a single-view XLCT reconstruction method based on a compressive sensing (CS) technique, incorporating a cone beam XLCT imaging system, we implement fast 3-D XLCT imaging. To evaluate the performance of the method, two types of phantom experiments were performed based on a cone beam XLCT imaging system. In Case 1, one tube filled with the X-ray-excitable nanophosphor (Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+)) was immerged in different positions in the phantom to evaluate the effect of the source position on single-view XLCT reconstruction accuracy. In Case 2, two tubes filled with Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+) were immerged in different heights in the phantom to evaluate the whole-body imaging performance of single-view XLCT reconstruction. The experimental results indicated that the tubes used in previous phantom experiments can be resolved from single-view XCLT reconstruction images. The location error is less than 1.2 mm. In addition, since only one view data are needed to implement 3-D XLCT imaging, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced (∼1 frame/s) compared with previous XLCT systems. Hence, the technique is suited for imaging the fast distribution of the X-ray-excitable nanophosphors within a biological object.

  11. Fourier techniques in X-ray timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Klis

    1988-01-01

    Basic principles of Fourier techniques often used in X-ray time series analysis are reviewed. The relation between the discrete Fourier transform and the continuous Fourier transform is discussed to introduce the concepts of windowing and aliasing. The relation is derived between the power spectrum

  12. High-resolution X-ray imaging in fast ignition experiment using Gekko and LFEX lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We improved diagnostic instruments to measure X-ray images in a hard X-ray harsh environment and succeeded in obtaining clear images with X-ray framing camera and X-ray streak camera in fast ignition experiment conducted in 2011 (FG-02 Experimental Campaign. We found that high-energy X-ray signals could be used as an indicator of the LFEX laser injection time relative to the imploded core. The LFEX laser injection time was estimated with better than 10 ps accuracy. Time-resolved 2D X-ray images suggested that shapes and motions of imploded core plasmas were improved by changing the configuration of the implosion lasers.

  13. Hard X-ray Timing with EXIST

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J E

    2004-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Timing Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission concept is under study as the Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP), one of the three Einstein Probe missions in the Beyond Einstein Program in the current NASA Strategic Plan. EXIST would conduct an all-sky imaging hard X-ray ($\\sim$10-600 keV) survey with unprecedented sensitivity: about 5 $\\times 10^{-13}$ cgs over any factor of 2 bandwidth, or comparable to that achieved at soft X-rays in the ROSAT survey. The proposed angular resolution of 5arcmin, temporal resolution of 10microsec, energy resolution of 1-4 keV over the broad band, and duty cycle of 0.2-0.5 for continuous coverage of any source provide an unprecedented phase space for timing and spectral studies of black holes --from stellar to supermassive, as well as neutron stars and accreting white dwarfs. The large sky coverage allows intrinsically rare events to be studied. One particularly exciting example is the possible detection of tidal disruption of stars near quiescent AGN. Super flares fr...

  14. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  15. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  16. Time-resolved Rocking Curve Measurement Method using Laboratory X-ray Source

    OpenAIRE

    林, 雄二郎; 佐藤, 真伸; 古賀, 三井; 佃, 昇; 蔵元, 英一

    2005-01-01

    Fast x-ray detectors and fast signal processing devices have enabled to measure time dependence of x-ray diffraction intensity. Using a fast x-ray detection system, we have developed a time-resolved measurement method of rocking curves with a laboratory x-ray source. The method has been demonstrated for time-resolved rocking curves from an ultrasound-vibrated silicon crystal in MHz range. The measured rocking curves have been consistent with simulated curves based on the dynamical diffraction...

  17. Time Resolved X-Ray Spot Size Diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Roger; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    A diagnostic was developed for the determination of temporal history of an X-ray spot. A pair of thin (0.5 mm) slits image the x-ray spot to a fast scintillator which is coupled to a fast detector, thus sampling a slice of the X-Ray spot. Two other scintillator/detectors are used to determine the position of the spot and total forward dose. The slit signal is normalized to the dose and the resulting signal is analyzed to get the spot size. The position information is used to compensate for small changes due to spot motion and misalignment. The time resolution of the diagnostic is about 1 ns and measures spots from 0.5 mm to over 3 mm. The theory and equations used to calculate spot size and position are presented, as well as data. The calculations assume a symmetric, Gaussian spot. The spot data is generated by the ETA II accelerator, a 2kA, 5.5 MeV, 60ns electron beam focused on a Tantalum target. The spot generated is typically about 1 mm FWHM. Comparisons are made to an X-ray pinhole camera which images th...

  18. Response measurement of single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond radiation detector for intense X-rays aiming at neutron bang-time and neutron burn-history measurement on an inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, T., E-mail: t.shimaoka@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Kaneko, J. H.; Tsubota, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Abe, Y.; Sakata, S.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H. [Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sato, Y. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chayahara, A.; Umezawa, H.; Shikata, S. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    A neutron bang time and burn history monitor in inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition are necessary for plasma diagnostics. In the FIREX project, however, no detector attained those capabilities because high-intensity X-rays accompanied fast electrons used for plasma heating. To solve this problem, single-crystal CVD diamond was grown and fabricated into a radiation detector. The detector, which had excellent charge transportation property, was tested to obtain a response function for intense X-rays. The applicability for neutron bang time and burn history monitor was verified experimentally. Charge collection efficiency of 99.5% ± 0.8% and 97.1% ± 1.4% for holes and electrons were obtained using 5.486 MeV alpha particles. The drift velocity at electric field which saturates charge collection efficiency was 1.1 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 7} cm/s and 1.0 ± 0.3 × 10{sup 7} cm/s for holes and electrons. Fast response of several ns pulse width for intense X-ray was obtained at the GEKKO XII experiment, which is sufficiently fast for ToF measurements to obtain a neutron signal separately from X-rays. Based on these results, we confirmed that the single-crystal CVD diamond detector obtained neutron signal with good S/N under ion temperature 0.5–1 keV and neutron yield of more than 10{sup 9} neutrons/shot.

  19. Fast x-ray fluorescence microtomography of hydrated biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Lombi

    Full Text Available Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.

  20. Avalanche Photodiodes as Fast X-ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, S

    1998-05-01

    An avalanche photodiode (APD) detector provides a sub-nanosecond time resolution and an output rate of more than 10(8) counts s(-1) of synchrotron X-rays. Moreover, the APD has the advantage of low noise. A review of recent developments of detectors using APD devices designed for X-ray experiments is presented in this paper. One of the detectors has an excellent time response of 100 ps resolution and a narrow width on its response function, 1.4 ns at 10(-5) maximum. The other consists of a stack of four diodes and has a transmission structure. The stacked detector improved the efficiency for X-rays, e.g. 55% at 16.53 keV. The output rates reached more than 10(8) counts s(-1) per device.

  1. Fast scintillation timing detector using proportional-mode avalanche photodiode for nuclear resonant scattering experiments in high-energy synchrotron X-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Keisuke; Kishimoto, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    To obtain both a high count rate of >107 s-1 and a detection efficiency sufficient for high-energy X-rays of >30 keV, we propose a scintillation timing detector using a proportional-mode silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) for synchrotron radiation nuclear resonant scattering. We here present results obtained with a prototype detector using a lead-loaded plastic scintillator (EJ-256) mounted on a proportional-mode Si-APD (active area size: 3 mm in diameter). The detector was operated at ‒35 °C for a better signal-to-noise ratio. Using synchrotron X-rays of 67.41 keV, which is the same energy as the first excited level of 61Ni, we successfully measured pulse-height and time spectra of the scintillation light. A good time resolution of 0.50±0.06 ns (full width at half-maximum) was obtained for 67.41 keV X-rays with a scintillator 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick.

  2. Searching for supergiant fast X-ray transients with Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Esposito, P; Sbarufatti, B; Haberl, F; Ponti, G; D'Avanzo, P; Ducci, L; Segreto, A; Jin, C; Masetti, N; Del Santo, M; Campana, S; Mangano, V

    2016-01-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) hosting a neutron star and an OB supergiant companion. We examine the available Swift data, as well as other new or archival/serendipitous data, on three sources: IGR J17407-2808, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, and IGR J18175-2419, whose X-ray characteristics qualify them as candidate SFXT, in order to explore their properties and test whether they are consistent with an SFXT nature. As IGR J17407-2808 and 2XMM J185114.3-000004 triggered the Burst Alert Telescope on board Swift, the Swift data allow us to provide their first arcsecond localisations, leading to an unequivocal identification of the source CXOU J174042.0-280724 as the soft X-ray counterpart of IGR J17407-2808, as well as their first broadband spectra, which can be fit with models generally describing accreting neutron stars in HMXBs. While still lacking optical spectroscopy to assess the spectral type of the companion, we propose 2XMM J185114.3-000004 as a very strong SFXT can...

  3. LOFT - the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Zane, S

    2014-01-01

    LOFT (the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing), is a mission concept that was considered by ESA as a candidate for an M3 mission and has been studied during an extended >2-years long assessment phase. The mission was specifically designed to perform fast X-ray timing and probe the status of the matter near black holes and neutron stars. The LOFT scientific payload is composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a 10 m^2-class pointed instrument with about 15 times the collecting area of the largest past timing missions (as the Rossi XTE) over the 2-30 keV range (30-80 keV expanded), combined with CCD-class spectral resolution, which holds the capability to revolutionise studies of X-ray variability down to the millisecond time scales. Its ground-breaking characteristic is a mass per unit surface in the range of 10 kg/m^2, enabling an effective area of about 10 m^2 (at 8 keV) at a reasonable weight. The development of such large but light experiment, with low mass and power...

  4. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  5. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-04-19

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  6. Simultaneous X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Radio Observations of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lynch, R. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Bower, G. C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Michilli, D.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5σ upper limit of 3 × 10‑11 erg cm‑2 on the 0.5–10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations fast radio bursts in general.

  7. X-Ray Emission by A Shocked Fast Wind from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Akashi, M; Behar, E; Akashi, Muhammad; Soker, Noam; Behar, Ehud

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the X-ray emission from the shocked fast wind blown by the central stars of planetary nebulae (PNs) and compare with observations. Using spherically symmetric self similar solutions with radiative cooling, we calculate the flow structure and X-ray temperature for a fast wind slamming into a previously ejected slow wind. We find that the observed X-ray emission of six PNs can be accounted for by shocked wind segments that were expelled during the early PN phase, if the fast wind speed is moderate, ~400-600 km/sec, and the mass loss rate is a few times 10^{-7} Mo/year. We find, as proposed previously, that the morphology of the X-ray emission is in the form of a narrow ring inner to the optical bright part of the nebula. The bipolar X-ray morphology of several observed PNs, which indicates an important role of jets rather than a spherical fast wind, cannot be explained by the flow studied here.

  8. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  9. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  10. SphinX: A Fast Solar Photometer in X-rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Sylwester; S. Kuzin; Yu. D. Kotov; F. Farnik; F. Reale

    2008-03-01

    The scientific goals and construction details of a new design, Polish X-ray spectrophotometer are given. It will be incorporated within the Russian TESIS X and EUV complex aboard the forthcoming CORONAS solar mission. SphinX (Solar Photometer in X-rays) will use PIN silicon detectors for high time resolution (0.01 s) measurements of the solar spectra of quiet and active corona in the range 0.5–15 keV. A new filter-fluorescence target concept will be employed to allow for a fast photometry of the solar X-ray flux variations in selected, well defined narrow spectral bands including the Fe xxvi and Fe xxv iron line groups.

  11. Fast sampling model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering is discussed in terms of the process total cross-section and the angular distribution of scattered X-ray photons. Comparisons with other calculations and experimental data are presented. The model is optimized for the simulation of X-ray tracking inside experimental setups with complex geometry where performance and memory volume are issues to be optimized. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will build on the Phase I X-ray pulsar-based navigation and timing (XNAV) feasibility assessment to develop a detailed XNAV simulation capability to...

  13. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process...... of bringing the data from measurement to analysis. Bridging the experimental design and challenges of the experiments from X-ray synchrotrons to the newly available X-ray Free Electron Laser sources (XFEL).LCLS in California is the first XFEL to come online and delivers intense 30fs X-ray pulses, orders...... of magnitude shorter than the 100ps X-ray pulses available from synchroton sources. This increase in time-resolution allows for the use of X-ray techniques in a completely new time-domain, where coherent photo-induced changes in structure can be studied on their intrinsic time-scale. Measurements on Rh2(dimen...

  14. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  15. Correlation between radio luminosity and X-ray timing frequencies in neutron star and black hole X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Fender, R.P.; van der Klis, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on correlations between radio luminosity and X-ray timing features in X-ray binary systems containing low magnetic field neutron stars and black holes. The sample of neutron star systems consists of 4U 1728-34, 4U 1820-34, Ser X-1, MXB 1730-335, GX 13+1, the millisecond X-ray pulsars SAX J

  16. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  17. On time transfer in X-ray pulsar navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhen; LI Ming; SHUAI Ping

    2009-01-01

    X-ray pulsar navigation (XPNAV) is a new approach for spacecraft autonomous navigation. The system gets position information utilizing accurate timing methods. Among the timing models, the high-order relativistic effects on the propagated signal must be incorporated to attain precise timing. The time transfer model is provided in detail here in two parts: the time frame transformation and the relativistic effects.

  18. Trends in hard X-ray fluorescence mapping: environmental applications in the age of fast detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, E; de Jonge, M D; Donner, E; Ryan, C G; Paterson, D

    2011-06-01

    Environmental samples are extremely diverse but share a tendency for heterogeneity and complexity. This heterogeneity poses methodological challenges when investigating biogeochemical processes. In recent years, the development of analytical tools capable of probing element distribution and speciation at the microscale have allowed this challenge to be addressed. Of these available tools, laterally resolved synchrotron techniques such as X-ray fluorescence mapping are key methods for the in situ investigation of micronutrients and inorganic contaminants in environmental samples. This article demonstrates how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence detector technology are bringing new possibilities to environmental research. Fast detectors are helping to circumvent major issues such as X-ray beam damage of hydrated samples, as dwell times during scanning are reduced. They are also helping to reduce temporal beamtime requirements, making particularly time-consuming techniques such as micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) tomography increasingly feasible. This article focuses on μXRF mapping of nutrients and metalloids in environmental samples, and suggests that the current divide between mapping and speciation techniques will be increasingly blurred by the development of combined approaches.

  19. Extremely fast orbital decay of the black hole X-ray binary Nova Muscae 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, J. I.; Suárez-Andrés, L.; Rebolo, R.; Casares, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present new medium-resolution spectroscopic observations of the black hole X-ray binary Nova Muscae 1991 taken with X-Shooter spectrograph installed at the 8.2-m VLT telescope. These observations allow us to measure the time of inferior conjunction of the secondary star with the black hole in this system that, together with previous measurements, yield an orbital period decay of dot{P}=-20.7± 12.7 ms yr-1 (-24.5 ± 15.1 μs per orbital cycle). This is significantly faster than those previously measured in the other black hole X-ray binaries A0620-00 and XTE J1118+480. No standard black hole X-ray binary evolutionary model is able to explain this extremely fast orbital decay. At this rate, the secondary star would reach the event horizon (as given by the Schwarzschild radius of about 32 km) in roughly 2.7 Myr. This result has dramatic implications on the evolution and lifetime of black hole X-ray binaries.

  20. Extremely fast orbital decay of the black hole X-ray binary Nova Muscae 1991

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, J I González; Rebolo, R; Casares, J

    2016-01-01

    We present new medium-resolution spectroscopic observations of the black hole X-ray binary Nova Muscae 1991 taken with X-Shooter spectrograph installed at the 8.2m-VLT telecope. These observations allow us to measure the time of inferior conjunction of the secondary star with the black hole in this system that, together with previous measurements, yield an orbital period decay of $\\dot P=-20.7\\pm12.7$ ms yr$^{-1}$ ($-24.5\\pm15.1$ $\\mu $s per orbital cycle). This is significantly faster than those previously measured in the other black hole X-ray binaries A0620-00 and XTE J1118+480. No standard black hole X-ray binary evolutionary model is able to explain this extremely fast orbital decay. At this rate, the secondary star would reach the event horizon (as given by the Schwarzschild radius of about 32 km) in roughly 2.7 Myr. This result has dramatic implications on the evolution and lifetime of black hole X-ray binaries.

  1. X-ray Time Lags in TeV Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X. Chen; G. Fossati; E. Liang; M. Böttcher

    2011-03-01

    We use Monte Carlo/Fokker–Planck simulations to study the X-ray time lags. Our results show that soft lags will be observed as long as the decay of the flare is dominated by radiative cooling, even when acceleration and cooling time scales are similar. Hard lags can be produced in the presence of a competitive achromatic particle energy loss mechanism if the acceleration process operates on a time scale such that particles are slowly moved towards higher energy while the flare evolves. In this type of scenario, the -ray/X-ray quadratic relation is also reproduced.

  2. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  3. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients: A Case Study for LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patrizia; Mangano, V.; Bozzo, E.; Esposito, P.; Ferrigno, C.

    2013-04-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, is a new space mission concept selected by ESA in February 2011 and currently competing for a launch of opportunity in 2022. LOFT will carry a coded mask Wide Field Monitor (WFM) and a 10-m^2 class collimated X-ray Large Area Detector (LAD) operating in the energy range 2-80 keV. The instruments on-board LOFT will dramatically deepen our knowledge of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients, a class of High-Mass X-ray Binaries whose optical counterparts are O or B supergiant stars, and whose X-ray outbursts are about 4 orders of magnitude brighter than the quiescent state. The LAD and the WFM will provide simultaneous high S/N broad-band and time-resolved spectroscopy in several intensity states, long term monitoring that will yield new determinations of orbital periods, as well as spin periods. We show the results of an extensive set of simulations based on the Swift broad-band and detailed XMM-Newton observations we collected up to now. Our simulations describe the outbursts at several intensities (F(2-10 keV)=5.9E-9 to 5.5E-10 erg cm-2 s-1), the intermediate and most common state (1E-11 erg cm-2 s-1), and the low state (1.2E-12 to 5E-13 erg cm-2 s-1). We also considered large variations of NH and the presence of emission lines, as observed by Swift and XMM-Newton. We acknowledge financial contribution from ASI-INAF I/004/11/0 and I/021/12/0.

  4. Look fast: Crystallization of conjugated molecules during solution shearing probed in-situ and in real time by X-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Smilgies, Detlef Matthias

    2012-12-20

    High-speed solution shearing, in which a drop of dissolved material is spread by a coating knife onto the substrate, has emerged as a versatile, yet simple coating technique to prepare high-mobility organic thin film transistors. Solution shearing and subsequent drying and crystallization of a thin film of conjugated molecules is probed in situ using microbeam grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (μGIWAXS). We demonstrate the advantages of this approach to study solution based crystal nucleation and growth, and identify casting parameter combinations to cast highly ordered and laterally aligned molecular thin films. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. X-ray Time Lags in TeV Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Liang, Edison; Böttcher, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo/Fokker-Planck simulations to study the X-ray time lags. Our results show that soft lags will be observed as long as the decay of the flare is dominated by radiative cooling, even when acceleration and cooling timescales are similar. Hard lags can be produced in presence of a competitive achromatic particle energy loss mechanism if the acceleration process operates on a timescale such that particles are slowly moved towards higher energy while the flare evolves. In this type of scenario, the {\\gamma} -ray/X-ray quadratic relation is also reproduced.

  6. Spectral brilliance of parametric X-rays at the FAST facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seiss, Todd [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-22

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays in the new photoinjector at the FAST (Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. These experiments will be conducted in addition to channeling X-ray radiation experiments. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays. We discuss the theoretical model and present detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance under different conditions. Furthermore, we report on expected results with parametric X-rays generated while under channeling conditions.

  7. X-ray Timing of Stellar Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Homan, Jeroen; Kaaret, Philip; Barret, Didier; Schnittman, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    X-ray timing observations of accreting stellar mass black holes have shown that they can produce signals with such short time scales that we must be probing very close to the innermost stable circular orbit that is predicted by the theory of General Relativity (GR). These signals are quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), and both the high-frequency variety (HFQPOs, which have frequencies in the 40-450 Hz range) as well as the 0.1-10 Hz low-frequency type have the potential to provide tests of GR in the strong field limit. An important step on the path to GR tests is to constrain the physical black hole properties, and the straightforward frequency measurements that are possible with X-ray timing may provide one of the cleanest measurements of black hole spins. While current X-ray satellites have uncovered these phenomenona, the HFQPOs are weak signals, and future X-ray timing missions with larger effective area are required for testing the candidate theoretical QPO mechanisms. Another main goal in the study of ...

  8. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Hernanz, M.; Hudec, R.; Santangelo, A.; Walton, D.; Zdziarski, A.; Barret, D.; Belloni, T.; Braga, J.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Campana, S.; den Herder, J.W.; Huovelin, J.; Israel, G.L.; Pohl, M.; Ray, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zane, S.; Argan, A.; Attinà, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bozzo, E.; Campana, R.; Chakrabarty, D.; Costa, E.; De Rosa, A.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cosimo, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Haas, D.; Jonker, P.; Korpela, S.; Labanti, C.; Malcovati, P.; Mignani, R.; Muleri, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rea, N.; Rubini, A.; Tenzer, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winter, B.; Wood, K.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Abramowicz, M.A.; Alpar, M.A.; Altamirano, D.; Alvarez, J.M.; Amati, L.; Amoros, C.; Antonelli, L.A.; Artigue, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bachetti, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Barbera, M.; Barbieri, C.; Basa, S.; Baykal, A.; Belmont, R.; Boirin, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Burderi, L.; Bursa, M.; Cabanac, C.; Cackett, E.; Caliandro, G.A.; Casella, P.; Chaty, S.; Chenevez, J.; Coe, M.J.; Collura, A.; Corongiu, A.; Covino, S.; Cusumano, G.; D'Amico, F.; Dall'Osso, S.; De Martino, D.; De Paris, G.; Di Persio, G.; Di Salvo, T.; Done, C.; Dovčiak, M.; Drago, A.; Ertan, U.; Fabiani, S.; Falanga, M.; Fender, R.; Ferrando, P.; Della Monica Ferreira, D.; Fraser, G.; Frontera, F.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J.L.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Göǧüş, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Götz, D.; Grassi, M.; Guttridge, P.; Hakala, P.; Henri, G.; Hermsen, W.; Horak, J.; Hornstrup, A.; in 't Zand, J.J.M.; Isern, J.; Kalemci, E.; Kanbach, G.; Karas, V.; Kataria, D.; Kennedy, T.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kokkotas, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Krolik, J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuvvetli, I.; Kylafis, N.; Lattimer, J.M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Leahy, D.; Lebrun, F.; Lin, D.; Lund, N.; Maccarone, T.; Malzac, J.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Mastropietro, M.; McClintock, J.; McHardy, I.; Mendez, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Miller, M.C.; Mineo, T.; Morelli, E.; Morsink, S.; Motch, C.; Motta, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Naletto, G.; Neustroev, V.; Nevalainen, J.; Olive, J.F.; Orio, M.; Orlandini, M.; Orleanski, P.; Ozel, F.; Pacciani, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I.E.; Papitto, A.; Patruno, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Petráček, V.; Petri, J.; Petrucci, P.O.; Phlips, B.; Picolli, L.; Possenti, A.; Psaltis, D.; Rambaud, D.; Reig, P.; Remillard, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Romano, P.; Romanova, M.; Schanz, T.; Schmid, C.; Segreto, A.; Shearer, A.; Smith, A.; Smith, P.J.; Soffitta, P.; Stergioulas, N.; Stolarski, M.; Stuchlik, Z.; Tiengo, A.; Torres, D.; Török, G.; Turolla, R.; Uttley, P.; Vaughan, S.; Vercellone, S.; Waters, R.; Watts, A.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wilms, J.; Zampieri, L.; Zezas, A.; Ziolkowski, J.

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m2-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant diagno

  9. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Hudec, R.; Santangelo, A.; Walton, D.; Zdziarski, A.; Barret, D.; Belloni, T.; Braga, J.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Campana, S.; den Herder, J.-W.; Huovelin, J.; Israel, G. L.; Pohl, M.; Ray, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zane, S.; Argan, A.; Attinà, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bozzo, E.; Campana, R.; Chakrabarty, D.; Costa, E.; De Rosa, A.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cosimo, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Haas, D.; Jonker, P.; Korpela, S.; Labanti, C.; Malcovati, P.; Mignani, R.; Muleri, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rea, N.; Rubini, A.; Tenzer, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winter, B.; Wood, K.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Alpar, M. A.; Altamirano, D.; Alvarez, J. M.; Amati, L.; Amoros, C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Artigue, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bachetti, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Barbera, M.; Barbieri, C.; Basa, S.; Baykal, A.; Belmont, R.; Boirin, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Burderi, L.; Bursa, M.; Cabanac, C.; Cackett, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Casella, P.; Chaty, S.; Chenevez, J.; Coe, M. J.; Collura, A.; Corongiu, A.; Covino, S.; Cusumano, G.; D'Amico, F.; Dall'Osso, S.; De Martino, D.; De Paris, G.; Di Persio, G.; Di Salvo, T.; Done, C.; Dovčiak, M.; Drago, A.; Ertan, U.; Fabiani, S.; Falanga, M.; Fender, R.; Ferrando, P.; Della Monica Ferreira, D.; Fraser, G.; Frontera, F.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J. L.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Göǧüş, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Götz, D.; Grassi, M.; Guttridge, P.; Hakala, P.; Henri, G.; Hermsen, W.; Horak, J.; Hornstrup, A.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Isern, J.; Kalemci, E.; Kanbach, G.; Karas, V.; Kataria, D.; Kennedy, T.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kokkotas, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Krolik, J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuvvetli, I.; Kylafis, N.; Lattimer, J. M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Leahy, D.; Lebrun, F.; Lin, D.; Lund, N.; Maccarone, T.; Malzac, J.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Mastropietro, M.; McClintock, J.; McHardy, I.; Mendez, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Miller, M. C.; Mineo, T.; Morelli, E.; Morsink, S.; Motch, C.; Motta, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Naletto, G.; Neustroev, V.; Nevalainen, J.; Olive, J. F.; Orio, M.; Orlandini, M.; Orleanski, P.; Ozel, F.; Pacciani, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I.; Papitto, A.; Patruno, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Petráček, V.; Petri, J.; Petrucci, P. O.; Phlips, B.; Picolli, L.; Possenti, A.; Psaltis, D.; Rambaud, D.; Reig, P.; Remillard, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Romano, P.; Romanova, M.; Schanz, T.; Schmid, C.; Segreto, A.; Shearer, A.; Smith, A.; Smith, P. J.; Soffitta, P.; Stergioulas, N.; Stolarski, M.; Stuchlik, Z.; Tiengo, A.; Torres, D.; Török, G.; Turolla, R.; Uttley, P.; Vaughan, S.; Vercellone, S.; Waters, R.; Watts, A.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wilms, J.; Zampieri, L.; Zezas, A.; Ziolkowski, J.

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m(2)-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant diag

  10. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, M.; Herder, J. W. den; Bozzo, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study th...

  11. On time transfer in X-ray pulsar navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    X-ray pulsar navigation(XPNAV) is a new approach for spacecraft autonomous navigation.The system gets position information utilizing accurate timing methods.Among the timing models,the high-order relativistic effects on the propagated signal must be incorporated to attain precise timing.The time transfer model is provided in detail here in two parts:the time frame transformation and the relativistic effects.

  12. Swift/XRT orbital monitoring of the candidate supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J17354-3255

    CERN Document Server

    Ducci, L; Esposito, P; Bozzo, E; Krimm, H A; Vercellone, S; Mangano, V; Kennea, J A

    2013-01-01

    We report on the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) monitoring of the field of view around the candidate supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J17354-3255, which is positionally associated with the AGILE/GRID gamma-ray transient AGL J1734-3310. Our observations, which cover 11 days for a total on-source exposure of about 24 ks, span 1.2 orbital periods (P_orb=8.4474 d) and are the first sensitive monitoring of this source in the soft X-rays. These new data allow us to exploit the timing variability properties of the sources in the field to unambiguously identify the soft X-ray counterpart of IGR J17354-3255. The soft X-ray light curve shows a moderate orbital modulation and a dip. We investigated the nature of the dip by comparing the X-ray light curve with the prediction of the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion theory, assuming both spherical and nonspherical symmetry of the outflow from the donor star. We found that the dip cannot be explained with the X-ray orbital modulation. We propose that an eclipse or the...

  13. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  14. Time-resolved X-ray PIV technique for diagnosing opaque biofluid flow with insufficient X-ray fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    X-ray imaging is used to visualize the biofluid flow phenomena in a nondestructive manner. A technique currently used for quantitative visualization is X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although this technique provides a high spatial resolution (less than 10 µm), significant hemodynamic parameters are difficult to obtain under actual physiological conditions because of the limited temporal resolution of the technique, which in turn is due to the relatively long exposure time (~10 ms) involved in X-ray imaging. This study combines an image intensifier with a high-speed camera to reduce exposure time, thereby improving temporal resolution. The image intensifier amplifies light flux by emitting secondary electrons in the micro-channel plate. The increased incident light flux greatly reduces the exposure time (below 200 µs). The proposed X-ray PIV system was applied to high-speed blood flows in a tube, and the velocity field information was successfully obtained. The time-resolved X-ray PIV system can be employed to investigate blood flows at beamlines with insufficient X-ray fluxes under specific physiological conditions. This method facilitates understanding of the basic hemodynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Fast catheter segmentation from echocardiographic sequences based on segmentation from corresponding X-ray fluoroscopy for cardiac catheterization interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianliang; Housden, James; Ma, YingLiang; Razavi, Benjamin; Rhode, Kawal; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiography is a potential alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy in cardiac catheterization given its richness in soft tissue information and its lack of ionizing radiation. However, its small field of view and acoustic artifacts make direct automatic segmentation of the catheters very challenging. In this study, a fast catheter segmentation framework for echocardiographic imaging guided by the segmentation of corresponding X-ray fluoroscopic imaging is proposed. The complete framework consists of: 1) catheter initialization in the first X-ray frame; 2) catheter tracking in the rest of the X-ray sequence; 3) fast registration of corresponding X-ray and ultrasound frames; and 4) catheter segmentation in ultrasound images guided by the results of both X-ray tracking and fast registration. The main contributions include: 1) a Kalman filter-based growing strategy with more clinical data evalution; 2) a SURF detector applied in a constrained search space for catheter segmentation in ultrasound images; 3) a two layer hierarchical graph model to integrate and smooth catheter fragments into a complete catheter; and 4) the integration of these components into a system for clinical applications. This framework is evaluated on five sequences of porcine data and four sequences of patient data comprising more than 3000 X-ray frames and more than 1000 ultrasound frames. The results show that our algorithm is able to track the catheter in ultrasound images at 1.3 s per frame, with an error of less than 2 mm. However, although this may satisfy the accuracy for visualization purposes and is also fast, the algorithm still needs to be further accelerated for real-time clinical applications.

  16. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Strohmayer, Tod E

    2008-01-01

    AXTAR is an X-ray observatory mission concept, currently under study in the U.S., that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8 square meters collecting area. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both RXTE and Constellation-X. AXTAR also carries a sensitive sky monitor that acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of...

  17. Fast scintillation detectors for high-energy X-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Shunji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Haruki, Rie; Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori

    2012-03-01

    We have developed fast scintillation detectors for nuclear resonant scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation and a nuclear excited level existing in >30 keV. A fast x-ray detector using an organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator of phenethylamine lead bromide (PhE-PbBr4) had a dominant light emission with a fast decay time of 9.9 ns. An x-ray detector equipped with a 0.9-mm-thick PhE-PbBr4 crystal (size: ˜8 × 7 mm2) was used to detect nuclear resonant scattering in 61Ni (the first excited level: 67.41 keV; half-life: 5.3 ns). We could successfully record the decaying gamma rays emitted from 61Ni with a relatively high detection efficiency of 24%. A lead-doped plastic scintillator (NE142, Pb ˜5 wt% doped) had been known to have a faster decay time of 1.7 ns. Following a test of a single NE142 detector, a four-channel NE142 detector was fabricated and successfully applied to the synchrotron-radiation based Mössbauer spectroscopy experiment on 61Ni.

  18. Fast simulation of x-ray projections of spline-based surfaces using an append buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-10-07

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, the simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640 × 480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically.

  19. Precision Timing of Two Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi; Chakrabarty; Steinberger

    1999-11-01

    We report on long-term X-ray timing of two anomalous X-ray pulsars, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 2259+586, using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. In monthly observations made over 1.4 and 2.6 yr for the two pulsars, respectively, we have obtained phase-coherent timing solutions which imply that these objects have been rotating with great stability throughout the course of our observations. For 1RXS J170849.0-400910, we find a rotation frequency of 0.0909169331(5) Hz and frequency derivative -15.687&parl0;4&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51215.931. For 1E 2259+586, we find a rotation frequency of 0.1432880613(2) Hz and frequency derivative -1.0026&parl0;7&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51195.583. The rms phase residuals from these simple models are only approximately 0.01 cycles for both sources. We show that the frequency derivative for 1E 2259+586 is inconsistent with that inferred from incoherent frequency observations made over the last 20 yr. Our observations are consistent with the magnetar hypothesis and make binary accretion scenarios appear unlikely.

  20. Thermalisation and hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency of self-interacting solar flare fast electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, R K; MacKinnon, A L; Brown, J C

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical descriptions of the production of solar flare bremsstrahlung radiation assume the collision of dilute accelerated particles with a cold, dense target plasma, neglecting interactions of the fast particles with each other. This is inadequate for situations where collisions with this background plasma are not completely dominant, as may be the case in, for example, low-density coronal sources. We aim to formulate a model of a self-interacting, entirely fast electron population in the absence of a dense background plasma, to investigate its implications for observed bremsstrahlung spectra and the flare energy budget. We derive approximate expressions for the time-dependent distribution function of the fast electrons using a Fokker-Planck approach. We use these expressions to generate synthetic bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra as would be seen from a corresponding coronal source. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the observed behaviour of some flares. As the flare progresses, the model's...

  1. Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of deeply buried tracer layers as a density and temperature diagnostic for the fast ignitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitenko, A. I., Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences

    1997-03-26

    The fast igniter concept for inertial confinement fusion relies on the generation of hot electrons, produced by a short-pulse ultra-high intensity laser, which propagate through high-density plasma to deposit their energy in the compressed fuel core and heat it to ignition. In preliminary experiments designed to investigate deep heating of high density matter, we used a 20 joule, 0.5-30 ps laser to heat solid targets, and used emission spectroscopy to measure plasma temperatures and densities achieved at large depths (2-20 microns) away from the initial target surface. The targets consisted of an Al tracer layer buried within a massive CH slab H-like and He-like line emission was then used to diagnose plasma conditions. We observe spectra from tracer layers buried up to 20 microns deep, measure emission durations of up to 200 ps, measure plasma temperatures up to T{sub c} = 650 eV, and measure electron densities near 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}. Analysis is in progress, but the data appear to be in reasonable agreement with simulations when space-charge induced inhibition is included in hot-electron transport.

  2. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  3. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ∼97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7–500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  4. X-ray Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds: Time Evolution of their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Coe, Malcolm J.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2017-08-01

    We have collected and analyzed the complete archive of XMM-Newton (116), Chandra (151), and RXTE (952) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of L_X= 10^{31.2}-10^{38} erg/s. From a sample of 65 pulsars we report 1654 individual pulsar detections, yielding 1393 pulse period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: spin period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram, and X-ray spectrum. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulsed fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 28/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse detection and flux as functions of spin period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars (Psearch for optical counterparts to X-ray sources in the local dwarf galaxy IC 10 to form a comparison sample for Magellanic Cloud X-ray pulsars.

  5. Computed Tomography with X-rays and Fast Neutrons for Restoration of Wooden Artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, Kurt; Bellon, Carsten; Hohendorf, Stefan; Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy; Wrobel, Norma; Nusser, Amélie; Freitag, Markus; Bücherl, Thomas; Bar, Doron; Mor, Ilan; Tamin, Noam; Weiss-Babai, Ruth; Bromberger, Benjamin; Dangendorf, Volker; Tittelmeier, Kai

    The objects of this investigation were sculptures taken from a ca. three hundred years old baroque epitaph of a church in Tönning, a town in Northern Germany. Around 1900 it was found in a disastrous state heavily damaged by wood-worm. At that time, the whole artwork was treated with the tar extract carbolineum as a remedy. Nowadays, this substance has been identified as carcinogenic, and its presence can be perceived by its stench and visually at certain spots on the surface where it has penetrated the covering paint. A gold-painted sculpture of a massive wooden skull was interrogated with X-rays and fast neutrons to investigate the internal distribution of the carbolineum. The X-ray tomography, with its excellent spatial resolution revealed galleries left over from the worm infestation in the outer areas and cracks in the central region. The golden color coating appeared as a thick and dense layer. In comparison the tomography with fast neutrons, though being of lower resolution and yet unresolved artefacts revealed sections of slightly different densities in the bulk of the wood. These differences we attribute to the differences in the distribution of the impregnant in the wood, visible due to its higher hydrogen content making it less transparent for neutrons.

  6. Fast Data Acquisition for X-ray CCD 165 SX Detector%X -ray CCD165-SX 探测器快速数据采集

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳义; 周平

    2014-01-01

    对X光探测器X-ray CCD165-SX在帧移模式下进行数据采集。选择合适开口高度的掩膜,使得CCD的曝光面仅是整个探测面的一小部份。利用TTL信号发生器产生的脉冲信号触发子潜像帧移,将各个不同时间内产生的子潜像储存在CCD的芯片上不同位置上,当芯片填满子潜像时,一次性读出。这种方式大大加快了实验数据的采集速度。实验中对快速升温的情况下对PE样品进行测试,成功地采集到了随时间快速变化的散射信号。%By installation of the mask with adjustable opening size and TTL generator ,X-ray Scattering data is collected by X-ray CCD 165 SX under Frameshift mode .In the process ,exposure area is onlysmall part of the detecting area of the CCD and sub -images produced at difference times are frame shifted by TTL trigger to difference parts on CCD chip subsequently .All the sub-images are read out at once until the chip reaches full-ness of sub -images.This approach greatly increases the data collection speed .Finally,we use PE as the sam-ple in fast temperature rising environment for the fast data acquisition measurement and successful ly collected the scattering data which changed with times .

  7. A Large Area Detector proposed for the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    CERN Document Server

    Zane, S; Kennedy, T; Feroci, M; Herder, J -W Den; Ahangarianabhari, M; Argan, A; Azzarello, P; Baldazzi, G; Barret, D; Bertuccio, G; Bodini, P; Bozzo, E; Cadoux, F; Cais, P; Campana, R; Coker, J; Cros, A; Del Monte, E; De Rosa, A; Di Cosimo, S; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Favre, Y; Feldman, C; Fraser, G; Fuschino, F; Grassi, M; Hailey, M R; Hudec, R; Labanti, C; Macera, D; Malcovati, P; Marisaldi, M; Martindale, A; Mineo, T; Muleri, F; Nowak, M; Orlandini, M; Pacciani, L; Perinati, E; Petracek, V; Pohl, M; Rachevski, A; Smith, P; Santangelo, A; Seyler, J -Y; Schmid, C; Soffitta, P; Suchy, S; Tenzer, C; Uttley, P; Vacchi, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Wilms, J; Winter, B

    2012-01-01

    The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) is one of the four candidate ESA M3 missions considered for launch in the 2022 time-frame. It is specifically designed to perform fast X-ray timing and probe the status of the matter near black holes and neutron stars. The LOFT scientific payload is composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a 10 m2-class pointed instrument with 20 times the collecting area of the best past timing missions (such as RXTE) over the 2-30 keV range, which holds the capability to revolutionize studies of X-ray variability down to the millisecond time scales. Its ground-breaking characteristic is a low mass per unit surface, enabling an effective area of ~10 m^2 (@10 keV) at a reasonable weight. The development of such large but light experiment, with low mass and power per unit area, is now made possible by the recent advancements in the field of large-area silicon detectors - able to time tag an X-ray photon with an accuracy <10 {\\mu}s and an...

  8. A fast method for spine localization in x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Detection of spines in medical images are important tasks in medical applications. These tasks are relatively easy for CT/MR images because the bones are easily distinguishable from other tissues. However, they are difficult for x-ray images due to bone and soft tissue overlapping. This paper illustrates a method for detecting the medial axis of spine in x-ray images. Given an initial point on the spine in the x-ray image manually or automatically, the method iteratively searches for good feature points on the spine to locate the medial axis. As a result, the effort of determining the relevant medical information, such as Cobb's angle, can be minimized. The proposed method is fast and efficient. In average it took less than 1 second for localizing the spine on a 3000×1000 gray scale x-ray image.

  9. LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; Feroci, M; Stella, L

    2011-01-01

    The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, LOFT, was selected by the European Space Agency as one of the four Cosmic Vision M3 candidate missions to compete for a launch opportunity at the start of the 2020s. Thanks to an innovative design and the development of large-area monolithic silicon drift detectors, the Large Area Detector (LAD) on board LOFT will operate in the 2-30 keV range (up to 50 keV in expanded mode), and achieve an effective area of ~10 m^2 at 8 keV, a time resolution of ~10 {\\mu}s, and a spectral resolution of ~260 eV (FWHM at 6 keV). These characteristics make LOFT a perfectly suited instrument to perform high-time-resolution X-ray observations of collapsed objects in our galaxy and brightest supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. LOFT will yield unprecedented information on strongly curved spacetimes and matter under extreme conditions of pressure and magnetic field strength, thus addressing two of the fundamental questions of the Cosmic Vision Theme "Matter under extreme condit...

  10. X-ray pulsar signal detection using photon interarrival time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Xie; Luping Xu; Hua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The distribution probability of the photon interarrival time (PIT) without signal initial phases is derived based on the Poisson model of X-ray pulsar signals, and a pulsar signal detec-tion algorithm employing the PIT sequence is put forward. The joint probability of the PIT sequence is regarded as a function of the distribution probability and used to compare a constant radiation intensity model with the nonhomogeneous Poisson model for the signal detection. The relationship between the number of detected photons and the probabilities of false negative and positive is stu-died, and the success rate and mean detection time are estimated based on the number of the given photons. For the spacecraft ve-locity data detection, the changes of time of photon arrival (TOPA) and PIT caused by spacecraft motion are presented first, then the influences on detection are analyzed respectively. By using the analytical pulse profile of PSR B0531+21, the simulation of the X-ray pulsar signal detection is implemented. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the contrast tests show that the proposed method is suitable for the spacecraft velocity data detection.

  11. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  12. Development of a fast multi-line x-ray CT detector for NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T.; Nachtrab, F.; Schlechter, T.; Neubauer, H.; Mühlbauer, J.; Schröpfer, S.; Ernst, J.; Firsching, M.; Schweiger, T.; Oberst, M.; Meyer, A.; Uhlmann, N.

    2015-04-01

    Typical X-ray detectors for non-destructive testing (NDT) are line detectors or area detectors, like e.g. flat panel detectors. Multi-line detectors are currently only available in medical Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. Compared to flat panel detectors, line and multi-line detectors can achieve much higher frame rates. This allows time-resolved 3D CT scans of an object under investigation. Also, an improved image quality can be achieved due to reduced scattered radiation from object and detector themselves. Another benefit of line and multi-line detectors is that very wide detectors can be assembled easily, while flat panel detectors are usually limited to an imaging field with a size of approx. 40 × 40 cm2 at maximum. The big disadvantage of line detectors is the limited number of object slices that can be scanned simultaneously. This leads to long scan times for large objects. Volume scans with a multi-line detector are much faster, but with almost similar image quality. Due to the promising properties of multi-line detectors their application outside of medical CT would also be very interesting for NDT. However, medical CT multi-line detectors are optimized for the scanning of human bodies. Many non-medical applications require higher spatial resolutions and/or higher X-ray energies. For those non-medical applications we are developing a fast multi-line X-ray detector.In the scope of this work, we present the current state of the development of the novel detector, which includes several outstanding properties like an adjustable curved design for variable focus-detector-distances, conserving nearly uniform perpendicular irradiation over the entire detector width. Basis of the detector is a specifically designed, radiation hard CMOS imaging sensor with a pixel pitch of 200 μ m. Each pixel has an automatic in-pixel gain adjustment, which allows for both: a very high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. The final detector is planned to have 256 lines of

  13. Subnanosecond time-resolved x-ray measurements using an organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, S.; Shibuya, K.; Nishikido, F.; Koshimizu, M.; Haruki, R.; Yoda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a fast x-ray detector using an organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator of phenethylamine lead bromide (PhE-PbBr4). The scintillator had a dominant light emission with a fast decay time of 9.9 ns. An x-ray detector equipped with a 0.9-mm-thick PhE-PbBr4 crystal was used to detect nuclear resonant scattering in N61i (the first excited level: 67.41 keV; lifetime: 7.6 ns) by using synchrotron radiation. With this detector, we could successfully record the decaying gamma rays emitted from N61i with a time resolution of 0.7 ns (full width at half maximum) and a relatively high detection efficiency of 24%.

  14. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.;

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m²-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant......? The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT), selected by ESA as one of the four Cosmic Vision M3 candidate missions to undergo an assessment phase, will revolutionise the study of collapsed objects in our galaxy and of the brightest supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. Thanks...... to an innovative design and the development of large-area monolithic silicon drift detectors, the Large Area Detector (LAD) on board LOFT will achieve an effective area of ~12 m² (more than an order of magnitude larger than any spaceborne predecessor) in the 2-30 keV range (up to 50 keV in expanded mode), yet...

  15. Dissecting the Accretion Environments of X-ray Binaries with High Speed Coordinated Optical and X-ray Timing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Durant, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Malzac, J.; Miller, J. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Spruit, H. C.; Makishima, K.

    2010-03-01

    We are uncovering significant optical variability in low/hard state observations of several X-ray binaries on the fastest time-scales of just tens of milliseconds typically probed with modern rapid imaging cameras. The optical light curves are remarkable in that they display properties very characteristic of X-ray variations: 1) power spectra with band-limited, red noise over broad time ranges of 10 ms - 1000 s, and in some cases, a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation; 2) an instantaneous variability amplitude linearly scaling with source flux; and, 3) log-normal distributions of fluxes. Aperiodic optical variability components can dominate over simple linear X-ray reprocessing expectations, and are much faster than viscous time-scales of the outer accretion disk or flow. Cross-correlated optical vs. X-ray time delays not only constrain emission mechanisms, but can also be used to probe characteristic size scales of the physical components (jet, corona), and to understand how they are coupled. Rapid, multiwavelength timing studies are thus opening a new window on the hearts of accreting sources, though the broad-band spectral plus timing properties remain to be unified consistently. I will briefly review recent results on rapid optical variability, including our new data on black hole and neutron star binary systems. The fact that the sources were all in typical low/hard states (with relatively-bright optical counterparts) suggests that correlated optical/X-ray activity may be a general feature, waiting to be uncovered in more systems. The continuance of RXTE is vital for such work.

  16. The XMM Newton and INTEGRAL observations of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J16328-4726

    CERN Document Server

    Fiocchi, M; Natalucci, L; Ubertini, P; Sguera, V; Bird, A J; Boon, C M; Persi, P; Piro, L

    2016-01-01

    The accretion mechanism producing the short flares observed from the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) is still highly debated and forms a major part in our attempts to place these X-ray binaries in the wider context of the High Mass X-ray Binaries. We report on a 216 ks INTEGRAL observation of the SFXT IGR J16328-4726 (August 24-27, 2014) simultaneous with two fixed-time observations with XMM Newton (33ks and 20ks) performed around the putative periastron passage, in order to investigate the accretion regime and the wind properties during this orbital phase. During these observations, the source has shown luminosity variations, from 4x10^{34} erg/s to 10^{36} erg/s, linked to spectral properties changes. The soft X-ray continuum is well modeled by a power law with a photon index varying from 1.2 up to 1.7 and with high values of the column density in the range 2-4x10^{23}/cm^2. We report on the presence of iron lines at 6.8-7.1 keV suggesting that the X-ray flux is produced by accretion of matter from ...

  17. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients Project:. [A Review, New Results and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Bocchino, F.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a review of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) Project, a systematic investigation of the properties of SFXTs with a strategy that combines Swift monitoring programs with outburst follow-up observations. This strategy has quickly tripled the available sets of broad-band data of SFXT outbursts, and gathered a wealth of out-of-outburst data, which have led us to a broad-band spectral characterization, an assessment of the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity. We present some new observational results obtained through our outburst follow-ups, as fitting examples of the exceptional capabilities of Swift in catching bright flares and monitor them panchromatically.

  18. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fanis, A.; Pešić, Z. D.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm2. This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with "pink" beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  19. Apparatus and Techniques for Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction using Diamond Anvil Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lin, C.; Rod, E.; Bai, L.; Shen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Complementary advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have recently made possible many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. Herein we present key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  20. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  1. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...

  2. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, Gian Luca; Castillo, Guillermo Andres Rodriguez; Sidoli, Lara

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 years of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190,000 lightcurves out of about 430,000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS@BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above about 2,000s resembles that of...

  3. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Kitty K; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B M

    2014-01-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the second \\textit{XMM-Newton} serendipitous source catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10-fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ${\\sim}$97% on a seven-class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest der...

  4. Time resolved energy dispersive X-ray diagnostic for the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.; Amaro, P.; Amorim, P.; Varandas, C.A.F. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Duval, B. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-10-01

    A time resolved energy dispersive X-ray diagnostic is being developed for the TCV tokamak (CRPP - Lausanne) to measure the evolution of the plasma impurities, runaway electrons and electron temperature. A liquid nitrogen cooled Ge diode detects the X-ray photons which are processed by a spectroscopic amplifier and a locally developed interface amplifier and timing generator (IATG) unit. The energy spectrum is obtained using a fast digitiser and a software histogramming algorithm. These electronics components have been optimised to improve the data throughput to match high flux 2 seconds time duration of a TCV plasma pulse. This paper describes the diagnostic hardware with particular emphasis on the IATG unit. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  5. Protein structural dynamics revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Goo; Kim, Tae Wu; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2015-08-18

    One of the most important questions in biological science is how a protein functions. When a protein performs its function, it undergoes regulated structural transitions. In this regard, to better understand the underlying principle of a protein function, it is desirable to monitor the dynamic evolution of the protein structure in real time. To probe fast and subtle motions of a protein in physiological conditions demands an experimental tool that is not only equipped with superb spatiotemporal resolution but also applicable to samples in solution phase. Time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS), discussed in this Account, fits all of those requirements needed for probing the movements of proteins in aqueous solution. The technique utilizes a pump-probe scheme employing an optical pump pulse to initiate photoreactions of proteins and an X-ray probe pulse to monitor ensuing structural changes. The technical advances in ultrafast lasers and X-ray sources allow us to achieve superb temporal resolution down to femtoseconds. Because X-rays scatter off all atomic pairs in a protein, an X-ray scattering pattern provides information on the global structure of the protein with subangstrom spatial resolution. Importantly, TRXSS is readily applicable to aqueous solution samples of proteins with the aid of theoretical models and therefore is well suited for investigating structural dynamics of protein transitions in physiological conditions. In this Account, we demonstrate that TRXSS can be used to probe real-time structural dynamics of proteins in solution ranging from subtle helix movement to global conformational change. Specifically, we discuss the photoreactions of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI). For PYP, we revealed the kinetics of structural transitions among four transient intermediates comprising a photocycle and, by applying structural analysis based on ab initio shape reconstruction, showed that the signaling of PYP involves

  6. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  7. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  8. Thermal X-ray emission from massive, fast rotating, highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Caceres, D L; Coelho, J G; de Lima, R C R; Rueda, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    There is solid observational evidence on the existence of massive, $M\\sim 1~M_\\odot$, highly magnetized white dwarfs (WDs) with surface magnetic fields up to $B\\sim 10^9$ G. We show that, if in addition to these features, the star is fast rotating, it can become a rotation-powered pulsar-like WD and emit detectable high-energy radiation. We infer the values of the structure parameters (mass, radius, moment of inertia), magnetic field, rotation period and spin-down rates of a WD pulsar death-line. We show that WDs above the death-line emit blackbody radiation in the soft X-ray band via the magnetic polar cap heating by back flowing pair-created particle bombardment and discuss as an example the X-ray emission of soft gamma-repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars within the WD model.

  9. Time dependence of X-ray polarizability of a crystal induced by an intense femtosecond X-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leonov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution of the electron density and the resulting time dependence of Fourier components of the X-ray polarizability of a crystal irradiated by highly intense femtosecond pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL is investigated theoretically on the basis of rate equations for bound electrons and the Boltzmann equation for the kinetics of the unbound electron gas. The photoionization, Auger process, electron-impact ionization, electron–electron scattering and three-body recombination have been implemented in the system of rate equations. An algorithm for the numerical solution of the rate equations was simplified by incorporating analytical expressions for the cross sections of all the electron configurations in ions within the framework of the effective charge model. Using this approach, the time dependence of the inner shell populations during the time of XFEL pulse propagation through the crystal was evaluated for photon energies between 4 and 12 keV and a pulse width of 40 fs considering a flux of 1012 photons pulse−1 (focusing on a spot size of ∼1 µm. This flux corresponds to a fluence ranging between 0.8 and 2.4 mJ µm−2. The time evolution of the X-ray polarizability caused by the change of the atomic scattering factor during the pulse propagation is numerically analyzed for the case of a silicon crystal. The time-integrated polarizability drops dramatically if the fluence of the X-ray pulse exceeds 1.6 mJ µm−2.

  10. SMALL VOLUME LONG PULSE X RAY PREIONISED XeCl LASER WITH DOUBLE DISCHARGE AND FAST FERRITE MAGNETIC SWITCH

    OpenAIRE

    J. Hueber; Kobhio, M.; Fontaine, B.; Delaporte, Ph.; Sentis, M.; Forestier, B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with a high efficiency small volume long pulse X-Ray preionised XeCl laser with double discharge and very fast ferrite magnetic switch are presented and compared with the results given by a new XeCl laser numerical self consistant model. The model takes into account most recent kinetic data and time variation of discharge impedence and switch inductance. There is a good agreement between experiment and model on electrical and laser parameters for typical conditions.

  11. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  12. Central Engine of Late-time X-Ray Flares with Internal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hui-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Lin, Da-Bin; Yi, Tuan; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2016-12-01

    This work focuses on a sample of seven extremely late-time X-ray flares with peak time {t}{{p}}\\gt {10}4 {{s}}, among which two flares can be confirmed as the late-time activity of central engine. The main purpose is to investigate the mechanism of such late-time flares based on the internal origin assumption. In the hyper-accreting black hole (BH) scenario, we study the possibility of two well-known mechanisms acting as the central engine to power such X-ray flares, i.e., the neutrino-antineutrino annihilation and the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. Our results show that the annihilation luminosity is far below the observational data. Thus, the annihilation mechanism cannot account for such late-time flares. For the BZ process, if the role of outflows is taken into consideration, the inflow mass rate near the horizon will be quite low such that the magnetic field will probably be too weak to power the observed X-ray flares. We therefore argue that, for the late-time flares with internal origin, the central engine is unlikely to be associated with BHs. On the contrary, a fast rotating neutron star with strong bipolar magnetic fields may be responsible for such flares.

  13. Simultaneous X-ray and Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. III. X-ray time variability

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Crenshaw, D M; Krämer, S B; Arav, N; George, I M; Liedahl, D A; Van der Meer, R L J; Paerels, F B S; Turner, T J; Yaqoob, T

    2004-01-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 was observed for a week by Chandra using both the HETGS and LETGS spectrometers. In this paper we study the time variability of the continuum radiation. During our observation, the source showed a gradual increase in flux over four days, followed by a rapid decrease and flattening of the light curve afterwards. Superimposed upon these relatively slow variations several short duration bursts or quasi-periodic oscillations occured with a typical duration of several hours and separation between 0.6-0.9 days. The bursts show a delay of the hard X-rays with respect to the soft X-rays of a few hours. We interprete these bursts as due to a rotating, fluctuating hot spot at approximately 10 gravitational radii; the time delay of the hard X-rays from the bursts agree with the canonical picture of Inverse Compton scattering of the soft accretion disk photons on a hot medium that is relatively close to the central black hole.

  14. NuSTAR detection of a cyclotron line in the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhalerao, Varun; Romano, Patrizia; Tomsick, John

    2015-01-01

    We present NuSTAR spectral and timing studies of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J17544-2619. The spectrum is well described by an  ∼ 1 keV blackbody and a hard continuum component, as expected from an accreting X-ray pulsar. We detect a cyclotron line at 17 keV, confirming...... do not find any significant pulsations in the source on time-scales of 1-2000 s....

  15. Fracture of metals samples under conditions of fast heating by intensive X-ray radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubev V.K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Results on studying the fracture of metals samples in the form of thin disks under fast heating by the X-ray pulse with the complete spectrum are presented in the paper. The samples of such metals as iron, copper, AMg6 aluminum, VT14 titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, cadmium, lead and zinc were tested. The samples were fixed in the special cartridges equipped with the gauges of a mechanical recoil momentum. The cartridges with samples were placed at such distances from the X-ray irradiator where the energy fluxes were 1.38, 0.90 and 0.29kJ/cm2. The irradiating X-ray pulse was about 2 ns in duration. After testing, the depth of material ablation from a sample front surface and the degree and character of its spall damage were determined. The method of metallographic analysis was used for these purposes. Numerical calculations of loading conditions were made with the use of an equation of state taking into account the process of evaporation. The calculated value of maximum negative pressure in the sample at the coordinate corresponding to the formation of spallation zones or spall cracks was conventionally accepted as the material resistance to spall fracture. The comparison of obtained results with the data on the fracture of examined materials in the conditions of fast heating by the X-ray pulse with the hard spectrum and a high-current electron beam was conducted.

  16. Giant outburst from the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619: accretion from a transient disc?

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mangano, V; Esposito, P; Israel, G; Tiengo, A; Campana, S; Ducci, L; Ferrigno, C; Kennea, J A

    2015-01-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries associated with OB supergiant companions and characterised by an X-ray flaring behaviour whose dynamical range reaches 5 orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hundred to thousands of seconds. Current investigations concentrate on finding possible mechanisms to inhibit accretion in SFXTs and explain their unusually low average X-ray luminosity. We present the Swift observations of an exceptionally bright outburst displayed by the SFXT IGR J17544-2619 on 2014 October 10 when the source achieved a peak luminosity of $3\\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This extends the total source dynamic range to $\\gtrsim$10$^6$, the largest (by a factor of 10) recorded so far from an SFXT. Tentative evidence for pulsations at a period of 11.6 s is also reported. We show that these observations challenge, for the first time, the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by an SFXT and propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient ac...

  17. Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheftman, D.; Shafer, D.; Efimov, S.; Gruzinsky, K.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A {approx}4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

  18. Elasticity and Anelasticity of Materials from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Smith, J.; Lin, C.; Bai, L.; Rod, E.; Shen, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for studying elasticity and anelasticity of minerals using fast compression and cyclic compression-decompression. A few recent studies will be highlighted. For example, with fast x-ray area detectors having millisecond time resolution, accurate thermal equations of state of materials at temperatures up to 1000K and megabar pressures can be collected in a matter of seconds using membrane-driven diamond anvil cells (DAC), yielding unprecedented time and pressure resolution of true isotherms. Short duration of the experiments eliminates temperature variation during the experiments and in general allows volume measurements at higher pressures and temperatures. Alternatively, high-frequency (kilohertz range) radial diffraction measurements in a panoramic DAC combined with fast, precise cyclic loading/unloading by piezo drive could provide the short time scale necessary for studying rheology of minerals from the elastic response and lattice relaxation as a function of pressure, temperature and strain rate. Finally, we consider some possible future applications for time-resolved high-pressure, high-temperature research of mantle minerals.

  19. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnota, M.; Banas, D.; Pajek, M. [Jan Kochanowski Univ., Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.P.; Mauron, O.; Raboud, P.A. [Fribourg Univ., Dept. of Physics (Switzerland); Chmielewska, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Polasik, M.; Slabkowska, K. [Nicholas Copernicus Univ., Faculty of Chemistry, Torun (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lalpha{sub 1,2} X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place prior to the X-ray emission, the ionization probabilities corresponding to the collision time were obtained. The latter were compared to predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the geometrical model. The SCA calculations were performed using relativistic hydrogenic and self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) electronic wave functions. It was found that the use of the more realistic DHF wave functions in the SCA calculations leads to a much better description of the measured ionization probabilities for both the L- and M-shells. (authors)

  20. Fast and thermal neutron profiles for a 25-MV x-ray beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, K W; Nath, R; Holeman, G R

    1978-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines generate neutrons by photonuclear reactions in the target and the treatment head and expose the patient to a neutron flux. In order to evaluate the neutron exposure quantitatively, fast and thermal neutron profiles for 25-MV x-ray beams of the Sagittaire accelerator have been measured. An activation technique, using the reactions 31P(n, gamma)32P (thermal neutrons) and 31P(n, p)31Si (fast neutrons, E greater than 0.7 MeV), has been developed to measure fast- and thermal-neutron fluxes in an intense high-energy photon flux. The sensitivity of this activation detector to high-energy photons, which has plagued many previous neutron measurements, was carefully measured and found to be less than 4%. Neutron fluxes for various photon field sizes ranging from 5 X 5 cm to 30 X 30 cm have been measured. The fast-neutron profiles were observed to have rounded edges and the thermal fluxes were found to be relatively uniform. In the central part of the x-ray beam, the ratio of neutron dose equivalent to photon absorbed dose was found to be between 0.2% and 0.5%. Outside of the photon field, the ratio of neutron dose equivalent to the central-axis photon absorbed dose was 0.12%.

  1. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Château, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'Aì, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchová; (16), D Götz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Josè; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mulačová; (1, F Muleri; (140), T Muñoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodríguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer; (91), B Stappers; (80), A W Steiner; (92), N Stergioulas; (10), G Stratta; (93), T E Strohmayer; (86), Z Stuchlik; (17), S Suchy; (17), V Sulemainov; (94), T Takahashi; (15), F Tamburini; (129), T Tauris; (17), C Tenzer; (6), L Tolos; (62), F Tombesi; (121), J Tomsick; (86), G Torok; (95), J M Torrejon; (96), D F Torres; (3), A Tramacere; (1), A Trois; (15), R Turolla; (101), S Turriziani; (17), P Uter; (5), P Uttley; (77), A Vacchi; (105), P Varniere; (35), S Vaughan; (57), S Vercellone; (97), V Vrba; (29), D Walton; (94), S Watanabe; (68), R Wawrzaszek; (8), N Webb; (28), N Weinberg; (17), H Wende; (98), P Wheatley; (5), R Wijers; (5), R Wijnands; (87), M Wille; (44), C A Wilson-Hodge; (29), B Winter; (78), K Wood; (77), G Zampa; (77), N Zampa; (99), L Zampieri; (50), L Zdunik; (50), A Zdziarski; (100), B Zhang; (2), F Zwart; (142), M Ayre; (142), T Boenke; (142), C Corral van Damme; (143), E Kuulkers; (, D Lumb (142); IAPS-INAF,; Rome,; Italy,; INFN,; Vergata, Sez Roma Tor; SRON,; Netherlands, The; ISDC,; University, Geneve; Switzerland,; University, Sabanci; Istanbul,; Turkey,; Pannekoek, Astronomical Institute Anton; Amsterdam, University of; IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB,; Barcelona,; Spain,; INAF-IASF-Bologna,; IRAP,; Toulouse,; France,; Physical, Faculty of; Sciences, Applied; Southampton, University of; Kingdom, United; ASDC,; University, Middle East Technical; 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Warwick, University of; Padova, INAF-OA; Padova,; Nevada, University of; Vegas, Las; Vergata, University of Rome Tor; INAF-IRA-Bologna,; Bologna, University of; de La Laguna, Universidad; de Tenerife, Santa Cruz; APC,; Diderot, Université Paris; CEA/Irfu,; de Paris, Observatoire; di Palermo, INAF- Osservatorio Astronomico; Physics, School of; Astronomy,; Southampton, University of; Astronomy, Kepler Institute of; Gòra, University of Zielona; California, University of; Diego, San; Wisconsin, University of; University, Wayne State; Detroit,; de Astrobiologia, Centro; Madrid,; Research, Foundation for; Technology,; Heraklion,; Greece,; CNES,; Toulouse,; France,; Cagliari, INAF-OA; Italy,; de Andalucia, Instituto Astrofisica; Granada,; Spain,; Pisa, University of; Waterloo,; Canada,; Fedelico, Università di Napoli; Physics, School of; Astronomy,; Birmingham, University of; Kingdom, United; California, University of; Berkeley,; Laboratory, Space Sciences; States, United; University, Ohio; Physik, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische; Garching,; Germany,; Physics, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational; Valencia, University of; Catalonia, Technical University of; Barcelona,; Physics, Department of; Waterloo, University of; University, Sapienza; Rome,; Astronomie, Argelander-Institut für; Bonn,; Leuven, Institute for Astronomy K U; Leuven,; Belgium,; University, Texas Tech; Research, Tata Institute of Fundamental; Mumbai,; India,; Prague, Charles University in; Republic, Czech; Consulting, Jorgen Sandberg; Denmark,; University, Istanbul Kültür; Turkey,; Salamanca, Facultad de Ciencias-Trilingüe University of; de Granada, Universidad; Surrey, University of; University, Washington; University, Oxford; ASTRON,; Netherlands, The; Agency, European Space; ESTEC,; Centre, European Space Astronomy; Madrid,; University, The Pennsylvania State; States), United

    2014-01-01

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

  2. Ultrafast Time Resolved X-ray Diffraction Studies of Laser Heated Metals and Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peilin; Tomov, I. V.; Rentzepis, P. M.

    1998-03-01

    Time resolved hard x-ray diffraction has been employed to study the dynamics of lattice structure deformation. When laser pulse energy is deposited in a material it generates a non uniform transient temperature distribution, which alters the lattice structure of the crystal. The deformed crystal lattice will change the angle of diffraction for a monochromatic x-ray beam. We report picosecond and nanosecond time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice temperature distribution, transient structure and stress, in Pt (111) and GaAs (111) crystals, caused by pulsed UV laser irradiation. An ArF excimer laser operated at 300 Hz was used, both, to drive an x-ray diode with copper anode and heat the crystal. Bragg diffracted x-ray radiation was recorded by a direct imaging x-ray CCD. Changes in the diffraction patterns induced by a few millijouls pulse energy were observed at different time delays between the laser heating pulse and the x-ray probing pulse. A kinematical model for time resolved x-ray diffraction was used to analyze the experimental data. Good agreement between the measured and calculated scattered x-ray intensities profiles was achieved, indicating that detailed time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements can be made with nanosecond and picosecond resolution for small temperature changes. Our system can detect changes in the lattice spacing of about 10-3 A.

  3. The Large Area Detector of LOFT: the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Zane, S; Kennedy, T; Feroci, M; Herder, J -W Den; Ahangarianabhari, M; Argan, A; Azzarello, P; Baldazzi, G; Barbera, M; Barret, D; Bertuccio, G; Bodin, P; Bozzo, E; Bradley, L; Cadoux, F; Cais, P; Campana, R; Coker, J; Cros, A; Del Monte, E; De Rosa, A; Di Cosimo, S; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Favre, Y; Feldman, C; Fraser, G; Fuschino, F; Grassi, M; Hailey, M R; Hudec, R; Labanti, C; Macera, D; Malcovati, P; Marisaldi, M; Martindale, A; Mineo, T; Muleri, F; Nowak, M; Orlandini, M; Pacciani, L; Perinati, E; Petracek, V; Pohl, M; Rachevski, A; Smith, P; Santangelo, A; Seyler, J -Y; Schmid, C; Soffitta, P; Suchy, S; Tenzer, C; Uttley, P; Vacchi, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Wilms, J; Winter, B

    2014-01-01

    LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) is one of the five candidates that were considered by ESA as an M3 mission (with launch in 2022-2024) and has been studied during an extensive assessment phase. It is specifically designed to perform fast X-ray timing and probe the status of the matter near black holes and neutron stars. Its pointed instrument is the Large Area Detector (LAD), a 10 m 2 -class instrument operating in the 2-30keV range, which holds the capability to revolutionise studies of variability from X-ray sources on the millisecond time scales. The LAD instrument has now completed the assessment phase but was not down-selected for launch. However, during the assessment, most of the trade-offs have been closed leading to a robust and well documented design that will be re- proposed in future ESA calls. In this talk, we will summarize the characteristics of the LAD design and give an overview of the expectations for the instrument capabilities.

  4. Modeling of fast capillary discharge for collisionally excited soft x-ray lasers: comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Gerusov, Alexey V.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.; Cortazar, O. D.; Tomasel, Fernando G.; Szapiro, Benito T.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a model of a fast capillary discharge (FCD) and discuss them in comparison with experiments. The overall good coincidence between theory and experiment and the observation of stable reproducible compression are beneficial properties of FCD which open the possibility for achieving X-ray laser action in a compact discharge device. The required discharge parameters for lasing in different atomic elements have been calculated.

  5. Fast temporal correlation between hard X-ray and ultraviolet continuum brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Mauas, Pablo J.

    1986-01-01

    Recent Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations have shown fast and simultaneous increases in hard X-rays (HXR, E25 keV) and ultraviolet continuum (UVC, lambda lambda approx. equals 1600 and 1388 A) radiation. A simple and natural explanation is given for this phenomenon to happen, which does not involve extreme conditions for energy transport processes, and confirms earlier results on the effect of XUV photoionization in the solar atmosphere.

  6. Achieving a stable time response in polymeric radiation sensors under charge injection by X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaniwet, Akarin; Mills, Christopher A; Sellin, Paul J; Shkunov, Maxim; Keddie, Joseph L

    2010-06-01

    Existing inorganic materials for radiation sensors suffer from several drawbacks, including their inability to cover large curved areas, lack of tissue-equivalence, toxicity, and mechanical inflexibility. As an alternative to inorganics, poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) diodes have been evaluated for their suitability for detecting radiation via the direct creation of X-ray induced photocurrents. A single layer of PTAA is deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, with top electrodes selected from Al, Au, Ni, and Pd. The choice of metal electrode has a pronounced effect on the performance of the device; there is a direct correlation between the diode rectification factor and the metal-PTAA barrier height. A diode with an Al contact shows the highest quality of rectifying junction, and it produces a high X-ray photocurrent (several nA) that is stable during continuous exposure to 50 kV Mo Kalpha X-radiation over long time scales, combined with a high signal-to-noise ratio with fast response times of less than 0.25 s. Diodes with a low band gap, 'Ohmic' contact, such as ITO/PTAA/Au, show a slow transient response. This result can be explained by the build-up of space charge at the metal-PTAA interface, caused by a high level of charge injection due to X-ray-induced carriers. These data provide new insights into the optimum selection of metals for Schottky contacts on organic materials, with wider applications in light sensors and photovoltaic devices.

  7. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鑫; 江舟亚; 陈龙; 陈黎明; 辛建国; 陈洁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal.

  8. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation...... of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  9. The LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) background simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Del Monte, E; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Lund, N; Alvarez, J; Hernanz, M; Perinati, E

    2012-01-01

    The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) is an innovative medium-class mission selected for an assessment phase in the framework of the ESA M3 Cosmic Vision call. LOFT is intended to answer fundamental questions about the behaviour of matter in the very strong gravitational and magnetic fields around compact objects. With an effective area of ~10 m^2 LOFT will be able to measure very fast variability in the X-ray fluxes and spectra. A good knowledge of the in-orbit background environment is essential to assess the scientific performance of the mission and to optimize the instrument design. The two main contributions to the background are cosmic diffuse X-rays and high energy cosmic rays; also, albedo emission from the Earth is significant. These contributions to the background for both the Large Area Detector and the Wide Field Monitor are discussed, on the basis of extensive Geant-4 simulations of a simplified instrumental mass model.

  10. LOFT - The large observatory for x-ray timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Herder, J.W.; Argan, A.; De Rosa, A.

    2012-01-01

    The LOFT mission concept is one of four candidates selected by ESA for the M3 launch opportunity as Medium Size missions of the Cosmic Vision programme. The launch window is currently planned for between 2022 and 2024. LOFT is designed to exploit the diagnostics of rapid X-ray flux and spectral v...

  11. Guitar with a bow: a jet-like X-ray-emitting feature associated a fast-moving pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The Guitar Nebula is known to be a ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula associated with the very fast-moving pulsar B2224+65. Existing observations at two epochs have shown an unexpected 2 arcmin long X-ray-emitting jet-like feature emanating from the pulsar and offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. We propose a deep third epoch observation of this system in order to measure the X-ray spectral gradient across the feature as well as to confirm its proper motion, its morphological variation with time, and the presence of a counter jet. We will then critically test scenarios proposed to explain this system, which represents a class of similarly enigmatic objects recently discovered locally and in the central region of our Galaxy.

  12. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-09-01

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115-54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201-41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651-9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237-51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5-20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242-6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445-50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725-9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We also outline

  13. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-08-22

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115–54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201–41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651–9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237–51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5–20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242–6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445–50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725–9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We

  14. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  15. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  16. Correlations between pulsed X-ray flux and radio arrival time in the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray and radio flux densities and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. We found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. We suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the radio emission, and less directly of the X-ray emission, are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  17. Correlation between X-ray Lightcurve Shape and Radio Arrival Time in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray emission and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. At a confidence level of 99.8% we have found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. Our results suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption of radio emission in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the X-ray emission are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  18. Synchrotron ultra-fast X-ray imaging of a cavitating flow in a Venturi profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabre, A.; Gmar, M.; Lazaro, D.; Legoupil, S.; Coutier, O.; Dazin, A.; Lee, W. K.; Fezzaa, K.

    2009-08-01

    Cavitation consists of successive vaporization and condensation processes in a liquid flow, due to a large pressure decrease usually associated with sudden flow acceleration. This phenomenon occurs typically in pumps and naval propellers, on the blades' suction side and/or in periphery of the rotor. It is associated with performance decrease, blade erosion, vibrations that may lead to damage, and noise due to vapor collapse close to the solid walls. Therefore, a general understanding of the mechanisms that govern flow vaporization and condensation is of the utmost importance to reduce or at least to control these effects. A major issue is to estimate velocity fields in both phases, i.e. liquid and vapor. These combined measurements are missing in the literature. We propose a method of ultra-fast X-ray imaging to cope this lack. This method is based on X-ray absorption and phase-contrast enhancement. This technique can simultaneously measure the flow velocities of both liquid and vapor phases at kHz frequency. For the X-ray measurements, a dedicated Venturi shape canal has been designed for the experiments. The design is based on a known two-phase flows hydraulic set-up. The studied cavitation occurs downstream from the Venturi profile. The experiments were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. These experiments have confirmed the advantages of ultra-fast X-ray imaging for the visualization of liquid-vapor interfaces. Also, the feasibility of estimating velocity field in the flow is acknowledged.

  19. Fracture response of several metals to fast heating of samples by intensive X-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Results on studying the fracture response of metals samples in the form of thin disks to fast heating by the intensive pulse of X-ray radiation of a complete spectrum are presented in the paper. The samples of such metals as iron, copper, AMg6 aluminum, VT14 titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, cadmium, lead and zinc were tested. The samples were fixed in the special cartridges that were placed at such distances from the X-ray irradiator where the energy fluxes were 1.38, 0.90 and 0.29 kJ/cm2. The irradiating X-ray pulse was about 2 ns in duration. After testing, the depth of material ablation from a sample front surface and the degree and character of its spall damage were determined. The method of metallographic analysis was used for these purposes. The spectrum data were used for the calculations of samples heating. Numerical calculations of thermomechanical and shock wave loading conditions were made with the use of the equation of state taking into account the process of evaporation. The calculated value of maximum negative pressure in the sample at the coordinate corresponding to the depth of ablation and formation of spallation zones or spall cracks was conventionally accepted as the material resistance to spall fracture in such conditions. The comparison of obtained results with the data on the fracture of examined materials in the conditions of fast heating by the X-ray pulse with a hard spectrum and by the high-current electron beam of an electron pulse generator was conducted.

  20. Fast X-ray powder diffraction on I11 at Diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen P; Parker, Julia E; Marchal, Julien; Potter, Jonathan; Birt, Adrian; Yuan, Fajin; Fearn, Richard D; Lennie, Alistair R; Street, Steven R; Tang, Chiu C

    2011-07-01

    The commissioning and performance characterization of a position-sensitive detector designed for fast X-ray powder diffraction experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source are described. The detecting elements comprise 18 detector-readout modules of MYTHEN-II silicon strip technology tiled to provide 90° coverage in 2θ. The modules are located in a rigid housing custom designed at Diamond with control of the device fully integrated into the beamline data acquisition environment. The detector is mounted on the I11 three-circle powder diffractometer to provide an intrinsic resolution of Δ2θ approximately equal to 0.004°. The results of commissioning and performance measurements using reference samples (Si and AgI) are presented, along with new results from scientific experiments selected to demonstrate the suitability of this facility for powder diffraction experiments where conventional angle scanning is too slow to capture rapid structural changes. The real-time dehydrogenation of MgH(2), a potential hydrogen storage compound, is investigated along with ultrafast high-throughput measurements to determine the crystallite quality of different samples of the metastable carbonate phase vaterite (CaCO(3)) precipitated and stabilized in the presence of amino acid molecules in a biomimetic synthesis process.

  1. X-ray time lags from a pivoting power law in black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körding, E.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Most black hole candidate X-ray binaries show Fourier time lags between softer and harder X-rays. The hard photons seem to arrive up to a few ms after the soft for a given Fourier frequency of the perturbation. The energy dependence of the time lags has a roughly logarithmic behavior. Up to now most

  2. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  3. Discovery of two new fast X-ray transients with INTEGRAL: IGR J03346+4414 and IGR J20344+3913

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sguera, V.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Bird, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of two fast X-ray transients (FXTs) from analysis of archival INTEGRAL data. Both are characterized by a remarkable hard X-ray activity above 20 keV, in terms of duration (˜15 and 30 min, respectively), peak flux (˜10-9 erg cm-2 s-1) and dynamic range (˜2400 and 1360, respectively). Swift/X-ray telescope follow-up observations failed to detect any quiescent or low-level soft X-ray emission from either of the two FXTs, providing an upper limit of the order of a few times 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. The main spectral and temporal Imager on Board INTEGRAL Satellite (IBIS)/INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager (ISGRI) characteristics are presented and discussed with the aim of inferring possible hints on their nature.

  4. Velocimetry in both phases of a cavitating flow by fast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier; Khlifa, Ilyass; Fuzier, Sylvie; Vabre, Alexandre; Fezzaa, Kamel; Marko, Hocevar

    2014-11-01

    A promising method to measure velocity fields in a cavitating flow is presented. Dynamics of the liquid phase and of the bubbles are both investigated. The measurements are based on ultra fast X-ray imaging performed at the APS (Advanced Photon Source) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental device consists of a millimetric Venturi test section associated with a transportable hydraulic loop. Various configurations of velocity, pressure, and temperature have been investigated. Radio-opaque particles are used as tracers for the liquid phase, in association with a multi-pixels sensor to record the successive positions of the particles. The use of X-rays instead of light solves the problem of light reflection and dispersion on phase boundaries, since X-rays penetrate a gas/liquid flow in straight lines. Images contain simultaneously the information related to the particles (for PIV analysis in the liquid), to the vapor bubbles (for PIV in the gas). The slip velocity between vapor and liquid is calculated everywhere both velocities can be obtained.

  5. Monitoring Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients with Swift. Results from the first year

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Cusumano, G; La Parola, V; Vercellone, S; Pagani, C; Ducci, L; Mangano, V; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Guidorzi, C; Kennea, J A; Hoversten, E A; Burrows, D N; Gehrels, N

    2009-01-01

    Swift has allowed the possibility to give Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), the new class of High Mass X-ray Binaries discovered by INTEGRAL, non serendipitous attention throughout all phases of their life. We present our results based on the first year of intense Swift monitoring of four SFXTs, IGR J16479-4514, XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619 and AX J1841.0-0536. We obtain the first assessment of how long each source spends in each state using a systematic monitoring with a sensitive instrument. The duty-cycle of inactivity is 17, 28, 39, 55% (5% uncertainty), for IGR J16479-4514, AX J1841.0-0536, XTE J1739-302, and IGR J17544-2619, respectively, so that true quiescence is a rare state. This demonstrates that these transients accrete matter throughout their life at different rates. AX J1841.0-0536 is the only source which has not undergone a bright outburst during our campaign. Although individual sources behave somewhat differently, common X-ray characteristics of this class are emerging such as outb...

  6. Small, Fast TES Microcalorimeters with Unprecedented X-ray Spectral Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    Driven initially by the desire for X-ray microcalorimeter arrays suitable for imaging the dynamic solar corona, we have developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeter optimization that exhibits a unique combination of high spectral resolving power and a wide X-ray bandpass. These devices have achieved spectral performance of dE approximately 1.3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV, 1.6 eV at 6 keV, and 2.0 eV at 8 keV, using small TESs (e.g., approximately 35 micron x 35 micron) that operate in a regime in which the superconducting transition is highly current dependent. In order to accommodate high X-ray count rates, the devices sit directly on a solid substrate instead of on membranes, and we use an embedded heatsinking layer to reduce pixel-to-pixel crosstalk. We will present results from devices with a range of TES and absorber sizes, and from device wafers with varied embedded heatsink materials. This contribution will focus on count-rate capabilities, including a discussion of the trade-off between count rate and energy resolution, and the heatsinking design. We will also present preliminary tests of array readout using a code-division multiplexed SQUID readout scheme, which may be necessary to enable large arrays of these fast devices.

  7. Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction: The Dynamics of the Chemical Bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic theoretical formulation for pulsed X-ray scattering on nonstationary molecular states. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incpherent X-ray pulses. The general formalism is applied to a nonstationary diatomic molecule in order to highlight the relation b...

  8. The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) aboard the International X-ray Observatory (IXO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Didier; Ravera, Laurent; Bodin, Pierre; Amoros, Carine; Boutelier, Martin; Glorian, Jean-Michel; Godet, Olivier; Orttner, Guillaume; Lacombe, Karine; Pons, Roger; Rambaud, Damien; Ramon, Pascale; Ramchoun, Souad; Biffi, Jean-Marc; Belasic, Marielle; Clédassou, Rodolphe; Faye, Delphine; Pouilloux, Benjamin; Motch, Christian; Michel, Laurent; Lechner, Peter H.; Niculae, Adrian; Strueder, Lothar W.; Distratis, Giuseppe; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Santangelo, Andréa; Tenzer, Christoph; Wende, Henning; Wilms, Joern; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Schmid, Christian; Paltani, Stéphane; Cadoux, Franck; Fiorini, Carlo; Bombelli, Luca; Méndez, Mariano; Mereghetti, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) is one of the five focal plane instruments of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). The HTRS is the only instrument matching the top level mission requirement of handling a one Crab X-ray source with an efficiency greater than 10%. It will provide IX

  9. Internal x-ray plateau in short GRBs: Signature of supramassive fast-rotating quark stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Nai-Bo; Gao, He; Qi, Bin; Liu, Tong

    2016-10-01

    A supramassive, strongly magnetized millisecond neutron star (NS) has been proposed to be the candidate central engine of at least some short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), based on the "internal plateau" commonly observed in the early x-ray afterglow. While a previous analysis shows a qualitative consistency between this suggestion and the Swift SGRB data, the distribution of observed break time tb is much narrower than the distribution of the collapse time of supramassive NSs for the several NS equations-of-state (EoSs) investigated. In this paper, we study four recently constructed "unified" NS EoSs (BCPM, BSk20, BSk21, and Shen) as well as three developed strange quark star (QS) EoSs within the new confinement density-dependent mass (CDDM) model, labelled as CIDDM, CDDM1, and CDDM2. All the EoSs chosen here satisfy the recent observational constraints of the two massive pulsars of which the masses are precisely measured. We construct sequences of rigidly rotating NS/QS configurations with increasing spinning frequency f , from nonrotating (f =0 ) to the Keplerian frequency (f =fK), and provide convenient analytical parametrizations of the results. Assuming that the cosmological NS-NS merger systems have the same mass distribution as the Galactic NS-NS systems, we demonstrate that all except the BCPM NS EoS can reproduce the current 22% supramassive NS/QS fraction constraint as derived from the SGRB data. We simultaneously simulate the observed quantities (the break time tb, the break time luminosity Lb, and the total energy in the electromagnetic channel Etotal) of SGRBs and find that, while equally well reproducing other observational constraints, QS EoSs predict a much narrower tb distribution than that of the NS EoSs, better matching the data. We therefore suggest that the postmerger product of NS-NS mergers might be fast-rotating supramassive QSs rather than NSs.

  10. Anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Galactic black hole sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sriram, K; Pendharkar, J K; Rao, A R; Pendharkar, Jayant K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the accretion disk geometry in Galactic black hole sources by measuring the time delay between soft and hard X-ray emissions. Similar to the recent discoveries of anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Cyg X-3 and GRS 1915+105, we find that the hard X-rays are anti-correlated with soft X-rays with a significant lag in another source: XTE J1550-564. We also find the existence of pivoting in the model independent X-ray spectrum during these observations. We investigate time-resolved X-ray spectral parameters and find that the variation in these parameters is consistent with the idea of a truncated accretion disk. The QPO frequency, which is a measure of the size of truncated accretion disk, too changes indicating that the geometric size of the hard X-ray emitting region changes along with the spectral pivoting and soft X-ray flux. Similar kind of delay is also noticed in 4U 1630-47.

  11. Fast helicity switching of x-ray circular polarization at beamline P09 at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strempfer, J., E-mail: Joerg.Strempfer@desy.de; Mardegan, J. R. L.; Francoual, S.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Spitzbart, T.; Zink, H. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bouchenoire, L. [XMaS, ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, Grenoble 38043 (France); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    At the resonant scattering and diffraction beamline P09 at PETRA III/DESY, polarization manipulation in the X-ray energy range 3-13 keV is possible using wave-plates. Recently, fast flipping of circular polarization helicity using the Raspberry Pi controlled FPGA (PiLC) device developed at DESY and dedicated piezo-electric flippers has been commissioned. Functionality of the PiLC for XMCD and first XMCD measurements at the Fe K-and Dy-L{sub 3} absorption edges are presented.

  12. Study of fast capillary discharge plasma columns for soft x-ray amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Jorge J. G.; Cortazar, O. D.; Szapiro, Benito T.; Tomasel, Fernando G.; Hartshorn, D.

    1994-02-01

    The efficient generation, by a fast discharge, of capillary plasma channels containing Ne-like and Ni-like ions for collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers is reported. Rapid pulse excitation of capillary channels 1.5 mm in diameter with currents of less than 70 kA produced Ca and Ti plasmas in which atoms are ionized up to the F-like state. Line emission at the wavelengths corresponding to the 3p - 3s and 3d - 3p transitions of Ne-like Ca has been observed.

  13. Investigation on new scintillators for subnanosecond time-resolved x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruki, R.; Shibuya, K.; Nishikido, F.; Koshimizu, M.; Yoda, Y.; Kishimoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    We investigated new x-ray detectors for nuclear resonant scattering measurements with high energy x rays. The organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator of phenethylamine lead halide ((C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbX4) (X:Br, I) was used. These compounds have fast light emission due to an exciton. They include heavy atoms, which make the detector to have high efficiency to high energy x rays. The merit of these scintillators is that we can make a thick crystal compared to a Si wafer which is used in an avalanche photo-diode detector. We successfully measured 67.41 keV x ray signals, the energy of 61Ni nuclear resonant scattering, with high detection efficiency of 42.5 % by the scintillator.

  14. Fast scattering simulation tool for multi-energy x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sossin, A., E-mail: artur.sossin@cea.fr [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tabary, J.; Rebuffel, V. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Létang, J.M.; Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Verger, L. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo (MC) and deterministic approaches was employed as a means of creating a simulation tool capable of providing energy resolved x-ray primary and scatter images within a reasonable time interval. Libraries of Sindbad, a previously developed x-ray simulation software, were used in the development. The scatter simulation capabilities of the tool were validated through simulation with the aid of GATE and through experimentation by using a spectrometric CdTe detector. A simple cylindrical phantom with cavities and an aluminum insert was used. Cross-validation with GATE showed good agreement with a global spatial error of 1.5% and a maximum scatter spectrum error of around 6%. Experimental validation also supported the accuracy of the simulations obtained from the developed software with a global spatial error of 1.8% and a maximum error of around 8.5% in the scatter spectra.

  15. Characterization of intense laser-produced fast electrons using hard x-rays via bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, H.; Sentoku, Y.; Bass, A.; Griffin, B.; Pandit, R.; Beg, F.; Chen, H.; McLean, H.; Link, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Energy distribution of high-power, short-pulse laser produced fast electrons was experimentally and numerically studied using high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. The hard x-ray photons and escaping electrons from various metal foils, irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility, were recorded with a differential filter stack spectrometer that is sensitive to photons produced by mainly 0.5-2 MeV electrons and an electron spectrometer measuring >2 MeV electrons. The experimental bremsstrahlung and the slope of the measured escaped electrons were compared with an analytic calculation using an input electron spectrum estimated with the ponderomotive scaling. The result shows that the electron spectrum entering a Cu foil could be continuous single slope with the slope temperature of ˜1.5 MeV in the detector range. The experiment and analytic calculation were then compared with a 2D particle-in-cell code, PICLS, including a newly developed radiation transport module. The simulation shows that a two-temperature electron distribution is generated at the laser interaction region, but only the hot component of the fast electrons flow into the target during the interaction because the low energy electron component is trapped by self-generated magnetic field in the preformed plasma. A significant amount of the photons less than 100 keV observed in the experiment could be attributed to the low energy electrons entering the foil a few picoseconds later after the gating field disappears.

  16. Demonstration of a time-resolved x-ray scattering instrument utilizing the full-repetition rate of x-ray pulses at the Pohang Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.; Lee, Sooheyong; Yu, Chung-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of a new experimental instrument for time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II). It operates with a photon energy ranging from 5 to 18 keV. It is equipped with an amplified Ti:sappahire femtosecond laser, optical diagnostics, and laser beam delivery for pump-probe experiments. A high-speed single-element detector and high trigger-rate oscilloscope are used for rapid data acquisition. While this instrument is capable of measuring sub-nanosecond dynamics using standard laser pump/x-ray probe techniques, it also takes advantage of the dense 500 MHz standard fill pattern in the PLS-II storage ring to efficiently record nano-to-micro-second dynamics simultaneously. We demonstrate this capability by measuring both the (fast) impulsive strain and (slower) thermal recovery dynamics of a crystalline InSb sample following intense ultrafast laser excitation. Exploiting the full repetition rate of the storage ring results in a significant improvement in data collection rates compared to conventional bunch-tagging methods.

  17. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient and classical Supergiant X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Gimenez-Garcia, A; Torrejon, J M; Oskinova, L; Martinez-Nunez, S; Hamann, W -R; Rodes-Roca, J J; Gonzalez-Galan, A; Alonso-Santiago, J; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C; Bernabeu, G; Sander, A

    2016-01-01

    Classical Supergiant X-ray Binaries (SGXBs) and Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are two types of High-mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyse the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. We compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. We find that the stellar para...

  18. Investigation of pure- and aerated-liquid jets using ultra-fast X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kuo-Cheng, E-mail: Kuo-Cheng.Lin@wpafb.af.mil [Taitech, Inc., Beavercreek, OH 45430 (United States); Rajnicek, Christopher; McCall, Jonathan; Carter, Campbell [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Fezzaa, Kamel [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Pure- and aerated-liquid jets were observed using the ultra-fast X-ray phase contrast imaging technique. Highly convoluted wrinkle structures were seen on the column surface of a turbulent pure-liquid jet, gas bubbles were discovered inside droplets and ligaments of aerated-liquid sprays, and apparently homogenous two-phase mixtures were observed inside the aerated-liquid injector. The major limitation of this X-ray technique lies in its line-of-sight nature, which can create overlapped objects/interfaces on the X-ray images.

  19. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D; Berset, Michel; Chmielewska, D; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Hoszowska, Joanna; Maillard, Yves-Patrick; Mauron, Olivier; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, Pierre-Alexandre; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lα1,2 X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place pr...

  20. Fast scale-invariant lateral lumbar vertebrae detection and segmentation in X-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Owens, William; Sa, Ruhan; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2016-08-01

    Fully automatic localization of lumbar vertebrae from clinical X-ray images is very challenging due to the variation of X-ray quality, scale, contrast, number of visible vertebrae, etc. To overcome these challenges, we present a novel framework, where we accelerate a scale-invariant object detection method using Support Vector Machines (SVM) trained on Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features and segmenting a fine vertebra contour using Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) based snake model. Support Vector Machines trained on HOG features are now an object detection standard in many perception fields and have demonstrated good performance on medical images as well. However, the computational complexity and lack of robustness brought by rescaling the original images have prevented its applicability. The proposed multistage detection framework uses lower-level detection result to determine the rescaling regions to reduce the region of interest, thereby decreasing the execution time. We further refine the detection result by segmenting the contour of vertebra using GVF snake, where we use edge detection techniques to increase the robustness of the GVF snake. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the effectiveness of this framework using a large set of clinical X-ray images.

  1. Ultra-fast Measurements of Optically Induced Lattice Dynamics in LuMnO3 Using Aluminum K-alpha X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, J.; Wark, J. S.

    2005-10-01

    An experiment to study the structural dynamics at the ultra-fast time scale in optically-pumped samples is presented. Measurements of lattice dynamics in LuMnO3 are presented and compared to calculations using dynamical diffraction theory modified for hexagonal crystal structure. Ultra-fast x-ray emission is used to measure Bragg peak shifts using diffraction and compared to calculations. Results are presented for optical pump energy densities of 8 and 20-mJ/cm^2. The experiment uses ˜150 mJ of a 100fs Ti:Sapphire laser to excite K-alpha x-ray emission in an aluminum wire with ˜1-2% split off for the material pump. The x-ray emission is relayed using a spherical Quartz crystal to the sample target. Plans for experiments using Cu K-alpha emission to probe Fe samples will also be described.

  2. Time-Dependent Electron Acceleration in Blazar Transients: X-Ray Time Lags and Spectral Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Tiffany R; Finke, Justin D

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation from blazar jets often displays strong variability, extending from radio to $\\gamma$-ray frequencies. In a few cases, this variability has been characterized using Fourier time lags, such as those detected in the X-rays from Mrk~421 using BeppoSAX. The lack of a theoretical framework to interpret the data has motivated us to develop a new model for the formation of the X-ray spectrum and the time lags in blazar jets based on a transport equation including terms describing stochastic Fermi acceleration, synchrotron losses, shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, and spatial diffusion. We derive the exact solution for the Fourier transform of the electron distribution, and use it to compute the Fourier transform of the synchrotron radiation spectrum and the associated X-ray time lags. The same theoretical framework is also used to compute the peak flare X-ray spectrum, assuming that a steady-state electron distribution is achieved during the peak of the flare. The model parameters are...

  3. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tokushi [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tomita, Ayana [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Chollet, Matthieu [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ichikawa, Hirohiko [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroshi [Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Adachi, Shin-ichi [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Koshihara, Shin-ya, E-mail: skoshi@cms.titech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H61 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented.

  4. Kilohertz sources of hard x rays and fast ions with femtosecond laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Richardson, M.; Korn, G.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Vogt, U.; Elsaesser, T.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new, stable, kilohertz femtosecond laser plasma source of hard-x-ray continuum and Kα emission that uses a microscopic liquid jet target that is continuous and debris free. Plasmas produced by ultrashort (50-fs) intense laser pulses from a fine (10-30-μm diameter) liquid Ga jet emit bright 9.3- and 10.3-keV Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multikilovolt bremmstrahlung continuum. Kilohertz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high-intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot to shot and debris free. Our target provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We show the hard-x-ray spectrum described above. The source was generated by a 50-fs-duration, 1-kHz, 2-W, high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser. Using the same technology, we also generate forward-going sub-mega-electron-volt (sub-MeV) protons from a 10-μm liquid water target at 1-kHz repetition rates. Kilohertz sources of high-energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies and will lead to efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors in both the forward and the backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high-repetition-rate lasers sources increases, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency, and directionality to occur. The effect of these developments is discussed. As compact, high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser technology reaches focused intensities of ~1019 W/cm2, many new applications of high-repetition-rate hard-x-ray and MeV ion sources will become practical.

  5. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin [High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  6. Celestial X-ray Source Modeling and Catalogues for Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microcosm X-ray pulsar-based navigation and timing (XNAV) team will provide the software and modeling infrastructure for NASA to support XNAV operations,...

  7. LOFT: the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Azzarello, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; Belloni, T; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Bodin, P; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Casella, P; Chakrabarty, D; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'Aì, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Martino, D; De Rosa, A; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; Donnarumma, I; Drago, A; Durant, M; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Evangelista, Y; Fabian, A; Falanga, M; Favre, Y; Feldman, C; Ferrigno, C; Finger, M H; Fraser, G W; Fuschino, F; Galloway, D K; Sanchez, J L Galvez; Garcia-Berro, E; Gendre, B; Gezari, S; Giles, A B; Gilfanov, M; Giommi, P; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Gouiffes, C; Grassi, M; Guidorzi, P Groot C; Haas, D; Hansen, F; Hartmann, D H; Haswe, C A; Heger, A; Homan, J; Hornstrup, A; Hudec, R; Huovelin, J; Ingram, A; Zand, J J M in't; Isern, J; Israe, G; Izzo, L; Jonker, P; Kaaret, P; Karas, V; Karelin, D; Kataria, D; Keek, L; Kennedy, T; Klochkov, D; Kluzniak, W; Kokkotas, K; Korpela, S; Kouveliotou, C; Kreykenbohm, I; Kuiper, L M; Kuvvetli, I; Labanti, C; Lai, D; Lamb, F K; Lebrun, F; Lin, D; Linder, D; Lodato, G; Longo, F; Lund, N; Maccarone, T J; Macera, D; Maier, D; Malcovati, P; Mangano, V; Manousakis, A; Marisaldi, M; Markowitz, A; Martindale, A; Matt, G; McHardy, I M; Melatos, A; Mendez, M; Migliari, S; Mignani, R; Miller, M C; Miller, J M; Mineo, T; Miniutti, G; Morsink, S; Motch, C; Motta, S; Mouchet, M; Muleri, F; Norton, A J; Nowak, M; O'Brien, P; Orienti, M; Orio, M; Orlandini, M; Orleanski, P; Osborne, J P; Osten, R; Ozel, F; Pacciani, L; Papitto, A; Paul, B; Perinati, E; Petracek, V; Portell, J; Poutanen, J; Psaltis, D; Rambaud, D; Ramsay, G; Rapisarda, M; Rachevski, A; Ray, P S; Rea, N; Reddy, S; Reig, P; Aranda, M Reina; Remillard, R; Reynolds, C; Rodríguez-Gil, P; Rodriguez, J; Romano, P; Rossi, E M R; Ryde, F; Sabau-Graziati, L; Sala, G; Salvaterra, R; Sanna, A; Schanne, S; Schee, J; Schmid, C; Schwenk, A; Schwope, A D; Seyler, J -Y; Shearer, A; Smith, A; Smith, D M; Smith, P J; Sochora, V; Soffitta, P; Soleri, P; Stappers, B; Stelzer, B; Stergioulas, N; Stratta, G; Strohmayer, T E; Stuchlik, Z; Suchy, S; Sulemainov, V; Takahashi, T; Tamburini, F; Tenzer, C; Tolos, L; Torok, G; Torrejon, J M; Torres, D F; Tramacere, A; Trois, A; Turriziani, S; Uter, P; Uttley, P; Vacchi, A; Varniere, P; Vaughan, S; Vercellone, S; Vrba, V; Walton, D; Watanabe, S; Wawrzaszek, R; Webb, N; Weinberg, N; Wende, H; Wheatley, P; Wijers, R; Wijnands, R; Wille, M; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Winter, B; Wood, K; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zampieri, L; Zdziarski, A; Zhang, B

    2012-01-01

    The LOFT mission concept is one of four candidates selected by ESA for the M3 launch opportunity as Medium Size missions of the Cosmic Vision programme. The launch window is currently planned for between 2022 and 2024. LOFT is designed to exploit the diagnostics of rapid X-ray flux and spectral variability that directly probe the motion of matter down to distances very close to black holes and neutron stars, as well as the physical state of ultra-dense matter. These primary science goals will be addressed by a payload composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a collimated (<1 degree field of view) experiment operating in the energy range 2-50 keV, with a 10 m^2 peak effective area and an energy resolution of 260 eV at 6 keV. The WFM will operate in the same energy range as the LAD, enabling simultaneous monitoring of a few-steradian wide field of view, with an angular resolution of <5 arcmin. The LAD and WFM experiments will allow us to investigate variability fr...

  8. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  9. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, M.; /SLAC; Pancaldi, M.; /CIC nanoGUNE /Stockholm U.; Bernhard, C.; /Fribourg U.; Driel, T.van; Glownia, J.M.; /SLAC; Marsik, P.; /Fribourg U.; Radovic, M.; Vaz, C.A.F.; /PLS, SLS; Zhu, D.; /SLAC; Bonetti, S.; /Stockholm U.; Staub, U.; /PLS, SLS; Hoffmann, M.C.; /SLAC

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. We find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO3 thin-film sample.

  10. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon.

  11. Type-I X-ray bursts reveal a fast co-evolving behavior of the corona in an X-ray binary

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Peng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Li, Jian; Wang, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    The coronae in X-ray binaries (XRBs) still remain poorly understood, although they have been believed for a long time to play a key role in modeling the characteristic outbursts of XRBs. Type-I X-ray bursts, the thermonuclear flashes happening on the surface of a neutron star (NS), can be used as a probe to the innermost region of a NS XRB, where the corona is believed to be located very close to the NS. We report the discovery of a tiny life cycle of the corona that is promptly co-evolved with the type-I bursts superimposed on the outburst of the NS XRB IGR J17473$-$2721. This finding may serve as the first evidence of directly seeing the rapid disappearance and formation of a corona in an XRB with a cooling/heating timescale of less than a second, which can strongly constrain the accretion models in XRBs at work.

  12. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  13. Thin film growth studies using time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Thin-film growth is important for novel functional materials and new generations of devices. The non-equilibrium growth physics involved is very challenging, because the energy landscape for atomic scale processes is determined by many parameters, such as the diffusion and Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers. We review the in situ real-time techniques of x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray growth oscillations and diffuse x-ray scattering (GISAXS) for the determination of structure and morphology on length scales from Å to µm. We give examples of time resolved growth experiments mainly from molecular thin film growth, but also highlight growth of inorganic materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and electrochemical deposition from liquids. We discuss how scaling parameters of rate equation models and fundamental energy barriers in kinetic Monte Carlo methods can be determined from fits of the real-time x-ray data.

  14. X-ray Timing of Neutron Stars, Astrophysical Probes of Extreme Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J; Gendreau, K; Lai, D; Lattimer, J; Link, B; Lommen, A; Miller, C; Ray, P; Rutledge, R; Strohmayer, T; Wilson-Hodge, C; Wood, K

    2009-01-01

    The characteristic physical timescales near stellar-mass compact objects are measured in milliseconds. These timescales -- the free-fall time, the fastest stable orbital period, and stellar spin periods -- encode the fundamental physical properties of compact objects: mass, radius, and angular momentum. The characteristic temperature of matter in the vicinity of neutron stars is such that the principal electromagnetic window into their realms is the X-ray band. Because of these connections to the fundamental properties of neutron stars, X-ray timing studies remain today the most direct means of probing their structure and dynamics. While current X-ray observatories have revealed many relevant and fascinating phenomena, they lack the sensitivity to fully exploit them to uncover the fundamental properties of compact objects and their extreme physics. With this white paper, we summarize and highlight the science opportunities that will accompany an order-of-magnitude improvement in X-ray timing sensitivity, a go...

  15. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  16. Three-dimensional foam flow resolved by fast X-ray tomographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Raufaste, Christophe; Mader, Kevin; Santucci, Stéphane; Mokso, Rajmund

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to ultra fast and high resolution X-ray tomography, we managed to capture the evolution of the local structure of the bubble network of a 3D foam flowing around a sphere. As for the 2D foam flow around a circular obstacle, we observed an axisymmetric velocity field with a recirculation zone, and indications of a negative wake downstream the obstacle. The bubble deformations, quantified by a shape tensor, are smaller than in 2D, due to a purely 3D feature: the azimuthal bubble shape variation. Moreover, we were able to detect plastic rearrangements, characterized by the neighbor-swapping of four bubbles. Their spatial structure suggest that rearrangements are triggered when films faces get smaller than a characteristic area.

  17. Development of a fast readout system of an X-ray CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Awaki, H; Koyama, K; Tomida, H; Tsuru, T

    1999-01-01

    In the course of developing a fast readout system of an X-ray CCD camera with low noise using HPK-CCD, we have succeeded in making a clock generator to read data from a CCD with the speed of 2 Mpixel/s. This generator is fabricated from commercially available products in order to simplify the manufacturing procedure. To determine the noise of the system, we are evaluating the noise from each part which conceivably contributes. It is known that the readout noise depends on the clock speed. Thus, to begin with, we measured the dependency of the system noise from the ADC in the data acquisition system on its clock speed.

  18. Use of soft x-ray diagnostic on the COMPASS tokamak for investigations of sawteeth crash neighborhood and of plasma position using fast inversion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imrisek, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Weinzettl, V.; Mlynar, J.; Panek, R.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Odstrcil, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Odstrcil, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Optical Research Center, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ficker, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Pinzon, J. R. [Institue Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Ehrlacher, C. [ENS Cachan, Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    The soft x-ray diagnostic is suitable for monitoring plasma activity in the tokamak core, e.g., sawtooth instability. Moreover, spatially resolved measurements can provide information about plasma position and shape, which can supplement magnetic measurements. In this contribution, fast algorithms with the potential for a real-time use are tested on the data from the COMPASS tokamak. In addition, the soft x-ray data are compared with data from other diagnostics in order to discuss possible connection between sawtooth instability on one side and the transition to higher confinement mode, edge localized modes and productions of runaway electrons on the other side.

  19. NuSTAR Detection Of A Cyclotron Line In The Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J17544-2619

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, Varun; Tomsick, John; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Smith, David M; Bellm, Eric; Boggs, Steven E; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Krivonos, Roman A; Lu, Ting-Ni; Madsen, Kristin; Stern, Daniel; Younes, George; Zhang, William

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR spectral and timing studies of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) IGR J17544-2619. The spectrum is well-described by a ~1 keV blackbody and a hard continuum component, as expected from an accreting X-ray pulsar. We detect a cyclotron line at 17 keV, confirming that the compact object in IGR J17544-2619 is indeed a neutron star. This is the first measurement of the magnetic field in a SFXT. The inferred magnetic field strength, B = (1.45 +/- 0.03) * 10^12 G * (1+z) is typical of neutron stars in X-ray binaries, and rules out a magnetar nature for the compact object. We do not find any significant pulsations in the source on time scales of 1-2000 s.

  20. Spectral and temporal properties of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J18483-0311 observed by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Ducci, L; Sasaki, M; Santangelo, A; Esposito, P; Romano, P; Vercellone, S

    2013-01-01

    IGR J18483-0311 is a supergiant fast X-ray transient whose compact object is located in a wide (18.5 d) and eccentric (e~0.4) orbit, which shows sporadic outbursts that reach X-ray luminosities of ~1e36 erg/s. We investigated the timing properties of IGR J18483-0311 and studied the spectra during bright outbursts by fitting physical models based on thermal and bulk Comptonization processes for accreting compact objects. We analysed archival INTEGRAL data collected in the period 2003-2010, focusing on the observations with IGR J18483-0311 in outburst. We searched for pulsations in the INTEGRAL light curves of each outburst. We took advantage of the broadband observing capability of INTEGRAL for the spectral analysis. We observed 15 outbursts, seven of which we report here for the first time. This data analysis almost doubles the statistics of flares of this binary system detected by INTEGRAL. A refined timing analysis did not reveal a significant periodicity in the INTEGRAL observation where a ~21s pulsation w...

  1. X-ray stacking of Lyman break galaxies in the 4\\,Ms CDF-S - X-ray luminosities and star formation rates across cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, Peter-Christian; Seymour, Nicholas; Bomans, Dominik J

    2012-01-01

    Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) are widely thought to be prototypical young galaxies in the early universe, particularly representative of those undergoing massive events of star formation. Therefore, LBGs should produce significant amounts of X-ray emission. We aim to trace the X-ray luminosity of Lyman Break Galaxies across cosmic time and from that derive constraints on their star formation history. We utilize the newly released 4 Ms mosaic obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the deepest X-ray image to date, alongside with the superb spectroscopic data sets available in the CDF-S survey region to construct large but nearly uncontaminated samples of LBGs across a wide range of redshift (0.5 < z < 4.5) which can be used as input samples for stacking experiments. This approach allows us to trace the X-ray emission of Lyman Break Galaxies to even lower, previously unreachable, flux density limits (~10^-18 mW m^-2) and therefore to larger redshifts. We reliably detect soft-band X-ray emission from al...

  2. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  3. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  4. The LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) background simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campana, R.; Feroci, M.; Del Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    around compact objects. With an effective area of ~10 m2 LOFT will be able to measure very fast variability in the X-ray fluxes and spectra. A good knowledge of the in-orbit background environment is essential to assess the scientific performance of the mission and to optimize the instrument...... design. The two main contributions to the background are cosmic diffuse X-rays and high energy cosmic rays; also, albedo emission from the Earth is significant. These contributions to the background for both the Large Area Detector and the Wide Field Monitor are discussed, on the basis of extrensive...

  5. FUX-Sim: Implementation of a fast universal simulation/reconstruction framework for X-ray systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Monica; Serrano, Estefania; Garcia-Blas, Javier; García, Ines; de Molina, Claudia; Carretero, Jesus; Desco, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The availability of digital X-ray detectors, together with advances in reconstruction algorithms, creates an opportunity for bringing 3D capabilities to conventional radiology systems. The downside is that reconstruction algorithms for non-standard acquisition protocols are generally based on iterative approaches that involve a high computational burden. The development of new flexible X-ray systems could benefit from computer simulations, which may enable performance to be checked before expensive real systems are implemented. The development of simulation/reconstruction algorithms in this context poses three main difficulties. First, the algorithms deal with large data volumes and are computationally expensive, thus leading to the need for hardware and software optimizations. Second, these optimizations are limited by the high flexibility required to explore new scanning geometries, including fully configurable positioning of source and detector elements. And third, the evolution of the various hardware setups increases the effort required for maintaining and adapting the implementations to current and future programming models. Previous works lack support for completely flexible geometries and/or compatibility with multiple programming models and platforms. In this paper, we present FUX-Sim, a novel X-ray simulation/reconstruction framework that was designed to be flexible and fast. Optimized implementation for different families of GPUs (CUDA and OpenCL) and multi-core CPUs was achieved thanks to a modularized approach based on a layered architecture and parallel implementation of the algorithms for both architectures. A detailed performance evaluation demonstrates that for different system configurations and hardware platforms, FUX-Sim maximizes performance with the CUDA programming model (5 times faster than other state-of-the-art implementations). Furthermore, the CPU and OpenCL programming models allow FUX-Sim to be executed over a wide range of hardware

  6. STINGRAY: Time Series Methods For Astronomical X-ray Data That Aren't Fishy At All!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Abigail; Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    In much of the small X-ray timing community, the data analysis software is old, private, poorly maintained, and poorly documented, and we believe this will hinder the further development of the sub-field. With the advent of new timing missions like ASTROSAT and NICER, we want the community to have software that has a low entrance threshold and relatively small learning curve. We are in the early stages of developing Stingray, a general-purpose python package for timing and spectral-timing analysis of astronomical X-ray data, with the intent to expand to fast timing data in other wavelengths in the future. GitHub pull requests and issues are welcome! http://stingraysoftware.github.io/

  7. Toward Fast, Low-noise, Low-power, Small Pixel Digital CCDs for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, Mark W.; Burke, Barry; Cooper, Michael; Foster, Richard; Grant, Catherine E.; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Miller, Eric D.; Prigozhin, Gregory; Schuette, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Future X-ray missions such as Lynx will require large-format imaging detectors with spectroscopic performance at least as good as the best current-generation devices but with much higher readout rates. We have been investigating a detector architecture under development at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, called the Digital CCD, for use in such missions. The Digital CCD is envisioned as a CMOS-compatible detector integrated with parallel CMOS signal processing chains. The combination of fast, low noise CCD amplifiers with highly parallel signal processing offers the high frame-rate required. The CMOS-compatibility of the CCD provides low-power charge transfer.Here we report on the X-ray spectral response of a CMOS-compatible test CCD read at 2.5 MHz (about 25 times faster than the CCDs operating on Chandra ACIS), using transfer clock levels of only +-1 V (power per unit area less than 25 times that of ACIS CCDs). The 8-micron pixels of this device are one third the size of those on Chandra ACIS. We compare charge splitting in this detector with that observed in larger-pixel detectors, and we briefly discuss the implications of the small-pixel, deep-depletion detector configurations required by Lynx.

  8. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE X-RAY TIME-DELAY TRANSFER FUNCTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legg, E.; Miller, L. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Turner, T. J.; Giustini, M.; Reeves, J. N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kraemer, S. B. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H 0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGNs have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (1) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (2) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (1) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (2) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-seconds from the primary X-ray source. The power spectral density and the frequency-dependent phase lags of the peak light curves are consistent with those of the full time series. There is evidence for non-stationarity in the Ark 564 time series in both the Fourier and peaks analyses. A sharp 'negative' lag (variations at hard photon energies lead soft photon energies) observed in Ark 564 appears to be generated by the shape of the hard-band transfer function and does not arise from soft-band reflection of X-rays. These results reinforce the evidence for the existence of X-ray reverberation in type I AGN, which requires that these AGNs are significantly affected by scattering from circumnuclear material a few tens or hundreds of gravitational radii in extent.

  9. Discovery of two new Fast X-ray Transients with INTEGRAL: IGR J03346+4414 and IGR J20344+3913

    CERN Document Server

    Sguera, V; Paizis, A; Bird, A J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of two Fast X-ray Transients (FXTs) from analysis of archival INTEGRAL data. Both are characterized by a remarkable hard X-ray activity above 20 keV, in term of duration (about 15 and 30 minutes, respectively), peak-flux (about 10^-9 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and dynamic range (about 2400 and 1360, respectively). Swift/XRT follow-up observations failed to detect any quiescent or low level soft X-ray emission from either of the two FXTs, providing an upper limit of the order of a few times 10^-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The main spectral and temporal IBIS/ISGRI characteristics are presented and discussed with the aim of infering possible hints on their nature.

  10. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Sasaki, Manami; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Laycock, Silas

    2017-09-01

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg2 region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity (L X ) of the pulsars ranges from 1034 to 1037 erg s‑1 at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L X ≳ 4 × 1035 erg s‑1 exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  11. High-efficiency fast scintillators for "optical" soft x-ray arrays for laboratory plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Stutman, D; Tritz, K; Vero, R; Finkenthal, M; Suliman, G; Kaita, R; Majeski, R; Stratton, B; Roquemore, L; Tarrio, C

    2007-08-20

    Scintillator-based "optical" soft x-ray (OSXR) arrays have been investigated as a replacement for the conventional silicon (Si)-based diode arrays used for imaging, tomographic reconstruction, magnetohydrodynamics, transport, and turbulence studies in magnetically confined fusion plasma research. An experimental survey among several scintillator candidates was performed, measuring the relative and absolute conversion efficiencies of soft x rays to visible light. Further investigations took into account glass and fiber-optic face-plates (FOPs) as substrates, and a thin aluminum foil (150 nm) to reflect the visible light emitted by the scintillator back to the optical detector. Columnar (crystal growth) thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) deposited on an FOP, was found to be the best candidate for the previously mentioned plasma diagnostics. Its luminescence decay time of the order of approximately 1-10 micros is thus suitable for the 10 micros time resolution required for the development of scintillator-based SXR plasma diagnostics. A prototype eight channel OSXR array using CsI:Tl was designed, built, and compared to an absolute extreme ultraviolet diode counterpart: its operation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment showed a lower level of induced noise relative to the Si-based diode arrays, especially during neutral beam injection heated plasma discharges. The OSXR concept can also be implemented in less harsh environments for basic spectroscopic laboratory plasma diagnostics.

  12. Fast and robust ray casting algorithms for virtual X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, N.; Duvauchelle, P.; Létang, J. M.; Babot, D.

    2006-07-01

    Deterministic calculations based on ray casting techniques are known as a powerful alternative to the Monte Carlo approach to simulate X- or γ-ray imaging modalities (e.g. digital radiography and computed tomography), whenever computation time is a critical issue. One of the key components, from the viewpoint of computing resource expense, is the algorithm which determines the path length travelled by each ray through complex 3D objects. This issue has given rise to intensive research in the field of 3D rendering (in the visible light domain) during the last decades. The present work proposes algorithmic solutions adapted from state-of-the-art computer graphics to carry out ray casting in X-ray imaging configurations. This work provides an algorithmic basis to simulate direct transmission of X-rays, as well as scattering and secondary emission of radiation. Emphasis is laid on the speed and robustness issues. Computation times are given in a typical case of radiography simulation.

  13. Fast and robust ray casting algorithms for virtual X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, N. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing Using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: Nicolas.Freud@insa-lyon.fr; Duvauchelle, P. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing Using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Letang, J.M. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing Using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI, Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing Using Ionizing Radiations, INSA-Lyon Scientific and Technical University, Bat. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-07-15

    Deterministic calculations based on ray casting techniques are known as a powerful alternative to the Monte Carlo approach to simulate X- or {gamma}-ray imaging modalities (e.g. digital radiography and computed tomography), whenever computation time is a critical issue. One of the key components, from the viewpoint of computing resource expense, is the algorithm which determines the path length travelled by each ray through complex 3D objects. This issue has given rise to intensive research in the field of 3D rendering (in the visible light domain) during the last decades. The present work proposes algorithmic solutions adapted from state-of-the-art computer graphics to carry out ray casting in X-ray imaging configurations. This work provides an algorithmic basis to simulate direct transmission of X-rays, as well as scattering and secondary emission of radiation. Emphasis is laid on the speed and robustness issues. Computation times are given in a typical case of radiography simulation.

  14. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  15. The eccentric short-period orbit of the supergiant fast X-ray transient HD 74194 (=LM Vel)

    CERN Document Server

    Gamen, R; Walborn, N R; Morrell, N I; Arias, J I; Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Alfaro, E J

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present the first orbital solution for the O-type supergiant star HD 74194, which is the optical counterpart of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J08408-4503. Methods. We measured the radial velocities in the optical spectrum of HD 74194, and we determined the orbital solution for the first time. We also analysed the complex H{\\alpha} profile. Results. HD 74194 is a binary system composed of an O-type supergiant and a compact object in a short-period ($P=9.5436\\pm0.0002$ d) and high-eccentricity ($e=0.63\\pm0.03$) orbit. The equivalent width of the H{\\alpha} line is not modulated entirely with the orbital period, but seems to vary in a superorbital period ($P=285\\pm10$ d) nearly 30 times longer than the orbital one.

  16. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Nemmen, R S; Braito, V; Gaspari, M; Reynolds, C S

    2012-01-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60%, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34%, >67% of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ioniza...

  17. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid using a hard X-ray free electron laser in a dual-beam dispersive detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Chiba, Yuhei; Isokawa, Yusuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Suzuki, Toshinori; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-13

    We present femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solution using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronized Ti:sapphire laser. The instrumental response time is 200 fs, and the repetition rate of measurement is 10 Hz. A cylindrical liquid beam 100 μm in diameter of aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate solution is photoexcited at 400 nm, and the transient X-ray absorption spectra are measured in the K-edge region of iron, 7.10 - 7.26 keV, using a dual X-ray beam dispersive detection method. Each of the dual beams has the pulse energy of 1.4 μJ, and pump-induced absorbance change on the order of 10(-3) is successfully detected. The photoexcited iron complex exhibits a red shifted iron K-edge with the appearance time constant of 260 fs. The X-ray absorption difference spectra, with and without the pump pulses, are independent of time delay after 1.5 ps up to 100 ps, indicating that the photoexcited species is long-lived.

  18. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) is an X-ray binary displaying an array of phenomena which makes it unique in our Galaxy. Despite several decades of observation, controversy surrounds even the most basic facts about this system. It is generally classified as a Neutron Star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB),though this classification is based primarily on the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. It is believed to be in a very eccentric {approx} 16.5 day orbit, displaying periodic outbursts in the radio and other frequency bands (including optical and IR) which reinforce the notion that this is in fact the orbital period. Cir X-1 lies in the plane of the Galaxy, where optical identification of the companion is made difficult due to dust obscuration. The companion is thought to be a low mass star, though a high mass companion has not currently been ruled out. In this work, the author analyzes recent observations of Cir X-1 made with the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, as well as archival observations of Cir X-1 made by a variety of instruments, from as early as 1969. The fast (< 1 s) timing properties of Cir X-1 are studied by performing FFT analyses of the USA data. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 1-50 Hz range are found and discussed in the context of recent correlations which question the leading models invoked for their generation. The energy dependence of the QPOs (rms increasing with energy) argues against them being generated in the disk and favors models in which the QPOs are related to a higher energy Comptonizing component. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its soft state is compared to that of Cygnus X-1 (Cyg X-1), the prototypical black hole candidate. Using scaling arguments the author argues that the mass of Cir X-1 could exceed significantly the canonical 1.4 M{circle_dot} mass of a neutron star, possibly partly explaining why this object appears so different to other neutron stars. The spectral evolution of Cir X-1 is

  19. The XMM-Newton1 and INTEGRAL2 Observations of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient IGR J16328-4726

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Sguera, V.; Bird, A. J.; Boon, C. M.; Persi, P.; Piro, L.

    2016-10-01

    The accretion mechanism producing the short flares observed from the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) is still highly debated and forms a major part in our attempts to place these X-ray binaries in the wider context of the High Mass X-ray Binaries. We report on a 216 ks INTEGRAL observation of the SFXT IGR J16328-4726 (2014 August 24–27) simultaneous with two fixed-time observations with XMM-Newton (33 and 20 ks) performed around the putative periastron passage, in order to investigate the accretion regime and the wind properties during this orbital phase. During these observations, the source has shown luminosity variations, from ∼ 4× {10}34 to ∼ {10}36 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, linked to spectral properties changes. The soft X-ray continuum is well modeled by a power law with a photon index varying from ∼1.2 up to ∼1.7 and with high values of the column density in the range of ∼ 2{--}4× {10}23 {{cm}}-2. We report on the presence of iron lines at ∼6.8–7.1 keV, suggesting that the X-ray flux is produced by the accretion of matter from the companion wind characterized by density and temperature inhomogeneities.

  20. XMM-Newton and NuSTAR joint observation of the periodic Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J11215-5952

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Sguera, V.

    2016-06-01

    IGRJ11215-5952 is the only Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient showing periodic outbursts (every 165 days, the orbital period of the system). The driving mechanism causing the transient X-ray emission in this sub-class of High Mass X-ray Binaries is still a matter of debate, after 10 years from the discovery of the class. To disentangle between magnetar-like neutron stars from models requiring more usual neutron star magnetic fields (1E12G), we observed the SFXT pulsar IGRJ11215-5952 with XMM-Newton coordinated with NuSTAR on 2016, February 14, during the expected peak of the outburst, for a net exposure time of 20 ks. The source was indeed caught in outburst (1E36 erg/s), with several bright flares repeating quasi-periodically with timescales of a few thousand seconds, spanning a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude. The overlapping observation with both XMM-Newton and NuSTAR enabled the study of the simultaneous broad band spectrum from 0.3 to 78 keV. The work is still in progress, given the extreme variability of the X-ray emission. X-ray pulsations were detected at 187.14 s, consistent with the last XMM-Newton observation, performed in 2007. We will discuss XMM+NuSTAR results in light of the different models proposed to explain the SFXTs behavior.

  1. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  2. Fermi acceleration at fast shock in a solar flare and impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuneta, S; Tsuneta, Saku; Naito, Tsuguya

    1998-01-01

    We propose that non-thermal electrons are efficiently accelerated by first-order Fermi process at the fast shock, as a natural consequence of the new magnetohydrodynamic picture of the flaring region revealed with Yohkoh. An oblique fast shock is naturally formed below the reconnection site, and boosts the acceleration to significantly decrease the injection energy. The slow shocks attached to the reconnection X-point heat the plasma up to 10--20 MK, exceeding the injection energy. The combination of the oblique shock configuration and the pre-heating by the slow shock allows bulk electron acceleration from the thermal pool. The accelerated electrons are trapped between the two slow shocks due to the magnetic mirror downstream of the fast shock, thus explaining the impulsive loop-top hard X-ray source discovered with Yohkoh. Acceleration time scale is ~ 0.3--0.6 s, which is consistent with the time scale of impulsive bursts. When these electrons stream away from the region enclosed by the fast shock and the s...

  3. A fast pulse phase estimation method for X-ray pulsar signals based on epoch folding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Mengfan; Li Xiaoping; Sun Haifeng; Fang Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XPNAV) is an attractive method for autonomous deep-space navigation in the future. The pulse phase estimation is a key task in XPNAV and its accuracy directly determines the navigation accuracy. State-of-the-art pulse phase estimation techniques either suffer from poor estimation accuracy, or involve the maximization of generally non-convex object function, thus resulting in a large computational cost. In this paper, a fast pulse phase estimation method based on epoch folding is presented. The statistical properties of the observed profile obtained through epoch folding are developed. Based on this, we recognize the joint prob-ability distribution of the observed profile as the likelihood function and utilize a fast Fourier transform-based procedure to estimate the pulse phase. Computational complexity of the proposed estimator is analyzed as well. Experimental results show that the proposed estimator significantly outperforms the currently used cross-correlation (CC) and nonlinear least squares (NLS) estima-tors, while significantly reduces the computational complexity compared with NLS and maximum likelihood (ML) estimators.

  4. A fast pulse phase estimation method for X-ray pulsar signals based on epoch folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Mengfan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XPNAV is an attractive method for autonomous deep-space navigation in the future. The pulse phase estimation is a key task in XPNAV and its accuracy directly determines the navigation accuracy. State-of-the-art pulse phase estimation techniques either suffer from poor estimation accuracy, or involve the maximization of generally non-convex object function, thus resulting in a large computational cost. In this paper, a fast pulse phase estimation method based on epoch folding is presented. The statistical properties of the observed profile obtained through epoch folding are developed. Based on this, we recognize the joint probability distribution of the observed profile as the likelihood function and utilize a fast Fourier transform-based procedure to estimate the pulse phase. Computational complexity of the proposed estimator is analyzed as well. Experimental results show that the proposed estimator significantly outperforms the currently used cross-correlation (CC and nonlinear least squares (NLS estimators, while significantly reduces the computational complexity compared with NLS and maximum likelihood (ML estimators.

  5. Fast and Furious: Shock Heated Gas as the Origin of Spatially Resolved Hard X-ray Emission in the Central 5 kpc of the Galaxy Merger NGC 6240

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Pellegrini, Silvia; Max, Claire; Risaliti, Guido; U, Vivian; Zezas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, sub-arcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT~6 keV (~70 million K) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with velocity of ~2200 km/s. For the first time we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting FeXXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large scale morphology of H_2(1-0) S(1) line emission and H\\alpha filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originated in the starburst driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L(0.5-8 keV)=5.3E+41 erg/s, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is 100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its ...

  6. X-Ray- and fast neutron induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana, and the effect of dithiothreitol upon the mutant spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellaert, L.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The genetic effects of X-ray and fast neutron seed-irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and the influence of a pre-irradiation treatment with the radio-protector dithiothreitol (DTT), are the main subjects of this thesis.Chapters I and II deal with the effects of radiation - with or with

  7. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DARPA recently initiated the XNAV program to undertake development of GPS independent, precision navigation and time determination based on observations of certain...

  8. Some aspects of analytical chemistry as applied to water quality assurance techniques for reclaimed water: The potential use of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for automated on-line fast real-time simultaneous multi-component analysis of inorganic pollutants in reclaimed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, A. C.; Macpherson, L. H.; Rey, M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential use of isotopically excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry for automated on line fast real time (5 to 15 minutes) simultaneous multicomponent (up to 20) trace (1 to 10 parts per billion) analysis of inorganic pollutants in reclaimed water was examined. Three anionic elements (chromium 6, arsenic and selenium) were studied. The inherent lack of sensitivity of XRF spectrometry for these elements mandates use of a preconcentration technique and various methods were examined, including: several direct and indirect evaporation methods; ion exchange membranes; selective and nonselective precipitation; and complexation processes. It is shown tha XRF spectrometry itself is well suited for automated on line quality assurance, and can provide a nondestructive (and thus sample storage and repeat analysis capabilities) and particularly convenient analytical method. Further, the use of an isotopically excited energy dispersive unit (50 mCi Cd-109 source) coupled with a suitable preconcentration process can provide sufficient sensitivity to achieve the current mandated minimum levels of detection without the need for high power X-ray generating tubes.

  9. Temporal Study of Magnetar Bursts with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    We performed detailed temporal analyses of all bursts observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer originated from four magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, SGR J1550-5418, and AXP 1E 2259+586. We first implemented a Bayesian block algorithm to identify bursts, and constructed Bayesian block representations of all identified bursts from these magnetars. Based on these results, we formed the burst duration distributions, and compared to those previously reported using different approach. We also performed detailed investigation of time lag between various energy intervals in order to uncover any possible time delay between soft and hard X-ray emission components.

  10. Theme Article - Time-Resolved X-Ray Scattering from Coherent Excitations in Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David (SLAC)

    2010-10-22

    Recent advances in pulsed x-ray sources have opened up new opportunities to study the dynamics of matter directly in the time domain with picosecond to femtosecond resolution. In this article, we present recent results from a variety of ultrafast sources on time-resolved x-ray scattering from elementary excitations in periodic solids. A few representative examples are given on folded acoustic phonons, coherent optical phonons, squeezed phonons, and polaritons excited by femtosecond lasers. Next-generation light sources, such as the x-ray-free electron laser, will lead to improvements in coherence, flux, and pulse duration. These experiments demonstrate potential opportunities for studying matter far from equilibrium on the fastest time scales and shortest distances that will be available in the coming years.

  11. Station Explorer X-Ray Timing and Navigation (SEXTANT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Because of their predictable pulsations, pulsars are highly reliable celestial clocks that can provide the same high-precision timing as the atomic clock signals...

  12. Excited state molecular structure determination in disordered media using laser pump/x-ray probe time-domain x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L. X.; Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    Advances in X-ray technologies provide opportunities for solving structures of photoexcited state molecules with short lifetimes. Using X-ray pulses from a modern synchrotron source, the structure of a metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state of CuI(dmp)2+ (dmp 1/4 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) was investigated by laser pump/X-ray probe X-ray absorption fine structure (LPXP-XAFS) in fluid solution at room temperature on a nanosecond time scale. The experimental requirements for such pump-probe XAFS are described in terms of technical challenges: (1) conversion of optimal excited state population, (2) synchronization of the pump laser pulse and probe Xray pulse, and (3) timing of the detection. Using a laser pump pulse for the photoexcitation, a photoluminescent MLCT excited state of CuI(dmp)2(BArF), (dmp 1/4 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline), BArF 1/4 tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethylphenyl)borate) with a lifetime of 98{+-}5 ns was created. Probing the structure of this state at its optimal concentration using an X-ray pulse cluster with a total duration of 14.2 ns revealed that (1) a Cu{sup II} center was generated via a whole charge transfer; (2) the copper in the MLCT state bound an additional ligand to form a penta-coordinate complex with a likely trigonal bipyramidal geometry; and (3) the average Cu-N bond length increases in the MLCT excited state by 0.07 . In contrast to previously reported literature, the photoluminescence of this pentacoordinate MLCT state was not quenched upon ligation with the fifth ligand. On the basis of experimental results, we propose that the absorptive and emissive states have distinct geometries. The results represent X-ray characterization of a molecular excited state in fluid solution on a nanosecond time scale.

  13. X-ray time delays from the Seyfert 2 galaxy IRAS 18325-5926

    CERN Document Server

    Lobban, Andrew; Vaughan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Using new XMM-Newton observations we detect hard X-ray time lags in the rapid variability of the Compton-thin Seyfert 2 galaxy IRAS 18325-5926. The higher-energy X-ray variations lag behind correlated lower-energy variations by up to ~3ks and the magnitude of the lag increases clearly with energy separation between the energy bands. We find that the lag-energy spectrum has a relatively simple log(E) shape. This is quite different in both shape and magnitude from the lags predicted by simple reflection models, but very similar to the hard X-ray lags often seen in black hole X-ray binaries. We apply several spectral models to the lag-energy spectrum and rule out simple reflection as an origin for the hard lags. We find that both propagating fluctuations embedded in the accretion flow and electron scattering from material embedded in or behind a cold absorbing medium offer equally good fits to the observed low-frequency hard X-ray lags and are both consistent with the time-averaged spectrum. Such models will lik...

  14. The extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Sun in Time: High-energy evolutionary tracks of a solar-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lin; Johnstone, Colin P.; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to describe the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar-mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods: We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar-mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results: We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, from ≈10 Myr to ≈300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions: Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20-500 Myr, before rotational convergence and therefore X-ray luminosity convergence sets in. This age range is crucial for the evolution of young planetary atmospheres and may thus lead to very different planetary evolution histories.

  15. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ``X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ``X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,`` tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {angstrom} as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas.

  16. STROBE-X: X-Ray Timing and Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith C.

    2017-01-01

    The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domai...

  17. Time and Energy Measurement Electronics for Silicon Drift Detector Aimed for X-ray Pulsar Navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Er-Lei; Ye, Chun-Feng; Liu, Shu-Bin; Jin, Dong-Dong; Lian, Jian; Hu, Hui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A readout electronic with high time and energy resolution performance is designed for the SDD (Silicon Drift Detector) signals readout, which is aimed for X-ray pulsar based navigation (XNAV). For time measurement, the input signal is fed into a fast shaping and Constant Fraction Discrimination (CFD) circuit, and then be digitalized by a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) implemented in an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), which is designed with a bin size of 2.5 ns. For energy measurement, a slow shaping and analog peak detection circuit is employed to acquire the energy information of input signals, which is then digitalized by a 14-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC). Both the time and energy measurement results are buffered and packaged in FPGA and then transmitted to Data Processing (DP) system. Test results indicate that the time resolution is about 3 ns, while the FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) of energy spectrum is better than 160 eV @ 5.9 keV, with the energy dynamic range from 1 keV to 10 keV....

  18. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  19. General relativistic modelling of the negative reverberation X-ray time delays in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the first systematic physical modelling of the time-lag spectra between the soft (0.3-1 keV) and the hard (1.5-4 keV) X-ray energy bands, as a function of Fourier frequency, in a sample of 12 active galactic nuclei which have been observed by XMM-Newton. We concentrate particularly on the negative X-ray time-lags (typically seen above 10-4 Hz), i.e. soft-band variations lag the hard-band variations, and we assume that they are produced by reprocessing and reflection by the accretion disc within a lamp-post X-ray source geometry. We also assume that the response of the accretion disc, in the soft X-ray bands, is adequately described by the response in the neutral Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV for which we use fully general relativistic ray-tracing simulations to determine its time evolution. These response functions, and thus the corresponding time-lag spectra, yield much more realistic results than the commonly used, but erroneous, top-hat models. Additionally, we parametrize the positive part of the time-lag spectra (typically seen below 10-4 Hz) by a power law. We find that the best-fitting black hole (BH) masses, M, agree quite well with those derived by other methods, thus providing us with a new tool for BH mass determination. We find no evidence for any correlation between M and the BH spin parameter, α, the viewing angle, θ, or the height of the X-ray source above the disc, h. Also on average, the X-ray source lies only around 3.7 gravitational radii above the accretion disc and θ is distributed uniformly between 20° and 60°. Finally, there is a tentative indication that the distribution of α may be bimodal above and below 0.62.

  20. Towards Practical Deep-Space Navigation using X-ray Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemar, Setnam; Fraser, George; Heil, Lucy; Hindley, David; Martindale, Adrian; Molyneux, Philippa; Pye, John P.; Warwick, Robert; Lamb, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We describe a recent study, conducted by the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Leicester for the European Space Agency, on the feasibility of using X-ray timing observations of pulsars for deep space navigation, a technique commonly referred to as ‘XNAV’. We have considered all primary aspects of the ‘system’, i.e. suitable pulsars and their sky distribution, available and future instrumentation, navigation methods and algorithms, and overall performance (e.g. position accuracy). We have used simulations to identify the best combinations of navigation method and X-ray pulsars with respect to predicted performance, taking account of current and future X-ray instrumentation. The XNAV technique would allow increased spacecraft autonomy, improved position accuracies and lower mission operating costs compared to the NASA and ESA Deep Space Networks (DSN). We have also used a high-level navigation algorithm together with real data (from the RXTE mission archive) for the Crab pulsar to demonstrate key elements of XNAV. X-ray instrumentation suitable for use as a spacecraft operational subsystem must be designed to use only modest spacecraft resources. We show that instrumentation designed for the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer, in production for the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury, offers a roadmap for a practical XNAV system. We identify key areas for future study.

  1. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  2. X-ray evidence for ultra-fast outflows in Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James; Cappi, Massimo; Dadina, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    X-ray evidence for massive, highly ionized, ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) has been recently reported in a number of AGNs through the detection of blue-shifted Fe XXV/XXVI absorption lines. We present the results of a comprehensive spectral analysis of a large sample of 42 local Seyferts observed with XMM-Newton. Similar results are also obtained from a Suzaku analysis of 5 radio galaxies. We find that UFOs are common phenomena, being present in >40% of the sources. Their outflow velocity distribution is in the range ˜0.03--0.3c, with mean value of ˜0.14c. The ionization parameter is very high, in the range logξ˜3--6 erg~s^{-1}~cm, and the associated column densities are also large, in the range ˜10^{22}--10^{24} cm^{-2}. Their location is constrained at ˜0.0003--0.03pc (˜10^2--10^4 r_s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are in the interval ˜0.01--1M_{⊙}~yr^{-1}. The associated mechanical power is also high, in the range ˜10^{43}--10^{45} erg/s, which indicates that UFOs are capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN cosmological feedback.

  3. X-ray Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Local AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Reynolds, C. S.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2012-08-01

    X-ray evidence for ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) has been recently reported in a number of local AGNs through the detection of blue-shifted Fe XXV/XXVI absorption lines. We present the results of a comprehensive spectral analysis of a large sample of 42 local Seyferts and 5 Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. We detect UFOs in ga 40% of the sources. Their outflow velocities are in the range ˜ 0.03-0.3c, with a mean value of ˜ 0.14c. The ionization is high, in the range logℰ ˜3-6rm erg s-1 cm, and also the associated column densities are large, in the interval ˜ 1022-1024rm cm-2. Overall, these results point to the presence of highly ionized and massive outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. Their variability and location on sub-pc scales favor a direct association with accretion disk winds/outflows. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the AGN cosmological feedback besides jets, and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds, and jets.

  4. X-ray evidence for ultra-fast outflows in local AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Sambruna, R M; Reeves, J N; Reynolds, C S; Braito, V; Dadina, M

    2012-01-01

    X-ray evidence for ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) has been recently reported in a number of local AGNs through the detection of blue-shifted Fe XXV/XXVI absorption lines. We present the results of a comprehensive spectral analysis of a large sample of 42 local Seyferts and 5 Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. We detect UFOs in >40% of the sources. Their outflow velocities are in the range 0.03-0.3c, with a mean value of ~0.14c. The ionization is high, in the range logxi~3-6 erg s^{-1} cm, and also the associated column densities are large, in the interval ~10^{22}-10^{24} cm^{-2}. Overall, these results point to the presence of highly ionized and massive outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. Their variability and location on sub-pc scales favor a direct association with accretion disk winds/outflows. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the AGN cosmological feedback besides jets and their study can provide important clues on th...

  5. Time-delayed beam splitting with energy separation of x-ray channels

    CERN Document Server

    Stetsko, Yuri P; Stephenson, G Brian

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a time-delayed beam splitting method based on the energy separation of x-ray photon beams. It is implemented and theoretically substantiated on an example of an x-ray optical scheme similar to that of the classical Michelson interferometer. The splitter/mixer uses Bragg-case diffraction from a thin diamond crystal. Another two diamond crystals are used as back-reflectors. For energy separation the back-reflectors are set at slightly different temperatures and angular deviations from exact backscattering. Because of energy separation and a minimal number (three) of optical elements, the split-delay line has high efficiency and is simple to operate. Due to the high transparency of diamond crystal, the split-delay line can be used in a beam sharing mode at x-ray free-electron laser facilities. The delay line can be made more compact by adding a fourth crystal.

  6. Time-delayed beam splitting with energy separation of x-ray channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetsko, Yuri P.; Shvyd' ko, Yuri V.; Brian Stephenson, G. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    We introduce a time-delayed beam splitting method based on the energy separation of x-ray photon beams. It is implemented and theoretically substantiated on an example of an x-ray optical scheme similar to that of the classical Michelson interferometer. The splitter/mixer uses Bragg-case diffraction from a thin diamond crystal. Another two diamond crystals are used as back-reflectors. Because of energy separation and a minimal number (three) of optical elements, the split-delay line has high efficiency and is simple to operate. Due to the high transparency of diamond crystal, the split-delay line can be used in a beam sharing mode at x-ray free-electron laser facilities.

  7. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology does not depend on the accompanying electronic structure method in principle as well as on the spectral range and, thus, can be applied to, e.g., UV and X-ray photo-electron and Auger spectroscopies.

  8. X-ray quantum-eraser setup for time-energy complementarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Jonas; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-12-01

    A quantum-eraser setup exploiting the time-energy complementarity relation in the x-ray regime is investigated theoretically. The starting point is the interference process between x-ray quanta driving two nuclear hyperfine transitions in a nuclear forward-scattering setup. We show that which-way information can be obtained by marking the scattering paths with orthogonal polarization states, thus leading to the disappearance of the interference pattern. In turn, erasure of the which-way information leads to the reappearance of the interference fringes. We put forward two schemes using resonant scattering off nuclear targets and design which-way marking procedures to realize the quantum-eraser setup for x-ray quanta.

  9. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  10. Direct Measurement of the X-ray Time-Delay Transfer Function in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Legg, E; Turner, T J; Giustini, M; Reeves, J N; Kraemer, S B

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the observed time lags, in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), between hard and soft X-ray photons is investigated using new XMM-Newton data for the narrow-line Seyfert I galaxy Ark 564 and existing data for 1H0707-495 and NGC 4051. These AGN have highly variable X-ray light curves that contain frequent, high peaks of emission. The averaged light curve of the peaks is directly measured from the time series, and it is shown that (i) peaks occur at the same time, within the measurement uncertainties, at all X-ray energies, and (ii) there exists a substantial tail of excess emission at hard X-ray energies, which is delayed with respect to the time of the main peak, and is particularly prominent in Ark 564. Observation (i) rules out that the observed lags are caused by Comptonization time delays and disfavors a simple model of propagating fluctuations on the accretion disk. Observation (ii) is consistent with time lags caused by Compton-scattering reverberation from material a few thousand light-se...

  11. Field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase: a time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, W; Emsley, J W; Levine, Y K; Luckhurst, G R; Seddon, J M; Timimi, B A

    2004-09-01

    The field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase is, in principle, a complicated process involving the director rotation via the interaction with the field and the layer rotation via the molecular interactions. Time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed this complexity in the case of the director alignment, but provides no direct information on the motion of the layers. Here we describe a time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment using synchrotron radiation to solve the challenging problem of capturing the diffraction pattern on a time scale which is fast in comparison with that for the alignment of the smectic layers. We have investigated the alignment of the smectic-A phase of 4-octyl-4(')-cyanobiphenyl by a magnetic field. The experiment consists of creating a monodomain sample of the smectic-A phase by slow cooling from the nematic phase in a magnetic field with a flux density of 7 T. The sample is then turned quickly through an angle phi(0) about an axis parallel to the x-ray beam direction but orthogonal to the field. A sequence of two-dimensional small angle x-ray diffraction patterns are then collected at short time intervals. Experiments were carried out for different values of phi(0), and at different temperatures. The results show that the alignment behavior changes fundamentally when phi(0) exceeds 45 degrees, and that there is a sharp change in the alignment process when the temperature is less than 3 degrees C below the smectic-A-nematic transition. The results of the x-ray experiments are in broad agreement with the NMR results, but reveal major phenomena concerning the maintenance of the integrity of the smectic-A layer structure during the alignment process. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  12. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  13. Thermal transport in thin films measured by time-resolved, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, D. A.; Sheu, Y.-M.; Trigo, M.; Reis, D. A. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Michigan,); (SLAC National Accelerator Lab.); (Stanford Univ.)

    2011-01-01

    We use depth- and time-resolved x-ray diffraction to study thermal transport across single crystal Bi films grown on sapphire in order to determine the thermal conductivity of the film and the Kapitza conductance of the interface. Ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser pulses were used to heat the films; x-ray diffraction then measured the film's lattice expansion. Use of grazing incidence diffraction geometry provided depth sensitivity, as the x-ray angle of incidence was varied near the critical angle. The shift of the film's Bragg peak position with time was used to determine the film temperature averaged over an x-ray penetration depth that could be selected by choice of the angle of incidence. For films that were thick compared to the laser penetration depth, we observed a large temperature gradient at early times. In this case, measurements with the incident angle near or well above the critical angle were more sensitive to the film conductivity or Kapitza conductance, respectively. For thinner films, however, cooling was dominated by the Kapitza conductance at all accessible time scales.

  14. General relativistic modelling of the negative reverberation X-ray time delays in AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; Dovciak, M; McHardy, I M

    2014-01-01

    We present the first systematic physical modelling of the time-lag spectra between the soft (0.3-1 keV) and the hard (1.5-4 keV) X-ray energy bands, as a function of Fourier frequency, in a sample of 12 active galactic nuclei which have been observed by XMM-Newton. We concentrate particularly on the negative X-ray time-lags (typically seen above $10^{-4}$ Hz) i.e. soft band variations lag the hard band variations, and we assume that they are produced by reprocessing and reflection by the accretion disc within a lamp-post X-ray source geometry. We also assume that the response of the accretion disc, in the soft X-ray bands, is adequately described by the response in the neutral iron line (Fe k$\\alpha$) at 6.4 keV for which we use fully general relativistic ray-tracing simulations to determine its time evolution. These response functions, and thus the corresponding time-lag spectra, yield much more realistic results than the commonly-used, but erroneous, top-hat models. Additionally we parametrize the positive ...

  15. Attosecond X-ray Source for Light-Triggered Time-Resolved Experiments Associated with the X-ray SASE FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, Evgeny L; Yurkov, Mikhail V

    2004-01-01

    We propose a technique for the production of attosecond X-ray pulses which is based on the use of X-ray SASE FEL combined with a femtosecond laser system. A few-cycle optical pulse from a Ti:sapphire laser interacts with the electron beam in a two-period undulator resonant to 800 nm wavelength and produces energy modulation within a slice of the electron bunch. Following the energy modulator the electron beam enters the X-ray undulator and produces SASE radiation. Due to energy modulation the frequency is correlated to the longitudinal position within the few-cycle-driven slice of SASE radiation pulse. The largest frequency offset corresponds to a single-spike pulse in the time domain which is confined to one half-oscillation period near the central peak electron energy. The selection of single-spike pulses is achieved by using a crystal monochromator after the X-ray undulator. Our studies show that the proposed technique is capable to produce 300 attoseconds long single pulses with GW-level output power in t...

  16. A novel setup for time-resolved X-ray diffraction on gas gun experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, Frédéric; Chauvin, Camille; Loyen, Arnaud; Combes, Philippe; Petit, Jacques; Bland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions in metals have been investigated for a long time under dynamic loadings through usual dynamic compression diagnostics such as velocity and temperature measurements. Such measurements were valuable for revealing the key role of kinetic effects in most phase transition mechanisms. However, the information extracted was mostly macroscopic. Obtaining direct insight about the crystallographic structure under dynamic loadings is critical for understanding mechanisms governing shock-induced structural changes. For example, in order to evidence a mixture phase or to determine the time scale of a transition, structural information may be extremely valuable. Over the last 20 years a significant number of X-ray diffraction experiments were carried under dynamic loading, either using laboratory X-ray sources or synchrotron radiation. We are developing a novel experimental setup based on a compact High Pulsed Power generator capable of producing intense X radiation through an X-pinch X-ray source. This source is specifically designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry on gas gun experiments. Promising preliminary diffraction data obtained under static conditions are presented.

  17. X-ray evidence for ultra-fast outflows in AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Sambruna, Rita; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James; Reynolds, Christopher; Cappi, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    X-ray evidence for massive, highly ionized, ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) has been recently reported in a number of AGNs through the detection of blue-shifted Fe XXV/XXVI absorption lines. We present the results of a comprehensive spectral analysis of a large sample of 42 local Seyferts and 5 radio galaxies observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. We assessed the global detection significance of the absorption lines and performed a detailed photo-ionization modeling. We find that UFOs are common phenomena, being present in >40% of the sources. Their outflow velocity distribution is in the range ˜0.03--0.3c, with mean value of ˜0.14c. The ionization parameter is very high, in the range logξ˜3--6 erg~s^{-1}~cm, and the associated column densities are also large, in the range ˜10^{22}--10^{24} cm^{-2}. Their location is constrained at ˜0.0003--0.03pc (˜10^2--10^4 r_s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are in the interval ˜0.01--1M_{⊙}~yr^{-1} and the associated mechanical power is high, in the range ˜10^{43}--10^{45} erg/s. Therefore, UFOs are capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN cosmological feedback and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds and jets.

  18. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D. (UAH); (NASA); (Georgia)

    2010-07-20

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain 'low-hanging fruit' protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area

  19. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, José A; Ng, Joseph D

    2005-07-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  20. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  1. X-ray Detection and Processing Models for Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on work done under Microcosm's recently completed Phase II SBIR program on X-ray pulsar based navigation (XNAV), relevant X-ray source characterization, X-ray...

  2. Protein structural dynamics in solution unveiled via 100-ps time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Schotte, Friedrich; Graber, Timothy; Henning, Robert; Anfinruda, Philip (NIH); (UC)

    2010-04-21

    We have developed a time-resolved x-ray scattering diffractometer capable of probing structural dynamics of proteins in solution with 100-ps time resolution. This diffractometer, developed on the ID14B BioCARS (Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, records x-ray scattering snapshots over a broad range of q spanning 0.02-2.5 {angstrom}{sup -1}, thereby providing simultaneous coverage of the small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) regions. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have tracked structural changes in myoglobin as it undergoes a photolysis-induced transition from its carbon monoxy form (MbCO) to its deoxy form (Mb). Though the differences between the MbCO and Mb crystal structures are small (rmsd < 0.2 {angstrom}), time-resolved x-ray scattering differences recorded over 8 decades of time from 100 ps to 10 ms are rich in structure, illustrating the sensitivity of this technique. A strong, negative-going feature in the SAXS region appears promptly and corresponds to a sudden > 22 {angstrom}{sup 3} volume expansion of the protein. The ensuing conformational relaxation causes the protein to contract to a volume {approx}2 {angstrom}{sup 3} larger than MbCO within {approx}10 ns. On the timescale for CO escape from the primary docking site, another change in the SAXS/WAXS fingerprint appears, demonstrating sensitivity to the location of the dissociated CO. Global analysis of the SAXS/WAXS patterns recovered time-independent scattering fingerprints for four intermediate states of Mb. These SAXS/WAXS fingerprints provide stringent constraints for putative models of conformational states and structural transitions between them.

  3. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    . The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration......The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline....

  4. Fast generation of virtual X-ray images for reconstruction of 3D anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlke, Moritz; Ramm, Heiko; Lamecker, Hans; Hege, Hans-Christian; Zachow, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    We propose a novel GPU-based approach to render virtual X-ray projections of deformable tetrahedral meshes. These meshes represent the shape and the internal density distribution of a particular anatomical structure and are derived from statistical shape and intensity models (SSIMs). We apply our method to improve the geometric reconstruction of 3D anatomy (e.g. pelvic bone) from 2D X-ray images. For that purpose, shape and density of a tetrahedral mesh are varied and virtual X-ray projections are generated within an optimization process until the similarity between the computed virtual X-ray and the respective anatomy depicted in a given clinical X-ray is maximized. The OpenGL implementation presented in this work deforms and projects tetrahedral meshes of high resolution (200.000+ tetrahedra) at interactive rates. It generates virtual X-rays that accurately depict the density distribution of an anatomy of interest. Compared to existing methods that accumulate X-ray attenuation in deformable meshes, our novel approach significantly boosts the deformation/projection performance. The proposed projection algorithm scales better with respect to mesh resolution and complexity of the density distribution, and the combined deformation and projection on the GPU scales better with respect to the number of deformation parameters. The gain in performance allows for a larger number of cycles in the optimization process. Consequently, it reduces the risk of being stuck in a local optimum. We believe that our approach will improve treatments in orthopedics, where 3D anatomical information is essential.

  5. Internal X-ray plateau in short GRBs: Signature of supramassive fast-rotating quark stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ang; Zhang, Nai Bo; Gao, He; Qi, Bin; Liu, Tong

    2016-01-01

    A supramassive, strongly-magnetized millisecond neutron star (NS) has been proposed to be the candidate central engine of at least some short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), based on the "internal plateau" commonly observed in the early X-ray afterglow. While a previous analysis shows a qualitative consistency between this suggestion and the Swift SGRB data, the distribution of observed break time $t_b$ is much narrower than the distribution of the collapse time of supramassive NSs for the several NS equations-of-state (EoSs) investigated. In this paper, we study four recently-constructed "unified" NS EoSs, as well as three developed strange quark star (QS) EoSs within the new confinement density-dependent mass model. All the EoSs chosen here satisfy the recent observational constraints of the two massive pulsars whose masses are precisely measured. We construct sequences of rigidly rotating NS/QS configurations with increasing spinning frequency $f$, from non-rotating ($f = 0$) to the Keplerian frequency ($f = f_{...

  6. Recent Results for AGN Observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, G. M.; Done, C.; Zycki, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has produced many excellent observations of active galaxies, providing the best sensitivity in the 10 - 20 keV range so far. This presentation reports selected RTXE data for AGN in the context of the currently popular models. One is the recent result for two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 5548 and IC4329a: both show the "canonical" Seyfert I X-ray spectra, with an underlying power law, plus Gaussian iron K line and Compton reflection. Interestingly, in both cases, the profile of the Fe K line does not extend as far to the red as seen in the famous NCG-6-30-15, and this indicates that the regions where the Fe K lines originate in AGN are diverse. Independently, in both objects we see a strong spectral variability of the primary continua, which soften as the sources brighten. The second result is for the heavily absorbed Seyfert 2 NGC 4945. The RXTE data confirm the strong absorption corresponding to the optical depth to electron scattering of about 2, but also reveal rapid variability of the hard (8-30 keV) X-ray emission on a time scale of a day or less. This suggests that for NGC 4945, the putative parsec-size molecular torus cannot be both geometrically and optically thick, and implies that the Cosmic X-ray Background is unlikely to be made up primarily of AGN with geometry as inferred for this object.

  7. Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT-P): A Probe-Class Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco

    2016-04-01

    LOFT-P is a mission concept for a NASA Astrophysics Probe-Class (state of ultra dense matter? What are the effects of strong gravity on matter spiraling into black holes? It would be optimized for sub-millisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources including X-ray bursters, black hole binaries, and magnetars to study phenomena at the natural timescales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons and to measure mass and spin of black holes. These measurements are synergistic to imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, addressing much smaller distance scales than are possible without very long baseline X-ray interferometry, and using complementary techniques to address the geometry and dynamics of emission regions. LOFT-P would have an effective area of >6 m2, >10x that of the highly successful Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). A sky monitor (~2-50 keV) acts as a trigger for pointed observations, providing high duty cycle, high time resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with ~20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE All-Sky Monitor, enabling multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies. A probe-class mission concept would employ lightweight collimator technology and large-area solid-state detectors, segmented into pixels or strips, technologies which have been recently greatly advanced during the ESA M-3 Phase A study of LOFT. Given the large community interested in LOFT (>800 supporters), the scientific productivity of this mission is expected to be very high, similar to or greater than RXTE (~2000 refereed publications.) In May 2016, MSFC’s Advanced Concepts Office will perform a study of a US-led probe-class LOFT concept. This is presented on behalf of the LOFT consortium.

  8. The X-ray continuum time-lags and intrinsic coherence in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2017-07-01

    We present the results from a systematic analysis of the X-ray continuum ('hard') time-lags and intrinsic coherence between the 2-4 keV and various energy bands in the 0.3-10 keV range, for 10 X-ray bright and highly variable active galactic nuclei (AGN). We used all available archival XMM-Newton data, and estimated the time-lags following Epitropakis & Papadakis. By performing extensive numerical simulations, we arrived at useful guidelines for computing intrinsic-coherence estimates that are minimally biased, have known errors and are (approximately) Gaussian distributed. Owing to the way we estimated the time-lags and intrinsic coherence, we were able to do a proper model fitting to the data. Regarding the continuum time-lags, we are able to demonstrate that they have a power-law dependence on frequency, with a slope of -1, and that their amplitude scales with the logarithm of the light-curve mean-energy ratio. We also find that their amplitude increases with the square root of the X-ray Eddington ratio. Regarding the intrinsic coherence, we found that it is approximately constant at low frequencies. It then decreases exponentially at frequencies higher than a characteristic 'break frequency'. Both the low-frequency constant intrinsic-coherence value and the break frequency have a logarithmic dependence on the light-curve mean-energy ratio. Neither the low-frequency constant intrinsic-coherence value nor the break frequency exhibits a universal scaling with either the central black hole mass or the X-ray Eddington ratio. Our results could constrain various theoretical models of AGN X-ray variability.

  9. Fast Detection Allows Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Metalloprotein by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine M; Mattern, Brian A; Pacold, Joseph I; Zakharova, Taisiya; Brewe, Dale; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Graber, Timothy J; Heald, Steve M; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2012-07-19

    The paradigm of "detection-before-destruction" was tested for a metalloprotein complex exposed at room temperature to the high x-ray flux typical of third generation synchrotron sources. Following the progression of the x-ray induced damage by Mn Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy, we demonstrated the feasibility of collecting room temperature data on the electronic structure of native Photosystem II, a trans-membrane metalloprotein complex containing a Mn(4)Ca cluster. The determined non-damaging observation timeframe (about 100 milliseconds using continuous monochromatic beam, deposited dose 1*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 1.3*10(4) Gy, and 66 microseconds in pulsed mode using pink beam, deposited dose 4*10(7) photons/µm(2) or 4.2*10(4) Gy) is sufficient for the analysis of this protein's electron dynamics and catalytic mechanism at room temperature. Reported time frames are expected to be representative for other metalloproteins. The described instrumentation, based on the short working distance dispersive spectrometer, and experimental methodology is broadly applicable to time-resolved x-ray emission analysis at synchrotron and x-ray free-electron laser light sources.

  10. Spectral and timing nature of the symbiotic X-ray binary 4U 1954+319: The slowest rotating neutron star in an X-ray binary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Corbet, Robin H. D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sasano, Makoto [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamada, Shin' ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo [High Energy Astrophysics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fuerst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wilms, Jörn, E-mail: teruaki.enoto@nasa.gov [Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-05-10

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ∼5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (∼7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (∼60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (≳ 10{sup 12} G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10{sup 33}-10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ∼10{sup 13} G NS, this scheme can explain the ∼5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (∼10{sup 16} G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (∼50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ∼10{sup 13} G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  11. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  12. Evaluation of the Fast-Electron Source Function for Two-Plasmon Decay from Temporal Hard X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Follett, R. K.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    The modeling of the fast-electron transport in the 1-D hydrodynamic code LILAC requires the description of the source electrons as a function of time. The particle-in-cell code OSIRIS and the interaction code FPSE provide some guidance but have not provided an algorithm for the energy fraction from the laser pulse as the coronal parameters change with time. The original algorithm, based on the measured hard x-ray (HXR) emission as a function of laser intensity, depended exponentially on the two-plasmon-decay threshold parameter up to about 0.9 and saturates above it. This algorithm along with FPSE simulations produced HXR emissions much earlier than observed. Analysis of the measured HXR emissions from implosions with near-constant threshold parameter values show that the rise time of the emission can be described with an exponential curve with roughly a rise time of 200 ps. Trial and error set the start of the rise at the threshold value of 0.75. Causes for this rise time will be discussed. Comparison between measured and computed HXR emissions for different implosion scenarios will be presented, including those for cryogenic targets. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Fast and slow magnetic deflagration fronts in Type I X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cavecchi, Yuri; Watts, Anna L; Braithwaite, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are produced by thermonuclear runaways that develop on accreting neutron stars. Once one location ignites, the flame propagates across the surface of the star. Flame propagation is fundamental in order to understand burst properties like rise time and burst oscillations. Previous work quantified the effects of rotation on the front, showing that the flame propagates as a deflagration and that the front strongly resembles a hurricane. However the effect of magnetic fields was not investigated, despite the fact that magnetic fields strong enough to have an effect on the propagating flame are expected to be present on many bursters. In this paper we show how the coupling between fluid layers introduced by an initially vertical magnetic field plays a decisive role in determining the character of the fronts that are responsible for the Type I bursts. In particular, on a star spinning at 450 Hz (typical among the bursters) we test seed magnetic fields of $10^{7} - 10^{10}$ G and find that for th...

  14. Method of time resolved refractive index measurements of x-ray laser heated solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. O.; Kuenzel, S.; Fajardo, M. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Chung, H.-K. [Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vinko, S. M. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Sardinha, A. B. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Technique Avancees, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7639, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Zeitoun, Ph. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Technique Avancees, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7639, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    With the advent of new x-ray light-sources worldwide, the creation of dense, uniformly heated plasma states arising from intense x-ray irradiation of solids has been made possible. In the early stages of x-ray solid heating, before significant hydrodynamic motion occurs, the matter exists in a highly non-equilibrium state. A method based on wavefront sensing is proposed to probe some of the fundamental properties of these states. The deflection and absorption of a high harmonic probe beam propagated through the plasma can be measured with a wavefront sensor, and allow for the determination of the complex refractive index (RI) of the plasma, giving a 2D map of the optical properties as function of time in a pump-probe arrangement. A solid heating model has been used to estimate the expected temperatures of x-ray heated thin foils, and these temperatures are used in three separate models to estimate the changes in the refractive index. The calculations show the changes induced on an extreme ultra-violet (XUV) probe beam by a solid density thin foil plasma are significant, in terms of deflection angle and absorption, to be measured by already existing XUV Hartmann wavefront sensors. The method is applicable to a wide range of photon energies in the XUV (10 s to several 100 s of eV) and plasma parameters, and can add much needed experimental data to the fundamental properties of such dense plasma states.

  15. Time-sequenced X-ray Observation of a Thermal Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tringe, J W; Molitoris, J D; Smilowitz, L; Kercher, J R; Springer, H K; Henson, B F; Glascoe, E A; Greenwood, D W; Garza, R G; Wong, B M; Batteux, J D; Maienschein, J L

    2009-08-03

    The evolution of a thermally-initiated explosion is studied using a multiple-image x-ray system. HMX-based PBX 9501 is used in this work, enabling direct comparison to recently-published data obtained with proton radiography [1]. Multiple x-ray images of the explosion are obtained with image spacing of ten microseconds or more. The explosion is simultaneously characterized with a high-speed camera using an interframe spacing of 11 {micro}s. X-ray and camera images were both initiated passively by signals from an embedded thermocouple array, as opposed to being actively triggered by a laser pulse or other external source. X-ray images show an accelerating reacting front within the explosive, and also show unreacted explosive at the time the containment vessel bursts. High-speed camera images show debris ejected from the vessel expanding at 800-2100 m/s in the first tens of {micro}s after the container wall failure. The effective center of the initiation volume is about 6 mm from the geometric center of the explosive.

  16. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C. H.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Chufeng

    2014-01-01

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  17. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C H; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Li, Chufeng

    2014-07-17

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. INTEGRAL Long-Term Monitoring of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient XTE J1739-302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, P.; Martinez-Nunez, S.; Negueruela, I.; Pottschmidt, K.; Smith, D. M.; Torrejon, J. M.; Reig, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kreykenbohm, I.

    2008-01-01

    Context. In the past few years, a new class of High Mass X-Ray Binaries (HMXRB) has been claimed to exist, the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT). These are X-ray binary systems with a compact companion orbiting a supergiant star which show very short and bright outbursts in a series of activity periods overimposed on longer quiescent periods. Only very recently the first attempts to model the behaviour of these sources have been published, some of them within the framework of accretion from clumpy stellar winds. Aims. Our goal is to analyze the properties of XTE J1739-302/IGR J17391-3021 within the context of the clumpy structure of the supergiant wind. Methods. We have used INTEGRAL and RXTE/PCA observations in order to obtain broad band (1 - 200 keV) spectra and light curves of XTE J1739-302 and investigate its X-ray spectrum and temporal variability. Results. We have found that XTE J1739-302 follows a much more complex behaviour than expected. Far from presenting a regular variability pattern, XTE J1739-302 shows periods of high, intermediate, and low flaring activity.

  19. INTEGRAL Long-Term Monitoring of the Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transient XTE J1739-302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, P.; Martinez-Nunez, S.; Negueruela, I.; Pottschmidt, K.; Smith, D. M.; Torrejon, J. M.; Reig, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Kreykenbohm, I.

    2008-01-01

    Context. In the past few years, a new class of High Mass X-Ray Binaries (HMXRB) has been claimed to exist, the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT). These are X-ray binary systems with a compact companion orbiting a supergiant star which show very short and bright outbursts in a series of activity periods overimposed on longer quiescent periods. Only very recently the first attempts to model the behaviour of these sources have been published, some of them within the framework of accretion from clumpy stellar winds. Aims. Our goal is to analyze the properties of XTE J1739-302/IGR J17391-3021 within the context of the clumpy structure of the supergiant wind. Methods. We have used INTEGRAL and RXTE/PCA observations in order to obtain broad band (1 - 200 keV) spectra and light curves of XTE J1739-302 and investigate its X-ray spectrum and temporal variability. Results. We have found that XTE J1739-302 follows a much more complex behaviour than expected. Far from presenting a regular variability pattern, XTE J1739-302 shows periods of high, intermediate, and low flaring activity.

  20. The XMM-Newton view of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients: the case of IGRJ16418-4532

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, L; Sguera, V; Pizzolato, F

    2011-01-01

    We report on a 40 ks long, uninterrupted X-ray observation of the candidate supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGRJ16418-4532 performed with XMM-Newton on February 23, 2011. This high mass X-ray binary lies in the direction of the Norma arm, at an estimated distance of 13 kpc. During the observation, the source showed strong variability exceeding two orders of magnitudes, never observed before from this source. Its X-ray flux varied in the range from 0.1 counts/s to about 15 counts/s, with several bright flares of different durations (from a few hundreds to a few thousands seconds) and sometimes with a quasi-periodic behavior. This finding supports the previous suggestion that IGRJ16418-4532 is a member of the SFXTs class. In our new observation we measured a pulse period of 1212+/-6 s, thus confirming that this binary contains a slowly rotating neutron star. During the periods of low luminosity the source spectrum is softer and more absorbed than during the flares. A soft excess is present below 2 keV in...

  1. Fast frame rate rodent cardiac x-ray imaging using scintillator lens coupled to CMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi Lakshmi, B.; Sai Varsha, M. K. N.; Kumar, N. Ashwin; Dixit, Madhulika; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2017-03-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (MCT) systems for small animal imaging plays a critical role for monitoring disease progression and therapy evaluation. In this work, an in-house built micro-CT system equipped with a X-ray scintillator lens coupled to a commercial CMOS camera was used to test the feasibility of its application to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). Literature has reported such studies being done with clinical X-ray tubes that can be pulsed rapidly or with rotating gantry systems, thus increasing the cost and infrastructural requirements.The feasibility of DSA was evaluated by injected Iodinated contrast agent (ICA) through the tail vein of a mouse. Projection images of the heart were acquired pre and post contrast using the high frame rate X-ray detector and processing done to visualize transit of ICA through the heart.

  2. The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sun in Time: High-Energy Evolutionary Tracks of a Solar-Like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Lin; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to describe the pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods. We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results. We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, approximately from 10 Myr to 300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions. Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20 to 500 Myrs, before rotational co...

  3. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  4. X-ray testing for short-time dynamic applications; Roentgenuntersuchungen fuer kurzzeitdynamische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfiss, Malte; Moser, Stefan; Popko, Gregor; Nau, Siegfried [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik, Efringen-Kirchen (Germany). Ernst-Mach-Inst. (EMI)

    2017-08-01

    For nondestructive testing purposes new challenges are short-time dynamic processes. The application of x-ray flash tubes and modern high-speed cameras allows the observation of the opening of air-bags or the energy absorption of compressed tubes as occurring during a vehicle crash. Special algorithms designed for computerized tomography analyses allow the 3D reconstruction at individual time points of the dynamic process. Possibilities and limitations of the actual techniques are discussed.

  5. The flux-dependent X-ray time lags in NGC 4051

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alston, W.N.; Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray time lags for the highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, based on a series of XMM-Newton observations taken in 2009. We investigate the Fourier frequency dependent time lags in the light curves between the 0.3-1.0 keV and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands as a function

  6. Real-time compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, T.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The system is capable of continuously processing 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024×1024 pixels with up to 64 512 photon hits per frame.

  7. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

  8. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  9. Estimates of Imaging Times for Conventional and Synchrotron X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, J

    2003-01-01

    The following notes are to be taken as estimates of the time requirements for imaging NIF targets in three-dimensions with absorption contrast. The estimates ignore target geometry and detector inefficiency, and focus only on the statistical question of detecting compositional (structural) differences between adjacent volume elements in the presence of noise. The basic equations, from the classic reference by Grodzins, consider imaging times in terms of the required number of photons necessary to provide an image with given resolution and noise. The time estimates, therefore, have been based on the calculated x-ray fluxes from the proposed Advanced Light Source (ALS) imaging beamline, and from the calculated flux for a tungsten anode x-ray generator operated in a point focus mode.

  10. Central Engine of Late-Time X-ray Flares with Internal Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Hui-Jun; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Lin, Da-Bin; Yi, Tuan; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on a sample of seven extremely late-time X-ray flares with peak time $t_{\\rm p} > 10^4 {\\rm s}$, among which two flares can be confirmed as the late-time activity of central engine. The main purpose is to investigate the mechanism of such late-time flares based on the internal origin assumption. In the hyper-accreting black hole (BH) scenario, we study the possibility of two well-known mechanisms as the central engine to power such X-ray flares, i.e., the neutrino-antineutrino annihilation and the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. Our results show that the annihilation luminosity is far below the observational data. Thus, the annihilation mechanism cannot account for such late-time flares. For the BZ process, if the role of outflows is taken into consideration, the inflow mass rate near the horizon will be quite low such that the magnetic field will probably be too weak to power the observed X-ray flares. We therefore argue that, for the late-time flares with internal origin, the central engine...

  11. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO2 lasers for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Shkolnikov, Peter; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas P.; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO2 lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle- sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO2 laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO2 laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-μm ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO2 gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO2 lasers in medicine and other areas.

  12. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO(2) lasers for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Shkolnikov, P. Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C.A.J.; Dover, N.P.; Oliva, P; Carpinelli, M.

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO{sub 2} lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle-sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO{sub 2} lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO{sub 2} laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO{sub 2} laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-{mu}m ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO{sub 2} gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO{sub 2} lasers in medicine and other areas.

  13. Time dependent spectrum of an X-ray irradiated accretion disc with stochastic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Bari; Wani, Naveel; Iqbal, Naseer; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    The X-rays emitted by the inner regions of the accretion disk induce structural changes in the outer regions of the disk. We study here how the effective temperature and hence the corresponding spectrum of the disk is altered by stochastic perturbations in the outer regions and thereby try to study the long term variability which has been observed in some X-ray binaries. We use a time dependent global hydrodynamic code to study the variations in the effective temperature of the disk in response to sinusoidal accretion rate perturbations introduced at different radii and with different time periods. To quantify the results, we calculate the root mean square effective temperature at different radii and the root mean square flux at different frequencies. From our calculations of the time-lags in accretion rate, effective temperature and the different frequencies, we find that the time-lags in presence of X-ray irradiation is significantly smaller than the expected viscous time-scale.

  14. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  15. Neutron Stars and Black Holes Seen with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Astrophysical X-rays bring information about location, energy, time, and polarization. X-rays from compact objects were seen in the first explorations to vary in time. Eclipses and pulsations have simple explanations that identified the importance of X-ray binaries and magnetic neutron stars in the first decade of X-ray astronomy. The dynamics of accretion onto stellar and supermassive black holes and onto neutron stars with relatively low magnetic fields shows up as more complex variations, quasi-periodic oscillations, noise with characteristic frequency spectra, broad-band changes in the energy spectra. To study these variations, RXTE instruments needed to have large area and operational flexibility to find transient activity and observe when it was present. Proportional counters and Phoswich scintillators provided it in a modest mission that has made textbook level contributions to understanding of compact objects. The first seen, and the brightest known, X-ray binary, Sco X-1 is one of a class of neutron stars with low mass companions. Before RXTE, none of these had been seen to show pulsations, though they were hypothesized to be the precursors of radio pulsars with millisecond periods and low magnetic fields. RXTE's large area led to identifying coherent millisecond pulsars in a subset which are relatively faint transients. It also led to identifying short episodes of pulsation during thermonuclear bursts, in sources where a steady signal is not seen. The X-ray stage verifies the evolution that produces millisecond radio pulsars.Masses and radii of neutron stars are being determined by various techniques, constraining the equation of state of matter at nuclear densities. Accretion should lead to a range of neutron star masses. An early stage of superstrong magnetic field neutron stars is now known to produce X-ray and gamma-ray bursts in crust quakes and magnetic field reconnection releases of energy. Soft Gamma Repeaters, Anomolous X-ray Pulsars, and high

  16. Chandra observation of the fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619: evidence for a neutron star?

    CERN Document Server

    in 't Zand, J J M

    2005-01-01

    IGR J17544-2619 belongs to a distinct group of at least seven fast X-ray transients that cannot readily be associated with nearby flare stars or pre-main sequence stars and most probably are X-ray binaries with wind accretion. Sofar, the nature of the accretor has been determined in only one case (SAX J1819.3-2525/V4641 Sgr). We carried out a 20 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of IGR J17544-2619 which shows the source in quiescence going into outburst. The Chandra position confirms the previous tentative identification of the optical counterpart, a blue O9Ib supergiant at 3 to 4 kpc (Pellizza, Chaty & Negueruela, in prep.). This is the first detection of a fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The quiescent spectrum is very soft. The photon index of 5.9+/-1.2 (90% confidence error margin) is much softer than 6 quiescent black hole candidates that were observed with Chandra ACIS-S (Kong et al. 2002; Tomsick et al. 2003). Assuming that a significant fraction of the quiescent photons comes from the accretor and ...

  17. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  18. Computational Models of X-Ray Burst Quenching Times and 12C Nucleosynthesis Following a Superburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker, J L

    2009-03-19

    Superbursts are energetic events on neutron stars that are a thousand times more powerful than ordinary type I X-ray bursts. They are believed to be powered by a thermonuclear explosion of accumulated {sup 12}C. However, the source of this {sup 12}C remains elusive to theoretical calculations and its concentration and ignition depth are both unknown. Here we present the first computational simulations of the nucleosynthesis during the thermal decay of a superbust, where X-ray bursts are quenched. Our calculations of the quenching time verify previous analytical calculations and shed new light on the physics of stable burning at low accretion rates. We show that concentrated (X{sub {sup 12}C} {approx}> 0.40), although insufficient, amounts of {sup 12}C are generated during the several weeks following the superburst where the decaying thermal flux of the superburst stabilizes the burning of the accreted material.

  19. Time course of an X-ray picture following operation for the ventricular septal defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khenynya, R.L.; Latsis, A.T.; Rubene, M.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray picture was studied over time in 80 pediatric patients by hemodynamic groups in accordance with the classification adopted in the A.I. Bakulev Institute of Cardiovascular Surgery, USSR AMS. Of them in 15 patients in addition to the ventricular septal defect, stenosis of the pulmonary artery was revealed, in 11 concomitant insufficiency of the tricuspid valve. The best results after radical correction of the defect were achieved in patients with insignificant or moderate disorder of the pulmonary hemodynamics; positive results in patients with a high pulmonary hypertension were observed over time later. X-ray studies on the regression of disorders of the pulmonary hemodynamics emphasize the necessity of early diagnosis of the ventricular septal defect followed by surgical correction.

  20. Comparative Studies of Prediction Strategies for Solar X-ray Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranushi, T.; Hattori, T.; Jin, Q.; Hishinuma, T.; Tominaga, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Fujiwara, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Sakaue, T.; Takahashi, T.; Seki, D.; Namekata, K.; Tei, A.; Ban, M.; Kawamura, A. D.; Hada-Muranushi, Y.; Asai, A.; Nemoto, S.; Shibata, K.

    2016-12-01

    Crucial virtues for operational space weather forecast are real-timeforecast ability, forecast precision and customizability to userneeds. The recent development of deep-learning makes it veryattractive to space weather, because (1) it learns gradually incomingdata, (2) it exhibits superior accuracy over conventional algorithmsin many fields, and (3) it makes the customization of the forecasteasier because it accepts raw images.However, the best deep-learning applications are only attainable bycareful human designers that understands both the mechanism of deeplearning and the application field. Therefore, we need to foster youngresearchers to enter the field of machine-learning aided forecast. So,we have held a seminar every Monday with undergraduate and graduatestudents from May to August 2016.We will review the current status of space weather science and theautomated real-time space weather forecast engine UFCORIN. Then, weintroduce the deep-learning space weather forecast environments wehave set up using Python and Chainer on students' laptop computers.We have started from simple image classification neural network, thenimplemented space-weather neural network that predicts future X-rayflux of the Sun based on the past X-ray lightcurve and magnetic fieldline-of-sight images.In order to perform each forecast faster, we have focused on simplelightcurve-to-lightcurve forecast, and performed comparative surveysby changing following parameters: The size and topology of the neural network Batchsize Neural network hyperparameters such as learning rates to optimize the preduction accuracy, and time for prediction.We have found how to design compact, fast but accurate neural networkto perform forecast. Our forecasters can perform predictionexperiment for four-year timespan in a few minutes, and achieveslog-scale errors of the order of 1. Our studies is ongoing, and inour talk we will review our progress till December.

  1. Time-resolved X-ray transmission microscopy on magnetic microstructures; Zeitaufloesende Roentgentransmissionsmikroskopie an magnetischen Mikrostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzic, Aleksandar

    2007-10-23

    Three excitation schemes were designed for stroboscopic imaging of magnetization dynamics with time-resolved magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TR-MTXM). These techniques were implemented into two types of X-ray microscopes, namely the imaging transmission X-ray microscope (ITXM) and the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM), both installed at the electron storage ring of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, USA. Circular diffraction gratings (Fresnel zone plates) used in both microscopes as focusing and imaging elements presently allow for lateral resolution down to 30 nm. Magnetic imaging is performed by using the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as element specific contrast mechanism. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the experimental investigation of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic microstructures. A temporal resolution well below 100 ps was achieved. A conventional pump-probe technique was implemented first. The dynamic response of the magnetization excited by a broadband pulsed magnetic field was imaged spatially resolved using focused X-ray flashes. As a complementary method, the spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance (SR-FMR) technique was developed for experimental study of magnetization dynamics in the frequency domain. As a third excitation mode, the burst excitation was implemented. The performance and efficiency of the developed methods have been demonstrated by imaging the local magnetization dynamics in laterally patterned ferromagnetic thin-film elements and three-layer stacks. The existence of multiple eigenmodes in the excitation spectra of ferromagnetic microstructures has been verified by using the pump-probe technique. Magnetostatic spin waves were selectively excited and detected with a time resolution of 50 ps using the SR-FMR technique. Thorough analysis of 20 in most cases independently prepared samples has verified that vortices which exhibit a low-amplitude switching of their core

  2. Fast and Furious: Shock heated gas as the origin of spatially resolved hard X-ray emission in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy merger NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junfeng; Nardini, Emanuele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Zezas, Andreas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pellegrini, Silvia [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universitá di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Max, Claire [Center for Adaptive Optics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); U, Vivian, E-mail: jfwang@northwestern.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We have obtained a deep, subarcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT ∼ 6 keV (∼70 MK) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with a velocity of ∼2200 km s{sup –1}. For the first time, we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting Fe XXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large-scale morphology of H{sub 2}(1-0) S(1) line emission and Hα filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originating in the starburst-driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L {sub 0.5-8} {sub keV} = 5.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is ∼100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its total mass (M {sub hot} = 1.8 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) and thermal energy (E {sub th} = 6.5 × 10{sup 57} erg). The total iron mass in the highly ionized plasma is M {sub Fe} = 4.6 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. Both the energetics and the iron mass in the hot gas are consistent with the expected injection from the supernovae explosion during the starburst that is commensurate with its high star formation rate. No evidence for fluorescent Fe I emission is found in the CO filament connecting the two nuclei.

  3. A global look at X-ray time lags in Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, E.; Alston, W. N.; Fabian, A. C.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Reynolds, C. S.; Zoghbi, A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray reverberation, where light-travel time delays map out the compact geometry around the inner accretion flow in supermassive black holes, has been discovered in several of the brightest, most variable and well-known Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we expand the study of X-ray reverberation to all Seyfert galaxies in the XMM-Newton archive above a nominal rms variability and exposure level (a total of 43 sources). Approximately 50 per cent of sources exhibit iron K reverberation, in that the broad iron K emission line responds to rapid variability in the continuum. We also find that on long time-scales, the hard band emission lags behind the soft band emission in 85 per cent of sources. This `low-frequency hard lag' is likely associated with the coronal emission, and so this result suggests that most sources with X-ray variability show intrinsic variability from the nuclear region. We update the known iron K lag amplitude versus black hole mass relation, and find evidence that the height or extent of the coronal source (as inferred by the reverberation time delay) increases with mass accretion rate.

  4. Ultrafast laser-induced melting and ablation studied by time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer zu Heringdorf F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering with 50 fs, 9.5 keV X-ray pulses from the Linear Coherent Light Source was used to study the structural dynamics in materials undergoing rapid melting and ablation after fs laser excitation.

  5. A diamond detector for inertial confinement fusion X-ray bang-time measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPhee, A G; Brown, C; Burns, S; Celeste, J; Glenzer, S H; Hey, D; Jones, O S; Landen, O; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N; Parker, J; Edgell, D; Glebov, V Y; Kilkenny, J; Kimbrough, J

    2010-11-09

    An instrument has been developed to measure X-ray bang-time for inertial confinement fusion capsules; the time interval between the start of the laser pulse and peak X-ray emission from the fuel core. The instrument comprises chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond photoconductive X-ray detectors with highly ordered pyrolytic graphite X-ray monochromator crystals at the input. Capsule bang-time can be measured in the presence of relatively high thermal and hard X-ray background components due to the selective band pass of the crystals combined with direct and indirect X-ray shielding of the detector elements. A five channel system is being commissioned at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for implosion optimization measurements as part of the National Ignition Campaign. Characteristics of the instrument have been measured demonstrating that X-ray bang-time can be measured with {+-} 30ps precision, characterizing the soft X-ray drive to +/- 1eV or 1.5%.

  6. Spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray millisecond pulsar IGR J17498-2921

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falanga, M.; Kuiper, L.; Poutanen, J.; Galloway, D.K.; Bozzo, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Hermsen, W.; Stella, L.

    2012-01-01

    Context. IGR J17498-2921 is the third X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about 40 days beginning on August 08, 2011. Aims. We analyze the spectral and timing properties of the object and the characteristics of X-ray bursts to constrain the phy

  7. Information about accretion flows from X-ray timing of pulsating sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, F. K.; Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1976-01-01

    The response was studied of a rotating neutron star to fluctuating torques and it was found that the observed variations in the pulsation periods of the compact X-ray sources Cen X-3 and Her X-1 could be caused by short time scale fluctuations in the accretion torques acting on the neutron stars. The sizes and rates of the required fluctuations are consistent with current accretion models. Such fluctuations can cause period variations either (a) directly, by causing a random walk of the star's angular velocity or (b) indirectly, by exciting a long-period mode of the neutron star, such as the Tkachenko mode of the rotating neutron superfluid. Phenomena in compact X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables which may be caused by fluctuating mass flow rates are also discussed.

  8. Time-, Frequency-, and Wavevector-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction from Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broad-band X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and ...

  9. Computer Evaluation Of Real-Time X-Ray And Acoustic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, M. H.; Loe, R. S.; Dondes, P. A.

    1983-03-01

    The weakest link in the inspection process is the subjective interpretation of data by inspectors. To overcome this troublesome fact computer based analysis systems have been developed. In the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) there is a large class of inspections that can benefit from computer analysis. X-ray images (both film and fluoroscopic) and acoustic images lend themselves to automatic analysis as do the one-dimensional signals associated with ultrasonic, eddy current and acoustic emission testing. Computer analysis can enhance and evaluate subtle details. Flaws can be located and measured, and accept-ance decisions made by computer in a consistent and objective manner. This paper describes the interactive, computer-based analysis of real-time x-ray images and acoustic images of graphite/epoxy adhesively bonded structures.

  10. Fast electron slowing-down and diffusion in a high temperature coronal X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, R K; Kontar, E P; Helander, P; Galloway, Ross K.; Kinnon, Alexander L. Mac; Kontar, Eduard P.; Helander, Per

    2005-01-01

    Finite thermal velocity modifications to electron slowing-down rates may be important for the deduction of solar flare total electron energy. Here we treat both slowing-down and velocity diffusion of electrons in the corona at flare temperatures, for the case of a simple, spatially homogeneous source. Including velocity diffusion yields a consistent treatment of both `accelerated' and `thermal' electrons. It also emphasises that one may not invoke finite thermal velocity target effects on electron lifetimes without simultaneously treating the contribution to the observed X-ray spectrum from thermal electrons. We present model calculations of the X-ray spectra resulting from injection of a power-law energy distribution of electrons into a source with finite temperature. Reducing the power-law distribution low-energy cutoff to lower and lower energies only increases the relative magnitude of the thermal component of the spectrum, because the lowest energy electrons simply join the background thermal distributio...

  11. Fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using x-ray grating interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph

    2014-04-15

    An x-ray grating interferometer was employed for in situ optimization of an x-ray bimorph mirror. Unlike many other at-wavelength techniques, only a single interferogram image, captured out of the focal plane, is required, enabling the optical surface to be quickly optimized. Moiré fringe analysis was used to calculate the wavefront slope error, which is proportional to the mirror's slope error. Using feedback from grating interferometry, the slope error of a bimorph mirror was reduced to <200  nrad (rms) in only two iterations. This technique has the potential to create photon beams with spatially homogeneous intensities for use in synchrotron and free electron laser beam lines.

  12. 3D quantification of dynamic fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media with fast x-ray microtomography: A comparison with quasi-equilibrium methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenheimer, D.; Brueck, C. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray microtomography imaging of fluid-fluid interfaces in three-dimensional porous media allows for the testing of thermodynamically derived predictions that seek a unique relationship between capillary pressure, fluid saturation, and specific interfacial area (Pc-Sw-Anw). Previous experimental studies sought to test this functional dependence under quasi-equilibrium conditions (assumed static on the imaging time-scale); however, applying predictive models developed under static conditions for dynamic scenarios can lead to substantial flaws in predicted outcomes. Theory and models developed using dynamic data can be verified using fast x-ray microtomography which allows for the unprecedented measurement of developing interfacial areas, curvatures, and trapping behaviors of fluid phases in three-dimensional systems. We will present results of drainage and imbibition experiments of air and water within a mixture of glass beads. The experiments were performed under both quasi-equilibrium and dynamic conditions at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Fast x-ray microtomography was achieved by utilizing the high brilliance of the x-ray beam at the APS under pink-beam conditions where the white beam is modified with a 4 mm Al absorber and a 0.8 mrad Pt-coated mirror to eliminate low and high-energy photons, respectively. We present a comparison of the results from the quasi-equilibrium and dynamic experiments in an effort to determine if the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is comparable under either experimental condition and to add to the discussion on whether the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is unique as hypothesized by existing theory.

  13. Spectral-Timing to Probe Strong Gravity in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Abigail; Uttley, Phil

    2017-01-01

    X-ray spectral-timing seeks to investigate how matter behaves in strong gravitational fields. Observations suggest that different types of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are associated with different emission-region geometries (e.g. disk-like or jet-like) in the innermost part of an X-ray binary, close to the neutron star or black hole. We developed a technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy of QPOs, and have applied it to low-frequency QPOs from black hole X-ray binaries. On the QPO time-scale, we find that the energy spectrum changes not only in normalization, but also in spectral shape. We identify these changes as a phase-dependence of the intrinsic power-law emission as well as the response of the accretion disk to variable illumination by the power-law. We also look for systematic trends between different classes of sources and different accretion states. These trends help us to further constrain the origin of low-frequency QPOs and QPO evolution with the changing emission geometry in the strong-gravity regime.

  14. Time-resolved X-ray PIV measurements of hemodynamic information of real pulsatile blood flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    X-ray imaging technique has been used to visualize various bio-fluid flow phenomena as a nondestructive manner. To obtain hemodynamic information related with circulatory vascular diseases, a time-resolved X-ray PIV technique with high temporal resolution was developed. In this study, to embody actual pulsatile blood flows in a circular conduit without changes in hemorheological properties, a bypass loop is established by connecting a microtube between the jugular vein and femoral artery of a rat. Biocompatible CO2 microbubbles are used as tracer particles. After mixing with whole blood, CO2 microbubbles are injected into the bypass loop. Particle images of the pulsatile blood flows in the bypass loop are consecutively captured by the time-resolved X-ray PIV system. The velocity field information are obtained with varying flow rate and pulsataility. To verify the feasibility of the use of CO2 microbubbles under in vivo conditions, the effects of the surrounding-tissues are also investigated, because these effects are crucial for deteriorating the image contrast of CO2 microbubbles. Therefore, the velocity information of blood flows in the abdominal aorta are obtained to demonstrate the visibility and usefulness of CO2 microbubbles under ex vivo conditions. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  15. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  16. Fast plasma discharge capillary design as a high power throughput soft x-ray emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndham, E S; Favre, M; Valdivia, M P; Valenzuela, J C; Chuaqui, H; Bhuyan, H

    2010-09-01

    We present the experimental details and results from a low energy but high repetition rate compact plasma capillary source for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray research and applications. Two lengths of capillary are mounted in two versions of a closely related design. The discharge operates in 1.6 and 3.2 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries of lengths 21 and 36 mm. The use of water both as dielectric and as coolant simplifies the compact low inductance design with nanosecond discharge periods. The stored electrical energy of the discharge is approximately 0.5 J and is provided by directly charging the capacitor plates from an inexpensive insulated-gate bipolar transistor in 1 μs or less. We present characteristic argon spectra from plasma between 30 and 300 Å as well as temporally resolved x-ray energy fluence in discrete bands on axis. The spectra also allow the level of ablated wall material to be gauged and associated with useful capillary lifetime according to the chosen configuration and energy storage. The connection between the electron beams associated with the transient hollow cathode mechanism, soft x-ray output, capillary geometry, and capillary lifetime is reported. The role of these e-beams and the plasma as measured on-axis is discussed. The relation of the electron temperature and the ionization stages observed is discussed in the context of some model results of ionization in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

  17. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-05-06

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinning of the crystal within a levitating droplet ensured an efficient sampling of the reciprocal space. The datasets were processed with a program suite developed for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). The structure, which was solved by molecular replacement, was found to be identical to the structure obtained by the conventional oscillation method for up to a 1.8-Å resolution limit. In particular, the absence of protein crystal damage resulting from the acoustic levitation was carefully established. These results represent a key step towards a fully automated sample handling and measurement pipeline, which has promising prospects for a high acquisition rate and high sample efficiency for room temperature X-ray crystallography.

  18. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinning of the crystal within a levitating droplet ensured an efficient sampling of the reciprocal space. The datasets were processed with a program suite developed for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). The structure, which was solved by molecular replacement, was found to be identical to the structure obtained by the conventional oscillation method for up to a 1.8-Å resolution limit. In particular, the absence of protein crystal damage resulting from the acoustic levitation was carefully established. These results represent a key step towards a fully automated sample handling and measurement pipeline, which has promising prospects for a high acquisition rate and high sample efficiency for room temperature X-ray crystallography.

  19. A global look at X-ray time lags in Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kara, E; Fabian, A C; Cackett, E M; Uttley, P; Reynolds, C S; Zoghbi, A

    2016-01-01

    X-ray reverberation, where light-travel time delays map out the compact geometry around the inner accretion flow in supermassive black holes, has been discovered in several of the brightest, most variable and well-known Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we expand the study of X-ray reverberation to all Seyfert galaxies in the XMM-Newton archive above a nominal rms variability and exposure level (a total of 43 sources). 50 per cent of source exhibit iron K reverberation, in that the broad iron K emission line responds to rapid variability in the continuum. We also find that on long timescales, the hard band emission lags behind the soft band emission in 85 per cent of sources. This `low-frequency hard lag' is likely associated with the coronal emission, and so this result suggests that most sources with X-ray variability show intrinsic variability from the nuclear region. We update the known iron K lag amplitude vs. black hole mass relation, and find evidence that the height or extent of the coronal source (as i...

  20. Real-time X-ray response of AlGaN/GaN-HEMT devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Paretzke, Herwig G.; Thalhammer, Stefan [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D.; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present the real-time X-ray irradiation response of charge and pH sensitive solution gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). At the interface of the two materials a fixed space charge appears due to the difference in polarisation of the materials and a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is produced. The electrical properties and therefore the conductivity of the system highly depend on the chip surface potential. We could demonstrate that the devices are stable and show reproducible behavior under and following X-ray radiation at different energies, including a linear integrated response with dose into the micro-gray range. Titration measurements of devices in solution reveal that the linear pH response and sensitivity are not only retained under X-ray irradiation, but an irradiation response could also be measured. The active areas of the sensors are in the size of about 1 mm{sup 2}, which makes them an ideal candidate for dose determination in radiology applications. The devices are bio-compatible and can be simultaneously operated in aggressive fluids and under hard radiation. The development of this sensor device, which provides the possibility of online radiation dosimetry acquisition during biosensing applications, has a huge potential in radiation biophysics.

  1. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  2. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  3. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  4. Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

    2008-11-22

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic Kα lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic Kβ line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  5. Energetic X-ray-emitting jets from the fast-moving middle-aged pulsar B2224+65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Johnson, Seth

    2017-08-01

    We present evidence for jets from the nearby pulsar, B2224+65, based on three epochs of Chandra X-ray observations, separated by 6 years from each other. This relatively slow rotating pulsar is well known for its extreme velocity of proper motion and associated "Guitar"-shaped optical nebula in the opposite direction. The main jet-like X-ray-emitting feature is extremely narrow and significantly curved near the pulsar, but further away remains amazingly straight and is directed about 62 degrees away from the nebula, the X-ray emission of which is also detected. We find the consistent proper motions of the pulsar and the feature. The substructure of the feature varies among the epochs, while its spectrum is well characterized by a power law with a photon index of 1.2, is significantly harder than that of the pulsar, and remains remarkably consistent spatially and with the time. These results can be explained most intuitively by ballistic, relativistic, and probably magnetic field-dominated jets from the pulsar, similar to those from active galactic nuclei. Indeed, we also detect the extended X-ray emission from the putative counter-jet, albeit at a much fainter level and a much smaller scale. The luminosity of these features is 7e30 erg/s in the Chandra band, accounting for about 1% of the spin-down energy rate of the pulsar. Because of the flat nonthermal X-ray spectrum, this fraction increases with the photon energy. The total power required to generate the jets is likely greater than 10% of the rate. Much of the acceleration of the particles for the (synchrotron) X-ray emission to energies > 100 TeV likely occurs within the jets, probably via magnetic field re-connection. This jet scenario and the underlying physics can be further tested by a carefully designed X-ray monitoring of the substructure and by a measurement of the radio polarization of the pulsar, as its spin axis is expected to be aligned with the jets. We speculate that the energetic jet ejection

  6. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    the recession of the solid propellant grain can drastically alter the flow-field and effect the recession of internal insulation and nozzle materials. Simultaneous measurement of the overall erosion rate, the development of the char layer, and the recession of the char-virgin interface during the motor operation can be rather difficult. While invasive techniques have been used with limited success, they have serious drawbacks. Break wires or make wire sensors can be installed into a sufficient number of locations in the charring material from which a time history of the charring surface can be deduced. These sensors fundamentally alter the local structure of the material in which they are imbedded. Also, the location of these sensors within the material is not known precisely without the use of an X-ray. To determine instantaneous recession rates, real-time X-ray radiography (X-ray RTR) has been utilized in several SRM experiments at PSU. The X-ray RTR system discussed in this paper consists of an X-ray source, X-ray image intensifier, and CCD camera connected to a capture computer. The system has been used to examine the ablation process of internal insulation as well as nozzle material erosion in a subscale SRM. The X-ray source is rated to 320 kV at 10 mA and has both a large (5.5 mm) and small (3.0 mm) focal spot. The lead-lined cesium iodide X-ray image intensifier produces an image which is captured by a CCD camera with a 1,000 x 1,000 pixel resolution. To produce accurate imagery of the object of interest, the alignment of the X-ray source to the X-ray image intensifier is crucial. The image sequences captured during the operation of an SRM are then processed to enhance the quality of the images. This procedure allows for computer software to extract data on the total erosion rate and the char layer thickness. Figure 1 Error! Reference source not found.shows a sequence of images captured during the operation the subscale SRM with the X-ray RTR system. The X-ray

  7. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  8. Timing and low-level rf system for an x-ray laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Otake

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL, SACLA, designed to open up new science, was constructed for generating coherent x rays with a peak power of more than 10 GW and a very short pulse of below 30 fs. This feature demands a very highly short-term temporal stability of less than 50 fs to the acceleration rf field of SACLA. For this reason, we developed a timing and low-level rf (LLRF system for SACLA based on that of the SPring8 compact SASE source (SCSS test accelerator for verifying the feasibility of an XFEL. The performance of the system using the in-phase and quadrature rf manipulation method was improved from SCSS’s system. Since the facility length of SACLA is 700 m, which is 10 times longer than that of the SCSS test accelerator, a phase-stabilized optical-fiber system designed to transmit time standard rf signals with low loss was also developed and deployed. This optical-fiber system equips fiber optical-length feedback control in order to mitigate environmental effects, such as temperature and humidity changes. On the other hand, the demanded maximum rf temporal stability is less than 50 fs, which is almost 10 times smaller than that of the SCSS test accelerator. Hence, reducing electric noise and increasing the temperature stability around timing and LLRF instruments were necessary and realized with a very low-noise power supply and a hemathermal 19-inch enclosure. The short-term temporal performance of the timing LLRF system finally attained a temporal stability of less than 13.6 fs in rms measured by a beam arrival-time measurement. This stability greatly helps to achieve the stable x-ray lasing of SACLA for routine operation during user experiments.

  9. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  10. Holographic methods in X-ray crystallography. Pt. 4. A fast algorithm and its application to macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, J.R. [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Szoeke, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beran, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Truckses, D. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Kim, S.H. [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Szoeke, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The holographic method makes use of partially modeled electron density and experimentally measured structure-factor amplitudes to recover electron density corresponding to the unmodeled part of a crystal structure. This paper describes a fast algorithm that makes it possible to apply the holographic method to sizable crystallographic problems. The algorithm uses positivity constraints on the electron density and can incorporate a `target` electron density, making it similar to solvent flattening. The potential for applying the holographic method to macromolecular X-ray crystallography is assessed using both synthetic and experimental data. (orig.).

  11. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, J; Fourment, C; Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Galtier, E; Harmand, M; Leguay, P M; Lee, H J; Nagler, B; Nakatsutsumi, M; Ozkan, C; Störmer, M; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P A; Dorchies, F

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called "molecular movie" within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  12. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J R; Krenner, Hubert J; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length).

  13. Hydrodynamics of Exploding Foil X-Ray Lasers with Time-Dependent Ionization Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Su, Dandan; Li, Yingjun

    2016-12-01

    A simple modified model is presented based on R. A. London's self-similarity model on time-independent ionization hydrodynamics of exploding foil X-ray lasers. In our model, the time-dependent ionization effect is under consideration and the average ion charge depends on the temperature. Then we obtain the new scaling laws for temperature, scale length and electron density, which have better agreement with experimental results. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11574390, 11374360, 41472130) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CBA01504)

  14. Dynamical Solution of the SGEMP Electron Boundary Layer for Linearly Rising and Constant X-Ray Time Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    The time dependent solution is presented for the dynamical behavior of the one dimensional electron boundary layer formed when X-rays knock photoelectrons out of a material surface. The X-ray flux is taken to be either linearly rising in time or constant in time . Two electron energy spectra are considered-exponential and linear-times-exponential. The electrons are assumed to have a cos theta

  15. STROBE-X: X-ray Timing & Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Maccarone, Tom; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Remillard, Ronald A.; Wood, Kent; Griffith, Christopher; STROBE-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We describe a proposed probe-class mission concept that will provide an unprecedented view of the X-ray sky, performing timing and spectroscopy over a broad band (0.2-30 keV) probing timescales from microseconds to years. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) comprises two primary instruments. The soft band (0.2-12 keV) will be covered by an array of lightweight optics (3-m focal length) that concentrate incident photons onto small solid state detectors with CCD-level (85-130 eV) energy resolution, 100 ns time resolution, and low background rates. This technology, fully developed for NICER, would be scaled up with enhanced optics to take advantage of the longer focal length of STROBE-X. The harder band (2 to at least 30 keV) would be covered by large-area collimated silicon drift detectors,developed for the European LOFT mission concept. Each instrument would provide an order of magnitude improvement in effective area compared with its predecessor (NICER in the soft band and RXTE in the hard band). A sensitive sky monitor would act as a trigger for pointed observations, provide high duty cycle, high time resolution, high spectral resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with ~20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM, and enable multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies on a continuous, rather than scanning basis.The broad coverage will enable thermal components, non-thermal components, iron lines, and reflection features to be studied simultaneously from a single platform for the first time in accreting black holes at all scales. The enormous collecting area will enable studies of the dense matter equation of state using both soft thermal emission from rotation-powered pulsars and harder emission from X-ray burst oscillations. Revolutionary science, such as high quality spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies and unprecedented timing investigations of active galactic nuclei, would also be obtained.We describe the mission

  16. STROBE-X: X-Ray Timing Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, P. S.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Chakrabarty, D.; Remillard, R.; Feroci, M.; Maccarone, T.; Wood, K.; Jenke, P.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a probe-class mission concept that provides an unprecedented view of the X-ray sky, performing timing and 0.2-30 keV spectroscopy over timescales from microseconds to years. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) comprises three primary instruments. The first uses an array of lightweight optics (3-m focal length) that concentrate incident photons onto solid state detectors with CCD-level (85-130 eV) energy resolution, 100 ns time resolution, and low background rates to cover the 0.2-12 keV band. This technology is scaled up from NICER, with enhanced optics to take advantage of the longer focal length of STROBE-X. The second uses large-area collimated silicon drift detectors, developed for ESA's LOFT, to cover the 2-30 keV band. These two instruments each provide an order of magnitude improvement in effective area compared with its predecessor (NICER and RXTE, respectively). Finally, a sensitive sky monitor triggers pointed observations, provides high duty cycle, high time resolution, high spectral resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with approx. 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM, and enables multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies on a continuous, rather than scanning basis.For the first time, the broad coverage provides simultaneous study of thermal components, non-thermal components, iron lines, and reflection features from a single platform for accreting black holes at all scales. The enormous collecting area allows detailed studies of the dense matter equation of state using both thermal emission from rotation-powered pulsars and harder emission from X-ray burst oscillations. The combination of the wide-field monitor and the sensitive pointed instruments enables observations of potential electromagnetic counterparts to LIGO and neutrino events. Additional extragalactic science, such as high quality spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies and unprecedented timing investigations of active

  17. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal [Medisys Research Group, Philips Healthcare, Paris 92156 (France); Gijsbers, Geert [Interventional X-ray, Philips Healthcare, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands); Cooklin, Michael; O' Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo [Department of Cardiology, Guys and St. Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  18. Fast signal processing of a yttrium-aluminum-perovskite:Ce detector for synchrotron x-ray experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masaaki; Sakurai, Kenji; Saitoh, Kazuhiro; Kishimoto, Shunji

    2001-11-01

    An amplifier has been developed to form narrow pulses of less than 100 ns for a YAP:Ce scintillator, which appears promising as a detector for high-counting rate x-ray measurements. The performance of the detector system has been evaluated with monochromatic 8, 16.5, and 25 keV synchrotron x-ray photons at the Photon Factory. The whole deadtime obtained was 84 ns, which is around 3.5 times the decay time of the scintillation (25 ns), indicating that the present system is almost optimum. It has been found that the counting loss for 1 M counts/s is only 8%-9%, and that the detector can count extremely strong photons up to 5 M counts/s.

  19. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  20. Timing accuracy of the Swift X-Ray Telescope in WT mode

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; Capalbi, M; Perri, M; Beardmore, A P; Burrows, D N; Campana, S; Kennea, J A; Osborne, J P; Sbarufatti, B; Tagliaferri, G

    2012-01-01

    The X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Swift was mainly designed to provide detailed position, timing and spectroscopic information on Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglows. During the mission lifetime the fraction of observing time allocated to other types of source has been steadily increased. In this paper, we report on the results of the in-flight calibration of the timing capabilities of the XRT in Windowed Timing read-out mode. We use observations of the Crab pulsar to evaluate the accuracy of the pulse period determination by comparing the values obtained by the XRT timing analysis with the values derived from radio monitoring. We also check the absolute time reconstruction measuring the phase position of the main peak in the Crab profile and comparing it both with the value reported in literature and with the result that we obtain from a simultaneous Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observation. We find that the accuracy in period determination for the Crab pulsar is of the order of a few picoseconds for the...

  1. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction of Ti in dynamic-DAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Dane; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic response of solids under extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a fundamental scientific quest and a basic research need in materials science. Specifically, obtaining an atomistic description of structural and chemical changes of solids under rapid heating and/or compression over a large temporal, spatial and energy range is challenging but critical to understanding material stability or metastable structure, chemical mechanism, transition dynamic, and mechanical deformation. In this paper, we present time-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction probing the structural evolution of Ti across the α-ω phase transition in dynamic-diamond anvil cell.

  2. The Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient with the shortest orbital period: Suzaku observes one orbit in IGRJ16479-4514

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, L; Sguera, V; Bodaghee, A; Tomsick, J A; Pottschmidt, K; Rodriguez, J; Romano, P; Wilms, J

    2013-01-01

    The eclipsing hard X-ray source IGR J16479-4514 is the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) with the shortest orbital period (3.32 days). This allowed us to perform a 250 ks long X-ray observation with Suzaku in 2012 February, covering most of its orbit, including the eclipse egress. Outside the eclipse, the source luminosity is around a few 1E34erg/s. The X-ray spectrum can be fit with an absorbed power law together with a neutral iron emission line at 6.4 keV. The column density is constant at 1E23 cm-2 outside the X-ray eclipse. During the eclipse it is lower, consistent with a scattering origin for the low X-ray emission during the eclipse by the supergiant companion wind. The scattered X-ray emission during the X-ray eclipse is used to directly probe the density of the companion wind at the orbital separation, resulting in 7E-14 g/cm3, which translates into a ratio Mdot_w/v_terminal = 7E-17 solar masses/km of the wind mass loss rate to the wind terminal velocity. This ratio, assuming reasonable termina...

  3. Real-time, ray casting-based scatter dose estimation for c-arm x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnewaini, Zaid; Langer, Eric; Schaber, Philipp; David, Matthias; Kretz, Dominik; Steil, Volker; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    usually detected was mainly from primary scattering (photons), whereas percentage differences between 2.8-20% are found on the side opposite to the x-ray source, where the lowest doses were detected. Dose calculation time of our approach was 0.85 seconds. The proposed approach yields a fast scatter dose estimation where we could run the Monte Carlo simulation only once for each x-ray tube angulation to get the Phase Space Files (PSF) for being used later by our ray casting approach to calculate the dose from only photons which will hit an movable elliptical cylinder shaped phantom and getting an output file for the positions of those hits to be used for visualizing the scatter dose propagation on the phantom surface. With dose calculation times of less than one second, we are saving much time compared to using a Monte Carlo simulation instead. With our approach, larger deviations occur only in regions with very low doses, whereas it provides a high precision in high-dose regions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Spectral variation in the supergiant fast X-ray transient SAX J1818.6-1703 observed by XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Boon, C M; Hill, A B; Sidoli, L; Sguera, V; Goossens, M E; Fiocchi, M; McBride, V A; Drave, S P

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a 30ks XMM-Newton observation of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) SAX J1818.6-1703 - the first in-depth soft X-ray study of this source around periastron. INTEGRAL observations shortly before and after the XMM-Newton observation show the source to be in an atypically active state. Over the course of the XMM-Newton observation, the source shows a dynamic range of ~100 with a luminosity greater than 1$\\times$10$^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for the majority of the observation. After an ~6 ks period of low luminosity (~10$^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$) emission, SAX J1818.6-1703 enters a phase of fast flaring activity, with flares 250 s long, separated by ~2ks. The source then enters a larger flare event of higher luminosity and ~8 ks duration. Spectral analysis revealed evidence for a significant change in spectral shape during the observation with a photon index varying from {\\Gamma} ~ 2.5 during the initial low luminosity emission phase, to {\\Gamma} ~ 1.9 through the fast flaring activity, and...

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging for Time-Resolved Investigation of the Biological Complexes: Computer Modelling towards the XFEL Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Yefanov, O. M.; Lorenz, U.; Soldatov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The development of the next generation synchrotron radiation sources - free electron lasers - is approaching to become an effective tool for the time-resolved experiments aimed to solve actual problems in various fields such as chemistry’ biology’ medicine’ etc. In order to demonstrate’ how these experiments may be performed for the real systems to obtain information at the atomic and macromolecular levels’ we have performed a molecular dynamics computer simulation combined with quantum chemistry calculations for the human phosphoglycerate kinase enzyme with Mg containing substrate. The simulated structures were used to calculate coherent X-ray diffraction patterns’ reflecting the conformational state of the enzyme, and Mg K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which depend on the local structure of the substrate. These two techniques give complementary information making such an approach highly effective for time-resolved investigation of various biological complexes, such as metalloproteins or enzymes with metal-containing substrate, to obtain information about both metal-containing active site or substrate and the atomic structure of each conformation.

  6. Fast in situ phase and stress analysis during laser surface treatment: a synchrotron x-ray diffraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, V; Gibmeier, J; Wilde, F; Staron, P; Rössler, R; Wanner, A

    2012-11-01

    An in situ stress analysis by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction was carried out during laser surface hardening of steel. A single exposure set-up that based on a special arrangement of two fast silicon strip line detectors was established, allowing for fast stress analysis according to the sin(2)ψ x-ray analysis method. For the in situ experiments a process chamber was designed and manufactured, which is described in detail. First measurements were carried out at the HZG undulator imaging beamline (IBL, beamline P05) at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III, DESY, Hamburg (Germany). The laser processing was carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser system. Two different laser optics were compared, a Gaussian optic with a focus spot of ø 3 mm and a homogenizing optic with a rectangular spot dimension of 8 × 8 mm(2). The laser processing was carried out using spot hardening at a heating-/cooling rate of 1000 K/s and was controlled via pyrometric temperature measurement using a control temperature of 1150 °C. The set-up being established during the measuring campaign allowed for this first realization data collection rates of 10Hz. The data evaluation procedure applied enables the separation of thermal from elastic strains and gains unprecedented insight into the laser hardening process.

  7. Colloquium: Measuring the neutron star equation of state using x-ray timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Anna L.; Andersson, Nils; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Hebeler, Kai; Israel, Gianluca; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Morsink, Sharon; Özel, Feryal; Patruno, Alessandro; Poutanen, Juri; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Schwenk, Achim; Steiner, Andrew W.; Stella, Luigi; Tolos, Laura; van der Klis, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary science goals of the next generation of hard x-ray timing instruments is to determine the equation of state of matter at supranuclear densities inside neutron stars by measuring the radius of neutron stars with different masses to accuracies of a few percent. Three main techniques can be used to achieve this goal. The first involves waveform modeling. The flux observed from a hotspot on the neutron star surface offset from the rotational pole will be modulated by the star's rotation, and this periodic modulation at the spin frequency is called a pulsation. As the photons propagate through the curved spacetime of the star, information about mass and radius is encoded into the shape of the waveform (pulse profile) via special and general-relativistic effects. Using pulsations from known sources (which have hotspots that develop either during thermonuclear bursts or due to channeled accretion) it is possible to obtain tight constraints on mass and radius. The second technique involves characterizing the spin distribution of accreting neutron stars. A large collecting area enables highly sensitive searches for weak or intermittent pulsations (which yield spin) from the many accreting neutron stars whose spin rates are not yet known. The most rapidly rotating stars provide a clean constraint, since the limiting spin rate where the equatorial surface velocity is comparable to the local orbital velocity, at which mass shedding occurs, is a function of mass and radius. However, the overall spin distribution also provides a guide to the torque mechanisms in operation and the moment of inertia, both of which can depend sensitively on dense matter physics. The third technique is to search for quasiperiodic oscillations in x-ray flux associated with global seismic vibrations of magnetars (the most highly magnetized neutron stars), triggered by magnetic explosions. The vibrational frequencies depend on stellar parameters including the dense matter equation of

  8. Guest–Host Interactions Investigated by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopies and Scattering at MHz Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Vanko, G.; Gawelda, W.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the photoinduced low spin (LS) to high spin (HS) conversion of [Fe(bipy)3]2+ in aqueous solution. In a laser pump/X-ray probe synchrotron setup permitting simultaneous, time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering (XDS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements at a 3.26 MHz repetition rate...... lifetime, allowing the detection of an ultrafast change in bulk solvent density. An analysis approach directly utilizing the spectroscopic data in the XDS analysis effectively reduces the number of free parameters, and both combined permit extraction of information about the ultrafast structural dynamics...

  9. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  10. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  11. Time-resolved soft X-ray diffraction reveals transient structural distortions of ternary liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Wilson; Peth, Christian; Busse, Gerhard; Scholz, Mirko; Mann, Klaus; Techert, Simone

    2009-11-04

    Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns) and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2-5.2 nm). The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C(16)E(7)/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 micros). Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 A resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  12. Spectral and timing characterization of the X-ray source 1RXS J194211.9+255552

    CERN Document Server

    D'Aì, A; La Parola, V; Segreto, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first spectral and timing characterization of the transient X-ray source 1RXS J194211.9+255552 using all available data from the Swift X-ray satellite. We used 10 years of hard X-ray data from the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) to characterize its long-term behaviour and to search for long periodicities, finding evidence for a periodic modulation at 166.5 $\\pm$ 0.5 d, that we interpret as the orbital period of the source. The folded light curve reveals that the X-ray emission is mostly concentrated in a restricted phase-interval and we propose to associate 1RXS J194211.9+255552 to the class of the Be X-ray binaries. This is also supported by the results of the spectral analysis, where we used the BAT data and three pointed Swift/XRT observations to characterize the X-ray broad-band spectral shape. We found mild spectral variability in soft X-rays that can be accounted for by a varying local neutral absorber, while the intrinsic emission is consistent with a hard power law multiplied by a high-en...

  13. The Effect of X-ray Irradiation on the Time Dependent Behaviour of Accretion Disks with Stochastic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Maqbool, Bari; Iqbal, Naseer; Ahmad, Naveel

    2015-01-01

    The UV emission from X-ray binaries, is more likely to be produced by reprocessing of X-rays by the outer regions of an accretion disk. The structure of the outer disk may be altered due to the presence of X-ray irradiation and we discuss the physical regimes where this may occur and point out certain X-ray binaries where this effect may be important. The long term X-ray variability of these sources is believed to be due to stochastic fluctuations in the outer disk, which propagate inwards giving rise to accretion rate variation in the X-ray producing inner regions. The X-ray variability will induce structural variations in the outer disk which in turn may affect the inner accretion rate. To understand the qualitative behaviour of the disk in such a scenario, we adopt simplistic assumptions that the disk is fully ionised and is not warped. We develop and use a time dependent global hydrodynamical code to study the effect of a sinusoidal accretion rate perturbation introduced at a specific radius. The response...

  14. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werz, T., E-mail: thomas.werz@uni-ulm.de [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Baumann, M. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Wolfram, U. [Ulm University, Institute of Orthopaedic Research and Biomechanics, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 89081 (Germany); Krill, C.E. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  15. X-ray time variability across the atoll source states of 4U 1636--53

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, D; Méndez, M; Jonker, P G; Klein-Wolt, M; Lewin, W H G

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the rapid X-ray time variability in 149 pointed observations with the \\textit{Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer} (RXTE)'s Proportional Counter Array of the atoll source 4U~1636--53 in the banana state and, for the first time with RXTE, in the island state. We compare the frequencies of the variability components of 4U~1636--53 with those in other atoll and Z-sources and find that 4U~1636--53 follows the universal scheme of correlations previously found for other atoll sources at (sometimes much) lower luminosities. Our results on the hectohertz QPO suggest that the mechanism that sets its frequency differs from that for the other components, while the amplitude setting mechanism is common. A previously proposed interpretation of the narrow low-frequency QPO frequencies in different sources in terms of harmonic mode switching is not supported by our data, nor by some previous data on other sources and the frequency range that this QPO covers is found not to be related to spin, angular momentum or lum...

  16. Ultrasensitive Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Pushing the Limits of Time Resolution and Magnetic Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    Understanding magnetic properties at ultrafast timescales is crucial for the development of new magnetic devices. Samples of interest are often thin film magnetic multilayers with thicknesses in the range of a few atomic layers. This fact alone presents a sensitivity challenge in STXM microscopy, which is more suited toward studying thicker samples. In addition the relevant time scale is of the order of 10 ps, which is well below the typical x-ray pulse length of 50 - 100 ps. The SSRL STXM is equipped with a single photon counting electronics that effectively allows using a double lock-in detection at 476MHz (the x-ray pulse frequency) and 1.28MHz (the synchrotron revelation frequency) to provide the required sensitivity. In the first year of operation the excellent spatial resolution, temporal stability and sensitivity of the detection electronics of this microscope has enabled researchers to acquire time resolved images of standing as well as traveling spin waves in a spin torque oscillator in real space as well as detect the real time spin accumulation in non magnetic Copper once a spin polarized current is injected into this material. The total magnetic moment is comparable to that of a single nanocube of magnetic Fe buried under a micron of non-magnetic material.

  17. Towards practical autonomous deep-space navigation using X-Ray pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemar, Setnam; Fraser, George; Heil, Lucy; Hindley, David; Martindale, Adrian; Molyneux, Philippa; Pye, John; Warwick, Robert; Lamb, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of deep-space navigation using the highly stable periodic signals from X-ray pulsars in combination with dedicated instrumentation on the spacecraft: a technique often referred to as `XNAV'. The results presented are based on the outputs from a study undertaken for the European Space Agency. The potential advantages of this technique include increased spacecraft autonomy and lower mission operating costs. Estimations of navigation uncertainties have been obtained using simulations of different pulsar combinations and navigation strategies. We find that the pulsar PSR B1937 + 21 has potential to allow spacecraft positioning uncertainties of ~2 and ~5 km in the direction of the pulsar after observation times of 10 and 1 h respectively, for ranges up to 30 AU. This could be achieved autonomously on the spacecraft using a focussing X-ray instrument of effective area ~50 cm2 together with a high performance atomic clock. The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) instrument, due to be launched on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury in 2018, is an example of an instrument that may be further developed as a practical telescope for XNAV. For a manned mission to Mars, where an XNAV system could provide valuable redundancy, observations of the three pulsars PSR B1937 + 21, B1821-24 and J0437-4715 would enable a three-dimensional positioning uncertainty of ~30 km for up to 3 months without the need to contact Earth-based systems. A lower uncertainty may be achieved, for example, by use of extended observations or, if feasible, by use of a larger instrument. X-ray instrumentation suitable for use in an operational XNAV subsystem must be designed to require only modest resources, especially in terms of size, mass and power. A system with a focussing optic is required in order to reduce the sky and particle background against which the source must be measured. We examine possible options for future developments in terms of simpler, lower

  18. Timing and Spectroscopy of Accreting X-ray Pulsars: the State of Cyclotron Line Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, W A; Coburn, W; Staubert, R; Wilms, J; Kreykenbohm, I; Kretschmar, P

    2004-01-01

    A great deal of emphasis on timing in the RXTE era has been on pushing toward higher and higher frequency phenomena, particularly kHz QPOs. However, the large areas of the RXTE pointed instruments provide another capability which is key for the understanding of accreting X-ray pulsars -- the ability to accumulate high quality spectra in a limited observing time. For the accreting X-ray pulsars, with their relatively modest spin frequencies, this translates into an ability to study broad band spectra as a function of pulse phase. This is a critical tool, as pulsar spectra are strong functions of the geometry of the "accretion mound" and the observers' viewing angle to the ~10^12 G magnetic field. In particular, the appearance of "cyclotron lines" is sensitively dependent on the viewing geometry, which must change with the rotation of the star. These spectral features, seen in only a handful of objects, are quite important, as they give us our only direct measure of neutron star magnetic fields. Furthermore, th...

  19. Negative X-ray reverberation time delays from MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanoulopoulos, D; Papadakis, I E

    2011-01-01

    We present an X-ray time lag analysis, as a function of Fourier frequency, for MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 using long term XMM-Newton light curves in the 0.5-1.5 keV and the 2-4 keV energy bands, together with some physical modelling of the corresponding time lag spectra. Both the time lag spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 show negative values (i.e. soft band variations lag behind the corresponding hard band variations) at high frequencies, around 0.001 Hz, similar to those previously observed from 1H 0707-495. The remarkable morphological resemblance between the time lag spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 indicate that the physical processes responsible for the observed soft time delays is very similar in the two sources, favouring a reflection scenario from material situated very nearby to the central black hole.

  20. A time dependent approach to model X-ray and γ-ray light curves of Mrk 421 observed during the flare in February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. K.; Sahayanathan, S.; Sinha, A.; Bhatt, N.; Tickoo, A. K.; Yadav, K. K.; Rannot, R. C.; Chandra, P.; Venugopal, K.; Marandi, P.; Kumar, N.; Goyal, H. C.; Goyal, A.; Agarwal, N. K.; Kothari, M.; Chanchalani, K.; Dhar, V. K.; Chouhan, N.; Bhat, C. K.; Koul, M. K.; Koul, R.

    2017-07-01

    Strong X-ray and γ-ray flares have been detected in February 2010 from the high synchrotron peaked blazar Mrk 421 (z = 0.031). With the motivation of understanding the physics involved in this flaring activity, we study the variability of the source in X-ray and γ-ray energy bands during the period February 10-23, 2010 (MJD 55237-55250). We use near simultaneous X-ray data collected by MAXI, Swift-XRT and γ-ray data collected by Fermi-LAT and TACTIC along with the optical V-band observations by SPOLat Steward Observatory. We observe that the variation in the one day averaged flux from the source during the flare is characterized by fast rise and slow decay. Besides, the TeV γ-ray flux shows a strong correlation with the X-ray flux, suggesting the former to be an outcome of synchrotron self Compton emission process. To model the observed X-ray and γ-ray light curves, we numerically solve the kinetic equation describing the evolution of particle distribution in the emission region. The injection of particle distribution into the emission region, from the putative acceleration region, is assumed to be a time dependent power law. The synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton emission from the evolving particle distribution in the emission region are used to reproduce the X-ray and γ-ray flares successfully. Our study suggests that the flaring activity of Mrk 421 can be an outcome of an efficient acceleration process associated with the increase in underlying non-thermal particle distribution.

  1. X-Ray Detection and Processing Models for Spacecraft Navigation and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Suneel; Hanson, John

    2013-01-01

    The current primary method of deepspace navigation is the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). High-performance navigation is achieved using Delta Differential One-Way Range techniques that utilize simultaneous observations from multiple DSN sites, and incorporate observations of quasars near the line-of-sight to a spacecraft in order to improve the range and angle measurement accuracies. Over the past four decades, x-ray astronomers have identified a number of xray pulsars with pulsed emissions having stabilities comparable to atomic clocks. The x-ray pulsar-based navigation and time determination (XNAV) system uses phase measurements from these sources to establish autonomously the position of the detector, and thus the spacecraft, relative to a known reference frame, much as the Global Positioning System (GPS) uses phase measurements from radio signals from several satellites to establish the position of the user relative to an Earth-centered fixed frame of reference. While a GPS receiver uses an antenna to detect the radio signals, XNAV uses a detector array to capture the individual xray photons from the x-ray pulsars. The navigation solution relies on detailed xray source models, signal processing, navigation and timing algorithms, and analytical tools that form the basis of an autonomous XNAV system. Through previous XNAV development efforts, some techniques have been established to utilize a pulsar pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) measurement to correct a position estimate. One well-studied approach, based upon Kalman filter methods, optimally adjusts a dynamic orbit propagation solution based upon the offset in measured and predicted pulse TOA. In this delta position estimator scheme, previously estimated values of spacecraft position and velocity are utilized from an onboard orbit propagator. Using these estimated values, the detected arrival times at the spacecraft of pulses from a pulsar are compared to the predicted arrival times defined by the pulsar s pulse

  2. BALLOON-BASED HIGH-TIME RESOLUTION MEASUREMENTS OF X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LIGHTNING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. EACK; D. SUSZCYNSKY; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project consisted of a series of balloon flights to collect high-time-resolution x-ray and electric-field-change measurements in thunderstorms in order to validate the existence of the runaway air-breakdown mechanism during lightning and/or sprite production. The runaway air-breakdown mechanism is currently the leading theory to account for unexplained balloon and aircraft-based measurements of x-ray enhancements associated with sprites. Balloon-borne gamma-ray and electric-field-change instruments were launched into a daytime summer thunderstorm. A greater than three-fold increase in the gamma-ray flux was observed as the balloon descended through a thunderstorm anvil where a strong electric field was present. These observations suggest that gamma-ray production in thunderstorms may not be as uncommon as previously believed.

  3. Exploiting the Photoelectric effect for X-ray Polarimetry using Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The promise of photoelectric X-ray polarimetry has now been realized in laboratory demonstrations and may soon be used for astrophysical observations. Photoelectric polarimetry in gas filled proportional counters achieves high sensitivity through a combination of broad band width and good modulation. The band can be tuned by careful choice of gas composition and pressure. The measurements rely on imaging the tracks of photoelectrons. The initial direction of each track carries information about the electric field of the X-ray photon, and an ensemble of such measurements thus measures the net polarization of the source. A novel readout geometry using time projection chambers (TPC) allows deep (i.e. high efficiency) detectors, albeit without the ability to image the sky. Polarimeters which exploit the TPC geometry can be optimized for use behind telescopes, to study faint persistent sources, or as wide field of view instruments, designed to study bright transient events such as gamma-ray bursts or solar flares. We present the conceptual design of both types of TPC polarimeter. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that these polarimeters can achieve substantial gains in the polarization sensitivity achievable in experiments of modest size.

  4. Developments in Time-Division Multiplexing of X-ray Transition-Edge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W. B.; Morgan, K. M.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Joe, Y. I.; Mates, J. A. B.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Robbins, N. O.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-07-01

    Time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a mature scheme for the readout of arrays of transition-edge sensors (TESs). TDM is based on superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID) current amplifiers. Multiple spectrometers based on gamma-ray and X-ray microcalorimeters have been operated with TDM readout, each at the scale of 200 sensors per spectrometer, as have several astronomical cameras with thousands of sub-mm or microwave bolometers. Here we present the details of two different versions of our TDM system designed to read out X-ray TESs. The first has been field-deployed in two 160-sensor (8 columns × 20 rows) spectrometers and four 240-sensor (8 columns × 30 rows) spectrometers. It has a three-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 320 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.41 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. The second, which is presently under development, has a two-SQUID-stage architecture, switches rows every 160 ns, and has total readout noise of 0.19 μ Φ 0 / surd Hz. Both quoted noise values are non-multiplexed and referred to the first-stage SQUID. In a demonstration of this new architecture, a multiplexed 1-column × 32-row array of NIST TESs achieved average energy resolution of 2.55± 0.01 eV at 6 keV.

  5. X-Ray Eclipse Time Delays in 4U2129+47

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; Papitto, A; Stella, L; Perna, R; Lazzati, D; Israel, G; Campana, S; Mangano, V; Di Salvo, T; Burderi, L

    2007-01-01

    4U 2129+47 was discovered in the early 80's and classified as an accretion disk corona source due to its broad and partial X-ray eclipses. The 5.24 hr binary orbital period was inferred from the X-ray and optical light curve modulation, implying a late K or M spectral type companion star. The source entered a low state in 1983, during which the optical modulation disappeared and an F8 IV star was revealed, suggesting that 4U 2129+47 might be part of a triple system. The nature of 4U 2129+47 has since been investigated, but no definitive conclusion has been reached. Here, we present timing and spectral analyses of two XMM-Newton observations of this source, carried out in May and June, 2005. We find evidence for a delay between two mid-eclipse epochs measured ~22 days apart, and we show that this delay can be naturally explained as being due to the orbital motion of the binary 4U 2129+47 around the center of mass of a triple system. This result thus provides further support in favor of the triple nature of 4U ...

  6. Potential of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing telescope for the search for dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neronov, A.; Boyarsky, A.; Iakubovskyi, D.; Ruchayskiy, O.

    2014-12-01

    Large observatory for x-ray timing (LOFT) is a concept of a next-generation x-ray telescope considered in the context of the "Cosmic Vision" program of the European Space Agency. The Large Area Detector on board of LOFT will be a collimator-type telescope with an unprecedentedly large collecting area of about 1 05 cm2 in the energy band between 2 and 100 keV. We demonstrate that LOFT will be a powerful dark matter detector, suitable for the search of the x-ray line emission expected from decays of light dark matter particles in galactic halos. We show that LOFT will have sensitivity for dark matter line search more than an order of magnitude higher than that of all existing x-ray telescopes. In this way, LOFT will be able to provide a new insight into the fundamental problem of the nature of dark matter.

  7. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a fast multielemental technique for human placenta sample analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, E.; Ricketts, P.; Fletcher, H.; Karydas, A. G.; Migliori, A.; Leani, J. J.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.; Voutchkov, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present contribution, benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been evaluated as a cost-effective multielemental analytical technique for human placenta analysis. An easy and rapid sample preparation consisting of suspending 50 mg of sample in 1 mL of a Triton 1% solution in deionized water showed to be the most suitable for this kind of samples. However, for comparison purposes, an acidic microwave acidic digestion procedure was also applied. For both sample treatment methodologies, limits of detection for most elements were in the low mg/kg level. Accurate and precise results were obtained using internal standardization as quantification approach and applying a correction factor to compensate for absorption effects. The correction factor was based on the proportional ratio between the slurry preparation results and those obtained for the analysis of a set of human placenta samples analysed by microwave acidic digestion and ICP-AES analysis. As a study case, the developed TXRF methodology was applied for multielemental analysis (K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr) of several healthy women's placenta samples from two regions in Jamaica.

  8. Multiwavelength study of the fast rotating supergiant high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16465-4507

    CERN Document Server

    Chaty, Sylvain; Negueruela, Ignacio; Coleiro, Alexis; Castro, Norberto; Simon-Diaz, Sergio; Heras, Juan Antonio Zurita; Goldoni, Paolo; Goldwurm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch, the X-ray and gamma-ray observatory INTEGRAL satellite has revealed a new class of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) displaying fast flares and hosting supergiant companion stars. Optical and infrared (OIR) observations in a multi-wavelength context are essential to understand the nature and evolution of these newly discovered celestial objects. The goal of this multiwavelength study (from ultraviolet to infrared) is to characterise the properties of IGR J16465-4507, to confirm its HMXB nature and that it hosts a supergiant star. We analysed all OIR, photometric and spectroscopic observations taken on this source, carried out at ESO facilities. Using spectroscopic data, we constrained the spectral type of the companion star between B0.5 and B1 Ib, settling the debate on the true nature of this source. We measured a high rotation velocity of v = 320 +/- 8 km/s from fitting absorption and emission lines in a stellar spectral model. We then built a spectral energy distribution from photometric ob...

  9. X-ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  10. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  11. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  12. Radio Disappearance of the Magnetar XTE J1810-197 and Continued X-ray Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, F.; Ransom, S. M.; Halpern, J. P.; Alford, J. A. J.; Cognard, I.; Reynolds, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Sarkissian, J.; van Straten, W.

    2016-04-01

    We report on timing, flux density, and polarimetric observations of the transient magnetar and 5.54 s radio pulsar XTE J1810-197 using the Green Bank, Nançay, and Parkes radio telescopes beginning in early 2006, until its sudden disappearance as a radio source in late 2008. Repeated observations through 2016 have not detected radio pulsations again. The torque on the neutron star, as inferred from its rotation frequency derivative \\dot{ν }, decreased in an unsteady manner by a factor of three in the first year of radio monitoring, until approximately mid-2007. By contrast, during its final year as a detectable radio source, the torque decreased steadily by only 9%. The period-averaged flux density, after decreasing by a factor of 20 during the first 10 months of radio monitoring, remained relatively steady in the next 22 months, at an average of 0.7 ± 0.3 mJy at 1.4 GHz, while still showing day-to-day fluctuations by factors of a few. There is evidence that during this last phase of radio activity the magnetar had a steep radio spectrum, in contrast to earlier flat-spectrum behavior. No secular decrease presaged its radio demise. During this time, the pulse profile continued to display large variations; polarimetry, including of a new profile component, indicates that the magnetic geometry remained consistent with that of earlier times. We supplement these results with X-ray timing of the pulsar from its outburst in 2003 up to 2014. For the first 4 years, XTE J1810-197 experienced non-monotonic excursions in frequency derivative by at least a factor of eight. But since 2007, its \\dot{ν } has remained relatively stable near its minimum observed value. The only apparent event in the X-ray record that is possibly contemporaneous with the radio shutdown is a decrease of ≈20% in the hot-spot flux in 2008-2009, to a stable, minimum value. However, the permanence of the high-amplitude, thermal X-ray pulse, even after the (unexplained) radio demise, implies

  13. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX Observations of the Transient X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1859+083

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, R. H. D.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Levine, A. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    2009-04-01

    We present observations of the 9.8 s X-ray pulsar XTE J1859+083 made with the All Sky Monitor (ASM) and Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on board BeppoSAX. The ASM data cover a 12 year time interval and show that an extended outburst occurred between approximately MJD 50,250 and 50,460 (1996 June 16 to 1997 January 12). The ASM data excluding this outburst interval suggest a possible modulation with a period of 60.65 ± 0.08 days. Eighteen sets of PCA observations were obtained over an approximately one month interval in 1999. The flux variability measured with the PCA appears consistent with the possible period found with the ASM. The PCA measurements of the pulse period showed it to decrease nonmonotonically and then to increase significantly. Doppler shifts due to orbital motion rather than accretion torques appear to be better able to explain the pulse period changes. Observations with the WFC during the extended outburst give a position that is consistent with a previously determined PCA error box, but which has a significantly smaller error. The transient nature of XTE J1859+083 and the length of its pulse period are consistent with it being a Be/neutron star binary. The possible 60.65 day orbital period would be of the expected length for a Be star system with a 9.8 s pulse period.

  14. Real-time segmentation of multiple implanted cylindrical liver markers in kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Høyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Gold markers implanted in or near a tumor can be used as x-ray visible landmarks for image based tumor localization. The aim of this study was to develop and demonstrate fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment kV and MV images and in cone-beam CT......). For the detected markers, the real-time segmentation was erroneous in 0.2-0.31% of the cases. The mean segmentation time per marker was 5.6 ms [2.1-12 ms] (kV), 5.5 ms [1.6-13 ms] (MV), and 6.5 ms [1.8-15 ms] (CBCT). Fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment k...... (CBCT) projections, for real-time motion management. Thirteen patients treated with conformal stereotactic body radiation therapy in three fractions had 2-3 cylindrical gold markers implanted in the liver prior to treatment. At each fraction, the projection images of a pre-treatment CBCT scan were used...

  15. Fast Monitoring Soil Environmental Qualities of Heavy Metal by Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Yu, Jian-xin; Huang, Biao; Hu, Wen-you; Chang, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer as a new type of equipment for quick test has a prominent prospect, but there are also shortcomings of detection range and limition, therefore this paper studied the suitability of PXRF spectrometer in monitoring soil environmental qualities of heavy metals included Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, As and Hg, the aim of this paper is to screen elements which can be detected by this kind of instrument and evaluate the accuracy of test results. The research method is to test heavy metals contaminated soil samples by PXRF spectrometer, evaluate the accuracy of test results of PXRF compared with inductively coupled plasma mass(ICP-MS), then establish linear regression relationship between analysis results of PXRF and ICP-MS method. The results show that, (1) When measuring the soil environmental quality, PXRF spectrometer is appropriate to measure the content of Pb, Zn, Cr and Cu, except Ni, Cd, As and Hg. (2) Compared with the test value of ICP-MS, the test value of Pb and Zn is lower, the test value of Cu is higher, the test value of Cr is too high, all the results of PXRF spectrometer should be linear corrected according to standard analysis method. In conclusion, PXRF spectrometer is suitable for monitoring environmental quality of soil which is polluted by heavy metal such as Pb, Zn, Cr and Cu, it is an analysis means with characteristics of simple and rapid, accurate and reliable. The innovation of this article is that reasonable avoiding the shortcomings of PXRF spectrometer as using the instrument to monitor soil environmental quality, at last improved the application value of test results.

  16. Time-resolved synchrotron radiation X-ray solution scattering study of DNA melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigdomenech, J; Perez-Grau, L; Porta, J; Vega, M C; Sicre, P; Koch, M H

    1989-09-01

    Time resolved x-ray solution scattering measurements were made during thermal denaturation of DNA from various sources in the temperature range of 20-90 degrees C. Preliminary results on the influence of fragment length, ionic strength, and origin of the DNA on the time course of the scattering are described. Interpretation is based on model calculations of the scattering patterns. The results indicate that, for long DNA fragments at very low ionic strength, the melting process is a continuous phenomenon over the whole temperature range. It is accompanied by a progressive decrease of the radius of gyration of the cross section and of the mass per unit length. For short fragments of 146 base pair nucleosomal core DNA, stiffening of the DNA appears to precede a sharp melting transition.

  17. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  18. Position-Sensitive Silicon Detector for X-ray Difractometry of Fast Transient Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugatch, V.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of the development and application of position sensitive microdetectors to study dynamics of fast transient processes in metals and alloys under heating/cooling by means of high-speed radiography are presented.

  19. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-Ray Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Miller, J. Scott; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz. Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ( soft , 100 500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth s magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (Space Weather Prediction Center. This presentation describes the radiation mitigation strategies to minimize the proton damage in the ACIS CCD detectors and the importance of real-time data sources that are used to protect

  20. Multimessenger astronomy with pulsar timing and X-ray observations of massive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Reynolds, M T; Dotti, M

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that very massive (>10^8\\msun), cosmologically nearby (z10^-13 erg s^-1 cm^-2 will be in the reach of upcoming X-ray observatories. Double relativistic K\\alpha lines may be observable in a handful of low redshift (z<0.3) sources by proposed deep X-ray probes, such as Athena. (Abridged)

  1. Real-time X-ray investigation of aluminum foam sandwich production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banhart, J.; Stanzick, H. [Fraunhofer-Inst. for Advanced Materials, Bremen (Germany); Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T. [Fraunhofer-Inst. for Non-Destructive Testing, Dresden (Germany); Nijhof, K. [Honsel-Werke AG, Meschede (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    The authors study the foaming behavior of Al-based sandwich panels using X-ray radioscopy. X-ray radioscopy is a suitable tool for observing the metal foaming process in general and the production of aluminum foam sandwich panels in particular. The internal structure of the foam can be resolved clearly. (orig.)

  2. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  3. Crystallization Dynamics of Organolead Halide Perovskite by Real-Time X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Shibata, Yosei; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Takurou N; Sugita, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Nobutaka; Chikamatsu, Masayuki

    2015-08-12

    We analyzed the crystallization process of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite by observing real-time X-ray diffraction immediately after combining a PbI2 thin film with a CH3NH3I solution. A detailed analysis of the transformation kinetics demonstrated the fractal diffusion of the CH3NH3I solution into the PbI2 film. Moreover, the perovskite crystal was found to be initially oriented based on the PbI2 crystal orientation but to gradually transition to a random orientation. The fluctuating characteristics of the crystallization process of perovskites, such as fractal penetration and orientational transformation, should be controlled to allow the fabrication of high-quality perovskite crystals. The characteristic reaction dynamics observed in this study should assist in establishing reproducible fabrication processes for perovskite solar cells.

  4. Time lag between hard and soft X-ray photons in QPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollman, G. M.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Der Klis, M.

    1987-01-01

    The millisec-order delay between quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed from Cyg X-2 and GX 5-1, in a high-energy and a low-energy bandpass, may be due to the Compton scattering of photons in a cloud of hot electron gas, depending on optical depth, electron temperature, and cloud radius, as well as input photon spectra. Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate how the observed delay and X-ray spectrum can be used to constrain the size of the scattering cloud, for an assumed input spectrum of photons. Both QPO in emergent photons and a time lag between high and low energy photons can be generated not only by the scattering of an oscillating signal in a constant cloud, but also by the scattering of a constant source of input photons through a cloud with oscillating optical depth.

  5. X-ray tomographic intervention guidance: Towards real-time 4D imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bartling, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of real-time, continuous, and three-dimensional imaging (4D intervention guidance) would be a quantum leap for minimally-invasive medicine. It allows guidance during interventions by assessing the spatial position of instruments continuously in respect to their surroundings. Recent research showed that it is feasible using X-ray and novel tomographic reconstruction approaches. Radiation dose stays within reasonable limits. This article provides abstractions and background information together with an outlook on these prospects. There are explanations of how situational awareness during interventions is generated today and how they will be in future. The differences between fluoroscopically and CT-guided interventions are eluted to within the context of these developments. The exploration of uncharted terrain between these current methods is worth pursuing. Necessary image quality of 4D intervention guidance varies relevantly from that of standard computed tomography. Means to analyze the risk-b...

  6. Capturing a photoexcited molecular structure through time-domain x-ray absorption fine structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L. X.; Jaeger, W. J. H.; Jennings, G.; Gosztola, D. J.; Munkholm, A.; Hessler, J. P.

    2001-04-13

    The determination of the structure of transient molecules, such as photoexcited states, in disordered media (such as in solution) usually requires methods with high temporal resolution. The transient molecular structure of a reaction intermediate produced by photoexcitation of NiTPP-L{sub 2} (NiTPP, nickeltetraphenylporphyrin; L, piperidine) in solution was determined by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) data obtained on a 14-nanosecond time scale from a third-generation synchrotron source. The XAFS measurements confirm that photoexcitation leads to the rapid removal of both axial ligands to produce a transient square-planar intermediate, NiTPP, with a lifetime of 28 nanoseconds. The transient structure of the photodissociated intermediate is nearly identical to that of the ground state NiTPP, suggesting that the intermediate adopts the same structure as the ground state in a noncoordinating solvent before it recombines with two ligands to form the more stable octahedrally coordinated NiTPP-L{sub 2}.

  7. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  8. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 10(12) X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry.

  9. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 1012 X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry. PMID:24914150

  10. Time-Lapse Observation of Electrolysis of Copper Sulfate with a Full-Field X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Aota, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Norio; Takano, Hidekazu; Yokosuka, Hiroki; Aoki, Sadao

    2008-06-01

    The time-lapse observation of the electrodeposition of copper in copper sulfate solution was performed by imaging X-ray fluorescence from the copper deposition. The X-ray fluorescence was directly imaged with a full-field Wolter mirror microscope, which was constructed at the Photon Factory. Controlling the electric current in the solution from 0 to 71.7 µA, the deposition of copper on a Pt cathode was directly observed by imaging its X-ray fluorescence. One exposure time for obtaining an X-ray fluorescence image was 80 s. Then, it was 17 min later from the beginning of the electrolysis when the X-ray fluorescence image of the electrodeposition is observed for the first time. At this exposure time, the detection limit of the mass of copper was estimated to be 0.60 pg/image, which was calculated using test samples of 1.00×10-3-1.00 mol/l copper sulfate solutions.

  11. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirihanage, W. U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2015-06-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ∼ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution 2D detectors with very high frame rates were utilized to capture time resolved X-ray diffraction data from suitably oriented solid dendrites evolving in the weld pool. Comprehensive analysis of the diffraction data revealed individual and overall dendritic growth characteristics and relevant melt and solid flow dynamics during weld pool solidification, which was completed within 1.5 s. Columnar dendrite tip velocities were estimated from the experimental data and during early stages of solidification were exceeded 4 mm/s. The most remarkable observation revealed through the time-resolved reciprocal space observations are correlated to significant tilting of columnar type dendrites at their root during solidification, presumably caused by convective currents in the weld pool. When the columnar dendrite tilting are transformed to respective metric linear tilting velocities at the dendrite tip; tilting velocities are found to be in the same order of magnitude as the columnar tip growth velocities, suggesting a highly transient nature of growth conditions.

  12. Third-order nonlinear and linear time-dependent dynamical diffraction of X-rays in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyan, Minas K

    2016-07-01

    For the first time the third-order nonlinear time-dependent Takagi's equations of X-rays in crystals are obtained and investigated. The third-order nonlinear and linear time-dependent dynamical diffraction of X-rays spatially restricted in the diffraction plane pulses in crystals is investigated theoretically. A method of solving the linear and the third-order nonlinear time-dependent Takagi's equations is proposed. Based on this method, results of analytical and numerical calculations for both linear and nonlinear diffraction cases are presented and compared.

  13. Models for Flare Statistics and the Waiting-time Distribution of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatland, M. S.; Edney, S. D.

    1999-12-01

    In a previous study (Wheatland, Sturrock, McTiernan 1998), a waiting-time distribution was constructed for solar flare hard X-ray bursts observed by the ICE/ISEE-3 spacecraft. A comparison of the observed distribution with that of a time-dependent Poisson process indicated an overabundance of short waiting times (10~s -- 10~min), implying that the hard X-ray bursts are not independent events. Models for flare statistics assume or predict that flares are independent events -- in particular the avalanche model makes this specific prediction. The results of the previous study may be reconciled with the avalanche picture if individual flares produce several distinct bursts of hard X-ray emission. A detailed comparison of the avalanche model and the ICE/ISEE-3 waiting-time distribution is presented here.

  14. Controlling backstreaming ions from X-ray converter targets with time varying final focusing solenoidal lens and beam energy variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Paul, A

    1998-08-20

    Backstreaming ions emitted from an x-ray converter hit by a tightly focused intense electron beam can form an ion focusing channel and over-focus the electron beam. As the ions move upstream in time, the net focusing strength increases. The final beam spot size on the target would then change in time and typically be larger than intended. We have developed a model to estimate the backstreaming ions' neutralization factor in a potential sheath near the target surface and away from the sheath. Performance of high resolution x-ray radiography facilities requires high current electron beams to be focused to a millimeter spot size on an x-ray converter through out the entire current pulse. We have studied the possibility of maintaining a constant final spot size for the entire pulse by using either a time varying final focusing solenoid field or beam energy variation to compensate the time varying ion focusing effects

  15. Correlation and time delays of the X-ray and optical emission of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC3783

    CERN Document Server

    Arevalo, P; Lira, P; Breedt, E; McHardy, I M; Churazov, E

    2009-01-01

    We present simultaneous X-ray and optical B and V band light curves of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC3783 spanning 2 years. The flux in all bands is highly variable and the fluctuations are significantly correlated. As shown before by Stirpe et al. the optical bands vary simultaneously, with a delay of less than 1.5 days but both B and V bands lag the X-ray fluctuations by 3-9 days. This delay points at optical variability produced by X-ray reprocessing and the value of the lag places the reprocessor close to the broad line region. A power spectrum analysis of the light curve, however, shows that the X-ray variability has a power law shape bending to a steeper slope at a time-scale ~2.9 days while the variability amplitude in the optical bands continues to grow towards the longest time-scale covered, ~ 300 days. We show that the power spectra together with the small value of the time delay is inconsistent with a picture where all the optical variability is produced by X-ray reprocessing, though the small amplitude, r...

  16. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges ($< 2$ decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times ($\\Delta t \\approx 10^{-3}- 10^3$ hrs), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, $N(\\Delta t) \\propto \\lambda_0 (1 + \\lambda_0 \\Delta t)^{-2}$, which has a powerlaw slope of $p \\approx 2.0$ at large waiting times ($\\Delta t \\approx 1-1000$ hrs) and flattens out at short waiting times $\\Delta t \\lapprox \\Delta t_0 = 1/\\lambda_0$. We find a consistent breakpoint at $\\Delta t_0 = 1/\\lambda_0 = 0.80\\pm0.14$ hours from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected event...

  17. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  18. Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oang, Key Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Jo, Junbeom; Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Jong Goo; Kim, Tae Wu; Jun, Sunhong; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2015-01-01

    Here we report sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering. By applying the time-slicing scheme to the measurement and subsequent deconvolution, we investigate the protein structural dynamics that occur faster than the X-ray temporal pulse width of synchrotrons (~100 ps). The singular value decomposition analysis of the experimental data suggests that two structurally distinguishable intermediates are formed within 100 ps. In particular, the global structural change occurring on the time scale of 70 ps is identified. PMID:25678733

  19. PSR J0357+3205: a fast moving pulsar with a very unusual X-ray trail

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Marelli, M; Salvetti, D; Sartore, N; Belfiore, A; Parkinson, P Saz; Caraveo, P A; Bignami, G F

    2013-01-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright gamma-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission, originating at the pulsar position and extending for > 9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.165"+/-0.030" yr^(-1). At a distance of ~500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of ~390 km s^(-1) assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is perfectly aligned with the main axis of the X-ray nebula, pointing to a physical, yet elusive link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H_alpha line is se...

  20. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  1. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  2. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F; Fedorov, N; Lecherbourg, L

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  3. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorchies, F., E-mail: dorchies@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, Talence F-33405 (France)

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  4. Future Probes of the Neutron Star Equation of State Using X-ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have resulted in the discovery of fast (200 - 600 Hz), coherent X-ray intensity oscillations (hereafter, "burst oscillations") during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 12 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). It is now beyond doubt that these oscillations result from spin modulation of the thermonuclear burst flux from the neutron star surface. Among the new timing phenomena revealed by RXTE the burst oscillations are perhaps the best under...

  5. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  6. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  7. X-ray spectral and timing characteristics of the stars in the young open cluster IC 2391

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A; Peres, G; Pillitteri, I; Sciortino, S

    2004-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral and timing analysis of members of the young open cluster IC 2391 observed with the XMM-Newton observatory. We detected 99 X-ray sources by analysing the summed data obtained from MOS1, MOS2 and pn detectors of the EPIC camera; 24 of them are members, or probable members, of the cluster. Stars of all spectral types have been detected, from the early-types to the late-M dwarfs. Despite the capability of the instrument to recognize up to 3 thermal components, the X-ray spectra of the G, K and M members of the cluster are well described with two thermal components (at kT$_1 \\sim$ 0.3-0.5 keV and kT$_2 \\sim$ 1.0-1.2 keV respectively) while the X-ray spectra of F members require only a softer 1-T model. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test applied to the X-ray photon time series shows that approximately 46% of the members of IC 2391 are variable with a confidence level $>$99%. The comparison of our data with those obtained with ROSAT/PSPC, nine years earlier, and ROSAT/HRI, seven years earlier, sho...

  8. Late-time X-Ray, UV and Optical Monitoring of Supernova 1979C

    OpenAIRE

    Immler, Stefan; Fesen, Robert A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Petre, Robert; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Pooley, David; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Bernd; Hammell, Molly C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2005-01-01

    We present results from observations of SN 1979C with XMM-Newton in X-rays and in the UV, archival X-ray and HST data, and follow-up ground-based optical imaging. The XMM-Newton MOS spectrum shows two-temperature thermal plasma emission characteristics of both the forward (4.1 keV) and reverse shock (0.78 keV) with no intrinsic absorption. The long-term X-ray lightcurve of SN 1979C shows no sign of a decline over 16-23 yrs after its outburst. The high X-ray luminosity (8 x 10^38 ergs/s) is ca...

  9. A time-correlation function approach to nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Modern X-ray spectroscopy has proven itself as a robust tool for probing the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Despite working on energy scales that are much larger than those corresponding to nuclear motions, taking nuclear dynamics and the associated nuclear correlations into account may be of importance for X-ray spectroscopy. Recently, we have developed an efficient protocol to account for nuclear dynamics in X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra [Karsten \\textit{et al.} arXiv:1608.03436], based on ground state molecular dynamics accompanied with state-of-the-art calculations of electronic excitation energies and transition dipoles. Here, we present an alternative derivation of the formalism and elaborate on the developed simulation protocol on the examples of gas phase and bulk water. The specific spectroscopic features stemming from the nuclear motions are analyzed and traced down to the dynamics of electronic energy gaps and transition dipole correlation ...

  10. Design and performance of an Automatic Gain Control system for the High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelling, Michael R.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Hertel, Robert; Nishiie, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE), currently under development for the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE) mission, employs a closed loop gain control system to attain 0.5 percent stabilization of each of eight-phoswich detector gains. This Automatic Gain Control (AGC) system utilizes a split window discriminator scheme to control the response of each detector pulse height analyzer to gated Am-241 X-ray events at 60 keV. A prototype AGC system has been implemented and tested within the gain perturbation environment expected to be experienced by the HEXTE instrument in flight. The AGC system and test configuration are described. Response, stability and noise characteristics are measured and compared with theoretical predictions. The system is found to be generally suitable for the HEXTE application.

  11. Design and performance of an Automatic Gain Control system for the High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelling, Michael R.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Hertel, Robert; Nishiie, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE), currently under development for the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE) mission, employs a closed loop gain control system to attain 0.5 percent stabilization of each of eight-phoswich detector gains. This Automatic Gain Control (AGC) system utilizes a split window discriminator scheme to control the response of each detector pulse height analyzer to gated Am-241 X-ray events at 60 keV. A prototype AGC system has been implemented and tested within the gain perturbation environment expected to be experienced by the HEXTE instrument in flight. The AGC system and test configuration are described. Response, stability and noise characteristics are measured and compared with theoretical predictions. The system is found to be generally suitable for the HEXTE application.

  12. X-ray bang-time and fusion reaction history at ~ps resolution using RadOptic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E; Baker, K L; Bennett, C V; Celeste, J R; Cerjan, C; Haynes, S; Hernandez, V J; Hsing, W W; London, R A; Moran, B; von Wittenau, A S; Steele, P T; Stewart, R E

    2012-05-01

    We report recent progress in the development of RadOptic detectors, radiation to optical converters, that rely upon x-ray absorption induced modulation of the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium to amplitude modulate an optical probe beam. The sensor temporal response is determined by the dynamics of the electron-hole pair creation and subsequent relaxation in the sensor medium. Response times of a few ps have been demonstrated in a series of experiments conducted at the LLNL Jupiter Laser Facility. This technology will enable x-ray bang-time and fusion burn-history measurements with {approx} ps resolution.

  13. Soft X-ray follow-up of five hard X-ray emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, L; Ferrigno, C; Falanga, M; Campana, S; Paltani, S; Stella, L; Walter, R

    2013-01-01

    We studied the soft-X-ray emission of five hard-X sources: IGR J08262-3736, IGR J17354-3255, IGR J16328-4726, SAX J1818.6-1703 and IGR J17348-2045. These sources are: a confirmed supergiant high mass X-ray binary (IGR J08262-3736); candidates (IGR J17354-3255, IGR J16328- 4726) and confirmed (SAX J1818.6-1703) supergiant fast X-ray transients; IGR J17348-2045 is one of the as-yet unidentified objects discovered with INTEGRAL. Thanks to dedicated XMM-Newton observations, we obtained the first detailed soft X-ray spectral and timing study of IGR J08262-3736. The results obtained from the observations of IGR J17354-3255 and IGR J16328-4726 provided further support in favor of their association with the class of Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients. SAX J1818.6-1703, observed close to phase 0.5, was not detected by XMM-Newton, thus supporting the idea that this source reaches its lowest X-ray luminosity (~10^32 erg/s) around apastron. For IGR J17348-2045 we identified for the first time the soft X-ray counterpart and...

  14. Experimental x-ray ghost imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard x-ray energy range. We used a synchrotron x-ray beam that was split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultra-fast imaging camera, we were able to image x-rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam was correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured on the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x-rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in non-destructive structural characterization using Free Electron Lasers.

  15. The time ending the shallow decay of the X-ray light curves of long GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, L; Ghirlanda, G; Cabrera, J I; Firmani, C; Avila-Reese, V

    2007-01-01

    The early X-ray light curve of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) is complex, and shows a typical steep-flat-steep behaviour. The time T_a at which the flat (plateau) part ends may bear some important physical information, especially if it plays the same role of the so called jet break time t_jet. To this aim, stimulated by the recent analysis of Willingale et al., we have assembled a sample of GRBs of known redshifts, spectral parameters of the prompt emission, and T_a. By using T_a as a jet angle indicator, and then estimating the collimation corrected prompt energetics, we find a correlation between the latter quantity and the peak energy of the prompt emission. However, this correlation has a large dispersion, similar to the dispersion of the Amati correlation and it is not parallel to the Ghirlanda correlation. Furthermore, we show that the correlation itself results mainly from the dependence of the jet opening angle on the isotropic prompt energy, with the time T_a playing no role, contrary to what we find for th...

  16. eXTP: Enhanced X-Ray Timing and Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. N.; Feroci, M.; Santangelo, A.; Dong, Y. W.; Feng, H.; Lu, F. J.; Nandra, K.; Wang, Z. S.; Zhang, S.; Bozzo, E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    eXTP is a science mission designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. Primary goals are the determination of the equation of state of matter at supra-nuclear density, the measurement of QED effects in highly magnetized star, and the study of accretion in the strong-field regime of gravity. Primary targets include isolated and binary neutron stars, strong magnetic field systems like magnetars, and stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. The mission carries a unique and unprecedented suite of state-of-the-art scientific instruments enabling for the first time ever the simultaneous spectral-timing-polarimetry studies of cosmic sources in the energy range from 0.5-30 keV (and beyond). Key elements of the payload are: the Spectroscopic Focusing Array (SFA) - a set of 11 X-ray optics for a total effective area of approx. 0.9 m(exp. 2) and 0.6 m(exp. 2) at 2 keV and 6 keV respectively, equipped with Silicon Drift Detectors offering less than 180 eV spectral resolution; the Large Area Detector (LAD) - a deployable set of 640 Silicon Drift Detectors, for a total effective area of approx. 3.4 m(exp. 2), between 6 and 10 keV, and spectral resolution better than 250 eV; the Polarimetry Focusing Array (PFA) - a set of 2 X-ray telescope, for a total effective area of 250 cm(exp. 2) at 2 keV, equipped with imaging gas pixel photoelectric polarimeters; the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) - a set of 3 coded mask wide field units, equipped with position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors, each covering a 90 degrees x 90 degrees field of view. The eXTP international consortium includes major institutions of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Universities in China, as well as major institutions in several European countries and the United States. The predecessor of eXTP, the XTP mission concept, has been selected and funded as one of the so-called background missions in the Strategic Priority Space Science Program of the Chinese

  17. Fast parallax-free, one-coordinate X-ray detector OD120 with the registration angle up to 360 deg.

    CERN Document Server

    Aulchenko, V M; Drozdetsky, A A; Dubrovin, M S; Sharafutdinov, M R; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Vasilev, A V; Velikzhanin, Yu S

    2001-01-01

    The project of the fast parallax-free, one-coordinate X-ray detector OD120 with the registration angle up to 360 deg. is presented. The operation principles and simulation results are discussed. The calculated angular resolution of the detector is 0.3x10 sup - sup 3 rad for the focal distance of 350 mm.

  18. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia;

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast global...... conformational change that arises within picoseconds and precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This provides direct structural evidence for a 'protein quake': the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake-like structural motions....

  19. High-throughput data acquisition and processing for real-time x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelgesang, Matthias; Rota, Lorenzo; Ardila Perez, Luis E.; Caselle, Michele; Chilingaryan, Suren; Kopmann, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    With ever-increasing data rates due to stronger light sources and better detectors, X-ray imaging experiments conducted at synchrotron beamlines face bandwidth and processing limitations that inhibit efficient workflows and prevent real-time operations. We propose an experiment platform comprised of programmable hardware and optimized software to lift these limitations and make beamline setups future-proof. The hardware consists of an FPGA-based data acquisition system with custom logic for data pre-processing and a PCIe data connection for transmission of currently up to 6.6 GB/s. Moreover, the accompanying firmware supports pushing data directly into GPU memory using AMD's DirectGMA technology without crossing system memory first. The GPUs are used to pre-process projection data and reconstruct final volumetric data with OpenCL faster than possible with CPUs alone. Besides, more efficient use of resources this enables a real-time preview of a reconstruction for early quality assessment of both experiment setup and the investigated sample. The entire system is designed in a modular way and allows swapping all components, e.g. replacing our custom FPGA camera with a commercial system but keep reconstructing data with GPUs. Moreover, every component is accessible using a low-level C library or using a high-level Python interface in order to integrate these components in any legacy environment.

  20. Real-Time Small-Angle X-ray Scattering from Rubber-Modified Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, R. A.

    1997-03-01

    Real-time small-angle X-ray scattering (RTSAXS) studies have been performed on a series of rubber-modified thermoplastics. These include: High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS), (2) Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymers (ABS), (3) weatherable ABS-type resins containing grafted rubber particles derived from acrylonitrile ethylene styrene (AES) or acrylonitrile styrene acrylate (ASA), and (4) rubber-toughened syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS). Scattering patterns were measured at successive time intervals of from 2 to 3 ms. and were analyzed to determine the plastic strain due to crazing. Simultaneous measurements of the absorption of the primary beam by the sample allowed the total plastic strain to be computed. The plastic strain due to other deformation mechanisms (e.g. particle cavitation and macroscopic shear deformation) was determined by the difference. The contribution from microscopic shear deformation was determined from video-based optical data obtained along with the RTSAXS data. One example is an experimental AES system in an SAN matrix with insufficient gel particle graft which was found to lack substantial contributions from crazing and microshear yielding mechanisms. Manipulating the graft and cross linking levels in the AES system results in a ten-fold increase in microshear yield, but not much additional cavitation and crazing.

  1. Some Early Results from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)

    CERN Document Server

    Bradt, H V

    1997-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) was successfully launched on 1995 December 30 and has been operational since that time. Its three instruments are probing regions close to compact objects, degenerate dwarfs, neutron stars, stellar black holes and the central engines of AGN. Temporal studies with the ASM and PCA have already yielded rich results which pertain to the environs, evolution, and nature of the compact objects in galactic systems. Here I review some selected results from these instruments, as obtained by various RXTE observers. The ASM is providing detailed light curves of about 60 detected sources and has uncovered new temporal/spectral states of galactic binary systems. The bizarre behavior of the possibly very young binary system, Cir X-1, is being revealed in detail by both the ASM and the PCA. A rare high/soft state of the black-hole candidate, Cyg X-1 provides new insight into the nature of the low/high transitions in black-hole binaries. The PCA has made possible the discovery of oscilla...

  2. Long time-scale variability of X-ray binaries with late type giant companions

    CERN Document Server

    Filippova, E; Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose and examine a physical mechanism which can lead to the generation of noise in the mass accretion rate of low mass X-ray binaries on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the system. We consider modulations of mass captured by the compact object from the companion star's stellar wind in binaries with late type giants, systems which usually have long orbital periods. We show that a hydrodynamical interaction of the wind matter within a binary system even without eccentricity results in variability of the mass accretion rate with characteristic time-scales close to the orbital period. The cause of the variability is an undeveloped turbulent motion (perturbed motion without significant vorticity) of wind matter near the compact object. Our conclusions are supported by 3D simulations with two different hydrodynamic codes based on Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches -- the SPH code GADGET and the Eulerian code PLUTO. In this work we assume that the wind mass loss rate of the second...

  3. Process control in aluminum foam production using real-time X-ray radioscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzick, H.; Wichmann, M.; Weise, J. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Advanced Materials (IFAM), D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Helfen, L. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Non-destructive Testing (IZFP), D-01326 Dresden (Germany); Baumbach, T.; Banhart, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institute (HMI), D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Aluminum alloy foams were created by expanding foamable precursors containing a gas-releasing blowing agent in a dense metallic matrix. The precursors were prepared in two different ways: either by hot-compaction of powder mixtures or by thixocasting of billets obtained by cold compaction of powder blends. Foam evolution was visualized by means of real-time X-ray radioscopy with image frequencies ranging up to 18 Hz and spatial resolutions down to 10 {mu}m. The difference in pore formation between the two processing routes could be studied. Rupture of cell walls during foam expansion could be visualized, critical rupture thickness measured, and the time-scale of the rupture process estimated. By manufacturing foam precursors in which defects were incorporated deliberately, the question of the origin of very large pores in solid metal foams could be examined. By forced cooling of liquid metal foams while recording their structure, the importance of solidification-induced changes of foam morphology was illustrated. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Timing of the first eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, D; Patruno, A; Watts, A; Linares, M; Degenaar, N; Kalamkar, M; van der Klis, M; Rea, N; Casella, P; Padilla, M Armas; Kaur, R; Yang, Y J; Soleri, P; Wijnands, R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the timing analysis of the first eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP): SWIFT J1749.4-2807. The neutron star rotates at a frequency of ~517.9 Hz and is in a binary system with an orbital period of 8.8 hrs and a projected semi-major axis of ~1.90 lt-s. Based on the mass function and the eclipse half-angle, we constrain the inclination of the system to be between ~76 and ~80 deg. This is to date the tightest constraint on the orbital inclination of any AMXP. We also estimate the mass of the companion to be in the 0.6-0.8 Msun range. As in other AMXPs, the pulse profile shows harmonic content up to the 3rd overtone. However, this is the first AMXP to show a 1st overtone with rms amplitudes between 5 and 25%, which is the strongest ever seen, and which can be more than two times stronger than the fundamental. The fact that SWIFT J1749.4-2807 is an eclipsing system which shows uncommonly strong harmonic content suggests that it might be the best source to date to set constraints ...

  5. Full Spectral Survey of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Archive

    CERN Document Server

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Rothschild, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed spectra for all active galactic nuclei in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) archive. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line equivalent width, Compton reflection and photon index, as well as calculating fluxes and luminosities in the 2-10 keV band for 100 AGN with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to yield high quality spectral results. We compare these parameters across the different classifications of Seyferts and blazars. Our distributions of photon indices for Seyfert 1's and 2's are consistent with the idea that Seyferts share a common central engine, however our distributions of Compton reflection hump strengths do not support the classical picture of absorption by a torus and reflection off a Compton-thick disk with type depending only on inclination angle. We conclude that a more complex reflecting geometry such as a combined disk and torus or clumpy torus is likely a more accurate picture of the Compton-thick material. We find that Compton ref...

  6. X-ray timing analysis of the quasar PG 1211+143

    CERN Document Server

    Lobban, Andrew; Pounds, Ken; Reeves, James

    2015-01-01

    We report on a timing analysis of a new ~630ks XMM-Newton observation of the quasar, PG 1211+143. We find a well-defined X-ray power spectrum with a well-detected bend at ~7e-5 Hz, consistent with the established bend-timescale--black-hole-mass correlation for luminous, accreting black holes. We find the linear rms-flux relation commonly observed in accreting black hole systems and investigate the energy-dependence of the rms. The fractional rms is roughly constant with energy on short timescales (< 1 day; within observations) whereas there is enhanced soft band variability on long timescales (between observations typically spaced by a few days). Additionally, we also report on the optical--UV variability using the OM on-board XMM-Newton and a ~2-month-long overlapping monitoring programme with Swift. We find that, although there is little UV variability within observations (<1 day), UV variations of a few per cent exist on time-scales of ~days--weeks.

  7. Reversibility of time series: revealing the hidden messages in X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Scaringi, S; Middleton, M

    2014-01-01

    We explore the non-linear, high-frequency, aperiodic variability properties in the three cataclysmic variables MV Lyr, KIC 8751494 and V1504 Cyg observed with Kepler, as well as the X-ray binary Cyg X-1 observed with RXTE. This is done through the use of a high-order Fourier statistic called the bispectrum and its related biphase and bicoherence, as well as the time-skewness statistic. We show how all objects display qualitatively similar biphase trends. In particular all biphase amplitudes are found to be smaller than $\\pi/2$, suggesting that the flux distributions for all sources are positively skewed on all observed timescales, consistent with the log-normal distributions expected from the fluctuating accretion disk model. We also find that for all objects the biphases are positive at frequencies where the corresponding power spectral densities display their high frequency break. This suggests that the noise-like flaring observed is rising more slowly than it is falling, and thus not time-reversible. This ...

  8. eXTP -- enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S N; Santangelo, A; Dong, Y W; Feng, H; Lu, F J; Nandra, K; Wang, Z S; Zhang, S; Bozzo, E; Brandt, S; De Rosa, A; Gou, L J; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Li, X D; Liu, Y; Orleanski, P; Pareschi, G; Pohl, M; Poutanen, J; Qu, J L; Schanne, S; Stella, L; Uttley, P; Watts, A; Xu, R X; Yu, W F; Zand, J J M in 't; Zane, S; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Baldini, L; Bambi, C; Basso, S; Bhattacharyya, S; Bellazzini, R; Belloni, T; Bellutti, P; Bianchi, S; Brez, A; Bursa, M; Burwitz, V; Budtz-Jorgensen, C; Caiazzo, I; Campana, R; Cao, X L; Casella, P; Chen, C Y; Chen, L; Chen, T X; Chen, Y; Chen, Y; Chen, Y P; Civitani, M; Zelati, F Coti; Cui, W; Cui, W W; Dai, Z G; Del Monte, E; De Martino, D; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Dovciak, M; Donnarumma, I; Doroshenko, V; Esposito, P; Evangelista, Y; Favre, Y; Friedrich, P; Fuschino, F; Galvez, J L; Gao, Z L; Ge, M Y; Gevin, O; Goetz, D; Han, D W; Heyl, J; Horak, J; Hu, W; Huang, F; Huang, Q S; Hudec, R; Huppenkothen, D; Israel, G L; Ingram, A; Karas, V; Karelin, D; Jenke, P A; Ji, L; Kennedy, T; Korpela, S; Kunneriath, D; Labanti, C; Li, G; Li, X; Li, Z S; Liang, E W; Limousin, O; Lin, L; Ling, Z X; Liu, H B; Liu, H W; Liu, Z; Lu, B; Lund, N; Lai, D; Luo, B; Luo, T; Ma, B; Mahmoodifar, S; Marisaldi, M; Martindale, A; Meidinger, N; Men, Y P; Michalska, M; Mignani, R; Minuti, M; Motta, S; Muleri, F; Neilsen, J; Orlandini, M; Pan, A T; Patruno, A; Perinati, E; Picciotto, A; Piemonte, C; Pinchera, M; Rachevski, A; Rapisarda, M; Rea, N; Rossi, E M R; Rubini, A; Sala, G; Shu, X W; Sgro, C; Shen, Z X; Soffitta, P; Song, L M; Spandre, G; Stratta, G; Strohmayer, T E; Sun, L; Svoboda, J; Tagliaferri, G; Tenzer, C; Tong, H; Taverna, R; Torok, G; Turolla, R; Vacchi, A; Wang, J; Wang, J X; Walton, D; Wang, K; Wang, J F; Wang, R J; Wang, Y F; Weng, S S; Wilms, J; Winter, B; Wu, X; Wu, X F; Xiong, S L; Xu, Y P; Xue, Y Q; Yan, Z; Yang, S; Yang, X; Yang, Y J; Yuan, F; Yuan, W M; Yuan, Y F; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zdziarski, A; Zhang, C; Zhang, C L; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhang, W D; Zheng, S J; Zhou, P; Zhou, X L

    2016-01-01

    eXTP is a science mission designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. Primary targets include isolated and binary neutron stars, strong magnetic field systems like magnetars, and stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. The mission carries a unique and unprecedented suite of state-of-the-art scientific instruments enabling for the first time ever the simultaneous spectral-timing-polarimetry studies of cosmic sources in the energy range from 0.5-30 keV (and beyond). Key elements of the payload are: the Spectroscopic Focusing Array (SFA) - a set of 11 X-ray optics for a total effective area of about 0.9 m^2 and 0.6 m^2 at 2 keV and 6 keV respectively, equipped with Silicon Drift Detectors offering <180 eV spectral resolution; the Large Area Detector (LAD) - a deployable set of 640 Silicon Drift Detectors, for a total effective area of about 3.4 m^2, between 6 and 10 keV, and spectral resolution <250 eV; the Polarimetry Focusing Array (PFA) - a set of...

  9. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; McTiernan, James M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges (<2 decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times (Δt ≈ 10-3-103 hr), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, N(Δt) vprop λ0(1 + λ0Δt)-2, which has a power-law slope of p ≈ 2.0 at large waiting times (Δt ≈ 1-1000 hr) and flattens out at short waiting times Δt <~ Δt 0 = 1/λ0. We find a consistent breakpoint at Δt 0 = 1/λ0 = 0.80 ± 0.14 hr from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected events, Δt 0 vprop 1/n det. This waiting time distribution can be modeled with a nonstationary Poisson process with a flare rate λ = 1/Δt that varies as f(λ) vprop λ-1exp - (λ/λ0). This flare rate distribution requires a highly intermittent flare productivity in short clusters with high rates, separated by relatively long quiescent intervals with very low flare rates.

  10. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size.

  11. Late-time X-Ray, UV and Optical Monitoring of Supernova 1979C

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Van Dyk, S D; Weiler, K W; Petre, R; Lewin, W H G; Pooley, D; Pietsch, W; Aschenbach, B; Hammell, M C; Rudie, G C; Immler, Stefan; Fesen, Robert A.; Dyk, Schuyler D. Van; Weiler, Kurt W.; Petre, Robert; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Pooley, David; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Bernd; Hammell, Molly C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2005-01-01

    We present results from observations of SN 1979C with XMM-Newton in X-rays and in the UV, archival X-ray and HST data, and follow-up ground-based optical imaging. The XMM-Newton MOS spectrum shows two-temperature thermal plasma emission characteristics of both the forward (4.1 keV) and reverse shock (0.78 keV) with no intrinsic absorption. The long-term X-ray lightcurve of SN 1979C shows no sign of a decline over 16-23 yrs after its outburst. The high X-ray luminosity (8 x 10^38 ergs/s) is caused by the interaction of the shock with dense circumstellar matter, likely deposited by a strong stellar wind from the progenitor with a high mass-loss rate of 1.5 x 10^-4 M_sun/yr. The X-ray data support a strongly decelerated shock and show a mass-loss rate history which is consistent with a constant progenitor mass-loss rate and wind velocity over the past >16,000 yrs in the evolution of the progenitor. We find a CSM density profile of rho_CSM \\propto r^-s with index s10^4 cm^-3) out to large radii from the site of t...

  12. Cavitation dynamics on a NACA0015 hydrofoil using time resolved X-ray densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Harish; Wu, Juliana; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Recent investigations of partial cavitation have shown that the transition from stable to shedding cavities can be related to the presence of both propagating bubbly shocks and re-entrant liquid jets originating in the cavity closure region. In the present study, formation of sheet cavitation and its transition to periodically shedding cavities is studied on a NACA0015 hydrofoil in a recirculating water tunnel at different attack angles. Using high-speed videos and time resolved X-ray densitometry, the instantaneous void fraction flow fields are obtained to identify the principal mechanism responsible for transition from stable to shedding cavities over a range of attack angles and cavitation numbers. The role of attack angle is of particular interest, since is it related to the pressure gradient at cavity enclosure, and can lead to the formation of stronger reentrant flows. The relative importance of reentrant liquid flow and bubbly shock wave propagation will be discussed This work is supported by Office of Naval Research.

  13. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, B.L., E-mail: macdonbl@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Vanderstelt, J., E-mail: joshv@nray.ca [Nray Services Inc., 56A Head Street, Dundas, ON (Canada); O’Meara, J. [University of Guelph, Department of Physics, Guelph (Canada); McNeill, F.E. [McMaster University, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  14. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, B. L.; Vanderstelt, J.; O'Meara, J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  15. Measuring the neutron star equation of state using X-ray timing

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Anna L; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Hebeler, Kai; Israel, Gianluca; Lamb, Frederick K; Miller, M Coleman; Morsink, Sharon; Özel, Feryal; Patruno, Alessandro; Poutanen, Juri; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Schwenk, Achim; Steiner, Andrew W; Stella, Luigi; Tolos, Laura; van der Klis, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary science goals of the next generation of hard X-ray timing instruments is to determine the equation of state of the matter at supranuclear densities inside neutron stars, by measuring the radius of neutron stars with different masses to accuracies of a few percent. Three main techniques can be used to achieve this goal. The first involves waveform modelling. The flux we observe from a hotspot on the neutron star surface offset from the rotational pole will be modulated by the star's rotation, giving rise to a pulsation. Information about mass and radius is encoded into the pulse profile via relativistic effects, and tight constraints on mass and radius can be obtained. The second technique involves characterising the spin distribution of accreting neutron stars. The most rapidly rotating stars provide a very clean constraint, since the mass-shedding limit is a function of mass and radius. However the overall spin distribution also provides a guide to the torque mechanisms in operation and th...

  16. Analytical Instrument of X-ray Fluorescence Determine Concentration of U and Pu in Organic Solution at the Same Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An instrument is developed to measure the concentration of U, Pu and the intensity of gamma ray in samples of 1AP organic phase at the same time. The Ag cold cathode is used to excite L series X-ray fluorescence of U and Pu. The Si-pin detector is

  17. In-situ real-time x-ray scattering for probing the processing-structure-performance relation

    KAUST Repository

    Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Materials Research Society. In-situ X-ray scattering methodology is discussed, in order to analyze the microstructure development of soft functional materials during coating, annealing, and drying processes in real-time. The relevance of a fundamental understanding of coating processes for future industrial production is pointed out.

  18. Real-time segmentation of multiple implanted cylindrical liver markers in kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Høyer, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    for automatic generation of a 3D marker model that consisted of the size, orientation, and estimated 3D trajectory of each marker during the CBCT scan. The 3D marker model was used for real-time template based segmentation in subsequent x-ray images by projecting each marker's 3D shape and likely 3D motion...

  19. Current status of the studies of biological objects by the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aul' chenko, V.M. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bukin, M.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vazina, A.A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino (Russian Federation); Gadzhiev, A.M. [Karaev Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, AzNas, 2, Sharifzade str., Baku, AZ1100 Azerbaijan (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: agadzhiev@bakinter.net; Korneev, B.N. [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino (Russian Federation); Sergienko, P.M. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino (Russian Federation); Titov, V.M. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tolochko, B.P. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sheromov, M.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    The methodological and technical aspects of the biological objects study by the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique are described with reference to muscle contraction. The results of relevant investigations into the structural dynamics of a living muscle during its contraction are presented.

  20. Time-dependent Takagi-Taupin eikonal theory of X-ray diffraction in rapidly changing crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W

    2004-03-01

    The Takagi-Taupin theory is extended by synthesizing it with the eikonal theory in a unified space-time approach based upon microscopic electromagnetism. The principal goal is the description of X-ray diffraction in a crystal undergoing subpicosecond and few-femtosecond changes.

  1. The fast Z-scan method for studying working catalytic reactors with high energy X-ray diffraction: ZSM-5 in the methanol to gasoline process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, David S; Bleken, Francesca L; O'Brien, Matthew G; Di Michiel, Marco; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Olsbye, Unni

    2013-06-14

    The methanol to gasoline process over the zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 in a lab-sized reactor bed (4 mm diameter) has been studied in operando with high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The fast z-scan method was used, scanning the reactor repeatedly and at speed through the X-ray beam. The X-ray diffraction data were processed using high throughput parametric Rietveld refinement to obtain real structural parameters. The diffraction data show only very subtle changes during the process and this allows us to demonstrate the combination of very large data volumes with parametric Rietveld methods to study weak features of the data. The different possible data treatment methodologies are discussed in detail and their effects on the results obtained are demonstrated. The trends in unit cell volume, zeolite channel occupancy and crystallite strain indicate that more or larger reaction intermediates are present close to the reactor outlet.

  2. eXTP: Enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarization mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. N.; Feroci, M.; Santangelo, A.; Dong, Y. W.; Feng, H.; Lu, F. J.; Nandra, K.; Wang, Z. S.; Zhang, S.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; De Rosa, A.; Gou, L. J.; Hernanz, M.; van der Klis, M.; Li, X. D.; Liu, Y.; Orleanski, P.; Pareschi, G.; Pohl, M.; Poutanen, J.; Qu, J. L.; Schanne, S.; Stella, L.; Uttley, P.; Watts, A.; Xu, R. X.; Yu, W. F.; in 't Zand, J. J. M.; Zane, S.; Alvarez, L.; Amati, L.; Baldini, L.; Bambi, C.; Basso, S.; Bhattacharyya S.; , Bellazzini, R.; Belloni, T.; Bellutti, P.; Bianchi, S.; Brez, A.; Bursa, M.; Burwitz, V.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Caiazzo, I.; Campana, R.; Cao, X.; Casella, P.; Chen, C. Y.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. P.; Civitani, M.; Coti Zelati, F.; Cui, W.; Cui, W. W.; Dai, Z. G.; Del Monte, E.; de Martino, D.; Di Cosimo, S.; Diebold, S.; Dovciak, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Doroshenko, V.; Esposito, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Favre, Y.; Friedrich, P.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J. L.; Gao, Z. L.; Ge, M. Y.; Gevin, O.; Goetz, D.; Han, D. W.; Heyl, J.; Horak, J.; Hu, W.; Huang, F.; Huang, Q. S.; Hudec, R.; Huppenkothen, D.; Israel, G. L.; Ingram, A.; Karas, V.; Karelin, D.; Jenke, P. A.; Ji, L.; Korpela, S.; Kunneriath, D.; Labanti, C.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Li, Z. S.; Liang, E. W.; Limousin, O.; Lin, L.; Ling, Z. X.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, Z.; Lu, B.; Lund, N.; Lai, D.; Luo, B.; Luo, T.; Ma, B.; Mahmoodifar, S.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Meidinger, N.; Men, Y.; Michalska, M.; Mignani, R.; Minuti, M.; Motta, S.; Muleri, F.; Neilsen, J.; Orlandini, M.; Pan, A. T.; Patruno, A.; Perinati, E.; Picciotto, A.; Piemonte, C.; Pinchera, M.; Rachevski A.; Rapisarda, M.; Rea, N.; Rossi, E. M. R.; Rubini, A.; Sala, G.; Shu, X. W.; Sgro, C.; Shen, Z. X.; Soffitta, P.; Song, L.; Spandre, G.; Stratta, G.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Sun, L.; Svoboda, J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tenzer, G.; Hong, T.; Taverna, R.; Torok, G.; Turolla, R.; Vacchi, S.; Wang, J.; Walton, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, J. F.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Weng, S. S.; Wilms, J.; Winter, B.; Wu, X.; Wu, X. F.; Xiong, S. L.; Xu, Y. P.; Xue, Y. Q.; Yan, Z.; Yang, S.; Yang, X.; Yang, Y. J.; Yuan, F.; Yuan, W. M.; Yuan, Y. F.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zdziarski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, W. D.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhou X. L.

    2016-07-01

    eXTP is a science mission designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. Primary goals are the determination of the equation of state of matter at supra-nuclear density, the measurement of QED effects in highly magnetized star, and the study of accretion in the strong-field regime of gravity. Primary targets include isolated and binary neutron stars, strong magnetic field systems like magnetars, and stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. The mission carries a unique and unprecedented suite of state-of-the-art scientific instruments enabling for the first time ever the simultaneous spectral-timing-polarimetry studies of cosmic sources in the energy range from 0.5-30 keV (and beyond). Key elements of the payload are: the Spectroscopic Focusing Array (SFA) - a set of 11 X-ray optics for a total effective area of ˜0.9 m2 and 0.6 m2 at 2 keV and 6 keV respectively, equipped with Silicon Drift Detectors offering pixel photoelectric polarimeters; the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) - a set of 3 coded mask wide field units, equipped with position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detectors, each covering a 90 degrees x 90 degrees field of view. The eXTP international consortium includes major institutions of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Universities in China, as well as major institutions in several European countries and the United States. The predecessor of eXTP, the XTP mission concept, has been selected and funded as one of the so-called background missions in the Strategic Priority Space Science Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since 2011. The strong European participation has significantly enhanced the scientific capabilities of eXTP. The planned launch date of the mission is earlier than 2025.

  3. High-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning with LOFT. White Paper in Support of the Mission Concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marisaldi, M.; Smith, D. M.; Brandt, Søren

    of ultradense matter in neutron stars? Does matter orbiting close to the event horizon follow the predictions of general relativity? These goals are elaborated in the mission Yellow Book (http://sci.esa.int/loft/ 53447-loft-yellow-book/) describing the LOFT mission as proposed in M3, which closely resembles...... science case, but also for many other open questions in astrophysics. LOFT’s primary instrument is the Large Area Detector (LAD), a 8.5m2 instrument operating in the 2–30 keV energy range, which will revolutionise studies of Galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources down to their fundamental time scales......-board alert system for the detection and rapid broadcasting to the ground of celestial bright and fast outbursts of X-rays (particularly, Gamma-ray Bursts). This paper is one of twelve White Papers that illustrate the unique potential of LOFT as an X-ray observatory in a variety of astrophysical fields...

  4. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  5. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  6. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenbeugung an einkristallinem Indiumantimonid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Sebastian

    2014-11-07

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit behandelt die experimentelle Untersuchung der strukturellen Aenderung des Halbleiters Indiumantimonid (InSB) nach der Anregung durch einen ultrakurzen Laserpuls (60 fs). Die Untersuchung erfolgt durch ultrakurze Roentgenpulse (rund 100 fs). Als Quelle der ultrakurzen Roentgenpulse dient eine Laser-Plasma Roentgenquelle. Bei dieser Quelle wird ein ultrakurzer intensiver optischer Laserpuls auf eine Metallfolie fokussiert (Intensitaet bis 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), durch das entstehende Plasma kommt es zu einer Emission von Roentgenstrahlung. Zur Charakterisierung der Roentgenquelle stand ein neuartiger Timepix- Detektor zu Verfuegung, der

  7. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  8. Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chufeng; Schmidt, Kevin; Spence, John C

    2015-07-01

    We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold.

  9. In situ spatial and time-resolved studies of electrochemical reactions by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Daniel; Stewart-Ornstein, Jacob; Zhang, Xuerong; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2005-06-01

    The first in situ measurements with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of an active electrochemical cell are reported. An electrochemical wet cell, consisting of an electrodeposited polyaniline thin film on a thin Au film covered by an overlayer of 1 M HCl solution sitting between two X-ray transparent silicon nitride windows, was assembled. X-ray absorption images and spatial and time-resolved spectra of this system under potential control were examined using the beamline 5.3.2 STXM at the Advanced Light Source. The chemical state of the polyaniline film was reversibly converted between reduced (leucoemeraldine) and oxidized (emeraldine chloride) states by changing the applied potential. The electrochemical changes were monitored by spatially resolved C 1s and N 1s X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical-state selective imaging. Comparison of differences between images at two energies at different potentials provided electrochemical contrast with a resolution better than 50 nm, thereby monitoring that component of the polyaniline film that was electrochemically active. Kinematic studies in the subsecond regime are demonstrated.

  10. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... 06, 2016 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No ...

  13. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  14. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  15. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Tibor; Lakatos, Tamás; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L.

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  16. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Tibor E-mail: tibpapp@netscape.nettibpapp@yahoo.ca; Lakatos, Tamas; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  17. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  18. Time-dependent search for neutrino emission from X-ray binaries with the ANTARES telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Albert; André; Anton; Ardid; Aubert,; Avgitas; Baret; Barrios-Martí; Basa; Bertin; Biagi; Bormuth; Bouwhuis; Bruijn, de, M.E.; Brunner

    2017-01-01

    ANTARES is currently the largest neutrino telescope operating in the NorthernHemisphere, aiming at the detection of high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources.Neutrino telescopes constantly monitor at least one complete hemisphere of the sky, and arethus well-suited to detect neutrinos produced in transient astrophysical sources. A timedependentsearch has been applied to a list of 33 X-ray binaries undergoing high flaringactivities in satellite data (RXTE/ASM, MAXI and Swift/BAT) and du...

  19. Fast and direct Na and K determination in table, marine, and low-sodium salts by X-ray fluorescence and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Col, José A; Bueno, Maria I M S; Melquiades, Fábio L

    2015-03-11

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a fast, low-cost, nondestructive, and truly multielement analytical technique. The objectives of this study are to quantify the amount of Na(+) and K(+) in samples of table salt (refined, marine, and light) and to compare three different methodologies of quantification using XRF. A fundamental parameter method revealed difficulties in quantifying accurately lighter elements (Z fast. Na(+) quantifications provided calibration errors lower than 16% and a correlation of 0.995. Of great concern was the observation of high Na(+) levels in low-sodium salts. The presented application may be performed in a fast and multielement fashion, in accordance with Green Chemistry specifications.

  20. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzakis, S.; Audebert, P.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J. P.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Nagels, V.; Gary, S.; Shepherd, R.; Girard, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Gauthier, J.-C.

    2006-05-01

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s 2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  1. The use of time-resolved X-ray diffraction and sample techniques for studying the muscle structure during relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazina, A. A.; Gadzhiev, A. M.; Gerasimov, V. S.; Gorbunova, N. P.; Sergienko, P. M.; Korneev, V. N.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Baru, S. E.

    1995-02-01

    The use of the modern time-resolved X-ray diffraction and sample technique has played an important role in studying muscle structures during contraction at various physiological conditions. We represent time-resolved X-ray data on equatorial diffraction and tension response of the frog sartorius muscle during relaxation. The measurements of the time-course of the intensity change of reflections (1,0), (1,1) and the background under them give a possibility to study the effect of potentiation of contraction by repetitive stimulation in fresh and tired muscles. Model calculations of meridional diffraction patterns for various configurations of cross-bridges in the relaxation phase were carried out.

  2. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068; de Groot, Frank M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  3. Anti-correlated hard X-ray time lag in GRS 1915+105: evidence for a truncated accretion disc

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, M; Das-Gupta, S; Pendharkar, J; Sriram, K; Agrawal, V K; Choudhury, Manojendu; Dasgupta, Surajit

    2005-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of Galactic black hole candidate sources indicate a close connection between the accretion disk emission and the jet emission. The recent discovery of an anti-correlated time lag between the soft and hard X-rays in Cygnus X-3 (Choudhury & Rao 2004) constrains the geometric picture of the disk-jet connection into a truncated accretion disk, the truncation radius being quite close to the black hole. Here we report the detection of similar anti-correlated time lag in the superluminal jet source GRS 1915+105. We show the existence of the pivoting in the X-ray spectrum during the delayed anti-correlation and we also find that the QPO parameters change along with the spectral pivoting. We explore theoretical models to understand this phenomenon.

  4. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  5. Investigating the X-ray time-lags in PG 1244+026 using an extended corona model

    CERN Document Server

    Chainakun, P

    2016-01-01

    We present an extended corona model based on ray-tracing simulations to investigate X-ray time lags in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). This model consists of two axial point sources illuminating an accretion disc that produce the reverberation lags. These lags are due to the time delays between the directly observed and reflection photons and are associated with the light-travel time between the source and the disc, so they allow us to probe the disc-corona geometry. We assume the variations of two X-ray sources are triggered by the same primary variations, but allow the two sources to respond in different ways (i.e. having different source responses). The variations of each source induce a delayed accretion disc response and the total lags consist of a combination of both source and disc responses. We show that the extended corona model can reproduce both the low-frequency hard and high-frequency soft (reverberation) lags. Fitting the model to the timing data of PG~1244+026 reveals the hard and soft X-ray sour...

  6. Investigating the X-ray time lags in PG 1244+026 using an extended corona model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainakun, P.; Young, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present an extended corona model based on ray-tracing simulations to investigate X-ray time lags in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This model consists of two axial point sources illuminating an accretion disc that produce the reverberation lags. These lags are due to the time delays between the directly observed and reflection photons and are associated with the light-travel time between the source and the disc, so they allow us to probe the disc-corona geometry. We assume the variations of two X-ray sources are triggered by the same primary variations, but allow the two sources to respond in different ways (i.e. having different source responses). The variations of each source induce a delayed accretion disc response and the total lags consist of a combination of both source and disc responses. We show that the extended corona model can reproduce both the low-frequency hard and high-frequency soft (reverberation) lags. Fitting the model to the timing data of PG 1244+026 reveals the hard and soft X-ray sources at ∼6rg and ∼11rg, respectively. The upper source produces small amounts of reflection and can be interpreted as a relativistic jet, or outflowing blob, whose emission is beamed away from the disc. This explains the observed lag energy in which there is no soft lag at energies possible but only at near the speed of light.

  7. STUDY OF TIME LAPSE IN FOREIGN BODY ASPIRATION IN RELATION TO CHEST X - RAY AND TYPE OF FOREIGN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Foreign body aspiration in pediatrics is a potentially fatal accident which will continue until children explore their surroundings with their hand and mouth. Pediatric aspirations will persist until mankind exists. Not all foreign body aspirations are witnessed hence chances of delay in diagnosing an aspiration are high. Delay in diagnosis depends on site and character of foreign body aspirated. The chest x - ray findings and type of foreign body extracted vary depending on the duration the foreign body remains in airway . OBJECTIVE: To study the X - ray finding in pediatric airway aspiration and its relation to time lapse, the type and site of lodgment of foreign body extracted via bronchoscopy. The type of foreign body in relation to time lapse in aspiration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective study done in Bapuji child health institute and research center, JJM Medical College, Davangere . History and pre bronchoscopy x - Ray finding were noted for 65 children who were posted for suspicious bronchoscopy from August 2011 to September 2013. 11 children were excluded from study as they showed no foreign body on bronchoscopy. Time lapse in aspir ation and seeking medical care was noted. The bronchoscopic findings regarding site of foreign body lodgment and type of foreign body were recorded. The type of foreign body and variation of x - ray picture in relation to time lapse in aspiration were noted. Data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULT: It was observed that mean age was 28 months. About 80% of the cases were between 1 to 3 years age. 82% (n=53/54 were radio lucent foreign body, only 1.5% (n=1/54 were radio o paque. Site of lodgment of foreign body was right main bronchus in 48% (n=26/54, left main bronchus 46% (n=25/54 , tracheal 1.85% (n=1/54, subglottic 1.85% (n=1/54, carinal 1.85% (n=1/54, multiple site i.e. left bronchus +right bronchus+ carinal 1.85% (n=1/54. Groundnut was most common

  8. Measurements of Ionic Structure in Shock Compressed Lithium Hydride from Ultra-fast X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Brown, C; Davis, P; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G; Holst, B; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Morse, E C; Pelka, A; Redmer, R; Roth, M; Vorberger, J; Wunsch, K; Glenzer, S H

    2009-07-14

    We present the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. These laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples are well characterized by inelastic Compton and Plasmon scattering of a K-{alpha} x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The experimental spectra yield the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for ionic screening.

  9. NASA's first in-space optical gyroscope: A technology experiment on the X ray Timing Explorer spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Glenn; Kaufman, David M.; Krainak, Michael; Sanders, Glenn; Taylor, Bill; Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    A technology experiment on the X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft to determine the feasibility of Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscopes for space flight navigation is described. The experiment consists of placing a medium grade fiber optic gyroscope in parallel with the spacecraft's inertial reference unit. The performance of the fiber optic gyroscope will be monitored and compared to the primary mechanical gyroscope's performance throughout the two-year mission life.

  10. Real-time in situ powder X-ray diffraction monitoring of mechanochemical synthesis of pharmaceutical cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasz, Ivan; Puškarić, Andreas; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Dinnebier, Robert E; Patel, Bhavnita; Jones, William; Strukil, Vjekoslav; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-10-25

    Looking in: The penetrating power of high-energy X-rays provides a means to monitor in situ and in real time the course of ball-milling reactions of organic pharmaceutical solids by detecting crystalline phases and assessing the evolution of their particle sizes. Upon switching from neat grinding to liquid-assisted grinding, cocrystal formation is enabled or tremendously accelerated, while the reaction mechanism alters its course.

  11. On the use of two-time correlation functions for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikondoa, Oier

    2017-04-01

    Multi-time correlation functions are especially well suited to study non-equilibrium processes. In particular, two-time correlation functions are widely used in X-ray photon correlation experiments on systems out of equilibrium. One-time correlations are often extracted from two-time correlation functions at different sample ages. However, this way of analysing two-time correlation functions is not unique. Here, two methods to analyse two-time correlation functions are scrutinized, and three illustrative examples are used to discuss the implications for the evaluation of the correlation times and functional shape of the correlations.

  12. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  13. Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final performance report for our grant 'Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar.' In the first year of this grant, we received the 50,000-second ROSAT (German acronym for X-ray satellite) High Resolution Images (HRI) observation of the Crab Nebula pulsar. We used the data to create a 65-ms-resolution pulse profile and compared it to a similar pulse profile obtained in 1991. No statistically significant differences were found. These results were presented at the January 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Since then, we have performed more sensitive analyses to search for potential changes in the pulse profile shape between the two data sets. Again, no significant variability was found. In order to augment this long (six-year) baseline data set, we have analyzed archival observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). While these observations have shorter time baselines than the ROSAT data set, their higher signal-to-noise offers similar sensitivity to long-term variability. Again, no significant variations have been found, confirming our ROSAT results. This work was done in collaboration with Prof. Stephen Eikenberry, Cornell University. These analyses will be included in Cornell University graduate student Dae-Sik Moon's doctoral thesis.

  14. Long-Term Timing and Glitch Characteristics of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1RXS J170849.0-400910

    CERN Document Server

    Mus, Sinem Sasmaz

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our detailed timing studies of an anomalous X-ray pulsar, 1RXS J170849.0-400910, using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations spanning over ~6 yr from 2005 until the end of RXTE mission. We constructed the long-term spin characteristics of the source and investigated time and energy dependence of pulse profile and pulsed count rates. We find that pulse profile and pulsed count rates in the 2-10 keV band do not show any significant variations in ~6 yr. 1RXS J170849.0-400910 has been the most frequently glitching anomalous X-ray pulsar: three spin-up glitches and three candidate glitches were observed prior to 2005. Our extensive search for glitches later in the timeline resulted in no unambiguous glitches though we identified two glitch candidates (with Delta(nu)/nu ~10^{-6}) in two data gaps: a strong candidate around MJD 55532 and another one around MJD 54819, which is slightly less robust. We discuss our results in the context of pulsar glitch models and expectancy of glit...

  15. Timing Analysis of the Light Curve of the Dipping-Bursting X-ray Binary X1916-053

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y; Bloser, P F

    2001-01-01

    We present the timing analysis results for our observations of the x-ray dip source X1916-053 conducted with RXTE between February and October of 1996. Our goal was to finally measure the binary period - as either the x-ray dip period or ~1% longer optical modulation period, thereby establishing if the binary has a precessing disk (SU UMa model) or a third star (triple model). Combined with historical data (1979-96), the x-ray dip period is measured to be 3000.6508 $\\pm$ 0.0009 sec with a 2$\\sigma$ upper limit $|\\dot P| \\leq 2.06 \\times 10^{-11}$. From our quasi-simultaneous optical observations (May 14-23, 1996) and historical data (1987-96), we measure the optical modulation period to be 3027.5510 $\\pm$ 0.0052 sec with a 2$\\sigma$ upper limit $|\\dot P| \\leq 2.28 \\times 10^{-10}$. The two periods are therefore each stable (over all recorded data) and require a $3.9087 \\pm 0.0008$d beat period. This beat period, and several of its harmonics is also observed as variations in the dip shape. Phase modulation of ...

  16. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Katayama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL.

  17. Comparison of 30 THz impulsive burst time development to microwaves, H-alpha, EUV, and GOES soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Miteva, R; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Fernandes, L O T; Freeland, S L; Karlicky, M; Kerdraon, A; Kudaka, A S; Luoni, M L; Marcon, R; Raulin, J -P; Trottet, G; White, S M

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of impulsive solar burst emission in the 30 THz band is raising new interpretation challenges. One event associated with a GOES M2 class flare has been observed simultaneously in microwaves, H-alpha, EUV, and soft X-ray bands. Although these new observations confirm some features found in the two prior known events, they exhibit time profile structure discrepancies between 30 THz, microwaves, and hard X-rays (as inferred from the Neupert effect). These results suggest a more complex relationship between 30 THz emission and radiation produced at other wavelength ranges. The multiple frequency emissions in the impulsive phase are likely to be produced at a common flaring site lower in the chromosphere. The 30 THz burst emission may be either part of a nonthermal radiation mechanism or due to the rapid thermal response to a beam of high-energy particles bombarding the dense solar atmosphere.

  18. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  19. A complementary dual-slope ADC with high frame rate and wide input range for fast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Cho, Minsik; Kang, Dong-Uk; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong

    2014-02-01

    The single-slope analog-to-digital converter (SS-ADC) is the most commonly used column-level ADC for high-speed industrial, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray image sensors because of its small chip area (the width of a pixel), its simple circuit structure, and its low power consumption. However, it generally has a long conversion time, so we propose an innovative design: a complimentary dual-slope ADC (CDS-ADC) that uses two opposite ramp signals instead of a single ramp to double the conversion speed. This CDS-ADC occupies only 15% more area than the original SS-ADC. A prototype 12-bit CDS-ADC and a 12-bit SS-ADC were fabricated using a 0.35-µm 1P 4M CMOS process. During comparison of the two, the measured maximum differential non-linearity (DNL) of the CDS-ADC was a 0.49 least significant bit (LSB), the maximum integral non-linearity (INL) was a 0.43 LSB, the effective number of bits (ENOB) was 9.18 bits, and the figure of merit (FOM) was 0.03 pJ/conversion. The total power consumption was 0.031 uW. The conversion time of the new CDS-ADC was half that of the SS-ADC. The proposed dual-slope concept can be extended to further multiply the conversion speed by using multiple pairs of dual-slope ramps.

  20. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-30

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  1. Timing Observations of PSR J1023+0038 During a Low-Mass X-ray Binary State

    CERN Document Server

    Jaodand, Amruta; Hessels, Jason W T; Bogdanov, Slavko; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Patruno, Alessandro; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T

    2016-01-01

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star's spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star's magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star's surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neut...

  2. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  3. Are spectral and timing correlations similar in different spectral states in black hole X-ray binaries?

    CERN Document Server

    Kalamkar, M; van der Klis, M; Altamirano, D; Miller, J M

    2015-01-01

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5--0127 and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope. The bandpass of the X-ray Telescope has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time, a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states; most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the hard-intermediate state (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard...

  4. Design of Time-Resolved Shifted Dual Transmission Grating Spectrometer for the X-Ray Spectrum Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoqing; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Tingshuai; Li, Jin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-07-01

    A new time-resolved shifted dual transmission grating spectrometer (SDTGS) is designed and fabricated in this work. This SDTGS uses a new shifted dual transmission grating (SDTG) as its dispersive component, which has two sub transmission gratings with different line densities, of 2000 lines/mm and 5000 lines/mm. The axes of the two sub transmission gratings in SDTG are horizontally and vertically shifted a certain distance to measure a broad range of 0.1-5 keV time-resolved X-ray spectra. The SDTG has been calibrated with a soft X-ray beam of the synchrotron radiation facility and its diffraction efficiency is also measured. The designed SDTGS can take full use of the space on a record panel and improve the precision for measuring spatial and temporal spectrum simultaneously. It will be a promising application for accurate diagnosis of the soft X-ray spectrum in inertial confinement fusion. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405158 and 11435011) and Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Nos. 2014B0102011 and 2014B0102012)

  5. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time-the crucial role of x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Stephan V

    2016-10-12

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented.

  6. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  7. X-ray spectra and time variability of active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Done, Christine; Pounds, Kenneth A.

    1993-01-01

    The history and the present status of X-ray observations of AGN are outlined with reference to Seyfert Is, Seyfert IIs, and quasars. Fe K emission lines, other distortions at E greater tha 6 keV, excess emission below 2 keV, absorption, and ionized material are discussed. The continuum flux variability and line variability in Seyfert Is and the continuum variability in Seyfert IIs are examined. Models and theories of the continuum are reviewed, and the total energy budget of AGN and their similarity to Galactic black holes are also discussed.

  8. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a con...

  9. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid

    2014-01-01

    , respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >1034 erg s-1. Although we do not reach a definitive determination...

  10. Large Observatory for x-ray Timing (LOFT-P): a Probe-class mission concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Alvarez, Laura; Baysinger, Michael; Becker, Chris; Bozzo, Enrico; Brandt, Soren; Carson, Billy; Chapman, Jack; Dominguez, Alexandra; Fabisinski, Leo; Gangl, Bert; Garcia, Jay; Griffith, Christopher; Hernanz, Margarita; Hickman, Robert; Hopkins, Randall; Hui, Michelle; Ingram, Luster; Jenke, Peter; Korpela, Seppo; Maccarone, Tom; Michalska, Malgorzata; Pohl, Martin; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanne, Stephane; Schnell, Andrew; Stella, Luigi; van der Klis, Michiel; Watts, Anna; Winter, Berend; Zane, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    LOFT-P is a mission concept for a NASA Astrophysics Probe-Class (concept originally proposed to ESAs M3 and M4 calls. LOFT-P requires very large collecting area, high time resolution, good spectral resolution, broad-band spectral coverage (2-30 keV), highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to detect and respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It addresses science questions such as: What is the equation of state of ultra dense matter? What are the effects of strong gravity on matter spiraling into black holes? It would be optimized for sub-millisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources including X-ray bursters, black hole binaries, and magnetars to study phenomena at the natural timescales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons and to measure mass and spin of black holes. These measurements are synergistic to imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, addressing much smaller distance scales than are possible without very long baseline X-ray interferometry, and using complementary techniques to address the geometry and dynamics of emission regions. LOFT-P would have an effective area of >6 m2, > 10x that of the highly successful Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). A sky monitor (2-50 keV) acts as a trigger for pointed observations, providing high duty cycle, high time resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE All-Sky Monitor, enabling multi-wavelength and multimessenger studies. A probe-class mission concept would employ lightweight collimator technology and large-area solid-state detectors, segmented into pixels or strips, technologies which have been recently greatly advanced during the ESA M3 Phase A study of LOFT. Given the large community interested in LOFT (>800 supporters*, the scientific productivity of this mission is expected to be very high, similar to or greater than RXTE ( 2000 refereed publications). We describe the results of a study, recently completed by the

  11. Time structure measurement of the storage ring with the time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence method at SSRF

    CERN Document Server

    Zhaohong, Zhang; Song, Xue; Lifang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the time structure of the storage ring on the sample spot inside the experimental hutch is a foundational step during the time-resolved experiments using the pulsed synchrotron X-rays with the time structure defined by the storage ring. In this work, the method of time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence was designed and implemented to do the measurement. This method is based on the principle of time-correlated single photon counting techniques. The measurement system consists of a spectrometer with a detector of photomultiplier tube, a timing system, a set of Nuclear Instrument Modules and a luminescent material of Zinc Oxide. The measurement was performed on the X-ray absorbed fine structure spectrum beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that this system can be used to measure the time structure of the storage ring with a precision of less than 1 ns.

  12. A simple method to prevent hard X-ray-induced preheating effects inside the cone tip in indirect-drive fast ignition implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dongxiao; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shui, Min; He, Yingling; Gu, Yuqiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn; Zhang, Baohan [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Chen, Li; Chen, Ming [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); and others

    2016-06-15

    During fast-ignition implosions, preheating of inside the cone tip caused by hard X-rays can strongly affect the generation and transport of hot electrons in the cone. Although indirect-drive implosions have a higher implosion symmetry, they cause stronger preheating effects than direct-drive implosions. To control the preheating of the cone tip, we propose the use of indirect-drive fast-ignition targets with thicker tips. Experiments carried out at the ShenGuang-III prototype laser facility confirmed that thicker tips are effective for controlling preheating. Moreover, these results were consistent with those of 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Crystallography using synchrotron radiation X-ray. Application of Weissenberg and time resolved Laue methods to macromolecular structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakabe, Noriyoshi [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules under static and dynamic conditions are very important for the study of molecular biology. X-ray crystallography is the most powerful tool to obtain the three-dimensional structures of the macromolecules of especially large size, for which synchrotron radiation X-ray is used, The collection of diffraction data is the first, most important step for crystalline structure analysis. Efforts have been exerted to establish the data collection system using monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-ray (SRX). The diffraction intensity data collection system combined with a newly developed Weissenberg camera for macromolecules and an image plate (IP) using SRX has been established at the Photon Factory. Many important biological structures by high resolution have already come out with this data collection system, which is used also for the study on enzymatic reaction mechanism. A time resolved Laue camera has been designed, and the preliminary experiment has been carried out in the Photon Factory. These systems are reported. (K.I.).

  14. A full-field transmission x-ray microscope for time-resolved imaging of magnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, J.; Nisius, T.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Wilhein, T. [Institute for X-Optics (IXO), Hochschule Koblenz, Joseph-Rovan-Allee 2, 53424 Remagen (Germany); Wessels, P.; Wieland, M.; Drescher, M. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Vogel, A. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Viefhaus, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Meier, G. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    Sub-nanosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited by a picosecond electric current pulse via a coplanar waveguide. The transmitted light of the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with < 65 nm resolution onto a 2D gateable X-ray detector to select one particular bunch in the storage ring that probes the time evolution of the dynamic information successively via XMCD spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme. In the experiments it was possible to generate a homogeneously magnetized state in patterned magnetic layers by a strong magnetic Oersted field pulse of 200 ps duration and directly observe the recovery to the initial flux-closure vortex patterns.

  15. Studies of electron diffusion in photo-excited Ni using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, A. I. H.; Jarnac, A.; Wang, Xiaocui; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the heat deposition profile in a laser-excited metal can be determined by time-resolved X-ray diffraction. In this study, we investigated the electron diffusion in a 150 nm thick nickel film deposited on an indium antimonide substrate. A strain wave that mimics the heat deposition profile is generated in the metal and propagates into the InSb, where it influences the temporal profile of X-rays diffracted from InSb. We found that the strain pulse significantly deviated from a simple exponential profile, and that the two-temperature model was needed to reproduce the measured heat deposition profile. Experimental results were compared to simulations based on the two-temperature model carried out using commercial finite-element software packages and on-line dynamical diffraction tools. To reproduce the experimental data, the electron-phonon coupling factor was lowered compared to previously measured values. The experiment was carried out at a third-generation synchrotron radiation source using a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera with a temporal resolution of 3 ps.

  16. Probing the hard and intermediate states of X-ray binaries using short time-scale variability

    CERN Document Server

    Skipper, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    Below an accretion rate of approximately a few per cent of the Eddington accretion rate, X-ray binary systems are not usually found in the soft spectral state. However, at accretion rates a factor of a few lower still, in the hard state, there is another spectral transition which is well observed but not well understood. Below ~0.5-1 per cent of the Eddington accretion rate (m_crit), the spectral index hardens with increasing accretion rate, but above m_crit, although still in the hard state, the spectral index softens with increasing accretion rate. Here we use a combination of X-ray spectral fitting and a study of short time-scale spectral variability to examine the behaviour of three well-known X-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1, GX 339-4 and XTE J1118+480. In Cygnus X-1 we find separate hard and soft continuum components, and show using root-mean-square (rms) spectra that the soft component dominates the variability. The spectral transition at m_crit is clearly present in the hard-state hardness-intensity diagram...

  17. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  18. Constraining the UV emissivity of AGN throughout cosmic time via X-ray surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, F; Shankar, F; La Franca, F; Civano, F

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological process of hydrogen (HI) reionization in the intergalactic medium is thought to be driven by UV photons emitted by star-forming galaxies and ionizing active galactic nuclei (AGN). The contribution of QSOs to HI reionization at $z>4$ has been traditionally believed to be quite modest. However, this view has been recently challenged by new estimates of a higher faint-end UV luminosity function (LF). To set firmer constraints on the emissivity of AGN at $z<6$, we here make use of complete X-ray selected samples including deep Chandra and new COSMOS data, capable to efficiently measure the 1 ryd comoving AGN emissivity up to $z\\sim5-6$ and down to five magnitudes fainter than probed by current optical surveys, without any luminosity extrapolation. We find good agreement between the logN$\\rm{_H}\\lesssim21-22$ cm$^{-2}$ X-ray LF and the optically-selected QSO LF at all redshifts for $M_{1450}\\leq -23$. The full range of the logN$\\rm{_H}\\lesssim21-22$ cm$^{-2}$ LF ($M_{1450} \\leq -17$) was then u...

  19. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M., E-mail: maike.becker@dlr.de; Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F. [Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), 51170 Köln (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min{sup −1} up to 10 K min{sup −1} can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K–1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  20. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di racting properties of a x-ray di racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  1. Time structure measurement of the storage ring with the time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence method at SSRF

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaohong, Zhang; Zheng, Jiang; Song, Xue; Lifang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the time structure of the storage ring on the sample spot inside the experimental hutch is a foundational step during the time-resolved experiments using the pulsed synchrotron X-rays with the time structure defined by the storage ring. In this work, the method of time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence was designed and implemented to do the measurement. This method is based on the principle of time-correlated single photon counting techniques. The measurement system consis...

  2. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  3. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benefits The discovery of X-rays and the invention of CT represented major advances in medicine. X- ... in X-ray and CT Examinations — X-ray definition, dose measurement, safety precautions, risk, and consideration with ...

  4. Structural and dynamical properties of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} metallic glasses studied by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruta, B., E-mail: ruta@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Giordano, V.M. [ILM, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Erra, L. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Liu, C.; Pineda, E. [Departament Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, UPC-BarcelonaTech, Castelldefels (Spain)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Study of rapidly quenched Mg-based metallic glasses under different thermal paths. • The atomic dynamics was investigated by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. • The structural changes were followed by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction. • Dynamical and structural properties of Mg-based metallic glasses at the atomic level. • Strengthened idea of a stress-induced atomic motion in metallic glasses. - Abstract: We present a temperature investigation of the structural and dynamical evolution of rapidly quenched metallic glasses of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} at the atomic length scale by means of in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We find a flattening of the temperature evolution of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak on approaching the glass transition temperature from the glassy state, which reflects into a surprising slowing down of the relaxation dynamics of even one order of magnitude with increasing temperature. The comparison between structural and dynamical properties strengthens the idea of a stress-induced, rather than pure diffusive, atomic motion in metallic glasses.

  5. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  6. Time-dependent search for neutrino emission from x-ray binaries with the ANTARES telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, A; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Avgitas, T; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Celli, S; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coleiro, A; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Di Palma, I; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Bojaddaini, I El; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Felis, I; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geiÿelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Glotin, H; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Höÿl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; Illuminati, G; James, C W; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kieÿling, D; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lachaud, C; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Melis, K; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Nezri, E; Pavalas, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Turpin, D; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2016-01-01

    ANTARES is currently the largest neutrino telescope operating in the Northern Hemisphere, aiming at the detection of high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Neutrino telescopes constantly monitor at least one complete hemisphere of the sky, and are thus well-suited to detect neutrinos produced in transient astrophysical sources. A timedependent search has been applied to a list of 33 x-ray binaries undergoing high flaring activities in satellite data (RXTE/ASM, MAXI and Swift/BAT) and during hardness transition states in the 2008-2012 period. The background originating from interactions of charged cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere is drastically reduced by requiring a directional and temporal coincidence with astrophysical phenomena. The results of this search are presented together with comparisons between the neutrino flux upper limits and the neutrino flux predictions from astrophysical models. The neutrino flux upper limits resulting from this search limit the jet parameter predictions for s...

  7. Time-interleaved multienergy acceleration for an x-ray free-electron laser facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To meet the demand from the growing number of user experiments, multi-beam-line operation with a wide spectral range is seriously considered in x-ray free-electron laser facilities. In a conventional design, the beam line of low photon energies branches off from the middle of the accelerator to take out low energy electron beams. Here in this paper, a novel method is proposed to deliver bunch-to-bunch energy changed electron beams at the end of the accelerator. Since all accelerator components are operated in steady state, this method enables quasisimultaneous operation of multi-beam-line in the same undulator hall without degrading the stability and performance of the electron beam.

  8. NuSTAR J163433-473841: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J; Bauer, Franz E; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fornasini, Francesca M; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Krivonos, Roman; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-473841, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted for between ~0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-IR imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5)(-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1)(-1.2) keV. The reduced-chi2 valu...

  9. A Library of known X-ray Pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Time Evolution of their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Drake, Jeremy J.; Hong, Jaesub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Coe, Malcolm; Ho, Wynn

    2017-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed 116 {\\itshape XMM-Newton\\/}, 151 {\\itshape Chandra\\/}, and 952 {\\itshape RXTE\\/} observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of $L_X= 10^{31.5}-10^{38}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. We report $\\sim$1600 individual pulsar detections, yielding $\\sim$1300 pulse period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram and X-ray spectrum. Upper-limits are estimated for all non-detections bringing the combined database to $\\sim$37,000 observations of 67 pulsars. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulse fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 27/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse-detection and flux as functions of spin-period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars ($Prarely detected, yet are more prone to giant outburst. Accompanying this paper is an initial public release of the library so that it can be used by other researchers. We intend the database and pulse profile library to be useful in driving improved models of neutron star magnetospheres and accretion physics.

  10. Silicon avalanche photodiodes for direct detection of X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alfred Q R; Kishimoto, Shunji; Morse, John; Rigal, Jean Marie

    2006-03-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are discussed as fast X-ray detectors for synchrotron radiation. The emphasis is on ;direct' detection, where the X-ray is absorbed within the silicon APD itself, and, therefore, on use with medium-energy X-rays, <30 keV. The impact of APD structure on device performance is examined, and representative data from many different commercial devices are presented. Specific areas discussed include signal shapes, high-rate behavior, time resolution and pulse-height response. Data from several APD arrays are also presented, as is a detailed description of an integrated package system. Tables are included comparing commercially available devices, including arrays.

  11. X-Ray Timing and Spectral Observations of Galactic Black Hole Candidate XTE J1550--564 During Outburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Kaice T

    2002-12-11

    Soft X-ray transients (SXTs), a sub-class of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), provide a unique opportunity to test General Relativity and to probe fundamental physics under conditions terrestrially unattainable. SXT outbursts are of great interest because they allow the study of LMXBs under a wide range of accretion rates. The majority of known SXTs contain black holes, therefore SXT outbursts are key to understanding accretion physics around black holes and in active galactic nuclei, which are thought to contain supermassive, M {approx} 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 10} M{circle_dot}, where M{circle_dot} is one solar mass, central compact objects. These compact objects are most likely black holes, which exhibit, on a much larger scale, accretion physics similar to that around black holes in SXTs. In this work, the timing and spectral properties of the SXT and microquasar XTE J1550-564 during outburst are studied. Observations made by the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) Experiment on board the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) are emphasized. USA data show a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) with a centroid frequency that tends to increase with increasing USA flux and a fractional rms amplitude which is correlated with the USA hardness ratio (4-16 keV/1-4 keV). Several high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) were detected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), during periods where the LFQPO is seen to be weakening or not detectable at all. The evolution of the USA hardness ratio with time and source flux is examined. The hardness-intensity diagram shows counterclockwise cyclical evolution and possibly indicates the presence of two independent accretion flows: a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk and a hot sub-Keplerian flow.

  12. Time Variability and Luminosity of X-ray Sources of Face-on Spiral Galaxy NGC 1232

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantua, Oscar; Rucas, Tyler; Singh, Pranjal; Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The ACIS detector (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the face-on spiral NGC 1232 over six epochs for a total exposure of ~250 ksec. We describe each observation as well as the merged data set. Each exposure contains ~50 individual sources. We focus on the time variability and luminosity distributions of the sources. We also describe our search for diffuse emission as well as our search for evidence for a reported collision with a dwarf galaxy. Finally, we compare the merged data set and the detected sources with other wavebands.

  13. Real-time X-ray diffraction imaging for semiconductor wafer metrology and high temperature in situ experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilewsky, A.N.; Wittge, J.; Hess, A.; Croell, A. [Kristallographie, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Rack, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Allen, D.; McNally, P. [Research Institute for Networks and Communications Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Santos Rolo, T. dos; Vagovic, P.; Baumbach, T. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Garagorri, J.; Elizalde, M.R. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), San Sebastian (Spain); Tanner, B.K. [Department of Physics, Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We describe a rapid digital system for X-ray diffraction imaging and demonstrate its application to the real-time identification of edge defects in a silicon wafer that had been subjected to rapid thermal annealing. The application of the system to the in situ study of slip nucleation at the location of mechanical wafer defects, indents and a thermocouple, and the subsequent dislocation dynamics is presented. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  15. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  16. Nonequilibrium lattice-driven dynamics of stripes in nickelates using time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Kung, Y.F.; Moritz, B.; Coslovich, G.; Kaindl, R.A.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moore, R.G.; Lu, D.H.; Kirchmann, P.S.; Robinson, J.S.; Minitti, M.P.; Dakovski, G.; Schlotter, W.F.; Turner, J.J.; Gerber, S.; Sasagawa, T.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.; Devereaux, T.P.

    2017-03-13

    We investigate the lattice coupling to the spin and charge orders in the striped nickelate, La 1.75 Sr 0.25 NiO 4 , using time-resolved resonant x-ray scattering. Lattice-driven dynamics of both spin and charge orders are observed when the pump photon energy is tuned to that of an E u bond- stretching phonon. We present a likely scenario for the behavior of the spin and charge order parameters and its implications using a Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  17. Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Irregular Shape Porosity in Hypoeutectic Aluminum Alloy by X-Ray Real Time Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yuna; Fan, Ran; Wang, Qigui; Pan, Ye

    2012-08-01

    The formation mechanism of irregular shape porosity in hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy (A356) was investigated by X-ray real time observation on porosity evolution during solidification and re-melting. Porosity in the hypoeutectic aluminum A356 alloy with high hydrogen content (>0.3 mL/100 g Al) first forms in the liquid as small spherical gas bubbles, then expands along with the pressure drop in the mushy zone due to shrinkage and lack of feeding, and finally deforms into irregular morphology by the impingement of aluminum dendrite network. Degassing is a key to eliminate porosity in aluminum alloy castings.

  18. Timing Observations of PSR J1023+0038 During a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaodand, Amruta; Archibald, Anne M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bogdanov, Slavko; D’Angelo, Caroline R.; Patruno, Alessandro; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.

    2016-10-01

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star’s spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star’s magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star’s surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neutron star. We have phase-connected nine XMM-Newton observations of PSR J1023+0038 over the last 2.5 years of the LMXB state to establish a precise measurement of spin evolution. We find that the average spin-down rate as an LMXB is 26.8 ± 0.4% faster than the rate (‑2.39 × 10‑15 Hz s‑1) determined during the RMSP state. This shows that negative angular momentum contributions (dipolar magnetic braking, and outflow) exceed positive ones (accreted material), and suggests that the pulsar wind continues to operate at a largely unmodified level. We discuss implications of this tight observational constraint in the context of possible accretion models.

  19. [C-MOS flat-panel sensor for real time X-ray imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Aoki, Y; Sasaki, Y; Akanuma, A; Mizuno, S

    1998-02-01

    Flat-panel, self-scanning, solid state diagnostic x-ray imaging devices using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (C-MOS) arrays are under investigation. A unit device with a 5 cm by 5 cm sensor area was developed and tested. The device consists of a CsI scintillator and C-MOS detector arrays. The detector arrays are composed of a regular arrangement of pixels (256 x 256), each of which is made of a C-MOS photodiode sensor coupled to a C-MOS FET (field effect transistor). A common FET gate line is connected to all the FET gates along each column. A common date line is connected to all the FET drains of each row. The source contact of each FET is connected to that of its corresponding photodiode. A positive gate pulse applied to a gate turns on all FETs connected to the date lines. The readout continues column by column. Correlated double sampling circuits and an offset variance compensation circuit were installed to reduce noise. A sampling speed of 15 frames per second and spatial resolution of 2.5 line per mm were achieved. Noise level and maximum signal were 1.5 mV rms and 1.8 V, respectively. Image quality was considered acceptable for clinical use. It is also discussed how to fabricate a large area sensor with the unit device.

  20. Efficient generation of highly ionized calcium and titanium plasma columns for collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers in a fast capillary discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, J.J.; Cortazar, O.D.; Tomasel, F.G.; Szapiro, B.T. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Fast discharges through 1.5-mm-diam capillaries have produced dense Ca and Ti plasma columns with an abundance of Ne-like ions, which are of interest for the development of small-scale, collisionally excited soft-x-ray lasers. Current pulses of 30 ns full width at half maximum and peak currents of less than 70 kA produced plasmas with line emission from ions with charge up to the F-like state. Line emission at the wavelengths of the 3[ital p]-3[ital s] and 3[ital d]-3[ital p] transitions of the Ne-like ions has been observed.

  1. Real-time phase-contrast x-ray imaging: a new technique for the study of animal form and function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socha, J.; Lee, W.; Chicago Field Museum; Arizona State Univ.

    2007-03-01

    Despite advances in imaging techniques, real-time visualization of the structure and dynamics of tissues and organs inside small living animals has remained elusive. Recently, we have been using synchrotron x-rays to visualize the internal anatomy of millimeter-sized opaque, living animals. This technique takes advantage of partially-coherent x-rays and diffraction to enable clear visualization of internal soft tissue not viewable via conventional absorption radiography. However, because higher quality images require greater x-ray fluxes, there exists an inherent tradeoff between image quality and tissue damage.

  2. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A fast X-ray transient in the galactic plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grindlay, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Natalucci, Lorenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W., E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8σ in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between ∼0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Γ=4.1{sub −1.0}{sup +1.5} (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2 ± 0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT=3.0{sub −1.2}{sup +2.1} keV. The reduced-χ{sup 2} values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with N{sub H}=(2.8{sub −1.4}{sup +2.3})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, (9{sub −7}{sup +15})×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}, and (1.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.7})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}. Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  3. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-Ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between approx. 0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5/-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1/-1.2) keV. The reduced-?2 values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with NH = (2.8(+2.3/-1.4) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), (9(+15 /-7) ) × 10(exp22) cm(exp-2), and (1.7(+1.7/-0.9)) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity greater than 10(exp34) erg s(exp-1). Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  4. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Y; Obara, Y; Katayama, T; Suzuki, Y-I; Liu, S Y; Bartlett, N C-M; Kurahashi, N; Karashima, S; Togashi, T; Inubushi, Y; Ogawa, K; Owada, S; Rubešová, M; Yabashi, M; Misawa, K; Slavíček, P; Suzuki, T

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s), and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-). The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III) is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II), followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II). Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2 (•))Fe(II)(C2O4)2](3-) and subsequently [Fe(II)(C2O4)2](2-).

  5. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s, and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III(C2O43]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II, followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II. Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•Fe(II(C2O42]3− and subsequently [Fe(II(C2O42]2−.

  6. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  7. Real time in situ x-ray topographic observation of deformation of single crystals and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.B.; Hershberger, J.; Chiaramonti, A.; Bilello, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rek, Z.U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.

    1998-12-31

    An experimental apparatus, which is capable of performing real time in situ X-ray topographic observation of deformation process via synchrotron white beam topography, has been developed. This device enables both tensile data (load-displacement) and topographic images to be recorded simultaneously. It has been utilized to study the deformation behaviors of crystals of Mo and W. These specimens have been subject to mechanical cycling with increasing load, and their deformation processes have been observed in real time and in situ via x-ray topography. This leads to the observation of several phenomena, which would have been difficult to reveal by other experimental techniques. They include stress concentration, microyielding, reversible variation of contrasts and stress relaxation. In addition, the deformation behaviors of small angle grain boundaries have also been examined. Furthermore, the specimens can be heated through a heating device attached to the tensile stage, which allows high temperature topography to be performed in real time. The technique has been applied to the Ta films on Si (100) substrates. With increasing temperature, the topographic observations have revealed that the Ta films yields, fracture and then proceed to delaminate from their substrates.

  8. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  9. ARE SPECTRAL AND TIMING CORRELATIONS SIMILAR IN DIFFERENT SPECTRAL STATES IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der [Astronomical Institute, “Anton Pannekoek,” University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Altamirano, D., E-mail: maithili@oa-roma.inaf.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-20

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states (HIMSs); most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the HIMS (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard state (in GX 339-4 and SWIFT J1753.5-0127). Also, the responses of the individual frequency components to changes in the disk temperature are markedly different from one component to the next. Hence, the spectral-timing evolution cannot be explained by a single correlation that spans both these spectral states. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  10. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, S; Caliebe, W; Siddons, P; So, I; Clay, B; Lenhard, T; Hanson, J; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A I; Marinkovic, N; Hould, N; Ginder-Vogel, M; Landrot, G L; Sparks, D L; Ganjoo, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  11. Effects of capillary discharge current on the time of lasing onset of soft x-ray laser at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yongpeng; Cheng Yuanli; Luan Bohan; Wu Yinchu; Wang Qi [National Key Laboratory of Tunable Laser Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2006-01-21

    The laser spike of Ne-like argon 46.9 nm pumped by a capillary discharge is measured with an x-ray diode (XRD) at low Ar pressure (25 Pa). Changing the rise-time and amplitude of the main current, we observe the effects of current on the time of the laser spike. The experimental results show that the time of lasing onset, which is the time of the laser spike after the onset of the main current, is larger than 40 ns and almost constant when the rise-time and amplitude of the current are changed. The theoretical results are calculated with the snow-plough model and show that the plasma is pinched several times before the laser spike occurs.

  12. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A.; Watson, Michael A.; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C.

    2016-12-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.

  13. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers).

  14. Design Improvements and X-Ray Performance of a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter for Persistent Astronomical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Emmett, Thomas J.; Enoto, Teruaki; Jahoda, Keith M.; Kaaret, Philip; Nolan, David S.; Tamagawa, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The design of the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) Polarimeter for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) was demonstrated to Technology Readiness Level 6 (TRL-6)3 and the flight detectors fabricated, assembled and performance tested. A single flight detector was characterized at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source with polarized X-rays at 10 energies from 2.3-8.0 keV at five detector positions. The detector met all of the GEMS performance requirements. Lifetime measurements have shown that the existing flight design has 23 years of lifetime4, opening up the possibility of relaxing material requirements, in particular the consideration of the use of epoxy, to reduce risk elsewhere. We report on design improvements to the GEMS detector to enable a narrower transfer gap that, when operated with a lower transfer field, reduces asymmetries in the detector response. In addition, the new design reduces cost and risk by simplifying the assembly and reducing production time. Finally, we report on the performance of the narrow-gap detector in response to polarized and unpolarized X-rays.

  15. Timing and spectral studies of the transient X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 during an outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Devasia, Jincy; Paul, Biswajit; Indulekha, Kavila

    2011-01-01

    We present the timing and spectral properties of the transient X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 during its recent outburst in 2010 August, using observations carried out with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) instrument on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. We detected strong intensity and energy dependent variations in the pulse profiles during the outburst. The pulse profile showed significant evolution over the outburst. It showed complex structures consisting of a main peak with steps on both sides during the start of the outburst. On some days, a sharp dip like feature was seen which disappeared at the end of the outburst; when the profile evolved into a sinusoidal shape. At low energies, the pulse profiles appeared complex, consisting of multiple peaks and a narrow minimum. The amplitude of the second brightest peak in low energies decreased with energy, and above 12 keV, the shape of the pulse profile changed to a single broad peak with a dip like feature. The dip had energy dependence, bo...

  16. On the importance of minimizing "coast-time" in x-ray driven inertially confined fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A.; Callahan, D. A.; Landen, O.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kline, J.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Moore, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J. D.; Widmann, K.

    2017-09-01

    By the time an inertially confined fusion (ICF) implosion has converged a factor of 20, its surface area has shrunk 400 × , making it an inefficient x-ray energy absorber. So, ICF implosions are traditionally designed to have the laser drive shut off at a time, toff, well before bang-time, tBT, for a coast-time of t coast = t B T - t o f f > 1 ns. High-foot implosions on NIF showed a strong dependence of many key ICF performance quantities on reduced coast-time (by extending the duration of laser power after the peak power is first reached), most notably stagnation pressure and fusion yield. Herein we show that the ablation pressure, pabl, which drives high-foot implosions, is essentially triangular in temporal shape, and that reducing tcoast boosts pabl by as much as ˜ 2 × prior to stagnation thus increasing fuel and hot-spot compression and implosion speed. One-dimensional simulations are used to track hydrodynamic characteristics for implosions with various coast-times and various assumed rates of hohlraum cooling after toff to illustrate how the late-time conditions exterior to the implosion can impact the fusion performance. A simple rocket model-like analytic theory demonstrates that reducing coast-time can lead to a ˜ 15 % higher implosion velocity because the reduction in x-ray absorption efficiency at late-time is somewhat compensated by small ( ˜ 5 % - 10 %) ablator mass remaining. Together with the increased ablation pressure, the additional implosion speed for short coast-time implosions can boost the stagnation pressure by ˜ 2 × as compared to a longer coast-time version of the same implosion. Four key dimensionless parameters are identified and we find that reducing coast-time to as little as 500 ps still provides some benefit. Finally, we show how the high-foot implosion data is consistent with the above mentioned picture.

  17. On-site Real-Time Inspection System for Pump-impeller using X-band Linac X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Natsui, Takuya; Taguchi, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Lee, Ki woo; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Sakumi, Akira; Yusa, Noritaka; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanabe, Eiji

    2009-03-01

    The methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) are generally ultrasonic, neutron, eddy-current and X-rays, NDT by using X-rays, in particular, is the most useful inspection technique having high resolution. We can especially evaluate corroded pipes of petrochemical complex, nuclear and thermal-power plants by the high energy X-ray NDT system. We develop a portable X-ray NDT system with X-band linac and magnetron. This system can generate a 950 keV electron beam. We are able to get X-ray images of samples with 1 mm spatial resolution. This system has application to real time impeller inspection because linac based X-ray sources are able to generate pulsed X-rays. So, we can inspect the rotating impeller if the X-ray pulse rate is synchronized with the impeller rotation rate. This system has application in condition based maintenance (CBM) of nuclear plants, for example. However, 950 keV X-ray source can only be used for thin tubes with 20 mm thickness. We have started design of a 3.95 MeV X-band linac for broader X-ray NDT application. We think that this X-ray NDT system will be useful for corrosion wastage and cracking in thicker tubes at nuclear plants and impeller of larger pumps. This system consists of X-band linac, thermionic cathode electron gun, magnetron and waveguide components. For achieving higher electric fields the 3.95 MeV X-band linac structure has the side-coupled acceleration structure. This structure has more efficient acceleration than the 950 keV linac with alternating periodic structure (APS). We adopt a 1.3 MW magnetron for the RF source. This accelerator system is about 30 cm long. The beam current is about 150 mA, and X-ray dose rate is 10 Gy@1 m/500 pps. In this paper, the detail of the whole system concept and the electromagnetic field of designed linac structure will be reported.

  18. Probing the hydrogen-bond network of water via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Wen, Haidan; Nordlund, Dennis; Szilagyi, Erzsi; Daranciang, Dan; Miller, Timothy A.; Nilsson, Anders; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2009-04-24

    We report time-resolved studies of hydrogen bonding in liquid H2O, in response to direct excitation of the O-H stretch mode at 3 mu m, probed via soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge. This approach employs a newly developed nanofluidic cell for transient soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquid phase. Distinct changes in the near-edge spectral region (XANES) are observed, and are indicative of a transient temperature rise of 10K following transient laser excitation and rapid thermalization of vibrational energy. The rapid heating occurs at constant volume and the associated increase in internal pressure, estimated to be 8MPa, is manifest by distinct spectral changes that differ from those induced by temperature alone. We conclude that the near-edge spectral shape of the oxygen K-edge is a sensitive probe of internal pressure, opening new possibilities for testing the validity of water models and providing new insight into the nature of hydrogen bonding in water.

  19. ''Live'' Prussian blue fading by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Claire [Smithsonian Institution Museum Conservation Institute, Suitland, MD (United States); Bern University of the Arts, Bern (Switzerland); Languille, Marie-Angelique [Synchrotron SOLEIL, IPANEMA, USR 3461 CNRS/MCC, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Reguer, Solenn [Synchrotron SOLEIL, DiffAbs beamline, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gillet, Martine [Museum national d' histoire naturelle, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation des Collections, Paris (France); Vicenzi, Edward P. [Smithsonian Institution Museum Conservation Institute, Suitland, MD (United States); Chagnot, Sebastien; Baudelet, Francois [Synchrotron SOLEIL, ODE beamline, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bertrand, Loic [Synchrotron SOLEIL, IPANEMA, USR 3461 CNRS/MCC, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-04-15

    Prussian blue (PB) is an artists' pigment that has been frequently used in many artworks but poses several problems of conservation because of its fading under light and anoxia treatment. PB fading is due to the reduction of iron(III) into iron(II) and depends a lot on the object investigated. Due to the complexity of the structure, the precise physico-chemical mechanisms behind the redox process remain obscure. In this paper, we present a procedure to investigate light- and anoxia-induced fading of PB-paper samples by means of time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at the Fe K-edge. A system composed of a visible light source and a flux-controlled environmental cell allowed light, gas and humidity to be modified in situ. The synchrotron X-ray beam was evidenced to induce a reduction of PB and to play a major role in the kinetics. The analysis of the PB fading kinetics of a sample submitted to various gas and light environments showed that both synchrotron beam and anoxia were influencing PB reduction in a correlated way. In comparison, light was found to play a minor role. Finally, we have demonstrated that the type of paper substrate could influence significantly the kinetics of reduction. Several hypotheses to explain the correlation between PB reduction mechanism and substrate are presented. (orig.)

  20. Spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray millisecond pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    CERN Document Server

    Falanga, M; Poutanen, J; Galloway, D K; Bonning, E W; Bozzo, E; Goldwurm, A; Hermsen, W; Stella, L

    2010-01-01

    IGR J17511-3057 is the second X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about a month from September 13, 2009. The broad-band average spectrum is well described by thermal Comptonization with an electron temperature of kT_e ~ 25 keV, soft seed photons of kT_bb ~ 0.6 keV, and Thomson optical depth \\tau_T ~ 2 in a slab geometry. During the outburst the spectrum stays remarkably stable with plasma and soft seed photon temperatures and scattering optical depth being constant within errors. We fitted the outburst profile with the exponential model, and using the disk instability model we inferred the outer disk radius to be (4.8 - 5.4) \\times 1010 cm. The INTEGRAL and RXTE data reveal the X-ray pulsation at a period of 4.08 milliseconds up to ~ 120 keV. The pulsed fraction is shown to decrease from ~22% at 3 keV to a constant pulsed fraction of ~17-18% between 7-30 keV, and then to decrease again down to ~13% at 60 keV. The nearly sinusoidal pulses show soft lags m...