WorldWideScience

Sample records for fast wave coupling

  1. Shear Alfven wave excitation by direct antenna coupling and fast wave resonant mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Antenna coupling to the shear Alfven wave by both direct excitation and fast wave resonant mode conversion is modelled analytically for a plasma with a one dimensional linear density gradient. We demonstrate the existence of a shear Alfven mode excited directly by the antenna. For localised antennas, this mode propagates as a guided beam along the steady magnetic field lines intersecting the antenna. Shear Alfven wave excitation by resonant mode conversion of a fast wave near the Alfven resonance layer is also demonstrated and we prove that energy is conserved in this process. We compare the efficiency of these two mechanisms of shear Alfven wave excitation and present a simple analytical formula giving the ratio of the coupled powers. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of some experimental results. 45 refs., 7 figs

  2. Calculation of coupling to slow and fast waves in the LHRF from phased waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R.I.; Duvall, R.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    A previously reported algorithm for solving the problem of coupling electromagnetic energy in the LHRF from a phased array of identical rectangular waveguides to a plane-stratified, magnetized cold plasma is numerically implemented. The resulting computer codes are sufficiently general to allow for an arbitrary number of waveguides with finite dimensions in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and are thus capable of computing coupling to both slow and fast waves in the plasma. Some of the details of the implementation and the extension of the algorithm to allow study of the Fourier spectrum of slow and fast waves launched by the array are discussed. Good agreement is found with previously reported, less general work for the slow wave launching case. The effect of phasing multirow arrays in the poloidal direction is studied, and an asymmetry between phasing 'up' and 'down' is found that persists in the case where the plasma adjacent to the array is uniform. A 4 x 3 array designed to launch fast waves of high phase velocity is studied. By using the optimal poloidal phasing, low reflection coefficients (absolute value of R 2 less than or equal to 20%) are found under some not unrealistic edge plasma conditions, but most of the input power is trapped in the outermost layer of the plasma. Implications of our results for fast wave current drive experiments are discussed

  3. Calculation of coupling to slow and fast waves in the LHRF from phased waveguide arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinsker, R.I.; Duvall, R.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    A previously reported algorithm for solving the problem of coupling electromagnetic energy in the LHRF from a phased array of identical rectangular waveguides to a plane-stratified, magnetized cold plasma is numerically implemented. The resulting computer codes are sufficiently general to allow for an arbitrary number of waveguides with finite dimensions in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and are thus capable of computing coupling to both slow and fast waves in the plasma. Some of the details of the implementation and the extension of the algorithm to allow study of the Fourier spectrum of slow and fast waves launched by the array are discussed. Good agreement is found with previously reported, less general work for the slow wave launching case. The effect of phasing multirow arrays in the poloidal direction is studied, and an asymmetry between phasing 'up' and 'down' is found that persists in the case where the plasma adjacent to the array is uniform. A 4 x 3 array designed to launch fast waves of high phase velocity is studied. By using the optimal poloidal phasing, low reflection coefficients (absolute value of R/sup 2/ less than or equal to 20%) are found under some not unrealistic edge plasma conditions, but most of the input power is trapped in the outermost layer of the plasma. Implications of our results for fast wave current drive experiments are discussed.

  4. Development of slow and fast wave coupling and heating from the C-Stellarator to NSTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosea Joel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A historical perspective on key discoveries which contributed to understanding the properties of coupling both slow and fast waves and the effects on plasma heating and current drive will be presented. Important steps made include the demonstration that the Alfven resonance was in fact a mode conversion on the C-stellarator, that toroidal m = -1 eigenmodes were excited in toroidal geometry and impurity influx caused the Z mode on the ST tokamak, that the H minority regime provided strong heating and that 3He minority could be used as well on PLT, that the 2nd harmonic majority tritium regime was viable on TFTR, and that high harmonic fast wave heating was efficient when the SOL losses were avoided on NSTX.

  5. Fast Inversion of Air-Coupled Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW Using in situ Particle Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Lu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW is widely used in nondestructive subsurface profiling for geological sites. The air-coupled SASW is an extension from conventional SASW methods by replacing ground-mounted accelerometers with non-contact microphones, which acquire a leaky surface wave instead of ground vibration. The air-coupled SASW is a good candidate for fast inspection in shallow geological studies. Especially for pavement maintenance, minimum traffic interference might be induced. One issue that restrains SASW from fast inspection is the traditional slow inversion which relies on guess-and-check iteration techniques including a forward analysis. In this article, a fast inversion analysis algorithm is proposed to estimate the shear velocity profile without performing conventional forward simulation. By investigating the attenuation of particle displacement along penetrating depths, a weighted combination relationship is derived to connect the dispersion curve with the shear velocity profile directly. Using this relationship, the shear velocity profile could be estimated from a given/measured dispersion curve. The proposed procedure allows the surface wave-based method to be fully automatic and even operated in real-time for geological site and pavement assessment. The method is verified by the forward analysis with stiffness matrix method. It is also proved by comparing with other published results using various inversion methods.

  6. Fast and slow light generated by surface plasmon wave and gold grating coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Iraj S.; Ariannejad, M. M.; Tajdidzadeh, M.; Sorger, Volker J.; Ling, Xi; Yupapin, P.

    2018-01-01

    We present here the results of a simulation of the effect of gold and graphene coatings on silicon micro-ring resonators. We studied the effect of different radii of graphene on the time delay, from which one an interesting aspect of light pulse behaviors, such as fast light, was numerically investigated. The obtained results indicate that the time delay can be varied, which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Fast and slow light pulse trains can be obtained by modifying the throughput port, which forms the gold grating length. The temporal gaps between the fast and slow light in the used graphene and gold are 140 and 168 fs, respectively, which can be tuned by varying the radius or grating length. The obtained results show that such a device may be useful in applications requiring fast and slow light pulse train pairs, such as optical switching, sensors, communications, and security applications.

  7. Modelling of radio frequency sheath and fast wave coupling on the realistic ion cyclotron resonant antenna surroundings and the outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Després, B.; Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E.; Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Křivská, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.

    2018-03-01

    In order to model the sheath rectification in a realistic geometry over the size of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) antennas, the self-consistent sheaths and waves for ICH (SSWICH) code couples self-consistently the RF wave propagation and the DC SOL biasing via nonlinear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions applied at plasma/wall interfaces. A first version of SSWICH had 2D (toroidal and radial) geometry, rectangular walls either normal or parallel to the confinement magnetic field B 0 and only included the evanescent slow wave (SW) excited parasitically by the ICRH antenna. The main wave for plasma heating, the fast wave (FW) plays no role on the sheath excitation in this version. A new version of the code, 2D SSWICH-full wave, was developed based on the COMSOL software, to accommodate full RF field polarization and shaped walls tilted with respect to B 0 . SSWICH-full wave simulations have shown the mode conversion of FW into SW occurring at the sharp corners where the boundary shape varies rapidly. It has also evidenced ‘far-field’ sheath oscillations appearing at the shaped walls with a relatively long magnetic connection length to the antenna, that are only accessible to the propagating FW. Joint simulation, conducted by SSWICH-full wave within a multi-2D approach excited using the 3D wave coupling code (RAPLICASOL), has recovered the double-hump poloidal structure measured in the experimental temperature and potential maps when only the SW is modelled. The FW contribution on the potential poloidal structure seems to be affected by the 3D effects, which was ignored in the current stage. Finally, SSWICH-full wave simulation revealed the left–right asymmetry that has been observed extensively in the unbalanced strap feeding experiments, suggesting that the spatial proximity effects in RF sheath excitation, studied for SW only previously, is still important in the vicinity of the wave launcher under full wave polarizations.

  8. Fast Plane Wave Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas

    This PhD project investigates and further develops methods for ultrasound plane wave imaging and blood flow estimation with the objective of overcoming some of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems, which are related to low frame rates and only estimation of velocities along th...

  9. Modulational instability of coupled waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Bingham, R.

    1989-01-01

    The collinear propagation of an arbitrary number of finite-amplitude waves is modeled by a system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations; one equation for each complex wave amplitude. In general, the waves are modulationally unstable with a maximal growth rate larger than the modulational growth rate of any wave alone. Moreover, waves that are modulationally stable by themselves can be driven unstable by the nonlinear coupling. The general theory is then applied to the relativistic modulational instability of two laser beams in a beat-wave accelerator. For parameters typical of a proposed beat-wave accelerator, this instability can seriously distort the incident laser pulse shapes on the particle-acceleration time scale, with detrimental consequences for particle acceleration

  10. Intense Shock Waves and Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2005-07-01

    The report presents the recent results of experimental investigations of equations of state, compositions, thermodynamical and transport properties, electrical conductivity and opacity of strongly coupled plasmas generated by intense shock and rarefaction waves. The experimental methods for generation of high energy densities in matter, drivers for shock waves and fast diagnostic tools are discussed. Application of intense shock waves to solid and porous targets generates nonideal plasmas in megabar-gigabar pressure range. Compression of plasma by a series of reverberating shock waves allows us to decrease irreversible heating effects. To increase the irreversibility effects and to generate high temperature plasma states the experiments on shock compression of porous samples (fine metal powder, aerogels) were performed. The adiabatic expansion of matter initially compressed by intense shocks up to megabars allows investigating the intermediate region between the solid and vapor phase of nonideal plasmas, including the metal-insulator transition phase and the high temperature saturation curve with critical points of metals. The shock-wave-induced non-equilibrium phenomena at fast melting, spallation and adiabatic condensation are analyzed in the framework of the interspinodal decomposition model. The spall strength of single and polycrystal metals at extremely fast deformation produced by fast shock waves is discussed. The ``pressure ionization'' phenomena in hydrogen, helium, argon, xenon, krypton, neon, iodine, silica, sulfur, fullerenes, and some metals are analyzed on the base of multiple shock compression experiments. For some simple metals (Li, Na, Ca) the effect of ``dielectrization'' as a result of multiple shock compression are discussed.

  11. Launching fast waves in large devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Kaye, A.; Brown, T.

    1994-01-01

    Design features of JET A2-antennae including that of remote location of ceramic are outlined. These antennae are being installed in preparation for the new divertor phase of JET that will commence in 1994. The experience of antenna design gained at JET is carried forward to present an outline in blanket/shield design of an antenna for launching fast waves in ITER for heating and current drive. Further, a new wide band antenna the so called 'violin antenna' is presented that features high plasma coupling resistance in selected bands in the 20-85 MHz frequency range. (author)

  12. Combline antennas for launching traveling fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, C.P.; Gould, R.W.; Phelps, D.A.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    The combline structure shows promise for launching traveling fast magnetosonic waves with adjustable n parallel (3 ≤ n parallel ≤ 6) for current drive. In this paper, the dispersion and damping properties of the combline antenna with and without a Faraday shield are given. The addition of a Faraday shield which eliminates the electrostatic coupling between current straps as well as between the straps and plasma offers the advantage of eliminating the need for the lumped capacitors which are otherwise required with this structure. The results of vacuum dispersion and damping measurements on a low power model antenna are also given. (author)

  13. Fast wave current drive above the slow wave density limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.; Sheehan, D.P.; Wolf, N.S.; Edrich, D.

    1989-01-01

    Fast wave and slow wave current drive near the mean gyrofrequency were compared in the Irvine Torus using distinct phased array antennae of similar principal wavelengths, frequencies, and input powers. The slow wave current drive density limit was measured for 50ω ci ≤ω≤500ω ci and found to agree with trends in tokamaks. Fast wave current drive was observed at densities up to the operating limit of the torus, demonstrably above the slow wave density limit

  14. Flashing coupled density wave oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Zhang Youjie

    1997-07-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The phenomenon and mechanism of different kinds of two-phase flow instabilities, namely geyser instability, flashing instability and flashing coupled density wave instability are described. The especially interpreted flashing coupled density wave instability has never been studied well, it is analyzed by using a one-dimensional non-thermo equilibrium two-phase flow drift model computer code. Calculations are in good agreement with the experiment results. (5 refs.,5 figs., 1 tab.)

  15. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  16. Waves from Propulsion Systems of Fast Ferries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taatø, Søren Haugsted; Aage, Christian; Arnskov, Michael M.

    1998-01-01

    generated by the ship hulls alone. Whereas this assumption may be reasonable for conventional ships with large hulls and limited propulsive power, the situation is different for fast ferries with their smaller hulls and very large installed power. A simple theoretical model and a series of model tests......Waves from fast ferries have become an environmental problem of growing concern to the public. Fast ferries produce not only higher waves than conventional ships but also fundamentally different wave systems when they sail at supercritical speeds. Hitherto, ship waves have been considered as being...... on a monohull fast ferry seem to indicate that a substantial part of the wave-making can be directly attributed to the propulsion system itself. Thus, two wave systems are created with different phases, but with similar frequency contents, which means that they merge into one system behind the ship, very...

  17. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    is found to have similar spatial patterns as the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) radar backscatter; both show features of the bathymetry. Analysis of the wind field from the non-coupled and WBLM coupled experiments show that the wind-wave coupling is important in strong wind conditions, varying......This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...

  18. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. (ANT-Nachrichtentechnik GmbH, Backnang (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high [beta] VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  19. Fast wave current drive system design for DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Moeller, C..; Petty, C.C.; Phelps, D.R.; Pinsker, R.I.; Remsen, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Taylor, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, W.; Martin, S. [ANT-Nachrichtentechnik GmbH, Backnang (Germany)

    1992-09-01

    DIII-D has a major effort underway to develop the physics and technology of fast wave electron heating and current drive in conjunction with electron cyclotron heating. The present system consists of a four strap antenna driven by one 2 MW transmitter in the 32--60 MHz band. Experiments have been successful in demonstrating the physics of heating and current drive. In order to validate fast wave current drive for future machines a greater power capability is necessary to drive all of the plasma current. Advanced tokamak modeling for DIII-D has indicated that this goal can be met for plasma configurations of interest (i.e. high {beta} VH-mode discharges) with 8 MW of transmitter fast wave capability. It is proposed that four transmitters drive fast wave antennas at three locations in DIII-D to provide the power for current drive and current profile modification. As the next step in acquiring this capability, two modular four strap antennas are in design and the procurement of a high power transmitter in the 30--120 MHz range is in progress. Additionally, innovations in the technology are being investigated, such as the use of a coupled combine antenna to reduce the number of required feedthroughs and to provide for parallel phase velocity variation with a relatively small change in frequency, and the use of fast ferrite tuners to provide millisecond timescale impedance matching. A successful test of a low power fast ferrite prototype was conducted on DIII-D.

  20. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  1. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  2. Coupling to fast MHD eigenmodes in a toroidal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoloni, F.J.

    1975-05-01

    The coupling to fast MHD waves in toroidal-like geometry is calculated when eigenmodes exist in the plasma. The torus is considered to be a resonant cavity into which energy is coupled by a half turn loop. The cavity Q is calculated for the minority heating process, for cyclotron harmonic damping, electron transit-time magnetic pumping, wall loading, and Coulomb collisional damping. The problem of sustaining the eigenmode as the plasma conditions change with time is also discussed. One method that seems to be practical is a feedback scheme that varies the plasma major radius by a small amount as the conditions change. (U.S.)

  3. Second harmonic ion cylotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave on the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave, and the propagation of the fast wave from the fundamental of the ion cyclotron frequency to its second harmonic was investigated in a hydrogen plasma on the PLT tokamak. The theory of fast magnetosonic wave propagation was extended to include the effects of density gradients, plasma current, and impurity ion species. The damping of the fast wave at the second harmonic is calculated, where the theory has been extended to include the full radial dependence of the fast wave fields. Power deposition profiles and eigenmode Q's are calculated using this theory. The effects of the interaction between the ion Bernstein wave and the fast magnetosonic wave are calculated, and enhanced fast wave damping is predicted. The antenna loading is calculated including the effects of overlap of the fast wave eigenmodes. During the second harmonic heating experiments, the antenna loading was characterized as a function of the plasma parameters, and efficient coupling of the RF power to the plasma at high density was observed. At very low densities, fast wave eigenmodes were identified on PLT, and their Q's are measured. Eigenmodes with different toroidal directions of propagation were observed to exhibit large splitting in density due to the plasma current. Efficient bulk heating, with centrally peaked profiles, is observed at the second harmonic, and a tail, which decreases monotonically with energy, is observed on the ion distribution

  4. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; V.S. Chan

    2001-01-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile

  5. Plane wave fast color flow mode imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolic, Ibrahim; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2006-01-01

    A new Plane wave fast color flow imaging method (PWM) has been investigated, and performance evaluation of the PWM based on experimental measurements has been made. The results show that it is possible to obtain a CFM image using only 8 echo-pulse emissions for beam to flow angles between 45...... deviation, sigma(est) of the velocity profile estimate is around 2% for beam to flow angles between 45 degrees and 75 degrees relative to the peak velocity, when the flow angle is known in advance. A study is performed to investigate how different parameters influence the blood velocity estimation...

  6. Simulation of the interaction between Alfven waves and fast particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Tamas Bela

    2014-02-18

    There is a wide variety of Alfven waves in tokamak and stellarator plasmas. While most of them are damped, some of the global eigenmodes can be driven unstable when they interact with energetic particles. By coupling the MHD code CKA with the gyrokinetic code EUTERPE, a hybrid kinetic-MHD model is created to describe this wave-particle interaction in stellarator geometry. In this thesis, the CKA-EUTERPE code package is presented. This numerical tool can be used for linear perturbative stability analysis of Alfven waves in the presence of energetic particles. The equations for the hybrid model are based on the gyrokinetic equations. The fast particles are described with linearized gyrokinetic equations. The reduced MHD equations are derived by taking velocity moments of the gyrokinetic equations. An equation for describing the Alfven waves is derived by combining the reduced MHD equations. The Alfven wave equation can retain kinetic corrections. Considering the energy transfer between the particles and the waves, the stability of the waves can be calculated. Numerically, the Alfven waves are calculated using the CKA code. The equations are solved as an eigenvalue problem to determine the frequency spectrum and the mode structure of the waves. The results of the MHD model are in good agreement with other sophisticated MHD codes. CKA results are shown for a JET and a W7-AS example. The linear version of the EUTERPE code is used to study the motion of energetic particles in the wavefield with fixed spatial structure, and harmonic oscillations in time. In EUTERPE, the gyrokinetic equations are discretized with a PIC scheme using the delta-f method, and both full orbit width and finite Larmor radius effects are included. The code is modified to be able to use the wavefield calculated externally by CKA. Different slowing-down distribution functions are also implemented. The work done by the electric field on the particles is measured to calculate the energy transfer

  7. Global analysis of ICRF wave coupling on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Tore Supra tokamak is equipped with a multi-megawatt ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) system for heating and current drive. The coupling of the fast wave to the plasma, characterized by the distributed coupling resistance along the radiating straps, is a crucial issue in order to launch large RF powers. Many factors can have an effect on ICRF wave coupling. Quantitative prediction from theoretical modelling requires the knowledge of the local inhomogeneous plasma density profile in front of the antenna for running sophisticated antenna codes. In this work, we have rather followed a 'global' approach, based on Tore Supra experimental results, for the parametric study of the coupling resistance. From a large data base covering seven experimental campaigns (∼2250 shots), a scaling law of the coupling resistance including the main parameters of the plasma and of the antenna configuration is established. This approach is found to be reliable for the analysis of coupling in the different scenarios: He/D 2 gas filling, gas/pellets for plasma fuelling, plasma leaning on inner wall/low field side limiter, limiter/ergodic divertor configuration, minority heating/direct electron heating. From one scenario to another, a significant variation of the coefficients of the scaling law is found. The study of these variations allows to get some insight on the main physical mechanisms which influence the ICRF wave coupling in a tokamak operation, such as the wall conditioning and recycling conditions, RF sheaths or frequency. (author)

  8. The essential theory of fast wave current drive with full wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Gong Xueyu; Yang Lei; Yin Chenyan; Yin Lan

    2007-01-01

    The full wave numerical method is developed for analyzing fast wave current drive in the range of ion cyclotron waves in tokamak plasmas, taking into account finite larmor radius effects and parallel dispersion. the physical model, the dispersion relation on the assumption of Finite Larmor Radius (FLR) effects and the form of full wave be used for computer simulation are developed. All of the work will contribute to further study of fast wave current drive. (authors)

  9. Fast wave current drive in reactor scale tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.; Saoutic, B.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility for driving current in large tokamak plasmas using the fast magnetosonic wave is analysed in terms of linear propagation-absorption, and also in terms of quasilinear absorption through an hamiltonian analysis of the wave-particle interaction. The tokamak geometry is shown to strongly influence the capability for the fast wave to sustain a significant part of the toroidal current. Synergetic effects with other scenarios are also discussed

  10. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  11. Separating fast and slow modes in coupled chaotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peña

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We test a simple technique based on breeding to separate fast and slow unstable modes in coupled systems with different time scales of evolution and variable amplitudes. The technique takes advantage of the earlier saturation of error growth rate of the fastest mode and of the lower value of the saturation amplitude of perturbation of either the fast or the slow modes. These properties of the coupled system allow a physically-based selection of the rescaling time interval and the amplitude of initial perturbations in the 'breeding' of unstable modes (Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1996, 1997; Aurell et al., 1997; Boffetta et al., 1998 to isolate the desired mode. We perform tests in coupled models composed of fast and slow versions of the Lorenz (1963 model with different strengths of coupling. As examples we present first a coupled system which we denote 'weather with convection', with a slow, large amplitude model coupled with a fast, small amplitude model, second an 'ENSO' system with a 'tropical atmosphere' strongly coupled with a 'tropical ocean', and finally a triply coupled system denoted 'tropical-extratropical' in which a fast model (representing the 'extratropical atmosphere' is loosely coupled to the 'ENSO' system. We find that it is always possible to isolate the fast modes by taking the limit of small amplitudes and short rescaling intervals, in which case, as expected, the results are the same as the local Lyapunov growth obtained with the linear tangent model. In contrast, slow modes cannot be isolated with either Lyapunov or Singular vectors, since the linear tangent and adjoint models are dominated by the fast modes. Breeding is successful in isolating slow modes if rescaling intervals and amplitudes are chosen from physically appropriate scales.

  12. Comments on the Terminology of "Convectively-Coupled Kelvin Waves"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Winston C.

    2006-01-01

    The terminology "convectively-coupled Kelvin waves" has been used frequently in the literature to refer to the 15 m/s eastward-moving planetary and large-scale waves in the tropics. This note points out that this terminology is not appropriate, since these waves contain Rossby waves and mixed Rossby-gravity waves also. The significance of pointing out this misnomer is that a better understanding of these waves may contribute to the search for their cause.

  13. Full wave simulations of fast wave mode conversion and lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, J.C.; Bonoli, P.T.; Brambilla, M.

    2004-01-01

    Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k(perpendi......Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k......(perpendicular to)rho(i)similar to1 which leads to a scaling of the maximum poloidal mode number, M-max, proportional to 1/rho(*) (rho(*)equivalent torho(i)/L). The computational resources needed scale with the number of radial (N-r), poloidal (N-theta), and toroidal (N-phi) elements as N-r * N-phi * N-theta(3...... time are capable of achieving the resolution and speed necessary to address mode conversion phenomena in full two-dimensional (2-D) toroidal geometry. These codes have been used in conjunction with theory and experimental data from the Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson , Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994...

  14. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I. [and others

    1995-07-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma} = 0.4 {times} 10{sup 18} T{sub eo} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances.

  15. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as γ = 0.4 x 10 18 T eo (keV) [A/m 2 W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances

  16. Analysis of fast wave current drive from the Alcyon code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.; Giruzzi, G.; Saoutic, B.

    1991-01-01

    Fast Wave Current Drive simulations have been performed with the 2-D full wave code ALCYON. These simulations include the computation of the RF field in a Tokamak geometry, for a given launched power spectrum, a linear estimation of the driven current profile using this RF field, and the numerical derivation of the quasilinear diffusion operator for a complete Fokker-Planck calculation. Results concerning the ITER, and the DIII-D Tokamaks are presented and discussed

  17. Travelling wave solutions of generalized coupled Zakharov–Kuznetsov and dispersive long wave equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arshad

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we constructed different form of new exact solutions of generalized coupled Zakharov–Kuznetsov and dispersive long wave equations by utilizing the modified extended direct algebraic method. New exact traveling wave solutions for both equations are obtained in the form of soliton, periodic, bright, and dark solitary wave solutions. There are many applications of the present traveling wave solutions in physics and furthermore, a wide class of coupled nonlinear evolution equations can be solved by this method. Keywords: Traveling wave solutions, Elliptic solutions, Generalized coupled Zakharov–Kuznetsov equation, Dispersive long wave equation, Modified extended direct algebraic method

  18. Fast Evaluation of Ship Responses in Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a rational and efficient procedure able to predict the design wave-induced motions, accelerations and loads with sufficient engineering accuracy in the conceptual design phase and in risk assessment. The procedure relies only on the following main parame...... parameters of the ship: Length, breadth, draught, block coefficient and water plane area together with the operational profile. The formulas are semi-analytical and the calculations can be easily done using a standard spreadsheet program....

  19. Characterizing MHD Fast Mode Wave Properties Relevant for Radiation Belt Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast mode waves (FMW) can interact with radiation belt electrons directly or by coupling to standing Alfven waves via field line resonance (FLR). Statistical analysis of FMW amplitudes, frequencies, and spatial distributions is needed to constrain the role of FMW in wave-particle interactions and FLR. However, observations of FMW outside the plasmasphere are complicated by the presence of other Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) wave modes with large amplitudes and similar magnetic signatures to FMW. We use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite measurements of the thermal pressure, magnetic field, and electric field near the magnetic equator to identify FMW events and discriminate them from other ULF wave modes. We present preliminary results for the spatial distribution and typical amplitudes of FMW with frequencies appropriate for radiation belt interactions.

  20. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Forest, C.B.; Ikezi, H.; Prater, R.; Baity, F.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Kim, K.W.; Lee, J.H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Murakami, M.; ONeill, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Rhodes, T.L.; Swain, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as γ=0.4x10 18 T e0 (keV) [A/m 2 W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with clear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. Fast cooling techniques for gravitational wave antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Furtado, S R

    2002-01-01

    The resonant-mass technique for the detection of gravitational waves may involve, in the near future, the cooling of very large masses (about 100 tons) from room temperature (300 K) to extreme cryogenic temperatures (20 mK). To cool these detectors to cryogenic temperatures an exchange gas (helium) is used, and the heat is removed from the antenna to the cold reservoir by thermal conduction and natural convection. With the current technique, cooling times of about 1 month can be obtained for cylindrical bar antennas of 2.5 tons. Should this same technique be used to cool a 100 ton spherical antenna the cooling time would be about 10 months, making the operation of these antennas impracticable. In this paper, we study the above-mentioned cooling technique and others, such as thermal switching and forced convection from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) using an aluminium truncated icosahedron of 19 kg weight and 25 cm diameter.

  2. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m 2

  3. A kind of iteration algorithm for fast wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xueguang; Kuang Guangli; Zhao Yanping; Li Youyi; Xie Jikang

    1998-03-01

    The standard normal distribution for particles in Tokamak geometry is usually assumed in fast wave heating. In fact, due to the quasi-linear diffusion effect, the parallel and vertical temperature of resonant particles is not equal, so, this will bring some error. For this case, the Fokker-Planck equation is introduced, and iteration algorithm is adopted to solve the problem well

  4. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping

  5. Nonlocal nonlinear coupling of kinetic sound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Lyubchyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study three-wave resonant interactions among kinetic-scale oblique sound waves in the low-frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived in the framework of a two-fluid plasma model. Because of dispersive modifications at small wavelengths perpendicular to the background magnetic field, these waves become a decay-type mode. We found two decay channels, one into co-propagating product waves (forward decay, and another into counter-propagating product waves (reverse decay. All wavenumbers in the forward decay are similar and hence this decay is local in wavenumber space. On the contrary, the reverse decay generates waves with wavenumbers that are much larger than in the original pump waves and is therefore intrinsically nonlocal. In general, the reverse decay is significantly faster than the forward one, suggesting a nonlocal spectral transport induced by oblique sound waves. Even with low-amplitude sound waves the nonlinear interaction rate is larger than the collisionless dissipation rate. Possible applications regarding acoustic waves observed in the solar corona, solar wind, and topside ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  6. On resonant coupling of acoustic waves and gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Christophe

    2017-11-01

    Acoustic propagation in the atmosphere is often modeled using modes that are confined within waveguides causing the sound to propagate through multiple paths to the receiver. On the other hand, direct observations in the lower stratosphere show that the gravity wave field is intermittent, and is often dominated by rather well defined large-amplitude wave packets. In the present work, we use normal modes to describe both the gravity wave field and the acoustic field. The gravity wave spectrum is obtained by launching few monochromatic waves whose properties are chosen stochastically to mimic the intermittency. Owing to the disparity of the gravity and acoustic length scales, the interactions between the gravity wave field and each of the acoustic modes can be described using a multiple-scale analysis. The appropriate amplitude evolution equation for the acoustic field involves certain random terms that can be directly related to the gravity wave sources. We will show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the gravity wave parameterization can create or destroy specific acoustic features.

  7. Hamiltonian analysis of fast wave current drive in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Fraboulet, D.; Giruzzi, G.; Moreau, D.; Saoutic, B.

    1993-12-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism is used to analyze the direct resonant interaction between the fast magnetosonic wave and the electrons in a tokamak plasma. The intrinsic stochasticity of the electron phase space trajectories is derived, and together with extrinsic de-correlation processes, assesses the validity of the quasilinear approximation for the kinetic studies of fast wave current drive (FWCD). A full-wave resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov set of equations provides the exact pattern of the wave fields in a complete tokamak geometry, for a realistic antenna spectrum. The local quasilinear diffusion tensor is derived from the wave fields, and is used for a computation of the driven current and deposited power profiles, the current drive efficiency, including possible non-linear effects in the kinetic equation. Several applications of FWCD on existing and future machines are given, as well as results concerning combination of FWCD with other non inductive current drive methods. An analytical expression for the current drive efficiency is given in the high single-pass absorption regimes. (authors). 20 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs

  8. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonlinear fast sausage waves in homogeneous magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhalyaev, Badma B.; Ruderman, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    > We consider fast sausage waves in straight homogeneous magnetic tubes. The plasma motion is described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in the cold plasma approximation. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the nonlinear evolution of an envelope of a carrier wave. The coefficients of this equation are expressed in terms Bessel and modified Bessel functions. They are calculated numerically for various values of parameters. In particular, we show that the criterion for the onset of the modulational or Benjamin-Fair instability is satisfied. The implication of the obtained results for solar physics is discussed.

  10. Wave-induced hydroelastic response of fast monohull displacement ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Wang, Zhaohui

    1998-01-01

    natural frequencies of the global hull modes can be relatively low compared to the frequency of wave encounter.In the present paper the effect of hull flexibility on the wave-induced springing and whipping vibrations is investigated in stationary stochastic seaways. The calculations are performed using...... a quadratic strip theory formulated in the frequency domain and a fully non-linear time-domain strip theory. The hydroelastic response is thereby excited partly by resonance and partly by non-linear excitation. The calculations are carried out for a recent proposal for a fast monohull containership....

  11. Recent Improvements in Fast Wave Heating in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Taylor, R.E. Bell, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.B. Wilgen, J.R. Wilson, and the NSTX Team

    2009-06-26

    Recent improvements in high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating in NSTX are attributed to using lithium conditioning, and other wall conditioning techniques, to move the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation further from the antenna. This has resulted in the first observation of HHFW core electron heating in deuterium plasma at a launched toroidal wavenumber, kφ = -3 m-1, NSTX record core electron temperatures of 5 keV in helium and deuterium discharges and, for the first time, significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral-beam-fuelled H-mode plasmas. Also, kφ = -8 m-1 heating of the plasma startup and plasma current ramp-up has resulted in significant core electron heating, even at central electron densities as low as ~ 4x1018 m-3.

  12. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mal vortex-like ion distribution and strongly correlated grains in a liquid-like state and discussed about the properties of shock ... shock waves in coupled dusty plasma with Boltzmann distribution of ions. Ghosh et al have studied the effect of ... ues of parameters where the nonlinear term is zero. Also new kind of shock wave.

  13. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  14. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-04-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  15. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m 2 and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n || components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW

  16. Shear-coupled PL waves observed at the Kerguelen Isles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, O.; Maupin, V.

    2003-04-01

    S-waves generated by earthquakes in Indonesia and recorded at the seismological broadband station PAF on the Kerguelen Isles are usually followed by particularly large, long and monochromatic wavetrains. These wavetrains are not observed, or are not as prominent, for events at comparable epicentral distances in other source regions. They have a clear dominant period of about 20 seconds and last usually for more than 100s. They show slight normal dispersion, and have a prograde elliptical motion in the vertical propagation plane with largest amplitude on the radial component. These characteristics suggest that the observed waves are shear-coupled PL-waves, i.e., a phase which propagates partly as a mantle S-wave and partly as P-waves trapped in the crust. The P-wave portion of the propagation may occur close to the source, close to the receiver, or at both ends of the wavepath, over a significant portion of the epicentral distance. Observations at Kerguelen of strong shear-coupled PL waves from Indonesian earthquakes suggest a special crust and upper mantle structure in the region between the Kerguelen hotspot and the South-East Indian Ridge, 1000 km away. This includes the region where a special upper mantle anisotropic structure has been detected from surface wave polarisation anomalies. We analyse which implications the strong shear-coupled PL waves may have on the structure between the hotspot and the ridge.

  17. Coupled magnetoelastic waves in ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar'Yakhtar, V. G.; Danilevich, A. G.; L'Vov, V. A.

    2011-10-01

    The theory of the spectra of coupled magnetoelastic waves in ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMA) is developed. The possibility of an abnormally strong coupling of spin waves with the soft elastic mode at approaching the martensitic transformation (MT) temperature is disclosed. In particular the magnetoelastic waves in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals are considered. A considerable (by an order of magnitude) reduction of the shear elastic modulus and an appropriate lowering of the transversal velocity of sound in the applied magnetic field are predicted. Optimum conditions for the experimental observation of the predicted effects are specified.

  18. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied in a DC discharge device by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1 c ) where Γ is the Coulomb coupling parameter and Γ c is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results

  19. Dispersive Evolution of Nonlinear Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: D.J.Pascoe@warwick.ac.uk [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-01

    Quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wave trains are frequently observed in extreme ultraviolet observations of the solar corona, or are inferred by the quasi-periodic modulation of radio emission. The dispersive nature of fast magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal structures provides a robust mechanism to explain the detected quasi-periodic patterns. We perform 2D numerical simulations of impulsively generated wave trains in coronal plasma slabs and investigate how the behavior of the trapped and leaky components depend on the properties of the initial perturbation. For large amplitude compressive perturbations, the geometrical dispersion associated with the waveguide suppresses the nonlinear steepening for the trapped wave train. The wave train formed by the leaky components does not experience dispersion once it leaves the waveguide and so can steepen and form shocks. The mechanism we consider can lead to the formation of multiple shock fronts by a single, large amplitude, impulsive event and so can account for quasi-periodic features observed in radio spectra.

  20. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... to parametrize z0. The results are validated through QuikScat data and point measurements from an open ocean site Ekosk and a coastal, relatively shallow water site Horns Rev. It is found that the modeling system captures in general better strong wind and strong wave characteristics for open ocean condition than...... Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the thirdgeneration ocean wave modelSWAN. This study investigates mainly two issues: spatial resolution and the wind-wave interface parameter roughness length(z0). To study the impact of resolution, the nesting function for both WRF and SWAN is used, with spatial...

  1. Fast Waves at the Base of the Cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Recio-Spinoso

    Full Text Available Georg von Békésy observed that the onset times of responses to brief-duration stimuli vary as a function of distance from the stapes, with basal regions starting to move earlier than apical ones. He noticed that the speed of signal propagation along the cochlea is slow when compared with the speed of sound in water. Fast traveling waves have been recorded in the cochlea, but their existence is interpreted as the result of an experiment artifact. Accounts of the timing of vibration onsets at the base of the cochlea generally agree with Békésy's results. Some authors, however, have argued that the measured delays are too short for consistency with Békésy's theory. To investigate the speed of the traveling wave at the base of the cochlea, we analyzed basilar membrane (BM responses to clicks recorded at several locations in the base of the chinchilla cochlea. The initial component of the BM response matches remarkably well the initial component of the stapes response, after a 4-μs delay of the latter. A similar conclusion is reached by analyzing onset times of time-domain gain functions, which correspond to BM click responses normalized by middle-ear input. Our results suggest that BM responses to clicks arise from a combination of fast and slow traveling waves.

  2. An Automated Algorithm for Fast Pulse Wave Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Nenova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an automated algorithm for fast pulse wave detection, directed to establishing the presence of cardiac activity in an emergency. The method relies on real-time estimation of similarity of closely positioned rising edges of the waveform and decision logic. The algorithm was tested on a set of pressure pulse waves from the MGH/MF waveform database from PhysioNet. Our approach to assessing the algorithm performance was based on location and classification of suspicious 10 s signal epochs by means of detection of dissimilar peak-to-peak intervals. The detected epochs were visually inspected and compared to the corresponding ECG-based expert beat annotations. The main epoch and error types were summarized. The performance of the algorithm and the visual interpretation of the results were illustrated by means of examples. The review of the recordings showed that the proposed algorithm correctly identifies cardiac pulsations even under considerable artefacts. Our conclusion is that the algorithm reliably detects critical periods in cardiac activity and is applicable to fast pulse wave detection in real-time applications and ambulatory measurement setups.

  3. Fast and Ultra-fast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett Marques Brum, C.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, P. P.; Gurubaran, S.; Pancheva, D.; Bageston, J. V.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating Fast (FK) and Ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubbles irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium Frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with TIMED/SABER temperature in the 40 km - 100 km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisondes operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of the both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (~10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electro dynamic coupling process as responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/ plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day-to-day variability of the ESF in its occurrence season.

  4. Verification of fast neutron spectrum calculation in coupled system HERBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdic, S.; Pesic, M.; Marinkovic, P.

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution semiconductor spectrometer filled with 3 He gas, in diode coincidence arrangement, is applied to measure neutron spectrum in the centre of the fast core of the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE in the 'Vinca' Institute. The neutron spectrum is evaluated from measured pulse height distribution by using the HE3 computer code developed in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA. Experimental results are compared with the relevant multigroup calculations in the energy range from 2.5 MeV to 10.5 MeV. The measured spectrum provides a sufficient overlapping with the calculated one and no serious divergence is found in the measured energy range. (author)

  5. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  6. Full-wave calculation of fast-wave current drive in tokamaks including kparallel upshifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical calculations of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) efficiency have generally been of two types: ray tracing or global wave calculations. Ray tracing shows that the projection of the wave number (k parallel) along the magnetic field can vary greatly over a ray trajectory, particularly when the launch point is above or below the equatorial plane. As the wave penetrates toward the center of the plasma, k parallel increases, causing a decrease in the parallel phase speed and a corresponding decrease in the current drive efficiency, γ. But the assumptions of geometrical optics, namely short wavelength and strong single-pass absorption, are not greatly applicable in FWCD scenarios. Eigenmode structure, which is ignored in ray tracing, can play an important role in determining electric field strength and Landau damping rates. In such cases, a full-wave or global solution for the wave fields is desirable. In full-wave calculations such as ORION k parallel appear as a differential operator (rvec B·∇) in the argument of the plasma dispersion function. Since this leads to a differential system of infinite order, such codes of necessity assume k parallel ∼ k var-phi = const, where k var-phi is the toroidal wave number. Thus, it is not possible to correctly include effects of the poloidal magnetic field on k parallel. The problem can be alleviated by expressing the electric field as a superposition of poloidal modes, in which case k parallel is purely algebraic. This paper describes a new full-wave calculation, Poloidal Ion Cyclotron Expansion Solution, which uses poloidal and toroidal mode expansions to solve the wave equation in general flux coordinates. The calculation includes a full solution for E parallel and uses a reduced-order form of the plasma conductivity tensor to eliminate numerical problems associated with resolution of the very short wavelength ion Bernstein wave

  7. Modeling of Synergy Between 4th and 6th Harmonic Absorptions of Fast Waves on Injected Beams in DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Chan, V. S.; Muscatello, C. M.; Jaeger, E. F.

    2011-01-01

    In recent moderate to high harmonic fast wave heating and current drive experiments in DIII-D, a synergy effect was observed when the 6 th harmonic 90 MHz fast wave power is applied to the plasma preheated by neutral beams and the 4 th harmonic 60 MHz fast wave. In this paper, we investigate how the synergy can occur using ORBIT-RF coupled with AORSA. Preliminary simulations suggest that damping of 4 th harmonic FW on beam ions accelerates them above the injection energy, which may allow significant damping of 6 th harmonic FW on beam ion tails to produce synergy.

  8. Strong wave/mean-flow coupling in baroclinic acoustic streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Greg; Michel, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    Recently, Chini et al. demonstrated the potential for large-amplitude acoustic streaming in compressible channel flows subjected to strong background cross-channel density variations. In contrast with classic Rayleigh streaming, standing acoustic waves of O (ɛ) amplitude acquire vorticity owing to baroclinic torques acting throughout the domain rather than via viscous torques acting in Stokes boundary layers. More significantly, these baroclinically-driven streaming flows have a magnitude that also is O (ɛ) , i.e. comparable to that of the sound waves. In the present study, the consequent potential for fully two-way coupling between the waves and streaming flows is investigated using a novel WKBJ analysis. The analysis confirms that the wave-driven streaming flows are sufficiently strong to modify the background density gradient, thereby modifying the leading-order acoustic wave structure. Simulations of the wave/mean-flow system enabled by the WKBJ analysis are performed to illustrate the nature of the two-way coupling, which contrasts sharply with classic Rayleigh streaming, for which the waves can first be determined and the streaming flows subsequently computed.

  9. Elastic wave from fast heavy ion irradiation on solids

    CERN Document Server

    Kambara, T; Kanai, Y; Kojima, T M; Nanai, Y; Yoneda, A; Yamazaki, Y

    2002-01-01

    To study the time-dependent mechanical effects of fast heavy ion irradiations, we have irradiated various solids by a short-bunch beam of 95 MeV/u Ar ions and observed elastic waves generated in the bulk. The irradiated targets were square-shaped plates of poly-crystals of metals (Al and Cu), invar alloy, ceramic (Al sub 2 O sub 3), fused silica (SiO sub 2) and single crystals of KC1 and LiF with a thickness of 10 mm. The beam was incident perpendicular to the surface and all ions were stopped in the target. Two piezo-electric ultrasonic sensors were attached to the surface of the target and detected the elastic waves. The elastic waveforms as well as the time structure and intensity of the beam bunch were recorded for each shot of a beam bunch. The sensor placed opposite to the beam spot recorded a clear waveform of the longitudinal wave across the material, except for the invar and fused silica targets. From its propagation time along with the sound velocity and the thickness of the target, the depth of the...

  10. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  11. Rational solitary wave and rogue wave solutions in coupled defocusing Hirota equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin, E-mail: 14491558@qq.com

    2016-06-03

    Highlights: • The M/W shape rational solitary wave solutions and rogue wave solutions of coupled Hirota equations are given. • The baseband modulational stability theory is established in the defocusing coupled Hirota model. • The M/W shape rational solitary wave can be explained by the baseband modulational stability theory. - Abstract: We derive and study a general rational solution of a coupled defocusing Hirota equation which can be used to describe evolution of light in a two-mode fiber with defocusing Kerr effect and some certain high-order effects. We find some new excitation patterns in the model, such as M-shaped soliton, W-shaped soliton, anti-eye-shaped rogue wave and four-petaled flower rogue wave. The results are compared with the solutions obtained in other coupled systems like vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation, coupled focusing Hirota and Sasa–Satsuma equations. We explain the new characters by modulational instability properties. This further indicates that rational solution does not necessarily correspond to rogue wave excitation dynamics and the quantitative relation between nonlinear excitations and modulational instability should exist.

  12. A coupling modulation model of capillary waves from gravity waves: Theoretical analysis and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengzhen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Li; Chong, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    According to Bragg theory, capillary waves are the predominant scatterers of high-frequency band (such as Ka-band) microwave radiation from the surface of the ocean. Therefore, understanding the modulation mechanism of capillary waves is an important foundation for interpreting high-frequency microwave remote sensing images of the surface of the sea. In our experiments, we discovered that modulations of capillary waves are significantly larger than the values predicted by the classical theory. Further, analysis shows that the difference in restoring force results in an inflection point while the phase velocity changes from gravity waves region to capillary waves region, and this results in the capillary waves being able to resonate with gravity waves when the phase velocity of the gravity waves is equal to the group velocity of the capillary waves. Consequently, we propose a coupling modulation model in which the current modulates the capillary wave indirectly by modulating the resonant gravity waves, and the modulation of the former is approximated by that of the latter. This model very effectively explains the results discovered in our experiments. Further, based on Bragg scattering theory and this coupling modulation model, we simulate the modulation of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of typical internal waves and show that the high-frequency bands are superior to the low-frequency bands because of their greater modulation of NRCS and better radiometric resolution. This result provides new support for choice of radar band for observation of wave-current modulation oceanic phenomena such as internal waves, fronts, and shears.

  13. Advantages of traveling wave resonant antennas for fast wave heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, D.A.; Callis, R.W.; Grassie, J.S. de

    1997-04-01

    The resilience of a maximally flat externally coupled traveling wave antenna (TWA) is contrasted with the sensitivity of a simple directly driven resonant loop array to vacuum and plasma conditions in DIII-D. We find a unique synergy between standing and traveling wave resonant TWA components. This synergy extends TWA operation to several passbands between 60 and 120 MHZ, provides 60 degrees- 120 degrees tunability between elements within a 1-2 MHZ bandwidth and permits efficient and continuous operation during ELMing H-mode

  14. High frequency fast wave results from the CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) is the first spherical torus (ST) to investigate radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive. To address the concern that large magnetic field line pitch at the outboard midplane of ST's could inhibit successful coupling to the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW), a rotatable, two strap antenna was installed on CDX-U. Parasitic loading and impurity generation were discovered to be weak and nearly independent of antenna phasing and angle over a wide range, and fast wave electron heating has been observed. Plasma densities up to about 10 12 cm -3 were obtained with noninductive startup solely with HHFW. New ST diagnostics under development on CDX-U include a multilayer mirror (MLM) detector to measure ultrasoft X-rays, a twelve spatial point Thomson scattering (TS) system, and an Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) system for both electron heating and electron temperature measurements. Preliminary experiments with a boron low velocity edge micropellet injector have also been performed, and further studies of its effectiveness for impurity control will be conducted with a variety of spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics on CDX-U. (author)

  15. High Harmonic Fast Wave heating and current drive for NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. A.; Majeski, R.; Hosea, J.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.; Mau, T. K.; Chiu, S. C.; Smithe, D.

    1997-11-01

    Heating and noninductive current drive in NSTX will initially use 6 MW of rf power in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime. We present numerical modelling of HHFW heating and current drive in NSTX using the PICES, CURRAY, FISIC, and METS95 codes. High electron β during the discharge flattop in NSTX is predicted to result in off-axis power deposition and current drive. However, reductions in the trapped electron fraction (due also to high β effects) are predicted to result in adequate current drive efficiency, with ~ 400 - 500 kA of noninductive current driven. Sufficient per-pass absorption (>10%) to ensure effective electron heating is also expected for the startup plasma. Present plans call for a single twelve strap antenna driven by six FMIT transmitters operating at 30 MHz. The design for the antenna and matching system will also be discussed.

  16. Technology of fast-wave current drive antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Taylor, D.J.; Swain, D.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Yugo, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The design of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antennas combines the usual antenna considerations (e.g., the plasma/antenna interface, disruptions, high currents and voltages, and thermal loads) with new requirements for spectral shaping and phase control. The internal configuration of the antenna array has a profound effect on the spectrum and the ability to control phasing. This paper elaborates on these considerations, as epitomized by a proof-of-principle (POP) experiment designed for the DIII-D tokamak. The extension of FWCD for machines such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) will require combining ideas implemented in the POP experiment with reactor-relevant antenna concepts, such as the folded waveguide. 6 refs., 8 figs

  17. Coupling of a Trivelpiece-Gould wave to a new type of electromagnetic wave observed around the electron cyclotron frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, J.A.C. (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica)

    1989-02-01

    The coupling between a Trivelpiece-Gould wave with a frequency close to the electron cyclotron frequency to a fast wave, propagating with almost the light velocity in vacuum inside a metallic cylindrical waveguide much below cutoff, is observed along a magnetized plasma column with a strong axial density gradient. The fast wave is characterized by the experimental determination of its dispersion as well as by measurements of its electric and magnetic field radial structures and associated polarization. A preliminary theoretical description of this electromagnetic wave, consistent with all the relevant experimental observations, is presented, strongly suggesting that it belongs to a kind of radially evanescent modified cold plasma ''left-ordinary'' mode. (author).

  18. Traveling-wave antenna for fast-wave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; Phelps, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    The travelling-wave antenna for heating and current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is shown theoretically to have loading and wavenumber spectra that are largely independent of plasma conditions. These characteristics have been demonstrated in low-power experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, in which a standard four-strap antenna was converted to a traveling-wave antenna through use of external coupling elements. The experiments indicate that the array maintains good impedance matching without dynamic tuning during abrupt changes in the plasma, such as during L- to H-mode transitions, edge-localized mode activity, and disruptions. An analytic model was developed that exhibits the features observed in the experiments. Guidelines for the design of travelling-wave antennas are derived from the validated model. 11 refs., 14 figs

  19. Traveling wave antenna for fast wave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; Phelps, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The traveling wave antenna for heating and current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is shown theoretically to have loading and wavenumber spectrum which are largely independent of plasma conditions. These characteristics have been demonstrated in low power experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, in which a standard four-strap antenna was converted to a traveling wave antenna through use of external coupling elements. The experiments indicate that the array maintains good impedance matching without dynamic tuning during abrupt changes in the plasma, such as during L- to H-mode transitions, edge localized mode activity, and disruptions. An analytic model was developed which exhibits the features observed in the experiments. Guidelines for the design of traveling wave antennas are derived from the validated model

  20. Fast T Wave Detection Calibrated by Clinical Knowledge with Annotation of P and T Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elgendi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited studies on the automatic detection of T waves in arrhythmic electrocardiogram (ECG signals. This is perhaps because there is no available arrhythmia dataset with annotated T waves. There is a growing need to develop numerically-efficient algorithms that can accommodate the new trend of battery-driven ECG devices. Moreover, there is also a need to analyze long-term recorded signals in a reliable and time-efficient manner, therefore improving the diagnostic ability of mobile devices and point-of-care technologies. Methods: Here, the T wave annotation of the well-known MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is discussed and provided. Moreover, a simple fast method for detecting T waves is introduced. A typical T wave detection method has been reduced to a basic approach consisting of two moving averages and dynamic thresholds. The dynamic thresholds were calibrated using four clinically known types of sinus node response to atrial premature depolarization (compensation, reset, interpolation, and reentry. Results: The determination of T wave peaks is performed and the proposed algorithm is evaluated on two well-known databases, the QT and MIT-BIH Arrhythmia databases. The detector obtained a sensitivity of 97.14% and a positive predictivity of 99.29% over the first lead of the validation databases (total of 221,186 beats. Conclusions: We present a simple yet very reliable T wave detection algorithm that can be potentially implemented on mobile battery-driven devices. In contrast to complex methods, it can be easily implemented in a digital filter design.

  1. Superposed nonlinear waves in coherently coupled Bose–Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu Mareeswaran, R.; Kanna, T., E-mail: kanna_phy@bhc.edu.in

    2016-09-23

    We study the dynamics of superposed nonlinear waves in coherently coupled Gross–Pitaevskii (CCGP) equations with constant (autonomous system) and time varying (non-autonomous system) nonlinearity coefficients. By employing a linear transformation, the autonomous CCGP system is converted into two separate scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equations and we show that linear superposition of different nonlinear wave solutions of these scalar equations results into several kinds of nonlinear coherent structures namely, coexisting rogue wave-Ma breather, Akhmediev–Ma breathers, collision and bound states of Ma breathers and solitons. Next, the non-autonomous CCGP system is converted into an autonomous CCGP system with a similarity transformation. We show an interesting possibility of soliton compression and appearance of creeping solitons for kink-like and periodically modulated nonlinearity coefficient. - Highlights: • Coherently coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations with constant and time-dependent nonlinearities are considered. • Novel superposed nonlinear structures are reported. • Breather collision and nontrivial twin-peak rogue wave are explored. • Co-existing breathers and rogue waves are observed. • Creeping solitons and compression mechanism, respectively for periodically modulated and kink-like nonlinearity are identified.

  2. Coupling between a Langmuir wave and a ballistic perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, F.; Olivain, J.; Quemeneur, A.; Trocheris, M.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the mode-mode coupling usually neglects the ballistic contribution associated with parent waves. If this approximation is not made, a new mode, resulting from the interaction between the ballistic perturbation of pulsation ω 2 associated with one launched wave and the Landau component of pulsation ω 1 of the second one appears if ω 1 >ω 2 . The problem is solved theoretically and experimental evidence of this mode from measurements performed on a D.C. plasma column, confirms the results of this analysis

  3. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiment for DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1989-07-01

    The DIII-D facility provides an opportunity to test fast wave current drive appoach. Efficient FWCD is achieved by direct electron absorption due to Landa damping and transit time magnetic pumping. To avoid competing damping mechamisms we seek to maximize the single-pass asorption of the fast waves by electrons. (AIP)

  4. Fast-wave current drive modelling for large non-circular tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Swain, D.W.; Ehst, D.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that a key element in the development of an attractive tokamak reactor, and in the successful achievement of the mission of ITER, is the development of an efficient steady-state current drive technique. Fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies hold the promise to drive steady-state currents with the required efficiency and to effectively heat the plasma to ignition. Advantages over other heating and current drive techniques include low cost per watt and the ability to penetrate to the center of high-density plasmas. The primary issues that must be resolved are: can an antenna array be designed to radiate the required spectrum of waves and have adequate coupling properties? Will the rf power be efficiently absorbed by electrons in the desired velocity range without unacceptable parasitic damping by fuel ions or α particles? What will the efficiency of current drive be when toroidal effects such as trapped particles are included? Can a practical rf system be designed and integrated into the device? We have addressed these issues by performing extensive calculations with ORION, a 2-D code, and the ray tracing code RAYS, which calculate wave propagation, absorption and current drive in tokamak geometry, and with RIP, a 2-D code that self-consistently calculates current drive with MHD equilibrium. An important figure of merit in this context is the integrated, normalized current drive efficiency. The calculations that we present here emphasize the ITER device. We consider a low-frequency scenario such that no ion resonances appear in the machine, and a high-frequency scenario such that the deuterium second harmonic resonance is just outside the plasma and the tritium second harmonic is in the plasma, midway between the magnetic axis and the inside edge. In both cases electron currents are driven by combined TTMP and Landau damping of the fast waves

  5. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    The densities in the E- and F-layer plasmas are much less than the density of background neutral atmosphere. Atmospheric neutral waves are primary sources of plasma density fluctuations and are the sources for triggering plasma instabilities. The neutral atmosphere supports acoustic waves, acoustic gravity waves, and Kelvin Helmholtz waves from wind shears. These waves help determine the structure of the ionosphere by changes in neutral density that affect ion-electron recombination and by neutral velocities that couple to the plasma via ion-neutral collisions. Neutral acoustic disturbances can arise from thunderstorms, chemical factory explosions and intentional high-explosive tests. Based on conservation of energy, acoustic waves grow in amplitude as they propagate upwards to lower atmospheric densities. Shock waves can form in an acoustic pulse that is eventually damped by viscosity. Ionospheric effects from acoustic waves include transient perturbations of E- and F-Regions and triggering of E-Region instabilities. Acoustic-gravity waves affect the ionosphere over large distances. Gravity wave sources include thunderstorms, auroral region disturbances, Space Shuttle launches and possibly solar eclipses. Low frequency acoustic-gravity waves propagate to yield traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's), triggering of Equatorial bubbles, and possible periodic structuring of the E-Region. Gravity wave triggering of equatorial bubbles is studied numerically by solving the equations for plasma continuity and ion velocity along with Ohms law to provide an equation for the induced electric potential. Slow moving gravity waves provide density depressions on bottom of ionosphere and a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. Radar scatter detects field aligned irregularities in the resulting plasma bubble. Neutral Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are produced by strong mesospheric wind shears that are also coincident with the formation of intense E-layers. An

  6. Validation Study of Wave Breaking Influence in a Coupled Wave Model for Hurricane Wind Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-27

    an essential modification to the Janssen (1991) input source term in the spirit of the notion of ’sheltering’ (e.g. Makin & Kudryavtsev , 2001...Ocean Waves, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 532pp. Makin, V.K. and V.N. Kudryavtsev , 2001: Coupled sea surface-atmosphere model. 1. Wind over

  7. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  8. Results of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Hosea; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; M. Carter; D. Gates; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Majeski; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; and J.R. Wilson

    2001-08-09

    The study of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being conducted on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) device to determine the physics of applying radio-frequency (rf) waves at high harmonics (approximately 10-20) of the ion cyclotron frequency in this high-beta plasma regime and to extend the performance of the NSTX plasma. The magnetic field of this low aspect ratio device is lower (less than or equal to 0.35 T for this work) than that for the typical moderate aspect ratio tokamak regime by about an order of magnitude and the plasma densities achieved are typically in the mid 10(superscript ''19'') m(superscript ''-3'') range. Thus, the dielectric constant of the plasma, epsilon always equals omega (subscript ''pe'')(superscript ''2'') divided by omega (subscript ''ce'')(superscript ''2''), is of order approximately 50-100 resulting in wave physics properties which favor electron heating by TTMP and Landau damping. Radio-frequency power is applied on NSTX at 3 0 MHz using an antenna array with 12 current straps aligned in the poloidal direction. The antenna can be phased to launch waves with toroidal wave numbers, k(subscript ''T'') between 2 m(superscript ''-1'') and 14 m(superscript ''-1'') and can be phased for current drive with peak toroidal directionality at 7 m(superscript ''-1''). To date most of the HHFW experiments have been carried out using k(subscript ''T'') = 14 m(superscript ''-1'') with 0-pi-0-pi-... phasing of the strap currents. The diagnostic complement on NSTX includes a 30-Hz, 10-spatial-channel Thomson scattering (MPTS) system for measuring profiles of electron temperature and density every 33 msec, and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system for

  9. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. A Fast Propagating Extreme-Ultraviolet Wave Associated with a Mini-filament Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Dan; Yang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The fast extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves (>1000 km s-1) in the solar corona were very rare in the past. Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, we present a fast EUV wave associated with a mini-filament eruption, a C1.0 flare, and a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2011 September 30. The event took place at the periphery between two active regions (ARs). The mini-filament rapidly erupted as a blowout jet associated with a flare and a CME. The CME front was likely developed from the large-scale overlying loops. The wave onset was nearly simultaneous with the start of the jet and the flare. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the rapid jet. The wave had an initial speed of about 1100 km s-1 and a slight deceleration in the last phase, and the velocity decreased to about 500 km s-1. The wave propagated in a narrow angle extent, likely to avoid the ARs on both sides. All the results provide evidence that the fast EUV wave was a fast-mode MHD wave. The wave resisted being driven by the CME, because it opened up the large-scale loops and its front likely formed later than the wave. The wave was most likely triggered by the jet, due to their close timing and location relations.

  11. Quantum fluctuation of electronic wave-packet dynamics coupled with classical nuclear motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Michiko; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2005-02-22

    An ab initio electronic wave-packet dynamics coupled with the simultaneous classical dynamics of nuclear motions in a molecule is studied. We first survey the dynamical equations of motion for the individual components. Reflecting the nonadiabatic dynamics that electrons can respond to nuclear motions only with a finite speed, the equations of motion for nuclei include a force arising from the kinematic (nuclear momentum) coupling from electron cloud. To materialize these quantum effects in the actual ab initio calculations, we study practical implementation of relevant electronic matrix elements that are related to the derivatives with respect to the nuclear coordinates. Applications of the present scheme are performed in terms of the configuration state functions (CSF) using the canonical molecular orbitals as basis functions without transformation to particular diabatic basis. In the CSF representation, the nonadiabatic interaction due to the kinematic coupling is anticipated to be rather small, and instead it should be well taken into account through the off-diagonal elements of the electronic Hamiltonian matrix. Therefore it is expected that the nonadiabatic dynamics based on this CSF basis neglecting the kinematic coupling may work. To verify this anticipation and to quantify the actual effects of the kinematic coupling, we compare the dynamics with and without the kinematic-coupling terms using the same CSF set. Applications up to the fifth electronically excited states in a nonadiabatic collision between H(2) and B(+) shows that the overall behaviors of these two calculations are surprisingly similar to each other in an average sense except for a fast fluctuation reflecting the electronic time scale. However, at the same time, qualitative differences in the collision events are sometimes observed. Therefore it turns out after all that the kinematic-coupling terms cannot be neglected in the CSF-basis representation. The present applications also demonstrate

  12. Wave stimulated phenomena in inductively coupled magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamrai, K P; Shinohara, S; Virko, V F; Slobodyan, V M; Virko, Yu V; Kirichenko, G S

    2005-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear wave phenomena and their influence on the discharge performance are considered in the helicon plasma (HP) and magnetized inductively coupled plasma (MICP). Magnetic field configuration is shown to result in strong variation in the efficiency of plasma production caused by alterations of the character of wave processes rather than by the particle confinement. Effects of magnetic configuration are found to be dominant in operation of the compact HP with permanent magnet. Low frequency turbulence in the megahertz range is revealed to be inherent for both the HP and MICP and to depend strongly on the magnetic configuration. Enhanced axial electric field arising in front of the metal end plate in the HP is argued to be a potential source of the nonlinear effects

  13. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal waves in piano strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchenique, Nikki; Collin, Samantha R; Moore, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    The existence of longitudinal waves in vibrating piano strings has been previously established, as has their importance in producing the characteristic sound of the piano. Modeling of the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motion of strings indicates that the amplitude of the longitudinal waves are quadratically related to the transverse displacement of the string, however, experimental verification of this relationship is lacking. In the work reported here this relationship is tested by driving the transverse motion of a piano string at only two frequencies, which simplifies the task of unambiguously identifying the constituent signals. The results indicate that the generally accepted relationship between the transverse motion and the longitudinal motion is valid. It is further shown that this dependence on transverse displacement is a good approximation when a string is excited by the impact of the hammer during normal play.

  14. Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains of Sausage Symmetry in Cylindrical Waveguides of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kuzin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  15. Cloud Computing for Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Kazanskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and analysis of complex nanophotonic and nanoelectronic structures require significant computing resources. Cloud computing infrastructure allows distributed parallel applications to achieve greater scalability and fault tolerance. The problems of effective use of high-performance computing systems for modeling and simulation of subwavelength diffraction gratings are considered. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA is adapted to cloud computing environment. In order to accomplish this, data flow of the RCWA is analyzed and CPU-intensive operations are converted to data-intensive operations. The generated data sets are structured in accordance with the requirements of MapReduce technology.

  16. Experimental Comparison of Fast Wave Absorption on Fast Ions at Fourth and Sixth Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, P. I.; Petty, C. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Baity, F. W.; Porkolab, M.

    2007-11-01

    In recent DIII-D experiments, we have compared the absorption of fast waves (FWs) on injected deuterium beams at the fourth and sixth deuterium cyclotron harmonics. Direct electron absorption also plays an important part in the core absorption. Up to 2 MW of FW power at 90 MHz is compared with a similar level of 60 MHz power in low-density L-mode discharges at 2 T with 1--2 MW of deuterium beam injection at 80 keV. Changes in the neutron rate and in the central sawtooth behavior are correlated with the observed acceleration of the beam ions by the rf as measured by the Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic. Results obtained with hydrogen beams in which second and third harmonic absorption at 60 MHz and 90 MHz are compared will be presented. Lower global absorption efficiency observed for higher cyclotron harmonics in this multiple-pass absorption regime is attributed to the effect of an edge loss that competes with the core absorption mechanisms.

  17. Coupling of acoustic waves to clouds in the jovian troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulme, Patrick; Mosser, Benoît

    2005-11-01

    Seismology is the best tool for investigating the interior structure of stars and giant planets. This paper deals with a photometric study of jovian global oscillations. The propagation of acoustic waves in the jovian troposphere is revisited in order to estimate their effects on the planetary albedo. According to the standard model of the jovian cloud structure there are three major ice cloud layers (e.g., [Atreya et al., 1999. A comparison of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn: Deep atmospheric composition, cloud structure, vertical mixing, and origin. Planet Space Sci. 47, 1243-1262]). We consider only the highest layers, composed of ammonia ice, in the region where acoustic waves are trapped in Jupiter's atmosphere. For a vertical wave propagating in a plane parallel atmosphere with an ammonia ice cloud layer, we calculate first the relative variations of the reflected solar flux due to the smooth oscillations at about the ppm level. We then determine the phase transitions induced by the seismic waves in the clouds. These phase changes, linked to ice particle growth, are limited by kinetics. A Mie model [Mishchenko et al., 2002. Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Small Particles. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, pp. 158-190] coupled with a simple radiation transfer model allows us to estimate that the albedo fluctuations of the cloud perturbed by a seismic wave reach relative variations of 70 ppm for a 3-mHz wave. This albedo fluctuation is amplified by a factor of ˜70 relative to the previously published estimates that exclude the effect of the wave on cloud properties. Our computed amplifications imply that jovian oscillations can be detected with very precise photometry, as proposed by the microsatellite JOVIS project, which is dedicated to photometric seismology [Mosser et al., 2004. JOVIS: A microsatellite dedicated to the seismic analysis of Jupiter. In: Combes, F., Barret, D., Contini, T., Meynadier, F., Pagani, L. (Eds.), SF2A-2004

  18. Suppression of lower hybrid wave coupling due to the ponderomotive force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.L.

    1980-04-01

    The coupling efficiency from a slow-wave structure to lower hybrid waves is investigated experimentally. At moderate electric field strengths large edge density changes are observed. Wave trajectory modifications and departure from linear coupling are observed consistent with these changes and in good agreement with a simple nonlinear theory that includes the ponderomotive force

  19. Toroidal plasmas permeability tensor and dissipation of fast waves (methods of evaluation and some results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfimov, A.G.; Nekrasov, F.M.

    1992-07-01

    A method for the analytical treatment of the toroidal plasma electron dielectric permeability tensor is developed. Simple expressions for some limiting cases are obtained. Electron Landau and TTMP absorption of the fast waves in tokamaks are discussed in terms of 'nonlocality' effects, including the effect of trapped and untrapped particles bounce resonances. Additional dissipation of the fast waves in tokamaks is founded in a comparison with cylindrical model Landau damping. (orig.)

  20. Fast wave current drive in H mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Grassie, J.S. de; Baity, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    Current driven by fast Alfven waves is measured in H mode and VH mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time. Analysis of the poloidal flux evolution shows that the fast wave current drive profile is centrally peaked but sometimes broader than theoretically expected. Although the measured current drive efficiency is in agreement with theory for plasmas with infrequent ELMs, the current drive efficiency is an order of magnitude too low for plasmas with rapid ELMs. Power modulation experiments show that the reduction in current drive with increasing ELM frequency is due to a reduction in the fraction of centrally absorbed fast wave power. The absorption and current drive are weakest when the electron density outside the plasma separatrix is raised above the fast wave cut-off density by the ELMs, possibly allowing an edge loss mechanism to dissipate the fast wave power since the cut-off density is a barrier for fast waves leaving the plasma. (author)

  1. Interpolation Algorithm for Fast Evaluation of EM Coupling between Wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasini, C.; Lepelaars, E.S.A.M.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Efficient and accurate evaluation of the EM field radiated by a current flowing along a wire is essential to solve the electromagnetic coupling between arbitrary oriented wires. In this paper, a numerically efficient algorithm for the evaluation of coupling is presented. The currents along the wires

  2. Searching for Fast Radio Bursts with the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ryan Patrick; Hughey, Brennan; Howell, Eric; LIGO Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Although Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) are being detected with increasing frequency, their progenitor systems are still mostly a mystery. We present the plan to conduct targeted searches for gravitational-wave counterparts to these FRB events in the data from the first and second observing runs of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO).

  3. Possibilities of heating a TFR plasma by absorption of the fast hydromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.

    The prospects of TFR heating by fast hydromagnetic waves are considered by an examination of the following topics: (1) characteristics of the dispersion relation, (2) the charge impedance of an antenna capable of exciting these modes, and (3) the heating effects which would be caused by dissipation of these waves around ω = ω/sub ci/ and ω = 2ω/sub ci/

  4. Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging of X-rays Events, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HyperV Technologies Corp. proposes to construct a long-record-length, fiber-coupled, fast imaging diagnostic for recording X-ray back-lit material flows and X-ray...

  5. Wave-Wave Coupling and Disasters: The 1985 Mexico Earthquake and the 2001 WTC Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, C.

    2002-12-01

    Wave-wave coupling occurs in the presence of weak nonlinearity. It can generate quite dramatic, unexpected effects. In the 1985 earthquake disaster in Mexico City more than 400 high-rise buildings collapsed on soft ground with a loss of life of around 10,000. The emergence of a large, monochromatic, coherent ground wave was an unforeseen factor. Linear modeling failed to reproduce the main features of this signal including the prominent spectral peak close to the resonant frequency of the high-rise buildings, and an extremely long time duration (more than five minutes). The signal was apparently due to coupling of a fundamental Rayleigh mode to the quarter-wavelength shear resonance in the surface mud layer through their common frequency at 0.4 Hz. An additional unexpected feature was the low attenuation of these modes in the mud layer, and the presence of prograde particle motion. Prograde rotation, though not necessarily caused by nonlinear effects, will couple with structural modes of vibration that tend to destabilize a tall building, much like a tall ship in ocean waves. Such unanticipated features may play a critical role in earthquake disasters on soft ground. A related case is the World Trade Center disaster of 11 September 2001, which was presumed to be due to gradual heat softening of steel girders. If so, the Twin Towers should have leaned over sideways but actually the collapse occurred vertically and quite suddenly. A likely alternative is coupling between a fireball caused by a phase transition between low- and high-oxygen consumption modes in burning jet fuel: (low-oxygen) 2CnH2n+2 + (n+1)O2 = nC2 + (2n+2)H2O, (1) (high-oxygen) 2CnH2n+2 + (3n+1)O2 = 2nCO2 + (2n+2)H2O, (2) and a pressure pulse propagating vertically inside the tubular structure. The pulse would have taken out the concrete floors, thus initiating collapse by implosion of the structural shell. Linear thinking may fail to anticipate coupling, and thus appropriate preventive measures may

  6. A Fast GPU-accelerated Mixed-precision Strategy for Fully NonlinearWater Wave Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Madsen, Morten G.

    2011-01-01

    We present performance results of a mixed-precision strategy developed to improve a recently developed massively parallel GPU-accelerated tool for fast and scalable simulation of unsteady fully nonlinear free surface water waves over uneven depths (Engsig-Karup et.al. 2011). The underlying wave......-preconditioned defect correction method. The improved strategy improves the performance by exploiting architectural features of modern GPUs for mixed precision computations and is tested in a recently developed generic library for fast prototyping of PDE solvers. The new wave tool is applicable to solve and analyze...

  7. Fast Multiscale Algorithms for Wave Propagation in Heterogeneous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Towards the Ultimate Solver for the Wave Equation in the Time Domain’’, Applied Math and Imaging Sciences Workshop, UT Pan- American, 2011...Engineering Computing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 2013 ``Boundary conditions for high-resolution simulations of waves...by Hermite methods. Pacific J. Appl. Math ., 4:125–139, 2012. [3] D. Appelö and T. Hagstrom. An energy-based discontinuous Galerkin discretization of

  8. Observaton of tunneling of slow and fast electromagnetic modes in coupled periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ha, Sangwoo; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of tunneling of slow and fast electromagnetic modes in coupled periodic waveguides shifted longitudinally by half of modulation period. According to the symmetry analysis, such a coupler supports two electromagnetic modes with exactly matched slow or fast gr...

  9. Plasma mass density, species mix and fluctuation diagnostics using fast Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezi, H.; deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    The authors propose to employ a fast Alfven wave interferometer and reflectometer as a tokamak diagnostic to measure the plasma mass density, D-T species mix profile, and density fluctuations. Utilize the property that the phase velocity of the fast wave propagating across the magnetic field is the Alfven speed with thermal correction, this fast wave interferometer on the DIII-D tokamak was successfully used to obtain the line integrated density. Since the position of the ion-ion hybrid cut-off in tokamaks is uniquely determined by the species mix ratio and the wave frequency, the reflectometer arrangement finds the species mix profile. The inversion method of reflectometry is discussed. The multiple chord interferometer also measures the mass density fluctuation profile

  10. Strongly coupled dusty plasmas: crystals, liquids, clusters and waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng-Mei Liu; Wen-Tau Juan; Ju-Wang Hsu; Zen-Hong Huang; Lin I

    1999-01-01

    The dusty plasma is a system that consists of many strongly-charged fine dust particles suspended in a plasma background. The slow dynamics and strong coupling due to the large mass and charges lead to the formation of highly-ordered dust crystal structures suspended in the plasma background, which can be directly observed. The dusty plasma forms a link to the area of condensed matter physics for the study of many interesting microscopic phenomena from order to disorder. In this paper, we introduce the special properties of this system from the viewpoint of conventional plasma physics, then we briefly review past works on the structure and dynamical behaviour from the highly-ordered state, through the melting and liquid states with associated vortex-type excitation and anomalous diffusion, to the state with self-organized macroscopic dust waves after losing microscopic order. The first observation of strongly-coupled dust Coulomb clusters with small numbers of particles from a few to a few hundred, which resemble classical atoms, is also demonstrated. (author)

  11. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  12. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-01-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V eff (NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V eff (LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V eff (LOL) increases as k increases and that of V eff (NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during

  13. Weakly coupled heat bath models for Gibbs-like invariant states in nonlinear wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajars, J.; Frank, J. E.; Leimkuhler, B. J.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal bath coupling mechanisms as utilized in molecular dynamics are applied to partial differential equation models. Working from a semi-discrete (Fourier mode) formulation for the Burgers-Hopf or Korteweg-de Vries equation, we introduce auxiliary variables and stochastic perturbations in order to drive the system to sample a target ensemble which may be a Gibbs state or, more generally, any smooth distribution defined on a constraint manifold. We examine the ergodicity of approaches based on coupling of the heat bath to the high wave numbers, with the goal of controlling the ensemble through the fast modes. We also examine different thermostat methods in the extent to which dynamical properties are corrupted in order to accurately compute the average of a desired observable with respect to the invariant distribution. The principal observation of this paper is that convergence to the invariant distribution can be achieved by thermostatting just the highest wave number, while the evolution of the slowest modes is little affected by such a thermostat.

  14. Numerical calculation of high frequency fast wave current drive in a reactor grade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka

    1988-02-01

    A fast wave current drive with a high frequency is estimated for a reactor grade tokamak by the ray tracing and the quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations with an assumption of single path absorption. The fast wave can drive RF current with the drive efficiency of η CD = n-bar e (10 19 m -3 )I RC (A)R(m)/P RF (W) ∼ 3.0 when the wave frequency is selected to be f/f ci > 7. A sharp wave spectrum and a ph|| >/υ Te ∼ 3.0 are required to obtain a good efficiency. A center peaked RF current profile can be formed with an appropriate wave spectrum even in the high temperature plasma. (author)

  15. Wave-induced Hydroelastic response of fast monohull ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1996-01-01

    of a quadratic strip theory formulated in the frequency domain. The springing response is thereby excited partly be resonance and partly by non-linear excitation. Special emphasis is given to the influence of springing on fatigue damage as the extreme responses even for very flexible ships are quite insensitive...... natural frequencies of the global hull modes can be relatively low compared to the frequency of wave encounter. In the present paper the effect of hull flexibility on the wave-induced springing vibrations is investigated in stationary stochastic seaways. The calculations are performed within the framework...

  16. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, A.

    1987-01-01

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Current drive with fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection. Fast wave experiments were performed using a 4-strap antenna with 1 MW of power at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency equivalent to that of neutral injection even when the single pass damping was calculated to be as small as 5%. The damping was probably due to the effect of multiple passes of the wave through the plasma. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional phasing of the antenna straps. Currents driven by fast wave current drive (FWCD) in the direction of the main plasma current of up to 100 kA were found, not including a calculated 40 kA of bootstrap current. Experiments with FWCD in the counter current direction showed little current drive. In both cases, changes in the sawtooth behavior and the internal inductance qualitatively support the measurement of FWCD. Experiments on electron cyclotron current drive have shown that 100 kA of current can be driven by 1 MW of power at 60 GHz. Calculations with a Fokker-Planck code show that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) can be well predicted when the effects of electron trapping and of the residual electric field are included. Experiments on driving current with neutral injection showed that effective current drive could be obtained and discharges with full current drive were demonstrated. Interestingly, all of these methods of current drive had about the same efficiency. (Author)

  18. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  19. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  20. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value

  1. Development of a numerical modelling tool for combined near field and far field wave transformations using a coupling of potential flow solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbrugghe, Tim; Troch, Peter; Kortenhaus, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    is complex; it is difficult to simulate both near field and far field effects with a single numerical model, with relatively fast computing times. Within this research a numerical tool is developed to model near-field and far-field wave transformations caused by WECs. The tool is based on the coupling...

  2. Extreme winds and waves for offshore turbines: Coupling atmosphere and wave modeling for design and operation in coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, Rodolfo; Du, Jianting

    modeling for oshore wind farms. This modeling system consists of the atmospheric Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the wave model SWAN and an interface the Wave Boundary Layer Model WBLM, within the framework of coupled-ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system COAWST...... (Hereinafter the WRF-WBLM-SWAN model). WBLM is implemented in SWAN, and it calculates stress and kinetic energy budgets in the lowest atmospheric layer where the wave-induced stress is introduced to the atmospheric modeling. WBLM ensures consistent calculation of stress for both the atmospheric and wave......, which can aect the choice of the off-shore wind turbine type. X-WiWa examined various methodologies for wave modeling. The offline coupling system using atmospheric data such as WRF or global reanalysis wind field to the MIKE 21 SW model has been improved with considerations of stability, air density...

  3. Conversion of Radio-Frequency Pulses to Continuous-Wave Sinusoids by Fast Switching and Narrowband Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ARL-TN-0783 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Conversion of Radio -Frequency Pulses to Continuous- Wave Sinusoids by Fast...ARL-TN-0783 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Conversion of Radio -Frequency Pulses to Continuous- Wave Sinusoids by Fast...08/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conversion of Radio -Frequency Pulses to Continuous- Wave Sinusoids by Fast Switching and Narrowband Filtering 5a

  4. Population of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide by cylindrical fast ionization wave

    KAUST Repository

    Levko, Dmitry

    2017-09-08

    The population of vibrational levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) by a cylindrical fast ionization wave is analyzed using a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model. The model takes into account the inelastic electron-neutral collisions as well as the super-elastic collisions between electrons and excited species. We observe an efficient population of only the first two levels of the symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of CO2 by means of a fast ionization wave. The excitation of other higher vibrational modes by the fast ionization wave is inefficient. Additionally, we observe a strong influence of the secondary electron emission on the population of vibrational states of CO2. This effect is associated with the kinetics of high energy electrons generated in the cathode sheath.

  5. Commissioning of the long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Cary, W.

    1995-01-01

    Two new four-element fast wave current drive antennas have been installed on DIII-D. These antennas are designed for 10-s pulses at 2 MW each in the frequency range of 30 to 120 MHz. Each element comprises two poloidal segments fed in parallel in order to optimize plasma coupling at the upper end of the frequency range. The antennas are mounted on opposite sides of the vacuum vessel, in ports designated 0 degrees and 180 degrees after their toroidal angle. Each antenna array is fed by a single transmitter. The power is first split two ways by means of a 3-dB hybrid coupler, then each of these lines feeds a resonant loop connecting a pair of array elements. The power transfer during asymmetric phasing is shunted between resonant loops by a decoupler. The resonant loops are fitted with line stretchers so that multiple frequencies of operation are possible without reconfiguring the transmission line. Commissioning of these antennas has been underway since June 1994. Several deficiencies in the transmission line system were uncovered during initial vacuum conditioning, including problems with the transmission line insulators and with the drive rods for the variable elements. The former was solved by replacing the original alumina insulators, and the latter has been avoided during operation to date by positioning the tuners to avoid high voltage appearing on the drive rods. A modified design for the drive rods will be implemented before RF operations resume operation June 1995. New transmitters were procured from ABB for the new antennas and were installed in parallel with the antenna installation. During initial vacuum conditioning of the antenna in the 180 degree port a fast digital oscilloscope was used to try to pinpoint the location of arcing by a time-of-flight technique and to develop an understanding of the typical arc signature in the system

  6. Acoustic wave propagation in fluids with coupled chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, T.S.; Schwarz, W.H.

    1984-08-01

    This investigation presents a hydroacoustic theory which accounts for sound absorption and dispersion in a multicomponent mixture of reacting fluids (assuming a set of first-order acoustic equations without diffusion) such that several coupled reactions can occur simultaneously. General results are obtained in the form of a biquadratic characteristic equation (called the Kirchhoff-Langevin equation) for the complex propagation variable chi = - (α + iω/c) in which α is the attenuation coefficient, c is the phase speed of the progressive wave and ω is the angular frequency. Computer simulations of sound absorption spectra have been made for three different chemical systems, each comprised of two-step chemical reactions using physico-chemical data available in the literature. The chemical systems studied include: (1) water-dioxane, (2) aqueous solutions of glycine and (3) cobalt polyphosphate mixtures. Explicit comparisons are made between the exact biquadratic characteristic solution and the approximate equation (sometimes referred to as a Debye equation) previously applied to interpret the experimental data for the chemical reaction contribution to the absorption versus frequency. The relative chemical reaction and classical viscothermal contributions to the sound absorption are also presented. Several discrepancies that can arise when estimating thermodynamic data (chemical reaction heats or volume changes) for multistep chemical reaction systems when making dilute solution or constant density assumptions are discussed

  7. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  8. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis-Najera, S. E., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Neria-Pérez, J. A., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Medina, L., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Garipov, R., E-mail: ruslan.garipov@mrsolutions.co.uk [MR Solutions Ltd, Surrey (United Kingdom); Rodríguez, A. O., E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, México, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  9. Electron acceleration in the Van Allen radiation belts by fast magnetosonic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Horne, Richard B.; Thorne, Richard M.; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; Santolik, Ondrej

    2007-01-01

    Local acceleration is required to explain electron flux increases in the outer Van Allen radiation belt during magnetic storms. Here we show that fast magnetosonic waves, detected by Cluster 3, can accelerate electrons between ∼10 keV and a few MeV inside the outer radiation belt. Acceleration occurs via electron Landau resonance, and not Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance, due to wave propagation almost perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Using quasi-linear theory, pitch angle and ...

  10. Wave-induced stress and breaking of sea ice in a coupled hydrodynamic discrete-element wave-ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled sea ice-wave model is developed and used to analyze wave-induced stress and breaking in sea ice for a range of wave and ice conditions. The sea ice module is a discrete-element bonded-particle model, in which ice is represented as cuboid grains floating on the water surface that can be connected to their neighbors by elastic joints. The joints may break if instantaneous stresses acting on them exceed their strength. The wave module is based on an open-source version of the Non-Hydrostatic WAVE model (NHWAVE). The two modules are coupled with proper boundary conditions for pressure and velocity, exchanged at every wave model time step. In the present version, the model operates in two dimensions (one vertical and one horizontal) and is suitable for simulating compact ice in which heave and pitch motion dominates over surge. In a series of simulations with varying sea ice properties and incoming wavelength it is shown that wave-induced stress reaches maximum values at a certain distance from the ice edge. The value of maximum stress depends on both ice properties and characteristics of incoming waves, but, crucially for ice breaking, the location at which the maximum occurs does not change with the incoming wavelength. Consequently, both regular and random (Jonswap spectrum) waves break the ice into floes with almost identical sizes. The width of the zone of broken ice depends on ice strength and wave attenuation rates in the ice.

  11. 4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

  12. Exact periodic wave solutions to the coupled schrِodinger-KdV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solutions for the coupled non-linear partial differential equations. 2. Application. 2.1 The coupled Schriodinger-KdV equation. The coupled schriodinger-KdV equation iuط = uــ + uv, vط + 6vvـ + vـــ = (|u|2. ) ,. (8) describes various processes in dusty plasma, such as Langmuir, dust-acoustic wave and electromagnetic waves ...

  13. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    between nonlinear and dispersion effects can result in the formation of symmetrical solitary waves. Also shock ... et al have studied the effect of nonadiabatic dust charge variation on the nonlinear dust acoustic wave with ..... Figure 5 presents the border between oscillatory- and monotonic-type shock waves as functions of ...

  14. Fast wave and electron cyclotron current drive in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Austin, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The non-inductive current drive from directional fast Alfven and electron cyclotron waves was measured in the DIII-D tokamak in order to demonstrate these forms of radiofrequency (RF) current drive and to compare the measured efficiencies with theoretical expectations. The fast wave frequency was 8 times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma centre, while the electron cyclotron wave was at twice the electron cyclotron frequency. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For steady current discharges, an analysis of the loop voltage revealed up to 195 kA of a non-inductive current (out of 310 kA) during combined electron cyclotron and fast wave injection, with a maximum of 110 kA of FWCD and 80 kA of ECCD achieved (not simultaneously). The peakedness of the current profile increased with RF current drive, indicating that the driven current was centrally localized. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with the central electron temperature as expected; however, the FWCD was severely degraded in low current discharges owing to incomplete fast wave absorption. The measured FWCD agreed with the predictions of a ray tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modelling along with multiple pass absorption. Enhancement of the second harmonic ECCD efficiency by the toroidal electric field was observed experimentally. The measured ECCD was in good agreement with Fokker-Planck code predictions. (author). 41 refs, 13 figs, 1 tab

  15. Recent Developments in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.P.; Bell, R.E.; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaye, S.M.; Liu, D.; Maingi, R.; Medley, S.S.; Ono, M.; Podesta, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Ryan, P.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves and the fast-ions created by neutral beam injection (NBI) is critical for future devices such as ITER, which rely on a combination ICRF and NBI. Experiments in NSTX which use 30 MHz High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW) ICRF and NBI heating show a competition between electron heating via Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping, and radio-frequency wave acceleration of NBI generated fast ions. Understanding and mitigating some of the power loss mechanisms outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) has resulted in improved HHFW heating inside the LCFS. Nevertheless a significant fraction of the HHFW power is diverted away from the enclosed plasma. Part of this power is observed locally on the divertor. Experimental observations point toward the radio-frequency (RF) excitation of surface waves, which disperse wave power outside the LCFS, as a leading loss mechanism. Lithium coatings lower the density at the antenna, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the antenna and surrounding material surfaces. Visible and infrared imaging reveal flows of RF power along open field lines into the divertor region. In L-mode -- low average NBI power -- conditions, the fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic measures a near doubling and broadening of the density profile of the upper energetic level of the fast ions concurrent with the presence of HHFW power launched with k// = -8m-1. We are able to heat NBI-induced H-mode plasmas with HHFW. The captured power is expected to be split between absorption by the electrons and absorption by the fast ions, based on TORIC calculation. In the case discussed here the Te increases over the whole profile when ∼2MW of HHFW power with antenna k// = 13m-1 is applied after the H-mode transition. But somewhat unexpectedly fast-ion diagnostics do not observe a change between the HHFW heated NBI discharge and the

  16. Realistic Modeling of Fast MHD Wave Trains in Coronal Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent SDO/AIA observations we have developed realistic modeling of quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs) using 3D MHD model initiated with potential magnetic field extrapolated from the solar coronal boundary. Localized quasi-periodic pulsations associated with C-class flares that drive the waves (as deduced from observations) are modeled with transverse periodic displacement of magnetic field at the lower coronal boundary. The modeled propagating speed and the form of the wave expansions matches the observed fast MHD waves speed >1000 km/s and topology. We study the parametric dependence of the amplitude, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We investigate the interaction of multiple QFP wave trains excited by adjacent flaring sources. We use the model results to synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs, such as the recent DEM analysis. We discuss the implications of our modeling results for the seismological application of QFPs for the diagnostic of the active region field, flare pulsations, end estimate the energy flux carried by the waves.

  17. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.

    Coronal loops are waveguides for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. These loops are expected to be structured. Therefore, in the present paper, we numerically studied the propagation of the fast MHD waves in the structured density slab (composed from a broad density slab with one axisymmetric narrow sub-slab superposed), and analysed the wave signals. Then, this structured slab was divided into its components, i.e., to simple broad and narrow slabs and the same analysis was made. We compared results of both these cases. For the calculations we adopted a two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solved a full set of ideal time-dependent MHD equations using the FLASH code, applying the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. To initiate the fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves, we used axisymmetric Gaussian velocity perturbation. Wave signals were detected in different locations along the slab and as a diagnostic tool of these waves, the wavelet analysis method has been used. We found that for the structured density slab with sufficiently sharp boundaries, i.e., for good quality waveguides (without an energy leakage), the guided waves in the structured slab behave similarly as in its separated (simple slab) components.

  18. Coupling of flexural and longitudinal wave motion in a periodic structure with asymmetrically arranged transverse beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    as the distribution of motion displacements in each wave type. This is used for calculating the spatial variation of the forced harmonic responses of a semi-infinite periodic structure to point excitations by a longitudinal force and by a moment. Numerical simulations reveal the complicated wave coupling phenomena......In this paper we investigate the coupling of flexural and longitudinal wave motions in a waveguide with structural side branches attached at regular intervals. The analysis is based on periodic structure theory, and considers wave transmission in a fully tricoupled and semidefinite periodic...... assembly of beam-type elements or plane-wave transmission for normal incidence in a similar plate assembly. Receptances of a composite periodic element with offset resonant beams are derived and used for computing the frequency-dependent propagation constants of three coupled wave types as well...

  19. Fast temporal evolution of a cosmic gravitational wave background spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, E; Coward, D; Burman, R; Blair, D [School of Physics, University of Western Australia (M013), Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2005-02-21

    We investigate the temporal evolution of a simulated gravitational wave spectrum modelled on a cosmological population of transient sources with characteristic rest-frame frequency of 1 kHz. Our purpose is to see what might be learned about the cosmic distribution of sources by the way in which such spectra build up over short spans of observation time. The spectral evolution depends on the history of source rate evolution and the observation time; and for a universal event rate of some tens s{sup -1} (comparable to the neutron star birth rate) locked to the evolving star formation rate, the spectrum evolves rapidly within the first seconds of observation. A rapid increase in bandwidth occurs because of the large population of sources at moderate to high redshift. Spectra calculated using two observation-based star formation rate models and one simulated model show a relatively stationary low-frequency peak arising from the high-z sources and a time-dependent higher-frequency edge resulting from rarer nearby sources. The spectra converge to a stable form within an observation period of about 20 min for a universal event rate of about 15-30 s{sup -1}. As a supplement, we provide Web-based movie files that highlight the rapid spectral evolution.

  20. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The first investigates how the brine volume gradient between the surface and underside of the sea ice affects its rigidity and flexural strength and... Auckland , December 2014. Montiel, F. Transmission of ocean waves through a row of randomly perturbed circular ice floes. Minisymposium on Wave Motions of...2014 AUT Mathematical Sciences Symposium, Auckland , December 2014. Mosig, J. E. M. Rheological models of flexural-gravity waves in an ice covered ocean

  1. Fast and ultrafast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Brum, Christiano GM; Batista, Paulo P.; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Pancheva, Dora; Bageston, Jose V.; Batista, Inez S.; Takahashi, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating fast (FK) and ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) temperature in the 40- to 100-km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisonde (Lowell Digisonde International, LLC, Lowell, MA, USA) operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (approximately 10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electrodynamic coupling process as being responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK-induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day

  2. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere–thermosphere vertical coupling by gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. T. Trinh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric gravity waves (GWs are essential for the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that these waves are also important for the thermosphere/ionosphere (T/I system. Via vertical coupling, GWs can significantly influence the mean state of the T/I system. However, the penetration of GWs into the T/I system is not fully understood in modeling as well as observations. In the current study, we analyze the correlation between GW momentum fluxes observed in the middle atmosphere (30–90 km and GW-induced perturbations in the T/I. In the middle atmosphere, GW momentum fluxes are derived from temperature observations of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER satellite instrument. In the T/I, GW-induced perturbations are derived from neutral density measured by instruments on the Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE and CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP satellites. We find generally positive correlations between horizontal distributions at low altitudes (i.e., below 90 km and horizontal distributions of GW-induced density fluctuations in the T/I (at 200 km and above. Two coupling mechanisms are likely responsible for these positive correlations: (1 fast GWs generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere can propagate directly to the T/I and (2 primary GWs with their origins in the lower atmosphere dissipate while propagating upwards and generate secondary GWs, which then penetrate up to the T/I and maintain the spatial patterns of GW distributions in the lower atmosphere. The mountain-wave related hotspot over the Andes and Antarctic Peninsula is found clearly in observations of all instruments used in our analysis. Latitude–longitude variations in the summer midlatitudes are also found in observations of all instruments. These variations and strong positive correlations in the summer midlatitudes suggest that GWs with origins related to convection also

  3. A Nonlinear Coupled-Mode System for Water Waves over a General Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassoulis, G. A.; Belibassakis, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    Athanassoulis 2002) problems, over variable bathymetry regions. Using the local-mode expansion in conjunction with the variational principle the original problem is reformulated as an infinite, coupled-mode system of second-order differential equations in the propagation (horizontal) space, fully accounting for the effects of non-linearity and dispersion. Various simplified equations, like Boussinesq-type models, in shallow water depth, and non-linear mild-slope models, in intermediate depth, can be obtained as limiting forms. As a first step towards the solution of fully nonlinear coupled-mode system, the system is simplified keeping only up to second-order terms in the system coefficients, and the derived weakly non-linear model has been applied to water waves propagating over a flat bottom and over an arbitrary bathymetry. This model is solved numerically in the frequency and in the time domain, providing very good results in a wide range of water depths. In the case of monochromatic waves propagating over a flat bottom, it is shown that the present model correctly treats the dispersion effects in the whole range of relative water depths from practically deep to shallow water. In the same case, it is also shown that the present model reproduces correctly the second-order Stokes solutions. In the general case, the solution of the coupled-mode system is obtained numerically by truncating the local-mode series into a finite number of terms, and using finite differences for approximating the derivatives on the horizontal plane. Numerical results presented for a smooth underwater shoaling with a steep bottom slope, demonstrate that the rate of decay of the modal-amplitude functions is very fast, in conformity with similar behaviour in the linear case (Athanassoulis and Belibassakis 1999). This means that a small number of modes (up to 5 or 7) are sufficient for precise numerical solution, provided that the two new modes (the free-surface and the sloping-bottom ones) are included

  4. The ergodic limit of multipass absorption for fast wave current drive in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, K.; Forest, C. B.; Petty, C. C.; Pinsker, R. I.

    1994-12-01

    In many parameter regimes of interest for fast wave current drive (FWCD) in tokamaks, direct absorption of the fast wave by resonant electrons is a weak process and multipass absorption is an important issue. Although both full wave codes and ray tracing codes have been developed to model FWCD, in the multipass regime these tools are computationally intensive, and yield little insight into the nature of the solutions. In this work, an alternative approach is considered. Based on the wave kinetic equation, a natural limit emerges for the multipass regime, where wave energy density, convected along stochastic ray trajectories, uniformly fills the entire accessible phase space. In this ergodic, weak damping limit, the absorbed power density and corresponding wave-driven current density are readily obtained by calculating the appropriate set of one-dimensional k-space integrals at every point in configuration space. The method is used here to model FWCD on the DIII-D tokamak [R. I. Pinsker and the DIII-D Team, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1993), Vol. 1, p. 683]. An example for reactor-grade plasma parameters is also considered.

  5. Model for ICRF fast wave current drive in self-consistent MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Englade, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a model for fast wave current drive in the ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) range was incorporated into the current drive and MHD equilibrium code ACCOME. The ACCOME model combines a free boundary solution of the Grad Shafranov equation with the calculation of driven currents due to neutral beam injection, lower hybrid (LH) waves, bootstrap effects, and ICRF fast waves. The equilibrium and current drive packages iterate between each other to obtain an MHD equilibrium which is consistent with the profiles of driven current density. The ICRF current drive package combines a toroidal full-wave code (FISIC) with a parameterization of the current drive efficiency obtained from an adjoint solution of the Fokker Planck equation. The electron absorption calculation in the full-wave code properly accounts for the combined effects of electron Landau damping (ELD) and transit time magnetic pumping (TTMP), assuming a Maxwellian (or bi-Maxwellian) electron distribution function. Furthermore, the current drive efficiency includes the effects of particle trapping, momentum conserving corrections to the background Fokker Planck collision operator, and toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumbers of the injected ICRF waves. This model has been used to carry out detailed studies of advanced physics scenarios in the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Results are shown, for example, which demonstrate the possibility of achieving stable equilibria at high beta and high bootstrap current fraction in TPX. Model results are also shown for the proposed ITER device

  6. Fast-Projectile Stopping Power of Quantal Multicomponent Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester, D.; Tkachenko, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    The Bethe-Larkin formula for the fast-projectile stopping power is extended to multicomponent plasmas. The results are to contribute to the correct interpretation of the experimental data, which could permit us to test existing and future models of thermodynamic, static, and dynamic characteristics of strongly coupled Coulomb systems

  7. Coupling Atmosphere and Waves for Coastal Wind Turbine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Petersen, Ole S.

    2014-01-01

    a 50% variation in roughness and 20% in wind, with the better formulation for wind leading degraded predictions of roughness compared with observations. The large estimates of roughness when using a 3rd generation wave model are evident offshore, while a roughness formulation based on wave age produces...

  8. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  9. An Improved Coupling of Numerical and Physical Models for Simulating Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shu-xue; Li, Jin-xuan

    2014-01-01

    An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used...... for the physical wave generation. An innovative scheme combining fourth-order Lagrange interpolation and Runge-Kutta scheme is described for solving the coupling equation. A Transfer function modulation method is presented to minimize the errors induced from the hydrodynamic invalidity of the coupling model and....../or the mechanical capability of the wavemaker in area where nonlinearities or dispersion predominate. The overall performance and applicability of the coupling model has been experimentally validated by accounting for both regular and irregular waves and varying bathymetry. Experimental results show...

  10. Spinor-electron wave guided modes in coupled quantum wells structures by solving the Dirac equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Jesus [Area de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Fisica, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)], E-mail: suso.linares.beiras@usc.es; Nistal, Maria C. [Area de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Fisica, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2009-05-04

    A quantum analysis based on the Dirac equation of the propagation of spinor-electron waves in coupled quantum wells, or equivalently coupled electron waveguides, is presented. The complete optical wave equations for Spin-Up (SU) and Spin-Down (SD) spinor-electron waves in these electron guides couplers are derived from the Dirac equation. The relativistic amplitudes and dispersion equations of the spinor-electron wave-guided modes in a planar quantum coupler formed by two coupled quantum wells, or equivalently by two coupled slab electron waveguides, are exactly derived. The main outcomes related to the spinor modal structure, such as the breaking of the non-relativistic degenerate spin states, the appearance of phase shifts associated with the spin polarization and so on, are shown.

  11. Inverse problems in cancellous bone: estimation of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves using Bayesian probability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian C; Bauer, Adam Q; Holland, Mark R; Pakula, Michal; Laugier, Pascal; Bretthorst, G Larry; Miller, James G

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of cancellous bone can be complicated by artifacts introduced by analyzing acquired data consisting of two propagating waves (a fast wave and a slow wave) as if only one wave were present. Recovering the ultrasonic properties of overlapping fast and slow waves could therefore lead to enhancement of bone quality assessment. The current study uses Bayesian probability theory to estimate phase velocity and normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) parameters in a model of fast and slow wave propagation. Calculations are carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo with simulated annealing to approximate the marginal posterior probability densities for parameters in the model. The technique is applied to simulated data, to data acquired on two phantoms capable of generating two waves in acquired signals, and to data acquired on a human femur condyle specimen. The models are in good agreement with both the simulated and experimental data, and the values of the estimated ultrasonic parameters fall within expected ranges.

  12. Advances in High-harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Podesta, M; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ahn, J -W; Chen, G; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Maingi, R; Ryan, P M; Wilgen, J B; Heidbrink, W W; Liu, D; Bonoli, P T; Brecht, T; Choi, M

    2009-12-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile were measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied. __________________________________________________

  13. Drift wave shear damping annulment due to parametric coupling and magnetic field variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, T.A.; Jovanovic, D.; Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear suppression of the drift wave shear damping by the simultaneous action of a strong standing pump wave and of the magnetic field variation along the magnetic field line is studied using a version of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. The threshold for the parametric destabilization is calculated as a function of the plasma parameters. Destabilization occurs due to the elimination of the energy convection towards the dissipative layer, by both the linear toroidal coupling and nonlinear parametric coupling

  14. Solitary waves for a coupled nonlinear Schrodinger system with dispersion management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotis Panayotaros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider a system of coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations with periodically varying dispersion coefficient that arises in the context of fiber-optics communication. We use Lions's Concentration Compactness principle to show the existence of standing waves with prescribed L^2 norm in an averaged equation that approximates the coupled system. We also use the Mountain Pass Lemma to prove the existence of standing waves with prescribed frequencies.

  15. Modelling of plasma-antenna coupling and non-linear radio frequency wave-plasma-wall interactions in the magnetized plasma device under ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, LingFeng

    2016-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) by waves in 30-80 MHz range is currently used in magnetic fusion plasmas. Excited by phased arrays of current straps at the plasma periphery, these waves exist under two polarizations. The Fast Wave tunnels through the tenuous plasma edge and propagates to its center where it is absorbed. The parasitically emitted Slow Wave only exists close to the launchers. How much power can be coupled to the center with 1 A current on the straps? How do the emitted radiofrequency (RF) near and far fields interact parasitically with the edge plasma via RF sheath rectification at plasma-wall interfaces? To address these two issues simultaneously, in realistic geometry over the size of ICRH antennas, this thesis upgraded and tested the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for ICH (SSWICH) code. SSWICH couples self-consistently RF wave propagation and Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs) at plasma/wall interfaces. Its upgrade is full wave and was implemented in two dimensions (toroidal/radial). New SBCs coupling the two polarizations were derived and implemented along shaped walls tilted with respect to the confinement magnetic field. Using this new tool in the absence of SBCs, we studied the impact of a density decaying continuously inside the antenna box and across the Lower Hybrid (LH) resonance. Up to the memory limits of our workstation, the RF fields below the LH resonance changed with the grid size. However the coupled power spectrum hardly evolved and was only weakly affected by the density inside the box. In presence of SBCs, SSWICH-FW simulations have identified the role of the fast wave on RF sheath excitation and reproduced some key experimental observations. SSWICH-FW was finally adapted to conduct the first electromagnetic and RF-sheath 2D simulations of the cylindrical magnetized plasma device ALINE. (author) [fr

  16. Rigorous coupled-wave theory for lossy volume grating in Laue geometry X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    André, Jean-Michel; Le Guen, Karine; Jonnard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The rigorous coupled-wave analysis of grating diffraction initiated by Moharam and Gaylor [JOSA 71, 811 (1981)] has been extended to lossy media and Fourier gratings for Laue diffraction geometry. In the rigorous approach, the second derivatives of field amplitude in the wave propagation equation together with high-order wave Fourier components are kept and exact boundary conditions are implemented. The problem is reduced to a state differential equation formulated in a matrix form. The restr...

  17. On the Boyd-Kadomstev System for a Three-Wave Coupling Problem and its Asymptotic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, Guy; Sentis, Rémi

    2013-04-01

    We consider the Boyd-Kadomstev system which is in particular a model for the Brillouin backscattering in laser-plasma interaction. It couples the propagation of two laser beams, the incoming and the backscattered waves, with an ion acoustic wave which propagates at a much slower speed. The ratio {\\varepsilon} between the plasma sound velocity and the (group) velocity of light is small, with typical value of order 10-3. In this paper, we make a rigorous analysis of the behavior of solutions as {\\varepsilon to 0} . This problem can be cast in the general framework of fast singular limits for hyperbolic systems. The main new point which is addressed in our analysis is that the singular relaxation term present in the equation is a nonlinear first order system.

  18. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Arctic sea ice has experienced since at least the beginning of the satellite era are believed to be caused by ice - albedo temperature feedback...dimensional (2D) ocean surface wave interactions with sea ice in a contemporary 3D Arctic ice /ocean model. To accomplish this primary goal, the objectives...of how ocean waves and sea ice interact, for use in operational models of the Arctic Basin and the adjacent seas ; – improve the forecasting

  19. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Coupling of Lower Hybrid Waves on Tore Supra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goniche, M.; Frincu, B.; Ekedahl, A.; Petržílka, Václav; Berger-By, G.; Hillairet, J.; Litaudon, X.; Preynas, M.; Voyer, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2012), s. 322-332 ISSN 1536-1055 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : LHwave * plasma * lower hybrid * wave coupling * nonlinear coupling Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.517, year: 2012

  1. Characterization of fast acoustic wave propagation using OFDR with double interrogation and frequency tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive OFDR system capable of detecting and tracking fast acoustic wave propagation is described. The system was tested by dropping a screw (50gr) and a paperclip (impact of the screw led to a transient shift in the frequency of the interrogating light which corrupted the observed response. By tracking the beat frequencies of predefined reflectors and extracting their amplitudes significant improvement in the system's output was obtained.

  2. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Rossi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  3. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Rossi; Riccardo Maria Liberati; Marco Frasca; Mauro Angelini

    2018-01-01

    The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  4. Air-coupled seismic waves at long range from Apollo launchings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, W. L.; Dalins, I.; Mccarty, V.; Ewing, M.; Kaschak , G.

    1971-01-01

    Microphones and seismographs were co-located in arrays on Skidaway Island, Georgia, for the launchings of Apollo 13 and 14, 374 km to the south. Simultaneous acoustic and seismic waves were recorded for both events at times appropriate to the arrival of the acoustic waves from the source. The acoustic signal is relatively broadband compared to the nearly monochromatic seismic signal; the seismic signal is much more continuous than the more pulse-like acoustic signal; ground loading from the pressure variations of the acoustic waves is shown to be too small to account for the seismic waves; and the measured phase velocities of both acoustic and seismic waves across the local instrument arrays differ by less than 6 per cent and possibly 3 per cent if experimental error is included. It is concluded that the seismic waves are generated by resonant coupling to the acoustic waves along some 10 km of path on Skidaway Island.

  5. Study of the Hamiltonian of the response of a tokamak plasma to the ion cyclotron heating wave: minor heating and generation of current by a fast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.

    1990-06-01

    The role of additional heatings, such as the ion Cyclotron heating, is to raise magnetic fusion plasmas to higher temperatures, to satisfy the ignition condition. The understanding of the wave absorption mechanisms by the plasma requires a precise description of the particle individual trajectories. The Hamiltonian mechanics, through action-angle variables, allows this description, and makes the computation of the wave-particle interaction easier. A quantitative evaluation of the intrinsic stochasticity is derived for ionic trajectories perturbated by the fast wave. The results show the importance of the Hamiltonian chaos in the formation of the deeply anisotropic distribution tails, encountered in minor heating scenarios. Direct interaction of the electrons and the fast wave is analysed. The influence of the various parameters is examined in order to optimize this scenario of fast wave current drive in tokamaks [fr

  6. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lepri@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pikovsky, Arkady [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str 24/25, Potsdam (Germany); Department of Control Theory, Nizhni Novgorod State University, Gagarin Av. 23, 606950, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a “chaotic diode,” where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  7. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Nakariakov, Valery M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: pankaj.kumar@nasa.gov [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s{sup −1}. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s{sup −1}. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  8. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ˜664-1416 km s-1. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ˜70 and ˜140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, I.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70-140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172-273 km s-1. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  9. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s −1 . Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s −1 . The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  10. An accurate, fast, and scalable solver for high-frequency wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Núñez, L.; Taus, M.; Hewett, R.; Demanet, L.

    2017-12-01

    In many science and engineering applications, solving time-harmonic high-frequency wave propagation problems quickly and accurately is of paramount importance. For example, in geophysics, particularly in oil exploration, such problems can be the forward problem in an iterative process for solving the inverse problem of subsurface inversion. It is important to solve these wave propagation problems accurately in order to efficiently obtain meaningful solutions of the inverse problems: low order forward modeling can hinder convergence. Additionally, due to the volume of data and the iterative nature of most optimization algorithms, the forward problem must be solved many times. Therefore, a fast solver is necessary to make solving the inverse problem feasible. For time-harmonic high-frequency wave propagation, obtaining both speed and accuracy is historically challenging. Recently, there have been many advances in the development of fast solvers for such problems, including methods which have linear complexity with respect to the number of degrees of freedom. While most methods scale optimally only in the context of low-order discretizations and smooth wave speed distributions, the method of polarized traces has been shown to retain optimal scaling for high-order discretizations, such as hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin methods and for highly heterogeneous (and even discontinuous) wave speeds. The resulting fast and accurate solver is consequently highly attractive for geophysical applications. To date, this method relies on a layered domain decomposition together with a preconditioner applied in a sweeping fashion, which has limited straight-forward parallelization. In this work, we introduce a new version of the method of polarized traces which reveals more parallel structure than previous versions while preserving all of its other advantages. We achieve this by further decomposing each layer and applying the preconditioner to these new components separately and

  11. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D. [and others

    1994-12-31

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX.

  12. Magnetic swirls and associated fast magnetoacoustic kink waves in a solar chromospheric flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, K.; Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Pascoe, D. J.; Jelínek, P.; Kuźma, B.; Fedun, V.

    2018-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated magnetic swirls in an isolated flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. These swirls are triggered by an initial pulse in a horizontal component of the velocity. The initial pulse is launched either (a) centrally, within the localized magnetic flux tube or (b) off-central, in the ambient medium. The evolution and dynamics of the flux tube are described by three-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved to reveal that in case (a) dipole-like swirls associated with the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 1 Alfvén waves are generated. In case (b), the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 0 Alfvén modes are excited. In both these cases, the excited fast magnetoacoustic kink and Alfvén waves consist of a similar flow pattern and magnetic shells are also generated with clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating plasma within them, which can be the proxy of dipole-shaped chromospheric swirls. The complex dynamics of vortices and wave perturbations reveals the channelling of sufficient amount of energy to fulfil energy losses in the chromosphere (˜104 W m-1) and in the corona (˜102 W m-1). Some of these numerical findings are reminiscent of signatures in recent observational data.

  13. RF heating and current drive on NSTX with high harmonic fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    NSTX is a small aspect ratio tokamak with a large dielectric constant (50-100); under these conditions high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) will readily damp on electrons via Landau damping and TTMP. The HHFW system is a 30 MHz, 12-element array capable of launching both symmetric and directional wave spectra for plasma heating and non-inductive current drive. It has delivered up to 6 MW for short pulses and has routinely operated at ∼3-4 MW for 100-200 ms pulses. Results include strong, centrally-peaked electron heating in both D and He plasmas, for both high and low phase velocity spectra. H-modes were obtained with application of HHFW power alone, with stored energy doubling after the L-H transition. Beta poloidal as large as unity has been obtained with large fractions (0.4) of bootstrap current. A fast ion tail with energies extending up to 140 keV has been observed when HHFW interacts with 80 keV neutral beams; neutron rate and lost ion measurements, as well as modeling, indicate significant power absorption by the fast ions. Radial power deposition profiles are being calculated with ray tracing and kinetic full-wave codes and benchmarked against measurements. (author)

  14. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  15. Switching terahertz wave with grating-coupled Kretschmann configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu-Sheng, Li

    2017-08-07

    We present a terahertz wave switch utilizing Kretschmann configuration which consists of high-refractive-index prism-liquid crystal-periodically grooved metal grating. The switching mechanism of the terahertz switch is based on spoof surface plasmon polariton (SSPP) excitation in the attenuated total reflection regime by changing the liquid crystal refractive index. The results highlighted the fact that the feasibility to "tune" the attenuated total reflection terahertz wave intensity by using the external applied bias voltage. The extinction ratio of the terahertz switch reaches 31.48dB. The terahertz switch has good control ability and flexibility, and can be used in potential terahertz free space device systems.

  16. Comparative Study between Slow Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Fast Shock Wave Lithotripsy in the Management of Renal Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Zamanul Islam Bhuiyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal calculi are frequent causes of ureteric colic. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the most common treatment of these stones. It uses focused sound waves to break up stones externally. Objective: To compare the efficiency of slow and fast delivery rate of shock waves on stone fragmentation and treatment outcome in patients with renal calculi. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the department of Urology, National Institute of Kidney diseases and Urology, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka from July 2006 to June 2007. Total 90 patients were treated using the Storz Medical Modulith ® SLX lithotripter. Patients were divided into Group A, Group B and Group C – each group having 30 subjects. Group A was selected for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL by 60 shock waves per minute, Group B by 90 shock waves per minute and Group C by 120 shock waves per minute. Results: Complete clearance of stone was observed in 24 patients in Group A and 13 patients in both Group B and Group C in first session. In Group A only 3 patients needed second session but in Group B and Group C, 12 and 8 patients needed second session. In Group A only one patient needed third session but third session was required for 3 patients in Group B and 5 patients in Group C for complete clearance of stone. In Group A, subsequent sessions were performed under spinal anesthesia and in Group B under sedation and analgesia (p>0.001. Mean number of sessions for full clearance of stones in group A was 1.37 ± 0.85, in Group B was 1.8 ± 0.887 and in Group C was 2.0 ± 1.083. Significant difference was observed in term of sessions among groups (p>0.05. In first follow-up, complete clearance of stones was seen in 24 patients in Group A and 13 in both Group B and Group C. In second follow-up, 3 patients in Group A, 12 in Group B and 8 in Group C showed complete clearance of stones. It was observed that rate of stone clearance was higher in Group A

  17. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B.; Mau, T.K.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.I.; Raman, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J.

    2003-01-01

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge

  18. Assessment of the importance of the current-wave coupling in the shelf ocean forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jordà

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wave-current interactions on shelf ocean forecasts is investigated in the framework of the MFSTEP (Mediterranean Forecasting System Project Towards Enviromental Predictions project. A one way sequential coupling approach is adopted to link the wave model (WAM to the circulation model (SYMPHONIE. The coupling of waves and currents has been done considering four main processes: wave refraction due to currents, surface wind drag and bottom drag modifications due to waves, and the wave induced mass flux. The coupled modelling system is implemented in the southern Catalan shelf (NW Mediterranean, a region with characteristics similar to most of the Mediterranean shelves. The sensitivity experiments are run in a typical operational configuration. The wave refraction by currents seems to be not very relevant in a microtidal context such as the western Mediterranean. The main effect of waves on current forecasts is through the modification of the wind drag. The Stokes drift also plays a significant role due to its spatial and temporal characteristics. Finally, the enhanced bottom friction is just noticeable in the inner shelf.

  19. Precise measurement and accuracy analysis for determining the fast or slow axis of wave plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guixia; Su, Junhong; Xu, Junqi

    2018-01-01

    A method used for precisely measuring the placement of the fast or slow axis of wave plate is presented. In this method, a test wave plate is placed between a polarizer and an analyzer. With the polarizer and analyzer being rotated to different positions, the intensity of the emergent light is measured and one of the optics principal axes of the test wave plate is marked. Then whether this optics principal axis is a fast or slow axis is measured by checking the state of the emergent light polarization. By taking the method of identifying the intensity value near the inflection point, the error caused by directly searching the extreme value of the light intensity can be avoided and the accuracy of determining axis can also be improved significantly. In addition, the source of the determining axis accuracy, which is +/-0.1° . is also analyzed in detail. With regard to the method, there are no requirements for the wavelength of the light source or the linearity, undercurrent and isotropy of the photoelectric detector. Above all, it can be applied to determining the axis of wave plate with any phase retardation.

  20. Benchmark on traveling wave fast reactor with negative reactivity feedback obtained with MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gann, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulations of traveling wave fast reactor with negative reactivity feedback. The results were obtained using MCNPX code combined with CINDER90 subroutine for depletion calculations. We considered 1-D model of TWR containing 4 m long core made of mixture of 66 at. % 238 U and 34 at. % 10 B. Ignitor made of 235 U was located in the center of the core. Boron was included as imitator of structural in-core materials and coolant. Negative reactivity feedback was adjusted to reactor power of 500 MW. In this case two burning waves originated from the igniter and travel to the ends of the core during the following 40 years; coefficient of utilization of 238 U reached 80 %. Distribution of specific power in traveling wave, isotope concentration of fission products and actinides, neutron flux, fast neutron spectrum, specific activity were calculated. Data of the computer simulation is in qualitative agreement with theoretical results obtained in slow burning wave approximation

  1. Breathers and rogue waves: Demonstration with coupled nonlinear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Different types of breathers and rogue waves (RWs) are some of the important coher- ent structures which have been recently realized in several physical phenomena in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, Bose–Einstein condensates, etc. Mathematically, they have been deduced in non- linear Schrödinger (NLS) ...

  2. Design of traveling wave windows for the PEP-II RF coupling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, N.M.; Ng, C.K.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, M.

    1995-05-01

    The waveguide windows in the PEP-II RF coupling network have to withstand high power of 500 kW. Traveling wave windows have lower power dissipation than conventional self-matched windows, thus rendering the possibility of less stringent mechanical design. The traveling wave behavior is achieved by providing a reflecting iris on each side of the window, and depending on the configuration of the irises, traveling wave windows are characterized as inductive or capacitive types. A numerical design procedure using MAFIA has been developed for traveling wave windows. The relative advantages of inductive and capacitive windows are discussed. Furthermore, the issues of bandwidth and multipactoring are also addressed

  3. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  4. Coupling of Wave and Circulation Models in the Atlantic European North-West Shelf Predicting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Krüger, Oliver; Behrens, Arno; Lewis, Huw; Castillo, Juan M.

    2017-04-01

    This study addresses the coupling between wind wave and circulation models on the example of the Atlantic - European North-West Shelf (NWS). This topic reflects the increased interest in operational oceanography to reduce prediction errors of state estimates at coastal scales. The uncertainties in most of the presently used models result from the nonlinear feedback between strong tidal currents and wind-waves, which can no longer be ignored, in particular in the coastal zone where its role seems to be dominant. Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on thermohaline distribution and ocean circulation at the NWS. Four scenarios - including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination of the three wave-induced forcing were performed to study the role of the wave-induced processes on model simulations. The individual and collective role of those processes is quantified and the results are compared with the NWS circulation model results without wave effects as well as against various in-situ measurements. The performance of the forecasting system is illustrated for the cases of several extreme events. The improved skills resulting from the new developments in the forecasting system, in particular during extreme events, justify further enhancements of the coastal operational systems. The study is performed in the frame of the COPERNICUS CMEMS Service Evolution Projects Wave2NEMO and OWAIRS.

  5. Impact of wind waves on the air-sea fluxes: A coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, V.; Chapron, B.; Makin, V.

    2014-02-01

    A revised wind-over-wave-coupling model is developed to provide a consistent description of the sea surface drag and heat/moister transfer coefficients, and associated wind velocity and temperature profiles. The spectral distribution of short wind waves in the decimeter to a few millimeters range of wavelengths is introduced based on the wave action balance equation constrained using the Yurovskaya et al. (2013) optical field wave measurements. The model is capable to reproduce fundamental statistical properties of the sea surface, such as the mean square slope and the spectral distribution of breaking crests length. The surface stress accounts for the effect of airflow separation due to wave breaking, which enables a better fit of simulated form drag to observations. The wave breaking controls the overall energy losses for the gravity waves, but also the generation of shorter waves including the parasitic capillaries, thus enhancing the form drag. Breaking wave contribution to the form drag increases rapidly at winds above 15 m/s where it exceeds the nonbreaking wave contribution. The overall impact of wind waves (breaking and nonbreaking) leads to a sheltering of the near-surface layer where the turbulent mixing is suppressed. Accordingly, the air temperature gradient in this sheltered layer increases to maintain the heat flux constant. The resulting deformation of the air temperature profile tends to lower the roughness scale for temperature compared to its value over the smooth surface.

  6. A fast linearized conservative finite element method for the strongly coupled nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Gu, Xian-Ming; Huang, Chengming; Fei, Mingfa; Zhang, Guoyu

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a fast linearized conservative finite element method is studied for solving the strongly coupled nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equations. We prove that the scheme preserves both the mass and energy, which are defined by virtue of some recursion relationships. Using the Sobolev inequalities and then employing the mathematical induction, the discrete scheme is proved to be unconditionally convergent in the sense of L2-norm and H α / 2-norm, which means that there are no any constraints on the grid ratios. Then, the prior bound of the discrete solution in L2-norm and L∞-norm are also obtained. Moreover, we propose an iterative algorithm, by which the coefficient matrix is independent of the time level, and thus it leads to Toeplitz-like linear systems that can be efficiently solved by Krylov subspace solvers with circulant preconditioners. This method can reduce the memory requirement of the proposed linearized finite element scheme from O (M2) to O (M) and the computational complexity from O (M3) to O (Mlog ⁡ M) in each iterative step, where M is the number of grid nodes. Finally, numerical results are carried out to verify the correction of the theoretical analysis, simulate the collision of two solitary waves, and show the utility of the fast numerical solution techniques.

  7. Atmosphere-ionosphere coupling from convectively generated gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Irfan; Barlage, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Ionospheric variability impacts operational performances of a variety of technological systems, such as HF communication, Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation, and radar surveillance. The ionosphere is not only perturbed by geomagnetic inputs but is also influenced by atmospheric tides and other wave disturbances propagating from the troposphere to high altitudes. Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) excited by meteorological sources are one of the largest sources of mesoscale variability in the ionosphere. In this paper, Total Electron Content (TEC) data from networks of GPS receivers in the United States are analyzed to investigate AGWs in the ionosphere generated by convective thunderstorms. Two case studies of convectively generated gravity waves are presented. On April 4, 2014 two distinct large convective systems in Texas and Arkansas generated two sets of concentric AGWs that were observed in the ionosphere as Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs). The period of the observed TIDs was 20.8 min, the horizontal wavelength was 182.4 km, and the horizontal phase speed was 146.4 m/s. The second case study shows TIDs generated from an extended squall line on December 23, 2015 stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes in North America. Unlike the concentric wave features seen in the first case study, the extended squall line generated TIDs, which exhibited almost plane-parallel phase fronts. The TID period was 20.1 min, its horizontal wavelength was 209.6 km, and the horizontal phase speed was 180.1 m/s. The AGWs generated by both of these meteorological events have large vertical wavelength (>100 km), which are larger than the F2 layer thickness, thus allowing them to be discernible in the TEC dataset.

  8. Dynamic Characteristics of Magnetic Coupling in Horizontal Axis Wave Energy Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To solve the dynamic response problems of magnetic coupling in the horizontal axis wave energy device, this has researched the dynamic characteristicsof magnetic coupling. The fitting formula about torque and angle of the magnetic coupling is obtained through experiments. The mathematical models of the magnetic coupling torque transmission are established. The steady state error of the magnetic coupling and the transfer function of the output angle are obtained. The analytical solution of the step response of the output angle in time domain is derived. The influence of the torsional rigidity, the damping coefficient and the driven rotor’s rotational inertia on dynamic characteristics of the magnetic coupling isanalyzed. According to the analysis results, the design rules of magnetic coupling are proposed.

  9. Self-Calibrating Wave-Encoded Variable-Density Single-Shot Fast Spin Echo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyu; Taviani, Valentina; Tamir, Jonathan I; Cheng, Joseph Y; Zhang, Tao; Song, Qiong; Hargreaves, Brian A; Pauly, John M; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2018-04-01

    It is highly desirable in clinical abdominal MR scans to accelerate single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging and reduce blurring due to T 2 decay and partial-Fourier acquisition. To develop and investigate the clinical feasibility of wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE imaging for improved image quality and scan time reduction. Prospective controlled clinical trial. With Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, the proposed method was assessed on 20 consecutive adult patients (10 male, 10 female, range, 24-84 years). A wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE sequence was developed for clinical 3.0T abdominal scans to enable high acceleration (3.5×) with full-Fourier acquisitions by: 1) introducing wave encoding with self-refocusing gradient waveforms to improve acquisition efficiency; 2) developing self-calibrated estimation of wave-encoding point-spread function and coil sensitivity to improve motion robustness; and 3) incorporating a parallel imaging and compressed sensing reconstruction to reconstruct highly accelerated datasets. Image quality was compared pairwise with standard Cartesian acquisition independently and blindly by two radiologists on a scale from -2 to 2 for noise, contrast, confidence, sharpness, and artifacts. The average ratio of scan time between these two approaches was also compared. A Wilcoxon signed-rank tests with a P value under 0.05 considered statistically significant. Wave-encoded variable-density SSFSE significantly reduced the perceived noise level and improved the sharpness of the abdominal wall and the kidneys compared with standard acquisition (mean scores 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8, respectively, P variable-density sampling SSFSE achieves improved image quality with clinically relevant echo time and reduced scan time, thus providing a fast and robust approach for clinical SSFSE imaging. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 6 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:954-966. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Identification of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Antoine; Hassaini, Roumaissa; Redor, Ivan; Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joël; Mordant, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The Weak Turbulence Theory is a theory, in the limit of vanishing nonlinearity, that derive analytically statistical features of wave turbulence. The stationary spectrum for the surface elevation in the case of gravity waves, is predicted to E(k) k - 5 / 2 . This spectral exponent -5/2 remains elusive in all experiments. in which the measured exponent is systematically lower than the prediction. Furthermore in the experiments the weaker the nonlinearity the further the spectral exponent is from the prediction. In order to investigate the reason for this observation we developed an experiment in the CORIOLIS facility in Grenoble. It is a 13m-diameter circular pool filled with water with a 70 cm depth. We generate wave turbulence by using two wedge wavemakers. Surface elevation measurements are performed by a stereoscopic optical technique and by capacitive probes. The nonlinear coupling at work in this system are analyzed by computing 3- and 4-wave correlations of the Fourier wave amplitudes in frequency. Theory predicts that coupling should occur through 4-wave resonant interaction. In our data, strong 3-wave correlations are observed in addition to the 4-wave correlation. Most our observations are consistent with field observation in the Black Sea (Leckler et al. 2015). This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC, Grant Agreement No 647018-WATU).

  11. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  12. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  13. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  14. Electromagnetic waves in an axion-active relativistic plasma non-minimally coupled to gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Muharlyamov, Ruslan K.; Zayats, Alexei E.

    2013-01-01

    We consider cosmological applications of a new self-consistent system of equations, accounting for a non-minimal coupling of the gravitational, electromagnetic and pseudoscalar (axion) fields in a relativistic plasma. We focus on dispersion relations for electromagnetic perturbations in an initially isotropic ultrarelativistic plasma coupled to the gravitational and axion fields in the framework of isotropic homogeneous cosmological model of the de Sitter type. We classify the longitudinal and transversal electromagnetic modes in an axionically active plasma and distinguish between waves (damping, instable or running), and nonharmonic perturbations (damping or instable). We show that for the special choice of the guiding model parameters the transversal electromagnetic waves in the axionically active plasma, non-minimally coupled to gravity, can propagate with the phase velocity smaller than the speed of light in vacuum, thus displaying a possibility for a new type of resonant particle-wave interactions. (orig.)

  15. Coupled Mooring Analyses for the WEC-Sim Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirnivas, Senu; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Hall, Matthew; Bosma, Bret

    2016-07-01

    A wave-energy-converter-specific time-domain modeling method (WEC-Sim) was coupled with a lumped-mass-based mooring model (MoorDyn) to improve its mooring dynamics modeling capability. This paper presents a verification and validation study on the coupled numerical method. First, a coupled model was built to simulate a 1/25 model scale floating power system connected to a traditional three-point catenary mooring with an angle of 120 between the lines. The body response and the tension force on the mooring lines at the fairlead in decay tests and under regular and irregular waves were examined. To validate and verify the coupled numerical method, the simulation results were compared to the measurements from a wave tank test and a commercial code (OrcaFlex). Second, a coupled model was built to simulate a two-body point absorber system with a chain-connected catenary system. The influence of the mooring connection on the point absorber was investigated. Overall, the study showed that the coupling of WEC-Sim and the MoorDyn model works reasonably well for simulating a floating system with practical mooring designs and predicting the corresponding dynamic loads on the mooring lines. Further analyses on improving coupling efficiency and the feasibility of applying the numerical method to simulate WEC systems with more complex mooring configuration are still needed.

  16. Ocean-Wave Coupled Modeling in COAMPS-TC: A Study of Hurricane Ivan (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    input of the Stokes Drift Current ( SDC ) calculated from the SWAN wave spectra to NCOM, is examined. The models indicate that the SDC was on the order...of 10 -25% of the near-surface Eulerian current during Ivan. Recent studies of the importance of the SDC and the resulting Langmuir turbulence on...model coupling, which included the input of the Stokes Drift Current ( SDC ) calculated from the SWAN wave spectra to NCOM, is examined. The models indi

  17. Coupled poroelastic waves and electromagnetic fields in layered media: Theory, Modeling, and Interferometric Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Grobbe, N.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, I study coupled poroelastic waves and electromagnetic fields in layered media. The focus is two-fold:1. Increase the theoretical and physical understanding of the seismo-electromagnetic phenomenon by analytically-based numerical modeling.2. Investigate the potential of seismo-electromagnetic interferometry.After presenting the governing equations that form the basis of the theoretical framework, I capture this system into a matrix-vector representation of the wave equation. I ...

  18. Air-coupled guided waves combined with thermography for monitoring fatigue in biaxially loaded composite tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Non-destructive methodologies for remote monitoring of fatigue induced by mechanical load in fibre reinforced plastics are presented. Hollow cylinders (glass fibre winding) were stepwise biaxially fatigued and measured in single-sided access configurations. Based on conversion of air-coupled ultrasound to guided waves, it is shown that accumulated fatigue damage is accompanied by decrease in phase velocity and increase in attenuation. The change in wave velocity caused by ...

  19. Coupled channel analysis of s-wave ππ and K anti-K photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chueng-Ryong Ji; Szczepaniak, A.; Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Williams, R.

    1997-10-01

    We present a coupled channel partial wave analysis of non-diffractive S-wave π + π - and K + K - photoproduction focusing on the K anti-K threshold. Final state interactions are included. We calculate total cross sections, angular and effective mass distributions in both ππ and K anti-K channels. Our results indicate that these processes are experimentally measurable and valuable information on the f 0 (980) resonance structure can be obtained. (author)

  20. Forced vibration and wave propagation in mono-coupled periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the wave propagation and vibration characteristics of mono-coupled structures which are of spatially periodic nature. The receptance approach to periodic structure theory is applied to study undamped periodic systems with composite structural elements; particular emphasis...... is laid on investigating resonant periodic point loading and its pronounced effect on the propagation of longitudinal waves. General mono-coupled periodic systems are first assumed to be infinite in extent; thereafter reflections caused by arbitrary end terminations of finite structures are considered...

  1. Traveling neutral disturbances. [acoustic-gravity wave coupling to minor species in atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S. H.; Eun, H.

    1976-01-01

    The coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the main atmosphere to acoustic waves characteristic of individual minor species in the atmosphere is postulated. Such coupling would exist as a result of resonances in the response of the minor species, and its likelihood depends on the mass of the atmospheric particle relative to the major species mass, the diffusion of the minor species, and the direction of propagation of the main disturbance. These minor-species disturbances may explain some AE-C measurements in the thermosphere and could possibly play a role in the distribution of minor species and their chemistry in the mesosphere.

  2. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  3. Efficiency of conscious access improves with coupling of slow and fast neural oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Chie; Raffone, Antonino; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-05-01

    Global workspace access is considered as a critical factor for the ability to report a visual target. A plausible candidate mechanism for global workspace access is coupling of slow and fast brain activity. We studied coupling in EEG data using cross-frequency phase-amplitude modulation measurement between delta/theta phases and beta/gamma amplitudes from two experimental sessions, held on different days, of a typical attentional blink (AB) task, implying conscious access to targets. As the AB effect improved with practice between sessions, theta-gamma and theta-beta coupling increased generically. Most importantly, practice effects observed in delta-gamma and delta-beta couplings were specific to performance on the AB task. In particular, delta-gamma coupling showed the largest increase in cases of correct target detection in the most challenging AB conditions. All these practice effects were observed in the right temporal region. Given that the delta band is the main frequency of the P3 ERP, which is a marker of global workspace activity for conscious access, and because the gamma band is involved in visual object processing, the current results substantiate the role of phase-amplitude modulation in conscious access to visual target representations.

  4. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  5. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-07-15

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  6. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part I: Formulation, implementation and numerical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    -order, bi-chromatic wave over a range of dimensionless water depth and oscillation frequency combinations, indicating that the resultant wave quality is significantly improved using the second-order coupling theory. A separate verification combining numerical and experimental model of the theory......In this series of two papers, we report on the irregular wave extension of the second-order coupling theory of numerical and physical wave model described in [Z. Yang, S. Liu, H.B. Bingham and J. Li. Second-order theory for coupling numerical and physical wave tanks: Derivation, evaluation...... interpolation and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme, with a numerical velocity time series which is decomposed by the Newton-Raphson iterative method. Analytical evaluations on the suppression of spurious free waves and the relative errors of the resultant bound waves have been conducted by considering a 2nd...

  7. Analytic calculation of the nonzero fast wave reflection coefficient from the tunneling equation with absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.S.; Swanson, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic series expression of the nonzero fast wave reflection coefficient has been found from the tunneling equation which models the wave propagation in weakly inhomogeneous media near a back-to-back resonance-cutoff pair. Explicit calculations are done for both second ion cyclotron and second electron cyclotron harmonic cases. Numerical values of this expression are compared to those calculated by solving an integral equation iteratively. They agree well with each other whenever both the series and the iteration converge. This result is based on a new method of evaluating integrals derived from the integral equation without having to solve the equation itself. This new method may have more applications and deserves further research and development

  8. d-3He reaction measurements during fast wave minority heating in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Time- and energy-resolved d- 3 He fusion reactions have been measured to infer the energy of the d + or He ++ minority ions heated near their cyclotron frequency by the magnetosonic fast wave. The average energy of the reacting 3 He ions during 3 He minority heating is in the range of 100 to 400 keV, as deduced from the magnitude of the reaction rate, its decay time, and the energy spread of the proton reaction products. The observed reaction rate and its scaling with wave power and electron density and temperature are in qualitative agreement with a radial reaction rate model using the minority distribution predicted from quasilinear velocity space diffusion. Oscillations in the reaction rate are observed concurrent with sawtooth and m = 2 MHD activity in the plasma

  9. Fast integral equation algorithms for the solution of electromagnetic wave propagation over general terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim K. Abu Seif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a fast numerical algorithm to solve an integral equation model for wave propagation along a perfectly conducting two-dimensional terrain is suggested. It is applied to different actual terrain profiles and the results indicate very good agreement with published work. In addition, the proposed algorithm has achieved considerable saving in processing time. The formulation is extended to solve the propagation over lossy dielectric surfaces. A combined field integral equation (CFIE for wave propagation over dielectric terrain is solved efficiently by utilizing the method of moments with complex basis functions. The numerical results for different cases of dielectric surfaces are compared with the results of perfectly conducting surface evaluated by the IE conventional algorithm.

  10. Coupled equations of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear metamaterial waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Mina; Hatami, Mohsen; Meygoli, Vahid; Yousefi, Elham

    2016-11-01

    Over the past decades, scientists have presented ways to manipulate the macroscopic properties of a material at levels unachieved before, and called them metamaterials. This research can be considered an important step forward in electromagnetics and optics. In this study, higher-order nonlinear coupled equations in a special kind of metamaterial waveguides (a planar waveguide with metamaterial core) will be derived from both electric and magnetic components of the transverse electric mode of electromagnetic pulse propagation. On the other hand, achieving the refractive index in this research is worthwhile. It is also shown that the coupled equations are not symmetric with respect to the electric and magnetic fields, unlike these kinds of equations in fiber optics and dielectric waveguides. Simulations on the propagation of a fundamental soliton pulse in a nonlinear metamaterial waveguide near the resonance frequency (a little lower than the magnetic resonant frequency) are performed to study its behavior. These pulses are recommended to practice in optical communications in controlled switching by external voltage, even in low power.

  11. Spin waves in the soft layer of exchange-coupled soft/hard bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-min Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic dynamical properties of the soft layer in exchange-coupled soft/hard bilayers have been investigated numerically using a one-dimensional atomic chain model. The frequencies and spatial profiles of spin wave eigenmodes are calculated during the magnetization reversal process of the soft layer. The spin wave modes exhibit a spatially modulated amplitude, which is especially evident for high-order modes. A dynamic pinning effect of surface magnetic moment is observed. The spin wave eigenfrequency decreases linearly with the increase of the magnetic field in the uniformly magnetized state and increases nonlinearly with field when spiral magnetization configuration is formed in the soft layer.

  12. Spin waves in the soft layer of exchange-coupled soft/hard bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Zheng-min; Ge, Su-qin; Wang, Xi-guang; Li, Zhi-xiong; Xia, Qing-lin; Wang, Dao-wei; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Guo, Guang-hua, E-mail: guogh@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tang, Wei [School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zeng, Zhong-ming [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The magnetic dynamical properties of the soft layer in exchange-coupled soft/hard bilayers have been investigated numerically using a one-dimensional atomic chain model. The frequencies and spatial profiles of spin wave eigenmodes are calculated during the magnetization reversal process of the soft layer. The spin wave modes exhibit a spatially modulated amplitude, which is especially evident for high-order modes. A dynamic pinning effect of surface magnetic moment is observed. The spin wave eigenfrequency decreases linearly with the increase of the magnetic field in the uniformly magnetized state and increases nonlinearly with field when spiral magnetization configuration is formed in the soft layer.

  13. Fast Flows in the Magnetotail and Energetic Particle Transport: Multiscale Coupling in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, X.; Fok, M. C. H.; Buzulukova, N.; Perez, J. D.; Chen, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction between the Earth's inner and outer magnetospheric regions associated with the tail fast flows is calculated by coupling the Auburn 3-D global hybrid simulation code (ANGIE3D) to the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere/Ionosphere (CIMI) model. The global hybrid code solves fully kinetic equations governing the ions and a fluid model for electrons in the self-consistent electromagnetic field of the dayside and night side outer magnetosphere. In the integrated computation model, the hybrid simulation provides the CIMI model with field data in the CIMI 3-D domain and particle data at its boundary, and the transport in the inner magnetosphere is calculated by the CIMI model. By joining the two existing codes, effects of the solar wind on particle transport through the outer magnetosphere into the inner magnetosphere are investigated. Our simulation shows that fast flows and flux ropes are localized transients in the magnetotail plasma sheet and their overall structures have a dawn-dusk asymmetry. Strong perpendicular ion heating is found at the fast flow braking, which affects the earthward transport of entropy-depleted bubbles. We report on the impacts from the temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian ion distributions associated with the fast flows on the ring current and the convection electric field.

  14. Universal Voltage Conveyor and Current Conveyor in Fast Full-Wave Rectifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Burian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals about the design of a fast voltage-mode full-wave rectifier, where universal voltage conveyor and second-generation current conveyor are used as active elements. Thanks to the active elements, the input and output impedance of the non-linear circuit is infinitely high respectively zero in theory. For the rectification only two diodes and three resistors are required as passive elements. The performance of the circuit is shown on experimental measurement results showing the dynamic range, time response, frequency dependent DC transient value and RMS error for different values of input voltage amplitudes.

  15. A fast improved fat tree encoder for wave union TDC in an FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qi; Zhao Lei; Liu Shubin; Qi Binxiang; Hu Xueye; An Qi; Liao Shengkai; Peng Chengzhi

    2013-01-01

    Up to now, the wave union method can achieve the best timing performance in FPGA-based TDC designs. However, it should be guaranteed in such a structure that the non-thermometer code to binary code (NTH2B) encoding process should be finished within just one system clock cycle. So the implementation of the NTH2B encoder is quite challenging considering the high speed requirement. Besides, the high resolution wave union TDC also demands that the encoder convert an ultra-wide input code to a binary code. We present a fast improved fat tree encoder (IFTE) to fulfill such requirements, in which bubble error suppression is also integrated. With this encoder scheme, a wave union TDC with 7.7 ps RMS and 3.8 ps effective bin size was implemented in an FPGA from Xilinx Virtex 5 family. An encoding time of 8.33 ns was achieved for a 276-bit non-thermometer code to a 9-bit binary code conversion. We conducted a series of tests on the oscillating period of the wave union launcher, as well as the overall performance of the TDC; test results indicate that the IFTE works well. In fact, in the implementation of this encoder, no manual routing or special constraints were required; therefore, this IFTE structure could also be further applied in other delay-chain-based FPGA TDCs. (authors)

  16. A fast estimation of shock wave pressure based on trend identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenjian; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Chenchen; Lv, Jing

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a fast method based on trend identification is proposed to accurately estimate the shock wave pressure in a dynamic measurement. Firstly, the collected output signal of the pressure sensor is reconstructed by discrete cosine transform (DCT) to reduce the computational complexity for the subsequent steps. Secondly, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is applied to decompose the reconstructed signal into several components with different frequency-bands, and the last few low-frequency components are chosen to recover the trend of the reconstructed signal. In the meantime, the optimal component number is determined based on the correlation coefficient and the normalized Euclidean distance between the trend and the reconstructed signal. Thirdly, with the areas under the gradient curve of the trend signal, the stable interval that produces the minimum can be easily identified. As a result, the stable value of the output signal is achieved in this interval. Finally, the shock wave pressure can be estimated according to the stable value of the output signal and the sensitivity of the sensor in the dynamic measurement. A series of shock wave pressure measurements are carried out with a shock tube system to validate the performance of this method. The experimental results show that the proposed method works well in shock wave pressure estimation. Furthermore, comparative experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the existing approaches in both estimation accuracy and computational efficiency.

  17. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sumita K.; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-01-01

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  18. Combined solitary-wave solution for coupled higher-order nonlinear Schroedinger equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jinping; Tian Huiping; Li Zhonghao; Zhou Guosheng

    2004-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations model several interesting physical phenomena. We used a trigonometric function transform method based on a homogeneous balance to solve the coupled higher-order nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We obtained four pairs of exact solitary-wave solutions including a dark and a bright-soliton pair, a bright- and a dark-soliton pair, a bright- and a bright-soliton pair, and the last pair, a combined bright-dark-soliton pair

  19. MCNP5 study on kinetics parameters of coupled fast-thermal system HERBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available New validation of the well-known Monte Carlo code MCNP5 against measured criticality and kinetics data for the coupled fast-thermal HERBE System at the Reactor B critical assembly is shown in this paper. Results of earlier calculations of these criticality and kinetics parameters, done by combination of transport and diffusion codes using two-dimension geometry model are compared to results of new calculations carried out by the MCNP5 code in three-dimension geometry. Satisfactory agreements in comparison of new results with experimental data, in spite complex heterogeneous composition of the HERBE core, are achieved confirming that MCNP5 code could apply successfully to study on HERBE kinetics parameters after uncertainties in impurities in material compositions and positions of fuel elements in fast zone were removed.

  20. Effect of antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling on spin-wave resonance frequency of multi-layer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Rong-ke, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • A quantum approach is developed to study the SWR of a bicomponent multi-layer films. • The comparison of the SWR in films with FM and AFM interfacial coupling has been made. • The present results show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of films. - Abstract: We investigate the spin-wave resonance (SWR) frequency in a bicomponent bilayer and triple-layer films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as function of interfacial coupling, surface anisotropy, interface anisotropy, thickness and external magnetic field, using the linear spin-wave approximation and Green’s function technique. The microwave properties for multi-layer magnetic film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling is different from those for multi-layer magnetic film with ferromagnetic interfacial coupling. For the bilayer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as the lower (upper) surface anisotropy increases, only the SWR frequencies of the odd (even) number modes increase. The lower (upper) surface anisotropy does not affect the SWR frequencies of the even (odd) number modes{sub .} For the multi-layer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling, the SWR frequency of modes m = 1, 3 and 4 decreases while that of mode m = 2 increases with increasing thickness of the film within a proper parameter region. The present results could be useful in enhancing our fundamental understanding and show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of bicomponent multi-layer magnetic films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial coupling.

  1. Coupled-wave analysis for photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers on air holes with arbitrary sidewalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Sakai, Kyosuke; Iwahashi, Seita; Noda, Susumu

    2011-11-21

    The coupled-wave theory (CWT) is extended to a photonic crystal structure with arbitrary sidewalls, and a simple, fast, and effective model for the quantitatively analysis of the radiative characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PC-SELs) has been developed. For illustrating complicated coupling effects accurately, sufficient numbers of waves are included in the formulation, by considering their vertical field profiles. The radiation of band-edge modes is analyzed for two in-plane air-hole geometries, in the case of two types of sidewalls: i.e. "tapered case" and "tilted case." The results of CWT analysis agree well with the results of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation. From the analytical solutions of the CWT, the symmetry properties of the band-edge modes are investigated. In-plane asymmetry of the air holes is crucial for achieving high output power because it causes partial constructive interference. Asymmetric air holes and tilted sidewalls help in inducing in-plane asymmetries. By breaking the symmetries with respect to the two orthogonal symmetric axes of the band-edge modes, the two factors can be tuned independently, so that the radiation power is enhanced while preserving the mode selectivity performance. Finally, top-down reactive ion etching (RIE) approach is suggested for the fabrication of such a structure. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  2. Neutronic/Thermalhydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean Ragusa; Andrew Siegel; Jean-Michel Ruggieri

    2010-09-28

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  3. Neutronic/Thermal-hydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragusa, Jean; Siegel, Andrew; Ruggieri, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  4. Fast Numerical Evaluation of Time-Derivative Nonadiabatic Couplings for Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Nagesh, Jayashree; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-11-05

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme that eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative nonadiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was the bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  5. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...... techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate...... holographic shaping, tracking of light in 3D with the purpose of coupling light in the WOWs....

  6. Observations of a Fast-mode Magnetosonic Wave Propagating along a Curving Coronal Loop on 2011 November 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Z. N.; Jiang, L. Q.; Chen, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    The detailed analysis of an interesting quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic wave is presented using high-resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The QFP wave occurred over the west solar limb during the fast eruption phase of a nearby prominence. It propagated along a group of curving coronal loop and manifested two types of wave trains that showed different morphologies and propagation characteristics. The wavefronts of the first type wave trains are relatively broad, and they changed their propagation direction when they pass through the turning part of the guiding loop. On the contrary, the wavefronts of the other type wave trains are narrow, and their propagation did not affected by geometric changes of the guiding loop. Measurements indicate that the average speeds of the broad (narrow) wave trains is 305(343) {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the period of the wave trains ranges from 54 to 458 s. We propose that the narrow wave trains may manifest the leakage of the wave trains from the guiding coronal loop, or were guided by another group of invisible coronal loop. In addition, the projection effect and weak magnetic field strength of the guiding coronal loop are proposed to explain the slow wave speed.

  7. Coupled poroelastic waves and electromagnetic fields in layered media : Theory, Modeling, and Interferometric Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobbe, N.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, I study coupled poroelastic waves and electromagnetic fields in layered media. The focus is two-fold:
    1. Increase the theoretical and physical understanding of the seismo-electromagnetic phenomenon by analytically-based numerical modeling.
    2. Investigate the potential of

  8. Construction of wave operator for two-dimensional Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger systems with Yukawa coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tsuruta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of the wave operator for the Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger system with Yukawa coupling. This non-linearity type is below Strichartz scaling, and therefore classic perturbation methods will fail in any Strichartz space. Instead, we follow the "first iteration method" to handle these critical non-linearities.

  9. Odd number of coupled antiferromagnetic anisotropic Heisenberg chains: Spin wave theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of the chain and perpendicular anisotropies on the energy gap for odd number of coupled quantum spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic anisotropic Heisenberg chains is investigated using a spin wave theory. The energy gap opens above a critical anisotropic value. The known results of the isotropic case have been obtained. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs

  10. Fast Moment Magnitude Determination from P-wave Trains for Bucharest Rapid Early Warning System (BREWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizurek, Grzegorz; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Wiszniowski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Bucharest, with a population of approximately 2 million people, has suffered damage from earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone, which is located about 170 km from Bucharest, at a depth of 80-200 km. Consequently, an earthquake early warning system (Bucharest Rapid earthquake Early Warning System or BREWS) was constructed to provide some warning about impending shaking from large earthquakes in the Vrancea zone. In order to provide quick estimates of magnitude, seismic moment was first determined from P-waves and then a moment magnitude was determined from the moment. However, this magnitude may not be consistent with previous estimates of magnitude from the Romanian Seismic Network. This paper introduces the algorithm using P-wave spectral levels and compares them with catalog estimates. The testing procedure used waveforms from about 90 events with catalog magnitudes from 3.5 to 5.4. Corrections to the P-wave determined magnitudes according to dominant intermediate depth events mechanism were tested for November 22, 2014, M5.6 and October 17, M6 events. The corrections worked well, but unveiled overestimation of the average magnitude result of about 0.2 magnitude unit in the case of shallow depth event ( H < 60 km). The P-wave spectral approach allows for the relatively fast estimates of magnitude for use in BREWS. The average correction taking into account the most common focal mechanism for radiation pattern coefficient may lead to overestimation of the magnitude for shallow events of about 0.2 magnitude unit. However, in case of events of intermediate depth of M6 the resulting M w is underestimated at about 0.1-0.2. We conclude that our P-wave spectral approach is sufficiently robust for the needs of BREWS for both shallow and intermediate depth events.

  11. Persistent gravity wave coupling from the stratosphere to the MLT versus secondary wave generation in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Geraghty, I.; Chu, X.; Vadas, S.; Becker, E.; Harvey, V. L.; Jones, R. M.; Chen, C.; Lu, X.

    2017-12-01

    After Antarctic persistent gravity waves (GWs) in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) were discovered from lidar observations [Chen et al., 2013, 2016], secondary wave generation theory was proposed to explain the source. Here we perform a source investigation of such persistent GWs through analyzing both stratospheric and MLT GWs at McMurdo using temperature measurements (30 - 50 km, year 2011 - 2015) obtained by Fe Boltzmann lidar. In the stratosphere, GW vertical wavelengths (λ) and periods exhibit seasonal cycles with winter maxima and summer minima, which linearly correlated with mean zonal wind velocities. GWs dissipate more in winter than in summer due to larger wave amplitudes. The potential energy density (Ep) are anti-correlated with wind rotation angles but positively correlated with surface and stratospheric winds. Critical level filtering, in-situ generation of GWs, and wave saturation changes play roles in Ep seasonal variations (winter maxima and summer minima). The large increase of Ep from summer to winter possibly results from the decrease in critical level filtering. The gradual variations of Ep from Mar to Oct are likely related both to the increased λ towards winter, allowing larger wave amplitudes before saturation, and to in-situ GW generation via geostrophic adjustment, secondary GW generation. Large Ep occur when McMurdo is inside the jet stream core 5-24º poleward from vortex edge. In winter MLT, the persistent GWs cause larger temperature perturbations (± 30 K, compared to ± 10 K in the stratosphere) with longer λ (23.5 km) and larger vertical phase speeds (1.8 m/s). More waves (95.4%) show downward phase progression compared to the stratospheric GWs (70.4%). Since the inferred horizontal wavelength of stratospheric GWs (350 - 450 km) are much shorter than those of the persistent GWs in the MLT (1000 - 2000 km), the dominant stratospheric GWs are not the direct source of the MLT persistent GWs. Secondary wave generation

  12. Drag Forces in a Coupled Wave-Ice Model: Implementation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Veeramony, J.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing a system for modeling the interactions between ocean surface waves and polar ice floes, which consists of a nonhydrostatic, finite-volume wave model (NHWAVE) coupled to a discrete element, particle-tracking ice model (LIGGGHTS). The effects of drag forces between fluid and ice were recently implemented in the coupled system. The drag formulations assume that the fluid velocity profile at the interface is logarithmic, leading to a drag coefficient that is a function of both grid size and a configurable roughness height. Net forcing vectors acting on the ice in each fluid cell are computed in the wave model and passed to the ice model at each time step. The vectors combine forces due to drag with additional forces due to dynamic pressure (buoyancy effects are computed separately in LIGGGHTS). This presentation will provide further details on these new features and summarize the results of several tests conducted to validate them.

  13. Gas cooled fast reactor materials: compatibility and reaction kinetics of fuel/matrices couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, J.; Aufore, L.; Basini, V.; Belin, R.; Vaudez, S.

    2004-01-01

    Fourth Generation Gas cooled Fast Reactor concept implies a fast neutron spectrum and aims to lead to an iso-generation of minor actinides. Criteria have been defined for these fuels such as: high core filling factor, efficient fuel cooling, low operation temperature, i.e. 400-850 deg C, good fission product retention, burn-ups in the range of 5-8 atom%, Pu content in the range of 15-25%. Materials matching this demand are considered: mixed uranium - plutonium nitrides and carbides as fuels, whereas TiN, TiC, ZrN, ZrC, SiC are investigated as inert matrices. Thermo-chemical compatibility studies have been carried out, mostly for (U,Pu)N/SiC and (U,Pu)N/TiN couples. They have been associated to matching diffusional studies. For the first studies, accidental reactor conditions have been chosen (1600 deg C) so as to select a couple. Results are presented in terms of nature and quantity of resulting phases identified by XRD and SEM for thermodynamical equilibrium experiments. (authors)

  14. Simulation of enhanced tokamak performance on DIII-D using fast wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, J.S. de; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chan, V.S.; Prater, R.; John, H. St.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    The fast magnetosonic wave is now recognized to be a leading candidate for noninductive current drive for the tokamak reactor due to the ability of the wave to penetrate to the hot dense core region. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments on DIII-D have realized up to 120 kA of rf current drive, with up to 40% of the plasma current driven noninductively. The success of these experiments at 60 MHz with a 2 MW transmitter source capability has led to a major upgrade of the FWCD system. Two additional transmitters, 30 to 120 MHz, with a 2 MW source capability each, will be added together with two new four-strap antennas in early 1994. Another major thrust of the DIII-D program is to develop advanced tokamak modes of operation, simultaneously demonstrating improvements in confinement and stability in quasi-steady-state operation. In some of the initial advanced tokamak experiments on DIII-D with neutral beam heated (NBI) discharges it has been demonstrated that energy confinement time can be improved by rapidly elongating the plasma to force the current density profile to be more centrally peaked. However, this high-l i phase of the discharge with the commensurate improvement in confinement is transient as the current density profile relaxes. By applying FWCD to the core of such a κ-ramped discharge it may be possible to sustain the high internal inductance and elevated confinement. Using computational tools validated on the initial DIII-D FWCD experiments we find that such a high-l i advanced tokamak discharge should be capable of sustainment at the 1 MA level with the upgraded capability of the FWCD system. (author) 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Unidirectional evanescent-wave coupling from circularly polarized electric and magnetic dipoles: An angular spectrum approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Michela F.; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Zayats, Anatoly V.; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J.

    2017-06-01

    Unidirectional evanescent-wave coupling from circularly polarized dipole sources is one of the most striking types of evidence of spin-orbit interactions of light and an inherent property of circularly polarized dipoles. Polarization handedness self-determines propagation direction of guided modes. In this paper, we compare two different approaches currently used to describe this phenomenon: the first requires the evaluation of the coupling amplitude between dipole and waveguide modes, while the second is based on the calculation of the angular spectrum of the dipole. We present an analytical expression of the angular spectrum of dipole radiation, unifying the description for both electric and magnetic dipoles. The symmetries unraveled by the implemented formalism show the existence of specific terms in the dipole spectrum which can be recognized as being directly responsible for directional evanescent-wave coupling. This provides a versatile tool for both a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon and a fully controllable engineering of directionality of guided modes.

  16. Hamiltonian study of the response of a tokamak plasma to the ion cyclotron heating wave: minor heating and current generation by the fast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.

    1990-06-01

    The role of additional Heatings, such as the Ion Cyclotron Heating, is to raise magnetic fusion plasmas to higher temperatures, to satisfy the ignition condition. The understanding of the wave absorption mechanisms by the plasma first requires a precise description of the particle individual trajectories. The Hamiltonian mechanics, through action-angle variables, allows this description, and makes the computation of the wave-particle interaction easier. We then derive a quantitative evaluation of the intrinsic stochasticity for ionic trajectories perturbated by the fast wave. This stochasticity, combinated to the collisional effects, gives the validity domain for a quasilinear approximation of the evolution equation. This equation is then written under a variational formulation, and solved semi-analytically. Results conclude to the importance of the Hamiltonian chaos in the formation of the deeply anisotropic distribution tails, encountered in minority heating scenarios. Direct interaction of the electrons and the fast wave is similarly analysed. The influence of the various parameters (wave spectrum, magnetic configuration, frequency,...) is then examined in order to optimize this scenario of fast wave current drive in tokamaks [fr

  17. Numerical methods and parallel algorithms for fast transient strongly coupled fluid-structure dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucher, V.

    2014-01-01

    This HDR is dedicated to the research in the framework of fast transient dynamics for industrial fluid-structure systems carried in the Laboratory of Dynamic Studies from CEA, implementing new numerical methods for the modelling of complex systems and the parallel solution of large coupled problems on supercomputers. One key issue for the proposed approaches is the limitation to its minimum of the number of non-physical parameters, to cope with constraints arising from the area of usage of the concepts: safety for both nuclear applications (CEA, EDF) and aeronautics (ONERA), protection of the citizen (EC/JRC) in particular. Kinematic constraints strongly coupling structures (namely through unilateral contact) or fluid and structures (with both conformant or non-conformant meshes depending on the geometrical situation) are handled through exact methods including Lagrange Multipliers, with consequences on the solution strategy to be dealt with. This latter aspect makes EPX, the simulation code where the methods are integrated, a singular tool in the community of fast transient dynamics software. The document mainly relies on a description of the modelling needs for industrial fast transient scenarios, for nuclear applications in particular, and the proposed solutions built in the framework of the collaboration between CEA, EDF (via the LaMSID laboratory) and the LaMCoS laboratory from INSA Lyon. The main considered examples are the tearing of the fluid-filled tank after impact, the Code Disruptive Accident for a Generation IV reactor or the ruin of reinforced concrete structures under impact. Innovative models and parallel algorithms are thus proposed, allowing to carry out with robustness and performance the corresponding simulations on supercomputers made of interconnected multi-core nodes, with a strict preservation of the quality of the physical solution. This was particularly the main point of the ANR RePDyn project (2010-2013), with CEA as the pilot. (author

  18. Antiresonant ring output-coupled continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Esteban-Martin, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2012-08-13

    We demonstrate the successful deployment of an antiresonant ring (ARR) interferometer for the attainment of optimum output coupling in a continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The cw OPO, configured as a singly-resonant oscillator (SRO), is based on a 50-mm-long MgO:PPLN crystal and pumped by cw Ytterbium-fiber laser at 1064 nm, with the ARR interferometer integrated into one arm of the standing-wave cavity. By fine adjustment of the ARR transmission, a continuously variable signal output coupling from 0.8% to 7.3% has been achieved, providing optimum output coupling for signal and optimum power extraction for the idler, at different input pumping levels. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations for conventional output-coupled cw SRO, and the study shows that by reducing the insertion loss of the ARR elements, the performance of the ARR-coupled cw SRO can be further enhanced. We also show that the use of the ARR does not lead to any degradation in the cw SRO output beam quality. The proof-of-principle demonstration confirms the effectiveness of the technique for continuous, in situ, and fine control of output coupling in cw OPOs to achieve maximum output power at any arbitrary pumping level above threshold.

  19. Edge Ion Heating by Launched High Harmonic Fast Waves in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biewer, T.M.; Bell, R.E.; Diem, S.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Ryan, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge simultaneously along both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during high-power high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (rf) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations of ions are present and have temperatures of typically 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively (predominantly perpendicular to the local magnetic field). This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (for both He + and C 2+ ions), and is well correlated with the period of rf power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot component is observed to increase with the applied rf power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW . The 30 MHz HHFW launched by the NSTX antenna is expected and observed to heat core electrons, but plasma ions do not resonate with the launched wave, which is typically at >10th harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency in the region of observation. A likely ion heating mechanism is parametric decay of the launched HHFW into an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW). The presence of the IBW in NSTX plasmas during HHFW application has been directly confirmed with probe measurements. IBW heating occurs in the perpendicular ion distribution, consistent with the toroidal and poloidal observations. Calculations of IBW propagation indicate that multiple waves could be created in the parametric decay process, and that most of the IBW power would be absorbed in the outer 10 to 20 cm of the plasma, predominantly on fully stripped ions. These predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations, and must be accounted for when calculating the energy budget of the plasma

  20. Coupling of slow waves near the lower hybrid frequency in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Nguyen, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    The linear (2-D) coupling theory of slow waves near the lower hybrid frequency is generalized for relatively high density plasmas facing the antenna and different coupling regimes are distinguished. A multipolar theory of juxtaposed waveguide arrays (Grills) is then developed and new r.f. structures derived from the principle of the Grill are studied in order to make the extrapolation of this principle to large tokamaks and to reactor easier. These ''compact structures'' allow the design of modular antennae, so called ''E-plane multijunction antennae'', and the electromagnetic theory of such ''multijunctions'' is presented. We have studied the physical properties of the slow wave antennae so obtained, as far as coupling the r.f. power to plasma waves is concerned, with the aid of a computer code (S.W.A.N.) and we present many numerical results. In particular, we point out an interesting ''self-adaptation'' phenomenon which should allow a good matching of ''progressive wave multijunction antennae'' (current drive) in a large range of edge plasma parameters. Reflection coefficients less than 1% could be considered with the potential consequence of reducing a lot the cost of the r.f. power transmission lines. To conclude, we relate very briefly the ''proof of principle'' experiments performed on PETULA-B and we show ''experimental spectra'' of radiated power which can be obtained from r.f. measurements through the SWAN code [fr

  1. A similarity relation of the coupled equations for RF waves in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Smithe, David; Jaeger, Erwin; Berry, Lee; Harvey, R. W.; Bonoli, Paul

    2017-10-01

    The propagation and damping of RF waves in plasmas are modeled kinetically by solving the coupled equations between Maxwell's equation and Fokker-Planck equation. When the plasmas are magnetized, the wave dielectric tensor strongly depends on the background magnetic field, which can be calculated using Grad-Shafranov equation in a toroidally symmetric geometry. We found a similarity in the solutions of the coupled equations above, which keep the several dimensionless parameters constant. By changing plasma density and pressure, machine geometry (major radius), and RF wave frequency and power according to the similarity rule, there exists a set of solutions that show the consistent change in the background magnetic fields in the Grad-Shafranov equation, the electric and magnetic fields in the Maxwell's equation, and the distribution function of the Fokker-Planck equation. By investigating the numerical errors of the solutions from the expected results by the similarity rule, we verify the coupled numerical code for the RF waves in a tokamak (e.g. TORIC or AORSA/CQL3D/ECOM). This work was supported by US DoE Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648 under a Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Initiative.

  2. Studying fast wave propagation and absorption at any cyclotron harmonic using a 2D finite element area coordinates wave equation solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ernesto; Van Eester, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Fourier analysis in the poloidal direction is a standard ingredient in present-day 2D wave equation solvers describing radio frequency waves in hot tokamak plasmas. Although a powerful and elegant technique, Fourier analysis has the disadvantage that a large number of modes is needed to describe the field pattern on a magnetic surface if a short wavelength mode exists on any - even very small - subpart of the particle trajectory. The present paper examines the potential of a method that does not suffer from this drawback: a finite element technique relying on simple linear or cubic area base functions that are defined on irregular elementary surfaces of triangular shape. The wave equation is solved in its weak Galerkin variational form and for realistic 2D tokamak geometry, accounting for the toroidal curvature but assuming the toroidal angle is ignorable, allowing to study the wave pattern for each of the independent toroidal modes excited by the antenna individually.The locally uniform full hot plasma dielectric tensor to all orders in finite Larmor radius was adopted. As the main intended application is the study of fast wave behavior (heating and current drive) at arbitrary harmonics, the wave vector complex amplitude appearing in the dielectric tensor is determined through a local dispersion root evaluation. High frequency fast wave propagation and damping is provided as an illustration in view of possible application of this type of current drive in future high density reactor-like tokamaks.

  3. Studying fast wave propagation and absorption at any cyclotron harmonic using a 2D finite element area coordinates wave equation solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Ernesto; Van Eester, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    Fourier analysis in the poloidal direction is a standard ingredient in present-day 2D wave equation solvers describing radio frequency waves in hot tokamak plasmas. Although a powerful and elegant technique, Fourier analysis has the disadvantage that a large number of modes is needed to describe the field pattern on a magnetic surface if a short wavelength mode exists on any - even very small - subpart of the particle trajectory. The present paper examines the potential of a method that does not suffer from this drawback: a finite element technique relying on simple linear or cubic area base functions that are defined on irregular elementary surfaces of triangular shape. The wave equation is solved in its weak Galerkin variational form and for realistic 2D tokamak geometry, accounting for the toroidal curvature but assuming the toroidal angle is ignorable, allowing to study the wave pattern for each of the independent toroidal modes excited by the antenna individually. The locally uniform full hot plasma dielectric tensor to all orders in finite Larmor radius was adopted. As the main intended application is the study of fast wave behavior (heating and current drive) at arbitrary harmonics, the wave vector complex amplitude appearing in the dielectric tensor is determined through a local dispersion root evaluation. High frequency fast wave propagation and damping is provided as an illustration in view of possible application of this type of current drive in future high density reactor-like tokamaks.

  4. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  5. Traveling Wave-Guide Channels of a New Coupled Integrable Dispersionless System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souleymanou, Abbagari; Kuetche, Victor K.; Bouetou, Thomas B.; Kofane, Timoleon C.

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the recent investigation of new coupled integrable dispersionless equations by means of the Darboux transformation [Zhaqilao, et al., Chin. Phys. B 18 (2009) 1780], we carry out the initial value analysis of the previous system using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta's computational scheme. As a result, while depicting its phase portraits accordingly, we show that the above dispersionless system actually supports two kinds of solutions amongst which the localized traveling wave-guide channels. In addition, paying particular interests to such localized structures, we construct the bilinear transformation of the current system from which scattering amongst the above waves can be deeply studied. (general)

  6. Efficient full wave code for the coupling of large multirow multijunction LH grills.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Hillairet, J.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 116060. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : lower hybrid waves * coupling * large multirow multijunction grills * tokamak * full-wave Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa7f4f/meta

  7. Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Spaleta; R. Majeski; C.K. Phillips; R.J. Dumont; R. Kaita; V. Soukhanovskii; L. Zakharov

    2003-07-14

    Third harmonic hydrogen cyclotron fast wave heating studies are planned in the near term on CDX-U to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating. In preparation for these studies, the available radio-frequency power in CDX-U has been increased to 0.5 MW. The operating frequency of the CDX-U radio-frequency transmitter was lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz, providing access to the ion harmonic range 2* {approx} 4* in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz radio-frequency system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. Preliminary computational studies over the plasma regimes of interest for NSTX and CDX-U indicate the possibility of strong localized absorption on bulk ion species.

  8. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H.

    1994-01-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs

  9. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  10. Current profile evolution during fast wave current drive on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of co and counter fast wave current drive (FWCD) on the plasma current profile has been measured for neutral beam heated plasmas with reversed magnetic shear on the DIII-D tokamak. Although the response of the loop voltage profile was consistent with the application of co and counter FWCD, little difference was observed between the current profiles for the opposite directions of FWCD. The evolution of the current profile was successfully modeled using the ONETWO transport code. The simulation showed that the small difference between the current profiles for co and counter FWCD was mainly due to an offsetting change in the o at sign c current proffie. In addition, the time scale for the loop voltage to reach equilibrium (i.e., flatten) was found to be much longer than the FWCD pulse, which limited the ability of the current profile to fully respond to co or counter FWCD

  11. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  12. Bimolecular Coupling as a Vector for Decomposition of Fast-Initiating Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gwendolyn A; Foscato, Marco; Higman, Carolyn S; Day, Craig S; Jensen, Vidar R; Fogg, Deryn Elizabeth

    2018-04-13

    The correlation between rapid initiation and rapid decomposition in olefin metathesis is probed for a series of fast-initiating Ru catalysts: the Hoveyda catalyst HII, RuCl2(L)(=CHC6H4-o-OiPr); the Grela catalyst nG (a derivative of HII with a nitro group para to OiPr); the Piers catalyst PII, [RuCl2(L)(=CHPCy3)]OTf; the third-generation Grubbs catalyst GIII, RuCl2(L)(py)2(=CHPh); and dianiline catalyst DA, RuCl2(L)(o-dianiline)(=CHPh) (L = H2IMes = N,N'-bis (mesityl)-imidazolin-2-ylidene). Prior studies of ethylene metathesis established that various Ru metathesis catalysts can decompose by -elimination of propene from metallacyclobutane RuCl2(H2IMes)(2-C3H6) Ru-2. The present work demonstrates that in metathesis of terminal olefins, -elimination yields only ca. 25-40% propenes for HII, nG, PII or DA, and none for GIII. The discrepancy is attributed to competing decomposition via bimolecular coupling of methylidene intermediate RuCl2(H2IMes)(=CH2) Ru-1. Direct evidence for methylidene coupling is presented, via the controlled decomposition of transiently-stabilized adducts of Ru-1, RuCl2(H2IMes)Ln(=CH2) (Ln = pyn'; n' = 1, 2, or o-dianiline). These adducts were synthesized by treating in situ-generated metallacyclobutane Ru-2 with pyridine or o-dianiline, and isolated at low temperature (-116 °C or -78 °C, respectively). On warming, both undergo methylidene coupling, liberating ethylene and forming RuCl2(H2IMes)Ln. A mechanism is proposed based on kinetic studies and molecular-level computational analysis. Bimolecular coupling emerges as an important contributor to the instability of Ru-1, and a potentially major pathway for decomposition of fast-initiating, phosphine-free metathesis catalysts.

  13. Coupling a Surface Acoustic Wave to an Electron Spin in Diamond via a Dark State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Andrew Golter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of quantum acoustics explores interactions between acoustic waves and artificial atoms and their applications in quantum information processing. In this experimental study, we demonstrate the coupling between a surface acoustic wave (SAW and an electron spin in diamond by taking advantage of the strong strain coupling of the excited states of a nitrogen vacancy center while avoiding the short lifetime of these states. The SAW-spin coupling takes place through a Λ-type three-level system where two ground spin states couple to a common excited state through a phonon-assisted as well as a direct dipole optical transition. Both coherent population trapping and optically driven spin transitions have been realized. The coherent population trapping demonstrates the coupling between a SAW and an electron spin coherence through a dark state. The optically driven spin transitions, which resemble the sideband transitions in a trapped-ion system, can enable the quantum control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom and potentially a trapped-ion-like solid-state system for applications in quantum computing. These results establish an experimental platform for spin-based quantum acoustics, bridging the gap between spintronics and quantum acoustics.

  14. Energy-flux characterization of conical and space-time coupled wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, A.; Couairon, A.; Faccio, D.; Trapani, P. Di

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of energy density flux as a characterization tool for the propagation of ultrashort laser pulses with spatiotemporal coupling. In contrast with calculations for the Poynting vector, those for energy density flux are derived in the local frame moving at the velocity of the envelope of the wave packet under examination and do not need knowledge of the magnetic field. We show that the energy flux defined from a paraxial propagation equation follows specific geometrical connections with the phase front of the optical wave packet, which demonstrates that the knowledge of the phase fronts amounts to the measurement of the energy flux. We perform a detailed numerical study of the energy density flux in the particular case of conical waves, with special attention paid to stationary-envelope conical waves (X or O waves). A full characterization of linear conical waves is given in terms of their energy flux. We extend the definition of this concept to the case of nonlinear propagation in Kerr media with nonlinear losses.

  15. Fast volumetric integral-equation solver for acoustic wave propagation through inhomogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleszynski, E; Bleszynski, M; Jaroszewicz, T

    2008-07-01

    Elements are described of a volumetric integral-equation-based algorithm applicable to accurate large-scale simulations of scattering and propagation of sound waves through inhomogeneous media. The considered algorithm makes possible simulations involving realistic geometries characterized by highly subwavelength details, large density contrasts, and described in terms of several million unknowns. The algorithm achieves its competitive performance, characterized by O(N log N) solution complexity and O(N) memory requirements, where N is the number of unknowns, through a fast and nonlossy fast Fourier transform based matrix compression technique, the adaptive integral method, previously developed for solving large-scale electromagnetic problems. Because of its ability of handling large problems with complex geometries, the developed solver may constitute an efficient and high fidelity numerical simulation tool for calculating acoustic field distributions in anatomically realistic models, e.g., in investigating acoustic energy transfer to the inner ear via nonairborne pathways in the human head. Examples of calculations of acoustic field distribution in a human head, which require solving linear systems of equations involving several million unknowns, are presented.

  16. Fast computation of seabed spherical-wave reflection coefficients in geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Jorge E; Dosso, Stan E; Dettmer, Jan; Holland, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    This paper develops a fast numerical approach to computing spherical-wave reflection coefficients (SWRCs) for layered seabeds, which provides substantial savings in computation time when used as the forward model for geoacoustic inversion of broadband seabed reflectivity data. The approach exploits the Sommerfeld-integral representation of SWRCs as the Hankel transform of a function proportional to the plane-wave reflection coefficient (PWRC), and applies Levin integration to the rapidly oscillating integrand cast as the product of a (pre-computed) media-independent matrix and a vector involving PWRCs at a sparse sampling of integration angles. Compared to conventional Simpson's rule integration for computation of the SWRC, the Levin integration yields speed-up factors of an order of magnitude or more. Further, it results in reduced memory requirements for storage of pre-computed quantities, a desirable property when a graphics processing unit (GPU) is used for parallel computation of SWRCs. The paper applies trans-dimensional Bayesian inversion to investigate the impact of forward modeling in terms of PWRCs and SWRCs on the estimation of geoacoustic parameters and uncertainties. Model comparisons are quantified in simulated- and measured-data inversions by comparing the estimated geoacoustic parameters to the true parameters or core measurements, respectively, and by calculating the deviance information criterion for model selection.

  17. Target continuum distorted-wave theory for collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crothers, D.S.F.; Dunseath, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    By considering the target continuum distorted-wave (TCDW) theory as the high-energy limit of the half-way house variational continuum distorted-wave theory, it is shown not only that there is no intermediate elastic divergence but also that the second-order amplitude based on a purely elastic intermediate state is of order υ -6 and is thus negligible. The residual inelastic TCDW theory is developed to second-order at high velocities. It is used to describe charge exchange during collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen. Using an on-shell peaking approximation and considering 1s-1s capture it is shown that the residual purely second-order transition amplitude comprises two terms, one real term of order υ -6 and one purely imaginary term of order υ -7 ln υ. At 5 MeV laboratory energy, it is shown that these are negligible. It is also shown that the υ -5 first-order term gives a differential cross section in very good agreement with an experiment at all angles including forward, interference minimum, Thomas maximum and large angles, particularly having folded our theory over experimental resolution. (author)

  18. Wave failure at strong coupling in intracellular C a2 + signaling system with clustered channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wu, Yuning; Gao, Xuejuan; Cai, Meichun; Shuai, Jianwei

    2018-01-01

    As an important intracellular signal, C a2 + ions control diverse cellular functions. In this paper, we discuss the C a2 + signaling with a two-dimensional model in which the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (I P3 ) receptor channels are distributed in clusters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The wave failure at large C a2 + diffusion coupling is discussed in detail in the model. We show that with varying model parameters the wave failure is a robust behavior with either deterministic or stochastic channel dynamics. We suggest that the wave failure should be a general behavior in inhomogeneous diffusing systems with clustered excitable regions and may occur in biological C a2 + signaling systems.

  19. Electrical access to critical coupling of circularly polarized waves in graphene chiral metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Teun-Teun; Oh, Sang Soon; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Park, Hyun Sung; Hess, Ortwin; Min, Bumki; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-09-01

    Active control of polarization states of electromagnetic waves is highly desirable because of its diverse applications in information processing, telecommunications, and spectroscopy. However, despite the recent advances using artificial materials, most active polarization control schemes require optical stimuli necessitating complex optical setups. We experimentally demonstrate an alternative-direct electrical tuning of the polarization state of terahertz waves. Combining a chiral metamaterial with a gated single-layer sheet of graphene, we show that transmission of a terahertz wave with one circular polarization can be electrically controlled without affecting that of the other circular polarization, leading to large-intensity modulation depths (>99%) with a low gate voltage. This effective control of polarization is made possible by the full accessibility of three coupling regimes, that is, underdamped, critically damped, and overdamped regimes by electrical control of the graphene properties.

  20. Effect of coupling currents on the dynamic inductance during fast transient in superconducting magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marinozzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present electromagnetic models aiming to calculate the variation of the inductance in a magnet due to dynamic effects such as the variation of magnetization or the coupling with eddy currents. The models are studied with special regard to the calculation of the inductance in superconducting magnets which are affected by interfilament coupling currents. The developed models have been compared with experimental data coming from tests of prototype Nb_{3}Sn magnets designed for the new generation of accelerators. This work is relevant for the quench protection study of superconducting magnets: quench is an unwanted event, when part of the magnet becomes resistive; in these cases, the current should be discharged as fast as possible, in order to maintain the resistive zone temperature under a safe limit. The magnet inductance is therefore a relevant term for the description of the current discharge, especially for the high-field new generation superconducting magnets for accelerators, and this work shows how to calculate the correct value during rapid current changes, providing a mean for simulations of the reached temperature.

  1. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure

  2. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  3. Resuspension events in a micro-tidal shallow bay using coupled wave-current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoll, Manel; Cerralbo, Pablo; Solà, Laura; Espino, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we investigate the observed resuspension events in Alfacs Bay (semi-enclosed bay in The Ebro Delta, NW Mediterranean Sea) using a wave-current coupled model. This bay is characterized by a micro-tidal environment and a relevant seiche activity which may lead velocities more than 50 cm·s-1. A set of ADCP and OBS moored at sea bottom were used to acquire hydrodynamic and optical information. The time-series observations showed an evident relation between seiche activity and the sediment resuspension events. The implementation of a wave-current coupled model shows a strong spatial variability in terms of combined bottom stress. Significant wave hight of 0.4 m are modeled during energetic wind events. A significant correlation between the resuspension events and the combined bottom stress are observed. The numerical results reveal two different mechanism to explain the resuspension events observed: during the Seiche episodes the combined bottom stresses are controlled by the current-induced bottom stress. Otherwise during strong winds the combined bottom stress are controlled by the wave-induced bottom stress.

  4. Analytical analysis of slow and fast pressure waves in a two-dimensional cellular solid with fluid-filled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Vladimir; Van Damme, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Wave propagation in cellular and porous media is widely studied due to its abundance in nature and industrial applications. Biot's theory for open-cell media predicts the existence of two simultaneous pressure waves, distinguished by its velocity. A fast wave travels through the solid matrix, whereas a much slower wave is carried by fluid channels. In closed-cell materials, the slow wave disappears due to a lack of a continuous fluid path. However, recent finite element (FE) simulations done by the authors of this paper also predict the presence of slow pressure waves in saturated closed-cell materials. The nature of the slow wave is not clear. In this paper, an equivalent unit cell of a medium with square cells is proposed to permit an analytical description of the dynamics of such a material. A simplified FE model suggests that the fluid-structure interaction can be fully captured using a wavenumber-dependent spring support of the vibrating cell walls. Using this approach, the pressure wave behavior can be calculated with high accuracy, but with less numerical effort. Finally, Rayleigh's energy method is used to investigate the coexistence of two waves with different velocities.

  5. Remote coupling between a probe and a superconducting klystron cavity for use in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, L. A. N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, N. F., Jr.

    2013-08-01

    In this work the main task was to measure the remote coupling between a probe and some niobium superconducting reentrant cavities for use in parametric transducers of gravitational wave detectors. The cavities were manufactured from RRR300 niobium and cryogenically tested to determine the electromagnetic coupling among other parameters. These cavities were also closed using a RRR300 niobium cover forming a narrow axial gap with the post top. A hole was made at the base opposite the cover in order to the probe reach the cavity. Generally, the critical coupling (β ≈ 1) is achieved with the probe inside the cavity. The mechanical connection of the probe with the transducer and the external circuit introduces an unwanted seismic noise in the transducer. The microstrip antennas have been traditionally employed to make a wireless connection. However, this study has demonstrated coupling factor β ≈ 1 with the probe moved away 4.0 mm from the cavity with a 3.0 mm diameter hole. Couplings with the probe moved away 1.0 mm and 7.0 mm from cavities with 1.5 mm and 3.5 mm diameter holes, respectively, have also been obtained. These results have revealed the influence of the hole diameter with the remote coupling between an electric field probe and the klystron mode of a superconducting reentrant cavity. Due to the practicalities, this effect may replace the microstrip antennas making it possible to implement high sensitivity parametric transducers.

  6. Observation of beat oscillation generation by coupled waves associated with parametric decay during radio frequency wave heating of a spherical tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Oosako, Takuya; Takase, Yuichi; Ejiri, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Adachi, Yuuki; Tojo, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kurashina, Hiroki; Yamada, Kotaro; An, Byung Il; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Shimpo, Fujio; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Haduki; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanashima, Kentaro; Kakuda, Hidetoshi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Wakatsuki, Takuma

    2010-06-18

    We present an observation of beat oscillation generation by coupled modes associated with parametric decay instability (PDI) during radio frequency (rf) wave heating experiments on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2. Nearly identical PDI spectra, which are characterized by the coexistence of the rf pump wave, the lower-sideband wave, and the low-frequency oscillation in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency, are observed at various locations in the edge plasma. A bispectral power analysis was used to experimentally discriminate beat oscillation from the resonant mode for the first time. The pump and lower-sideband waves have resonant mode components, while the low-frequency oscillation is exclusively excited by nonlinear coupling of the pump and lower-sideband waves. Newly discovered nonlocal transport channels in spectral space and in real space via PDI are described.

  7. An operational coupled wave-current forecasting system for the northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A.; Coluccelli, A.; Deserti, M.; Valentini, A.; Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.

    2012-04-01

    Since 2005 an Adriatic implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (AdriaROMS) is being producing operational short-term forecasts (72 hours) of some hydrodynamic properties (currents, sea level, temperature, salinity) of the Adriatic Sea at 2 km horizontal resolution and 20 vertical s-levels, on a daily basis. The main objective of AdriaROMS, which is managed by the Hydro-Meteo-Clima Service (SIMC) of ARPA Emilia Romagna, is to provide useful products for civil protection purposes (sea level forecasts, outputs to run other forecasting models as for saline wedge, oil spills and coastal erosion). In order to improve the forecasts in the coastal area, where most of the attention is focused, a higher resolution model (0.5 km, again with 20 vertical s-levels) has been implemented for the northern Adriatic domain. The new implementation is based on the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST)and adopts ROMS for the hydrodynamic and Simulating WAve Nearshore (SWAN) for the wave module, respectively. Air-sea fluxes are computed using forecasts produced by the COSMO-I7 operational atmospheric model. At the open boundary of the high resolution model, temperature, salinity and velocity fields are provided by AdriaROMS while the wave characteristics are provided by an operational SWAN implementation (also managed by SIMC). Main tidal components are imposed as well, derived from a tidal model. Work in progress is oriented now on the validation of model results by means of extensive comparisons with acquired hydrographic measurements (such as CTDs or XBTs from sea-truth campaigns), currents and waves acquired at observational sites (including those of SIMC, CNR-ISMAR network and its oceanographic tower, located off the Venice littoral) and satellite-derived wave-heights data. Preliminary results on the forecast waves denote how, especially during intense storms, the effect of coupling can lead to significant variations in the wave

  8. Development and testing of a fast Fourier transform high dynamic-range spectral diagnostics for millimeter wave characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoen, D. J.; Bongers, W. A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Beveren, V. van; Goede, A. P. H.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Hennen, B. A.

    2009-01-01

    A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based wide range millimeter wave diagnostics for spectral characterization of scattered millimeter waves in plasmas has been successfully brought into operation. The scattered millimeter waves are heterodyne downconverted and directly digitized using a fast analog-digital converter and a compact peripheral component interconnect computer. Frequency spectra are obtained by FFT in the time domain of the intermediate frequency signal. The scattered millimeter waves are generated during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the TEXTOR tokamak and demonstrate the performance of the diagnostics and, in particular, the usability of direct digitizing and Fourier transformation of millimeter wave signals. The diagnostics is able to acquire 4 GHz wide spectra of signals in the range of 136-140 GHz. The rate of spectra is tunable and has been tested between 200 000 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 100 MHz and 120 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 25 kHz. The respective dynamic ranges are 52 and 88 dB. Major benefits of the new diagnostics are a tunable time and frequency resolution due to postdetection, near-real time processing of the acquired data. This diagnostics has a wider application in astrophysics, earth observation, plasma physics, and molecular spectroscopy for the detection and analysis of millimeter wave radiation, providing high-resolution spectra at high temporal resolution and large dynamic range.

  9. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hong-Xing [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Yong-Dong, E-mail: LYDbeijing@163.com [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Xiong, Tao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Guan, Yong [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2016-09-07

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained. - Highlights: • SH-wave is investigated in a multiferroic plate with coupled interfacial imperfections. • SH-wave is affected by both interfacial imperfections and their inter-couplings. • Physical mechanisms of the effects are explained via energy transformations.

  10. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hong-Xing; Li, Yong-Dong; Xiong, Tao; Guan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained. - Highlights: • SH-wave is investigated in a multiferroic plate with coupled interfacial imperfections. • SH-wave is affected by both interfacial imperfections and their inter-couplings. • Physical mechanisms of the effects are explained via energy transformations.

  11. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  12. Composite rogue waves and modulation instability for the three-coupled Hirota system in an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Han-Peng; Tian, Bo; Chai, Jun; Du, Zhong

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the three-coupled Hirota system, which is applied to model the long distance communication and ultrafast signal routing systems governing the propagation of light pulses. With the aid of the Darboux dressing transformation, composite rogue wave solutions are derived. Spatial-temporal structures, including the four-petaled structure for the three-coupled Hirota system, are exhibited. We find that the four-petaled rogue waves occur in two of the three components, whereas the eye-shaped rogue wave occurs in the other one. The composite rogue waves can split up into two or three single rogue waves. The corresponding conditions for the occurrence of such phenomena are discussed and presented. We find that the relative position of every single rogue wave is influenced by the ratios of certain parameters. Besides, the linear instability analysis is performed, and our results agree with those from the baseband modulation instability theory.

  13. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, R. V.

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger chaotic system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  14. A Unified Air-Sea Interface in Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Data Assimilation and Ensemble Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi; Curcic, Milan; Donelan, Mark; Campbell, Tim; Smith, Travis; Chen, Sue; Allard, Rick; Michalakes, John

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study are to 1) better understand the physical processes controlling air-sea interaction and their impact on coastal marine and storm predictions, 2) explore the use of coupled atmosphere-ocean observations in model verification and data assimilation, and 3) develop a physically based and computationally efficient coupling at the air-sea interface that is flexible for use in a multi-model system and portable for transition to the next generation research and operational coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-land models. We have developed a unified air-sea interface module that couples multiple atmosphere, wave, and ocean models using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). This standardized coupling framework allows researchers to develop and test air-sea coupling parameterizations and coupled data assimilation, and to better facilitate research-to-operation activities. It also allows for future ensemble forecasts using coupled models that can be used for coupled data assimilation and assessment of uncertainties in coupled model predictions. The current component models include two atmospheric models (WRF and COAMPS), two ocean models (HYCOM and NCOM), and two wave models (UMWM and SWAN). The coupled modeling systems have been tested and evaluated using the coupled air-sea observations (e.g., GPS dropsondes and AXBTs, drifters and floats) collected in recent field campaigns in the Gulf of Mexico and tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and Pacific basins. This talk will provide an overview of the unified air-sea interface model and fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model predictions over various coastal regions and tropical cyclones in the Pacific and Atlantic basins including an example from coupled ensemble prediction of Superstorm Sandy (2012).

  15. Spin-wave resonance frequency in ferromagnetic thin film with interlayer exchange coupling and surface anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuhui; Rong, Jianhong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Lei

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of spin-wave resonance(SWR) frequency on the surface anisotropy, the interlayer exchange coupling, the ferromagnetic layer thickness, the mode number and the external magnetic field in a ferromagnetic superlattice film by means of the linear spin-wave approximation and Green's function technique. The SWR frequency of the ferromagnetic thin film is shifted to higher values corresponding to those of above factors, respectively. It is found that the linear behavior of SWR frequency curves of all modes in the system is observed as the external magnetic field is increasing, however, SWR frequency curves are nonlinear with the lower and the higher modes for different surface anisotropy and interlayer exchange coupling in the system. In addition, the SWR frequency of the lowest (highest) mode is shifted to higher (lower) values when the film thickness is thinner. The interlayer exchange coupling is more important for the energetically higher modes than for the energetically lower modes. The surface anisotropy has a little effect on the SWR frequency of the highest mode, when the surface anisotropy field is further increased.

  16. Simulation of high-energy proton production by fast magnetosonic shock waves in pinched plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Yusuke; Sakai, Jun-Ichi; Yousefi, Hamid Reza; Haruki, Takayuki; Masugata, Katsumi

    2007-03-01

    High-energy particles of a few hundred keV for electrons and up to MeV for ions were observed in a plasma focus device. Haruki et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 082106-1 (2006)] studied the mechanism of high-energy particle production in pinched plasma discharges by use of a 3D relativistic and fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. It was found that the pinched current is unstable against a sausage instability, and then becomes unstable against a kink instability. As a result high-energy electrons were observed, but protons with MeV energies were not observed. In this paper the same pinch dynamics as Haruki and co-workers is investigated, focusing on the shock formation and the shock acceleration during the pinched current. It is found that a fast magnetosonic shock wave is produced during the pinching phase which, after the maximum pinch occurs, is strongly enhanced and propagates outwards. Some protons trapped in the electrostatic potential produced near the shock front can be accelerated to a few MeV by the surfatron acceleration mechanism. It is also found that the protons accelerated along the pinched axis have a ring-shaped angular distribution that is observed from numerous experiments.

  17. Evaluation of Simulated Marine Aerosol Production Using the WaveWatchIII Prognostic Wave Model Coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model within the Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M. S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Keene, William C. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Zhang, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Reichl, B. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Shi, Y. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Hara, T. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Reid, J. S. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Monterey, CA (United States); Fox-Kemper, B. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences; Craig, A. P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Erickson, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Division; Ginis, I. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Webb, A. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Ocean Technology, Policy, and Environment

    2016-11-08

    Primary marine aerosol (PMA) is emitted into the atmosphere via breaking wind waves on the ocean surface. Most parameterizations of PMA emissions use 10-meter wind speed as a proxy for wave action. This investigation coupled the 3rd generation prognostic WAVEWATCH-III wind-wave model within a coupled Earth system model (ESM) to drive PMA production using wave energy dissipation rate – analogous to whitecapping – in place of 10-meter wind speed. The wind speed parameterization did not capture basin-scale variability in relations between wind and wave fields. Overall, the wave parameterization did not improve comparison between simulated versus measured AOD or Na+, thus highlighting large remaining uncertainties in model physics. Results confirm the efficacy of prognostic wind-wave models for air-sea exchange studies coupled with laboratory- and field-based characterizations of the primary physical drivers of PMA production. No discernible correlations were evident between simulated PMA fields and observed chlorophyll or sea surface temperature.

  18. Development and validation of the fast doppler broadening module coupled within RMC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jiankai; Liang Jin'gang; Yu Ganglin; Wang Kan

    2015-01-01

    It is one of the efficient approach to reduce the memory consumption in Monte Carlo based reactor physical simulations by using the On-the-fly Doppler broadening for temperature dependent nuclear cross sections. RXSP is a nuclear cross sections processing code being developed by REAL team in Department of Engineering Physics in Tsinghua University, which has an excellent performance in Doppler broadening the temperature dependent continuous energy neutron cross sections. To meet the dual requirements of both accuracy and efficiency during the Monte Carlo simulations with many materials and many temperatures in it, this work enables the capability of on-the-fly pre-Doppler broadening cross sections during the neutron transport by coupling the Fast Doppler Broaden module in RXSP code embedded in the RMC code also being developed by REAL team in Tsinghua University. Additionally, the original OpenMP-based parallelism has been successfully converted into the MPI-based framework, being fully compatible with neutron transport in RMC code, which has achieved a vast parallel efficiency improvement. This work also provides a flexible approach to solve Monte Carlo based full core depletion calculation with many temperatures feedback in many isotopes. (author)

  19. Influence of void effects on reactivity of coupled fast-thermal system HERBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Milovanovic, S.; Milovanovic, T.; Cuknic, O.

    1997-01-01

    Coupled fast-thermal system HERBE at the experimental zero power heavy water reactor RB is a system with the significant effects of the neutron leakage and neutron absorption. Presence of a coolant void introduces a new structure in an extremely heterogeneous core. In those conditions satisfactory results of the calculation are acquired only using specified space-energy homogenization procedure. In order to analyze transient appearances and accidental cases of the reactor systems, a procedure for modeling of influence of moderator and coolant loss on reactivity ('void effect') is developed. Reduction of the moderator volume fraction in some fuel channels due to air gaps or steam generation during the accidental moderator boiling, restricts validity of the diffusion approximation in the reactor calculations. In cases of high neutron flux gradients, which are consequence of high neutron absorption, application of diffusion approximation is questionable too. The problem may be solved using transport or Monte Carlo methods, but they are not acceptable in the routine applications. Applying new techniques based on space-energy core homogenization, such as the SPH method or the discontinuity factor method, diffusion calculations become acceptable. Calculations based on the described model show that loss of part of moderator medium introduce negative reactivity in the HERBE system. Calculated local void reactivity coefficients are used in safety analysis of hypothetical accidents

  20. Elemental Bioimaging by Means of Fast Scanning Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehe, Christoph A.; Thyssen, Georgina M.; Herdering, Christina; Raj, Indra; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common setups for elemental bioimaging, the hyphenation of a laser ablation (LA) system and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), was expanded by adding full scan mass spectrometric information as another dimension of information. While most studies deal with the analysis of typically not more than up to 10 isotopes per scan cycle, a fast scanning quadrupole mass analyzer was utilized to record the full mass spectrum of interest in this work. Mass-to-charge ratios from 6 to 250 were observed within one cycle. Besides the x- and y-position on the ablated sample and the intensity, the m/z-ratio served as fourth variable for each pixel of the obtained data, closing thereby the gap between "inorganic" and "organic" mass spectrometric imaging techniques. The benefits of this approach include an improved control of interferences, the discovery of unexpected elemental distributions, the possibility to plot isotopic ratios, and to integrate the intensities of a certain number of mass channels recorded for each isotope, thus virtually increasing sensitivity. The respective data are presented for dried droplets as well as embedded animal and human tissue slices. Limits of detection were calculated and found to be in accordance with counting statistics. A dedicated software macro was developed for data manipulation prior to common evaluation and image creation.

  1. A coupled modal-finite element method for the wave propagation modeling in irregular open waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelat, Adrien; Felix, Simon; Pagneux, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    In modeling the wave propagation within a street canyon, particular attention must be paid to the description of both the multiple reflections of the wave on the building facades and the radiation in the free space above the street. The street canyon being considered as an open waveguide with a discontinuously varying cross-section, a coupled modal-finite element formulation is proposed to solve the three-dimensional wave equation within. The originally open configuration-the street canyon open in the sky above-is artificially turned into a close waveguiding structure by using perfectly matched layers that truncate the infinite sky without introducing numerical reflection. Then the eigenmodes of the resulting waveguide are determined by a finite element method computation in the cross-section. The eigensolutions can finally be used in a multimodal formulation of the wave propagation along the canyon, given its geometry and the end conditions at its extremities: initial field condition at the entrance and radiation condition at the output. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. Design of a side coupled standing wave accelerating tube for NSTRI e-Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, S.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Lamehi Rachti, M.; Ghasemi, F.

    2017-09-01

    The design and construction of a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator (e-Linac) was defined in the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (NSTRI) for cargo inspection and medical applications. For this accelerator, a side coupled standing wave tube resonant at a frequency of 2998.5 MHZ in π/2 mode was selected. In this article, the authors provide a step-by-step explanation of the process of the design for this tube. The design and simulation of the accelerating and coupling cavities were carried out in five steps; (1) separate design of the accelerating and coupling cavities, (2) design of the coupling aperture between the cavities, (3) design of the entire structure for resonance at the nominal frequency, (4) design of the buncher, and (5) design of the power coupling port. At all design stages, in addition to finding the dimensions of the cavity, the impact of construction tolerances and simulation errors on the electromagnetic parameters were investigated. The values obtained for the coupling coefficient, coupling constant, quality factor and capture efficiency are 2.11, 0.011, 16203 and 36%, respectively. The results of beam dynamics study of the simulated tube in ASTRA have yielded a value of 5.14 π-mm-mrad for the horizontal emittance, 5.06 π-mm-mrad for the vertical emittance, 1.17 mm for the horizontal beam size, 1.16 mm for the vertical beam size and 1090 keV for the energy spread of the output beam.

  3. Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Modeling of Tropical Cyclones: Progress, Challenges, and Ways Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi

    2015-04-01

    It has long been recognized that air-sea interaction plays an important role in tropical cyclones (TC) intensity change. However, most current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are deficient in predicting TC intensity. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in TCs push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. Parameterizations of air-sea fluxes in NWP models are often crude and create "manmade" energy source/sink that does not exist, especially in the absence of a fully interactive ocean in the model. The erroneous surface heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes can cause compounding errors in the model (e.g., precipitation, water vapor, boundary layer properties). The energy source (heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean) and sink (surface friction and wind-induced upper ocean cooling) are critical to TC intensity. However, observations of air-sea fluxes in TCs are very limited, especially in extreme high wind conditions underneath of the eyewall region. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program was designed to better understand the air-sea interaction, especially in high wind conditions, which included laboratory and coupled model experiments and field campaign in 2003-04 hurricane seasons. Significant progress has been made in better understanding of air-sea exchange coefficients up to 30 m/s, i.e., a leveling off in drag coefficient and relatively invariant exchange coefficient of enthalpy with wind speed. More recently, the Impact of Typhoon on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field campaign in 2010 has provided an unprecedented data set to study the air-sea fluxes in TCs and their impact on TC structure and intensity. More than 800 GPS dropsondes and 900 AXBTs/AXCTs as well as drifters, floats, and moorings were deployed in TCs, including Typhoons Fanapi and Malakas, and Supertyphoon Megi with a record peak wind speed of more than 80 m

  4. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Davanço, Marcelo I; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains.

  5. SELF-EXCITED WAVE PROCESSES IN CHAINS OF UNIDIRECTIONALLY COUPLED IMPULSE NEURONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Glyzin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the mathematical modeling of neural activity. We propose new classes of singularly perturbed differential-difference equations with delay of Volterra type. With these systems, the models as a single neuron or neural networks are described. We study attractors of ring systems of unidirectionally coupled impulse neurons in the case where the number of links in the system increases indefinitely. In order to study periodic solutions of travelling wave type of this system, some special tricks are used which reduce the existence and stability problems for cycles to the investigation of auxiliary system with impulse actions. Using this approach, we establish that the number of stable self-excited waves simultaneously existing in the chain increases unboundedly as the number of links of the chain increases, that is, the well-known buffer phenomenon occurs.

  6. Integrable parameter regimes and stationary states of nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, N.N.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the stationary propagation of nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma via the ponderomotive force is carried out. For small but finite amplitudes, the governing equations have a Hamiltonian structure, but with a kinetic energy term that is not positive definite. The Hamiltonian is similar to the well-known Hacute enon endash Heiles Hamiltonian of nonlinear dynamics, and is completely integrable in three regimes of the allowed parameter space. The corresponding second invariants of motion are also explicitly obtained. The integrable parameter regimes correspond to supersonic values of the Mach number, which characterizes the propagation speed of the coupled waves. On the other hand, in the sub- as well as near-sonic regimes, the coupled mode equations admit different types of exact analytical solutions, which represent nonlinear localized eigenstates of the electromagnetic field trapped in the density cavity due to the ponderomotive potential. While the density cavity has always a single-dip structure, for larger amplitudes it can support higher-order modes having a larger number of nodes in the electromagnetic field. In particular, we show the existence of a new type of localized electromagnetic wave whose field intensity has a triple-hump structure. For typical parameter values, the triple-hump solitons propagate with larger Mach numbers that are closer to the sonic limit than the single- as well as the double-hump solitons, but carry a lesser amount of the electromagnetic field energy. A comparison between the different types of solutions is carried out. The possibility of the existence of trapped electromagnetic modes having a larger number of humps is also discussed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Terahertz amplification in RTD-gated HEMTs with a grating-gate wave coupling topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condori Quispe, Hugo O.; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi [The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Encomendero-Risco, Jimy J.; Xing, Huili Grace [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    We theoretically analyze the operation of a terahertz amplifier consisting of a resonant-tunneling-diode gated high-electron-mobility transistor (RTD-gated HEMT) in a grating-gate topology. In these devices, the key element enabling substantial power gain is the efficient coupling of terahertz waves into and out of plasmons in the RTD-gated HEMT channel, i.e., the gain medium, via the grating-gate itself, part of the active device, rather than by an external antenna structure as discussed in previous works, therefore potentially enabling terahertz amplification with associated power gains >40 dB.

  8. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis of electromagnetic scattering from lamellar grating with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koki; Pištora, Jaromír; Nakatake, Yoshimasa

    2011-12-05

    This paper proposes a spectral-domain approach to the electromagnetic scattering problem of lamellar grating with defects. The fields in imperfectly periodic structures have continuous spectra in the wavenumber space, and the main problem of the spectral-domain approach is connected to the discretization scheme on the wavenumber. The present approach introduces the pseudo-periodic Fourier transform to consider the discretization scheme in the Brillouin zone. This transformation also makes it possible to apply the conventional grating formulations to the problems of imperfectly periodic structures. The present formulation is based on the rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the help of pseudo-periodic Fourier transform.

  9. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  10. Experimental study of the attenuation waves oriented to transients caused by the sodium-water explosive reaction in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the problems related to fluid-structure interaction that can compromise the structural integrity of components of a fast reactor is the explosion caused by the sodium-water reaction, in the case of a flood at the level of the thermic exchange wall at the steam generator. In this paper we have considered the aspects of the pressure-waves damping caused by the reaction, when these waves transverse certain perforated structures. In order to solve this problem, we also adopted a parametric experimental approach, using a scale model (RIO test rig). (author)

  11. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part II: Experimental validation in two-dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental validation of the second-order coupling theory outlined by Yang et al. (Z. Yang, S. Liu, H.B. Bingham and J. Li., 2013. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part I: Formulation, implementation and numerical properties......, submitted for publication) using 2D irregular waves. This work provides a second-order dispersive correction for the physical wavemaker signal which improves the nonlinear transfer of information between the numerical and physical models compared to the first-order method of Zhang et al. (2007......). The important nonlinear parameters and numerical performance were theoretically investigated in Part I. In the present Part II, careful experimental validation is carried out using a sequence of progressively more complex analytical and numerical target waves. The results demonstrate clearly that improved...

  12. On the use of the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute's prototype seabed-coupled shear wave vibrator for shallow soil characterization - I. Acquisition and processing of multimodal surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Maarten; Madshus, Christian; Socco, Valentina L.; Maraschini, Margherita; Sparrevik, Per M.; Westerdahl, Harald; Duffaut, Kenneth; Skomedal, Eiliv; Bjørnarâ, Tore I.

    2011-04-01

    Pure shear wave data are only very rarely acquired for offshore site investigations and exploration. Here, we present details of a novel, seabed-coupled, shear wave vibrator and field data recorded by a densely populated, multicomponent ocean-bottom cable, to improve shallow soil characterization. The prototype shear wave vibrator uses vibroseis technology adopted for marine environments through its instalment on top of a suction anchor, assuring seabed coupling in combination with self-weight penetration. The prototype is depth rated to 1500 m water depth, and can be rotated while installed in the seabed. The philosophy is to acquire fully complementary seismic data to conventional P- and P-to-S-converted waves, in particular for 2-D profiling, VSP (vertical seismic profiling) or monitoring purposes, thereby exploiting advantages of shear waves over compressional waves for determining, for example, anisotropy, small-strain shear modulus and excess pore pressures/effective stress. The source was primarily designed for reservoir depths. However, significant energy is emitted as surface waves, which provide detailed geotechnical information through mapping of shear wave velocities in potentially high resolution of the upper soil units. To fully utilize pure shear wave content, a proper analysis of surface waves is paramount, due to the proximity of surface wave propagation speed with shear wave velocities. The experiment was carried out in the northern North Sea in 364 m water depth. Cable dragging was necessary to obtain close receiver spacing (2.5 m effective spacing), with total line length of 600 m. Frequency-waveform transforms reveal both Scholte and Love waves. Up to six surface wave modes are identified, that is, fundamental mode and several higher surface wave modes. The occurrence of these two different dispersive surface wave types with well-resolved higher modes allows for a unique analysis and inversion scheme for high-resolution mapping of physical

  13. FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, R R; Daru, P; Barrera, A E; Mostofa Kamal, S M; Islam, S; Ul-Alam, M; Sultana, R; Rahman, M; Hossain, Md S; Lederer, P; Hurwitz, S; Chakraborty, K; Kak, N; Tierney, D B; Nardell, E

    2017-09-01

    National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka; Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Dhaka; and Chittagong Chest Disease Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. To present operational data and discuss the challenges of implementing FAST (Find cases Actively, Separate safely and Treat effectively) as a tuberculosis (TB) transmission control strategy. FAST was implemented sequentially at three hospitals. Using Xpert® MTB/RIF, 733/6028 (12.2%, 95%CI 11.4-13.0) patients were diagnosed with unsuspected TB. Patients with a history of TB who were admitted with other lung diseases had more than twice the odds of being diagnosed with unsuspected TB as those with no history of TB (OR 2.6, 95%CI 2.2-3.0, P stakeholder engagement and laboratory capacity are important for sustainability and scalability.

  14. A Comparison Study of a Generic Coupling Methodology for Modeling Wake Effects of Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verbrugghe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wave Energy Converters (WECs need to be deployed in large numbers in an array layout in order to have a significant power production. Each WEC has an impact on the incoming wave field, by diffracting, reflecting and radiating waves. Simulating the wave transformations within and around a WEC array is complex; it is difficult, or in some cases impossible, to simulate both these near-field and far-field wake effects using a single numerical model, in a time- and cost-efficient way in terms of computational time and effort. Within this research, a generic coupling methodology is developed to model both near-field and far-field wake effects caused by floating (e.g., WECs, platforms or fixed offshore structures. The methodology is based on the coupling of a wave-structure interaction solver (Nemoh and a wave propagation model. In this paper, this methodology is applied to two wave propagation models (OceanWave3D and MILDwave, which are compared to each other in a wide spectrum of tests. Additionally, the Nemoh-OceanWave3D model is validated by comparing it to experimental wave basin data. The methodology proves to be a reliable instrument to model wake effects of WEC arrays; results demonstrate a high degree of agreement between the numerical simulations with relative errors lower than 5 % and to a lesser extent for the experimental data, where errors range from 4 % to 17 % .

  15. A framework for efficient irregular wave simulations using Higher Order Spectral method coupled with viscous two phase model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inno Gatin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a framework for efficient irregular wave simulations using Higher Order Spectral method coupled with fully nonlinear viscous, two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model is presented. CFD model is based on solution decomposition via Spectral Wave Explicit Navier–Stokes Equation method, allowing efficient coupling with arbitrary potential flow solutions. Higher Order Spectrum is a pseudo-spectral, potential flow method for solving nonlinear free surface boundary conditions up to an arbitrary order of nonlinearity. It is capable of efficient long time nonlinear propagation of arbitrary input wave spectra, which can be used to obtain realistic extreme waves. To facilitate the coupling strategy, Higher Order Spectrum method is implemented in foam-extend alongside the CFD model. Validation of the Higher Order Spectrum method is performed on three test cases including monochromatic and irregular wave fields. Additionally, the coupling between Higher Order Spectrum and CFD is validated on three hour irregular wave propagation. Finally, a simulation of a 3D extreme wave encountering a full scale container ship is shown.

  16. IRPhE/RRR-SEG, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Frank-Peter; Dietze, Klaus; Jacqmin, Robert; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The RRR-SEG-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactor RRG-SEG (at RC Rossendorf / Germany) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in Note Technique SPRC/LEPh/93-230 (SEG) The SEG experiments are considered 'clean' integral experiments, simple and clear in geometry and well suited for calculation. In all SEG configurations only a few materials were used, most of these were standards. Due to the designed adjoint function (energy-independent or monotonously rising), the capture or scattering effect was dominant, convenient to check separately capture or scattering data. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Rossendorf. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and

  17. IRPhE/STEK, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, Klaus; Klippel, Henk Th.; Koning, Arjan; Jacqmin, Robert

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The STEK-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactors STEK (ECN Petten/ Netherlands) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in RCN-209, ECN-10 The 5 STEK configurations cover a broad energy range due to their increasing softness. The experiments are very valuable because of the extensive program of sample reactivity measurements with many fission product nuclides important in reactor burn-up calculations. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Petten. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2) are compared in JEF/DOC-861. It contains the following documents: 31 Reports, 2 publications, 5 JEF documents, 4 conferences. 2 - Related or auxiliary programs

  18. Evanescent wave coupling in a geophysical system: Airborne acoustic signals from the Mw 8.1 Macquarie Ridge earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, L.G.; Smets, P.S.M.; Brown, D.; Heaney, K.D.; Assink, J.D.; Snellen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric low-frequency sound, i.e., infra-sound, from underwater events has not been considered thus far, due to the high impedance contrast of the water-air interface making it almost fully reflective. Here we report for the first time on atmospheric infra-sound from a large underwater earthquake (Mw 8.1) near the Macquarie Ridge, which was recorded at 1325 km from the epicenter. Seismic waves coupled to hydro acoustic waves at the ocean floor, after which the energy entered the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel and was detected on a hydro-phone array. The energy was diffracted by a sea-mount and an oceanic ridge, which acted as a secondary source, into the water column followed by coupling into the atmosphere. The latter results from evanescent wave coupling and the attendant anomalous transparency of the sea surface for very low frequency acoustic waves. (authors)

  19. Bifurcation to square-wave switching in orthogonally delay-coupled semiconductor lasers: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoller, C. [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, ES-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Sukow, D. [Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems, Campus Universitat de les Illes Balears, ES-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Gavrielides, A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/EOARD, 86 Blenheim Crescent, Ruislip Middlesex HA4 7HB (United Kingdom); Sciamanna, M. [Optics and Electronics (OPTEL) Research Group, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photonique et Systemes (LMOPS), Supelec, 2 Rue Edouard Belin, FR-57070 Metz (France)

    2011-08-15

    We analyze the dynamics of two semiconductor lasers with so-called orthogonal time-delayed mutual coupling: the dominant TE (x) modes of each laser are rotated by 90 deg. (therefore, TM polarization or y) before being coupled to the other laser. Although this laser system allows for steady-state emission in either one or in both polarization modes, it may also exhibit stable time-periodic dynamics including square waveforms. A theoretical mapping of the switching dynamics unveils the region in parameter space where one expects to observe long-term time-periodic mode switching. Detailed numerical simulations illustrate the role played by the coupling strength, the mode frequency detuning, or the mode gain to loss difference. We complement our theoretical study with several experiments and measurements. We present time series and intensity spectra associated with the characteristics of the square waves and other waveforms observed as a function of the strength of the delay coupling. The experimental observations are in very good agreement with the analysis and the numerical results.

  20. Toward nonlinear magnonics: Intensity-dependent spin-wave switching in insulating side-coupled magnetic stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Odintsov, S. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate that the nonlinear spin-wave transport in two laterally parallel magnetic stripes exhibit the intensity-dependent power exchange between the adjacent spin-wave channels. By the means of Brillouin light scattering technique, we investigate collective nonlinear spin-wave dynamics in the presence of magnetodipolar coupling. The nonlinear intensity-dependent effect reveals itself in the spin-wave mode transformation and differential nonlinear spin-wave phase shift in each adjacent magnetic stripe. The proposed analytical theory, based on the coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations, predicts the geometry design involving the reduction of power requirement to the all-magnonic switching. A very good agreement between calculation and experiment was found. In addition, a micromagnetic and finite-element approach has been independently used to study the nonlinear behavior of spin waves in adjacent stripes and the nonlinear transformation of spatial profiles of spin-wave modes. Our results show that the proposed spin-wave coupling mechanism provides the basis for nonlinear magnonic circuits and opens the perspectives for all-magnonic computing architecture.

  1. Wave instability induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in a model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Ernesto M.; Bär, Markus; Engel, Harald

    2006-06-01

    We study spatiotemporal patterns resulting from instabilities induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In this system, nonlocal coupling can be externally imposed by means of an optical feedback loop which links the intensity of locally applied illumination with the activity in a certain vicinity of a particular point weighted by a given coupling function. This effect is included in the three-variable Oregonator model by an additional integral term in the photochemically induced bromide flow. A linear stability analysis of this modified Oregonator model predicts that wave and Turing instabilities of the homogeneous steady state can be induced for experimentally realistic parameter values. In particular, we find that a long-range inhibition in the optical feedback leads to a Turing instability, while a long-range activation induces wave patterns. Using a weakly nonlinear analysis, we derive amplitude equations for the wave instability which are valid close to the instability threshold. Therein, we find that the wave instability occurs supercritically or subcritically and that traveling waves are preferred over standing waves. The results of the theoretical analysis are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the model near the wave instability threshold. For larger distances from threshold, a secondary breathing instability is found for traveling waves.

  2. Comparison of rigorous coupled-wave approach and finite element method for photovoltaic devices with periodically corrugated metallic backreflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Manuel E; Faryad, Muhammad; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Monk, Peter B

    2014-10-01

    Optimal design of photovoltaic devices with a periodically corrugated metallic backreflector requires a rapid and reliable way to simulate the optical characteristics for wide ranges of wavelengths and angles of incidence. Two independent numerical techniques are needed for confidence in numerical results. We compared the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA) and the finite element method (FEM), the former being fast and flexible, but the latter having predictable convergence even for discontinuous constitutive properties. Depending on the shape of the corrugation and the constitutive properties of the metal and dielectric materials making up the device, both techniques can exhibit slow convergence rates for p-polarized light. The chosen model problem in this paper is of this type. As rapid spatial variations of the fields are the underlying cause, suitable selective refinement of the FEM mesh can overcome this slow convergence. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a self-adaptive scheme for choosing the mesh in the FEM. This will slow down the algorithm but give a reliable way to check the RCWA results.

  3. XMDS2: Fast, scalable simulation of coupled stochastic partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Graham R.; Hope, Joseph J.; Johnsson, Mattias T.

    2013-01-01

    XMDS2 is a cross-platform, GPL-licensed, open source package for numerically integrating initial value problems that range from a single ordinary differential equation up to systems of coupled stochastic partial differential equations. The equations are described in a high-level XML-based script, and the package generates low-level optionally parallelised C++ code for the efficient solution of those equations. It combines the advantages of high-level simulations, namely fast and low-error development, with the speed, portability and scalability of hand-written code. XMDS2 is a complete redesign of the XMDS package, and features support for a much wider problem space while also producing faster code. Program summaryProgram title: XMDS2 Catalogue identifier: AENK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 872490 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45522370 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python and C++. Computer: Any computer with a Unix-like system, a C++ compiler and Python. Operating system: Any Unix-like system; developed under Mac OS X and GNU/Linux. RAM: Problem dependent (roughly 50 bytes per grid point) Classification: 4.3, 6.5. External routines: The external libraries required are problem-dependent. Uses FFTW3 Fourier transforms (used only for FFT-based spectral methods), dSFMT random number generation (used only for stochastic problems), MPI message-passing interface (used only for distributed problems), HDF5, GNU Scientific Library (used only for Bessel-based spectral methods) and a BLAS implementation (used only for non-FFT-based spectral methods). Nature of problem: General coupled initial-value stochastic partial differential equations. Solution method: Spectral method

  4. Neutronics - thermal-hydraulics coupling: application to the helium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiana, F.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of interactions between neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics. Neutron-kinetics allow to calculate the power in a nuclear reactor and the temperature evolution of materials where this power is deposited is known thanks to thermal-hydraulics. Moreover, when the temperatures evolve, the densities and cross sections change. These two disciplines are thus coupled. The first part of this work corresponds to the study and development of a method which allows to simulate transients in nuclear reactors and especially with a Monte-Carlo code for neutron-kinetics. An algorithm for the resolution of the neutron transport equation has been established and validated with a benchmark. In thermal-hydraulics, a porous media approach, based on another thesis, is considered. This gives the opportunity to solve the equations on the whole core without unconscionable computation time. Finally, a theoretical study has been performed on the statistical uncertainties which result from the use of a Monte-Carlo code and which spread from the reactivity to the power and from the power to the temperatures. The second part deals with the study of a misplaced control rod withdrawing in a GFR (helium-cooled fast reactor), a fourth generation reactor. Some models allowing to calculate neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics in the core (which contains assemblies built up with fuel plates) were defined. In thermal-hydraulics, a model for the core based on the porous media approach and a fuel plate homogenization model have been set up. A similar homogenization model has been studied for neutron-kinetics. Finally, the control rod withdrawing transient where we can observe the power raising and the stabilisation by thermal feedback has been performed with the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli for neutron-kinetics and the code Trio-U for thermal-hydraulics. (author)

  5. Method of Moments of Coupled-Cluster Equations: Externally Corrected Approaches Employing Configuration Interaction Wave Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S.O. Pimienta

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A new approach to the many-electron correlation problem, termed the method of moments of coupled-cluster equations (MMCC, is further developed and tested. The main idea of the MMCC theory is that of the noniterative energy corrections which, when added to the energies obtained in the standard coupled-cluster calculations, recover the exact (full configuration interaction energy. The MMCC approximations require that a guess is provided for the electronic wave function of interest. The idea of using simple estimates of the wave function, provided by the inexpensive configuration interaction (CI methods employing small sets of active orbitals to define higher–than–double excitations, is tested in this work. The CI-corrected MMCC methods are used to study the single bond breaking in HF and the simultaneous breaking of both O–H bonds in H2O.

  6. Density Convection near Radiating ICRF Antennas and its Effect on the Coupling of Lower Hybrid Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mailloux, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore Supra and JET tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in JET indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k//-spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum

  7. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Tuccillo, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k / spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  8. Charging-delay effect on longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Gupta, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the charging-delay effect, the nonlinear propagation characteristics of longitudinal dust acoustic wave in strongly coupled collisional dusty plasma described by generalized hydrodynamic model have been investigated. In the 'hydrodynamic limit', a Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation with a damping term arising due to dust-neutral collision is derived in which the Burger term is proportional to the dissipation due to dust viscosity through dust-dust correlation and charging-delay-induced anomalous dissipation. On the other hand, in the 'kinetic limit', a KdVB equation with a damping term and a nonlocal nonlinear forcing term arising due to memory-dependent strong correlation effect of dust fluid is derived in which the Burger term depends only on the charging-delay-induced dissipation. Numerical solution of integrodifferential equations reveals that (i) dissipation due to dust viscosity and principally due to charging delay causes excitation of the longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma and (ii) dust-neutral collision does not appear to play any direct role in shock formation. The condition for the generation of shock is also discussed briefly

  9. Efficient laser-overdense plasma coupling via surface plasma waves and steady magnetic field generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigongiari, A. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); TIPS/LULI, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilee 94200, Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Raynaud, M. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riconda, C. [TIPS/LULI, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilee 94200, Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Heron, A. [CPHT, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Macchi, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (CNR/INO), Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The efficiency of laser overdense plasma coupling via surface plasma wave excitation is investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed over a wide range of laser pulse intensity from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}{mu}m{sup 2} with electron density ranging from 25 to 100n{sub c} to describe the laser interaction with a grating target where a surface plasma wave excitation condition is fulfilled. The numerical studies confirm an efficient coupling with an enhancement of the laser absorption up to 75%. The simulations also show the presence of a localized, quasi-static magnetic field at the plasma surface. Two interaction regimes are identified for low (I{lambda}{sup 2} < 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}{mu}m{sup 2}) and high (I{lambda}{sup 2} > 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}{mu}m{sup 2}) laser pulse intensities. At ''relativistic'' laser intensity, steady magnetic fields as high as {approx}580 MG {mu}m/{lambda}{sub 0} at 7 x 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}{mu}m{sup 2} are obtained in the simulations.

  10. A fast search strategy for gravitational waves from low-mass x-ray binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messenger, C; Woan, G

    2007-01-01

    We present a new type of search strategy designed specifically to find continuously emitting gravitational wave sources in known binary systems. A component of this strategy is based on the incoherent summation of frequency-modulated binary signal sidebands, a method previously employed in the detection of electromagnetic pulsar signals from radio observations. The search pipeline can be divided into three stages: the first is a wide bandwidth, F-statistic search demodulated for sky position. This is followed by a fast second stage in which areas in frequency space are identified as signal candidates through the frequency domain convolution of the F-statistic with an approximate signal template. For this second stage only precise information on the orbit period and approximate information on the orbital semi-major axis are required a priori. For the final stage we propose a fully coherent Markov chain Monte Carlo based follow-up search on the frequency subspace defined by the candidates identified by the second stage. This search is particularly suited to the low-mass x-ray binaries, for which orbital period and sky position are typically well known and additional orbital parameters and neutron star spin frequency are not. We note that for the accreting x-ray millisecond pulsars, for which spin frequency and orbital parameters are well known, the second stage can be omitted and the fully coherent search stage can be performed. We describe the search pipeline with respect to its application to a simplified phase model and derive the corresponding sensitivity of the search

  11. Waveform Modeling of the Crust and Upper Mantle Using S, Sp, SsPmP, and Shear-Coupled PL Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-10

    and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph )-period (T) curve: αN and βN are the P and S wave...Pulliam and Sen, 2005) (b) Propagation characteristics and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph

  12. Stiffness measurement and defect detection in laminated composites by dry-coupled plate waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Ziola, Steve M.; Dorighi, John F.; Gorman, Michael R.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a novel non-destruction technique for stiffness measurement and defect detection in laminated composite plates using dry-coupled ultrasonic plate waves. The technique involves using a pari of wide-band transducers normally-placed on the plate surface to generate and receive the lowest order flexural mode (A0 mode) at low frequencies. The stiffness measurement first experimentally determines the phase velocity of the A0 mode, then reconstructs the stiffness matrix components D11, D22, A44, and A55 utilizing the higher order plate wave solution for laminated composites and a nonlinear least-square optimization method. Such stiffness measurements can be used for quality control/quality assurance of in-service composite structures or composite manufacturing process, and for verification of composite design. As well as the stiffness measurements, the time-of- flight and amplitude measurements are achieved by keeping the pulser-receiver distance and pulsing frequency constant, and scanning the transducers over the plate surface. Since the plate wave measurements are based on the direct first arrival of the flexural mode, they are not limited by the thinness of the specimen as the conventional c-scan. Examples of stiffness measurement and defect detection are given, including cases of impact damage, delamination and debonding in composite structures. Finally the main hardware and software features of a recently-developed F-Scan system are also described.

  13. 9Be scattering with microscopic wave functions and the continuum-discretized coupled-channel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descouvemont, P.; Itagaki, N.

    2018-01-01

    We use microscopic 9Be wave functions defined in a α +α +n multicluster model to compute 9Be+target scattering cross sections. The parameter sets describing 9Be are generated in the spirit of the stochastic variational method, and the optimal solution is obtained by superposing Slater determinants and by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian. The 9Be three-body continuum is approximated by square-integral wave functions. The 9Be microscopic wave functions are then used in a continuum-discretized coupled-channel (CDCC) calculation of 9Be+208Pb and of 9Be+27Al elastic scattering. Without any parameter fitting, we obtain a fair agreement with experiment. For a heavy target, the influence of 9Be breakup is important, while it is weaker for light targets. This result confirms previous nonmicroscopic CDCC calculations. One of the main advantages of the microscopic CDCC is that it is based on nucleon-target interactions only; there is no adjustable parameter. The present work represents a first step towards more ambitious calculations involving heavier Be isotopes.

  14. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in aquachannel simulations: 1. Propagation speeds, composite structures, and comparison with aquaplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Joaquín. E.; Nolan, David S.; Tulich, Stefan N.

    2016-10-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) represent a significant contribution to the total variability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). This study analyzes the structure and propagation of CCKWs simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using two types of idealized domains. These are the "aquachannel," a flat rectangle on a beta plane with zonally periodic boundary conditions and length equal to the Earth's circumference at the equator, and the "aquapatch," a square domain with zonal extent equal to one third of the aquachannel's length. A series of simulations are performed, including a doubly nested aquapatch, in which convection is solved explicitly along the equator. The model intercomparison is carried out throughout the use of several techniques such as power spectra, filtering, wave tracking, and compositing, and it is extended to some simulations from the Aquaplanet Experiment (APE). Results show that despite the equatorial superrotation bias produced by the WRF simulations, the CCKWs simulated with this model propagate with similar phase speeds (relative to the low-level mean flow) as the corresponding waves from the APE simulations. Horizontal and vertical structures of the CCKWs simulated with aquachannels are also in overall good agreement with those from aquaplanet simulations and observations, although there is a distortion of the zonal extent of anomalies when the shorter aquapatch is used.

  15. The build-up and characterization of nuclear burn-up wave in a fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The TT and TL are defined, respectively, as the time and length needed to establish 95% and 99% of the asymptotic neutron flux propagating in the media. From these parameters, the transient wave velocity is determined. The characteristics of asymptotic part of the wave are determined in terms of wave velocity, Full Width ...

  16. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system ({rho},{xi}) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number {alpha} as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions.

  17. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system (ρ,ξ) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number α as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions

  18. Observations of the ultra-fast Kelvin wave using meteor radar over a Brazilian extra-tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Amitava; Prado Batista, Paulo; Clemesha, Barclay Robert

    2013-04-01

    Characteristics of the equatorial 3.5-day ultra-fast Kelvin (UKF) wave are investigated with four year meteor radar wind observations over Cachoeira Paulista (22.7S, 45W). UFK signature manifests as discrete bursts spanning over various times of the year with generally less amplitude during fall equinox and early winter span. Daily as well as seasonal mean amplitude of the UFK wave is found to be sufficiently smaller than that observed previously from equatorial stations. Estimated vertical wavelength of the UFK wave comes out to be larger than 80 km. Comparison of present results with another Brazilian equatorial station exhibits latitudinal invariance of the wave as well as transient local dynamical influence to its variability. High zonal acceleration caused by momentum flux convergence due to the UFK wave just after equinoxes is supposed to be responsible for driving westerly phase of the mean zonal wind immediately after equinoxes and hence the mesospheric semiannual oscillation. There is a clear signature of modulation of the UFK wave amplitude by various harmonics of the annual oscillation.

  19. T-wave variability for the prediction of fast ventricular arrhythmias – prospective, observer-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Ristl, Robin; Moser, Fabian T; Wolzt, Michael; Wojta, Johann; Schmidinger, Herwig; Pezawas, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The clinical value of T-wave variability (T-var) for ventricular arrhythmia (VA) risk prediction was evaluated. Three 20-min Holter-ECG-based T-var measurements (I1 at baseline, I2 after 6.5 ± 1.6 months and I3 after 13.1 ± 2.0 months) were done in 121 patients. T-var was defined as the amplitude variability of the T-wave with the maximum of T-wave oscillation. The endpoint was a fast, potentially fatal VA (>240 beats/min). During follow-up (20 ± 4 months) 20/121 patients (55% ischemic heart disease, 15% preserved left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF]) had fast VA terminated by ICD or external shock. Although T-var did not differ between patients with vs. without fast VA at baseline (I1: 10.7 ± 7.3 µV vs. 7.8 ± 4.1 µV, P=0.170), patients with fast VA had higher T-var compared to those without fast VA at 2 subsequent measurements (I2: 14.0 ± 6.5 µV vs. 8.2 ± 3.6 µV, P=0.030; I3: 17.0 ± 5.4 µV vs. 8.8 ± 4.6 µV, P=0.004). The increase in T-var between I1 and I2 was higher in patients with fast VA (∆T-var=7.0 ± 9.3 µV), as compared to patients without (∆T-var=0.4 ± 4.3 µV). After adjustment for LVEF in a multiple logistic regression model, the odds ratio for developing fast VA was 1.1 (P=0.056) for each 1-µV increment in T-var at I1. T-var is elevated in patients with fast VA, and both elevation of T-var and increase in T-var may complement LVEF in VA risk stratification.

  20. On nonlinear changes of the reflection coefficient of the fast wave at LH frequencies due to ponderomotive forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1991-09-01

    The nonlinear changes of the reflection coefficient R of fast waves launched by waveguide arrays may be significant even for power densities S in the range of 3 or 4 kW/cm 2 . For the input parameters chosen in the computations, the effects of ponderomotive forces lead to an increase in plasma density in front of the grill , whereas for the slow wave the plasma density always decreases with growing S. For small plasma density in front of the grill, ponderomotive forces thus lead to the decrease of R, whereas for high plasma densities R grows with growing power density S. The heating of the edge plasma by the wave tends to weaken these changes. (Z.S.) 6 figs., 17 refs

  1. Thermal degradation assessment of canola and olive oil using ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzak, Tomasz; Lubinska, Martyna; Różańska, Anna; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Oil blending is often used to enhance the properties of vegetable oils. The admixture of a more thermally stable oil makes the resulting blend more suitable for use in frying. A new method of quality assessment of vegetable oils used in frying is presented in this paper. In this method, ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector and chemometrics is employed. Principal component analysis was used for data processing. The results obtained with this method were compared with the results of the Rancimat test and sensory evaluation. It is demonstrated that the addition of olive oil improves the stability of rapeseed oil, and also changes its flavour and aroma profile. In addition, it was found that ultra-fast GC coupled with chemometrics is an effective tool for the assessment of the quality of edible oils. The proposed method does not require sample preparation, and the total time of analysis is less than 2 min.

  2. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  3. Wave-Ice interaction in the Marginal Ice Zone: Toward a Wave-Ocean-Ice Coupled Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Wave-Ice interaction in the Marginal Ice Zone: Toward a...scattering of waves by interaction with ice in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). The wave model physics developed here will later be part of an operational...10.5670/oceanog.2014.73. Liu, A.K., B. Holt, and P.W. Vachon, 1991: Wave propagation in the Marginal Ice Zone: Model predictions and comparisons

  4. Develop and Test Coupled Physical Parameterizations and Tripolar Wave Model Grid: NAVGEM / WaveWatch III / HYCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    disk the following wave input fields: Stokes drift current ( SDC ), wave-to-ocean momentum flux (WOMF), bottom orbital wave current (OWC). (b) Add SDC ...Earth System Modeling Framework) layer in HYCOM to import SDC , WOMF and OWC fields and export SSC (surface current) and SSH (surface height) fields

  5. Influence of Four-Wave Mixing and Walk-Off on the Self-Focusing of Coupled Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Four-wave mixing and walk-off between two optical beams are! investigated For focusing Kerr media. It is shown that four-wave mixing reinforces the self-focusing of mutually trapped waves by lowering their power threshold for collapse, only when their phase mismatch is small. On the contrary, wal...

  6. Coupling of modal and finite elements methods for the diffraction of guided elastics waves: application to non destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baronian, V.

    2009-11-01

    A typical nondestructive examination based on guided elastic waves can be simulated by considering an elastic 2D (a plate) or 3D (a rod) guide that contains a defect (a crack, a local heterogeneity due to a weld etc.). Our aim is to solve numerically the problem of the scattering by a defect of a mode propagating in a guide. This has been achieved by developing a method that couples i) finite elements in the smallest possible region of the guide that contains the defect, with ii) the modal decomposition of waves outside this region. The main challenge consists in finding the right linking condition of both representations. A decisive tool is the obtaining of an orthogonality relation which makes it possible to project the finite element solution onto guided modes. For this, the problem is formulated in terms of hybrid vectors (displacement/stress) for which a bi-orthogonality relation exists, namely, the Fraser's relation. It is then possible to derive an exact (transparent) condition on the artificial boundaries of the finite element domain; the modal series taken into account being necessarily truncated, transparency is achieved only approximately. Eventually, this boundary condition is integrated in a variational approach (in terms of displacement) in order to develop a finite element method. The transparent boundary condition being expressed in terms of the hybrid vectors, the stress normal to the artificial boundary is introduced as a supplementary unknown, together with a mixed formulation. Both 2D and 3D isotropic guides with free boundary conditions have been considered numerically. Guided modes are computed thanks to an original modeling approach also based on the hybrid (displacement/stress) vectors; interestingly, bi-orthogonality relation expressed in a discrete form is preserved. The code implementing these methods leads to fast computations of the scattering matrix of a defect; once this matrix has been computed at various frequencies, the defect

  7. Numerical simulation of the solitary wave interacting with an elastic structure using MPS-FEM coupled method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chengping; Zhang, Youlin; Wan, Decheng

    2017-12-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) caused by fluid impacting onto a flexible structure commonly occurs in naval architecture and ocean engineering. Research on the problem of wave-structure interaction is important to ensure the safety of offshore structures. This paper presents the Moving Particle Semi-implicit and Finite Element Coupled Method (MPS-FEM) to simulate FSI problems. The Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method is used to calculate the fluid domain, while the Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to address the structure domain. The scheme for the coupling of MPS and FEM is introduced first. Then, numerical validation and convergent study are performed to verify the accuracy of the solver for solitary wave generation and FSI problems. The interaction between the solitary wave and an elastic structure is investigated by using the MPS-FEM coupled method.

  8. Resonant excitation of coupled Rayleigh waves in a short and narrow fluid channel clad between two identical metal plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. García-Chocano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of ultrasonic waves through a slit between two water immersed brass plates is studied for sub-wavelength plate thicknesses and slit apertures. Extraordinary high absorption is observed at discrete frequencies corresponding to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves on the both sides of the channel. The coupling of the Rayleigh waves occurs through the fluid and the corresponding contribution to the dispersion has been theoretically derived and also experimentally confirmed. Symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are predicted but only the symmetric mode resonances have been observed. It follows from the dispersion equation that the coupled Rayleigh waves cannot be excited in a channel with apertures less than the critical one. The calculated critical aperture is in a good agreement with the measured acoustic spectra. These findings could be applied to design a broadband absorptive metamaterial.

  9. Effect of air bubbles in the coupling medium on efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arun; Shah, Tariq K

    2007-06-01

    Replacement of the water bath by a water cushion in newer lithotriptors introduces an acoustic interface and an ideal coupling agent is required to prevent energy loss at this interface. We aim to study the effect of bubbles in the coupling media on efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by an in vitro experiment. Using a standardised in vitro model 40 artificial stones were randomly treated on Modulith SLK lithotriptor using either conventional ultrasound gel (high bubble content) before and after displacing visible bubbles, a thin ultrasound gel (Therasonic) or silicon oil (both with negligible bubbles). Percentage area covered by bubbles in each case and the diameters and depth of crater created in each stone were measured by two blinded observers to determine the correlation between the bubble contents and disintegration efficacy. In vivo effect of two ultrasound gels was compared in terms of pain scores and stone fragmentation rates in ten patients treated with both gels. Volume of the craters was significantly greater with the Therasonic gel (102.4+/-33.4 mm3) or silicon oil (98.8+/-9.8 mm3) than the conventional ultrasound gel (49.2+/-32.6 mm3). But it was greatest (p<0.001) with ultrasound gel without bubbles (163.5+/-22.6 mm3). Depth and volume of the stone crater increased significantly with decreasing bubble contents of gel (p<0.001). Compared to standard ultrasound gel, patients treated with Therasonic gel reported significantly higher pain scores (median 3.5 vs. 8.0; p<0.001). Efficacy of ESWL is significantly correlated to air bubbles within the coupling gel and can be improved significantly by eliminating the bubbles from the coupling medium.

  10. Study of the ultra-fast Kelvin wave with meteor radar observations over a Brazilian extra-tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, A.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.

    2013-09-01

    Characteristics of the 3.5-day ultra-fast Kelvin (UKF) wave are investigated with 4 years of meteor radar wind observations over Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45°W). The UFK signature manifests itself as discrete bursts spanning over various times of the year with generally less amplitude during fall equinox and early winter. Daily as well as seasonal mean amplitude of the UFK component is found to be considerably smaller than that observed previously from equatorial stations. Estimated vertical wavelengths of the UFK wave come out to be larger than 40 km. Comparison of the present results with another Brazilian equatorial station implies latitudinal invariance of the wave as well as transient local dynamical influence to its variability. High zonal acceleration caused by momentum flux convergence due to the UFK wave just after equinoxes is believed to be responsible for driving the westerly phase of the mean zonal wind immediately after the equinoxes and hence the mesospheric semiannual oscillation to some extent. There is a clear signature of modulation of the UFK wave amplitude by various harmonics of the annual oscillation.

  11. Abundant soliton and periodic wave solutions for the coupled Higgs field equation, the Maccari system and the Hirota-Maccari system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we explore a variety of solitary wave ansatze and periodic wave ansatze to some nonlinear equations. Three complex systems of nonlinear equations that appear in mathematical physics are investigated. We derive abundant soliton and periodic wave solutions for the coupled Higgs field equation, the Maccari system and the Hirota-Maccari system. The results obtained show that these three coupled equations exhibit the richness of explicit solutions: solitons, periodic and rational wave solutions.

  12. On the Boyd-Kadomstev System for a three-wave coupling problem and its asymptotic limit

    OpenAIRE

    Metivier, Guy; Sentis, Remi

    2010-01-01

    article accepted for publication in Comm Math. Physics; A paraitre dans Comm. Math. Physics; We consider the Boyd-Kadomstev system which is in particular a model for the Brillouin backscattering in laser-plasma interaction. It couples the propagation of two laser beams, the incoming and the backscattered waves, with an ion acoustic wave which propagates at a much slower speed. The ratio $\\varepsilon$ between the plasma sound velocity and the (group) velocity of light is small, with typical va...

  13. Performance analysis of coupled and uncoupled hydrodynamic and wave models in the northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Claudia; Coluccelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Andrea; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Carniel, Sandro; Falcieri, Francesco; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Ravaioli, Mariangela; Riminucci, Francesco; Sclavo, Mauro; Russo, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    The complex dynamics of the Adriatic Sea are the result of geographical position, orography and bathymetry, as well as rivers discharge and meteorological conditions that influence, more strongly, the shallow northern part. Such complexity requires a constant monitoring of marine conditions in order to support several activities (marine resources management, naval operations, emergency management, shipping, tourism, as well as scientific ones). Platforms, buoys and mooring located in Adriatic Sea supply almost continuously real time punctual information, which can be spatially extended, with some limitations, by drifters and remote sensing. Operational forecasting systems represent valid tools to provide a complete tridimensional coverage of the area, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. The Hydro-Meteo-Clima Service of the Emilia-Romagna Environmental Agency (ARPA-SIMC, Bologna, Italy) and the Dept. of Life and Environmental Sciences of Università Politecnica delle Marche (DISVA-UNIVPM, Ancona, Italy), in collaboration with the Institute of Marine Science of the National Research Council (ISMAR-CNR, Italy) operationally run several wave and hydrodynamic models on the Adriatic Sea. The main implementations are based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), the wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of the former two models in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. Horizontal resolutions of the different systems range from the 2 km of AdriaROMS to the 0.5 km of the recently implemented northern Adriatic COAWST. Forecasts are produced every day for the subsequent 72 hour with hourly resolution. All the systems compute the fluxes exchanged through the interface with the atmosphere from the numerical weather prediction system named COSMO-I7, an implementation for Italy of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) model, at 7 km horizontal resolution. Considering the several operational

  14. Lie symmetry analysis, conservation laws, solitary and periodic waves for a coupled Burger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Juan; Tian, Shou-Fu; Tu, Jian-Min; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Under investigation in this paper is a generalized (2 + 1)-dimensional coupled Burger equation with variable coefficients, which describes lots of nonlinear physical phenomena in geophysical fluid dynamics, condense matter physics and lattice dynamics. By employing the Lie group method, the symmetry reductions and exact explicit solutions are obtained, respectively. Based on a direct method, the conservations laws of the equation are also derived. Furthermore, by virtue of the Painlevé analysis, we successfully obtain the integrable condition on the variable coefficients, which plays an important role in further studying the integrability of the equation. Finally, its auto-Bäcklund transformation as well as some new analytic solutions including solitary and periodic waves are also presented via algebraic and differential manipulation.

  15. On elastic waves in an thinly-layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pal Roy

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with a simple transformation rule in finding out the composite elastic coefficients of a thinly layered laminated medium whose bulk properties are strongly anisotropic with a microelastic bending rigidity. These elastic coefficients which were not known completely for a layered laminated structure, are obtained suitably in terms of initial stress components and Lame's constants λi, μi of initially isotropic solids. The explicit solutions of the dynamical equations for a prestressed thinly layered laminated medium under horizontal compression in a gravity field are derived. The results are discussed specifying the effects of hydrostatic, deviatoric and couple stresses upon the characteristic propagation velocities of shear and compression wave modes.

  16. Ultrasonic wave propagation in viscoelastic cortical bone plate coupled with fluids: a spectral finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the ultrasonic wave propagation in the cortical layer of long bones which is known as being a functionally graded anisotropic material coupled with fluids. The viscous effects are taken into account. The geometrical configuration mimics the one of axial transmission technique used for evaluating the bone quality. We present a numerical procedure adapted for this purpose which is based on the spectral finite element method (FEM). By using a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, the vibroacoustic problem may be transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain in which, as radiation conditions may be exactly introduced in the infinite fluid halfspaces, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analysed using FEM. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed approach. We present some results to study the influence of the frequency on the first arriving signal velocity in (visco)elastic bone plate.

  17. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-07

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  18. A 2D Time Domain DRBEM Computer Model for MagnetoThermoelastic Coupled Wave Propagation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelsabour Fahmy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical computer model based on the dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM is extended to study magneto-thermoelastic coupled wave propagation problems with relaxation times involving anisotropic functionally graded solids. The model formulation is tested through its application to the problem of a solid placed in a constant primary magnetic field acting in the direction of the z-axis and rotating about this axis with a constant angular velocity. In the case of two-dimensional deformation, an implicit-explicit time domain DRBEM was presented and implemented to obtain the solution for the displacement and temperature fields. A comparison of the results is presented graphically in the context of Lord and Shulman (LS and Green and Lindsay (GL theories. Numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed method are also presented graphically.

  19. A Quasi-periodic Fast-propagating Magnetosonic Wave Associated with the Eruption of a Magnetic Flux Rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Song, Tengfei; Tian, Zhanjun

    2018-01-01

    Using high temporal and high spatial resolution observations taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present a detailed observational analysis of a high-quality quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic wave that was associated with the eruption of a magnetic flux rope and a GOES C5.0 flare. For the first time, we find that the QFP wave lasted for the entire flare lifetime rather than only during the rising phase of the accompanying flare, as reported in previous studies. In addition, the propagation of the different parts of the wave train showed different kinematics and morphologies. For the southern (northern) part, the speed, duration, and intensity variation are about 875 ± 29 (1485 ± 233) km s‑1, 45 (60) minutes, and 4% (2%), and their pronounced periods are 106 ± 12 and 160 ± 18 (75 ± 10 and 120 ± 16) s, respectively. It is interesting that the northern part of the wave train showed an obvious refraction effect when it passed through a region of strong magnetic field. The result of a periodicity analysis indicates that all of the periods of the QFP wave can be found in the period spectrum of the accompanying flare, suggesting their common physical origin. We propose that the quasi-periodic nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics process in the magnetic reconnection that produces the accompanying flare should be important in exciting a QFP wave, and the different magnetic distributions along different paths can account for the different speeds and morphology evolution of the wave fronts.

  20. CHEMO-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atis, S.; Saha, S.; Auradou, H.; Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Talon, L.; Salin, D.

    2012-09-01

    Autocatalytic reaction fronts between two reacting species in the absence of fluid flow, propagate as solitary waves. The coupling between autocatalytic reaction front and forced simple hydrodynamic flows leads to stationary fronts whose velocity and shape depend on the underlying flow field. We address the issue of the chemico-hydrodynamic coupling between forced advection in porous media and self-sustained chemical waves. Towards that purpose, we perform experiments over a wide range of flow velocities with the well characterized iodate arsenious acid and chlorite-tetrathionate autocatalytic reactions in transparent packed beads porous media. The characteristics of these porous media such as their porosity, tortuosity, and hydrodynamics dispersion are determined. In a pack of beads, the characteristic pore size and the velocity field correlation length are of the order of the bead size. In order to address these two length scales separately, we perform lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations in a stochastic porous medium, which takes into account the log-normal permeability distribution and the spatial correlation of the permeability field. In both experiments and numerical simulations, we observe stationary fronts propagating at a constant velocity with an almost constant front width. Experiments without flow in packed bead porous media with different bead sizes show that the front propagation depends on the tortuous nature of diffusion in the pore space. We observe microscopic effects when the pores are of the size of the chemical front width. We address both supportive co-current and adverse flows with respect to the direction of propagation of the chemical reaction. For supportive flows, experiments and simulations allow observation of two flow regimes. For adverse flow, we observe upstream and downstream front motion as well as static front behaviors over a wide range of flow rates. In order to understand better these observed static state fronts, flow

  1. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  2. Future Evolution of Marine Heat Waves in the Mediterranean: Coupled Regional Climate Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmaraki, Sofia; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence; Nabat, Pierre; Cavicchia, Leone; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Cabos, William; Sein, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    FUTURE EVOLUTION OF MARINE HEAT WAVES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN : COUPLED REGIONAL CLIMATE PROJECTIONS The Mediterranean area is identified as a « Hot Spot » region, vulnerable to future climate change with potentially strong impacts over the sea. By 2100, climate models predict increased warming over the sea surface, with possible implications on the Mediterranean thermohaline and surface circulation,associated also with severe impacts on the ecosystems (e.g. fish habitat loss, species extinction and migration, invasive species). However, a robust assesment of the future evolution of the extreme marine temperatures remains still an open issue of primary importance, under the anthropogenic pressure. In this context, we study here the probability and characteristics of marine heat wave (MHW) occurrence in the Mediterranean Sea in future climate projections. To this end, we use an ensemble of fully coupled regional climate system models (RCSM) from the Med- CORDEX initiative. This multi-model approach includes a high-resolution representation of the atmospheric, land and ocean component, with a free air-sea interface.Specifically, dedicated simulations for the 20th and the 21st century are carried out with respect to the different IPCC-AR5 socioeconomic scenarios (1950-2100, RCP8.5, RCP4.5, RCP2.6). Model evaluation for the historical period is performed using satellite and in situ data. Then, the variety of factors that can cause the MHW (e.g. direct radiative forcing, ocean advection, stratification change) are examined to disentangle the dominant driving force. Finally, the spatial variability and temporal evolution of MHW are analyzed on an annual basis, along with additional integrated indicators, useful for marine ecosystems.

  3. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period. Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (−3.2 mmHg, p < 0.005 and −2.6 mmHg, p < 0.0001; respectively and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p < 0.0001. Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  4. Latitudinal wave coupling of the stratosphere and mesosphere during the major stratospheric warming in 2003/2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pancheva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of the dynamical regimes in the high- and low-latitude stratosphere and mesosphere during the major SSW in the Arctic winter of 2003/2004 has been studied. The UKMO zonal wind data were used to explore the latitudinal coupling in the stratosphere, while the coupling in the mesosphere was investigated by neutral wind measurements from eleven radars situated at high, high-middle and tropical latitudes. It was found that the inverse relationship between the variability of the zonal mean flows at high- and low-latitude stratosphere related to the SSW is produced by global-scale zonally symmetric waves. Their origin and other main features have been investigated in detail. Similar latitudinal dynamical coupling has been found for the mesosphere as well. Indirect evidence for the presence of zonally symmetric waves in the mesosphere has been found.

  5. A fast pointwise strategy for anisotropic wave-mode separation in TI media

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qiancheng

    2017-08-17

    The multi-component wavefield contains both compressional and shear waves. Separating wave-modes has many applications in seismic workflows. Conventionally, anisotropic wave-mode separation is implemented by either directly filtering in the wavenumber domain or nonstationary filtering in the space domain, which are computationally expensive. These methods could be categorized into the pseudo-derivative family and only work well within Finite Difference (FD) methods. In this paper, we establish a relationship between group-velocity direction and polarity direction and propose a method, which could go beyond modeling by FD. In particular, we are interested in performing wave-mode separation in a Spectral Element Method (SEM), which is widely used for seismic wave propagation on various scales. The separation is implemented pointwise, independent of its neighbor points, suitable for running in parallel. Moreover, no correction for amplitude and phase changes caused by the derivative operator is required. We have verified our scheme using numerical examples.

  6. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  7. Fully Coupled Three-Dimensional Dynamic Response of a Tension-Leg Platform Floating Wind Turbine in Waves and Wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumari Ramachandran, Gireesh Kumar Vasanta; Bredmose, Henrik; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    , which is a consequence of the wave-induced rotor dynamics. Loads and coupled responses are predicted for a set of load cases with different wave headings. Further, an advanced aero-elastic code, Flex5, is extended for the TLP wind turbine configuration and the response comparison with the simpler model......A dynamic model for a tension-leg platform (TLP) floating offshore wind turbine is proposed. The model includes three-dimensional wind and wave loads and the associated structural response. The total system is formulated using 17 degrees of freedom (DOF), 6 for the platform motions and 11...... for the wind turbine. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic loads have been formulated using a frequency-and direction-dependent spectrum. While wave loads are computed from the wave kinematics using Morison's equation, the aerodynamic loads are modeled by means of unsteady blade-element-momentum (BEM) theory...

  8. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular permalloy dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlotti, G., E-mail: giovanni.carlotti@fisica.unipg.it; Madami, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM), Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Gubbiotti, G.; Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W. [Center for Nano Science and Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present the results of a Brillouin light scattering investigation of thermally excited spin wave eigenmodes in square arrays of either isolated rectangular dots of permalloy or twins of dipolarly coupled elements, placed side-by-side or head-to-tail. The nanodots, fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off, are 20 nm thick and have the major size D in the range between 90 nm and 150 nm. The experimental spectra show the presence of two main peaks, corresponding to modes localized either at the edges or in the center of the dots. Their frequency dependence on the dot size and on the interaction with adjacent elements has been measured and successfully interpreted on the basis of dynamical micromagnetic simulations. The latter enabled us also to describe the spatial profile of the eigenmodes, putting in evidence the effects induced by the dipolar interaction between coupled dots. In particular, in twinned dots the demagnetizing field is appreciably modified in proximity of the “internal edges” if compared to the “external” ones, leading to a splitting of the edge mode. These results can be relevant for the exploitation of sub-150 nm magnetic dots in new applications, such as magnonic metamaterials, bit-patterned storage media, and nano-magnetic logic devices.

  9. Stability analysis of new exact traveling-wave solutions of new coupled KdV and new coupled Zakharov-Kuznetsov systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seadawy, Aly R.; Arshad, M.; Lu, Dianchen

    2017-04-01

    In this article, our aim is to further extend the applications of modified extended direct algebraic method on new coupled systems, which have many important applications in mathematical physics. many exact solutions out of which some are new in different forms such as soliton, solitary wave, periodic, elliptic function solutions of new coupled KdV and new coupled Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) systems are constructed by employing this method. The constructed exact solutions are also presented graphically. The modulation instability is utilized to discuss the stability of obtained solutions. All solutions are stable and exact solutions. The obtained results show that the modified extended method is general and effective. Furthermore, many other new coupled systems arising in mathematical physics can also be solved by this powerful and effective method.

  10. Fast 3D seismic wave simulations of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy earthquake for visual communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Casarotti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first application of the fast reacting framework for 3D simulations of seismic wave propagation generated by earthquakes in the Italian region with magnitude Mw 5. The driven motivation is to offer a visualization of the natural phenomenon to the general public but also to provide preliminary modeling to expert and civil protection operators. We report here a description of this framework during the emergency of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy Earthquake, a discussion on the accuracy of the simulation for this seismic event and a preliminary critical analysis of the visualization structure and of the reaction of the public.

  11. Analysis of the Tangjiaxi landslide-generated waves in the Zhexi Reservoir, China, by a granular flow coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bolin; Yin, Yueping; Wang, Shichang; Tan, Jianmin; Liu, Guangning

    2017-05-01

    A rocky granular flow is commonly formed after the failure of rocky bank slopes. An impulse wave disaster may also be initiated if the rocky granular flow rushes into a river with a high velocity. Currently, the granular mass-water body coupling study is an important trend in the field of landslide-induced impulse waves. In this paper, a full coupling numerical model for landslide-induced impulse waves is developed based on a non-coherent granular flow equation, i.e., the Mih equation. In this model, the Mih equation for continuous non-coherent granular flow controls movements of sliding mass, the two-phase flow equation regulates the interaction between sliding mass and water, and the renormalization group (RNG) turbulence model governs the movement of the water body. The proposed model is validated and applied for the 2014 Tangjiaxi landslide of the Zhexi Reservoir located in Hunan Province, China, to analyze the characteristics of both landslide motion and its following impulse waves. On 16 July 2014, a rocky debris flow was formed after the failure of the Tangjiaxi landslide, damming the Tangjiaxi stream and causing an impulse wave disaster with three dead and nine missing bodies. Based on the full coupling numerical analysis, the granular flow impacts the water with a maximum velocity of about 22.5 m s-1. Moreover, the propagation velocity of the generated waves reaches up to 12 m s-1. The maximum calculated run-up of 21.8 m is close enough to the real value of 22.7 m. The predicted landslide final deposit and wave run-up heights are in a good agreement with the field survey data. These facts verify the ability of the proposed model for simulating the real impulse wave generated by rocky granular flow events.

  12. Continuous control of light group velocity from subluminal to superluminal propagation with a standing-wave coupling field in a Rb vapor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In-Ho; Moon, Han Seb

    2011-01-01

    We present the continuous control of the light group velocity from subluminal to superluminal propagation with an on-resonant standing-wave coupling field in the 5S 1/2 -5P 1/2 transition of the Λ-type system of 87 Rb atoms. When a coupling field was changed from a traveling-wave to a standing-wave field by adjusting the power of a counterpropagating coupling field, the probe pulse propagation continuously transformed from subluminal propagation, due to electromagnetically induced transparency with the traveling-wave coupling field, to superluminal propagation, due to narrow enhanced absorption with the standing-wave coupling field. The group velocity of the probe pulse was measured to be approximately 0.004c to -0.002c as a function of the disparity between the powers of the copropagating and the counterpropagating coupling fields.

  13. Isochoric heating and strong blast wave formation driven by fast electrons in solid-density targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. J.; Vauzour, B.; Touati, M.; Gremillet, L.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Ceccotti, T.; Bouillaud, R.; Deneuville, F.; Floquet, V.; Fourment, C.; Hadj-Bachir, M.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, Ph; d'Oliveira, P.; Reau, F.; Samaké, A.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally investigate the fast (metallic foils and subsequent high-pressure hydrodynamics induced by energetic electrons driven by high-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses. The early-time temperature profile inside the target is measured from the streaked optical pyrometry of the target rear side. This is further characterized from benchmarked simulations of the laser-target interaction and the fast electron transport. Despite a modest laser energy (laser-based platform dedicated to high-energy-density physics studies.

  14. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  15. Generalization of Ryan's theorem: Probing tidal coupling with gravitational waves from nearly circular, nearly equatorial, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chao; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    Extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) and intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) - binaries in which a stellar-mass object spirals into a massive black hole or other massive, compact body - are important sources of gravitational waves for LISA and LIGO, respectively. Thorne has speculated that the waves from EMRIs and IMRIs encode, in principle, all the details of (i) the central body's spacetime geometry (metric), (ii) the tidal coupling (energy and angular momentum exchange) between the central body and orbiting object, and (iii) the evolving orbital elements. Fintan Ryan has given a first partial proof that this speculation is correct: Restricting himself to nearly circular, nearly equatorial orbits and ignoring tidal coupling, Ryan proved that the central body's metric is encoded in the waves. In this paper we generalize Ryan's theorem. Retaining Ryan's restriction to nearly circular and nearly equatorial orbits, and dropping the assumption of no tidal coupling, we prove that Thorne's conjecture is nearly fully correct: the waves encode not only the central body's metric but also the evolving orbital elements and (in a sense slightly different from Thorne's conjecture) the evolving tidal coupling.

  16. Fast and high-fidelity entangling gate through parametrically modulated longitudinal coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Royer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate an approach to universal quantum computation based on the modulation of longitudinal qubit-oscillator coupling. We show how to realize a controlled-phase gate by simultaneously modulating the longitudinal coupling of two qubits to a common oscillator mode. In contrast to the more familiar transversal qubit-oscillator coupling, the magnitude of the effective qubit-qubit interaction does not rely on a small perturbative parameter. As a result, this effective interaction strength can be made large, leading to short gate times and high gate fidelities. We moreover show how the gate infidelity can be exponentially suppressed with squeezing and how the entangling gate can be generalized to qubits coupled to separate oscillators. Our proposal can be realized in multiple physical platforms for quantum computing, including superconducting and spin qubits.

  17. Numerical study of the wave-induced slamming force on the elastic plate based on MPS-FEM coupled method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Cheng-ping; Wan, De-cheng

    2018-02-01

    Slamming is the phenomenon of structure impacting the water surface. It always results in the extremely high load on the structure. This paper is mainly concerned with the slamming force caused by the wave-plate interaction. In this paper, the process of solitary wave impacting onto the horizontal plate is simulated with the help of the moving particle semi-implicit and finite element coupled method (MPS-FEM). The MPS method is adopted to calculate the fluid domain while the structural domain is solved by FEM method. In the first series of simulations, the profiles of the solitary waves with various amplitudes, which are generated in the numerical wave tank, are compared with the theoretical results. Thereafter the interaction between the solitary waves and a rigid plate is simulated. The effects of wave amplitude, as well as the elevation of the plate above the initial water level, on the slamming force are numerically investigated. The calculated results are compared with the available experimental data. Finally, the interactions between the solitary waves and the elastic plate are also simulated. The effects of the structural flexibility on the wave-induced force are analyzed by the comparison between the cases with elastic and the rigid plate.

  18. Dispersion spectrum of acoustoelectric waves in 1D piezoelectric crystal coupled with 2D infinite network of capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsenko, A. A.; Shuvalov, A. L.; Poncelet, O.

    2018-01-01

    A one-dimensional piezoelectric crystal coupled through periodically embedded electrodes with a two-dimensional semi-infinite periodic network of capacitors is considered. The unit cell of the network contains two capacitors with capacitances C1 and C2 which are in parallel and in series, respectively, with the electrodes. The dispersion spectrum of the longitudinal acoustoelectric wave in the piezoelectric crystal coupled with the electric wave of potentials and charges in the network of capacitors is investigated. It is shown that when C1 and C2 are of the same sign, the dispersion spectrum consists of a discrete set of curves, for which the electric wave exponentially decays into the depth of the network of capacitors. In contrast, if C1 and C2 are of the opposite sign and |C1/C2|capacitors.

  19. Localization and oscillations of Majorana fermions in a two-dimensional electron gas coupled with d -wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, L.; Varona, S.; Viyuela, O.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    We study the localization and oscillation properties of the Majorana fermions that arise in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a Zeeman field coupled with a d -wave superconductor. Despite the angular dependence of the d -wave pairing, localization and oscillation properties are found to be similar to the ones seen in conventional s -wave superconductors. In addition, we study a microscopic lattice version of the previous system that can be characterized by a topological invariant. We derive its real space representation that involves nearest and next-to-nearest-neighbors pairing. Finally, we show that the emerging chiral Majorana fermions are indeed robust against static disorder. This analysis has potential applications to quantum simulations and experiments in high-Tc superconductors.

  20. Event Handler II: a fast, programmable, CAMAC-coupled data acquisition interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    The architecture of the Event Handler II, a fast, programmable data acquisition interface linked to and through CAMAC is described. The special features of this interface make it a powerful tool in implementing data acquisition systems for experiments in nuclear physics. 1 figure, 1 table

  1. Development of a Fast Fluid-Structure Coupling Technique for Wind Turbine Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos García, Néstor; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    used in the aero-elastic code FLEX5. The new code, MIRASFLEX, in general shows good agreement with the standard aero-elastic codes FLEX5 and FAST for various test cases. The structural model in MIRAS-FLEX acts to reduce the aerodynamic load computed by MIRAS, particularly near the tip and at high wind...

  2. Event Handler: a fast programmable, CAMAC-coupled data acquisition interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the architecture and performance of the Event Handler, a fast, programmable data acquisition interface which is linked to and through CAMAC. The special features of this interface make it a powerful tool in implementing data acquisition systems for experiments in nuclear physics

  3. Estimation of oceanic subsurface mixing under a severe cyclonic storm using a coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Kumar Ravi; Nigam, Tanuja; Pant, Vimlesh

    2018-04-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model was used to examine mixing in the upper-oceanic layers under the influence of a very severe cyclonic storm Phailin over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during 10-14 October 2013. The coupled model was found to improve the sea surface temperature over the uncoupled model. Model simulations highlight the prominent role of cyclone-induced near-inertial oscillations in subsurface mixing up to the thermocline depth. The inertial mixing introduced by the cyclone played a central role in the deepening of the thermocline and mixed layer depth by 40 and 15 m, respectively. For the first time over the BoB, a detailed analysis of inertial oscillation kinetic energy generation, propagation, and dissipation was carried out using an atmosphere-ocean-wave coupled model during a cyclone. A quantitative estimate of kinetic energy in the oceanic water column, its propagation, and its dissipation mechanisms were explained using the coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model. The large shear generated by the inertial oscillations was found to overcome the stratification and initiate mixing at the base of the mixed layer. Greater mixing was found at the depths where the eddy kinetic diffusivity was large. The baroclinic current, holding a larger fraction of kinetic energy than the barotropic current, weakened rapidly after the passage of the cyclone. The shear induced by inertial oscillations was found to decrease rapidly with increasing depth below the thermocline. The dampening of the mixing process below the thermocline was explained through the enhanced dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy upon approaching the thermocline layer. The wave-current interaction and nonlinear wave-wave interaction were found to affect the process of downward mixing and cause the dissipation of inertial oscillations.

  4. Sand waves in environmental flows: Insights gained by coupling large-eddy simulation with morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Khosronejad, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Sand waves arise in subaqueous and Aeolian environments as the result of the complex interaction between turbulent flows and mobile sand beds. They occur across a wide range of spatial scales, evolve at temporal scales much slower than the integral scale of the transporting turbulent flow, dominate river morphodynamics, undermine streambank stability and infrastructure during flooding, and sculpt terrestrial and extraterrestrial landscapes. In this paper, we present the vision for our work over the last ten years, which has sought to develop computational tools capable of simulating the coupled interactions of sand waves with turbulence across the broad range of relevant scales: from small-scale ripples in laboratory flumes to mega-dunes in large rivers. We review the computational advances that have enabled us to simulate the genesis and long-term evolution of arbitrarily large and complex sand dunes in turbulent flows using large-eddy simulation and summarize numerous novel physical insights derived from our simulations. Our findings explain the role of turbulent sweeps in the near-bed region as the primary mechanism for destabilizing the sand bed, show that the seeds of the emergent structure in dune fields lie in the heterogeneity of the turbulence and bed shear stress fluctuations over the initially flatbed, and elucidate how large dunes at equilibrium give rise to energetic coherent structures and modify the spectra of turbulence. We also discuss future challenges and our vision for advancing a data-driven simulation-based engineering science approach for site-specific simulations of river flooding.

  5. Application of Coupled-Wave Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin Approximation to Ground Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Prokopovich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with bistatic subsurface probing of a horizontally layered dielectric half-space by means of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves. In particular, the main objective of this work is to present a new method for the solution of the two-dimensional back-scattering problem arising when a pulsed electromagnetic signal impinges on a non-uniform dielectric half-space; this scenario is of interest for ground penetrating radar (GPR applications. For the analytical description of the signal generated by the interaction of the emitted pulse with the environment, we developed and implemented a novel time-domain version of the coupled-wave Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. We compared our solution with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD results, achieving a very good agreement. We then applied the proposed technique to two case studies: in particular, our method was employed for the post-processing of experimental radargrams collected on Lake Chebarkul, in Russia, and for the simulation of GPR probing of the Moon surface, to detect smooth gradients of the dielectric permittivity in lunar regolith. The main conclusions resulting from our study are that our semi-analytical method is accurate, radically accelerates calculations compared to simpler mathematical formulations with a mostly numerical nature (such as the FDTD technique, and can be effectively used to aid the interpretation of GPR data. The method is capable to correctly predict the protracted return signals originated by smooth transition layers of the subsurface dielectric medium. The accuracy and numerical efficiency of our computational approach make promising its further development.

  6. Three wave coupling and explosive instability of magneto-elastic excitations in FeBO3 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevstafyev, O.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Pernod, P.; Berzhansky, V.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric generation of coupled triads of magneto-elastic waves is studied experimentally in FeBO 3 single crystal under transversal electromagnetic pumping at the temperature range 77-293 K. The explosive supercritical dynamics of three wave coupling is observed when the pumping phase is modulated according to the nonlinear frequency shift of an excited magnetoelastic mode. The experimental results are in agreement with strongly nonlinear model of magneto-elastic excitations in antiferromagnets with 'easy plane' magnetic anisotropy. - Research highlights: → Parametric excitation of coupled magneto-elastic triads in FeBO 3 under EM pumping. → Quasi-singular pumping phase modulation to compensate nonlinear frequency shift. → Observation of explosive instability at the temperature range 77-293 K. → Supercritical triads excitation strongly nonlinear model of magneto-elastic dynamics.

  7. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  8. Atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves over Indian Ocean: initiation, propagation and interactions with the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz; Flatau, Maria; Flatau, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) propagate eastward in the equatorial belt and represent one of key modes of the intraseasonal variability in the topical atmosphere. CCKWs with other waves are building blocks of the Madden-Julian Oscillations (MJO), but their activity is not limited to the MJO itself. In this study, we utilize Lagrangian analysis, which allows tracking individual CCKW events. Such an approach enables identification of initiation and decay of convective events as well as analysis of environmental conditions throughout the lifetime of a CCKW. Analysis of 15-year-long global record of CCKW activity, derived from TRMM satellite data, shows that Indian Ocean basin is characterized by globally largest activity of CCKWs and that about 40% of events active in that region are sequential waves, which propagate in close proximity to each other. Analysis of environmental conditions identifies air-sea interaction, primarily development of the diurnal warm layers, to be an important contributor to the initiation of CCKW events over Indian Ocean basin. CCKWs events, which initiation over the same area within a few days of each other are proceeded by abnormally high diurnal SST due to warm layer development. Propagation of a CCKW across the Indian Ocean is characterized by coherent variability in air-sea fluxes: increase of wind speed and latent heat flux, and suppression of diurnal warm layer development, decrease in SST and lower tropospheric temperature and humidity. This typical variability last for about 5 days, after which time most of variables relax to their climatological levels. However, SST and lower tropospheric humidity rectify into longer, intraseasonal time scale. Magnitude of this variability increases monotonically across the Indian Ocean as CCKWs propagate eastward and achieves maximum west of the coast of Sumatra. The Maritime Continent (MC), which bounds Indian Ocean from the east, is a net sink of CCKW activity, which

  9. Conceptual study of an ICRH traveling-wave antenna system for low-coupling conditions as expected in DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, R.; Messiaen, A.

    2016-07-01

    For the central heating of a fusion reactor ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRH) is the first choice method as it is able to couple RF power to the ions without density limit. The drawback of this heating method is the problem of excitation of the magneto-sonic wave through the plasma boundary layer from the antenna located along the wall, without exceeding its voltage standoff. The amount of coupling depends on the antenna excitation and the surface admittance at the antenna output due to the plasma profile. The paper deals with the optimization of the antenna excitation by the use of sections of traveling-wave antennas (TWAs) distributed all along the reactor wall between the blanket modules. They are mounted and fed in resonant ring system(s). First, the physics of the coupling of a strap array is studied by simple models and the coupling code ANTITER II. Then, after the study of the basic properties of a TWA section, its feeding problem is solved by hybrids driving them in resonant ring circuit(s). The complete modeling is obtained from the matrices of the TWA sections connected to one of the feeding hybrid(s). The solution is iterated with the coupling code to determine the loading for a reference low-coupling ITER plasma profile. The resulting wave pattern up to the plasma bulk is derived. The proposed system is totally load resilient and allows us to obtain a very selective exciting wave spectrum. A discussion of some practical implementation problems is added.

  10. Fast calcium wave propagation mediated by electrically conducted excitation and boosted by CICR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, J.M.A.M.; Meerwijk, W.P. van; Ypey, D.L.; Theuvenet, A.P.R.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated synchronization and propagation of calcium oscillations, mediated by gap junctional excitation transmission. For that purpose we used an experimentally based model of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, electrically coupled in a one-dimensional configuration (linear strand).

  11. Conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and fast magnetosonic waves at a plasma density cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    Analytic expressions are presented for conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and magnetosonic waves by scattering off a small scale density cavity. The governing equations are solved in slab geometry with wave vectors perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the density gradient associated with density cavity using a scale length separation method. The theory predicts strong excitation of localized lower hybrid oscillations for a set of frequencies between the lower hybrid frequency of the ambient plasma and the minimum lower hybrid frequency inside the cavity. The theory is relevant for the lower hybrid solitary structures observed in space plasmas

  12. Hyphenation of ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for fast analysis of bromine containing preservatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendahl, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2006-01-01

    Ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) was coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for fast analysis of three bromine-containing preservatives, monitoring the 79Br and 81Br isotopes simultaneously. Due to the efficiency of the 1.7 microm column packing material, t...

  13. Excitation of Alfvén waves by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, with application to FAST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kolesnikova

    Full Text Available During the operation of the EISCAT high power facility (heater at Tromsø, Norway, on 8 October 1998, the FAST spacecraft made electric field and particle observations in the inner magnetosphere at 0.39 Earth radii above the heated ionospheric region. Measurements of the direct current electric field clearly exhibit oscillations with a frequency close to the modulated frequency of heater ( ~ 3 Hz and an amplitude of ~ 2 - 5 mV m-1. Thermal electron data from the electrostatic analyser show the modulation at the same frequency of the downward electron fluxes. During this period the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar, sited also at Tromsø, measured a significant enhancement of the electron density in E-layer up to 2 · 1012 m-3. These observations have prompted us to make quantitative estimates of the expected pulsations in the inner magnetosphere caused by the modulated HF heating of lower ionosphere. Under the conditions of the strong electron precipitation in the ionosphere, which took place during the FAST observations, the primary current caused by the perturbation of the conductivity in the heated region is closed entirely by the parallel current which leaks into the magnetosphere. In such circumstances the conditions at the ionosphere-magnetosphere boundary are most favourable for the launching of an Alfvén wave: it is launched from the node in the gradient of the scalar potential which is proportional to the parallel current. The parallel electric field of the Alfvén wave is significant in the region where the electron inertial length is of order of the transverse wavelength of the Alfvén wave or larger and may effectively accelerate superthermal electrons downward into the ionosphere.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; ionosphere – magnetosphere interactions; particle acceleration

  14. Excitation of Alfvén waves by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, with application to FAST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kolesnikova

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available During the operation of the EISCAT high power facility (heater at Tromsø, Norway, on 8 October 1998, the FAST spacecraft made electric field and particle observations in the inner magnetosphere at 0.39 Earth radii above the heated ionospheric region. Measurements of the direct current electric field clearly exhibit oscillations with a frequency close to the modulated frequency of heater ( ~ 3 Hz and an amplitude of ~ 2 - 5 mV m-1. Thermal electron data from the electrostatic analyser show the modulation at the same frequency of the downward electron fluxes. During this period the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar, sited also at Tromsø, measured a significant enhancement of the electron density in E-layer up to 2 · 1012 m-3. These observations have prompted us to make quantitative estimates of the expected pulsations in the inner magnetosphere caused by the modulated HF heating of lower ionosphere. Under the conditions of the strong electron precipitation in the ionosphere, which took place during the FAST observations, the primary current caused by the perturbation of the conductivity in the heated region is closed entirely by the parallel current which leaks into the magnetosphere. In such circumstances the conditions at the ionosphere-magnetosphere boundary are most favourable for the launching of an Alfvén wave: it is launched from the node in the gradient of the scalar potential which is proportional to the parallel current. The parallel electric field of the Alfvén wave is significant in the region where the electron inertial length is of order of the transverse wavelength of the Alfvén wave or larger and may effectively accelerate superthermal electrons downward into the ionosphere.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; ionosphere – magnetosphere interactions; particle acceleration

  15. Modeling guided wave excitation in plates with surface mounted piezoelectric elements: coupled physics and normal mode expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    Guided waves have been extensively studied and widely used for structural health monitoring because of their large volumetric coverage and good sensitivity to defects. Effectively and preferentially exciting a desired wave mode having good sensitivity to a certain defect is of great practical importance. Piezoelectric discs and plates are the most common types of surface-mounted transducers for guided wave excitation and reception. Their geometry strongly influences the proportioning between excited modes as well as the total power of the excited modes. It is highly desirable to predominantly excite the selected mode while the total transduction power is maximized. In this work, a fully coupled multi-physics finite element analysis, which incorporates the driving circuit, the piezoelectric element and the wave guide, is combined with the normal mode expansion method to study both the mode tuning and total wave power. The excitation of circular crested waves in an aluminum plate with circular piezoelectric discs is numerically studied for different disc and adhesive thicknesses. Additionally, the excitation of plane waves in an aluminum plate, using a stripe piezoelectric element is studied both numerically and experimentally. It is difficult to achieve predominant single mode excitation as well as maximum power transmission simultaneously, especially for higher order modes. However, guidelines for designing the geometry of piezoelectric elements for optimal mode excitation are recommended.

  16. Determination of the pion-nucleon coupling constant and s-wave scattering lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Samaranayake, V K

    1972-01-01

    Presently available values of D/sub +or-/, the real parts of the pi /sup +or-/p elastic scattering amplitudes in the forward direction in the laboratory frame, obtained by extrapolation of experimental data to the forward direction, have been fitted up to a pion lab. kinetic energy of 2 GeV using forward dispersion relation. A substantial number of data points have to be discarded to obtain a reasonable goodness of fit. Above 300 MeV the values of D/sub +or-/ obtained from the CERN phase shift analysis are strongly favoured compared with those from the Saclay analysis. The final results for the pion-nucleon coupling constant and s-wave scattering lengths are: 10/sup 3/f/sup 2 /=76.3+or-2.0, 10/sup 3/D/sub +/( mu )=-102.4+or-5.2, 10/sup 3/D/sub - /( mu )=104.8+or-5.4, 10/sup 3/(a/sub 1/-a/sub 3/)=270.6+or-11.3, 10 /sup 3/(a/sub 1/+2a/sub 3/)=3.1+or-8.0. The errors quoted take account of experimental uncertainties and also attempt to include systematic errors arising from the unphysical continuum and from the v...

  17. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...

  18. Bloch Surface Waves for MoS2 Emission Coupling and Polariton Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lerario

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their extraordinary quality factor and extreme sensitivity to surface perturbations, Bloch surface waves (BSW have been widely investigated for sensing applications so far. Over the last few years, on-chip control of optical signals through BSW has experienced a rapidly-expanding interest in the scientific community, attesting to BSW’s position at the forefront towards on-chip optical operations. The backbone of on-chip optical devices requires the choice of integrated optical sources with peculiar optic/optoelectronic properties, the efficient in-plane propagation of the optical signal and the possibility to dynamic manipulate the signal through optical or electrical driving. In this paper, we discuss our approach in addressing these requirements. Regarding the optical source integration, we demonstrate the possibility to couple the MoS2 mono- and bi-layers emission—when integrated on top of a 1D photonic crystal—to a BSW. Afterward, we review our results on BSW-based polariton systems (BSWP. We show that the BSWPs combine long-range propagation with energy tuning of their dispersion through polariton–polariton interactions, paving the way for logic operations.

  19. Optical characterization of iridescent wings of butterflies using multilayer rigorous coupled wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guanglan; Cao, Yanbo; Shi, Tielin; Zuo, Haibo; Peng, Ping; Tang, Zirong

    2008-12-01

    In certain species of moths and butterflies iridescent colors arise from sub-wavelength diffractive surface corrugation of the wing-scales. The optical properties of such structures depend strongly on the wavelength, the incidence angle, the polarization of illuminating radiation, and the index of ambient medium. In this paper, after getting the SEM picture of the dorsal scales of the Morpho didius butterfly, we construct a bionic two dimension model, whose ridge contains a certain quasi-periodic arrangement of tree-like sub-wavelength microstructures. Then using a multilayer rigorous coupled wave analysis method in two dimensions, we study the reflection spectra of the wings of Morpho didius butterfly by simulating the multilayer model of a transverse cross-section comprised of the ground scale. Here we assume that the structure is made of a slightly lossy dielectric material and analyzed the polarization, the incidence angle and the index of ambient medium which affect the reflection spectra strongly. The results got, have revealed the natural phenomenon of iridescent colors and color-changed in essence, and the simulation results enable an artificial microsensor which discriminate vapor or component by reflective efficiency spectra.

  20. Estimation of the convergence order of rigorous coupled-wave analysis for OCD metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Liu, Shiyuan; Chen, Xiuguo; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2011-12-01

    In most cases of optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology, when applying rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) to optical modeling, a high order of Fourier harmonics is usually set up to guarantee the convergence of the final results. However, the total number of floating point operations grows dramatically as the truncation order increases. Therefore, it is critical to choose an appropriate order to obtain high computational efficiency without losing much accuracy in the meantime. In this paper, the convergence order associated with the structural and optical parameters has been estimated through simulation. The results indicate that the convergence order is linear with the period of the sample when fixing the other parameters, both for planar diffraction and conical diffraction. The illuminated wavelength also affects the convergence of a final result. With further investigations concentrated on the ratio of illuminated wavelength to period, it is discovered that the convergence order decreases with the growth of the ratio, and when the ratio is fixed, convergence order jumps slightly, especially in a specific range of wavelength. This characteristic could be applied to estimate the optimum convergence order of given samples to obtain high computational efficiency.

  1. Influence of Bow-Wave Breaking on the Added Resistance of Fast Ships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, B.

    2018-01-01

    The publication of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has recently stimulated the accurate assessment of actual sea performance of ships, which is evaluated as added resistance in waves. However, a satisfactory consensus on the evaluation

  2. Structured mass density slab as a waveguide of fast magnetoacoustic waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2015), s. 51-58 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /13./. Hvar, 22.09.2014-26.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : magnetohydrodynamics * flares * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  3. Lamb waves based fast subwavelength imaging using a DORT-MUSIC algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-02-01

    A Lamb wave-based, subwavelength imaging algorithm is developed for damage imaging in large-scale, plate-like structures based on a decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method combined with the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm in the space-frequency domain. In this study, a rapid, hybrid non-contact scanning system was proposed to image an aluminum plate using a piezoelectric linear array for actuation and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) line-scan for sensing. The physics of wave propagation, reflection, and scattering that underlies the response matrix in the DORT method is mathematically formulated in the context of guided waves. The singular value decomposition (SVD) and MUSIC-based imaging condition enable quantifying the damage severity by a `reflectivity' parameter and super-resolution imaging. With the flexibility of this scanning system, a considerably large area can be imaged using lower frequency Lamb waves with limited line-scans. The experimental results showed that the hardware system with a signal processing tool such as the DORT-MUSIC (TR-MUSIC) imaging technique can provide rapid, highly accurate imaging results as well as damage quantification with unknown material properties.

  4. Fast, greener and scalable direct coupling of organolithium compounds with no additional solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinxterhuis, Erik B.; Giannerini, Massimo; Hornillos, Valentin; Feringa, Ben L.

    Although the use of catalytic rather than stoichiometric amounts of metal mediator in cross-coupling reactions between organic halides and organometallic counterparts improves significantly the atom economy and waste production, the use of solvents and stoichiometric generation of main-group

  5. Fast-neutron and gamma-ray imaging with a capillary liquid xenon converter coupled to a gaseous photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, I.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Vartsky, D.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Caspi, E. N.; Breskin, A.

    2017-09-01

    Gamma-ray and fast-neutron imaging was performed with a novel liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation detector read out by a Gaseous Photomultiplier (GPM). The 100 mm diameter detector prototype comprised a capillary-filled LXe converter/scintillator, coupled to a triple-THGEM imaging-GPM, with its first electrode coated by a CsI UV-photocathode, operated in Ne/5%CH4 at cryogenic temperatures. Radiation localization in 2D was derived from scintillation-induced photoelectron avalanches, measured on the GPM's segmented anode. The localization properties of 60Co gamma-rays and a mixed fast-neutron/gamma-ray field from an AmBe neutron source were derived from irradiation of a Pb edge absorber. Spatial resolutions of 12± 2 mm and 10± 2 mm (FWHM) were reached with 60Co and AmBe sources, respectively. The experimental results are in good agreement with GEANT4 simulations. The calculated ultimate expected resolutions for our application-relevant 4.4 and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and 1-15 MeV neutrons are 2-4 mm and ~ 2 mm (FWHM), respectively. These results indicate the potential applicability of the new detector concept to Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR) and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography (DDEGR) of large objects.

  6. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashino, Katsuya, E-mail: hashino@jodo.sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kakizaki, Mitsuru, E-mail: kakizaki@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kanemura, Shinya, E-mail: kanemu@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Ko, Pyungwon, E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Matsui, Toshinori, E-mail: matsui@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-10

    We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  7. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Hashino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  8. Effect of phase coupling on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Nonlinear features of wind generated surface waves are considered here to be caused by nonrandomness (non-Uniform) in the phase spectrum. Nonrandomness in recorded waves, if present, would be generally obscured within the error level of observations...

  9. Hybrid finite-element/rigorous coupled wave analysis for scattering from three-dimensional doubly periodic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuloglu, Mustafa; Lee, Robert

    2012-07-01

    A new hybrid finite-element/rigorous coupled wave analysis formulation is presented for the modeling of electromagnetic wave interactions with doubly periodic structures. The structures under investigation are periodic in two dimensions and have a finite extent in the third dimension. The proposed model can handle structures that have material properties varying arbitrarily in any of the dimensions within the unit cell. Employment of Fourier series expansion and Floquet's theory in one of the periodic dimensions helps to reduce the dimension of the mesh. Results obtained from alternative methods are used to verify the proposed method's validity.

  10. Stochastic process of pragmatic information for 2D spiral wave turbulence in globally and locally coupled Alief-Panfilov oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Jun; Miyata, Hajime; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Recently, complex dynamics of globally coupled oscillators have been attracting many researcher's attentions. In spite of their numerous studies, their features of nonlinear oscillator systems with global and local couplings in two-dimension (2D) are not understood fully. The paper focuses on 2D states of coherent, clustered and chaotic oscillation especially under the effect of negative global coupling (NGC) in 2D Alief-Panfilov model. It is found that the tuning NGC can cause various new coupling-parameter dependency on the features of oscillations. Then quantitative characterization of various states of oscillations (so called spiral wave turbulence) is examined by using the pragmatic information (PI) which have been utilized in analyzing multimode laser, solar activity and neuronal systems. It is demonstrated that the dynamics of the PI for various oscillations can be characterized successfully by the Hyper-Gamma stochastic process.

  11. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  12. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  13. Fast, Statistical Model of Surface Roughness for Ion-Solid Interaction Simulations and Efficient Code Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobny, Jon; Curreli, Davide; Ruzic, David; Lasa, Ane; Green, David; Canik, John; Younkin, Tim; Blondel, Sophie; Wirth, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Surface roughness greatly impacts material erosion, and thus plays an important role in Plasma-Surface Interactions. Developing strategies for efficiently introducing rough surfaces into ion-solid interaction codes will be an important step towards whole-device modeling of plasma devices and future fusion reactors such as ITER. Fractal TRIDYN (F-TRIDYN) is an upgraded version of the Monte Carlo, BCA program TRIDYN developed for this purpose that includes an explicit fractal model of surface roughness and extended input and output options for file-based code coupling. Code coupling with both plasma and material codes has been achieved and allows for multi-scale, whole-device modeling of plasma experiments. These code coupling results will be presented. F-TRIDYN has been further upgraded with an alternative, statistical model of surface roughness. The statistical model is significantly faster than and compares favorably to the fractal model. Additionally, the statistical model compares well to alternative computational surface roughness models and experiments. Theoretical links between the fractal and statistical models are made, and further connections to experimental measurements of surface roughness are explored. This work was supported by the PSI-SciDAC Project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through contract DOE-DE-SC0008658.

  14. Fast acceleration of 2D wave propagation simulations using modern computational accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Lifan; Cavazos, John; Huang, Howie H; Kay, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than 150x speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least 200x faster than the sequential implementation and 30x faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of 120x with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other computational models of

  15. Fast acceleration of 2D wave propagation simulations using modern computational accelerators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Recent developments in modern computational accelerators like Graphics Processing Units (GPUs and coprocessors provide great opportunities for making scientific applications run faster than ever before. However, efficient parallelization of scientific code using new programming tools like CUDA requires a high level of expertise that is not available to many scientists. This, plus the fact that parallelized code is usually not portable to different architectures, creates major challenges for exploiting the full capabilities of modern computational accelerators. In this work, we sought to overcome these challenges by studying how to achieve both automated parallelization using OpenACC and enhanced portability using OpenCL. We applied our parallelization schemes using GPUs as well as Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC coprocessor to reduce the run time of wave propagation simulations. We used a well-established 2D cardiac action potential model as a specific case-study. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to study auto-parallelization of 2D cardiac wave propagation simulations using OpenACC. Our results identify several approaches that provide substantial speedups. The OpenACC-generated GPU code achieved more than 150x speedup above the sequential implementation and required the addition of only a few OpenACC pragmas to the code. An OpenCL implementation provided speedups on GPUs of at least 200x faster than the sequential implementation and 30x faster than a parallelized OpenMP implementation. An implementation of OpenMP on Intel MIC coprocessor provided speedups of 120x with only a few code changes to the sequential implementation. We highlight that OpenACC provides an automatic, efficient, and portable approach to achieve parallelization of 2D cardiac wave simulations on GPUs. Our approach of using OpenACC, OpenCL, and OpenMP to parallelize this particular model on modern computational accelerators should be applicable to other

  16. Nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, V.I.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves coupled to fast magnetosonic waves is investigated in two spatial dimensions by numerical simulations. The long time evolution of the modulational instability shows a quasirecurrent behavior with a slow spreading...... of the energy, originally confined to the lowest wave numbers, to larger and larger wave numbers resulting in an apparently chaotic or random wave field. © 1990 The American Physical Society...

  17. Optimized Plane Wave Imaging for Fast and High-Quality Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for optimizing parameters affecting the image quality in plane wave imaging. More specifically, the number of emissions and steering angles is optimized to attain the best images with the highest frame rate possible. The method is applied to a specific problem, where...... image quality for a λ-pitch transducer is compared with a λ/2-pitch transducer. Grating lobe artifacts for λ-pitch transducers degrade the contrast in plane wave images, and the impact on frame rate is studied. Field II simulations of plane wave images are made for all combinations of the parameters...... at 9 mm (24λ). Using a λ/2-pitch transducer and only 21 emissions within the same angle range, the image quality is improved in terms of contrast, which is −37 dB. For imaging in regions deeper than 25 mm (66λ), only 21 emissions are optimal for both the transducers, resulting in a −36 dB contrast...

  18. Fast Acceleration of ``Killer'' Electrons and Energetic Ions by Interplanetary Shock Stimulated ULF Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons and ions in the Van Allen radiation belt are the number one space weather threat. How the energetic particles are accelerated in the Van Allen radiation belts is one of major problems in the space physics. Very Low Frequency (VLF) wave-particle interaction has been considered as one of primary electron acceleration mechanisms because electron cyclotron resonances can easily occur in the VLF frequency range. However, recently, by using four Cluster spacecraft observations, we have found that after interplanetary shocks impact on the Earth’s magnetosphere, the acceleration of the energetic electrons in the radiation belt started nearly immediately and lasted for a few hours. The time scale (a few days) for traditional acceleration mechanism of VLF wave-particle interaction, as proposed by Horne et al. [1], to accelerate electrons to relativistic energies is too long to explain the observations. It is further found that interplanetary shocks or solar wind pressure pulses with even small dynamic pressure change can play a non-negligible role in the radiation belt dynamics. Interplanetary shocks interact with and the Earth’s magnetosphere manifests many fundamental important space physics phenomena including energetic particle acceleration. The mechanism of fast acceleration of energetic electrons in the radiation belt response to interplanetary shock impact contains three contributing parts: (1) the initial adiabatic acceleration due to the strong shock-related magnetic field compression; (2) then followed by the drift-resonant acceleration with poloidal ULF waves excited at different L-shells; and (3) particle acceleration due to fast damping electric fields associated with ULF waves. Particles will have a net acceleration since particles in the second half circle will not lose all of the energy gained in the first half cycle. The results reported in this paper cast new lights on understanding the acceleration of energetic particles in the

  19. BEC-BCS crossover in a (p+ip)-wave pairing Hamiltonian coupled to bosonic molecular pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, Clare; Isaac, Phillip S.; Links, Jon; Zhao, Shao-You

    2011-01-01

    We analyse a (p+ip)-wave pairing BCS Hamiltonian, coupled to a single bosonic degree of freedom representing a molecular condensate, and investigate the nature of the BEC-BCS crossover for this system. For a suitable restriction on the coupling parameters, we show that the model is integrable and we derive the exact solution by the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In this manner we also obtain explicit formulae for correlation functions and compute these for several cases. We find that the crossover between the BEC state and the strong pairing p+ip phase is smooth for this model, with no intermediate quantum phase transition.

  20. Wave propagation simulation in the upper core of sodium-cooled fast reactors using a spectral-element method for heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaso, Masaru; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Moysan, Joseph; Lhuillier, Christian

    2018-01-01

    ASTRID project, French sodium cooled nuclear reactor of 4th generation, is under development at the moment by Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). In this project, development of monitoring techniques for a nuclear reactor during operation are identified as a measure issue for enlarging the plant safety. Use of ultrasonic measurement techniques (e.g. thermometry, visualization of internal objects) are regarded as powerful inspection tools of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) including ASTRID due to opacity of liquid sodium. In side of a sodium cooling circuit, heterogeneity of medium occurs because of complex flow state especially in its operation and then the effects of this heterogeneity on an acoustic propagation is not negligible. Thus, it is necessary to carry out verification experiments for developments of component technologies, while such kind of experiments using liquid sodium may be relatively large-scale experiments. This is why numerical simulation methods are essential for preceding real experiments or filling up the limited number of experimental results. Though various numerical methods have been applied for a wave propagation in liquid sodium, we still do not have a method for verifying on three-dimensional heterogeneity. Moreover, in side of a reactor core being a complex acousto-elastic coupled region, it has also been difficult to simulate such problems with conventional methods. The objective of this study is to solve these 2 points by applying three-dimensional spectral element method. In this paper, our initial results on three-dimensional simulation study on heterogeneous medium (the first point) are shown. For heterogeneity of liquid sodium to be considered, four-dimensional temperature field (three spatial and one temporal dimension) calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with Large-Eddy Simulation was applied instead of using conventional method (i.e. Gaussian Random field). This three-dimensional numerical

  1. Self-action of Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides and formation of light bullets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, A. A., E-mail: balakin.alexey@yandex.ru; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A., E-mail: sk.sa1981@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The self-action of two-dimensional and three-dimensional Bessel wave packets in a system of coupled light guides is considered using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The features of the self-action of such wave fields are related to their initial strong spatial inhomogeneity. The numerical simulation shows that for the field amplitude exceeding a critical value, the development of an instability typical of a medium with the cubic nonlinearity is observed. Various regimes are studied: the self-channeling of a wave beam in one light guide at powers not strongly exceeding a critical value, the formation of the “kaleidoscopic” picture of a wave packet during the propagation of higher-power radiation along a stratified medium, the formation of light bullets during competition between self-focusing and modulation instabilities in the case of three-dimensional wave packets, etc. In the problem of laser pulse shortening, the situation is considered when the wave-field stratification in the transverse direction dominates. This process is accompanied by the self-compression of laser pulses in well enough separated light guides. The efficiency of conversion of the initial Bessel field distribution to two flying parallel light bullets is about 50%.

  2. An investigation of the field-aligned currents associated with a large-scale ULF wave using data from CUTLASS and FAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Scoffield

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available On 14 December 1999, a large-scale ULF wave event was observed by the Hankasalmi radar of the SuperDARN chain. Simultaneously, the FAST satellite passed through the Hankasalmi field-of-view, measuring the magnetic field oscillations of the wave at around 2000km altitude, along with the precipitating ion and electron populations associated with these fields. A simple field line resonance model of the wave has been created and scaled using the wave's spatial and temporal characteristics inferred from SuperDARN and IMAGE magnetometer data. Here the model calculated field-aligned current is compared with field-aligned currents derived from the FAST energetic particle spectra and magnetic field measurements. This comparison reveals the small-scale structuring and energies of the current carriers in a large-scale Alfvén wave, a topic, which at present, is of considerable theoretical interest. When FAST traverses a region of the wave involving low upward field-aligned current densities, the current appears to be carried by unstructured downgoing electrons of energies less than 30eV. A downward current region appears to be carried partially by upgoing electrons below the FAST energy detection threshold, but also consists of a mixture of hotter downgoing magnetospheric electrons and upgoing ionospheric electrons of energies <30eV, with the hotter upgoing electrons presumably representing those upgoing electrons which have been accelerated by the wave field above the low energy detection threshold of FAST. A stronger interval of upward current shows that small-scale structuring of scale ~50km has been imposed on the current carriers, which are downgoing magnetospheric electrons of energy 0-500eV.

  3. A Possible Detection of a Fast-mode Extreme Ultraviolet Wave Associated with a Mini Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Yang, Liheng; Yang, Dan

    2011-10-01

    "Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves" are large-scale wavelike transients often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this Letter, we present a possible detection of a fast-mode EUV wave associated with a mini-CME observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. On 2010 December 1, a small-scale EUV wave erupted near the disk center associated with a mini-CME, which showed all the low corona manifestations of a typical CME. The CME was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament, with a typical length of about 30''. Although the eruption was tiny, the wave had the appearance of an almost semicircular front and propagated at a uniform velocity of 220-250 km s-1 with very little angular dependence. The CME lateral expansion was asymmetric with an inclination toward north, and the southern footprints of the CME loops hardly shifted. The lateral expansion resulted in deep long-duration dimmings, showing the CME extent. Comparing the onset and the initial speed of the CME, the wave was likely triggered by the rapid expansion of the CME loops. Our analysis confirms that the small-scale EUV wave is a true wave, interpreted as a fast-mode wave.

  4. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales. PMID:27296550

  5. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  6. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-12-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  7. Ionization Waves in a Fast, Hollow-Cathode-Assisted Capillary Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkevich, I.; Mond, M.; Kaufman, Y.; Choi, P.; Favre, M.

    1999-01-01

    The initial, low-current stage of the evolution of a soft x-ray emitting, hollow-cathode-assisted capillary discharge initiated by a steep high-voltage pulse is investigated. The capillary is surrounded by a shield having the cathode potential. The mean electric field E of the order of 10 kV/cm and the low gas pressure (P<1Torr) provide conditions for extensive electron runaway. This is taken into account in the formulation of the theoretical approach by retaining the inertial terms in the momentum equation for the electrons. In addition, the ionization rate is calculated by considering the cross section for ionization by high-energy electrons. The two-dimensional system of the basic equations is reduced to a system of one-dimensional equations for the axial distributions of the physical quantities by introducing appropriate radial profiles of the electric potential, and the electron gas parameters and satisfying the electrodynamic boundary conditions at the capillary wall and at the shield. The resulting system of equations admits solutions in the form of stationary ionization waves transferring the anode potential to the cathode end. Numerical calculations of such solutions for argon show that the wave velocity V increases with the gas pressure P and with the density of initial electron beam ejected from the cathode hole ahead of the ionization front, while the dependence of V on the applied voltage is weak. At the instant when the virtual anode reaches the cathode hole, the plasma in the capillary is not yet fully ionized. The traverse time of the ionization wave along the capillary calculated for various gas pressures is in reasonable agreement with experimentally registered time delay for a high-current stage resulting in voltage collapse and soft x-ray emission

  8. Estimation of oceanic subsurface mixing under a severe cyclonic storm using a coupled atmosphere–ocean–wave model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Prakash

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A coupled atmosphere–ocean–wave model was used to examine mixing in the upper-oceanic layers under the influence of a very severe cyclonic storm Phailin over the Bay of Bengal (BoB during 10–14 October 2013. The coupled model was found to improve the sea surface temperature over the uncoupled model. Model simulations highlight the prominent role of cyclone-induced near-inertial oscillations in subsurface mixing up to the thermocline depth. The inertial mixing introduced by the cyclone played a central role in the deepening of the thermocline and mixed layer depth by 40 and 15 m, respectively. For the first time over the BoB, a detailed analysis of inertial oscillation kinetic energy generation, propagation, and dissipation was carried out using an atmosphere–ocean–wave coupled model during a cyclone. A quantitative estimate of kinetic energy in the oceanic water column, its propagation, and its dissipation mechanisms were explained using the coupled atmosphere–ocean–wave model. The large shear generated by the inertial oscillations was found to overcome the stratification and initiate mixing at the base of the mixed layer. Greater mixing was found at the depths where the eddy kinetic diffusivity was large. The baroclinic current, holding a larger fraction of kinetic energy than the barotropic current, weakened rapidly after the passage of the cyclone. The shear induced by inertial oscillations was found to decrease rapidly with increasing depth below the thermocline. The dampening of the mixing process below the thermocline was explained through the enhanced dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy upon approaching the thermocline layer. The wave–current interaction and nonlinear wave–wave interaction were found to affect the process of downward mixing and cause the dissipation of inertial oscillations.

  9. Excitation and propagation of the fast wave in a non uniform plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierre, Y.

    1980-04-01

    Until now, the resolutions of the wave equation that have been suggested considered the asymptotic developments of the solutions and did not fully allow for the effects of reflexion on the wall. It will be shown that these effects are significant and can lead to unexpected results. First, the physical model will be developed laying particular emphasis on the hypotheses that guided us. Then, by means of an example, the results that we reached will be shown by endeavouring to relate them as far as is possible to the experimental results. Finally, the mathematical approach which enabled us to find the results will be given but only for the record [fr

  10. Poly(ethylene oxide) : succinonitrile-a polymeric matrix for fast-ion conducting redox-couple solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravindra Kumar; Kim, Hyun-Min; Rhee, Hee-Woo, E-mail: hwrhee@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-25

    A blend of poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, and succinonitrile, SN, was investigated for the first time for applying it as a polymeric matrix of low-cost and thermally stable fast-ion conducting redox-couple solid polymer electrolytes. The PEO-SN blend in equal weight fraction showed room temperature ionic conductivity of 1 x 10{sup -8} S cm{sup -1} with nearly two orders of magnitude higher than that of PEO due to reduced crystallinity. The blend resulted in a solid electrolyte with improved ionic conductivity of {approx}7 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} at 25 deg. C. The blend and its electrolyte showed thermal stability up to 100 deg. C, which is essential for outdoor application of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  11. Coupled Hydrodynamic and Wave Propagation Modeling for the Source Physics Experiment: Study of Rg Wave Sources for SPE and DAG series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmat, C. S.; Delorey, A.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Steedman, D. W.; Bradley, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation reports numerical modeling efforts to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave generation and propagation from underground explosions, with a focus on Rg waves. The numerical model is based on the coupling of hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus, CASH and HOSS), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Validation datasets are provided by the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) which is a series of highly instrumented chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site with yields from 100kg to 5000kg. A first series of explosions in a granite emplacement has just been completed and a second series in alluvium emplacement is planned for 2018. The long-term goal of this research is to review and improve current existing seismic sources models (e.g. Mueller & Murphy, 1971; Denny & Johnson, 1991) by providing first principles calculations provided by the coupled codes capability. The hydrodynamic codes, Abaqus, CASH and HOSS, model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. A new material model for unconsolidated alluvium materials has been developed and validated with past nuclear explosions, including the 10 kT 1965 Merlin event (Perret, 1971) ; Perret and Bass, 1975). We use the efficient Spectral Element Method code, SPECFEM3D (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998; 2002), and Geologic Framework Models to model the evolution of wavefield as it propagates across 3D complex structures. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests which provide evidence that the damage processes happening in the vicinity of the explosions create secondary seismic sources. These sources interfere with the original explosion moment and reduces the apparent seismic moment at the origin of Rg waves up to 20%.

  12. Formation of fast-spreading lower oceanic crust as revealed by a new Mg-REE coupled geospeedometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenguang; Lissenberg, C. Johan

    2018-04-01

    A new geospeedometer is developed based on the differential closures of Mg and rare earth element (REE) bulk-diffusion between coexisting plagioclase and clinopyroxene. By coupling the two elements with distinct bulk closure temperatures, this speedometer can numerically solve the initial temperatures and cooling rates for individual rock samples. As the existing Mg-exchange thermometer was calibrated for a narrow temperature range and strongly relies on model-dependent silica activities, a new thermometer is developed using literature experimental data. When the bulk closure temperatures of Mg and REE are determined, respectively, using this new Mg-exchange thermometer and the existing REE-exchange thermometer, this speedometer can be implemented for a wide range of compositions, mineral modes, and grain sizes. Applications of this new geospeedometer to oceanic gabbros from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise at Hess Deep reveal that the lower oceanic crust crystallized at temperatures of 998-1353 °C with cooling rates of 0.003-10.2 °C/yr. Stratigraphic variations of the cooling rates and crystallization temperatures support deep hydrothermal circulations and in situ solidification of various replenished magma bodies. Together with existing petrological, geochemical and geophysical evidence, results from this new speedometry suggest that the lower crust formation at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges involves emplacement of primary mantle melts in the deep section of the crystal mush zone coupled with efficient heat removal by crustal-scale hydrothermal circulations. The replenished melts become chemically and thermally evolved, accumulate as small magma bodies at various depths, feed the shallow axial magma chamber, and may also escape from the mush zone to generate off-axial magma lenses.

  13. Enhancement of sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational wave detectors using fast-light-based white light cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet been observed directly. The initial LIGO apparatus has not yet observed GWs. The advanced LIGO (AdLIGO) will use a combination of improved techniques in order to increase the sensitivity. Along with power recycling and a higher power laser source, the AdLIGO will employ signal recycling (SR). While SR would increase sensitivity, it would also reduce the bandwidth significantly. Previously, we and others have investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the feasibility of using a fast-light-based white light cavity (WLC) to circumvent this constraint. However, in the previous work, it was not clear how one would incorporate the white light cavity effect. Here, we first develop a general model for Michelson-interferometer-based GW detectors that can be easily adapted to include the effects of incorporating a WLC into the design. We then describe a concrete design of a WLC constructed as a compound mirror, to replace the signal recycling mirror. This design is simple, robust, completely non-invasive, and can be added to the AdLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal sensitivity as well as the bandwidth are enhanced significantly over what is planned for the AdLIGO, covering the entire spectrum of interest for gravitational waves

  14. New exact travelling wave solutions for two potential coupled KdV equations with symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zonghang

    2007-01-01

    We find new exact travelling wave solutions for two potential KdV equations which are presented by Foursov [Foursov MV. J Math Phys 2000;41:6173-85]. Compared with the extended tanh-function method, the algorithm used in our paper can obtain some new kinds of exact travelling wave solutions. With the aid of symbolic computation, some novel exact travelling wave solutions of the potential KdV equations are constructed

  15. Coupled Wave Energy and Erosion Dynamics along a Salt Marsh Boundary, Hog Island Bay, Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Priestas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between lateral erosion of salt marshes and wind waves is studied in Hog Island Bay, Virginia USA, with high-resolution field measurements and aerial photographs. Marsh retreat is compared to wave climate calculated in the bay using the spectral wave-model Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN. We confirm the existence of a linear relationship between long-term salt marsh erosion and wave energy, and show that wave power can serve as a good proxy for average salt-marsh erosion rates. At each site, erosion rates are consistent across several temporal scales, ranging from months to decades, and are strongly related to wave power. On the contrary, erosion rates vary in space and weakly depend on the spatial distribution of wave energy. We ascribe this variability to spatial variations in geotechnical, biological, and morphological marsh attributes. Our detailed field measurements indicate that at a small spatial scale (tens of meters, a positive feedback between salt marsh geometry and wave action causes erosion rates to increase with boundary sinuosity. However, at the scale of the entire marsh boundary (hundreds of meters, this relationship is reversed: those sites that are more rapidly eroding have a marsh boundary which is significantly smoother than the marsh boundary of sheltered and slowly eroding marshes.

  16. Rapid measurement of residual dipolar couplings for fast fold elucidation of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasia, Rodolfo M. [Jean-Pierre Ebel CNRS/CEA/UJF, Institut de Biologie Structurale (France); Lescop, Ewen [CNRS, Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles (France); Palatnik, Javier F. [Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas (Argentina); Boisbouvier, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr; Brutscher, Bernhard, E-mail: Bernhard.brutscher@ibs.fr [Jean-Pierre Ebel CNRS/CEA/UJF, Institut de Biologie Structurale (France)

    2011-11-15

    It has been demonstrated that protein folds can be determined using appropriate computational protocols with NMR chemical shifts as the sole source of experimental restraints. While such approaches are very promising they still suffer from low convergence resulting in long computation times to achieve accurate results. Here we present a suite of time- and sensitivity optimized NMR experiments for rapid measurement of up to six RDCs per residue. Including such an RDC data set, measured in less than 24 h on a single aligned protein sample, greatly improves convergence of the Rosetta-NMR protocol, allowing for overnight fold calculation of small proteins. We demonstrate the performance of our fast fold calculation approach for ubiquitin as a test case, and for two RNA-binding domains of the plant protein HYL1. Structure calculations based on simulated RDC data highlight the importance of an accurate and precise set of several complementary RDCs as additional input restraints for high-quality de novo structure determination.

  17. Rapid measurement of residual dipolar couplings for fast fold elucidation of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasia, Rodolfo M.; Lescop, Ewen; Palatnik, Javier F.; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that protein folds can be determined using appropriate computational protocols with NMR chemical shifts as the sole source of experimental restraints. While such approaches are very promising they still suffer from low convergence resulting in long computation times to achieve accurate results. Here we present a suite of time- and sensitivity optimized NMR experiments for rapid measurement of up to six RDCs per residue. Including such an RDC data set, measured in less than 24 h on a single aligned protein sample, greatly improves convergence of the Rosetta-NMR protocol, allowing for overnight fold calculation of small proteins. We demonstrate the performance of our fast fold calculation approach for ubiquitin as a test case, and for two RNA-binding domains of the plant protein HYL1. Structure calculations based on simulated RDC data highlight the importance of an accurate and precise set of several complementary RDCs as additional input restraints for high-quality de novo structure determination.

  18. Homogenization of heterogeneously coupled bistable ODE's - applied to excitation waves in pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2004-01-01

    We consider a lattice of coupled identical differential equations. The coupling is between nearest neighbors and of resistance type, but the strength of coupling varies from site to site. Such a lattice can, for example, model an islet of Langerhans, where the sites in the lattice model individua...

  19. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP

  20. Bistable four-wave mixing response in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; Xiao, Si; Liang, Shan; He, Meng-Dong; Luo, Jian-Hua; Kim, Nam-Chol; Chen, Li-Qun

    2017-10-16

    We perform a theoretical study of the bistable four-wave mixing (FWM) response in a coupled system comprised of a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and a photonic crystal (PC) nanocavity in which the SQD is embedded. It is shown that the shape of the FWM spectrum can switch among single-peaked, double-peaked, triple-peaked, and four-peaked arising from the vacuum Rabi splitting and the exciton-nanocavity coupling. Especially, we map out bistability phase diagrams within a parameter subspace of the system, and find that it is easy to turn on or off the bistable FWM response by only adjusting the excitation frequency or the pumping intensity. Our results offer a feasible means for measuring the SQD-PC nanocavity coupling strength and open a new avenue to design optical switches and memories.

  1. Validation of a coupled wave-flow model in a high-energy setting: the mouth of the Columbia River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; van der Westhuysen, André J.

    2012-01-01

     A monthlong time series of wave, current, salinity, and suspended-sediment measurements was made at five sites on a transect across the Mouth of Columbia River (MCR). These data were used to calibrate and evaluate the performance of a coupled hydrodynamic and wave model for the MCR based on the Delft3D modeling system. The MCR is a dynamic estuary inlet in which tidal currents, river discharge, and wave-driven currents are all important. Model tuning consisted primarily of spatial adjustments to bottom drag coefficients. In combination with (near-) default parameter settings, the MCR model application is able to simulate the dominant features in the tidal flow, salinity and wavefields observed in field measurements. The wave-orbital averaged method for representing the current velocity profile in the wave model is considered the most realistic for the MCR. The hydrodynamic model is particularly effective in reproducing the observed vertical residual and temporal variations in current structure. Density gradients introduce the observed and modeled reversal of the mean flow at the bed and augment mean and peak flow in the upper half of the water column. This implies that sediment transport during calmer summer conditions is controlled by density stratification and is likely net landward due to the reversal of flow near the bed. The correspondence between observed and modeled hydrodynamics makes this application a tool to investigate hydrodynamics and associated sediment transport.

  2. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  3. Fast quantification of endogenous carbohydrates in plasma using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Li, Xituo; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Dai, Jieyu; Wang, Guiming; Cheng, Yu; Yan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous carbohydrates in biosamples are frequently highlighted as the most differential metabolites in many metabolomics studies. A simple, fast, simultaneous quantitative method for 16 endogenous carbohydrates in plasma has been developed using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In order to quantify 16 endogenous carbohydrates in plasma, various conditions, including columns, chromatographic conditions, mass spectrometry conditions, and plasma preparation methods, were investigated. Different conditions in this quantified analysis were performed and optimized. The reproducibility, precision, recovery, matrix effect, and stability of the method were verified. The results indicated that a methanol/acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) mixture could effectively and reproducibly precipitate rat plasma proteins. Cold organic solvents coupled with vortex for 1 min and incubated at -20°C for 20 min were the most optimal conditions for protein precipitation and extraction. The results, according to the linearity, recovery, precision, matrix effect, and stability, showed that the method was satisfactory in the quantification of endogenous carbohydrates in rat plasma. The quantified analysis of endogenous carbohydrates in rat plasma performed excellently in terms of sensitivity, high throughput, and simple sample preparation, which met the requirement of quantification in specific expanded metabolomic studies after the global metabolic profiling research. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A Coupled VOF-Eulerian Multiphase CFD Model to Simulate Breaking Wave Impacts on Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomaselli, Pietro; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2016-01-01

    Breaking wave-induced loads on offshore structures can be extremely severe. The air entrainment mechanism during the breaking process plays a not well-known role in the exerted forces. This paper present a CFD solver, developed in the Open-FOAM environment, capable of simulating the wave breaking...

  5. Coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex for fast, nanoscale spin addressability and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovsky, Jesse

    As we begin to look at how spin qubits might be integrated into a scalable platform, a promising strategy is to engineer the magnetic environment of the spins using micron- or nanometer-scale ferromagnetic (FM) elements, for functionalities such as nanoscale addressability, spin-wave mediated coupling, or enhanced sensing. The promise of these FM/spin interactions brings with it the question of how the coherence properties of the spin will be affected by coupling to these complex mesoscopic systems. To explore the physics of individual spins coupled to a proximal, dynamic ferromagnetic structure, we have studied interactions between individual nitrogen-vacancy (NV) spins and a model FM system - a vortex magnetization state. The complex, yet controllable, spin texture of a FM vortex, formed in a thin disk or nanowire, allows one to study different regimes of interaction with a nearby confined spin. The vortex core produces a large static dipole-like fringe field. The vortex state also displays discrete dynamic modes ranging from several 100 MHz to GHz. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, the position of the vortex core relative to the NV spin can be controlled with nanometer-scale resolution, and time resolution of 10s of nanoseconds. As the vortex core is translated into proximity with an NV spin, the fringe field from the core generates a large position-dependent spin splitting, permitting nanoscale spin addressability. We also find that the dynamic interaction of the vortex, NV spin, and applied microwave field results in amplification of the Rabi transition rate by more than an order of magnitude. Finally, we explore how spin decoherence and relaxation mechanisms are enhanced as the vortex core approaches the NVs, with implications for proposed technology incorporating coherent spins and proximal FM elements. We acknowledge support from DOE, Award No. DE-SC008148.

  6. Inverse engineering for fast transport and spin control of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in moving harmonic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Ruan-Lei; Li, Jing; Ban, Yue; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate fast transport and spin manipulation of tunable spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in a moving harmonic trap. Motivated by the concept of shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design inversely the time-dependent trap position and spin-orbit-coupling strength. By choosing appropriate boundary conditions we obtain fast transport and spin flip simultaneously. The nonadiabatic transport and relevant spin dynamics are illustrated with numerical examples and compared with the adiabatic transport with constant spin-orbit-coupling strength and velocity. Moreover, the influence of nonlinearity induced by interatomic interaction is discussed in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii approach, showing the robustness of the proposed protocols. With the state-of-the-art experiments, such an inverse engineering technique paves the way for coherent control of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in harmonic traps.

  7. Crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Cameroon, West Africa, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Chen, Haopeng; Xie, Jun

    2018-01-01

    To understand the depth variation of deformation beneath Cameroon, West Africa, we developed a new 3D model of S-wave isotropic velocity and azimuthal anisotropy from joint analysis of ambient seismic noise and earthquake surface wave dispersion. We found that the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is well delineated by slow phase velocities in contrast with the neighboring Congo Craton, in agreement with previous studies. Apart from the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt, the uppermost mantle revealed a relatively slow velocity indicating a thinned or thermally altered lithosphere. The direction of fast axis in the upper crust is mostly NE-SW, but trending approximately N-S around Mt. Oku and the southern CVL. The observed crustal azimuthal anisotropy is attributed to alignment of cracks and crustal deformation related to magmatic activities. A widespread zone of weak-to-zero azimuthal anisotropy in the mid-lower crust shows evidence for vertical mantle flow or isotropic mid-lower crust. In the uppermost mantle, the fast axis direction changed from NE-SW to NW-SE around Mt. Oku and northern Cameroon. This suggests a layered mechanism of deformation and revealed that the mantle lithosphere has been deformed. NE-SW fast azimuths are observed beneath the Congo Craton and are consistent with the absolute motion of the African plate, suggesting a mantle origin for the observed azimuthal anisotropy. Our tomographically derived fast directions are consistent with the local SKS splitting results in some locations and depths, enabling us to constrain the origin of the observed splitting. The different feature of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper crust and the uppermost mantle implies decoupling between deformation of crust and mantle in Cameroon.

  8. On the interaction of waves carrying light, sound and small particles : wave-based methods for miniature laboratories and fast optical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Oever, Jan Joannes Frederik

    2018-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is waves: sound waves for trapping, guiding or mixing suspended particles, and light waves for making sound waves and rough surfaces visible. One of the important functions on a Lab-on-a-Chip system is suspended particle manipulation and concentration. One way to

  9. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes.

  10. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanesio, D., E-mail: daniele.milanesio@polito.it; Maggiora, R. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni (DET), Torino (Italy)

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  11. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  12. Coupling and absorption of lower-hybrid waves in a thermonuclear plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.; Tutter, M.

    1975-01-01

    The three important aspects, namely 1) accessibility, 2) matching and 3) absorption of the lower-hybrid waves in a thermonuclear plasma are studied under idealized but physically pertinent conditions within the framework of linearized theory. (orig.) [de

  13. Application and exploration of fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor to the analysis of thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Yeon; Ko, Jae Won; Jeong, Seo-Young; Hong, Jongki

    2008-09-26

    Fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of volatile aroma compounds emanated from thymus medicinal plants such as T. quinquecostotus (Jeju and Mt. Gaya in South Korea), T. quinquecostotus var. japonica (Ulreung island in South Korea), T. mongolicus (Northeastern Asia), and T. serpyllum (Europe). The GC/SAW involving the fragrance pattern analysis provides a novel analytical method with a very fast separation and characterization of aromas caused by the delicate difference of chemical composition according to botanical and geographical origin. On the comparison of experiments, the characteristic components and analytical tendency for air-dried thymus species detected by GC/SAW appear to be quite similar to those obtained by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-GC-MS, but the abundance ratios between these two methods are different. In addition to that, the discrimination of various thymus species by using VaporPrint image based on GC/SAW provides a quite reliable result. On the basis of principal component analysis (PCA) results, the ability for classification among species of completely different chemotypes by HS-SPME-GC-MS is good enough, but the classification of same chemotypes species which are from different geographical origin in same country, original species and its variety, an air-drying term for 13 days and 16 months appear much lower than GC/SAW. Interestingly, the present experiment reveals that the air-drying term influences the aroma composition: the concentration of the pharmacologically active species, monoterpene phenol (thymol), reaches its highest concentrations after it was dried for 5 days or 13 days, which is much higher than in fresh or over-dried for a long times.

  14. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  15. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  16. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherford, Brandon R.; Barnat, E. V.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3 × 10 9  cm s −1 , depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  17. Bottom attenuation estimation using sound intensity fluctuations due to mode coupling by nonlinear internal waves in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, Valery A; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F

    2016-11-01

    Analyses of fluctuations of low frequency signals (300 ± 30 Hz) propagating in shallow water in the presence of nonlinear internal waves (NIWs) in the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are carried out. Signals were received by a vertical line array at a distance of ∼20 km from the source. A NIW train was moving totally inside of the acoustic track, and the angle between the wave front of the NIW and the acoustic track in the horizontal plane was ∼10°. It is shown that the spectrum of the sound intensity fluctuations contains peaks corresponding to the coupling of pairs of propagating modes. Analysis of spectra at different hydrophone depths, and also summed over depth allows the authors to estimate attenuation in the bottom sediments.

  18. Coupled determination of gravimetric and elastic effects on two resonant chemical sensors: love wave and microcantilever platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Ludivine; Zimmermann, Céline; Dufour, Isabelle; Déjous, Corinne; Rebière, Dominique; Pistré, Jacques

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to couple theoretical and experimental results from microcantilevers and Love-wave acoustic devices in order to identify and separate mass loading effects from elastic effects. This is important in the perspective of sensing applications. For that, a thin-film polymer is deposited on both resonant platforms. It is demonstrated that microcantilevers are essentially mass sensitive. They allow one to determine the polymer layer thickness, which is validated by optical profilometry measurements. Then, taking into account this thickness, theoretical modeling and experimental measurements with Love-wave devices permit one to estimate an equivalent elastic shear modulus of the thin-film polymer at high frequency. Results are interesting if one is to fully understand and optimize (bio)chemical sensor responses.

  19. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  20. Charge transport in 2DEG/s-wave superconductor junction with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We study spin-dependent charge transport in superconducting junctions. We consider ballistic two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)/s-wave superconductor junctions with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling (DSOC). We calculate the conductance normalized by that in the normal state of superconductor in order to study the effect of DSOC in 2DEG on conductance, changing the height of insulating barrier. We find the DSOC suppresses the conductance for low insulating barrier, while it can slightly enhance the conductance for high insulating barrier. It has a reentrant dependence on DSOC for middle strength insulating barrier. The effect of DSOC is weaken as the insulating barrier becomes high

  1. Adaptive observer for the joint estimation of parameters and input for a coupled wave PDE and infinite dimensional ODE system

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor

    2016-08-05

    This paper deals with joint parameters and input estimation for coupled PDE-ODE system. The system consists of a damped wave equation and an infinite dimensional ODE. This model describes the spatiotemporal hemodynamic response in the brain and the objective is to characterize brain regions using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data. For this reason, we propose an adaptive estimator and prove the asymptotic convergence of the state, the unknown input and the unknown parameters. The proof is based on a Lyapunov approach combined with a priori identifiability assumptions. The performance of the proposed observer is illustrated through some simulation results.

  2. Multichannel heterodyne radiometers with fast-scanning backward-wave oscillators for ECE measurement on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Poznyak, V.I.; Ploskirev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.N.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, K.J.; Kuang, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators (BWOs) in 78-118 and 118-178 GHz were developed and installed for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements on HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double sideband (DSB) radiometer in 78-118 GHz measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning time period of 0.65 ms. The other radiometer in 118-178 GHz consists of one independent channel of DSB heterodyne receiver with intermediate frequency (IF) of 100-500 MHz and two channels of single sideband (SSB) heterodyne receiver that are sensitive to upper sideband and lower sideband individually; the IF frequency of the SSB channels are 1.5 GHz around the local oscillator frequencies with 1 GHz bandwidth. By employing a novel design, this unique radiometer measures 3 ECE frequency points at each of the 16 local oscillator frequency points in 118-178 GHz, and the full band can be swept in 0.65 ms period, thus the radiometer measures 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms in principle. Each of the local oscillators' frequency points can be preset by program to meet specific physics interests. Horizontal view of ECE was installed to measure electron temperature profiles; vertically viewing optics along a perpendicular chord was also installed to study nonthermal ECE spectra. Preliminary measurement results were presented during ohmic and pellet injection plasmas

  3. On the Unsteadiness of a Transitional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction Using Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, E. Lara; Schmisseur, John

    2017-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint has been used to evaluate the unsteady dynamics of transitional and turbulent shock wave-boundary layer interactions generated by a vertical cylinder on a flat plate in a Mach 2 freestream. The resulting shock structure consists of an inviscid bow shock that bifurcates into a separation shock and trailing shock. The primary features of interest are the separation shock and an upstream influence shock that is intermittently present in transitional boundary layer interactions, but not observed in turbulent interactions. The power spectral densities, frequency peaks, and normalized wall pressures are analyzed as the incoming boundary layer state changes from transitional to fully turbulent, comparing both centerline and outboard regions of the interaction. The present study compares the scales and frequencies of the dynamics of the separation shock structure in different boundary layer regimes. Synchronized high-speed Schlieren imaging provides quantitative statistical analyses as well as qualitative comparisons to the fast-response pressure sensitive paint measurements. Materials based on research supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research under Award Number N00014-15-1-2269.

  4. Rapid determination of floral aroma compounds of lilac blossom by fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Yeon; Shin, Hyun Du; Kim, Sung Jean; Hong, Jongki

    2008-03-07

    A novel analytical method using fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been developed for the detection of volatile aroma compounds emanated from lilac blossom (Syringa species: Syringa vulgaris variginata and Syringa dilatata). GC/SAW could detect and quantify various fragrance emitted from lilac blossom, enabling to provide fragrance pattern analysis results. The fragrance pattern analysis could easily characterize the delicate differences in aromas caused by the substantial difference of chemical composition according to different color and shape of petals. Moreover, the method validation of GC/SAW was performed for the purpose of volatile floral actual aroma analysis, achieving a high reproducibility and excellent sensitivity. From the validation results, GC/SAW could serve as an alternative analytical technique for the analysis of volatile floral actual aroma of lilac. In addition, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) GC-MS was employed to further confirm the identification of fragrances emitted from lilac blossom and compared to GC/SAW.

  5. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress....... The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered...

  6. The pump-probe coupling of matter wave packets to remote lattice states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob F; Park, Sung Jong; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm

    2012-01-01

    containing a Bose–Einstein condensate. The evolution of these wave packets is monitored in situ and their six-photon reflection at a band gap is observed. In direct analogy with pump–probe spectroscopy, a probe pulse allows for the resonant de-excitation of the wave packet into states localized around...... selected lattice sites at a long, controllable distance of more than 100 lattice sites from the main component. This precise control mechanism for ultra-cold atoms thus enables controlled quantum state preparation and splitting for quantum dynamics, metrology and simulation....

  7. Variational Approach for Coupled Backward and Forward Wave Excitation in Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A; Pinhasi, Y

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper [1] we have described a novel variational formulation for the propagation and generation of radiation in wave-guides. The formulation is based on the representation of all the involved quantities in the frequency domain and the decomposition of field and currents in terms of the wave-guide transversal Eigen function. In this work we present the utilization of this formalism to the derivation of a numerical scheme that is used to study the build up of radiation in free electron lasers in the linear approximation.

  8. Lagrangian analysis of two-phase hydrodynamic and nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1974-01-01

    The mathematical technique known as the ''method of characteristics'' has been used to construct an exact, analytical solution to predict the onset of density-wave oscillations in diabatic two-phase systems, such as Boiling Water Nuclear Reactors (BWR's). Specifically, heater wall dynamics, boiling boundary dynamics and nuclear kinetics have been accounted for in this analysis. Emphasis is placed on giving the reader a clear physical understanding of the phenomena of two-phase density-wave oscillations. Explanations are presented in terms of block diagram logic, and phasor representations of the various pressure drop perturbations are given. (U.S.)

  9. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-28

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q(-)) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ()(1/2)=6.7 mH, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, |H(ab)|=3.8 mH. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q(-) in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  10. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO).

  11. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-06-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''.

  12. Ultrashort pulse propagation in near-field periodic diffractive structures by use of rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, W; Tyan, R C; Sun, P C; Xu, F; Fainman, Y

    2001-05-01

    We present a method for near-field analysis of ultrashort optical pulse propagation in periodic structures-including subwavelength and resonant grating structures-based on the integration of Fourier spectrum decomposition and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). We discuss the spectral decomposition, including considerations for computational efficiency, the application of the RCWA method to compute the internal and external fields of the structure, and the synthesis of the resulting fields to obtain the time-domain solution. We apply this tool to the analysis of two photonic structures: (1) a nanostructured polarization-selective mirror that exhibits the desired broadband performance characteristics when operated at the design wavelength but yields strongly diminished polarization selectivity and modulation of the pulse envelope at an offset wave-length and (2) a two-mode coupled waveguide structure that produces from one incident pulse two transmitted pulses whose temporal separation depends on the waveguide geometry. In both examples, we apply our new modeling tool to investigate the near fields and find that near-field effects are critical in determining the performance characteristics of nanostructured devices. Furthermore, detailed observation and understanding of near-field phenomena in nanostructures may be applied to the design of novel photonic devices.

  13. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-01-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''

  14. Use of plasma waves to create in Tokamaks quasi-stationary conditions required for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    1993-04-01

    In this thesis are studied the coupling of hybrid waves to the plasma, multijunction antennas, hybrid wave stochastic propagation, fast wave current drive and lower-hybrid current drive experiments in Tore Supra and Jet. The possibility of decoupling current density profile and temperature give one more degree of freedom for the control of plasma in a configuration which is not very flexible

  15. Gravitational-wave mediated preheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephon Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new preheating mechanism through the coupling of the gravitational field to both the inflaton and matter fields, without direct inflaton–matter couplings. The inflaton transfers power to the matter fields through interactions with gravitational waves, which are exponentially enhanced due to an inflation–graviton coupling. One such coupling is the product of the inflaton to the Pontryagin density, as in dynamical Chern–Simons gravity. The energy scales involved are constrained by requiring that preheating happens fast during matter domination.

  16. On-line coupling of physiologically relevant bioaccessibility testing to inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Proof of concept for fast assessment of gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of micronutrients from soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mónica Alejandra; Rosende, María; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; Miró, Manuel

    2016-10-05

    In-vitro physiologically relevant gastrointestinal extraction based on the validated Unified BARGE Method (UBM) is in this work hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry in a batch-flow configuration for real-time monitoring of oral bioaccessibility assays with high temporal resolution. A fully automated flow analyzer is designed to foster in-line filtration of gastrointestinal extracts at predefined times (≤15 min) followed by on-line multi-elemental analysis of bioaccessible micro-nutrients, viz., Cu, Fe and Mn, in well-defined volumes of extracts (300 μL) of transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds taken as model samples. The hyphenated flow setup allows for recording of temporal extraction profiles to gain full knowledge of the kinetics of the gastrointestinal digestion processes, including element leaching and concomitant precipitation and complexation reactions hindering bioavailability. Simplification of the overall standard procedure is also feasible by identification of steady-state extraction conditions. Our findings indicate that reliable measurement of oral bioaccessible pools of Cu, Fe and Mn in soybean might be obtained in less than 180 min rather than 240 min as endorsed by UBM. Using a matrix-matched external calibration, limits of detection according to the 3s criteria were 0.5 μg/g for Mn, 0.6 μg/g for Cu and 2.3 μg/g for Fe. Trueness of the automatic bioaccessibility method was confirmed by mass balance validation with recoveries ranging from 87 to 116% regardless of the target element and sample. Cu was the micronutrient with the highest oral bioaccessibility ranging from 73% to 83% (7.5-7.9 μg/g) for non-transgenic and transgenic soybeans, respectively, followed by Mn and Fe within the ranges of 29-31% (10.8-11.4 μg/g) and 11-15% (8-14 μg/g), respectively, regardless of transgenesis. The proposed kinetic method is proven suitable for fast and expedient estimation of the nutritional value of

  17. Passive cavity laser and tilted wave laser for Bessel-like beam coherently coupled bars and stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Maximov, M. V.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Kaluzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Vashanova, K. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Schmidt, N. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Ultralarge output apertures of semiconductor gain chips facilitate novel applications that require efficient feedback of the reflected laser light. Thick (10-30 μm) and ultrabroad (>1000 μm) waveguides are suitable for coherent coupling through both near-field of the neighboring stripes in a laser bar and by applying external cavities. As a result direct laser diodes may become suitable as high-power high-brightness coherent light sources. Passive cavity laser is based on the idea of placing the active media outside of the main waveguide, for example in the cladding layers attached to the waveguide, or, as in the case of the Tilted Wave Laser (TWL) in a thin waveguide coupled to the neighboring thick waveguide wherein most of the field intensity is localized in the broad waveguide. Multimode or a single vertical mode lasing is possible depending on the coupling efficiency. We demonstrate that 1060 nm GaAs/GaAlAs-based Tilted Wave Lasers (TWL) show wall-plug efficiency up to ~55% with the power concentrated in the two symmetric vertical beams having a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 2 degrees each. Bars with pitch sizes in the range of 25-400 μm are studied and coherent operation of the bars is manifested with the lateral far field lobes as narrow as 0.1° FWHM. As the near field of such lasers in the vertical direction represents a strongly modulated highly periodic pattern of intensity maxima such lasers or laser arrays generate Bessel-type beams. These beams are focusable similar to the case of Gaussian beams. However, opposite to the Gaussian beams, such beams are self-healing and quasi non-divergent. Previously Bessel beams were generated using Gaussian beams in combination with an axicon lens or a Fresnel biprism. A new approach does not involve such complexity and a novel generation of laser diodes evolves.

  18. Application of Coupled-Wave Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin Approximation to Ground Penetrating Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Prokopovich; Alexei Popov; Lara Pajewski; Marian Marciniak

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with bistatic subsurface probing of a horizontally layered dielectric half-space by means of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves. In particular, the main objective of this work is to present a new method for the solution of the two-dimensional back-scattering problem arising when a pulsed electromagnetic signal impinges on a non-uniform dielectric half-space; this scenario is of interest for ground penetrating radar (GPR) applications. For the analytical description of the s...

  19. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engebretson, M.J.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Anderson, B.J.; Rosenberg, T.J.; Carpenter, D.L.; Inan, U.S.; Eather, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock related upstream source. In this paper, the authors first review many of these new observational results by presenting a comparison of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then present a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere. Simultaneous multi-instrument observations at South Pole Station, located below the cusp/cleft ionosphere near local noon, magnetic field observations by the AMPTE CCE satellite in the dayside outer magnetosphere, and upstream magnetic field observations by the IMP 8 satellite show clear interplanetary magnetic field field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons. They believe that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an ionospheric transistor. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere

  20. Analysis of Shear Wave Generation by Decoupled and Partially Coupled Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-31

    The explosive source is on scale relative to the cavity size. Two factors suggest that both explosions m ight act as spherical seism ic sources...REFERENCES Baker, G. E., H. Xu, and J. L. Stevens (2009), Generation of Shear Waves from Explosions in Water-Filled Cavities, submitted to Bull. Seism ...I: Seismic Spectrum Scaling, Bull. Seism . Soc. Am., 61, 1675-1692 Murphy, J. (1969), Discussion of Paper by D. Springer, M. Denny, J. Healy, and W

  1. Coupling of Coastal Wave Transformation and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Seakeeping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    jet above initially stagnant water. Gauges 2 recorded a transient initial pulse generated by the submerged jet and surface disturbances associated...surface with significant air entrainment. 2 recorded a large leading wave followed by surface disturbances generated by the mixing processes, while...correction finite difference model for simulation of transoceanic tsunamis. Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, 18(1), 31-53. Zhou, J.G

  2. Mechanisms of Saharan Dust Radiative Effects Coupled to Eddy Energy and Wave Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    We explore mechanisms addressing the relationships between the net radiative forcing of Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and eddy energetics of the African Easterly jet-African easterly wave (AEJ-AEWs) system across the tropical Atlantic storm track. This study indicates that radiatively interactive dust aerosols have the capability to modify the exchange of kinetic energy between the AEWs and AEJ. We find that while dust can have both constructive and destructive effects on eddy activity of the waves, depending on the behavior and structure of waves exhibiting different characteristic time-scales, the local heating by dust tends to change the quadruple pattern of eddy momentum fluxes of the AEWs which can yield feedbacks onto the mean-flow. These results arise from applying an ensemble of large NASA satellite observational data sets, such as MODIS, SeaWiFS and TRMM, as well as the GOCART aerosol model and MERRA reanalysis. Sensitivity studies indicate that the results are consistent when the analysis is performed with multiple different aerosol datasets. While the mechanisms proposed here require further evaluation with numerical model experiments, this study presents a novel approach and new insights into Saharan dust effects on large-scale climate dynamics.

  3. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  4. Matter-waves in Bose-Einstein condensates with spin-orbit and Rabi couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquillo, Emerson

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) reduction of a quantum field theory starting from the three-dimensional (3D) many-body Hamiltonian of interacting bosons with spin-orbit (SO) and Rabi couplings. We obtain the effective time-dependent 1D and 2D nonpolynomial Heisenberg equations for both the repulsive and attractive signs of the inter-atomic interaction. Our findings show that in the case in which the many-body state coincides with the Glauber coherent state, the 1D and 2D Heisenberg equations become 1D and 2D nonpolynomial Schrödinger equations (NPSEs). These models were derived in a mean-field approximation from 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), describing a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with SO and Rabi couplings. In the present work self-repulsive and self-attractive localized solutions of the 1D NPSE and the 1D GPE are obtained in a numerical form. The combined action of SO and Rabi couplings produces conspicuous sidelobes on the density profile, for both signs of the interaction. In the case of the attractive nonlinearity, an essential result is the possibility of getting an unstable condensate by the increasing of SO coupling.

  5. An OPMA for Robust Mutual Coupling Coefficients Estimation of URA with Single Snapshot in MIMO HF Sky-Wave Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguan Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fluctuation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the single snapshot case in the MIMO HF sky-wave radar system, the accuracy of the online estimation of the mutual coupling coefficients matrix of the uniform rectangle array (URA might be degraded by the classical approach, especially in the case of low SNR. In this paper, an Online Particle Mean-Shift Approach (OPMA is proposed, which is to get a relatively more effective estimation of the mutual coupling coefficients matrix with the low SNR. Firstly, the spatial smoothing technique combined with the MUSIC algorithm of URA is introduced for the DOA estimation of the multiple targets in the case of single snapshot which are taken as coherent sources. Then, based on the idea of the particle filter, the online particles with a moderate computational complexity are used to generate some different estimation results. Finally, the mean-shift algorithm is applied to get a more robust estimate of the equivalent mutual coupling coefficients matrix. The simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach in terms of the success probability, the statistics of bias, and the variance. The proposed approach is more robust and more accurate than the other two approaches.

  6. Fast-forward scaling theory for phase imprinting on a BEC: creation of a wave packet with uniform momentum density and loading to Bloch states without disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro; Nakahara, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    We study phase imprinting on Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with the fast-forward scaling theory revealing a nontrivial scaling property in quantum dynamics. We introduce a wave packet with uniform momentum density (WPUM) which has peculiar properties but is short-lived. The fast-forward scaling theory is applied to derive the driving potential for creation of the WPUMs in a predetermined time. Fast manipulation is essential for the creation of WPUMs because of the instability of the state. We also study loading of a BEC into a predetermined Bloch state in the lowest band from the ground state of a periodic potential. Controlled linear potential is not sufficient for creation of the Bloch state with large wavenumber because the change in the amplitude of the order parameter is not negligible. We derive the exact driving potential for creation of predetermined Bloch states using the obtained theory.

  7. Mode Conversion of High-Field-Side-Launched Fast Waves at the Second Harmonic of Minority Hydrogen in Advanced Tokamak Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, R.; Scharer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Under advanced tokamak reactor conditions, the Ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100% efficiency. IBWs have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. The relatively high frequency (around 200 MHz) minimizes parasitic electron absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the 5th tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratios < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Large machine size and adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a 1-D full-wave analysis. 2-D ray tracing of the IBW indicates a slightly bean-shaped equilibrium allows access to the tritium resonance

  8. Symmetry breaking of localized discrete matter waves induced by spin–orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello”, CNISM and INFN–Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Universitá di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Abdullaev, F.Kh., E-mail: fatkhulla@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Kulliyyah of Science, International Islamic University of Malaysia, 25200 Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2015-10-02

    We study localized nonlinear excitations of a dilute Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) with spin–orbit coupling in a deep optical lattice (OL). For this we introduce a tight-binding model that includes the spin–orbit coupling (SOC) at the discrete level in the form of a generalized discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Existence and stability of discrete solitons of different symmetry types is demonstrated. Quite interestingly, we find three distinctive regions in which discrete solitons undergo spontaneously symmetry breaking, passing from on-site to inter-site and to asymmetric, simply by varying the interatomic interactions. Existence ranges of discrete solitons with inter-site symmetry depend on SOC and shrink to zero as the SOC parameter is increased. Asymmetric discrete solitons appear as novel excitations specific of the SOC. Possible experimental implementation of these results is briefly discussed.

  9. An analysis of lower hybrid grill coupling using an efficient full wave code

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 8 (2012), 083005-083005 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0419; GA MŠk 7G09042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Overdense plasma * Conversion * Tokamaks * Lower hybrid waves * LH Grills Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/52/8/083005/pdf/0029-5515_52_8_083005.pdf

  10. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro......-actuation requires the optimization of optical forces and optical torques that, in turn, requires the optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction [1]. We have previously proposed and demonstrated micro-targeted light-delivery and the opto-mechanical capabilities of so-called wave-guided optical...

  11. Simulation of coupled-spin systems in the steady-state free-precession acquisition mode for fast magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk jr., Zenon; Starčuková, Jana; Štrbák, Oliver; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 10 (2009), 104033:1-9 ISSN 0957-0233 Grant - others:EC 6FP(XE) MRTN-CT-2006-035801 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : magnetic resonance * fast spectroscopic imaging * steady-state free-precession * coupled-spin system * density matrix simulation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.317, year: 2009

  12. Interaction of fast ions with ion cyclotron electromagnetic waves in tokamak plasma; Interaction des ions rapides avec les ondes a la frequence cyclotronique ionique dans un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeaud, V

    2000-12-01

    In an ignited fusion reactor, the plasma temperature is sustained by the fusion reactions. However, before this regime is reached, it is necessary to bring an additional power to the plasma. One of the methods that enables the coupling of power is the use of an electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). This thesis deals with the interaction between ICRF heating and the fast ions. The thesis contains a theoretical study of the influence of ICRF heating on the ion distribution function. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of the toroidal spectrum of the modes of propagation of the wave in the tokamak. It is necessary to take into account all these modes in order to correctly assess the strength of the wave particle interaction, especially for high energy particles (of the order of hundreds of keV). The classical treatment of the wave particle interaction is based on the hypothesis that the cyclotron phase of the particle and the wave phase are de-correlated between successive resonant interactions. One is therefore led to consider ICRF heating as a diffusive process. This hypothesis is reconsidered in this thesis and it is shown that strong correlations exist in a large part of the velocity space. For this study, a numerical code that computes the full trajectory of particles interacting with a complete electromagnetic field has been developed. The thesis also deals with the problem of fast ion losses due to the breaking of the toroidal symmetry of the confinement magnetic field (called the ripple modulation). Between two toroidal coils, local magnetic wells exist, and particles can be trapped there. When trapped they undergo a vertical drift that makes them quit the plasma rapidly. The ripple modulation also causes an enhancement of the radial diffusion, thereby increasing the losses. A Monte Carlo model describing these mechanisms is presented. This model is validated thanks to a comparison with an experimental database from

  13. Non-equilibrium study of spin wave interference in systems with both Rashba and Dresselhaus (001) spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kuo-Chin; Su, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Ching-Ray; Chen, Son-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    We study the electron spin transport in two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system with both Rashba and Dresselhaus (001) spin-orbital coupling (SOC). We assume spatial behavior of spin precession in the non-equilibrium transport regime, and study also quantum interference induced by non-Abelian spin-orbit gauge field. The method we adopt in this article is the non-equilibrium Green's function within a tight binding framework. We consider one ferromagnetic lead which injects spin polarized electron to a system with equal strength of Rashba and Dresselhaus (001) SOC, and we observe the persistent spin helix property. We also consider two ferromagnetic leads injecting spin polarized electrons into a pure Dresselhaus SOC system, and we observe the resultant spin wave interference pattern

  14. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge density wave transformations in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions. In the classical regime strong enough coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima, so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Intersite interactions order spins at lower temperatures. Extension to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the charge density wave (CDW) transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains metallic because the structural vector Q and the Fermi surface sizes are not related. Large values of the CDW gap seen in the tunneling experiments correspond to the energy of the minima in the electron-ion two-well complex. The gap is defined through the density of states inside the electronic bands below the CDW transition. We focus mainly on electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  15. Bond-order wave phase of the extended Hubbard model: Electronic solitons, paramagnetism, and coupling to Peierls and Holstein phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Soos, Zoltán G.

    2010-10-01

    The bond-order wave (BOW) phase of the extended Hubbard model (EHM) in one dimension (1D) is characterized at intermediate correlation U=4t by exact treatment of N -site systems. Linear coupling to lattice (Peierls) phonons and molecular (Holstein) vibrations are treated in the adiabatic approximation. The molar magnetic susceptibility χM(T) is obtained directly up to N=10 . The goal is to find the consequences of a doubly degenerate ground state (gs) and finite magnetic gap Em in a regular array. Degenerate gs with broken inversion symmetry are constructed for finite N for a range of V near the charge-density-wave boundary at V≈2.18t where Em≈0.5t is large. The electronic amplitude B(V) of the BOW in the regular array is shown to mimic a tight-binding band with small effective dimerization δeff . Electronic spin and charge solitons are elementary excitations of the BOW phase and also resemble topological solitons with small δeff . Strong infrared intensity of coupled molecular vibrations in dimerized 1D systems is shown to extend to the regular BOW phase while its temperature dependence is related to spin solitons. The Peierls instability to dimerization has novel aspects for degenerate gs and substantial Em that suppresses thermal excitations. Finite Em implies exponentially small χM(T) at low temperature followed by an almost linear increase with T . The EHM with U=4t is representative of intermediate correlations in quasi-1D systems such as conjugated polymers or organic ion-radical and charge-transfer salts. The vibronic and thermal properties of correlated models with BOW phases are needed to identify possible physical realizations.

  16. Coupling Functions between Brain Waves: Significance of Opened/Closed Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Hussain

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In dynamical systems, the information flows converge or diverges in state space and is integrated or communicated between different cells assemblies termed as CFC. This process allows different oscillatory systems to communicate in accurate time, control and distribute the information flows in cell assemblies. The CF interactions allow the oscillatory rhythms to communicate in accurate time, and reintegrate the separated information. The intrinsic brain dynamics in Electroencephalography (EEG with eye - closed (EC and eye open (EO during resting states have been investigated to see the changes in brain complexity i.e. simple visual processing which are associated with increase in global dimension complexity. In order to study these changes in EEG, we have computed the coupling to see the inhibitory interneurons response and inter-regions functional connectivity differences between the eye conditions. We have investigated the fluctuations in EEG activities in low (delta, theta and high (alpha frequency brain oscillations. Coupling strength was estimated using Dynamic Bayesian inference approach which can effectively detect the phase connectivity subject to the noise within a network of time varying coupled phase oscillators. Using this approach, we have seen that delta-alpha and theta-alpha CFC are more dominant in resting state EEG and applicable to multivariate network oscillator. It shows that alpha phase was dominated by low frequency oscillations i.e. delta and theta. These different CFC help us to investigate complex neuronal brain dynamics at large scale networks. We observed the local interactions at high frequencies and global interactions at low frequencies. The alpha oscillations are generated from both posterior and anterior origins whereas the delta oscillations found at posterior regions.

  17. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  18. Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances generated by upward propagating gravity waves simulated by a whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Jin, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Shinagawa, H.

    2017-12-01

    It has been recognized that gravity waves (GWs) play an important role on the momentum and energy budget in the thermosphere/ionosphere. In this study, using a whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model (GAIA), behaviors of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) generated by upward propagating GWs in the thermosphere are investigated. The horizontal resolution of GAIA is 1 degree longitude by 1 degree latitude, which is adequate to simulate large-scale GWs. The GAIA contains the region from the ground surface to the upper thermosphere, so that we can simulate excitation of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere, their upward propagation to the mesosphere and thermosphere, and their impacts on the thermosphere/ionosphere system. The GAIA can simulate TIDs because interaction processes between the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere are included. We focus on seasonal and longitudinal variations of TIDs and their relation to GW activity in the thermosphere. Our results indicate that many TIDs are generated by upward propagating GWs in the thermosphere, and these TIDs propagate equatorward. TIDs are much stronger in winter than in summer. Moreover, day-to-day variability of GW activity in the stratosphere and mesosphere are examined, and their impacts on temporal variability of TIDs are discussed.

  19. Coupling of Rayleigh-like waves with zero-sound modes in normal 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacz, S.A.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Landau kinetic equation is solved in the collisionless regime for a sample of normal 3 He excited by a surface perturbation of arbitrary ω and k. The boundary condition for the nonequilibrium particle distribution is determined for the case of specular reflection of the elementary excitations at the interface. Using the above solution, the energy flux through the boundary is obtained as a function of the surface wave velocity ω/k. The absorption spectrum and its frequency derivative are calculated numerically for typical values of temperature and pressure. The spectrum displays a sharp, resonant-like maximum concentrated at the longitudinal sound velocity and a sharp maximum of the derivative concentrated at the transverse sound velocity. The energy transfer is cut off discontinuously below the Fermi velocity. An experimental measurement of the energy transfer spectrum would permit a determination of both zero-sound velocities and the Fermi velocity with spectroscopic precision

  20. Effect of roughness formulation on the performance of a coupled wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of algorithms are available for parameterizing the hydrodynamic bottom roughness associated with grain size, saltation, bedforms, and wave–current interaction in coastal ocean models. These parameterizations give rise to spatially and temporally variable bottom-drag coefficients that ostensibly provide better representations of physical processes than uniform and constant coefficients. However, few studies have been performed to determine whether improved representation of these variable bottom roughness components translates into measurable improvements in model skill. We test the hypothesis that improved representation of variable bottom roughness improves performance with respect to near-bed circulation, bottom stresses, or turbulence dissipation. The inner shelf south of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, is the site of sorted grain-size features which exhibit sharp alongshore variations in grain size and ripple geometry over gentle bathymetric relief; this area provides a suitable testing ground for roughness parameterizations. We first establish the skill of a nested regional model for currents, waves, stresses, and turbulent quantities using a uniform and constant roughness; we then gauge model skill with various parameterization of roughness, which account for the influence of the wave-boundary layer, grain size, saltation, and rippled bedforms. We find that commonly used representations of ripple-induced roughness, when combined with a wave–current interaction routine, do not significantly improve skill for circulation, and significantly decrease skill with respect to stresses and turbulence dissipation. Ripple orientation with respect to dominant currents and ripple shape may be responsible for complicating a straightforward estimate of the roughness contribution from ripples. In addition, sediment-induced stratification may be responsible for lower stresses than predicted by the wave–current interaction model.

  1. Novel optical solitary waves and modulation instability analysis for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation in monomode step-index optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inc, Mustafa; Aliyu, Aliyu Isa; Yusuf, Abdullahi; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation (CNLSE) in monomode step-index in optical fibers which describes the nonlinear modulations of two monochromatic waves, whose group velocities are almost equal. A class of dark, bright, dark-bright and dark-singular optical solitary wave solutions of the model are constructed using the complex envelope function ansatz. Singular solitary waves are also retrieved as bye products of the in integration scheme. This naturally lead to some constraint conditions placed on the solitary wave parameters which must hold for the solitary waves to exist. The modulation instability (MI) analysis of the model is studied based on the standard linear-stability analysis. Numerical simulation and physical interpretations of the obtained results are demonstrated. It is hoped that the results reported in this paper can enrich the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the CNLSE.

  2. Coupling electromagnetic pulse-shaped waves into wire-like interconnection structures with a non-linear protection – Time domain calculations by the PEEC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wollenberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An interconnection system whose loads protected by a voltage suppressor and a low-pass filter against overvoltages caused by coupling pulse-shaped electromagnetic waves is analyzed. The external wave influencing the system is assumed as a plane wave with HPM form. The computation is provided by a full-wave PEEC model for the interconnection structure incorporated in the SPICE code. Thus, nonlinear elements of the protection circuit can be included in the calculation. The analysis shows intermodulation distortions and penetrations of low frequency interferences caused by intermodulations through the protection circuits. The example examined shows the necessity of using full-wave models for interconnections together with non-linear circuit solvers for simulation of noise immunity in systems protected by nonlinear devices.

  3. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields.

  4. Modeling and experimental investigation of thermal-mechanical-electric coupling dynamics in a standing wave ultrasonic motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; He, Yigang; Dai, Shichao

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasonic motor operation relies on high-frequency vibration of a piezoelectric vibrator and interface friction between the stator and rotor/slider, which can cause temperature rise of the motor under continuous operation, and can affect motor parameters and performance in turn. In this paper, an integral model is developed to study the thermal-mechanical-electric coupling dynamics in a typical standing wave ultrasonic motor. Stick-slip motion at the contact interface and the temperature dependence of material parameters of the stator are taken into account in this model. The elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric material coefficients of the piezoelectric ceramic, as a function of temperature, are determined experimentally using a resonance method. The critical parameters in the model are identified via measured results. The resulting model can be used to evaluate the variation in output characteristics of the motor caused by the thermal-mechanical-electric coupling effects. Furthermore, the dynamic temperature rise of the motor can be accurately predicted under different input parameters using the developed model, which will contribute to improving the reliable life of a motor for long-term running.

  5. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi, E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse, 7/2/366-MST, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Luo, J. K., E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk [Institute of Renewable Energy Environmental Technology, University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom); Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  6. Detection of Propagating Fast Sausage Waves through Detailed Analysis of a Zebra-pattern Fine Structure in a Solar Radio Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, K.; Misawa, H.; Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Katoh, Y.; Obara, T.

    2018-03-01

    Various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves have recently been detected in the solar corona and investigated intensively in the context of coronal heating and coronal seismology. In this Letter, we report the first detection of short-period propagating fast sausage mode waves in a metric radio spectral fine structure observed with the Assembly of Metric-band Aperture Telescope and Real-time Analysis System. Analysis of Zebra patterns (ZPs) in a type-IV burst revealed a quasi-periodic modulation in the frequency separation between the adjacent stripes of the ZPs (Δf ). The observed quasi-periodic modulation had a period of 1–2 s and exhibited a characteristic negative frequency drift with a rate of 3–8 MHz s‑1. Based on the double plasma resonance model, the most accepted generation model of ZPs, the observed quasi-periodic modulation of the ZP can be interpreted in terms of fast sausage mode waves propagating upward at phase speeds of 3000–8000 km s‑1. These results provide us with new insights for probing the fine structure of coronal loops.

  7. CSF in the ventricles of the brain behaves as a relay medium for arteriovenous pulse wave phase coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Butler

    Full Text Available The ventricles of the brain remain perhaps the largest anatomic structure in the human body without established primary purpose, even though their existence has been known at least since described by Aristotle. We hypothesize that the ventricles help match a stroke volume of arterial blood that arrives into the rigid cranium with an equivalent volume of ejected venous blood by spatially configuring cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to act as a low viscosity relay medium for arteriovenous pulse wave (PW phase coupling. We probe the hypothesis by comparing the spatiotemporal behavior of vascular PW about the ventricular surfaces in piglets to internal observations of ventricle wall motions and adjacent CSF pressure variations in humans. With wavelet brain angiography data obtained from piglets, we map the travel relative to brain pulse motion of arterial and venous PWs over the ventricle surfaces. We find that arterial PWs differ in CF phase from venous PWs over the surfaces of the ventricles consistent with arteriovenous PW phase coupling. We find a spatiotemporal difference in vascular PW phase between the ventral and dorsal ventricular surfaces, with the PWs arriving slightly sooner to the ventral surfaces. In humans undergoing neuroendoscopic surgery for hydrocephalus, we measure directly ventricle wall motions and the adjacent internal CSF pressure variations. We find that CSF pressure peaks slightly earlier in the ventral Third Ventricle than the dorsal Lateral Ventricle. When matched anatomically, the peri-ventricular vascular PW phase distribution in piglets complements the endo-ventricular CSF PW phase distribution in humans. This is consistent with a role for the ventricles in arteriovenous PW coupling and may add a framework for understanding hydrocephalus and other disturbances of intracranial pressure.

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulisation Mass Spectrometry for the Fast and Highly Sensitive Characterisation of Synthetic Dyes in Textile Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astefanei, A.; van Bommel, M.; Corthals, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulisation (SAWN) mass spectrometry (MS) is a method to generate gaseous ions compatible with direct MS of minute samples at femtomole sensitivity. To perform SAWN, acoustic waves are propagated through a LiNbO3 sampling chip, and are conducted to the liquid sample, which

  9. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimik, Soling; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re-entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the-art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral- or scroll-wave frequency ω, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane potential of the fibroblast and the number of fibroblasts attached to the myocytes on the stability of these waves. Finally, we show that the presence of GFDs can lead to the formation of spiral waves at high-frequency pacing.

  10. A New Coupled Ocean-Waves-Atmosphere Model Designed for Tropical Storm Studies: Example of Tropical Cyclone Bejisa (2013-2014) in the South-West Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianezze, J.; Barthe, C.; Bielli, S.; Tulet, P.; Jullien, S.; Cambon, G.; Bousquet, O.; Claeys, M.; Cordier, E.

    2018-03-01

    Ocean-Waves-Atmosphere (OWA) exchanges are not well represented in current Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems, which can lead to large uncertainties in tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts. In order to explore and better understand the impact of OWA interactions on tropical cyclone modeling, a fully coupled OWA system based on the atmospheric model Meso-NH, the oceanic model CROCO, and the wave model WW3 and called MSWC was designed and applied to the case of tropical cyclone Bejisa (2013-2014). The fully coupled OWA simulation shows good agreement with the literature and available observations. In particular, simulated significant wave height is within 30 cm of measurements made with buoys and altimeters. Short-term (wind speed are necessary to produce sea salt aerosol emissions in the right place (in the eyewall of the tropical cyclone) and with the right size distribution, which is critical for cloud microphysics.

  11. Elliptic and solitary wave solutions for Bogoyavlenskii equations system, couple Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli equations system and Time-fractional Cahn-Allen equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa M.A. Khater

    Full Text Available In this article and for the first time, we introduce and describe Khater method which is a new technique for solving nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs.. We apply this method for each of the following models Bogoyavlenskii equation, couple Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli system and Time-fractional Cahn-Allen equation. Khater method is very powerful, Effective, felicitous and fabulous method to get exact and solitary wave solution of (PDEs.. Not only just like that but it considers too one of the general methods for solving that kind of equations since it involves some methods as we will see in our discuss of the results. We make a comparison between the results of this new method and another method. Keywords: Bogoyavlenskii equations system, Couple Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli equations system, Time-fractional Cahn-Allen equation, Khater method, Traveling wave solutions, Solitary wave solutions

  12. Model simulations of line-of-sight effects in airglow imaging of acoustic and fast gravity waves from ground and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Guerrero, J.; Snively, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic waves (AWs) have been predicted to be detectable by imaging systems for the OH airglow layer [Snively, GRL, 40, 2013], and have been identified in spectrometer data [Pilger et al., JASP, 104, 2013]. AWs are weak in the mesopause region, but can attain large amplitudes in the F region [Garcia et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and have local impacts on the thermosphere and ionosphere. Similarly, fast GWs, with phase speeds over 100 m/s, may propagate to the thermosphere and impart significant local body forcing [Vadas and Fritts, JASTP, 66, 2004]. Both have been clearly identified in ionospheric total electron content (TEC), such as following the 2013 Moore, OK, EF5 tornado [Nishioka et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami [e.g., Galvan et al., RS, 47, 2012, and references therein], but AWs have yet to be unambiguously imaged in MLT data and fast GWs have low amplitudes near the threshold of detection; nevertheless, recent imaging systems have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution and sensitivity to detect both AWs and fast GWs with short periods [e.g., Pautet et al., AO, 53, 2014]. The associated detectability challenges are related to the transient nature of their signatures and to systematic challenges due to line-of-sight (LOS) effects such as enhancements and cancelations due to integration along aligned or oblique wavefronts and geometric intensity enhancements. We employ a simulated airglow imager framework that incorporates 2D and 3D emission rate data and performs the necessary LOS integrations for synthetic imaging from ground- and space-based platforms to assess relative intensity and temperature perturbations. We simulate acoustic and fast gravity wave perturbations to the hydroxyl layer from a nonlinear, compressible model [e.g., Snively, 2013] for different idealized and realistic test cases. The results show clear signal enhancements when acoustic waves are imaged off-zenith or off-nadir and the temporal evolution of these

  13. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere–ocean–wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor’Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor’easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor’Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  14. Detection of Propagating Fast Sausage Waves through a Detailed Analysis of a Zebra Pattern Fine Structure in a Solar Radio Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, K.; Misawa, H.; Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Katoh, Y.; Obara, T.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations have revealed that various modes of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the corona. In imaging observations in EUV, propagating fast magnetoacoustic waves are difficult to observe due to the lack of time resolution. Quasi-periodic modulation of radio fine structures is an important source of information on these MHD waves. Zebra patterns (ZPs) are one of such fine structures in type IV bursts, which consist of several parallel stripes superimposed on the background continuum. Although the generation mechanism of ZPs has been discussed still, the most favorable model of ZPs is so-called double plasma resonance (DPR) model. In the DPR model, the frequency separation between the adjacent stripes (Δf) is determined by the plasma density and magnetic field in their source. Hence, the variation of Δf in time and frequency represents the disturbance in their source region in the corona. We report the detection of propagating fast sausage waves through the analysis of a ZP event on 2011 June 21. The variation of Δf in time and frequency was obtained using highly resolved spectral data from the Assembly of Metric-band Aperture Telescope and Real-time Analysis System (AMATERAS). We found that Δf increases with the increase of emission frequency as a whole, which is consistent with the DPR model. Furthermore, we also found that irregularities in Δf are repetitively drifting from the high frequency side to the low frequency side. Their frequency drift rate was 3 - 8 MHz/s and the repetitive frequency was several seconds. Assuming the ZP generation by the DPR model, the drifting irregularities in Δf correspond to propagating disturbances in plasma density and magnetic field with speeds of 3000 - 8000 km/s. Taking account of these facts, the observed modulations in Δf can be explained by fast sausage waves propagating through the corona. We will also discuss the plasma conditions in the corona estimated from the observational results.

  15. Three-dimensional coupled thermoelastodynamic stress and flux induced wave propagation for isotropic half-space with scalar potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Yazdan; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza

    2018-02-01

    An asymmetric three-dimensional thermoelastodynamic wave propagation with scalar potential functions is presented for an isotropic half-space, in such a way that the wave may be originated from an arbitrary either traction or heat flux applied on a patch at the free surface of the half-space. The displacements, stresses and temperature are presented within the framework of Biot's coupled thermoelasticity formulations. By employing a complete representation for the displacement and temperature fields in terms of two scalar potential functions, the governing equations of coupled thermoelasticity are uncoupled into a sixth- and a second-order partial differential equation in cylindrical coordinate system. By virtue of Fourier expansion and Hankel integral transforms, the angular and radial variables are suppressed respectively, and a 6{th}- and a 2{nd}-order ordinary differential equation in terms of depth are received, which are solved readily, from which the displacement, stresses and temperature fields are derived in transformed space by satisfying both the regularity and boundary conditions. By applying the inverse Hankel integral transforms, the displacements and temperature are numerically evaluated to determine the solutions in the real space. The numerical evaluations are done for three specific cases of vertical and horizontal time-harmonic patch traction and a constant heat flux passing through a circular disc on the surface of the half-space. It has been previously proved that the potential functions used in this paper are applicable from elastostatics to thermoelastodynamics. Thus, the analytical solutions presented in this paper are verified by comparing the results of this study with two specific problems reported in the literature, which are an elastodynamic problem and an axisymmetric quasi-static thermoelastic problem. To show the accuracy of numerical results, the solution of this study is also compared with the solution for elastodynamics exists in

  16. Enhanced gravity-wave activity and interhemispheric coupling during the MaCWAVE/MIDAS northern summer program 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Becker

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present new sensitivity experiments that link observed anomalies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere at high latitudes during the MaCWAVE/MIDAS summer program 2002 to enhanced planetary Rossby-wave activity in the austral winter troposphere.

    We employ the same general concept of a GCM having simplified representations of radiative and latent heating as in a previous study by Becker et al. (2004. In the present version, however, the model includes no gravity wave (GW parameterization. Instead we employ a high vertical and a moderate horizontal resolution in order to describe GW effects explicitly. This is supported by advanced, nonlinear momentum diffusion schemes that allow for a self-consistent generation of inertia and mid-frequency GWs in the lower atmosphere, their vertical propagation into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, and their subsequent dissipation which is induced by prescribed horizontal and vertical mixing lengths as functions of height.

    The main anomalies in northern summer 2002 consist of higher temperatures than usual above 82 km, an anomalous eastward mean zonal wind between 70 and 90 km, an altered meridional flow, enhanced turbulent dissipation below 80 km, and enhanced temperature variations associated with GWs. These signals are all reasonably described by differences between two long-integration perpetual model runs, one with normal July conditions, and another run with modified latent heating in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere to mimic conditions that correspond to the unusual austral winter 2002. The model response to the enhanced winter hemisphere Rossby-wave activity has resulted in both an interhemispheric coupling through a downward shift of the GW-driven branch of the residual circulation and an increased GW activity at high summer latitudes. Thus a quantitative explanation of the dynamical state of the northern mesosphere and lower

  17. Global observations of 2 day wave coupling to the diurnal tide in a high-altitude forecast-assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Nguyen, V.; Palo, S. E.; Siskind, D. E.; Mitchell, N. J.; Stober, G.; Wilhelm, S.; Livesey, N. J.

    2017-04-01

    We examine wave components in a high-altitude forecast-assimilation system that arise from nonlinear interaction between the diurnal tide and the westward traveling quasi 2 day wave. The process yields a westward traveling "sum" wave with zonal wave number 4 and a period of 16 h, and an eastward traveling "difference" wave with zonal wave number 2 and a period of 2 days. While the eastward 2 day wave has been reported in satellite temperatures, the westward 16 h wave lies outside the Nyquist limits of resolution of twice daily local time satellite sampling. Hourly output from a high-altitude forecast-assimilation model is used to diagnose the nonlinear quadriad. A steady state primitive equation model forced by tide-2 day wave advection is used to intepret the nonlinear wave products. The westward 16 h wave maximizes in the midlatitude winter mesosphere and behaves like an inertia-gravity wave. The nonlinearly generated component of the eastward 2 day wave maximizes at high latitudes in the lower thermosphere, and only weakly penetrates to low latitudes. The 16 h and the eastward 2 day waves are of comparable amplitude and alias to the same apparent frequency when viewed from a satellite perspective.

  18. Resilience of branching and massive corals to wave loading under sea level rise--a coupled computational fluid dynamics-structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Tom E; Karampour, Hassan; Sleep, Rachael; Vyltla, Anisha; Albermani, Faris; Golshani, Aliasghar; Callaghan, David P; Roff, George; Mumby, Peter J

    2014-09-15

    Measurements of coral structural strength are coupled with a fluid dynamics-structural analysis to investigate the resilience of coral to wave loading under sea level rise and a typical Great Barrier Reef lagoon wave climate. The measured structural properties were used to determine the wave conditions and flow velocities that lead to structural failure. Hydrodynamic modelling was subsequently used to investigate the type of the bathymetry where coral is most vulnerable to breakage under cyclonic wave conditions, and how sea level rise (SLR) changes this vulnerability. Massive corals are determined not to be vulnerable to wave induced structural damage, whereas branching corals are susceptible at wave induced orbital velocities exceeding 0.5m/s. Model results from a large suite of idealised bathymetry suggest that SLR of 1m or a loss of skeleton strength of order 25% significantly increases the area of reef flat where branching corals are exposed to damaging wave induced flows. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of millimeter-wave irradiation on cation interdiffusion in the calcium titanate/strontium titanate ceramic couple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Kamakura, Yukari; Teranishi, Takashi; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    Interdiffusion between the perovskite CaTiO 3 and SrTiO 3 diffusion couple was investigated in an annealing method using 24-GHz MMW irradiation as the heating source. Interdiffusion was enhanced by MMW irradiation, and the apparent activation energy for interdiffusion decreased 54%, compared with conventional furnace heating. The intrinsic diffusions for both Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ were also enhanced, although their relative degrees of enhancement differed, partly as a result of differences in MMW absorptivity between the two ceramics. The observed isothermal diffusion enhancement could be ascribed to a nonthermal effect, apart from the differential degree of enhancement between the transport species. - Highlights: ► Interdiffusion was enhanced by MMW (millimeter-wave) irradiation. ► At the same time the apparent activation energy decreased. ► The enhancement degrees were different between the transport species. ► The observed diffusion enhancement can be ascribed to a nonthermal effect. ► MMW irradiation could be an effective means of preparing novel complex oxides

  20. FAST Model Calibration and Validation of the OC5-DeepCwind Floating Offshore Wind System Against Wave Tank Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robertson, Amy N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-03

    During the course of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continued, with Correlation (OC5) project, which focused on the validation of numerical methods through comparison against tank test data, the authors created a numerical FAST model of the 1:50-scale DeepCwind semisubmersible system that was tested at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands ocean basin in 2013. This paper discusses several model calibration studies that were conducted to identify model adjustments that improve the agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental test data. These calibration studies cover wind-field-specific parameters (coherence, turbulence), hydrodynamic and aerodynamic modeling approaches, as well as rotor model (blade-pitch and blade-mass imbalances) and tower model (structural tower damping coefficient) adjustments. These calibration studies were conducted based on relatively simple calibration load cases (wave only/wind only). The agreement between the final FAST model and experimental measurements is then assessed based on more-complex combined wind and wave validation cases.