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Sample records for fast volumetric spatial-spectral

  1. Volumetric fast multipole method for modeling Schroedinger's equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhiqin; Kovvali, Narayan; Lin, Wenbin; Ahn, Chang-Hoi; Couchman, Luise; Carin, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    A volume integral equation method is presented for solving Schroedinger's equation for three-dimensional quantum structures. The method is applicable to problems with arbitrary geometry and potential distribution, with unknowns required only in the part of the computational domain for which the potential is different from the background. Two different Green's functions are investigated based on different choices of the background medium. It is demonstrated that one of these choices is particularly advantageous in that it significantly reduces the storage and computational complexity. Solving the volume integral equation directly involves O(N 2 ) complexity. In this paper, the volume integral equation is solved efficiently via a multi-level fast multipole method (MLFMM) implementation, requiring O(N log N) memory and computational cost. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method for rectangular and spherical quantum wells, and the quantum harmonic oscillator, and present preliminary results of interest for multi-atom quantum phenomena

  2. Three-dimensional airways volumetric analysis before and after fast and early mandibular osteodistraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramieri, Valerio; Basile, Emanuela; Bosco, Giulio; Caresta, Elena; Papoff, Paola; Cascone, Piero

    2017-03-01

    Newborns with Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and syndromic micrognathia show microgenia and glossoptosis, which cause reduction of the airway and breathing difficulty from birth. Our goal is to analyze quantitative and qualitative volumetric changes before and after fast and early mandibular osteodistraction (FEMOD) and to compare radiological data. The sample was composed of 4 patients, who satisfied inclusion criteria for completeness of data. Computed tomography pre- and post-operation were performed, then a volumetric assessment was made with Dolphin Imaging. Polysomnography was performed before and after FEMOD. Pre- and post-operative CT scan data were compared. The analysis of all three sections showed a significant increase of volumetric parameters. The retroglossal volume average increase was 346%, and the retropalatal volume average increase was 169%. These data matched the improvement recorded by polysomnography. The data confirm FEMOD as an efficient treatment to improve airways and breathing problem in patients affected by Pierre Robin sequence and syndromic micrognathia. The three-dimensional volume rendering could be a useful method to evaluate and quantify the increase in airways volume. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast volumetric integral-equation solver for acoustic wave propagation through inhomogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleszynski, E; Bleszynski, M; Jaroszewicz, T

    2008-07-01

    Elements are described of a volumetric integral-equation-based algorithm applicable to accurate large-scale simulations of scattering and propagation of sound waves through inhomogeneous media. The considered algorithm makes possible simulations involving realistic geometries characterized by highly subwavelength details, large density contrasts, and described in terms of several million unknowns. The algorithm achieves its competitive performance, characterized by O(N log N) solution complexity and O(N) memory requirements, where N is the number of unknowns, through a fast and nonlossy fast Fourier transform based matrix compression technique, the adaptive integral method, previously developed for solving large-scale electromagnetic problems. Because of its ability of handling large problems with complex geometries, the developed solver may constitute an efficient and high fidelity numerical simulation tool for calculating acoustic field distributions in anatomically realistic models, e.g., in investigating acoustic energy transfer to the inner ear via nonairborne pathways in the human head. Examples of calculations of acoustic field distribution in a human head, which require solving linear systems of equations involving several million unknowns, are presented.

  4. F2DPR: a fast and robust cross-correlation technique for volumetric PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Thomas; Jeon, Young Jin; Lecordier, Bertrand; David, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    The current state-of-the-art in cross-correlation based time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques are the fluid trajectory correlation, FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013) and the fluid trajectory evaluation based on an ensemble-averaged cross-correlation, FTEE (Jeon et al 2014a). These techniques compute the velocity vector as a polynomial trajectory Γ in space and time, enabling the extraction of beneficial quantities such as material acceleration whilst significantly increasing the accuracy of the particle displacement prediction achieved by standard two-frame PIV. In the context of time-resolved volumetric PIV, the drawback of trajectory computation is the computational expense of the three-dimensional (3D) cross-correlation, exacerbated by the requirement to perform N  -  1 cross-correlations, where N (for typically 5≤slant N≤slant 9 ) is the number of sequential particle volumes, for each velocity field. Therefore, the acceleration of this calculation is highly desirable. This paper re-examines the application of two-dimensional (2D) cross-correlation methods to three-dimensional (3D) datasets by Bilsky et al (2011) and the binning techniques of Discetti and Astarita (2012). A new and robust version of the 2D methods is proposed and described, called fast 2D projection—re-projection (f2dpr). Performance tests based on computational time and accuracy for both two-frame and multi-frame PIV are carried out on synthetically generated data. The cases presented herein include uniaxial uniform linear displacements and shear, and simulated turbulence data. The proposed algorithm is shown to be in the order of 10 times faster than a standard 3D FFT without loss of precision for a wide range of synthetic test cases, while combining with the binning technique can yield 50 times faster computation. The algorithm is also applied to reconstructed synthetic turbulent particle fields to investigate reconstruction noise on its performance and no

  5. Spatial-spectral blood cell classification with microscopic hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Qiong; Chang, Lan; Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Microscopic hyperspectral images provide a new way for blood cell examination. The hyperspectral imagery can greatly facilitate the classification of different blood cells. In this paper, the microscopic hyperspectral images are acquired by connecting the microscope and the hyperspectral imager, and then tested for blood cell classification. For combined use of the spectral and spatial information provided by hyperspectral images, a spatial-spectral classification method is improved from the classical extreme learning machine (ELM) by integrating spatial context into the image classification task with Markov random field (MRF) model. Comparisons are done among ELM, ELM-MRF, support vector machines(SVM) and SVMMRF methods. Results show the spatial-spectral classification methods(ELM-MRF, SVM-MRF) perform better than pixel-based methods(ELM, SVM), and the proposed ELM-MRF has higher precision and show more accurate location of cells.

  6. Automated volumetric analysis of four cardiac chambers in pulmonary embolism: a novel technology for fast risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Sirota-Cohen, Chen; Steinvil, Arie; Keren, Gad; Banai, Shmuel; Sosna, Jacob; Berliner, Shlomo; Rogowski, Ori

    2012-08-01

    Identification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) who might be at risk of circulatory collapse by using a fast, automated system is highly desired. It was our objective to investigate whether automated cardiac volumetric analysis following computerised tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is useful to identify increased clot load and adverse prognosis in patients with acute PE. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive series of non-gated CTPA studies of 124 patients with acute PE and 43 controls. Right and left ventricular diameters (RV/LV) were measured on four-chamber view, while each cardiac chamber underwent automatic volumetric measurements. Findings were correlated to the pulmonary arterial obstruction index (PAOI). Outcome was expressed by admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) or mortality within 30 days. There was a significant positive correlation between the PAOI and the volumes of the right side cavities (r=0.25 for the atrium and r=0.49 for the ventricle), and between the right-to-left atrial and ventricular volume ratios (r=0.49 and r=0.57, respectively). Results for the combined outcome of mortality or ICU admission that fell in the upper tertile of the right atrial and right ventricular volumes yielded hazard ratios of 3.9 and 3.3, respectively, compared to those in the lower tertile. RV/LV diameter ratio did not correlate with outcome. In conclusion, adverse outcome and significant pulmonary clot load in patients with acute PE are associated with a volume shift towards right heart cavities, which correlates to prognosis better than the CT-measured RV/LV diameter ratio, suggesting the advantage of using fast fully automatic volumetric analysis to identify patients at risk.

  7. SU-E-T-422: Fast Analytical Beamlet Optimization for Volumetric Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Kenny S K; Lee, Louis K Y [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chan, Anthony T C [Department of Clinical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a fast optimization algorithm on CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing platform and to obtain an optimal fluence for a given target dose distribution from the pre-calculated beamlets in an analytical approach. Methods: The 2D target dose distribution was modeled as an n-dimensional vector and estimated by a linear combination of independent basis vectors. The basis set was composed of the pre-calculated beamlet dose distributions at every 6 degrees of gantry angle and the cost function was set as the magnitude square of the vector difference between the target and the estimated dose distribution. The optimal weighting of the basis, which corresponds to the optimal fluence, was obtained analytically by the least square method. Those basis vectors with a positive weighting were selected for entering into the next level of optimization. Totally, 7 levels of optimization were implemented in the study.Ten head-and-neck and ten prostate carcinoma cases were selected for the study and mapped to a round water phantom with a diameter of 20cm. The Matlab computation was performed in a heterogeneous programming environment with Intel i7 CPU and NVIDIA Geforce 840M GPU. Results: In all selected cases, the estimated dose distribution was in a good agreement with the given target dose distribution and their correlation coefficients were found to be in the range of 0.9992 to 0.9997. Their root-mean-square error was monotonically decreasing and converging after 7 cycles of optimization. The computation took only about 10 seconds and the optimal fluence maps at each gantry angle throughout an arc were quickly obtained. Conclusion: An analytical approach is derived for finding the optimal fluence for a given target dose distribution and a fast optimization algorithm implemented on the CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing environment greatly reduces the optimization time.

  8. Empirical Constraints on the Origin of Fast Radio Bursts: Volumetric Rates and Host Galaxy Demographics as a Test of Millisecond Magnetar Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M.; Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.; Villar, V. A.; Alexander, K. D.; Eftekhari, T.; Metzger, B. D.

    2017-07-01

    The localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 to a low-metallicity dwarf galaxy at z = 0.193, and its association with a luminous quiescent radio source, suggests the possibility that FRBs originate from magnetars, formed by the unusual supernovae that occur in such galaxies. We investigate this possibility via a comparison of magnetar birth rates, the FRB volumetric rate, and host galaxy demographics. We calculate average volumetric rates of possible millisecond magnetar production channels, such as superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and general magnetar production via core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). For each channel, we also explore the expected host galaxy demographics using their known properties. We determine for the first time the number density of FRB emitters (the product of their volumetric birth rate and lifetime), {R}{FRB}τ ≈ {10}4 Gpc-3, assuming that FRBs are predominantly emitted from repetitive sources similar to FRB 121102 and adopting a beaming factor of 0.1. By comparing rates, we find that production via rare channels (SLSNe, GRBs) implies a typical FRB lifetime of ˜30-300 years, in good agreement with other lines of argument. The total energy emitted over this time is consistent with the available energy stored in the magnetic field. On the other hand, any relation to magnetars produced via normal CCSNe leads to a very short lifetime of ˜0.5 years, in conflict with both theory and observation. We demonstrate that due to the diverse host galaxy distributions of the different progenitor channels, many possible sources of FRB birth can be ruled out with ≲ 10 host galaxy identifications. Conversely, targeted searches of galaxies that have previously hosted decades-old SLSNe and GRBs may be a fruitful strategy for discovering new FRBs and related quiescent radio sources, and determining the nature of their progenitors.

  9. Development and Characterization of Fast Burning Solid Fuels/Propellants for Hybrid Rocket Motors with High Volumetric Efficiency

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposed work is to develop several fast burning solid fuels/fuel-rich solid propellants for hybrid rocket motor applications. In the...

  10. Bobcat 2013: a hyperspectral data collection supporting the development and evaluation of spatial-spectral algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jason; Celenk, Mehmet; White, A. K.; Stocker, Alan D.

    2014-06-01

    The amount of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data currently available is relatively small compared to other imaging modalities, and what is suitable for developing, testing, and evaluating spatial-spectral algorithms is virtually nonexistent. In this work, a significant amount of coincident airborne hyperspectral and high spatial resolution panchromatic imagery that supports the advancement of spatial-spectral feature extraction algorithms was collected to address this need. The imagery was collected in April 2013 for Ohio University by the Civil Air Patrol, with their Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) sensor. The target materials, shapes, and movements throughout the collection area were chosen such that evaluation of change detection algorithms, atmospheric compensation techniques, image fusion methods, and material detection and identification algorithms is possible. This paper describes the collection plan, data acquisition, and initial analysis of the collected imagery.

  11. Hyperspectral Image Classification Based on the Combination of Spatial-spectral Feature and Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Zhaoxia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to avoid the problem of being over-dependent on high-dimensional spectral feature in the traditional hyperspectral image classification, a novel approach based on the combination of spatial-spectral feature and sparse representation is proposed in this paper. Firstly, we extract the spatial-spectral feature by reorganizing the local image patch with the first d principal components(PCs into a vector representation, followed by a sorting scheme to make the vector invariant to local image rotation. Secondly, we learn the dictionary through a supervised method, and use it to code the features from test samples afterwards. Finally, we embed the resulting sparse feature coding into the support vector machine(SVM for hyperspectral image classification. Experiments using three hyperspectral data show that the proposed method can effectively improve the classification accuracy comparing with traditional classification methods.

  12. SPATIAL-SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION BASED ON THE UNSUPERVISED CONVOLUTIONAL SPARSE AUTO-ENCODER FOR HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Han

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current hyperspectral remote sensing imagery spatial-spectral classification methods mainly consider concatenating the spectral information vectors and spatial information vectors together. However, the combined spatial-spectral information vectors may cause information loss and concatenation deficiency for the classification task. To efficiently represent the spatial-spectral feature information around the central pixel within a neighbourhood window, the unsupervised convolutional sparse auto-encoder (UCSAE with window-in-window selection strategy is proposed in this paper. Window-in-window selection strategy selects the sub-window spatial-spectral information for the spatial-spectral feature learning and extraction with the sparse auto-encoder (SAE. Convolution mechanism is applied after the SAE feature extraction stage with the SAE features upon the larger outer window. The UCSAE algorithm was validated by two common hyperspectral imagery (HSI datasets – Pavia University dataset and the Kennedy Space Centre (KSC dataset, which shows an improvement over the traditional hyperspectral spatial-spectral classification methods.

  13. Parallel exploitation of a spatial-spectral classification approach for hyperspectral images on RVC-CAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, R.; Madroñal, D.; Fabelo, H.; Ortega, S.; Salvador, R.; Callicó, G. M.; Juárez, E.; Sanz, C.

    2017-10-01

    Hyperspectral Imaging (HI) assembles high resolution spectral information from hundreds of narrow bands across the electromagnetic spectrum, thus generating 3D data cubes in which each pixel gathers the spectral information of the reflectance of every spatial pixel. As a result, each image is composed of large volumes of data, which turns its processing into a challenge, as performance requirements have been continuously tightened. For instance, new HI applications demand real-time responses. Hence, parallel processing becomes a necessity to achieve this requirement, so the intrinsic parallelism of the algorithms must be exploited. In this paper, a spatial-spectral classification approach has been implemented using a dataflow language known as RVCCAL. This language represents a system as a set of functional units, and its main advantage is that it simplifies the parallelization process by mapping the different blocks over different processing units. The spatial-spectral classification approach aims at refining the classification results previously obtained by using a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) filtering process, in which both the pixel spectral value and the spatial coordinates are considered. To do so, KNN needs two inputs: a one-band representation of the hyperspectral image and the classification results provided by a pixel-wise classifier. Thus, spatial-spectral classification algorithm is divided into three different stages: a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm for computing the one-band representation of the image, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, and the KNN-based filtering algorithm. The parallelization of these algorithms shows promising results in terms of computational time, as the mapping of them over different cores presents a speedup of 2.69x when using 3 cores. Consequently, experimental results demonstrate that real-time processing of hyperspectral images is achievable.

  14. A spatial-spectral approach for deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for remote sensing image transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogge, Derek; Bachmann, Martin; Rivard, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    -line surveys, or temporal data sets as computational burden becomes significant. In this paper we present a spatial-spectral approach to deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for image transformations which possess an inherently ability to reduce the effects of noise. The approach applies a spatial...... and spectral subsampling to the data, which is accomplished by deriving a limited set of eigenvectors for spatially contiguous subsets. These subset eigenvectors are compiled together to form a new noise reduced data set, which is subsequently used to derive a set of global orthogonal eigenvectors. Data from...

  15. Spatial-spectral dimensionality reduction of hyperspectral imagery with partial knowledge of class labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Nathan D.; Chew, Selene E.; Wenger, Paul S.

    2015-05-01

    Laplacian Eigenmaps (LE) and Schroedinger Eigenmaps (SE) are effective dimensionality reduction algorithms that are capable of integrating both the spatial and spectral information inherent in a hyperspectral image. In this paper, we consider how to extend LE- and SE-based spatial-spectral dimensionality reduction algorithms to situations where partial knowledge of class labels exists, for example, when a subset of pixels has been manually labeled by an expert user. This partial knowledge is incorporated through the use of cluster potentials, turning each underlying algorithm into an instance of SE. Using publicly available data, we show that incorporating this partial knowledge improves the performance of subsequent classification algorithms.

  16. Three-Dimensional Spatial-Spectral Filtering Based Feature Extraction for Hyperspectral Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKYUREK, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral pixels which have high spectral resolution are used to predict decomposition of material types on area of obtained image. Due to its multidimensional form, hyperspectral image classification is a challenging task. Hyperspectral images are also affected by radiometric noise. In order to improve the classification accuracy, many researchers are focusing on the improvement of filtering, feature extraction and classification methods. In the context of hyperspectral image classification, spatial information is as important as spectral information. In this study, a three-dimensional spatial-spectral filtering based feature extraction method is presented. It consists of three main steps. The first is a pre-processing step which include spatial-spectral information filtering in three-dimensional space. The second comprises extract functional features of filtered data. The last one is combining extracted features by serial feature fusion strategy and using to classify hyperspectral image pixels. Experiments were conducted on two popular public hyperspectral remote sensing image, 1%, 5%, 10% and 15% of samples of each classes used as training set, the remaining is used as test set. The proposed method compared with well-known methods. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieved outstanding performance than compared methods in hyperspectral image classification task.

  17. A reconstruction algorithm for three-dimensional object-space data using spatial-spectral multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhejun; Kudenov, Michael W.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a reconstruction algorithm for the Spatial-Spectral Multiplexing (SSM) optical system. The goal of this algorithm is to recover the three-dimensional spatial and spectral information of a scene, given that a one-dimensional spectrometer array is used to sample the pupil of the spatial-spectral modulator. The challenge of the reconstruction is that the non-parametric representation of the three-dimensional spatial and spectral object requires a large number of variables, thus leading to an underdetermined linear system that is hard to uniquely recover. We propose to reparameterize the spectrum using B-spline functions to reduce the number of unknown variables. Our reconstruction algorithm then solves the improved linear system via a least- square optimization of such B-spline coefficients with additional spatial smoothness regularization. The ground truth object and the optical model for the measurement matrix are simulated with both spatial and spectral assumptions according to a realistic field of view. In order to test the robustness of the algorithm, we add Poisson noise to the measurement and test on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional spatial and spectral scenes. Our analysis shows that the root mean square error of the recovered results can be achieved within 5.15%.

  18. A Weighted Spatial-Spectral Kernel RX Algorithm and Efficient Implementation on GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Zhao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The kernel RX (KRX detector proposed by Kwon and Nasrabadi exploits a kernel function to obtain a better detection performance. However, it still has two limits that can be improved. On the one hand, reasonable integration of spatial-spectral information can be used to further improve its detection accuracy. On the other hand, parallel computing can be used to reduce the processing time in available KRX detectors. Accordingly, this paper presents a novel weighted spatial-spectral kernel RX (WSSKRX detector and its parallel implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs. The WSSKRX utilizes the spatial neighborhood resources to reconstruct the testing pixels by introducing a spectral factor and a spatial window, thereby effectively reducing the interference of background noise. Then, the kernel function is redesigned as a mapping trick in a KRX detector to implement the anomaly detection. In addition, a powerful architecture based on the GPU technique is designed to accelerate WSSKRX. To substantiate the performance of the proposed algorithm, both synthetic and real data are conducted for experiments.

  19. Semi-supervised Spatial-spectral Discriminant Analysis for Hyperspectral Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Banghuan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to make full use of the spatial information embedded in the hyperspectral image to improve the classification accuracy, a semi-supervised spatial-spectral discriminant analysis (S3DA algorithm for hyperspectral image classification is proposed. According to the spatial consistency property of hyperspectral image, the intra-class scatter matrix infered from a little labeled samples preserves the spectral similarity of the same class pixels, while the spatial local pixel scatter matrix defined by the unlabeled spatial neighbors uncovers the spatial-domain local pixel neighborhood structures and the ground objects detailed distribution. The S3DA method not only maintains the spectral-domain separability of the data set, but also preserves the spatial-domain local pixel neighborhood structure, which promotes the compactness of the same class pixels or the spatial neighbor pixels in the projected subspace and enhances the classification performance. The overall classification accuracies respectively reach 81.50% and 71.77% on the PaviaU and Indian Pines data sets. Compared with the traditional spectral methods, the proposed method can effectively improve ground objects classification accuracy.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  1. Spatial-Spectral Approaches to Edge Detection in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cary M.

    This dissertation advances geoinformation science at the intersection of hyperspectral remote sensing and edge detection methods. A relatively new phenomenology among its remote sensing peers, hyperspectral imagery (HSI) comprises only about 7% of all remote sensing research - there are five times as many radar-focused peer reviewed journal articles than hyperspectral-focused peer reviewed journal articles. Similarly, edge detection studies comprise only about 8% of image processing research, most of which is dedicated to image processing techniques most closely associated with end results, such as image classification and feature extraction. Given the centrality of edge detection to mapping, that most important of geographic functions, improving the collective understanding of hyperspectral imagery edge detection methods constitutes a research objective aligned to the heart of geoinformation sciences. Consequently, this dissertation endeavors to narrow the HSI edge detection research gap by advancing three HSI edge detection methods designed to leverage HSI's unique chemical identification capabilities in pursuit of generating accurate, high-quality edge planes. The Di Zenzo-based gradient edge detection algorithm, an innovative version of the Resmini HySPADE edge detection algorithm and a level set-based edge detection algorithm are tested against 15 traditional and non-traditional HSI datasets spanning a range of HSI data configurations, spectral resolutions, spatial resolutions, bandpasses and applications. This study empirically measures algorithm performance against Dr. John Canny's six criteria for a good edge operator: false positives, false negatives, localization, single-point response, robustness to noise and unbroken edges. The end state is a suite of spatial-spectral edge detection algorithms that produce satisfactory edge results against a range of hyperspectral data types applicable to a diverse set of earth remote sensing applications. This work

  2. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  3. FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, R R; Daru, P; Barrera, A E; Mostofa Kamal, S M; Islam, S; Ul-Alam, M; Sultana, R; Rahman, M; Hossain, Md S; Lederer, P; Hurwitz, S; Chakraborty, K; Kak, N; Tierney, D B; Nardell, E

    2017-09-01

    National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka; Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Dhaka; and Chittagong Chest Disease Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. To present operational data and discuss the challenges of implementing FAST (Find cases Actively, Separate safely and Treat effectively) as a tuberculosis (TB) transmission control strategy. FAST was implemented sequentially at three hospitals. Using Xpert® MTB/RIF, 733/6028 (12.2%, 95%CI 11.4-13.0) patients were diagnosed with unsuspected TB. Patients with a history of TB who were admitted with other lung diseases had more than twice the odds of being diagnosed with unsuspected TB as those with no history of TB (OR 2.6, 95%CI 2.2-3.0, P stakeholder engagement and laboratory capacity are important for sustainability and scalability.

  4. Improved classification accuracy of powdery mildew infection levels of wine grapes by spatial-spectral analysis of hyperspectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, Uwe; Matros, Andrea; Petrovic, Tijana; Zanker, Timothy; Scott, Eileen S; Seiffert, Udo

    2017-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is an emerging means of assessing plant vitality, stress parameters, nutrition status, and diseases. Extraction of target values from the high-dimensional datasets either relies on pixel-wise processing of the full spectral information, appropriate selection of individual bands, or calculation of spectral indices. Limitations of such approaches are reduced classification accuracy, reduced robustness due to spatial variation of the spectral information across the surface of the objects measured as well as a loss of information intrinsic to band selection and use of spectral indices. In this paper we present an improved spatial-spectral segmentation approach for the analysis of hyperspectral imaging data and its application for the prediction of powdery mildew infection levels (disease severity) of intact Chardonnay grape bunches shortly before veraison. Instead of calculating texture features (spatial features) for the huge number of spectral bands independently, dimensionality reduction by means of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was applied first to derive a few descriptive image bands. Subsequent classification was based on modified Random Forest classifiers and selective extraction of texture parameters from the integral image representation of the image bands generated. Dimensionality reduction, integral images, and the selective feature extraction led to improved classification accuracies of up to [Formula: see text] for detached berries used as a reference sample (training dataset). Our approach was validated by predicting infection levels for a sample of 30 intact bunches. Classification accuracy improved with the number of decision trees of the Random Forest classifier. These results corresponded with qPCR results. An accuracy of 0.87 was achieved in classification of healthy, infected, and severely diseased bunches. However, discrimination between visually healthy and infected bunches proved to be challenging for a few samples

  5. Volumetric Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Force Office of Scientific Research Submitted by: Lin Ma, PhD Professor Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Mechanical ...established PLIF (planar LIF [11, 12]) to volumetric measurement of species concentration, and have demonstrated single- shot VLIF measurements in both...Ikeda, J., Xu, W., Carter, C.D. Single Shot 3D Flame Diagnostic Based on Volumetric Laser Induced Fluorescence (VLIF), Proceedings of the

  6. When Low Rank Representation Based Hyperspectral Imagery Classification Meets Segmented Stacked Denoising Auto-Encoder Based Spatial-Spectral Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available When confronted with limited labelled samples, most studies adopt an unsupervised feature learning scheme and incorporate the extracted features into a traditional classifier (e.g., support vector machine, SVM to deal with hyperspectral imagery classification. However, these methods have limitations in generalizing well in challenging cases due to the limited representative capacity of the shallow feature learning model, as well as the insufficient robustness of the classifier which only depends on the supervision of labelled samples. To address these two problems simultaneously, we present an effective low-rank representation-based classification framework for hyperspectral imagery. In particular, a novel unsupervised segmented stacked denoising auto-encoder-based feature learning model is proposed to depict the spatial-spectral characteristics of each pixel in the imagery with deep hierarchical structure. With the extracted features, a low-rank representation based robust classifier is then developed which takes advantage of both the supervision provided by labelled samples and unsupervised correlation (e.g., intra-class similarity and inter-class dissimilarity, etc. among those unlabelled samples. Both the deep unsupervised feature learning and the robust classifier benefit, improving the classification accuracy with limited labelled samples. Extensive experiments on hyperspectral imagery classification demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  7. Spatial-spectral flexible optical networking: enabling switching solutions for a simplified and efficient SDM network platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkos, I.; Zakynthinos, P.; Klonidis, D.; Marom, D.; Sygletos, S.; Ellis, A.; Salvadori, E.; Siracusa, D.; Angelou, M.; Papastergiou, G.; Psaila, N.; Ferran, J. F.; Ben-Ezra, S.; Jimenez, F.; Fernández-Palacios, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The traffic carried by core optical networks grows at a steady but remarkable pace of 30-40% year-over-year. Optical transmissions and networking advancements continue to satisfy the traffic requirements by delivering the content over the network infrastructure in a cost and energy efficient manner. Such core optical networks serve the information traffic demands in a dynamic way, in response to requirements for shifting of traffics demands, both temporally (day/night) and spatially (business district/residential). However as we are approaching fundamental spectral efficiency limits of singlemode fibers, the scientific community is pursuing recently the development of an innovative, all-optical network architecture introducing the spatial degree of freedom when designing/operating future transport networks. Spacedivision- multiplexing through the use of bundled single mode fibers, and/or multi-core fibers and/or few-mode fibers can offer up to 100-fold capacity increase in future optical networks. The EU INSPACE project is working on the development of a complete spatial-spectral flexible optical networking solution, offering the network ultra-high capacity, flexibility and energy efficiency required to meet the challenges of delivering exponentially growing traffic demands in the internet over the next twenty years. In this paper we will present the motivation and main research activities of the INSPACE consortium towards the realization of the overall project solution.

  8. Volumetric composition of nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Lilholt, Hans; Mannila, Juha

    2015-01-01

    . An analytical model, previously established for conventional fibre composites, is used for the analysis of the volumetric composition. For the aluminosilicate/polylactate nanocomposites, based on the established linear relationship between the porosity content and the fibre volume content, the fibre correlated...... porosity factor is determined to be 0.18. Geometrical considerations of the packing of parallel nanofibres in a square array are used to make the assumption that the maximum obtainable fibre volume content in the nanocomposites will not exceed 6 % due to the small fibre spacing that restricts full matrix...... significant figures. The plotting of the measured nanocomposite density as a function of the nanofibre weight content is shown to be a first good approach of assessing the porosity content of the materials. The known gravimetric composition of the nanocomposites is converted into a volumetric composition...

  9. Flexible Volumetric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Schlecht, Robin W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A flexible volumetric structure has a first spring that defines a three-dimensional volume and includes a serpentine structure elongatable and compressible along a length thereof. A second spring is coupled to at least one outboard edge region of the first spring. The second spring is a sheet-like structure capable of elongation along an in-plane dimension thereof. The second spring is oriented such that its in-plane dimension is aligned with the length of the first spring's serpentine structure.

  10. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  11. Parametric model of volumetric scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarill, Simon; Cassarly, William J.; Jenkins, David R.; Yang, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Guang

    2017-11-01

    We develop a method to determine volumetric scattering model parameter values based on measured BSDF characteristics. Example models often use Mie or Gegenbauer particles. The accuracy and flexibility of this approach are illustrated.

  12. Interactive stereoscopic rendering of volumetric environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ming; Zhang, Nan; Qu, Huamin; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an efficient stereoscopic rendering algorithm supporting interactive navigation through large-scale 3D voxel-based environments. In this algorithm, most of the pixel values of the right image are derived from the left image by a fast 3D warping based on a specific stereoscopic projection geometry. An accelerated volumetric ray casting then fills the remaining gaps in the warped right image. Our algorithm has been parallelized on a multiprocessor by employing effective task partitioning schemes and achieved a high cache coherency and load balancing. We also extend our stereoscopic rendering to include view-dependent shading and transparency effects. We have applied our algorithm in two virtual navigation systems, flythrough over terrain and virtual colonoscopy, and reached interactive stereoscopic rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second on a 16-processor SGI Challenge.

  13. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  14. Nonrigid registration of volumetric images using ranked order statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennakoon, Ruwan; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza; Cao, Zhenwei

    2014-01-01

    burden and increase the registration accuracy has become an intensive area of research. In this paper we propose a fast and accurate non-rigid registration method for intra-modality volumetric images. Our approach exploits the information provided by an order statistics based segmentation method, to find......Non-rigid image registration techniques using intensity based similarity measures are widely used in medical imaging applications. Due to high computational complexities of these techniques, particularly for volumetric images, finding appropriate registration methods to both reduce the computation...... the important regions for registration and use an appropriate sampling scheme to target those areas and reduce the registration computation time. A unique advantage of the proposed method is its ability to identify the point of diminishing returns and stop the registration process. Our experiments...

  15. Volumetric Optoacoustic Temperature Mapping in Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Francisco Javier Oyaga; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-08-29

    Photothermal therapy and ablation are commonplace medical procedures employed for treatment of tumors, vascular and brain abnormalities as well as other disorders that require selective destruction of tissues. Yet, accurate mapping of the dynamic temperature field distribution in the treated region represents an unmet clinical need, strongly affecting the clinical outcome of these interventions. We introduce a fast three-dimensional temperature mapping method based on real-time optoacoustic sensing of the treated region coupled with a thermal-diffusion-based model of heat distribution in tissues. Deviations of the optoacoustic temperature readings provided at 40  ms intervals remained below 10% in tissue-mimicking phantom experiments for temperature elevations above 3 °C, as validated by simultaneous thermocouple measurements. Performance of the new method to dynamically estimate the volumetric temperature distribution was further showcased in post-mortem mouse imaging experiments. The newly discovered capacity to non-invasively measure the temperature map in an entire treated volume with both high spatial and temporal resolutions holds potential for improving safety and efficacy of light-based therapeutic interventions.

  16. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  17. Real-time volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this brief review is to review the current status of real-time 3D scintillation dosimetry and what has been done so far in this area. The basic concept is to use a large volume of a scintillator material (liquid or solid) to measure or image the dose distributions from external radiation therapy (RT) beams in three dimensions. In this configuration, the scintillator material fulfills the dual role of being the detector and the phantom material in which the measurements are being performed. In this case, dose perturbations caused by the introduction of a detector within a phantom will not be at issue. All the detector configurations that have been conceived to date used a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera to measure the light produced within the scintillator. In order to accurately measure the scintillation light, one must correct for various optical artefacts that arise as the light propagates from the scintillating centers through the optical chain to the CCD chip. Quenching, defined in its simplest form as a nonlinear response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) charged particles, is one of the disadvantages when such systems are used to measure the absorbed dose from high-LET particles such protons. However, correction methods that restore the linear dose response through the whole proton range have been proven to be effective for both liquid and plastic scintillators. Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution and accurate 3D imaging of RT dose distributions. Further research is warranted to optimize the necessary image reconstruction methods and optical corrections needed to achieve its full potential.

  18. CUDA Accelerated Multi-domain Volumetric Image Segmentation and Using a Higher Order Level Set Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Anton, François; Zhang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for smooth surface segmentation (partition) of volumetric images using higher order level set scheme. The segmentation allows for a multi-domain partitioning by minimizing modi-fied Mumford-Shah functional. Since, volumetric images tend to be de......-manding in terms of computation and memory space, we employ a CUDA based fast GPU segmentation and provide accuracy measures compared with an equivalent CPU implementation. Our resulting surfaces are C2-smooth resulting from tri-cubic spline interpolation algorithm. We also provide error bounds...... on the reconstruction/segmentation....

  19. Hologlyphics: volumetric image synthesis performance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Walter

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a novel volumetric image synthesis system and artistic technique, which generate moving volumetric images in real-time, integrated with music. The system, called the Hologlyphic Funkalizer, is performance based, wherein the images and sound are controlled by a live performer, for the purposes of entertaining a live audience and creating a performance art form unique to volumetric and autostereoscopic images. While currently configured for a specific parallax barrier display, the Hologlyphic Funkalizer's architecture is completely adaptable to various volumetric and autostereoscopic display technologies. Sound is distributed through a multi-channel audio system; currently a quadraphonic speaker setup is implemented. The system controls volumetric image synthesis, production of music and spatial sound via acoustic analysis and human gestural control, using a dedicated control panel, motion sensors, and multiple musical keyboards. Music can be produced by external acoustic instruments, pre-recorded sounds or custom audio synthesis integrated with the volumetric image synthesis. Aspects of the sound can control the evolution of images and visa versa. Sounds can be associated and interact with images, for example voice synthesis can be combined with an animated volumetric mouth, where nuances of generated speech modulate the mouth's expressiveness. Different images can be sent to up to 4 separate displays. The system applies many novel volumetric special effects, and extends several film and video special effects into the volumetric realm. Extensive and various content has been developed and shown to live audiences by a live performer. Real world applications will be explored, with feedback on the human factors.

  20. Why Students Fail at Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Miles

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the reasons for students' failure in an introductory volumetric analysis course by analyzing test papers and judging them against a hypothetical ideal method of grading laboratory techniques. (GA)

  1. Volumetric B1 (+) mapping of the brain at 7T using DREAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrke, Kay; Versluis, Maarten J; Webb, Andrew; Börnert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To tailor and optimize the Dual Refocusing Echo Acquisition Mode (DREAM) approach for volumetric B1 (+) mapping of the brain at 7T. A new DREAM echo timing scheme based on the virtual stimulated echo was derived to minimize potential effects of transverse relaxation. Furthermore, the DREAM B1 (+) mapping performance was investigated in simulations and experimentally in phantoms and volunteers for volumetric applications, studying and optimizing the accuracy of the sequence with respect to saturation effects, slice profile imperfections, and T1 and T2 relaxation. Volumetric brain protocols were compiled for different isotropic resolutions (5-2.5 mm) and SENSE factors, and were studied in vivo for different RF drive modes (circular/linear polarization) and the application of dielectric pads. Volumetric B1 (+) maps with good SNR at 2.5 mm isotropic resolution were acquired in about 20 s or less. The specific absorption rate was well below the safety limits for all scans. Mild flow artefacts were observed in the large vessels. Moreover, a slight contrast in the ventricle was observed in the B1 (+) maps, which could be attributed to T1 and T2 relaxation effects. DREAM enables safe, very fast, and robust volumetric B1 (+) mapping of the brain at ultrahigh fields. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases during follow-up--initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, Michael; Bolte, H; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Bornemann, L; Dicken, V; Delorme, S; Kauczor, H-U; Heller, M; Biederer, J

    2011-04-01

    Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible evaluation. The current standard is RECIST measurement with its inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is an alternative for therapy monitoring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases using a software prototype in a follow-up setting. MSCT was performed in 50 patients covering the chest, abdomen and pelvis. A total of 174 suspicious lymph nodes were evaluated by two radiologists regarding short axis diameters and volumetric analysis using semi-automated software. Quality of segmentation, time, maximum diameter and volume were documented. Variability of the derived change rates was computed as the standard deviation of the difference of the obtained respective change rates. The software performance provides robust volumetric analysis. Quality of segmentation was rated acceptable to excellent in 76-79% by each reader. Mean time spent per lesion was 38 s. The variability of change in effective diameters was 10.6%; for change rates of RECIST maximum diameter variability was 27.5%. Semi-automated volumetric analysis allows fast and convenient segmentation of most lymph node metastases. Compared with RECIST the inter-observer-variability in baseline and follow-up is reduced. This should principally allow subtle changes to be subclassified within the RECIST stable range as minor response [-15% to +10%].

  3. Process conditions and volumetric composition in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is linked to the gravimetric composition, and it is influenced by the conditions of the manufacturing process. A model for the volumetric composition is presented, where the volume fractions of fibers, matrix and porosity are calculated...... as a function of the fiber weight fraction, and where parameters are included for the composite microstructure, and the fiber assembly compaction behavior. Based on experimental data of composites manufactured with different process conditions, together with model predictions, different types of process related...... the fiber and matrix volume fractions are only slightly changed. Air entrapment in the matrix due to non-ideal process conditions is found to have a marked effect on the volumetric composition. For composites with such type of matrix porosity, the porosity content is decreased when the fiber content...

  4. Volumetric composition in composites and historical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is of importance for the prediction of mechanical and physical properties, and in particular to assess the best possible (normally the highest) values for these properties. The volumetric model for the composition of (fibrous) composites gives...... guidance to the optimal combination of fibre content, matrix content and porosity content, in order to achieve the best obtainable properties. Several composite materials systems have been shown to be handleable with this model. An extensive series of experimental data for the system of cellulose fibres...... and polymer (resin) was produced in 1942 – 1944, and these data have been (re-)analysed by the volumetric composition model, and the property values for density, stiffness and strength have been evaluated. Good agreement has been obtained and some further observations have been extracted from the analysis....

  5. Uncertainty quantification in volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Charonko, John; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) uncertainty quantification is challenging due to coupled sources of elemental uncertainty and complex data reduction procedures in the measurement chain. Recent developments in this field have led to uncertainty estimation methods for planar PIV. However, no framework exists for three-dimensional volumetric PIV. In volumetric PIV the measurement uncertainty is a function of reconstructed three-dimensional particle location that in turn is very sensitive to the accuracy of the calibration mapping function. Furthermore, the iterative correction to the camera mapping function using triangulated particle locations in space (volumetric self-calibration) has its own associated uncertainty due to image noise and ghost particle reconstructions. Here we first quantify the uncertainty in the triangulated particle position which is a function of particle detection and mapping function uncertainty. The location uncertainty is then combined with the three-dimensional cross-correlation uncertainty that is estimated as an extension of the 2D PIV uncertainty framework. Finally the overall measurement uncertainty is quantified using an uncertainty propagation equation. The framework is tested with both simulated and experimental cases. For the simulated cases the variation of estimated uncertainty with the elemental volumetric PIV error sources are also evaluated. The results show reasonable prediction of standard uncertainty with good coverage.

  6. Green chemistry volumetric titration kit for pharmaceutical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stopcock SC and Spring Sp models of Econoburette (Calibrated, RTC (NR), Ministry of Small Scale Industries, Government of India), developed for semimicro volumetric titration of pharmaceutical formulations are reported. These are economized and risk free titration where pipette is replaced by an inbuilt pipette and ...

  7. Volumetric, dashboard-mounted augmented display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David; Grabowski, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    The optical design of a compact volumetric display for drivers is presented. The system displays a true volume image with realistic physical depth cues, such as focal accommodation, parallax and convergence. A large eyebox is achieved with a pupil expander. The windshield is used as the augmented reality combiner. A freeform windshield corrector is placed at the dashboard.

  8. Marginal Space Deep Learning: Efficient Architecture for Volumetric Image Parsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghesu, Florin C; Krubasik, Edward; Georgescu, Bogdan; Singh, Vivek; Yefeng Zheng; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-05-01

    Robust and fast solutions for anatomical object detection and segmentation support the entire clinical workflow from diagnosis, patient stratification, therapy planning, intervention and follow-up. Current state-of-the-art techniques for parsing volumetric medical image data are typically based on machine learning methods that exploit large annotated image databases. Two main challenges need to be addressed, these are the efficiency in scanning high-dimensional parametric spaces and the need for representative image features which require significant efforts of manual engineering. We propose a pipeline for object detection and segmentation in the context of volumetric image parsing, solving a two-step learning problem: anatomical pose estimation and boundary delineation. For this task we introduce Marginal Space Deep Learning (MSDL), a novel framework exploiting both the strengths of efficient object parametrization in hierarchical marginal spaces and the automated feature design of Deep Learning (DL) network architectures. In the 3D context, the application of deep learning systems is limited by the very high complexity of the parametrization. More specifically 9 parameters are necessary to describe a restricted affine transformation in 3D, resulting in a prohibitive amount of billions of scanning hypotheses. The mechanism of marginal space learning provides excellent run-time performance by learning classifiers in clustered, high-probability regions in spaces of gradually increasing dimensionality. To further increase computational efficiency and robustness, in our system we learn sparse adaptive data sampling patterns that automatically capture the structure of the input. Given the object localization, we propose a DL-based active shape model to estimate the non-rigid object boundary. Experimental results are presented on the aortic valve in ultrasound using an extensive dataset of 2891 volumes from 869 patients, showing significant improvements of up to 45

  9. Some questions and answers concerning fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1980-01-01

    The theme of the lecture is the place of the fast reactor in an evolving nuclear programme. The whole question of plutonium is first considered, ie its method of production and the ways in which it can be used in the fast reactor fuel cycle. Whether fast reactors are necessary is then discussed. Their safety is examined with particular attention to those design features which are most criticised ie high volumetric power density of the core, and the use of liquid sodium as coolant. Attention is then paid to environmental and safeguard aspects. (U.K.)

  10. Volumetric analysis of chronic maxillary atelectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Giant C; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Bleier, Benjamin S; Holbrook, Eric H; Busaba, Nicolas Y; Yoon, Michael K; Gray, Stacey T

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between orbit and maxillary sinus volumes in patients with chronic maxillary atelectasis (CMA), commonly known as silent sinus syndrome if enophthalmos is present, is poorly understood. A retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for CMA from 2005 to 2013 was performed. Computed tomography (CT) images were analyzed using OsiriX 5.8.2 software for volumetric analysis of the orbit and maxillary sinus at presentation and after surgical treatment with ESS. Pretreatment mean orbit volumes on the diseased side (DS) and the contralateral side (CS) were 29.22 and 26.50 mL, respectively (p Volumetric analysis is a powerful and novel method for objectively demonstrating the degree of orbit expansion and maxillary sinus contraction seen with CMA. Spontaneous maxillary sinus expansion and a decrease in orbit volume can occur after ESS, but post-ESS volumes do not return to the normal volume of the CS.

  11. Plant fibre composites - porosity and volumetric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the combination of a high fibre volume fraction, a low porosity and a high composite density is optimal. Experimental data from the literature on volumetric composition and density of four types of plant fibre composites are used to validate the model. It is demonstrated that the model provides a concept......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relative large amount of porosity, which considerably influences properties and performance of the composites. The large porosity must be integrated in the conversion of weight fractions into volume fractions of the fibre and matrix parts. A model...... is presented to predict the porosity as a function of the fibre weight fractions, and to calculate the related fibre and matrix volume fractions, as well as the density of the composite. The model predicts two cases of composite volumetric interaction separated by a transition fibre weight fraction, at which...

  12. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  13. Combined surface and volumetric occlusion shading

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Matthias O.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The proposed algorithm extends the recently proposed Directional Occlusion Shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  15. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E.; Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Keeser, D.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  16. A volumetric data system for environmental robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourtellott, J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional, spatially organized or volumetric data system provides an effective means for integrating and presenting environmental sensor data to robotic systems and operators. Because of the unstructed nature of environmental restoration applications, new robotic control strategies are being developed that include environmental sensors and interactive data interpretation. The volumetric data system provides key features to facilitate these new control strategies including: integrated representation of surface, subsurface and above-surface data; differentiation of mapped and unmapped regions in space; sculpting of regions in space to best exploit data from line-of-sight sensors; integration of diverse sensor data (for example, dimensional, physical/geophysical, chemical, and radiological); incorporation of data provided at different spatial resolutions; efficient access for high-speed visualization and analysis; and geometric modeling tools to update a open-quotes world modelclose quotes of an environment. The applicability to underground storage tank remediation and buried waste site remediation are demonstrated in several examples. By integrating environmental sensor data into robotic control, the volumetric data system will lead to safer, faster, and more cost-effective environmental cleanup

  17. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E. [University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); Keeser, D. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Innenstadtkliniken Medical Centre, Munich (Germany)

    2014-10-16

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  18. Biomimetic joint spatial-spectral pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2003-08-01

    Most animals use color and shape to recognize things in their worlds. Shapes are properties of objects inferable from their 2D images. Colors are spectral discriminants computed by their brains using data sensed in 2-4 broad, spectrally overlapping bands. So color is not an object property. Both shape and color combine to make discrimination work well. I will describe Artificial Color and then ways to recognize an Artificially colored image.

  19. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  20. Volumetric real-time imaging using a CMUT ring array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2012-06-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device. This paper presents simulated and experimental imaging results for the described CMUT ring array. Three different imaging methods--flash, classic phased array (CPA), and synthetic phased array (SPA)--were used in the study. For SPA imaging, two techniques to improve the image quality--Hadamard coding and aperture weighting--were also applied. The results show that SPA with Hadamard coding and aperture weighting is a good option for ring-array imaging. Compared with CPA, it achieves better image resolution and comparable signal-to-noise ratio at a much faster image acquisition rate. Using this method, a fast frame rate of up to 463 volumes per second is achievable if limited only by the ultrasound time of flight; with the described system we reconstructed three cross-sectional images in real-time at 10 frames per second, which was limited by the computation time in synthetic beamforming.

  1. Illustration-inspired depth enhanced volumetric medical visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svakhine, Nikolai A; Ebert, David S; Andrews, William M

    2009-01-01

    Volume illustration can be used to provide insight into source data from CT/MRI scanners in much the same way as medical illustration depicts the important details of anatomical structures. As such, proven techniques used in medical illustration should be transferable to volume illustration, providing scientists with new tools to visualize their data. In recent years, a number of techniques have been developed to enhance the rendering pipeline and create illustrative effects similar to the ones found in medical textbooks and surgery manuals. Such effects usually highlight important features of the subject while subjugating its context and providing depth cues for correct perception. Inspired by traditional visual and line-drawing techniques found in medical illustration, we have developed a collection of fast algorithms for more effective emphasis/de-emphasis of data as well as conveyance of spatial relationships. Our techniques utilize effective outlining techniques and selective depth enhancement to provide perceptual cues of object importance as well as spatial relationships in volumetric datasets. Moreover, we have used illustration principles to effectively combine and adapt basic techniques so that they work together to provide consistent visual information and a uniform style.

  2. Volumetrically controlled ultrafiltration. Current experiences and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, T; Ahrenholz, P; Falkenhagen, D; Klinkmann, H

    1982-05-01

    Exact control of ultrafiltration (UF) is a prerequisite for high flux dialysis and hemodiafiltration. Volumetric dialysate balancing is the best current method for the use of dialyzers with high water permeabilities. The precision of UF control by volumetric dialysate balancing is in agreement with all medical requirements. A positive influence of volumetric UF control on patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis can be shown by the frequencies of dialysis side effects. Volumetric UF control is only a first step towards an intelligent UF module to correlate water removal, solute removal and sodium balance.

  3. Computational simulation of two-dimensional transient natural convection in volumetrically heated square enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural convection is a physical phenomenon that has been investigated in nuclear engineering so as to provide information about heat transfer in severe accident conditions involving nuclear reactors. This research reported transient natural convection of fluids with uniformly distributed volumetrically heat generation in square cavity with isothermal side walls and adiabatic top/bottom walls. Two Prandtl numbers were considered, 0:0321 and 0:71. Direct numerical simulations were applied in order to obtain results about the velocities of the fluid in directions x and y. These results were used in Fast Fourier Transform, which showed the periodic, quasi-chaotic and chaotic behavior of transient laminar flow. (author)

  4. Solvent evaporation induced graphene powder with high volumetric capacitance and outstanding rate capability for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Raj, Devaraj Vasanth; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Zhaoping

    2018-04-01

    Graphene-based electrode materials for supercapacitors usually suffer from poor volumetric performance due to the low density. The enhancement of volumetric capacitance by densification of graphene materials, however, is usually accompanied by deterioration of rate capability, as the huge contraction of pore size hinders rapid diffusion of electrolytes. Thus, it is important to develop suitable pore size in graphene materials, which can sustain fast ion diffusion and avoid excessive voids to acquire high density simultaneously for supercapacitor applications. Accordingly, we propose a simple solvent evaporation method to control the pore size of graphene powders by adjusting the surface tension of solvents. Ethanol is used instead of water to reduce the shrinkage degree of graphene powder during solvent evaporation process, due to its lower surface tension comparing with water. Followed by the assistance of mechanical compression, graphene powder having high compaction density of 1.30 g cm-3 and a large proportion of mesopores in the pore size range of 2-30 nm is obtained, which delivers high volumetric capacitance of 162 F cm-3 and exhibits outstanding rate performance of 76% capacity retention at a high current density of 100 A g-1 simultaneously.

  5. Breast volumetric analysis for aesthetic planning in breast reconstruction: a literature review of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2016-04-01

    Accurate volumetric analysis is an essential component of preoperative planning in both reconstructive and aesthetic breast procedures towards achieving symmetrization and patient-satisfactory outcome. Numerous comparative studies and reviews of individual techniques have been reported. However, a unifying review of all techniques comparing their accuracy, reliability, and practicality has been lacking. A review of the published English literature dating from 1950 to 2015 using databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE, was undertaken. Since Bouman's first description of water displacement method, a range of volumetric assessment techniques have been described: thermoplastic casting, direct anthropomorphic measurement, two-dimensional (2D) imaging, and computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. However, most have been unreliable, difficult to execute and demonstrate limited practicability. Introduction of 3D surface imaging has revolutionized the field due to its ease of use, fast speed, accuracy, and reliability. However, its widespread use has been limited by its high cost and lack of high level of evidence. Recent developments have unveiled the first web-based 3D surface imaging program, 4D imaging, and 3D printing. Despite its importance, an accurate, reliable, and simple breast volumetric analysis tool has been elusive until the introduction of 3D surface imaging technology. However, its high cost has limited its wide usage. Novel adjunct technologies, such as web-based 3D surface imaging program, 4D imaging, and 3D printing, appear promising.

  6. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in patients with malignant melanoma stage III/IV--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, M; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Giesel, F L; Bornemann, L; Dicken, V; Kopp-Schneider, A; Moser, C; Delorme, S; Kauczor, H-U

    2008-06-01

    Therapy monitoring in oncological patient care requires accurate and reliable imaging and post-processing methods. RECIST criteria are the current standard, with inherent disadvantages. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of semi-automated volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in patients with malignant melanoma compared to manual volumetric analysis and RECIST. Multislice CT was performed in 47 patients, covering the chest, abdomen and pelvis. In total, 227 suspicious, enlarged lymph nodes were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists regarding diameters (RECIST), manually measured volume by placement of ROIs and semi-automated volumetric analysis. Volume (ml), quality of segmentation (++/--) and time effort (s) were evaluated in the study. The semi-automated volumetric analysis software tool was rated acceptable to excellent in 81% of all cases (reader 1) and 79% (reader 2). Median time for the entire segmentation process and necessary corrections was shorter with the semi-automated software than by manual segmentation. Bland-Altman plots showed a significantly lower interobserver variability for semi-automated volumetric than for RECIST measurements. The study demonstrated feasibility of volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases. The software allows a fast and robust segmentation in up to 80% of all cases. Ease of use and time needed are acceptable for application in the clinical routine. Variability and interuser bias were reduced to about one third of the values found for RECIST measurements.

  7. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in patients with malignant melanoma stage III/IV-A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabel, M.; Tengg-Kobligk, H. von; Giesel, F.L.; Delorme, S.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Bornemann, L.; Dicken, V.; Kopp-Schneider, A.; Moser, C.

    2008-01-01

    Therapy monitoring in oncological patient care requires accurate and reliable imaging and post-processing methods. RECIST criteria are the current standard, with inherent disadvantages. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of semi-automated volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in patients with malignant melanoma compared to manual volumetric analysis and RECIST. Multislice CT was performed in 47 patients, covering the chest, abdomen and pelvis. In total, 227 suspicious, enlarged lymph nodes were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists regarding diameters (RECIST), manually measured volume by placement of ROIs and semi-automated volumetric analysis. Volume (ml), quality of segmentation (++/-) and time effort (s) were evaluated in the study. The semi-automated volumetric analysis software tool was rated acceptable to excellent in 81% of all cases (reader 1) and 79% (reader 2). Median time for the entire segmentation process and necessary corrections was shorter with the semi-automated software than by manual segmentation. Bland-Altman plots showed a significantly lower interobserver variability for semi-automated volumetric than for RECIST measurements. The study demonstrated feasibility of volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases. The software allows a fast and robust segmentation in up to 80% of all cases. Ease of use and time needed are acceptable for application in the clinical routine. Variability and interuser bias were reduced to about one third of the values found for RECIST measurements. (orig.)

  8. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinga, Wietse; Lagerwaard, Frank; Verbakel, Wilko; Slotman, Ben; Senan, Suresh

    2010-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows for improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs) in advanced pancreatic cancer. A planning study evaluated if volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) could be used as an alternative to IMRT in such cases. In ten patients, five-field IMRT (5f-IMRT) plans with fixed gantry positions were compared to RA plans using similar constraints for planning target volume (PTV) and OARs. PTV coverage, conformity indices (CI), and OAR doses were compared. One patient was treated using RA and calculated dose distributions were measured in coronal planes in a solid-water phantom. RA plans showed superior mean CI of 1.09 +/- 0.02 (+/- 1 SD [standard deviation]) versus 1.20 +/- 0.10 in 5f-IMRT (p = 0.003). Both techniques achieved similar sparing of the right kidney, but RA significantly reduced left kidney doses with V(15) of 7.2% +/- 5.3% and 15.9% +/- 11.1%, respectively; p = 0.02. RA modestly decreased mean doses to liver (13.8 vs. 15.1 Gy; p = 0.003), stomach (16.7 vs. 17.9 Gy; p = 0.017), small bowel (19.8 vs. 22.1 Gy; p < 0.001), and duodenum (38.8 vs. 41.9 Gy; p = 0.004). Film dosimetry revealed excellent agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. The delivery time for RA was < 3 min. RA planning achieved superior CI for pancreatic tumors compared to 5f-IMRT, and modestly reduced OAR doses. Fast treatment delivery using RA may decrease the risk of intrafractional organ motion.

  9. Radiofrequency volumetric reduction for masseteric hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin Park, Young; Woo Jo, Yong; Bang, Sa Ik; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lim, So Young; Mun, Goo Hyun; Hyon, Won Sok; Oh, Kap Sung

    2007-01-01

    Masseteric hypertrophy occurs frequently among Asians, including Koreans, because of racial characteristics and dietary habits. It is thought to be an unpleasant feature, especially because of its strong and masculine impression. Recently, the authors developed a method for the volumetric reduction of hypertrophied masseter muscles using radiofrequency energy to correct the squared facial appearance caused by the hypertrophy. This study was performed to investigate the effects of radiofrequency applied to reduce hypertrophied masseter muscles of patients who sought an aesthetic alternative for a slim, smooth, and feminine-looking lower facial contour. A total of 340 patients were treated. The patients usually recognized the volume change 3 to 6 weeks after treatment, and an objective volume reduction was observed within 3 months of the operation. The range of the reduction in the masseter thickness, as measured by ultrasonic examination at a 6-month postoperative follow-up visit, was 10% to 60% (mean, 27%). Most of the patients could eat a nearly normal diet after 4 weeks and were satisfied with the improved aesthetic contour lines of their lower face. Radiofrequency-induced coagulation tissue necrosis of the masseter did not cause any infections or limitations of mouth opening, and the clinical improvement was well maintained after the treatment.

  10. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric particle distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieneke, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    For tracking the motion of illuminated particles in space and time several volumetric flow measurement techniques are available like 3D-particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) recording images from typically three to four viewing directions. For higher seeding densities and the same experimental setup, tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) reconstructs voxel intensities using an iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique, MART) followed by cross-correlation of sub-volumes computing instantaneous 3D flow fields on a regular grid. A novel hybrid algorithm is proposed here that similar to MART iteratively reconstructs 3D-particle locations by comparing the recorded images with the projections calculated from the particle distribution in the volume. But like 3D-PTV, particles are represented by 3D-positions instead of voxel-based intensity blobs as in MART. Detailed knowledge of the optical transfer function and the particle image shape is mandatory, which may differ for different positions in the volume and for each camera. Using synthetic data it is shown that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to about 0.05 ppp with similar accuracy as Tomo-PIV. Finally the method is validated with experimental data. (paper)

  11. Hyperspectral image classification based on volumetric texture and dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongjun; Sheng, Yehua; Du, Peijun; Chen, Chen; Liu, Kui

    2015-06-01

    A novel approach using volumetric texture and reduced-spectral features is presented for hyperspectral image classification. Using this approach, the volumetric textural features were extracted by volumetric gray-level co-occurrence matrices (VGLCM). The spectral features were extracted by minimum estimated abundance covariance (MEAC) and linear prediction (LP)-based band selection, and a semi-supervised k-means (SKM) clustering method with deleting the worst cluster (SKMd) bandclustering algorithms. Moreover, four feature combination schemes were designed for hyperspectral image classification by using spectral and textural features. It has been proven that the proposed method using VGLCM outperforms the gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) method, and the experimental results indicate that the combination of spectral information with volumetric textural features leads to an improved classification performance in hyperspectral imagery.

  12. Increasing the volumetric efficiency of Diesel engines by intake pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Hans

    1933-01-01

    Development of a method for calculating the volumetric efficiency of piston engines with intake pipes. Application of this method to the scavenging pumps of two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging and to four-stroke-cycle engines. The utility of the method is demonstrated by volumetric-efficiency tests of the two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging. Its practical application to the calculation of intake pipes is illustrated by example.

  13. A Technique for Volumetric CSG Based on Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new technique for volumetric CSG is presented. The technique requires the input volumes to correspond to solids which fulfill a voxelization suitability criterion. Assume the CSG operation is union. The volumetric union of two such volumes is defined in terms of the voxelization...... of the union of the two original solids. The theory behind the new technique is discussed, the algorithm and implementation are presented. Finally, we present images and timings....

  14. Volumetric graphics in liquid using holographic femtosecond laser pulse excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kota; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    Much attention has been paid to the development of three-dimensional volumetric displays in the fields of optics and computer graphics, and it is a dream of we display researchers. However, full-color volumetric displays are challenging because many voxels with different colors have to be formed to render volumetric graphics in real three-dimensional space. Here, we show a new volumetric display in which microbubble voxels are three-dimensionally generated in a liquid by focused femtosecond laser pulses. Use of a high-viscosity liquid, which is the key idea of this system, slows down the movement of the microbubbles, and as a result, volumetric graphics can be displayed. This "volumetric bubble display" has a wide viewing angle and simple refresh and requires no addressing wires because it involves optical access to transparent liquid and achieves full-color graphics composed on light-scattering voxels controlled by illumination light sources. In addition, a bursting of bubble graphics system using an ultrasonic vibrator also has been demonstrated. This technology will open up a wide range of applications in three-dimensional displays, augmented reality and computer graphics.

  15. FAST scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anna

    FAST-skanning er en metode, der har til formål at hurtigt diagnosticere fri væske i bughulen hos traumapatienter og andre akutte patienter. Denne skanningsteknik blev først introduceret til hunde i 2004, og omfatter ultralydsskanning af specifikke punkter i bughulen, hvor der er stor chance....../sorte) områder. I dag bruges FAST-skanning meget hyppigt indenfor human og veterinær akutmedicin. Det kan ses som et værktøj for dyrlæger som ikke arbejder med ultralyd til daglig. FAST-skanning har mange fordele; proceduren er effektiv og kan tage under 3 minutter, men har alligevel høj diagnostisk værdi. Det...... nødvendigt. Det skal dog understreges, at de abdominale organer ikke undersøges specifikt. Det kan være svært at skelne mellem væske i peritonealhulen og i det retroperitoneale rum. Man kan heller ikke karakterisere væsken og derved skelne mellem f.eks. blod, pus eller urin. Siden FAST-skanning blev...

  16. Fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Peter

    Bogen omfatter en gennemgang af lovgivning, praksis og teori vedrørende køb af fast ejendom og offentligretlig og privatretlig regulering. Bogen belyser bl.a. de privatretlige emner: købers misligholdelsesbeføjelser, servitutter, naboret, hævd og erstatningsansvar for miljøskader samt den...

  17. Subcortical volumetric abnormalities in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, D P; Westlye, L T; van Erp, T G M; Rasmussen, J; Leonardo, C D; Faskowitz, J; Haukvik, U K; Hartberg, C B; Doan, N T; Agartz, I; Dale, A M; Gruber, O; Krämer, B; Trost, S; Liberg, B; Abé, C; Ekman, C J; Ingvar, M; Landén, M; Fears, S C; Freimer, N B; Bearden, C E; Sprooten, E; Glahn, D C; Pearlson, G D; Emsell, L; Kenney, J; Scanlon, C; McDonald, C; Cannon, D M; Almeida, J; Versace, A; Caseras, X; Lawrence, N S; Phillips, M L; Dima, D; Delvecchio, G; Frangou, S; Satterthwaite, T D; Wolf, D; Houenou, J; Henry, C; Malt, U F; Bøen, E; Elvsåshagen, T; Young, A H; Lloyd, A J; Goodwin, G M; Mackay, C E; Bourne, C; Bilderbeck, A; Abramovic, L; Boks, M P; van Haren, N E M; Ophoff, R A; Kahn, R S; Bauer, M; Pfennig, A; Alda, M; Hajek, T; Mwangi, B; Soares, J C; Nickson, T; Dimitrova, R; Sussmann, J E; Hagenaars, S; Whalley, H C; McIntosh, A M; Thompson, P M; Andreassen, O A

    2016-12-01

    Considerable uncertainty exists about the defining brain changes associated with bipolar disorder (BD). Understanding and quantifying the sources of uncertainty can help generate novel clinical hypotheses about etiology and assist in the development of biomarkers for indexing disease progression and prognosis. Here we were interested in quantifying case-control differences in intracranial volume (ICV) and each of eight subcortical brain measures: nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, lateral ventricles. In a large study of 1710 BD patients and 2594 healthy controls, we found consistent volumetric reductions in BD patients for mean hippocampus (Cohen's d=-0.232; P=3.50 × 10 -7 ) and thalamus (d=-0.148; P=4.27 × 10 -3 ) and enlarged lateral ventricles (d=-0.260; P=3.93 × 10 -5 ) in patients. No significant effect of age at illness onset was detected. Stratifying patients based on clinical subtype (BD type I or type II) revealed that BDI patients had significantly larger lateral ventricles and smaller hippocampus and amygdala than controls. However, when comparing BDI and BDII patients directly, we did not detect any significant differences in brain volume. This likely represents similar etiology between BD subtype classifications. Exploratory analyses revealed significantly larger thalamic volumes in patients taking lithium compared with patients not taking lithium. We detected no significant differences between BDII patients and controls in the largest such comparison to date. Findings in this study should be interpreted with caution and with careful consideration of the limitations inherent to meta-analyzed neuroimaging comparisons.

  18. Volumetric optoacoustic monitoring of endovenous laser treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is one of the most common medical conditions with reported prevalence estimates as high as 30% in the adult population. Although conservative management with compression therapy may improve the symptoms associated with CVI, healing often demands invasive procedures. Besides established surgical methods like vein stripping or bypassing, endovenous laser therapy (ELT) emerged as a promising novel treatment option during the last 15 years offering multiple advantages such as less pain and faster recovery. Much of the treatment success hereby depends on monitoring of the treatment progression using clinical imaging modalities such as Doppler ultrasound. The latter however do not provide sufficient contrast, spatial resolution and three-dimensional imaging capacity which is necessary for accurate online lesion assessment during treatment. As a consequence, incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains highly variable among patients. In this study, we examined the capacity of volumetric optoacoustic tomography (VOT) for real-time monitoring of ELT using an ex-vivo ox foot model. ELT was performed on subcutaneous veins while optoacoustic signals were acquired and reconstructed in real-time and at a spatial resolution in the order of 200μm. VOT images showed spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression, characteristics of the vessel wall, and position of the ablation fiber's tip during the pull back. It was also possible to correlate the images with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the ablation spot. We conclude that VOT is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy.

  19. Dual-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Wu, Junqing; Wu, Huanmei; Geneser, Sarah; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an emerging radiation therapy modality for treatment of tumors affected by respiratory motion. However, gating significantly prolongs the treatment time, as delivery is only activated during a single respiratory phase. To enhance the efficiency of gated VMAT delivery, a novel dual-gated VMAT (DG-VMAT) technique, in which delivery is executed at both exhale and inhale phases in a given arc rotation, is developed and experimentally evaluated. Arc delivery at two phases is realized by sequentially interleaving control points consisting of MUs, MLC sequences, and angles of VMAT plans generated at the exhale and inhale phases. Dual-gated delivery is initiated when a respiration gating signal enters the exhale window; when the exhale delivery concludes, the beam turns off and the gantry rolls back to the starting position for the inhale window. The process is then repeated until both inhale and exhale arcs are fully delivered. DG-VMAT plan delivery accuracy was assessed using a pinpoint chamber and diode array phantom undergoing programmed motion. DG-VMAT delivery was experimentally implemented through custom XML scripting in Varian’s TrueBeam™ STx Developer Mode. Relative to single gated delivery at exhale, the treatment time was improved by 95.5% for a sinusoidal breathing pattern. The pinpoint chamber dose measurement agreed with the calculated dose within 0.7%. For the DG-VMAT delivery, 97.5% of the diode array measurements passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. The feasibility of DG-VMAT delivery scheme has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. By leveraging the stability and natural pauses that occur at end-inspiration and end-exhalation, DG-VMAT provides a practical method for enhancing gated delivery efficiency by up to a factor of two

  20. Parallel implementation of 3D FFT with volumetric decomposition schemes for efficient molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoon; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (3D FFT) plays an important role in a wide variety of computer simulations and data analyses, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this study, we develop hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) parallelization schemes of 3D FFT based on two new volumetric decompositions, mainly for the particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation in MD simulations. In one scheme, (1d_Alltoall), five all-to-all communications in one dimension are carried out, and in the other, (2d_Alltoall), one two-dimensional all-to-all communication is combined with two all-to-all communications in one dimension. 2d_Alltoall is similar to the conventional volumetric decomposition scheme. We performed benchmark tests of 3D FFT for the systems with different grid sizes using a large number of processors on the K computer in RIKEN AICS. The two schemes show comparable performances, and are better than existing 3D FFTs. The performances of 1d_Alltoall and 2d_Alltoall depend on the supercomputer network system and number of processors in each dimension. There is enough leeway for users to optimize performance for their conditions. In the PME method, short-range real-space interactions as well as long-range reciprocal-space interactions are calculated. Our volumetric decomposition schemes are particularly useful when used in conjunction with the recently developed midpoint cell method for short-range interactions, due to the same decompositions of real and reciprocal spaces. The 1d_Alltoall scheme of 3D FFT takes 4.7 ms to simulate one MD cycle for a virus system containing more than 1 million atoms using 32,768 cores on the K computer.

  1. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-01-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V 20Gy and V 30Gy dose levels (range, 4.62–17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D 35% of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5–5.8%. Mean V 10Gy and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15–20 Gy) in the range of 14–16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20–25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  3. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  4. Volumetric display using a roof mirror grid array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuuki; Ohno, Keisuke; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2010-02-01

    A volumetric display system using a roof mirror grid array (RMGA) is proposed. The RMGA consists of a two-dimensional array of dihedral corner reflectors and forms a real image at a plane-symmetric position. A two-dimensional image formed with a RMGA is moved at thigh speed by a mirror scanner. Cross-sectional images of a three-dimensional object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image can be observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images by high-speed scanning. Image formation by a RMGA is free from aberrations. Moreover, a compact optical system can be constructed because a RMGA doesn't have a focal length. An experimental volumetric display system using a galvanometer mirror and a digital micromirror device was constructed. The formation of a three-dimensional image consisting of 1024 × 768 × 400 voxels is confirmed by the experimental system.

  5. Modeling and Representation of Human Hearts for Volumetric Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates automatic construction of a three-dimensional heart model from a set of medical images, represents it in a deformable shape, and uses it to perform volumetric measurements. This not only significantly improves its reliability and accuracy but also makes it possible to derive valuable novel information, like various assessment and dynamic volumetric measurements. The method is based on a flexible model trained from hundreds of patient image sets by a genetic algorithm, which takes advantage of complete segmentation of the heart shape to form a geometrical heart model. For an image set of a new patient, an interpretation scheme is used to obtain its shape and evaluate some important parameters. Apart from automatic evaluation of traditional heart functions, some new information of cardiovascular diseases may be recognized from the volumetric analysis.

  6. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-10-12

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  7. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological......-average intensity for parallel beamforming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details...

  8. Gradients estimation from random points with volumetric tensor in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Nagata, Koji

    2017-12-01

    We present an estimation method of fully-resolved/coarse-grained gradients from randomly distributed points in turbulence. The method is based on a linear approximation of spatial gradients expressed with the volumetric tensor, which is a 3 × 3 matrix determined by a geometric distribution of the points. The coarse grained gradient can be considered as a low pass filtered gradient, whose cutoff is estimated with the eigenvalues of the volumetric tensor. The present method, the volumetric tensor approximation, is tested for velocity and passive scalar gradients in incompressible planar jet and mixing layer. Comparison with a finite difference approximation on a Cartesian grid shows that the volumetric tensor approximation computes the coarse grained gradients fairly well at a moderate computational cost under various conditions of spatial distributions of points. We also show that imposing the solenoidal condition improves the accuracy of the present method for solenoidal vectors, such as a velocity vector in incompressible flows, especially when the number of the points is not large. The volumetric tensor approximation with 4 points poorly estimates the gradient because of anisotropic distribution of the points. Increasing the number of points from 4 significantly improves the accuracy. Although the coarse grained gradient changes with the cutoff length, the volumetric tensor approximation yields the coarse grained gradient whose magnitude is close to the one obtained by the finite difference. We also show that the velocity gradient estimated with the present method well captures the turbulence characteristics such as local flow topology, amplification of enstrophy and strain, and energy transfer across scales.

  9. Automated MRI Volumetric Analysis in Patients with Rasmussen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z I; Krishnan, B; Shattuck, D W; Leahy, R M; Moosa, A N V; Wyllie, E; Burgess, R C; Al-Sharif, N B; Joshi, A A; Alexopoulos, A V; Mosher, J C; Udayasankar, U; Jones, S E

    2016-12-01

    Rasmussen syndrome, also known as Rasmussen encephalitis, is typically associated with volume loss of the affected hemisphere of the brain. Our aim was to apply automated quantitative volumetric MR imaging analyses to patients diagnosed with Rasmussen encephalitis, to determine the predictive value of lobar volumetric measures and to assess regional atrophy differences as well as monitor disease progression by using these measures. Nineteen patients (42 scans) with diagnosed Rasmussen encephalitis were studied. We used 2 control groups: one with 42 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects and the other with 42 epileptic patients without Rasmussen encephalitis with the same disease duration as patients with Rasmussen encephalitis. Volumetric analysis was performed on T1-weighted images by using BrainSuite. Ratios of volumes from the affected hemisphere divided by those from the unaffected hemisphere were used as input to a logistic regression classifier, which was trained to discriminate patients from controls. Using the classifier, we compared the predictive accuracy of all the volumetric measures. These ratios were used to further assess regional atrophy differences and correlate with epilepsy duration. Interhemispheric and frontal lobe ratios had the best prediction accuracy for separating patients with Rasmussen encephalitis from healthy controls and patient controls without Rasmussen encephalitis. The insula showed significantly more atrophy compared with all the other cortical regions. Patients with longitudinal scans showed progressive volume loss in the affected hemisphere. Atrophy of the frontal lobe and insula correlated significantly with epilepsy duration. Automated quantitative volumetric analysis provides accurate separation of patients with Rasmussen encephalitis from healthy controls and epileptic patients without Rasmussen encephalitis, and thus may assist the diagnosis of Rasmussen encephalitis. Volumetric analysis could also be included as part of

  10. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  11. Dielectric breakdown of fast switching LCD shutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozolevskis, Gatis; Sekacis, Ilmars; Nitiss, Edgars; Medvids, Arturs; Rutkis, Martins

    2017-02-01

    Fast liquid crystal optical shutters due to fast switching, vibrationless control and optical properties have found various applications: substitutes for mechanical shutters, 3D active shutter glasses, 3D volumetric displays and more. Switching speed depends not only on properties of liquid crystal, but also on applied electric field intensity. Applied field in the shutters can exceed >10 V/micron which may lead to dielectric breakdown. Therefore, a dielectric thin film is needed between transparent conductive electrodes in order to reduce breakdown probability. In this work we have compared electrical and optical properties of liquid crystal displays with dielectric thin films with thicknesses up to few hundred nanometers coated by flexo printing method and magnetron sputtering. Dielectric breakdown values show flexographic thin films to have higher resistance to dielectric breakdown, although sputtered coatings have better optical properties, such as higher transmission and no coloration.

  12. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions of MgCl2.6H2O at 288.15, and 308.15 K. Amalendu Pal Suresh Kumar. Volume 117 Issue 3 May 2005 pp 267-273 ...

  13. 100KE/KW fuel storage basin surface volumetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    This Supporting Document presents calculations of surface Volumetric factors for the 100KE and 100KW Fuel Storage Basins. These factors relate water level changes to basin loss or additions of water, or the equivalent water displacement volumes of objects added to or removed from the basin

  14. Environmental Consequences of Volumetric Traffic Flow in Calabar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings revealed that, Air pollutant such as carbon dioxide (C02) nitrogen oxides (N0) Sulphur dioxide (SO2), Carbon monoxide (C0) and particulate concentrations were above threshold level. With this result of analyses, it shows that there is a positive relationship between air pollutants concentration and volumetric traffic ...

  15. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions of MgCl2.6H2O at 288.15, and 308.15 K. Amalendu Pal Suresh Kumar. Volume 117 Issue 3 May 2005 pp 267-273 ...

  16. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems whe...

  17. Influence of pore pressure change on coseismic volumetric strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Barbour, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Coseismic strain is fundamentally important for understanding crustal response to transient changes of stress. The elastic dislocation model has been widely applied to interpreting observed shear deformation caused by earthquakes. The application of this model to interpreting volumetric strain, however, has met with difficulty, especially in the far field of earthquakes. Predicted volumetric strain with dislocation model often differs substantially, and sometimes of opposite signs, from observed coseismic volumetric strains. The disagreement suggests that some processes unaccounted for by the dislocation model may occur during earthquakes. Several hypotheses have been suggested, but none have been tested quantitatively. In this study we first assemble published data to highlight the significant difference between the measured and predicted coseismic volumetric strains from the dislocation theory. We then show that the disagreement may largely be explained by coseismic change of pore pressure in the shallow crust. We provide a quantitative test of the model with the assembled data, which allows us to conclude that coseismic change of pore pressure may be an important mechanism for coseismic crustal strain and, in the far field, may even be the controlling mechanism. Thus in the interpretation of observed coseismic crustal strain, one needs to account not only for the elastic strain due to fault rupture but also for the strain due to coseismic change of pore pressure.

  18. Volumetric motion quantification by 3D tissue phase mapped CMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Anja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was the quantification of myocardial motion from 3D tissue phase mapped (TPM CMR. Recent work on myocardial motion quantification by TPM has been focussed on multi-slice 2D acquisitions thus excluding motion information from large regions of the left ventricle. Volumetric motion assessment appears an important next step towards the understanding of the volumetric myocardial motion and hence may further improve diagnosis and treatments in patients with myocardial motion abnormalities. Methods Volumetric motion quantification of the complete left ventricle was performed in 12 healthy volunteers and two patients applying a black-blood 3D TPM sequence. The resulting motion field was analysed regarding motion pattern differences between apical and basal locations as well as for asynchronous motion pattern between different myocardial segments in one or more slices. Motion quantification included velocity, torsion, rotation angle and strain derived parameters. Results All investigated motion quantification parameters could be calculated from the 3D-TPM data. Parameters quantifying hypokinetic or asynchronous motion demonstrated differences between motion impaired and healthy myocardium. Conclusions 3D-TPM enables the gapless volumetric quantification of motion abnormalities of the left ventricle, which can be applied in future application as additional information to provide a more detailed analysis of the left ventricular function.

  19. Uptake and Loss of Carbon Dioxide in Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macca, Carlo

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of ratio diagrams, which plot the calculations of equilibrium concentrations of the species of the carbonate system. Provides examples to describe how these diagrams can be used to illustrate the behavior systems of interest in volumetric analysis, where absorption or loss of carbon dioxide takes place. (TW)

  20. Three-dimensional volumetric analysis after sinus grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sik; Moon, Seong-Yong; Kim, Su-Gwan; Park, Hyun-Chun; Oh, Ji-Su

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the augmentation volume of a sinus graft according to the time and graft materials based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and to assess efficacy of a bioabsorbable membrane. Fourteen patients were investigated, and volumetric analysis was performed using OnDemand 3DTM software (Cybermed, Seoul, Korea). CBCT scans were performed on patients before surgery, immediately after surgery, 6 months after surgery, and 1 year after surgery. Following this analysis, the volumetric data were compared with the actual grafted volumes. Bioabsorbable membranes were used in all patients to promote the protection of sinus membranes and to guide bone regeneration. Overall, the average percent volume of graft material that remained 6 months after implantation was 82.0%, and the average percent volume of graft material that remained 1 year after surgery was 60.4%. These reductions in the volume of graft material from immediately after surgery until 6 months or 1 year after surgery were shown to be statistically significant (P = 0.002 and P volumetric analysis performed using CBCT can provide highly accurate data. A significant difference was observed in volumetric change over time, but no significant differences were observed between materials. No significant relationship was observed between the resorption of grafted bone and the success rate.

  1. Volumetric and viscometric behaviour of soya bean and gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volumetric and viscometric behaviour of soya bean and gram proteins in aqueous methotrexate (anticancer drug) solution at 298.15 to 308.15K. ... and viscosities (h) for 0.00005 to 0.0004 kg.mol-1 (50 to 400 mmol kg-1) aqueous methotrexate (MTX), gram (Gp) and soya bean (SBp) proteins, and similar compositions of Gp

  2. Influence of pore pressure change on coseismic volumetric strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Yuen; Barbour, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Coseismic strain is fundamentally important for understanding crustal response to changes of stress after earthquakes. The elastic dislocation model has been widely applied to interpreting observed shear deformation caused by earthquakes. The application of the same theory to interpreting volumetric strain, however, has met with difficulty, especially in the far field of earthquakes. Predicted volumetric strain with dislocation model often differs substantially, and sometimes of opposite signs, from observed coseismic volumetric strains. The disagreement suggests that some processes unaccounted for by the dislocation model may occur during earthquakes. Several hypotheses have been suggested, but none have been tested quantitatively. In this paper we first examine published data to highlight the difference between the measured and calculated static coseismic volumetric strains; we then use these data to provide quantitative test of the model that the disagreement may be explained by the change of pore pressure in the shallow crust. The test allows us to conclude that coseismic change of pore pressure may be an important mechanism for coseismic crustal strain and, in the far field, may even be the dominant mechanism. Thus in the interpretation of observed coseismic crustal strain, one needs to account not only for the elastic strain due to fault rupture but also for the strain due to coseismic change of pore pressure.

  3. Tandem Gravimetric and Volumetric Apparatus for Methane Sorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald

    Concerns about global climate change have driven the search for alternative fuels. Natural gas (NG, methane) is a cleaner fuel than gasoline and abundantly available due to hydraulic fracturing. One hurdle to the adoption of NG vehicles is the bulky cylindrical storage vessels needed to store the NG at high pressures (3600 psi, 250 bar). The adsorption of methane in microporous materials can store large amounts of methane at low enough pressures for the allowance of conformable, ``flat'' pressure vessels. The measurement of the amount of gas stored in sorbent materials is typically done by measuring pressure differences (volumetric, manometric) or masses (gravimetric). Volumetric instruments of the Sievert type have uncertainties that compound with each additional measurement. Therefore, the highest-pressure measurement has the largest uncertainty. Gravimetric instruments don't have that drawback, but can have issues with buoyancy corrections. An instrument will be presented with which methane adsorption measurements can be performed using both volumetric and gravimetric methods in tandem. The gravimetric method presented has no buoyancy corrections and low uncertainty. Therefore, the gravimetric measurements can be performed throughout an entire isotherm or just at the extrema to verify the results from the volumetric measurements. Results from methane sorption measurements on an activated carbon (MSC-30) and a metal-organic framework (Cu-BTC, HKUST-1, MOF-199) will be shown. New recommendations for calculations of gas uptake and uncertainty measurements will be discussed.

  4. Multimodality comparison of quantitative volumetric analysis of the right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeng, Lissa; Mor-Avi, Victor; Weinert, Lynn; Niel, Johannes; Ebner, Christian; Steringer-Mascherbauer, Regina; Bartolles, Ralf; Baumann, Rolf; Schummers, Georg; Lang, Roberto M; Nesser, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We undertook volumetric analysis of the right ventricle (RV) by real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE), cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) on images obtained in RV-shaped phantoms and in patients with a wide range of RV geometry. Assessment of the RV by 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography remains challenging due to its unique geometry and limitations of the current analysis techniques. RT3DE, CMR, and CCT, which can quantify RV volumes, promise to overcome the limitations of 2D echocardiography. Images were analyzed using RV Analysis software. Volumes measured in vitro were compared with the true volumes. The human protocol included 28 patients who underwent RT3DE, CMR, and CT on the same day. Volumetric analysis of CMR images was used as a reference, against which RT3DE and CCT measurements were compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. To determine the reproducibility of the volumetric analysis, repeated measurements were performed for all 3 imaging modalities in 11 patients. The in vitro measurements showed that: 1) volumetric analysis of CMR images yielded the most accurate measurements; 2) CCT measurements showed slight (4%) but consistent overestimation; and 3) RT3DE measurements showed small underestimation, but considerably wider margins of error. In humans, both RT3DE and CCT measurements correlated highly with the CMR reference (r=0.79 to 0.89) and showed the same trends of underestimation and overestimation noted in vitro. All interobserver and intraobserver variability values were <14%, with those of CMR being the highest. Volumetric quantification of RV volume was performed on CMR, CCT, and RT3DE images. Eliminating analysis-related intermodality differences allowed fair comparisons and highlighted the unique limitations of each modality. Understanding these differences promises to aid in the functional assessment of the RV. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation

  5. Comparative Study of the Volumetric Methods Calculation Using GNSS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şmuleac, Adrian; Nemeş, Iacob; Alina Creţan, Ioana; Sorina Nemeş, Nicoleta; Şmuleac, Laura

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to achieve volumetric calculations for different mineral aggregates using different methods of analysis and also comparison of results. To achieve these comparative studies and presentation were chosen two software licensed, namely TopoLT 11.2 and Surfer 13. TopoLT program is a program dedicated to the development of topographic and cadastral plans. 3D terrain model, level courves and calculation of cut and fill volumes, including georeferencing of images. The program Surfer 13 is produced by Golden Software, in 1983 and is active mainly used in various fields such as agriculture, construction, geophysical, geotechnical engineering, GIS, water resources and others. It is also able to achieve GRID terrain model, to achieve the density maps using the method of isolines, volumetric calculations, 3D maps. Also, it can read different file types, including SHP, DXF and XLSX. In these paper it is presented a comparison in terms of achieving volumetric calculations using TopoLT program by two methods: a method where we choose a 3D model both for surface as well as below the top surface and a 3D model in which we choose a 3D terrain model for the bottom surface and another 3D model for the top surface. The comparison of the two variants will be made with data obtained from the realization of volumetric calculations with the program Surfer 13 generating GRID terrain model. The topographical measurements were performed with equipment from Leica GPS 1200 Series. Measurements were made using Romanian position determination system - ROMPOS which ensures accurate positioning of reference and coordinates ETRS through the National Network of GNSS Permanent Stations. GPS data processing was performed with the program Leica Geo Combined Office. For the volumetric calculating the GPS used point are in 1970 stereographic projection system and for the altitude the reference is 1975 the Black Sea projection system.

  6. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  7. Semi-automatic segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images using a statistical shape+pose model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzani, Amin; Rasoulian, Abtin; Fels, Sidney; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Segmentation of vertebral structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images is challenging because of poor con­trast between bone surfaces and surrounding soft tissue. This paper describes a semi-automatic method for segmenting vertebral bodies in multi-slice MR images. In order to achieve a fast and reliable segmentation, the method takes advantage of the correlation between shape and pose of different vertebrae in the same patient by using a statistical multi-vertebrae anatomical shape+pose model. Given a set of MR images of the spine, we initially reduce the intensity inhomogeneity in the images by using an intensity-correction algorithm. Then a 3D anisotropic diffusion filter smooths the images. Afterwards, we extract edges from a relatively small region of the pre-processed image with a simple user interaction. Subsequently, an iterative Expectation Maximization tech­nique is used to register the statistical multi-vertebrae anatomical model to the extracted edge points in order to achieve a fast and reliable segmentation for lumbar vertebral bodies. We evaluate our method in terms of speed and accuracy by applying it to volumetric MR images of the spine acquired from nine patients. Quantitative and visual results demonstrate that the method is promising for segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images.

  8. Fast Convolution Module (Fast Convolution Module)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bierens, L

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design and realisation of a real-time range azimuth compression module, the so-called 'Fast Convolution Module', based on the fast convolution algorithm developed at TNO-FEL...

  9. Segmentation and volumetric analysis of the caudate nucleus in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Sudevan; Smitha, Karavallil Achuthan; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Pillai, Vellara Pappukutty Mahadevan; Jayasree, Ramapurath S

    2013-09-01

    A quantitative volumetric analysis of caudate nucleus can provide valuable information in early diagnosis and prognosis of patients with Alzheimer's diseases (AD). Purpose of the study is to estimate the volume of segmented caudate nucleus from MR images and to correlate the variation in the segmented volume with respect to the total brain volume. We have also tried to evaluate the caudate nucleus atrophy with the age related atrophy of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a group of Alzheimer's disease patients. 3D fast low angle shot (3D FLASH) brain MR images of 15 AD patients, 15 normal volunteers and 15 patients who had normally diagnosed MR images were included in the study. Brain tissue and caudate nuclei were segmented using the statistical parametric mapping package and a semi-automatic tool, respectively and the volumes were estimated. Volume of segmented caudate nucleus is correlated with respect to the total brain volume. Further, the caudate nucleus atrophy is estimated with the age related atrophy of WM, GM and CSF in a group of AD patients. Significant reduction in the caudate volume of AD patients was observed compared to that of the normal volunteers. Statistical analysis also showed significant variation in the volume of GM and CSF of AD patients. Among the patients who had normal appearing brain, 33% showed significant changes in the caudate volume. We hypothesize that these changes can be considered as an indication of early AD. The method of volumetric analysis of brain structures is simple and effective way of early diagnosis of neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease. We have illustrated this with the observed changes in the volume of caudate nucleus in a group of patients. A detailed study with more subjects will be useful in correlating these results for early diagnosis of AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Segmentation and volumetric analysis of the caudate nucleus in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, Sudevan, E-mail: jijiaiswaryap@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695581, Kerala (India); Smitha, Karavallil Achuthan, E-mail: mithamahesh@gmail.com [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum 695012, Kerala (India); Gupta, Arun Kumar, E-mail: gupta209@gmail.com [Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India); Pillai, Vellara Pappukutty Mahadevan, E-mail: vpmpillai9@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695581, Kerala (India); Jayasree, Ramapurath S., E-mail: jayashreemenon@gmail.com [Biophotonics and Imaging Lab, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum 695012, Kerala (India)

    2013-09-15

    Objectives: A quantitative volumetric analysis of caudate nucleus can provide valuable information in early diagnosis and prognosis of patients with Alzheimer's diseases (AD). Purpose of the study is to estimate the volume of segmented caudate nucleus from MR images and to correlate the variation in the segmented volume with respect to the total brain volume. We have also tried to evaluate the caudate nucleus atrophy with the age related atrophy of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a group of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methods: 3D fast low angle shot (3D FLASH) brain MR images of 15 AD patients, 15 normal volunteers and 15 patients who had normally diagnosed MR images were included in the study. Brain tissue and caudate nuclei were segmented using the statistical parametric mapping package and a semi-automatic tool, respectively and the volumes were estimated. Volume of segmented caudate nucleus is correlated with respect to the total brain volume. Further, the caudate nucleus atrophy is estimated with the age related atrophy of WM, GM and CSF in a group of AD patients. Results: Significant reduction in the caudate volume of AD patients was observed compared to that of the normal volunteers. Statistical analysis also showed significant variation in the volume of GM and CSF of AD patients. Among the patients who had normal appearing brain, 33% showed significant changes in the caudate volume. We hypothesize that these changes can be considered as an indication of early AD. Conclusion: The method of volumetric analysis of brain structures is simple and effective way of early diagnosis of neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease. We have illustrated this with the observed changes in the volume of caudate nucleus in a group of patients. A detailed study with more subjects will be useful in correlating these results for early diagnosis of AD.

  11. Segmentation and volumetric analysis of the caudate nucleus in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiji, Sudevan; Smitha, Karavallil Achuthan; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Pillai, Vellara Pappukutty Mahadevan; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A quantitative volumetric analysis of caudate nucleus can provide valuable information in early diagnosis and prognosis of patients with Alzheimer's diseases (AD). Purpose of the study is to estimate the volume of segmented caudate nucleus from MR images and to correlate the variation in the segmented volume with respect to the total brain volume. We have also tried to evaluate the caudate nucleus atrophy with the age related atrophy of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a group of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methods: 3D fast low angle shot (3D FLASH) brain MR images of 15 AD patients, 15 normal volunteers and 15 patients who had normally diagnosed MR images were included in the study. Brain tissue and caudate nuclei were segmented using the statistical parametric mapping package and a semi-automatic tool, respectively and the volumes were estimated. Volume of segmented caudate nucleus is correlated with respect to the total brain volume. Further, the caudate nucleus atrophy is estimated with the age related atrophy of WM, GM and CSF in a group of AD patients. Results: Significant reduction in the caudate volume of AD patients was observed compared to that of the normal volunteers. Statistical analysis also showed significant variation in the volume of GM and CSF of AD patients. Among the patients who had normal appearing brain, 33% showed significant changes in the caudate volume. We hypothesize that these changes can be considered as an indication of early AD. Conclusion: The method of volumetric analysis of brain structures is simple and effective way of early diagnosis of neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease. We have illustrated this with the observed changes in the volume of caudate nucleus in a group of patients. A detailed study with more subjects will be useful in correlating these results for early diagnosis of AD

  12. Predicting positional error of MLC using volumetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareram, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    IMRT normally using multiple beamlets (small width of the beam) for a particular field to deliver so that it is imperative to maintain the positional accuracy of the MLC in order to deliver integrated computed dose accurately. Different manufacturers have reported high precession on MLC devices with leaf positional accuracy nearing 0.1 mm but measuring and rectifying the error in this accuracy is very difficult. Various methods are used to check MLC position and among this volumetric analysis is one of the technique. Volumetric approach was adapted in our method using primus machine and 0.6cc chamber at 5 cm depth In perspex. MLC of 1 mm error introduces an error of 20%, more sensitive to other methods

  13. Reference volumetric samples of gamma-spectroscopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaev, E.; Taskaeva, M.; Grigorov, T.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the requirements for matrices of reference volumetric radiation sources necessary for detector calibration. The first stage of this determination consists in analysing some available organic and nonorganic materials. Different sorts of food, grass, plastics, minerals and building materials have been considered, taking into account the various procedures of their processing (grinding, screening, homogenizing) and their properties (hygroscopy, storage life, resistance to oxidation during gamma sterilization). The procedures of source processing, sample preparation, matrix irradiation and homogenization have been determined. A rotation homogenizing device has been elaborated enabling to homogenize the matrix activity irrespective of the vessel geometry. 33 standard volumetric radioactive sources have been prepared: 14 - on organic matrix and 19 - on nonorganic matrix. (author)

  14. A feasibility study of digital tomosynthesis for volumetric dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M K; Kim, H K; Youn, H; Kim, S S

    2012-01-01

    We present a volumetric dental tomography method that compensates for insufficient projection views obtained from limited-angle scans. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the backprojection filtering method which employs apodizing filters that reduce out-of-plane blur artifacts and suppress high-frequency noise. In order to accompolish this volumetric imaging two volume-reconstructed datasets are synthesized. These individual datasets provide two different limited-angle scans performed at orthogonal angles. The obtained reconstructed images, using less than 15% of the number of projection views needed for a full skull phantom scan, demonstrate the potential use of the proposed method in dental imaging applications. This method enables a much smaller radiation dose for the patient compared to conventional dental tomography.

  15. CO2 Capacity Sorbent Analysis Using Volumetric Measurement Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Roger; Richardson, Tra-My Justine; Belancik, Grace; Jan, Darrell; Knox, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In support of air revitalization system sorbent selection for future space missions, Ames Research Center (ARC) has performed CO2 capacity tests on various solid sorbents to complement structural strength tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The materials of interest are: Grace Davison Grade 544 13X, Honeywell UOP APG III, LiLSX VSA-10, BASF 13X, and Grace Davison Grade 522 5A. CO2 capacity was for all sorbent materials using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 Physisorption Volumetric Analysis machine to produce 0C, 10C, 25C, 50C, and 75C isotherms. These data are to be used for modeling data and to provide a basis for continued sorbent research. The volumetric analysis method proved to be effective in generating consistent and repeatable data for the 13X sorbents, but the method needs to be refined to tailor to different sorbents.

  16. Quantitative analysis of fish wake dynamics using volumetric PIV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    In the study of swimming hydrodynamics, the fluid impulse in the wake is used to quantify the momentum transferred by the fish as it swims. This impulse is typically computed from planar PIV measurements of the wake circulation and geometry by assuming an axisymmetric vortex ring model. However, in many propulsive and maneuvering scenarios, three-dimensional effects are of substantial importance, and wake features are not often an isolated, symmetric vortex ring. Volumetric PIV data provides a complete measure of the vortex geometry and orientation, and circulation can be determined over multiple planar slices through the volume. Using sample datasets obtained from synthetic aperture PIV (SAPIV), we demonstrate how the availability of volumetric PIV data enables more detailed analysis of hydrodynamic impulse and characterize the uncertainty created by planar measurements. Special attention is paid to unsteady maneuvering behaviors that generate asymmetric and linked wake features.

  17. COMPARISON OF VOLUMETRIC REGISTRATION ALGORITHMS FOR TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Julio; Joshi, Anand A; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear registration of brain MRI scans is often used to quantify morphological differences associated with disease or genetic factors. Recently, surface-guided fully 3D volumetric registrations have been developed that combine intensity-guided volume registrations with cortical surface constraints. In this paper, we compare one such algorithm to two popular high-dimensional volumetric registration methods: large-deformation viscous fluid registration, formulated in a Riemannian framework, and the diffeomorphic "Demons" algorithm. We performed an objective morphometric comparison, by using a large MRI dataset from 340 young adult twin subjects to examine 3D patterns of correlations in anatomical volumes. Surface-constrained volume registration gave greater effect sizes for detecting morphometric associations near the cortex, while the other two approaches gave greater effects sizes subcortically. These findings suggest novel ways to combine the advantages of multiple methods in the future.

  18. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive......Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  19. Volumetric velocity measurements on flows through heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troolin, Daniel; Amatya, Devesh; Longmire, Ellen

    2009-11-01

    Volumetric velocity fields inside two types of artificial heart valves were obtained experimentally through the use of volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V). Index matching was used to mitigate the effects of optical distortions due to interfaces between the fluid and curved walls. The steady flow downstream of a mechanical valve was measured and the results matched well with previously obtained 2D PIV results, such as those of Shipkowitz et al. (2002). Measurements upstream and downstream of a deformable silicone valve in a pulsatile flow were obtained and reveal significant three-dimensional features of the flow. Plots and movies will be shown, and a detailed discussion of the flow and various experimental considerations will be included. Reference: Shipkowitz, T, Ambrus J, Kurk J, Wickramasinghe K (2002) Evaluation technique for bileaflet mechanical valves. J. Heart Valve Disease. 11(2) pp. 275-282.

  20. Determination of uranium by a gravimetric-volumetric titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.

    1998-01-01

    A volumetric-gravimetric modification of a method for the determination of uranium based on the reduction of uranium to U (IV) in a phosphoric acid medium and titration with a standard potassium dichromate solution is described. More than 99% of the stoichiometric amount of the titrating solution is weighed and the remainder is added volumetrically by using the Mettler DL 40 RC Memotitrator. Computer interconnected with analytical balances collects continually the data on the analyzed samples and evaluates the results of determination. The method allows to determine uranium in samples of uranium metal, alloys, oxides, and ammonium diuranate by using aliquot portions containing 30 - 100 mg of uranium with the error of determination, expressed as the relative standard deviation, of 0.02 - 0.05%. (author)

  1. Systematic Parameterization, Storage, and Representation of Volumetric DICOM Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Felix; Selver, M. Alper; Gezer, Sinem; Dicle, O?uz; Hillen, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic medical imaging systems produce hundreds to thousands of slices, enabling three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Radiologists process these images through various tools and techniques in order to generate 3D renderings for various applications, such as surgical planning, medical education, and volumetric measurements. To save and store these visualizations, current systems use snapshots or video exporting, which prevents further optimizations and requires the storage of significant addi...

  2. 3D volumetric analysis for planning breast reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Hunter-Smith, David J; Spychal, Robert T; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2014-07-01

    Breast reconstruction plays an integral role in the holistic management of breast cancer, with assessment of breast volume, shape, and projection vital in planning breast reconstruction surgery. Current practice includes two-dimensional (2D) photography and visual estimation in selecting ideal volume and shape of breast implants or soft-tissue flaps. Other objective quantitative means of calculating breast volume have been reported, such as direct anthropomorphic measurements or three-dimensional (3D) photography, but none have proven reliably accurate. We describe a novel approach to volumetric analysis of the breast, through the creation of a haptic, tactile model, or 3D print of scan data. This approach comprises use of a single computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan for volumetric analysis, which we use to compare to simpler estimation techniques, create software-generated 3D reconstructions, calculate, and visualize volume differences, and produce biomodels of the breasts using a 3D printer for tactile appreciation of volume differential. Using the technique described, parenchymal volume was assessed and calculated using CT data. A case report was utilized in a pictorial account of the technique, in which a volume difference of 116 cm(3) was calculated, aiding reconstructive planning. Preoperative planning, including volumetric analysis can be used as a tool to aid esthetic outcomes and attempt to reduce operative times in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction surgery. The combination of accurate volume calculations and the production of 3D-printed haptic models for tactile feedback and operative guidance are evolving techniques in volumetric analysis and preoperative planning in breast reconstruction.

  3. In-Situ Spatial Variability Of Thermal Conductivity And Volumetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of spatial variability of thermal conductivity and volumetric water content of silty topsoil were conduct-ed on a 0.6 ha site at Abeokuta, South-Western Nigeria. The thermal conductivity (k) was measured at depths of up to 0.06 m along four parallel profiles of 200 m long and at an average temperature of 25 C, using ...

  4. Thermodynamic and volumetric databases and software for magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Aliravci, Celil; Spencer, Philip J.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Fuerst, Carlton D.; Chartrand, Patrice; Pelton, Arthur D.

    2009-05-01

    Extensive databases for the thermodynamic and volumetric properties of magnesium alloys have been prepared by critical evaluation, modeling, and optimization of available data. Software has been developed to access the databases to calculate equilibrium phase diagrams, heat effects, etc., and to follow the course of equilibrium or Scheil-Gulliver cooling, calculating not only the amounts of the individual phases, but also of the microstructural constituents.

  5. Three-dimensional volumetric display by inclined-plane scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Eto, Takuma; Nishimura, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Kenji

    2003-05-01

    A volumetric display system based on three-dimensional (3-D) scanning that uses an inclined two-dimensional (2-D) image is described. In the volumetric display system a 2-D display unit is placed obliquely in an imaging system into which a rotating mirror is inserted. When the mirror is rotated, the inclined 2-D image is moved laterally. A locus of the moving image can be observed by persistence of vision as a result of the high-speed rotation of the mirror. Inclined cross-sectional images of an object are displayed on the display unit in accordance with the position of the image plane to observe a 3-D image of the object by persistence of vision. Three-dimensional images formed by this display system satisfy all the criteria for stereoscopic vision. We constructed the volumetric display systems using a galvanometer mirror and a vector-scan display unit. In addition, we constructed a real-time 3-D measurement system based on a light section method. Measured 3-D images can be reconstructed in the 3-D display system in real time.

  6. Volumetric Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry (V-Echo-PIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of 3D flow field inside the cardiac chambers has proven to be a challenging task. Current laser-based 3D PIV methods estimate the third component of the velocity rather than directly measuring it and also cannot be used to image the opaque heart chambers. Modern echocardiography systems are equipped with 3D probes that enable imaging the entire 3D opaque field. However, this feature has not yet been employed for 3D vector characterization of blood flow. For the first time, we introduce a method that generates velocity vector field in 4D based on volumetric echocardiographic images. By assuming the conservation of brightness in 3D, blood speckles are tracked. A hierarchical 3D PIV method is used to account for large particle displacement. The discretized brightness transport equation is solved in a least square sense in interrogation windows of size 163 voxels. We successfully validate the method in analytical and experimental cases. Volumetric echo data of a left ventricle is then processed in the systolic phase. The expected velocity fields were successfully predicted by V-Echo-PIV. In this work, we showed a method to image blood flow in 3D based on volumetric images of human heart using no contrast agent.

  7. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  8. Volumetric 3D display with multi-layered active screens for enhanced the depth perception (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Park, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Ji-Sub; Min, Sung-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display technology has been studied actively because it can offer more realistic images compared to the conventional 2D display. Various psychological factors such as accommodation, binocular parallax, convergence and motion parallax are used to recognize a 3D image. For glass-type 3D displays, they use only the binocular disparity in 3D depth cues. However, this method cause visual fatigue and headaches due to accommodation conflict and distorted depth perception. Thus, the hologram and volumetric display are expected to be an ideal 3D display. Holographic displays can represent realistic images satisfying the entire factors of depth perception. But, it require tremendous amount of data and fast signal processing. The volumetric 3D displays can represent images using voxel which is a physical volume. However, it is required for large data to represent the depth information on voxel. In order to simply encode 3D information, the compact type of depth fused 3D (DFD) display, which can create polarization distributed depth map (PDDM) image having both 2D color image and depth image is introduced. In this paper, a new volumetric 3D display system is shown by using PDDM image controlled by polarization controller. In order to introduce PDDM image, polarization states of the light through spatial light modulator (SLM) was analyzed by Stokes parameter depending on the gray level. Based on the analysis, polarization controller is properly designed to convert PDDM image into sectioned depth images. After synchronizing PDDM images with active screens, we can realize reconstructed 3D image. Acknowledgment This work was supported by `The Cross-Ministry Giga KOREA Project' grant from the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea

  9. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Wang

    Full Text Available Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known.To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population.Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume.Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2 values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume to 0.91 (total breast volume. Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63, but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume.Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  10. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeff; Azziz, Ania; Fan, Bo; Malkov, Serghei; Klifa, Catherine; Newitt, David; Yitta, Silaja; Hylton, Nola; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known. To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population. Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara) with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume. Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2) values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume) to 0.91 (total breast volume). Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63), but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume. Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  11. Volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules: variability in automated analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluru, Krishna; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William; King, Tara; Siddiqui, Khan; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    Over the past decade, several computerized tools have been developed for detection of lung nodules and for providing volumetric analysis. Incidentally detected lung nodules have traditionally been followed over time by measurements of their axial dimensions on CT scans to ensure stability or document progression. A recently published article by the Fleischner Society offers guidelines on the management of incidentally detected nodules based on size criteria. For this reason, differences in measurements obtained by automated tools from various vendors may have significant implications on management, yet the degree of variability in these measurements is not well understood. The goal of this study is to quantify the differences in nodule maximum diameter and volume among different automated analysis software. Using a dataset of lung scans obtained with both "ultra-low" and conventional doses, we identified a subset of nodules in each of five size-based categories. Using automated analysis tools provided by three different vendors, we obtained size and volumetric measurements on these nodules, and compared these data using descriptive as well as ANOVA and t-test analysis. Results showed significant differences in nodule maximum diameter measurements among the various automated lung nodule analysis tools but no significant differences in nodule volume measurements. These data suggest that when using automated commercial software, volume measurements may be a more reliable marker of tumor progression than maximum diameter. The data also suggest that volumetric nodule measurements may be relatively reproducible among various commercial workstations, in contrast to the variability documented when performing human mark-ups, as is seen in the LIDC (lung imaging database consortium) study.

  12. Method for Determining Volumetric Efficiency and Its Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrozik Andrzej

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern means of transport are basically powered by piston internal combustion engines. Increasingly rigorous demands are placed on IC engines in order to minimise the detrimental impact they have on the natural environment. That stimulates the development of research on piston internal combustion engines. The research involves experimental and theoretical investigations carried out using computer technologies. While being filled, the cylinder is considered to be an open thermodynamic system, in which non-stationary processes occur. To make calculations of thermodynamic parameters of the engine operating cycle, based on the comparison of cycles, it is necessary to know the mean constant value of cylinder pressure throughout this process. Because of the character of in-cylinder pressure pattern and difficulties in pressure experimental determination, in the present paper, a novel method for the determination of this quantity was presented. In the new approach, the iteration method was used. In the method developed for determining the volumetric efficiency, the following equations were employed: the law of conservation of the amount of substance, the first law of thermodynamics for open system, dependences for changes in the cylinder volume vs. the crankshaft rotation angle, and the state equation. The results of calculations performed with this method were validated by means of experimental investigations carried out for a selected engine at the engine test bench. A satisfactory congruence of computational and experimental results as regards determining the volumetric efficiency was obtained. The method for determining the volumetric efficiency presented in the paper can be used to investigate the processes taking place in the cylinder of an IC engine.

  13. Statistical volumetric model for characterization and visualization of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianping; Srikanchana, Rujirutana; McClain, Maxine A.; Wang, Yue J.; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    To reveal the spatial pattern of localized prostate cancer distribution, a 3D statistical volumetric model, showing the probability map of prostate cancer distribution, together with the anatomical structure of the prostate, has been developed from 90 digitally-imaged surgical specimens. Through an enhanced virtual environment with various visualization modes, this master model permits for the first time an accurate characterization and understanding of prostate cancer distribution patterns. The construction of the statistical volumetric model is characterized by mapping all of the individual models onto a generic prostate site model, in which a self-organizing scheme is used to decompose a group of contours representing multifold tumors into localized tumor elements. Next crucial step of creating the master model is the development of an accurate multi- object and non-rigid registration/warping scheme incorporating various variations among these individual moles in true 3D. This is achieved with a multi-object based principle-axis alignment followed by an affine transform, and further fine-tuned by a thin-plate spline interpolation driven by the surface based deformable warping dynamics. Based on the accurately mapped tumor distribution, a standard finite normal mixture is used to model the cancer volumetric distribution statistics, whose parameters are estimated using both the K-means and expectation- maximization algorithms under the information theoretic criteria. Given the desired number of tissue samplings, the prostate needle biopsy site selection is optimized through a probabilistic self-organizing map thus achieving a maximum likelihood of cancer detection. We describe the details of our theory and methodology, and report our pilot results and evaluation of the effectiveness of the algorithm in characterizing prostate cancer distributions and optimizing needle biopsy techniques.

  14. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  15. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  16. Volumetric and calorimetric properties of aqueous ionene solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukšič, Miha; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The volumetric (partial and apparent molar volumes) and calorimetric properties (apparent heat capacities) of aqueous cationic polyelectrolyte solutions - ionenes - were studied using the oscillating tube densitometer and differential scanning calorimeter. The polyion's charge density and the counterion properties were considered as variables. The special attention was put to evaluate the contribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects to the properties studied. The contribution of the CH 2 group of the polyion's backbone to molar volumes and heat capacities was estimated. Synergistic effect between polyion and counterions was found.

  17. Volumetric hemispheric ratio as a useful tool in personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christian; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Wagner, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Markett, Sebastian; Weber, Bernd; Quesada, Carlos M

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigates the link between volumetric hemispheric ratios (VHRs) and personality measures in N=267 healthy participants using Eysenck's Personality Inventory-Revised (EPQ-R) and the BIS/BAS scales. A robust association between extraversion and VHRs was observed for gray matter in males but not females. Higher gray matter volume in the left than in the right hemisphere was associated with higher extraversion in males. The results are discussed in the context of positive emotionality and laterality of the human brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Hierarchical anatomical brain networks for MCI prediction: revisiting volumetric measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luping Zhou

    Full Text Available Owning to its clinical accessibility, T1-weighted MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging has been extensively studied in the past decades for prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI. The volumes of gray matter (GM, white matter (WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are the most commonly used measurements, resulting in many successful applications. It has been widely observed that disease-induced structural changes may not occur at isolated spots, but in several inter-related regions. Therefore, for better characterization of brain pathology, we propose in this paper a means to extract inter-regional correlation based features from local volumetric measurements. Specifically, our approach involves constructing an anatomical brain network for each subject, with each node representing a Region of Interest (ROI and each edge representing Pearson correlation of tissue volumetric measurements between ROI pairs. As second order volumetric measurements, network features are more descriptive but also more sensitive to noise. To overcome this limitation, a hierarchy of ROIs is used to suppress noise at different scales. Pairwise interactions are considered not only for ROIs with the same scale in the same layer of the hierarchy, but also for ROIs across different scales in different layers. To address the high dimensionality problem resulting from the large number of network features, a supervised dimensionality reduction method is further employed to embed a selected subset of features into a low dimensional feature space, while at the same time preserving discriminative information. We demonstrate with experimental results the efficacy of this embedding strategy in comparison with some other commonly used approaches. In addition, although the proposed method can be easily generalized to incorporate other metrics of regional similarities, the benefits of using Pearson correlation in our application are reinforced by the experimental

  19. Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry: A New Approach to Volumetric PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troolin, Dan; Boomsma, Aaron; Lai, Wing; Pothos, Stamatios; Fluid Mechanics Research Instruments Team

    2016-11-01

    Volumetric velocity fields are useful in a wide variety of fluid mechanics applications. Several types of three-dimensional imaging methods have been used in the past to varying degrees of success, for example, 3D PTV (Maas et al., 1993), DDPIV (Peireira et al., 2006), Tomographic PIV (Elsinga, 2006), and V3V (Troolin and Longmire, 2009), among others. Each of these techniques has shown advantages and disadvantages in different areas. With the advent of higher resolution and lower noise cameras with higher stability levels, new techniques are emerging that combine the advantages of the existing techniques. This talk describes a new technique called Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry (TAPTV), in which segmented triangulation and diameter tolerance are used to achieve three-dimensional particle tracking with extremely high particle densities (on the order of ppp = 0.2 or higher) without the drawbacks normally associated with ghost particles (for example in TomoPIV). The results are highly spatially-resolved data with very fast processing times. A detailed explanation of the technique as well as plots, movies, and experimental considerations will be discussed.

  20. Effect of the radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinate on expiratory nasal sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the short-term efficacy of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction (RFVTR) in treatment of inferior turbinate hypertrophy (TH) as measured by expiratory nasal sound spectra. In our study, we aimed to investigate the Odiosoft-rhino (OR) as a new diagnostic method to evaluate the nasal airflow of patients before and after RFVTR. In this study, we have analyzed and recorded the expiratory nasal sound in patients with inferior TH before and after RFVTR. This analysis includes the time expanded waveform, the spectral analysis with time averaged fast Fourier transform (FFT), and the waveform analysis of nasal sound. We found an increase in sound intensity at high frequency (Hf) in the sound analyses of the patients before RFVTR and a decrease in sound intensity at Hf was found in patients after RFVTR. This study indicates that RFVTR is an effective procedure to improve nasal airflow in the patients with nasal obstruction with inferior TH. We found significant decreases in the sound intensity level at Hf in the sound spectra after RFVTR. The OR results from the 2000- to 4000-Hz frequency (Hf) interval may be more useful in assessing patients with nasal obstruction than other frequency intervals. OR may be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to evaluate the nasal airflow.

  1. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Volumetric Changes in Sinuses Augmented with Two Different Bone Substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alper Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The bone volume of the posterior maxilla may not be appropriate for implant placement, due to factors such as pneumatized maxillary sinus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the percentage of graft volume reduction following sinus floor elevation (SFE, with either slow resorbable bone substitute only or a composite of slow and fast resorbable bone substitutes, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods. In this retrospective study, CBCT scans of SFE procedures were evaluated to determine the volume of grafted sinus with either deproteinized bovine bone (DBB or a 2 : 1 mixture of biphasic calcium sulfate (CS and DBB, as a composite. The volumetric changes of sinus augmentations were measured 2 weeks (V-I and 6 months (V-II after operation. Results. Thirty-three patients were included in this study. The average percentage volume reduction was 9.39±3.01% and 17.65±4.15% for DBB and composite grafts, respectively. A significant graft volume reduction was observed between V-I and V-II for both groups (p<0.01. The DBB group exhibited significantly less volume reduction than the composite group (p<0.01. Conclusions. Augmented sinus volume may change before implant placement. DBB offers greater volume stability during healing than composite grafts.

  2. A GPU-Accelerated 3-D Coupled Subsample Estimation Algorithm for Volumetric Breast Strain Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Yuqi; Hall, Timothy J; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-04-01

    Our primary objective of this paper was to extend a previously published 2-D coupled subsample tracking algorithm for 3-D speckle tracking in the framework of ultrasound breast strain elastography. In order to overcome heavy computational cost, we investigated the use of a graphic processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the 3-D coupled subsample speckle tracking method. The performance of the proposed GPU implementation was tested using a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo breast ultrasound data. The performance of this 3-D subsample tracking algorithm was compared with the conventional 3-D quadratic subsample estimation algorithm. On the basis of these evaluations, we concluded that the GPU implementation of this 3-D subsample estimation algorithm can provide high-quality strain data (i.e., high correlation between the predeformation and the motion-compensated postdeformation radio frequency echo data and high contrast-to-noise ratio strain images), as compared with the conventional 3-D quadratic subsample algorithm. Using the GPU implementation of the 3-D speckle tracking algorithm, volumetric strain data can be achieved relatively fast (approximately 20 s per volume [2.5 cm ×2.5 cm ×2.5 cm]).

  3. Automated DICOM metadata and volumetric anatomical information extraction for radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichail, D.; Ploussi, A.; Kordolaimi, S.; Karavasilis, E.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Syrgiamiotis, V.; Efstathopoulos, E.

    2015-09-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry calculations based on simulation techniques have as a prerequisite the modeling of the modality system and the creation of voxelized phantoms. This procedure requires the knowledge of scanning parameters and patients’ information included in a DICOM file as well as image segmentation. However, the extraction of this information is complicated and time-consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a simple graphical user interface (GUI) to (i) automatically extract metadata from every slice image of a DICOM file in a single query and (ii) interactively specify the regions of interest (ROI) without explicit access to the radiology information system. The user-friendly application developed in Matlab environment. The user can select a series of DICOM files and manage their text and graphical data. The metadata are automatically formatted and presented to the user as a Microsoft Excel file. The volumetric maps are formed by interactively specifying the ROIs and by assigning a specific value in every ROI. The result is stored in DICOM format, for data and trend analysis. The developed GUI is easy, fast and and constitutes a very useful tool for individualized dosimetry. One of the future goals is to incorporate a remote access to a PACS server functionality.

  4. Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Imaging with a Piezoelectric 2-D Row-Column Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row-column addres......The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row...

  5. Passive Standoff Super Resolution Imaging using Spatial-Spectral Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    emission wavelength. Fig. 69. Measured results. (a) Channeled spectra . The spectra are illustrated from highest to lowest spatial frequency from top...1967).Photon Technologies International, “PTI Technical Notes: Lamp Emission Spectra ,” http://www.pti-nj.com/TechnicalNotes/Lamp- Emission -Spectra.pdf...Nonlinear Channeled Spectra ..................................................................... 29 2.4 Angular Resolution Analysis

  6. Spatial-Spectral Sensor Techniques for Detection of Atmospheric Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sears, Robert

    2000-01-01

    This report addresses the problem of utilizing spatial-hyperspectral imaging capabilities of spaceborne sensors to detect and characterize regions of atmospheric turbulence and cirrus cloud clutter...

  7. Three-dimensional volumetric assessment of response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, C.G.; Stracher, M.A.; Linggood, R.M.; Leong, J.C.; Skates, S.J.; Miketic, L.M.; Kushner, D.C.; Jacobson, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    From 1981 to 1986, 12 patients with Stage I and II diffuse large cell lymphoma of the mediastinum were treated with 4 or more cycles of multiagent chemotherapy and for nine patients this was followed by mediastinal irradiation. The response to treatment was assessed by three-dimensional volumetric analysis utilizing thoracic CT scans. The initial mean tumor volume of the five patients relapsing was 540 ml in contrast to an initial mean tumor volume of 360 ml for the seven patients remaining in remission. Of the eight patients in whom mediastinal lymphoma volumes could be assessed 1-2 months after chemotherapy prior to mediastinal irradiation, the three patients who have relapsed had volumes of 292, 92 and 50 ml (mean volume 145 ml) in contrast to five patients who have remained in remission with residual volume abnormalities of 4-87 ml (mean volume 32 ml). Four patients in prolonged remission with CT scans taken one year after treatment have been noted to have mediastinal tumor volumes of 0-28 ml with a mean value of 10 ml. This volumetric technique to assess the extent of mediastinal large cell lymphoma from thoracic CT scans appears to be a useful method to quantitate the amount of disease at presentation as well as objectively monitor response to treatment. 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table

  8. Scanners and drillers: Characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a “stack” of 2-D chest CT “slices.” At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: “drilling” and “scanning.” Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated. PMID:23922445

  9. Computational assessment of visual search strategies in volumetric medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gezheng; Aizenman, Avigael; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Haygood, Tamara Miner; Markey, Mia K

    2016-01-01

    When searching through volumetric images [e.g., computed tomography (CT)], radiologists appear to use two different search strategies: "drilling" (restrict eye movements to a small region of the image while quickly scrolling through slices), or "scanning" (search over large areas at a given depth before moving on to the next slice). To computationally identify the type of image information that is used in these two strategies, 23 naïve observers were instructed with either "drilling" or "scanning" when searching for target T's in 20 volumes of faux lung CTs. We computed saliency maps using both classical two-dimensional (2-D) saliency, and a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamic saliency that captures the characteristics of scrolling through slices. Comparing observers' gaze distributions with the saliency maps showed that search strategy alters the type of saliency that attracts fixations. Drillers' fixations aligned better with dynamic saliency and scanners with 2-D saliency. The computed saliency was greater for detected targets than for missed targets. Similar results were observed in data from 19 radiologists who searched five stacks of clinical chest CTs for lung nodules. Dynamic saliency may be superior to the 2-D saliency for detecting targets embedded in volumetric images, and thus "drilling" may be more efficient than "scanning."

  10. Volumetric Flow Measurement Using an Implantable CMUT Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengli Wang; Jingkuang Chen

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes volumetric-flow velocity measurement using an implantable capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The array is comprised of multiple-concentric CMUT rings for ultrasound transmission and an outmost annular CMUT array for ultrasound reception. Microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technology allows reception CMUT on this flowmeter to be implemented with a different membrane thickness and gap height than that of transmission CMUTs, optimizing the performance of these two different kinds of devices. The silicon substrate of this 2-mm-diameter CMUT ring array was bulk micromachined to approximately 80 to 100 μm thick, minimizing tissue disruption. The blood-flow velocity was detected using pulse ultrasound Doppler by comparing the demodulated echo ultrasound with the incident ultrasound. The demodulated ultrasound signal was sampled by a pulse delayed in time domain from the transmitted burst, which corresponds to detecting the signal at a specific distance. The flow tube/vessel diameter was detected through the time-flight delay difference from near and far wall reflections, which was measured from the ultrasound pulse echo. The angle between the ultrasound beam and the flow was found by using the cross-correlation from consecutive ultrasound echoes. Artificial blood flowing through three different polymer tubes was experimented with, while keeping the same volumetric flow rate. The discrepancy in flow measurement results between this CMUT meter and a calibrated laser Doppler flowmeter is less than 5%.

  11. Automated volumetric breast density estimation: A comparison with visual assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.M.; Ko, E.S.; Han, B.-K.; Ko, E.Y.; Shin, J.H.; Hahn, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare automated volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement with visual assessment according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to determine the factors influencing the agreement between them. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-three consecutive screening mammograms reported as negative were included in the study. Three radiologists assigned qualitative BI-RADS density categories to the mammograms. An automated volumetric breast-density method was used to measure VBD (% breast density) and density grade (VDG). Each case was classified into an agreement or disagreement group according to the comparison between visual assessment and VDG. The correlation between visual assessment and VDG was obtained. Various physical factors were compared between the two groups. Results: Agreement between visual assessment by the radiologists and VDG was good (ICC value = 0.757). VBD showed a highly significant positive correlation with visual assessment (Spearman's ρ = 0.754, p < 0.001). VBD and the x-ray tube target was significantly different between the agreement group and the disagreement groups (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: Automated VBD is a reliable objective method to measure breast density. The agreement between VDG and visual assessment by radiologist might be influenced by physical factors

  12. Volumetric verification of multiaxis machine tool using laser tracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Sergio; Samper, David; Santolaria, Jorge; Aguilar, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a method of volumetric verification in machine tools with linear and rotary axes using a laser tracker. Beyond a method for a particular machine, it presents a methodology that can be used in any machine type. Along this paper, the schema and kinematic model of a machine with three axes of movement, two linear and one rotational axes, including the measurement system and the nominal rotation matrix of the rotational axis are presented. Using this, the machine tool volumetric error is obtained and nonlinear optimization techniques are employed to improve the accuracy of the machine tool. The verification provides a mathematical, not physical, compensation, in less time than other methods of verification by means of the indirect measurement of geometric errors of the machine from the linear and rotary axes. This paper presents an extensive study about the appropriateness and drawbacks of the regression function employed depending on the types of movement of the axes of any machine. In the same way, strengths and weaknesses of measurement methods and optimization techniques depending on the space available to place the measurement system are presented. These studies provide the most appropriate strategies to verify each machine tool taking into consideration its configuration and its available work space.

  13. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  14. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  15. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  16. Fast food (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  17. Fast food tips (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  18. Physiology of Ramadan fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Bonakdaran

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emphasis of Islam on the importance of fasting, Muslims attempt to fast from dawn until sunset during the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting is associated with several benefits for normal and healthy individuals. However, it could pose high risks to the health of diabetic patients due to certain physiological changes. This study aimed to compare the physiological changes associated with fasting in healthy individuals and diabetic patients during Ramadan. Furthermore, we reviewed t...

  19. Ramadan, fasting and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Urfan Zahoor; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Islam, the month of Ramadan is a period of fasting lasting 29 or 30 days. Epidemiological studies among Muslims in Denmark have not been conducted, but studies show, that fasting among pregnant Muslim women is common. Fasting does not increase the risk of growth restriction or preterm delivery...

  20. The efficiency of a volumetric alcohol tax in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Joshua; Petrie, Dennis J; Doran, Christopher M; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In Australia and elsewhere, fiscal measures such as alcohol taxation are a commonly used intervention and cost-effective strategy to reduce alcohol consumption and associated harm. However, alcohol taxation policies distort the market for alcohol, specifically increasing the marginal cost of alcohol. It is proposed that a volumetric tax, which taxes alcohol equally across all beverage types, is less distortive of consumer preferences and more efficient at reducing alcohol consumption than the current Australian tax model, where taxes are charged at varying amounts per litre of pure alcohol, depending on the beverage type. This paper quantifies the effect of four different alcohol taxation systems, relative to the current Australian system: two different types of volumetric taxation (deadweight loss neutral and tax revenue neutral); the recent strategy trialled in Australia of increasing the tax only on ready-to-drink alcoholic beverages (i.e. premixed spirits); and a tiered tax system, which may be more politically acceptable. A partial equilibrium approach was used to measure taxation revenue, consumer welfare and consumption in alcohol markets. Estimates of taxation revenue, consumer welfare and consumption were first calculated for 2008 and then compared with the four scenarios considered. Relative to the previous alcohol taxation scheme in Australia, the taxation strategy that increased the tax solely on ready-to-drink alcoholic beverages increased taxation revenue by 479 million Australian dollars ($A), reduced pure alcohol consumption by 754 000 litres and increased the net deadweight loss of taxation by $A62 million. For a tax-neutral approach, for the same level of taxation revenue as is currently generated, a volumetric tax could substantially reduce the cost of taxation (as described by the net loss in consumer welfare) by $A177 million and reduce pure alcohol consumption by 4 68 000 litres. Under a deadweight loss-neutral scenario, for the same

  1. Ramadan, faste og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Urfan Zahoor; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Islam, the month of Ramadan is a period of fasting lasting 29 or 30 days. Epidemiological studies among Muslims in Denmark have not been conducted, but studies show, that fasting among pregnant Muslim women is common. Fasting does not increase the risk of growth restriction or preterm delivery......, but there are reports of decreased foetal movements. Furthermore, the fasting may have long-term health consequences for the offspring, especially when they reach their middle age. According to Islam and the interpretation, pregnant and breast-feeding women are allowed to postpone the fasting of the month of Ramadan...

  2. Control and design of volumetric composition in pultruded hybrid fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Hashemi, Fariborz; Tahir, Paridah

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid composites consist of two of more fibre phases in a common matrix phase. This is a challenge for the control and design of the volumetric composition and microstructural uniformity of such composites. In the present study, a model is presented for the prediction of the complete volumetric...

  3. Volumetric and two-dimensional image interpretation show different cognitive processes in learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gijp, Anouk; Ravesloot, Cécile J.; van der Schaaf, Marieke F.; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Huige, Josephine C B M; Vincken, Koen L.; Ten Cate, Olle Th J; van Schaik, Jan P J

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: In current practice, radiologists interpret digital images, including a substantial amount of volumetric images. We hypothesized that interpretation of a stack of a volumetric data set demands different skills than interpretation of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional

  4. Volumetric and two-dimensional image interpretation show different cognitive processes in learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gijp, Anouk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413648907; Ravesloot, C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362749663; van der Schaaf, Marieke F; van der Schaaf, Irene C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29133489X; Huige, Josephine C B M; Vincken, Koen L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143101722; Ten Cate, Olle Th J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068931204; van Schaik, JPJ|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114811

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: In current practice, radiologists interpret digital images, including a substantial amount of volumetric images. We hypothesized that interpretation of a stack of a volumetric data set demands different skills than interpretation of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional

  5. Volumetric Arterial Wall Shear Stress Calculation Based on Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Wouter V.; van Ooij, Pim; Marquering, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the accuracy and precision of a volumetric wall shear stress (WSS) calculation method applied to cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) data. Materials and MethodsVolumetric WSS vectors were calculated in software phantoms. WSS algorithm parameters were optimized

  6. Radiologist assessment of breast density by BI-RADS categories versus fully automated volumetric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Son, Eun Ju

    2013-09-01

    The objective of our study was to estimate mammographic breast density using a fully automated volumetric breast density measurement method in comparison with BI-RADS breast density categories determined by radiologists. A total of 791 full-field digital mammography examinations with standard views were evaluated by three blinded radiologists as BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For fully automated volumetric analysis, volumetric breast density was calculated with fully automated software. The volume of fibroglandular tissue, the volume of the breast, and the volumetric percentage density were provided. The weighted overall kappa was 0.48 (moderate agreement) for the three radiologists' estimates of BI-RADS density. Pairwise comparisons of the radiologists' measurements of BI-RADS density revealed moderate to substantial agreement, with kappa values ranging from 0.51 to 0.64. There was a significant difference in mean volumetric breast density among the BI-RADS density categories, and the mean volumetric breast density increased as the BI-RADS density category increased (pBI-RADS categories and fully automated volumetric breast density (ρ=0.765, pBI-RADS density categories. Mammographic density assessment with the fully automated volumetric method may be used to assign BI-RADS density categories.

  7. Stability and Volumetric Properties of Asphalt Mixture Containing Waste Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Kader Siti Aminah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to determine the optimum bitumen content (OBC for every percentage added of waste plastics in asphalt mixtures and to investigate the stability properties of the asphalt mixtures containing waste plastic. Marshall stability and flow values along with density, air voids in total mix, voids in mineral aggregate, and voids filled with bitumen were determined to obtain OBC at different percentages of waste plastic, i.e., 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% by weight of bitumen as additive. Results showed that the OBC for the plastic-modified asphalt mixtures at 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% are 4.98, 5.44, 5.48, and 5.14, respectively. On the other hand, the controlled specimen’s shows better volumetric properties compared to plastic mixes. However, 4% additional of waste plastic indicated better stability than controlled specimen.

  8. Green chemistry volumetric titration kit for pharmaceutical formulations: Econoburette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Singh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Stopcock SC and Spring Sp models of Econoburette (Calibrated, RTC (NR, Ministry of Small Scale Industries, Government of India, developed for semimicro volumetric titration of pharmaceutical formulations are reported. These are economized and risk free titration where pipette is replaced by an inbuilt pipette and conical flask by inbuilt bulb. A step of pipetting of stock solution by mouth is deleted. It is used to allow solution exposure to user’s body. This risk is removed and even volatile and toxic solutions are titrated with full proof safety. Econoburette minimizes use of materials and time by 90 % and prevent discharge of polluting effluent to environment. Few acid and base samples are titrated and an analysis of experimental expenditure is described in the papers.

  9. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos

    2017-03-22

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  10. Thermal expansion and volumetric changes during indium phosphide melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Davletov, K.; Nashel'skij, A.Ya.; Mamedov, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the measurements of a thermal expansion were summed up at various temperatures as a diagram in coordinates (Δ 1/1) approximately F(t). It was shown that an appreciable deviation of the relationship (Δ1/1) approximately f(t) from the linear law corresponded to a temperature of 500-550 deg C. It was noted that the said deviation was related to an appreciable thermal decomposition of indium phosphide as temperature increased. The strength of the inter-atomic bond of indium phosphide was calculated. Investigated were the volumetric changes of indium phosphide on melting. The resultant data were analyzed with the aid of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation

  11. Volumetric multimodality neural network for brain tumor segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana Castillo, Laura; Alexandra Daza, Laura; Carlos Rivera, Luis; Arbeláez, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    Brain lesion segmentation is one of the hardest tasks to be solved in computer vision with an emphasis on the medical field. We present a convolutional neural network that produces a semantic segmentation of brain tumors, capable of processing volumetric data along with information from multiple MRI modalities at the same time. This results in the ability to learn from small training datasets and highly imbalanced data. Our method is based on DeepMedic, the state of the art in brain lesion segmentation. We develop a new architecture with more convolutional layers, organized in three parallel pathways with different input resolution, and additional fully connected layers. We tested our method over the 2015 BraTS Challenge dataset, reaching an average dice coefficient of 84%, while the standard DeepMedic implementation reached 74%.

  12. Natural convection in wavy enclosures with volumetric heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztop, H.F.; Varol, Y.; Abu-Nada, E.; Chamkha, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of volumetric heat sources on natural convection heat transfer and flow structures in a wavy-walled enclosure are studied numerically. The governing differential equations are solved by an accurate finite-volume method. The vertical walls of enclosure are assumed to be heated differentially whereas the two wavy walls (top and bottom) are kept adiabatic. The effective governing parameters for this problem are the internal and external Rayleigh numbers and the amplitude of wavy walls. It is found that both the function of wavy wall and the ratio of internal Rayleigh number (Ra I ) to external Rayleigh number (Ra E ) affect the heat transfer and fluid flow significantly. The heat transfer is predicted to be a decreasing function of waviness of the top and bottom walls in case of (IRa/ERa)>1 and (IRa/ERa)<1. (authors)

  13. Benchmark calculations for evaluation methods of gas volumetric leakage rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, R.; Aritomi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    1998-01-01

    A containment function of radioactive materials transport casks is essential for safe transportation to prevent the radioactive materials from being released into environment. Regulations such as IAEA standard determined the limit of radioactivity to be released. Since is not practical for the leakage tests to measure directly the radioactivity release from a package, as gas volumetric leakages rates are proposed in ANSI N14.5 and ISO standards. In our previous works, gas volumetric leakage rates for several kinds of gas from various leaks were measured and two evaluation methods, 'a simple evaluation method' and 'a strict evaluation method', were proposed based on the results. The simple evaluation method considers the friction loss of laminar flow with expansion effect. The strict evaluating method considers an exit loss in addition to the friction loss. In this study, four worked examples were completed for on assumed large spent fuel transport cask (Type B Package) with wet or dry capacity and at three transport conditions; normal transport with intact fuels or failed fuels, and an accident in transport. The standard leakage rates and criteria for two kinds of leak test were calculated for each example by each evaluation method. The following observations are made based upon the calculations and evaluations: the choked flow model of ANSI method greatly overestimates the criteria for tests ; the laminar flow models of both ANSI and ISO methods slightly overestimate the criteria for tests; the above two results are within the design margin for ordinary transport condition and all methods are useful for the evaluation; for severe condition such as failed fuel transportation, it should pay attention to apply a choked flow model of ANSI method. (authors)

  14. Volumetric analysis of corticocancellous bones using CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krappinger, Dietmar; Linde, Astrid von; Rosenberger, Ralf; Blauth, Michael [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Trauma Surgery and Sports Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Glodny, Bernhard; Niederwanger, Christian [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology I, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-05-15

    To present a method for an automated volumetric analysis of corticocancellous bones such as the superior pubic ramus using CT data and to assess the reliability of this method. Computed tomography scans of a consecutive series of 250 patients were analyzed. A Hounsfield unit (HU) thresholding-based reconstruction technique (''Vessel Tracking,'' GE Healthcare) was used. A contiguous space of cancellous bone with similar HU values between the starting and end points was automatically identified as the region of interest. The identification was based upon the density gradient to the adjacent cortical bone. The starting point was defined as the middle of the parasymphyseal corticocancellous transition zone on the axial slice showing the parasymphyseal superior pubic ramus in its maximum anteroposterior width. The end point was defined as the middle of the periarticular corticocancellous transition zone on the axial slice showing the quadrilateral plate as a thin cortical plate. The following parameters were automatically obtained on both sides: length of the center line, volume of the superior pubic ramus between the starting point and end point, minimum, maximum and mean diameter perpendicular to the center line, and mean cross-sectional area perpendicular to the center line. An automated analysis without manual adjustments was successful in 207 patients (82.8%). The center line showed a significantly greater length in female patients (67.6 mm vs 65.0 mm). The volume was greater in male patients (21.8 cm{sup 3} vs 19.4 cm{sup 3}). The intersite reliability was high with a mean difference between the left and right sides of between 0.1% (cross-sectional area) and 2.3% (volume). The method presented allows for an automated volumetric analysis of a corticocancellous bone using CT data. The method is intended to provide preoperative information for the use of intramedullary devices in fracture fixation and percutaneous cement augmentation techniques

  15. Lesion Segmentation in Automated 3D Breast Ultrasound: Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Richa; Diaz, Oliver; Lladó, Xavier; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Vilanova, Joan C; Martí, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Mammography is the gold standard screening technique in breast cancer, but it has some limitations for women with dense breasts. In such cases, sonography is usually recommended as an additional imaging technique. A traditional sonogram produces a two-dimensional (2D) visualization of the breast and is highly operator dependent. Automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) has also been proposed to produce a full 3D scan of the breast automatically with reduced operator dependency, facilitating double reading and comparison with past exams. When using ABUS, lesion segmentation and tracking changes over time are challenging tasks, as the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the images makes the analysis difficult and tedious for radiologists. The goal of this work is to develop a semi-automatic framework for breast lesion segmentation in ABUS volumes which is based on the Watershed algorithm. The effect of different de-noising methods on segmentation is studied showing a significant impact ([Formula: see text]) on the performance using a dataset of 28 temporal pairs resulting in a total of 56 ABUS volumes. The volumetric analysis is also used to evaluate the performance of the developed framework. A mean Dice Similarity Coefficient of [Formula: see text] with a mean False Positive ratio [Formula: see text] has been obtained. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the segmented volumes and the corresponding ground truth volumes is [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]). Similar analysis, performed on 28 temporal (prior and current) pairs, resulted in a good correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) for prior and [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) for current cases. The developed framework showed prospects to help radiologists to perform an assessment of ABUS lesion volumes, as well as to quantify volumetric changes during lesions diagnosis and follow-up.

  16. Volumetric analysis of corticocancellous bones using CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappinger, Dietmar; Linde, Astrid von; Rosenberger, Ralf; Blauth, Michael; Glodny, Bernhard; Niederwanger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To present a method for an automated volumetric analysis of corticocancellous bones such as the superior pubic ramus using CT data and to assess the reliability of this method. Computed tomography scans of a consecutive series of 250 patients were analyzed. A Hounsfield unit (HU) thresholding-based reconstruction technique (''Vessel Tracking,'' GE Healthcare) was used. A contiguous space of cancellous bone with similar HU values between the starting and end points was automatically identified as the region of interest. The identification was based upon the density gradient to the adjacent cortical bone. The starting point was defined as the middle of the parasymphyseal corticocancellous transition zone on the axial slice showing the parasymphyseal superior pubic ramus in its maximum anteroposterior width. The end point was defined as the middle of the periarticular corticocancellous transition zone on the axial slice showing the quadrilateral plate as a thin cortical plate. The following parameters were automatically obtained on both sides: length of the center line, volume of the superior pubic ramus between the starting point and end point, minimum, maximum and mean diameter perpendicular to the center line, and mean cross-sectional area perpendicular to the center line. An automated analysis without manual adjustments was successful in 207 patients (82.8%). The center line showed a significantly greater length in female patients (67.6 mm vs 65.0 mm). The volume was greater in male patients (21.8 cm 3 vs 19.4 cm 3 ). The intersite reliability was high with a mean difference between the left and right sides of between 0.1% (cross-sectional area) and 2.3% (volume). The method presented allows for an automated volumetric analysis of a corticocancellous bone using CT data. The method is intended to provide preoperative information for the use of intramedullary devices in fracture fixation and percutaneous cement augmentation techniques. (orig.)

  17. Volumetric optical coherence microscopy enabled by aberrated optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Siyang; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging technique that enables high resolution, non-invasive imaging of 3D cell cultures and biological tissues. Volumetric imaging with OCM suffers a trade-off between high transverse resolution and poor depth-of-field resulting from defocus, optical aberrations, and reduced signal collection away from the focal plane. While defocus and aberrations can be compensated with computational methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) or computational adaptive optics (CAO), reduced signal collection must be physically addressed through optical hardware. Axial scanning of the focus is one approach, but comes at the cost of longer acquisition times, larger datasets, and greater image reconstruction times. Given the capabilities of CAO to compensate for general phase aberrations, we present an alternative method to address the signal collection problem without axial scanning by using intentionally aberrated optical hardware. We demonstrate the use of an astigmatic spectral domain (SD-)OCM imaging system to enable single-acquisition volumetric OCM in 3D cell culture over an extended depth range, compared to a non-aberrated SD-OCM system. The transverse resolution of the non-aberrated and astigmatic imaging systems after application of CAO were 2 um and 2.2 um, respectively. The depth-range of effective signal collection about the nominal focal plane was increased from 100 um in the non-aberrated system to over 300 um in the astigmatic system, extending the range over which useful data may be acquired in a single OCM dataset. We anticipate that this method will enable high-throughput cellular-resolution imaging of dynamic biological systems over extended volumes.

  18. Short-term mechanisms influencing volumetric brain dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Dieleman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and brain analysis tools, it has become possible to measure brain volume changes up to around 0.5%. Besides long-term brain changes caused by atrophy in aging or neurodegenerative disease, short-term mechanisms that influence brain volume may exist. When we focus on short-term changes of the brain, changes may be either physiological or pathological. As such determining the cause of volumetric dynamics of the brain is essential. Additionally for an accurate interpretation of longitudinal brain volume measures by means of neurodegeneration, knowledge about the short-term changes is needed. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms influencing brain volumes on a short-term basis and set-out a framework of MRI techniques to be used for volumetric changes as well as the used analysis tools. 3D T1-weighted images are the images of choice when it comes to MRI of brain volume. These images are excellent to determine brain volume and can be used together with an analysis tool to determine the degree of volume change. Mechanisms that decrease global brain volume are: fluid restriction, evening MRI measurements, corticosteroids, antipsychotics and short-term effects of pathological processes like Alzheimer's disease, hypertension and Diabetes mellitus type II. Mechanisms increasing the brain volume include fluid intake, morning MRI measurements, surgical revascularization and probably medications like anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-hypertensive medication. Exercise was found to have no effect on brain volume on a short-term basis, which may imply that dehydration caused by exercise differs from dehydration by fluid restriction. In the upcoming years, attention should be directed towards studies investigating physiological short-term changes within the light of long-term pathological changes. Ultimately this may lead to a better understanding of the physiological short-term effects of

  19. System analysis of formation and perception processes of three-dimensional images in volumetric displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, Alexander; Sgibnev, Arthur

    2018-03-01

    One of the promising devices is currently a volumetric display. Volumetric displays capable to visualize complex three-dimensional information as nearly as possible to its natural – volume form without the use of special glasses. The invention and implementation of volumetric display technology will expand opportunities of information visualization in various spheres of human activity. The article attempts to structure and describe the interrelation of the essential characteristics of objects in the area of volumetric visualization. Also there is proposed a method of calculation of estimate total number of voxels perceived by observers during the 3D demonstration, generated using a volumetric display with a rotating screen. In the future, it is planned to expand the described technique and implement a system for estimation the quality of generated images, depending on the types of biplanes and their initial characteristics.

  20. Design, Implementation and Characterization of a Quantum-Dot-Based Volumetric Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Tate, Naoya; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a volumetric display system based on quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a polymer substrate. Unlike conventional volumetric displays, our system does not require electrical wiring; thus, the heretofore unavoidable issue of occlusion is resolved because irradiation by external light supplies the energy to the light-emitting voxels formed by the QDs. By exploiting the intrinsic attributes of the QDs, the system offers ultrahigh definition and a wide range of colours for volumetric displays. In this paper, we discuss the design, implementation and characterization of the proposed volumetric display's first prototype. We developed an 8 × 8 × 8 display comprising two types of QDs. This display provides multicolour three-type two-dimensional patterns when viewed from different angles. The QD-based volumetric display provides a new way to represent images and could be applied in leisure and advertising industries, among others.

  1. Volumetric and two-dimensional image interpretation show different cognitive processes in learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gijp, Anouk; Ravesloot, Cécile J; van der Schaaf, Marieke F; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Huige, Josephine C B M; Vincken, Koen L; Ten Cate, Olle Th J; van Schaik, Jan P J

    2015-05-01

    In current practice, radiologists interpret digital images, including a substantial amount of volumetric images. We hypothesized that interpretation of a stack of a volumetric data set demands different skills than interpretation of two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images. This study aimed to investigate and compare knowledge and skills used for interpretation of volumetric versus 2D images. Twenty radiology clerks were asked to think out loud while reading four or five volumetric computed tomography (CT) images in stack mode and four or five 2D CT images. Cases were presented in a digital testing program allowing stack viewing of volumetric data sets and changing views and window settings. Thoughts verbalized by the participants were registered and coded by a framework of knowledge and skills concerning three components: perception, analysis, and synthesis. The components were subdivided into 16 discrete knowledge and skill elements. A within-subject analysis was performed to compare cognitive processes during volumetric image readings versus 2D cross-sectional image readings. Most utterances contained knowledge and skills concerning perception (46%). A smaller part involved synthesis (31%) and analysis (23%). More utterances regarded perception in volumetric image interpretation than in 2D image interpretation (Median 48% vs 35%; z = -3.9; P Cognitive processes in volumetric and 2D cross-sectional image interpretation differ substantially. Volumetric image interpretation draws predominantly on perceptual processes, whereas 2D image interpretation is mainly characterized by synthesis. The results encourage the use of volumetric images for teaching and testing perceptual skills. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fast computed tomography and volume rendering using the body-centered cubic lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Finkbeiner, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Two main tasks in the field of volumetric image processing are acquisition and visualization of 3D data. The main challenge is to reduce processing costs, while maintaining high accuracy. To achieve these goals for volume rendering (visualization), we demonstrate that non-separable box splines for body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices can be adapted to fast evaluation on graphics hardware. Thus, the BCC lattice can be used for interactive volume rendering leading to better image quality than com...

  3. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments for and against the fast breeder reactor are debated. The case for the fast reactor is that the world energy demand will increase due to increasing population over the next forty years and that the damage to the global environment from burning fossil fuels which contribute to the greenhouse effect. Nuclear fission is the only large scale energy source which can achieve a cut in the use of carbon based fuels although energy conservation and renewable sources will also be important. Fast reactors produce more energy from uranium than other types of (thermal) reactors such as AGRs and PWRs. Fast reactors would be important from about 2020 onwards especially as by then many thermal reactors will need to be replaced. Fast reactors are also safer than normal reactors. The arguments against fast reactors are largely economic. The cost, especially the capital cost is very high. The viability of the technology is also questioned. (UK)

  4. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author gives a survey of 'fast breeder reactors'. In detail the process of breeding, the reasons for the development of fast breeders, the possible breeder reactors, the design criteria, fuels, cladding, coolant, and safety aspects are reported on. Design data of some experimental reactors already in operation are summarized in stabular form. 300 MWe Prototype-Reactors SNR-300 and PFR are explained in detail and data of KWU helium-cooled fast breeder reactors are given. (HR) [de

  5. Islamic fasting and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Fereidoun

    2010-01-01

    Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset during the month of Ramadan, the 9th lunar month. The duration of fasting varies from 13 to 18 h/day. Fasting includes avoidance of drinking liquids and eating foods. The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting. Related abstracts from 1960 to 2009 were obtained from Medline and local journals in Islamic countries. One hundred and thirteen articles meeting the criteria for paper selection were reviewed in depth to identify details of related materials. During the fasting days of Ramadan glucose homeostasis is maintained by meals taken before dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and depend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well-controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting, but fasting is not recommended for type 1, noncompliant, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. There are no adverse effects of Ramadan fasting on the heart, lung, liver, kidney, eyes, hematologic profile, endocrine and neuropsychiatric functions. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals, those with various diseases should consult their physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  6. Temperature-dependent dynamic control of the TCA cycle increases volumetric productivity of itaconic acid production by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Björn-Johannes; Bettenbrock, Katja; Klamt, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    Based on the recently constructed Escherichia coli itaconic acid production strain ita23, we aimed to improve the productivity by applying a two-stage process strategy with decoupled production of biomass and itaconic acid. We constructed a strain ita32 (MG1655 ΔaceA Δpta ΔpykF ΔpykA pCadCs), which, in contrast to ita23, has an active tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and a fast growth rate of 0.52 hr -1 at 37°C, thus representing an ideal phenotype for the first stage, the growth phase. Subsequently we implemented a synthetic genetic control allowing the downregulation of the TCA cycle and thus the switch from growth to itaconic acid production in the second stage. The promoter of the isocitrate dehydrogenase was replaced by the Lambda promoter (p R ) and its expression was controlled by the temperature-sensitive repressor CI857 which is active at lower temperatures (30°C). With glucose as substrate, the respective strain ita36A grew with a fast growth rate at 37°C and switched to production of itaconic acid at 28°C. To study the impact of the process strategy on productivity, we performed one-stage and two-stage bioreactor cultivations. The two-stage process enabled fast formation of biomass resulting in improved peak productivity of 0.86 g/L/hr (+48%) and volumetric productivity of 0.39 g/L/hr (+22%) in comparison to the one-stage process. With our dynamic production strain, we also resolved the glutamate auxotrophy of ita23 and increased the itaconic acid titer to 47 g/L. The temperature-dependent activation of gene expression by the Lambda promoters (p R /p L ) has been frequently used to improve protein or, in a few cases, metabolite production in two-stage processes. Here we demonstrate that the system can be as well used in the opposite direction to selectively knock-down an essential gene (icd) in E. coli to design a two-stage process for improved volumetric productivity. The control by temperature avoids expensive inducers and has the

  7. A quality assurance phantom for the performance evaluation of volumetric micro-CT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Louise Y; Umoh, Joseph; Nikolov, Hristo N; Pollmann, Steven I; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W

    2007-01-01

    Small-animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. As a result, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems are becoming more common in research laboratories, due to their ability to achieve spatial resolution as high as 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. Most recently, a volumetric cone-beam micro-CT system using a flat-panel detector (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare, London, ON) has been developed that combines the high resolution of micro-CT and the fast scanning speed of clinical CT, so that dynamic perfusion imaging can be performed in mice and rats, providing functional physiological information in addition to anatomical information. This and other commercially available micro-CT systems all promise to deliver precise and accurate high-resolution measurements in small animals. However, no comprehensive quality assurance phantom has been developed to evaluate the performance of these micro-CT systems on a routine basis. We have designed and fabricated a single comprehensive device for the purpose of performance evaluation of micro-CT systems. This quality assurance phantom was applied to assess multiple image-quality parameters of a current flat-panel cone-beam micro-CT system accurately and quantitatively, in terms of spatial resolution, geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.5 mm -1 and noise of ±35 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 s at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy

  8. Volumetric analysis of intravoxel incoherent motion imaging for assessment of solitary pulmonary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mei; Zhong, Yan; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Tong-Fu; Li, Hai; Wu, Jiang-Fen

    2017-12-01

    Background Differentiating between malignant and benign solitary pulmonary lesions (SPLs) is challenging. Purpose To determine diagnostic performance of intravoxel incoherent motion-based diffusion-weighted imaging (DW-IVIM) in distinguishing malignant from benign SPLs, using histogram analysis derived whole-tumor and single-section region of interest (ROI). Material and Methods This retrospective study received institutional review board approval. A total of 129 patients with diagnosed SPLs underwent DW-IVIM and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). ADC, slow diffusion coefficient (D), fast diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were calculated separately by outlining whole-tumor and single-section ROI. Inter-observer reliability was assessed by inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC). ADC and DW-IVIM parameters were analyzed using independent-sample T-test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was constructed to determine diagnostic performance. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify independent factors associated with malignant SPLs. Results There were 48 benign SPLs found in 35 patients and 94 patients with lung cancer (LC). ICC for whole-tumor ROI (range, 0.89-0.95) was higher than that for single-section ROI (range, 0.61-0.71). Mean ADC and D were significantly lower in the malignant group. ADC and D 10th showed significantly higher AUC values than did mean ADC and D. D showed significantly higher diagnostic accuracy in mean, 10th, and 25th percentiles than ADC values (all Ps Volumetric analysis had higher reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy than did single-section. Further, compared to ADC, D value differentiated benign SPLs from LCs more accurately.

  9. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  10. Volumetric and MGMT parameters in glioblastoma patients: Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, Georgios; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios; Televantou, Despina; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Lambaki, Sofia; Misailidou, Despina; Selviaridis, Panagiotis; Fountzilas, George

    2012-01-01

    In this study several tumor-related volumes were assessed by means of a computer-based application and a survival analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of pre- and postoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. In addition, MGMT (O 6 -methylguanine methyltransferase) related parameters were compared with those of volumetry in order to observe possible relevance of this molecule in tumor development. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM) who underwent radiotherapy with concomitant adjuvant temozolomide. For the purpose of volumetry T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) sequences were used, acquired both pre- and postoperatively (pre-radiochemotherapy). The volumes measured on preoperative MR images were necrosis, enhancing tumor and edema (including the tumor) and on postoperative ones, net-enhancing tumor. Age, sex, performance status (PS) and type of operation were also included in the multivariate analysis. MGMT was assessed for promoter methylation with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), for RNA expression with real time PCR, and for protein expression with immunohistochemistry in a total of 44 cases with available histologic material. In the multivariate analysis a negative impact was shown for pre-radiochemotherapy net-enhancing tumor on the overall survival (OS) (p = 0.023) and for preoperative necrosis on progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.030). Furthermore, the multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of PS in PFS and OS of patients. MGMT promoter methylation was observed in 13/23 (43.5%) evaluable tumors; complete methylation was observed in 3/13 methylated tumors only. High rate of MGMT protein positivity (> 20% positive neoplastic nuclei) was inversely associated with pre-operative tumor necrosis (p = 0.021). Our findings implicate that volumetric parameters may have a significant role in the prognosis of GBM patients. Furthermore

  11. Volumetric brain tumour detection from MRI using visual saliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Somosmita; Banerjee, Subhashis; Hayashi, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Medical image processing has become a major player in the world of automatic tumour region detection and is tantamount to the incipient stages of computer aided design. Saliency detection is a crucial application of medical image processing, and serves in its potential aid to medical practitioners by making the affected area stand out in the foreground from the rest of the background image. The algorithm developed here is a new approach to the detection of saliency in a three dimensional multi channel MR image sequence for the glioblastoma multiforme (a form of malignant brain tumour). First we enhance the three channels, FLAIR (Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery), T2 and T1C (contrast enhanced with gadolinium) to generate a pseudo coloured RGB image. This is then converted to the CIE L*a*b* color space. Processing on cubes of sizes k = 4, 8, 16, the L*a*b* 3D image is then compressed into volumetric units; each representing the neighbourhood information of the surrounding 64 voxels for k = 4, 512 voxels for k = 8 and 4096 voxels for k = 16, respectively. The spatial distance of these voxels are then compared along the three major axes to generate the novel 3D saliency map of a 3D image, which unambiguously highlights the tumour region. The algorithm operates along the three major axes to maximise the computation efficiency while minimising loss of valuable 3D information. Thus the 3D multichannel MR image saliency detection algorithm is useful in generating a uniform and logistically correct 3D saliency map with pragmatic applicability in Computer Aided Detection (CADe). Assignment of uniform importance to all three axes proves to be an important factor in volumetric processing, which helps in noise reduction and reduces the possibility of compromising essential information. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated over the BRATS MICCAI 2015 dataset having 274 glioma cases, consisting both of high grade and low grade GBM. The results were compared with

  12. Volumetric and MGMT parameters in glioblastoma patients: Survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study several tumor-related volumes were assessed by means of a computer-based application and a survival analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of pre- and postoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. In addition, MGMT (O6-methylguanine methyltransferase related parameters were compared with those of volumetry in order to observe possible relevance of this molecule in tumor development. Methods We prospectively analyzed 65 patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM who underwent radiotherapy with concomitant adjuvant temozolomide. For the purpose of volumetry T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR sequences were used, acquired both pre- and postoperatively (pre-radiochemotherapy. The volumes measured on preoperative MR images were necrosis, enhancing tumor and edema (including the tumor and on postoperative ones, net-enhancing tumor. Age, sex, performance status (PS and type of operation were also included in the multivariate analysis. MGMT was assessed for promoter methylation with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA, for RNA expression with real time PCR, and for protein expression with immunohistochemistry in a total of 44 cases with available histologic material. Results In the multivariate analysis a negative impact was shown for pre-radiochemotherapy net-enhancing tumor on the overall survival (OS (p = 0.023 and for preoperative necrosis on progression-free survival (PFS (p = 0.030. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of PS in PFS and OS of patients. MGMT promoter methylation was observed in 13/23 (43.5% evaluable tumors; complete methylation was observed in 3/13 methylated tumors only. High rate of MGMT protein positivity (> 20% positive neoplastic nuclei was inversely associated with pre-operative tumor necrosis (p = 0.021. Conclusions Our findings implicate that volumetric parameters may have a significant role in

  13. Comparison of surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilford, W.B.; Ullrich, C.G.; Moore, T.

    1988-01-01

    Both surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional image processing from CT data can provide accurate demonstration of skeletal anatomy. While realistic, surface contour images may obscure fine detail such as nondisplaced fractures, and thin bone may disappear. Volumetric processing can provide high detail, but the transparency effect is unnatural and may yield a confusing image. Comparison of both three-dimensional modes is presented to demonstrate those findings best shown with each and to illustrate helpful techniques to improve volumetric display, such as disarticulation of unnecessary anatomy, short-angle repeating rotation (dithering), and image combination into overlay displays

  14. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYSIS OF VOLUMETRIC STRAINS IN POROUS MATERIALS IN TERMS OF WATER FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusin Z.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the differential analysis of volumetric strain (DAVS. The method allows measurements of volumetric deformations of capillary-porous materials caused by water-ice phase change. The VSE indicator (volumetric strain effect, which under certain conditions can be interpreted as the minimum degree of phase change of water contained in the material pores, is proposed. The test results (DAVS for three materials with diversified microstructure: clinker brick, calcium-silicate brick and Portland cement mortar were compared with the test results for pore characteristics obtained with the mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  15. Sub-diffraction limit localization of proteins in volumetric space using Bayesian restoration of fluorescence images from ultrathin specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Wang

    Full Text Available Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA(2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion, which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is -220 nm and -600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT, with its native 50-100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF, a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes.

  16. Manipulation of volumetric solids with applications to sculpting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2002-01-01

    are, of course, of theoretical interest, but not exclusively: A technique for constructive manipulation which maintains the properties of openness and closedness has been developed. A technique for fast volume visualization is an essential part of a sculpting system. Two techniques for interactive...

  17. An MRI-based semiautomated volumetric quantification of hip osteonecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malizos, K.N.; Siafakas, M.S.; Karachalios, T.S.; Fotiadis, D.I.; Soucacos, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To objectively and precisely define the spatial distribution of osteonecrosis and to investigate the influence of various factors including etiology. Design: A volumetric method is presented to describe the size and spatial distribution of necrotic lesions of the femoral head, using MRI scans. The technique is based on the definition of an equivalent sphere model for the femoral head. Patients: The gender, age, number of hips involved, disease duration, pain intensity, limping disability and etiology were correlated with the distribution of the pathologic bone. Seventy-nine patients with 122 hips affected by osteonecrosis were evaluated. Results: The lesion size ranged from 7% to 73% of the sphere equivalent. The lateral octants presented considerable variability, ranging from wide lateral lesions extending beyond the lip of the acetabulum, to narrow medial lesions, leaving a lateral supporting pillar of intact bone. Patients with sickle cell disease and steroid administration presented the largest lesions. The extent of the posterior superior medial octant involvement correlated with the symptom intensity, a younger age and male gender. Conclusion: The methodology presented here has proven a reliable and straightforward imaging tool for precise assessment of necrotic lesions. It also enables us to target accurately the drilling and grafting procedures. (orig.)

  18. Volumetric Measurements of Amnioserosa Cells in Developing Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, David; Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Hutson, Shane

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of cells in tissue in developing Drosophila melanogaster has become increasingly clearer over the past few decades, in large part due to advances in imaging techniques, genetic markers, predictive modeling, and micromanipulation (notably laser microsurgery). We now know apical contractions in amnioserosa cells are a significant factor in large scale processes like germ band retraction and dorsal closure. Also, laser microsurgery induces cellular recoil that strongly mimics a 2D elastic sheet. Still, what we know about these processes comes entirely from the apical surface where the standard fluorescent markers like cadherin are located, but many open questions exist concerning the remaining ``dark'' portion of cells. Does cell volume remain constant during contraction or do cells leak? Also, what shape changes do cells undergo? Do they bulge, wedge, contract prismatically, or something else? By using a marker that labels the entire membrane of amnioserosa cells (Resille, 117) and adapting our watershed segmentation routines for 4D datasets, we have been able to quantify the entire volumetric region of cells in tissue through time and compare changes in apical area and volume. Preliminary results suggest a fairly constant volume over the course of a contraction cycle.

  19. Volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Jin Ho; Seo, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Sae Rom; Kang, Ju Hee; Oh, Song Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of object shape and distance from the center of the image on the volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, according to different parameters of tube voltage and current. Four geometric objects (cylinder, cube, pyramid, and hexagon) with predefined dimensions were fabricated. The objects consisted of Teflon-perfluoroalkoxy embedded in a hydrocolloid matrix (Dupli-Coe-Loid TM; GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), encased in an acrylic resin cylinder assembly. An Alphard Vega Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire CBCT images. OnDemand 3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software was used for object segmentation and image analysis. The accuracy was expressed by the volume error (VE). The VE was calculated under 3 different exposure settings. The measured volumes of the objects were compared to the true volumes for statistical analysis. The mean VE ranged from −4.47% to 2.35%. There was no significant relationship between an object's shape and the VE. A significant correlation was found between the distance of the object to the center of the image and the VE. Tube voltage affected the volume measurements and the VE, but tube current did not. The evaluated CBCT device provided satisfactory volume measurements. To assess volume measurements, it might be sufficient to use serial scans with a high resolution, but a low dose. This information may provide useful guidance for assessing volume measurements.

  20. Normative biometrics for fetal ocular growth using volumetric MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-04-01

    To determine normative ranges for fetal ocular biometrics between 19 and 38 weeks gestational age (GA) using volumetric MRI reconstruction. The 3D images of 114 healthy fetuses between 19 and 38 weeks GA were created using super-resolution volume reconstructions from MRI slice acquisitions. These 3D images were semi-automatically segmented to measure fetal orbit volume, binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), and ocular diameter (OD). All biometry correlated with GA (Volume, Pearson's correlation coefficient (CC) = 0.9680; BOD, CC = 0.9552; OD, CC = 0.9445; and IOD, CC = 0.8429), and growth curves were plotted against linear and quadratic growth models. Regression analysis showed quadratic models to best fit BOD, IOD, and OD and a linear model to best fit volume. Orbital volume had the greatest correlation with GA, although BOD and OD also showed strong correlation. The normative data found in this study may be helpful for the detection of congenital fetal anomalies with more consistent measurements than are currently available. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cortical thickness and brain volumetric analysis in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sarah K; Zai, Alex; Pirnia, Tara; Arienzo, Donatello; Zhan, Liang; Moody, Teena D; Thompson, Paul M; Feusner, Jamie D

    2015-04-30

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) suffer from preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance, causing severe distress and disability. Although BDD affects 1-2% of the population, the neurobiology is not understood. Discrepant results in previous volumetric studies may be due to small sample sizes, and no study has investigated cortical thickness in BDD. The current study is the largest neuroimaging analysis of BDD. Participants included 49 medication-free, right-handed individuals with DSM-IV BDD and 44 healthy controls matched by age, sex, and education. Using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we computed vertex-wise gray matter (GM) thickness on the cortical surface and GM volume using voxel-based morphometry. We also computed volumes in cortical and subcortical regions of interest. In addition to group comparisons, we investigated associations with symptom severity, insight, and anxiety within the BDD group. In BDD, greater anxiety was significantly associated with thinner GM in the left superior temporal cortex and greater GM volume in the right caudate nucleus. There were no significant differences in cortical thickness, GM volume, or volumes in regions of interest between BDD and control subjects. Subtle associations with clinical symptoms may characterize brain morphometric patterns in BDD, rather than large group differences in brain structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Volumetric PIV in Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindise, Melissa; Dickerhoff, Ben; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms impose a unique challenge in which neurosurgeons must assess and decide between the risk of rupture and risk of treatment for each patient. Risk of rupture is often difficult to determine and most commonly assessed using geometric data including the size and shape of the aneurysm and parent vessel. Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in the growth and rupture of a cerebral aneurysm, but its specific influence is largely unknown due to the inability of in vivo modalities to characterize detailed flow fields and limited in vitro studies. In this work, we use a patient-specific basilar tip aneurysm model and volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV). In vivo, 4-D PC-MRI measurements were obtained for this aneurysm and the extracted pulsatile waveform was used for the in vitro study. Clinically relevant metrics including wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), relative residence time (RRT), 3-D pressure contours, and pressure wave speed were subsequently computed. This is the first study to investigate in vitro 3-D pressure fields within a cerebral aneurysm. The results of this study demonstrate how these metrics influence the biomechanics of the aneurysm and ultimately their affect on the risk of rupture.

  3. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  4. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  5. Region-of-interest volumetric visual hull refinement

    KAUST Repository

    Knoblauch, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a region-of-interest visual hull refinement technique, based on flexible voxel grids for volumetric visual hull reconstructions. Region-of-interest refinement is based on a multipass process, beginning with a focussed visual hull reconstruction, resulting in a first 3D approximation of the target, followed by a region-of-interest estimation, tasked with identifying features of interest, which in turn are used to locally refine the voxel grid and extract a higher-resolution surface representation for those regions. This approach is illustrated for the reconstruction of avatars for use in tele-immersion environments, where head and hand regions are of higher interest. To allow reproducability and direct comparison a publicly available data set for human visual hull reconstruction is used. This paper shows that region-of-interest reconstruction of the target is faster and visually comparable to higher resolution focused visual hull reconstructions. This approach reduces the amount of data generated through the reconstruction, allowing faster post processing, as rendering or networking of the surface voxels. Reconstruction speeds support smooth interactions between the avatar and the virtual environment, while the improved resolution of its facial region and hands creates a higher-degree of immersion and potentially impacts the perception of body language, facial expressions and eye-to-eye contact. Copyright © 2010 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  6. Femoral head osteonecrosis: Volumetric MRI assessment and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassounas, Athanasios E.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.

    2007-01-01

    Effective treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis (FHON) requires early diagnosis and accurate assessment of the disease severity. The ability to predict in the early stages the risk of collapse is important for selecting a joint salvage procedure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome in patients treated with vascularized fibular grafts in relation to preoperative MR imaging volumetry. We studied 58 patients (87 hips) with FHON. A semi-automated octant-based lesion measurement method, previously described, was performed on the T1-w MR images. The mean time of postoperative follow-up was 7.8 years. Sixty-three hips were successful and 24 failed and converted to total hip arthroplasty within a period of 2-4 years after the initial operation. The rate of failures for hips of male patients was higher than in female patients. The mean lesion size was 28% of the sphere equivalent of the femoral head, 24 ± 12% for the successful hips and 37 ± 9% for the failed (p < 0.001). The most affected octants were antero-supero-medial (58 ± 26%) and postero-supero-medial (54 ± 31%). All but postero-infero-medial and postero-infero-lateral octants, showed statistically significant differences in the lesion size between patients with successful and failed hips. In conclusion, the volumetric analysis of preoperative MRI provides useful information with regard to a successful outcome in patients treated with vascularized fibular grafts

  7. Keratoconus Detection Based on a New Corneal Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavas-Martínez, Francisco; Bataille, Laurent; Fernández-Pacheco, Daniel G; Cañavate, Francisco J F; Alio, Jorge L

    2017-11-20

    There are numerous tomographic indices for the detection of keratoconus risk. When the indexes based on corneal volume are analyzed, two problems are presented: on the one hand, they are not very sensitive to the detection of incipient cases of keratoconus because they are not locally defined in the primary developmental region of the structural abnormalities; and on the other hand, they do not register the geometric decompensation driven by the asymmetry present during the disease progression. This work performed a morphogeometric modeling of the cornea by the aid of CAD tools and using raw topographic data (Sirius system, CSO, Firenze). For this method, four singular points present on the corneal surfaces were located and the following parameters based on corneal volume were calculated: VOL mct , defined by the points of minimal thickness; VOL aap , defined by the anterior corneal apex, and VOL pap , defined by the posterior corneal apex. The results demonstrate that a further reduction of corneal volume in keratoconus happens and significantly progresses along the disease severity level. The combination of optical and volumetric data, that collect the sensitivity of the asymmetry generated by the disease, allows an accurate detection of incipient cases and follow up of the disease progression.

  8. A volumetric flow sensor for automotive injection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, U.; Krötz, G.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2008-04-01

    For further optimization of the automotive power train of diesel engines, advanced combustion processes require a highly flexible injection system, provided e.g. by the common rail (CR) injection technique. In the past, the feasibility to implement injection nozzle volumetric flow sensors based on the thermo-resistive measurement principle has been demonstrated up to injection pressures of 135 MPa (1350 bar). To evaluate the transient behaviour of the system-integrated flow sensors as well as an injection amount indicator used as a reference method, hydraulic simulations on the system level are performed for a CR injection system. Experimentally determined injection timings were found to be in good agreement with calculated values, especially for the novel sensing element which is directly implemented into the hydraulic system. For the first time pressure oscillations occurring after termination of the injection pulse, predicted theoretically, could be verified directly in the nozzle. In addition, the injected amount of fuel is monitored with the highest resolution ever reported in the literature.

  9. Parkinson's disease: diagnostic utility of volumetric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Meng-Hsiang [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); Chou, Kun-Hsien [National Yang-Ming University, Brain Research Center, Taipei (China); Lee, Pei-Lin [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Tsai, Nai-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung (China); Chen, Hsiu-Ling [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Hsu, Ai-Ling [National Taiwan University, Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Huang, Yung-Cheng [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kaohsiung (China); Lin, Ching-Po [National Yang-Ming University, Brain Research Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China)

    2017-04-15

    This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of structural imaging as an aid in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). High-resolution T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 72 patients with idiopathic PD (mean age, 61.08 years) and 73 healthy subjects (mean age, 58.96 years). The whole brain was parcellated into 95 regions of interest using composite anatomical atlases, and region volumes were calculated. Three diagnostic classifiers were constructed using binary multiple logistic regression modeling: the (i) basal ganglion prior classifier, (ii) data-driven classifier, and (iii) basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to unbiasedly evaluate the predictive accuracy of imaging features. Pearson's correlation analysis was further performed to correlate outcome measurement using the best PD classifier with disease severity. Smaller volume in susceptible regions is diagnostic for Parkinson's disease. Compared with the other two classifiers, the basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier had the highest diagnostic reliability with a sensitivity of 74%, specificity of 75%, and accuracy of 74%. Furthermore, outcome measurement using this classifier was associated with disease severity. Brain structural volumetric analysis with multiple logistic regression modeling can be a complementary tool for diagnosing PD. (orig.)

  10. Volumetric associations between uncinate fasciculus, amygdala, and trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baur Volker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent investigations of white matter (WM connectivity suggest an important role of the uncinate fasciculus (UF, connecting anterior temporal areas including the amygdala with prefrontal-/orbitofrontal cortices, for anxiety-related processes. Volume of the UF, however, has rarely been investigated, but may be an important measure of structural connectivity underlying limbic neuronal circuits associated with anxiety. Since UF volumetric measures are newly applied measures, it is necessary to cross-validate them using further neural and behavioral indicators of anxiety. Results In a group of 32 subjects not reporting any history of psychiatric disorders, we identified a negative correlation between left UF volume and trait anxiety, a finding that is in line with previous results. On the other hand, volume of the left amygdala, which is strongly connected with the UF, was positively correlated with trait anxiety. In addition, volumes of the left UF and left amygdala were inversely associated. Conclusions The present study emphasizes the role of the left UF as candidate WM fiber bundle associated with anxiety-related processes and suggests that fiber bundle volume is a WM measure of particular interest. Moreover, these results substantiate the structural relatedness of UF and amygdala by a non-invasive imaging method. The UF-amygdala complex may be pivotal for the control of trait anxiety.

  11. Femoral head osteonecrosis: Volumetric MRI assessment and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassounas, Athanasios E. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, GR 711 10 (Greece); Fotiadis, Dimitrios I. [Unit of Medical Technology and Intelligent Information Systems, Department of Computer Science, University of Ioannina and Biomedical Research Institute-FORTH, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Malizos, Konstantinos N. [Orthopaedic Department, Medical School, University of Thessalia, GR 412 22 Larissa (Greece)]. E-mail: kmalizos@otenet.gr

    2007-07-15

    Effective treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis (FHON) requires early diagnosis and accurate assessment of the disease severity. The ability to predict in the early stages the risk of collapse is important for selecting a joint salvage procedure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome in patients treated with vascularized fibular grafts in relation to preoperative MR imaging volumetry. We studied 58 patients (87 hips) with FHON. A semi-automated octant-based lesion measurement method, previously described, was performed on the T1-w MR images. The mean time of postoperative follow-up was 7.8 years. Sixty-three hips were successful and 24 failed and converted to total hip arthroplasty within a period of 2-4 years after the initial operation. The rate of failures for hips of male patients was higher than in female patients. The mean lesion size was 28% of the sphere equivalent of the femoral head, 24 {+-} 12% for the successful hips and 37 {+-} 9% for the failed (p < 0.001). The most affected octants were antero-supero-medial (58 {+-} 26%) and postero-supero-medial (54 {+-} 31%). All but postero-infero-medial and postero-infero-lateral octants, showed statistically significant differences in the lesion size between patients with successful and failed hips. In conclusion, the volumetric analysis of preoperative MRI provides useful information with regard to a successful outcome in patients treated with vascularized fibular grafts.

  12. An MRI-based semiautomated volumetric quantification of hip osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malizos, K.N.; Siafakas, M.S.; Karachalios, T.S. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Univ. of Thessalia, Larissa (Greece); Fotiadis, D.I. [Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece); Soucacos, P.N. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To objectively and precisely define the spatial distribution of osteonecrosis and to investigate the influence of various factors including etiology. Design: A volumetric method is presented to describe the size and spatial distribution of necrotic lesions of the femoral head, using MRI scans. The technique is based on the definition of an equivalent sphere model for the femoral head. Patients: The gender, age, number of hips involved, disease duration, pain intensity, limping disability and etiology were correlated with the distribution of the pathologic bone. Seventy-nine patients with 122 hips affected by osteonecrosis were evaluated. Results: The lesion size ranged from 7% to 73% of the sphere equivalent. The lateral octants presented considerable variability, ranging from wide lateral lesions extending beyond the lip of the acetabulum, to narrow medial lesions, leaving a lateral supporting pillar of intact bone. Patients with sickle cell disease and steroid administration presented the largest lesions. The extent of the posterior superior medial octant involvement correlated with the symptom intensity, a younger age and male gender. Conclusion: The methodology presented here has proven a reliable and straightforward imaging tool for precise assessment of necrotic lesions. It also enables us to target accurately the drilling and grafting procedures. (orig.)

  13. Volumetric Security Alarm Based on a Spherical Ultrasonic Transducer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Umut; Scaini, Davide; Arteaga, Daniel

    Most of the existent alarm systems depend on physical or visual contact. The detection area is often limited depending on the type of the transducer, creating blind spots. Our proposition is a truly volumetric alarm system that can detect any movement in the intrusion area, based on monitoring the change over time of the impulse response of the room, which acts as an acoustic footprint. The device depends on an omnidirectional ultrasonic transducer array emitting sweep signals to calculate the impulse response in short intervals. Any change in the room conditions is monitored through a correlation function. The sensitivity of the alarm to different objects and different environments depends on the sweep duration, sweep bandwidth, and sweep interval. Successful detection of intrusions also depends on the size of the monitoring area and requires an adjustment of emitted ultrasound power. Strong air flow affects the performance of the alarm. A method for separating moving objects from strong air flow is devised using an adaptive thresholding on the correlation function involving a series of impulse response measurements. The alarm system can be also used for fire detection since air flow sourced from heating objects differ from random nature of the present air flow. Several measurements are made to test the integrity of the alarm in rooms sizing from 834-2080m3 with irregular geometries and various objects. The proposed system can efficiently detect intrusion whilst adequate emitting power is provided.

  14. Volumetric PIV behind mangrove-type root models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; van de Riet, Keith; Curet, Oscar M.

    2017-11-01

    Mangrove trees form dense networks of prop roots in coastal intertidal zones. The interaction of mangroves with the tidal flow is fundamental in estuaries and shoreline by providing water filtration, protection against erosion and habitat for aquatic animals. In this work, we modeled the mangrove prop roots with a cluster of rigid circular cylinders (patch) to investigate its hydrodynamics. We conducted 2-D PIV and V3V in the near- and far-wake in the recirculating water channel. Two models were considered: (1) a rigid patch, and (2) a flexible patch modeled as rigid cylinders with a flexible hinge. We found that Strouhal number changes with porosity while the patch diameter is constant. Based on the wake signature, we defined an effective diameter length scale. The volumetric flow measurements revealed a regular shedding forming von Kármán vortices for the rigid patch while the flexible patch produced a less uniform wake where vortices were substantially distorted. We compare the wake structure between that 2-D PIV and V3V. This analysis of the hydrodynamics of mangrove-root like models can also be extended to understand other complex flows including bio-inspired coastal infrastructures, damping-wave systems, and energy harvesting devices.

  15. Islamic Fasting and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  16. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  17. Fast ejendom III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Bogen er det tredje bind af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen og III Ejerbeføjelsen. Fremstillingens giver et grundigt overblik over centrale områder af en omfattende regulering af fast ejendom, med angivelse af litteratur, hvor læseren kan søge yderligere...... oplysning. En ejer af fast ejendom er på særdeles mange områder begrænset i sin råden sammenlignet med ejeren af et formuegode i almindelighed. Fremstillingen tager udgangspunkt i ejerens perspektiv (fremfor samfundets eller myndighedernes). Både den privatretlige og offentligretlige regulering behandles......, eksempelvis ejendomsdannelsen, servitutter, naboretten, hævd, zoneinddelingen, den fysiske planlægning, beskyttelse af natur, beskyttelse af kultur, forurening fra fast ejendom, erstatning for forurening, jordforurening, ekspropriation, byggeri og adgang til fast ejendom....

  18. Inkjet printing-based volumetric display projecting multiple full-colour 2D patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a method to construct a full-colour volumetric display is presented using a commercially available inkjet printer. Photoreactive luminescence materials are minutely and automatically printed as the volume elements, and volumetric displays are constructed with high resolution using easy-to-fabricate means that exploit inkjet printing technologies. The results experimentally demonstrate the first prototype of an inkjet printing-based volumetric display composed of multiple layers of transparent films that yield a full-colour three-dimensional (3D) image. Moreover, we propose a design algorithm with 3D structures that provide multiple different 2D full-colour patterns when viewed from different directions and experimentally demonstrate prototypes. It is considered that these types of 3D volumetric structures and their fabrication methods based on widely deployed existing printing technologies can be utilised as novel information display devices and systems, including digital signage, media art, entertainment and security.

  19. EVALUATION OF VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION METHODS USED IN UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the spring and summer of 1987, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluated the performance of 25 commercially available volumetric test methods for the detection of small leaks in underground storage tanks containing gasoline. Performance was estimated by...

  20. Volumetric study of the olfactory bulb in patients with chronic rhinonasal sinusitis using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda A. Alarabawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: MRI with volumetric analysis is a useful tool in assessment of the olfactory bulb volume in patients with olfactory loss and appears to be of help in assessment of the degree of recovery in patients after sinus surgery.

  1. Accuracy of electrocardiographic-gated versus nongated volumetric intravascular ultrasound measurements of coronary arterial narrowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per

    2007-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) allows precise measurements of plaque plus media (P+M) volume and neointimal hyperplasia after coronary artery stenting. Conventional IVUS volumetric analysis is performed mostly without electrocardiographically gated acquisition, and the IVUS images are selected...

  2. LBA-ECO ND-02 Soil Volumetric Water Content, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports monthly measured soil volumetric water content (VWC) from a rainfall exclusion experiment that was conducted from 1999-2001 at the km 67 Seca...

  3. LBA-ECO ND-02 Soil Volumetric Water Content, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports monthly measured soil volumetric water content (VWC) from a rainfall exclusion experiment that was conducted from 1999-2001 at the km...

  4. Quantitative attenuation analysis for identification of early Barrett's neoplasia in volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swager, Anne-Fre; Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Weusten, Bas L.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Bergman, Jacques J.; Curvers, Wouter L.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2017-01-01

    Early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is difficult to detect. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) incorporates optical coherence tomography, providing a circumferential scan of the esophageal wall layers. The attenuation coefficient (mu(VLE)) quantifies decay of detected backscattered light

  5. The Influence of Water and Mineral Oil On Volumetric Losses in a Hydraulic Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Śliwiński Pawel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper volumetric losses in hydraulic motor supplied with water and mineral oil (two liquids having significantly different viscosity and lubricating properties) are described and compared. The experimental tests were conducted using an innovative hydraulic satellite motor, that is dedicated to work with different liquids, including water. The sources of leaks in this motor are also characterized and described. On this basis, a mathematical model of volumetric losses and model of effec...

  6. Understanding Volumetric and Gravimetric Hydrogen Adsorption Trade-off in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Wang, Timothy C; García-Holley, Paula; Sawelewa, Ruth M; Argueta, Edwin; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K

    2017-10-04

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials that are promising for adsorption-based, on-board storage of hydrogen in fuel-cell vehicles. Volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen capacities are the key factors that determine the size and weight of the MOF-filled tank required to store a certain amount of hydrogen for reasonable driving range. Therefore, they must be optimized so the tank is neither too large nor too heavy. Because the goals of maximizing MOF volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen adsorption loadings individually are incompatible, an in-depth understanding of the trade-off between MOF volumetric and gravimetric loadings is necessary to achieve the best compromise between these properties. Here we study, both experimentally and computationally, the trade-off between volumetric and gravimetric cryo-adsorbed hydrogen deliverable capacity by taking an isoreticular series of highly stable zirconium MOFs, NU-1101, NU-1102, and NU-1103 as a case study. These MOFs were studied under recently proposed operating conditions: 77 K/100 bar →160 K/5 bar. We found the difference between highest and lowest measured deliverable capacity in the MOF series to be ca. 40% gravimetrically, but only ca. 10% volumetrically. From our molecular simulation results, we found hydrogen "monolayer" adsorption to be proportional to the surface area, whereas hydrogen "pore filling" adsorption is proportional to the pore volume. Thus, we found that the higher variability in gravimetric deliverable capacity in contrast to the volumetric capacity, occurs due to the proportional relation between gravimetric surface area and pore volume in the NU-110x series in contrast to the inverse relation between volumetric surface area and void fraction. Additionally, we find better correlations with geometric surface areas than with BET areas. NU-1101 presents the highest measured volumetric performance with 46.6 g/L (9.1 wt %), whereas NU-1103 presents the highest gravimetric one

  7. BI-RADS Density Classification From Areometric and Volumetric Automatic Breast Density Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerås, Bjørn Helge; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T; Brandal, Siri Helene B; Chaudhry, Khalida Nasreen; Eben, Ellen; Haakenaasen, Unni; Falk, Ragnhild Sørum; Skaane, Per

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study was to classify breast density using areometric and volumetric automatic measurements to best match Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density scores, and determine which technique best agrees with BI-RADS. Second, this study aimed to provide a set of threshold values for areometric and volumetric density to estimate BI-RADS categories. We randomly selected 537 full-field digital mammography examinations from a population-based screening program. Five radiologists assessed breast density using BI-RADS with all views available. A commercial program calculated areometric and volumetric breast density automatically. We compared automatically calculated density to all BI-RADS density thresholds using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and used Youden's index to estimate thresholds in automatic densities, with matching sensitivity and specificity. The 95% confidence intervals were estimated by bootstrapping. Areometric density correlated well with volumetric density (r(2) = 0.76, excluding outliers, n = 2). For the BI-RADS threshold between II and III, areometric and volumetric assessment showed about equal area under the curve (0.94 vs. 0.93). For the threshold between I and II, areometric assessment was better than volumetric assessment (0.91 vs. 0.86). For the threshold between III and IV, volumetric assessment was better than areometric assessment (0.97 vs. 0.92). Volumetric assessment is equal to or better than areometric assessment for the most clinically relevant thresholds (ie, between scattered fibroglandular and heterogeneously dense, and between heterogeneously dense and extremely dense breasts). Thresholds found in this study can be applied in daily practice to automatic measurements of density to estimate BI-RADS classification. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast track-hoftealloplastik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Gromov, Kirill; Kristensen, Billy B

    2017-01-01

    Fast-track surgery implies a coordinated perioperative approach aimed at reducing surgical stress and facilitating post-operative recovery. The fast-track programme has reduced post-operative length of stay and has led to shorter convalescence with more rapid functional recovery and decreased...... morbidity and mortality in total hip arthroplasty. It should now be a standard total hip arthroplasty patient pathway, but fine tuning of the multiple factors in the fast-track pathway is still needed in patients with special needs or high comorbidity burden....

  9. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  10. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  11. Systematic Parameterization, Storage, and Representation of Volumetric DICOM Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Felix; Selver, M Alper; Gezer, Sinem; Dicle, Oğuz; Hillen, Walter

    Tomographic medical imaging systems produce hundreds to thousands of slices, enabling three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Radiologists process these images through various tools and techniques in order to generate 3D renderings for various applications, such as surgical planning, medical education, and volumetric measurements. To save and store these visualizations, current systems use snapshots or video exporting, which prevents further optimizations and requires the storage of significant additional data. The Grayscale Softcopy Presentation State extension of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard resolves this issue for two-dimensional (2D) data by introducing an extensive set of parameters, namely 2D Presentation States (2DPR), that describe how an image should be displayed. 2DPR allows storing these parameters instead of storing parameter applied images, which cause unnecessary duplication of the image data. Since there is currently no corresponding extension for 3D data, in this study, a DICOM-compliant object called 3D presentation states (3DPR) is proposed for the parameterization and storage of 3D medical volumes. To accomplish this, the 3D medical visualization process is divided into four tasks, namely pre-processing, segmentation, post-processing, and rendering. The important parameters of each task are determined. Special focus is given to the compression of segmented data, parameterization of the rendering process, and DICOM-compliant implementation of the 3DPR object. The use of 3DPR was tested in a radiology department on three clinical cases, which require multiple segmentations and visualizations during the workflow of radiologists. The results show that 3DPR can effectively simplify the workload of physicians by directly regenerating 3D renderings without repeating intermediate tasks, increase efficiency by preserving all user interactions, and provide efficient storage as well as transfer of visualized data.

  12. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-01

    Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1-10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the "gold standard" for validation of the method's accuracy. The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation method.

  13. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  14. Automatic interactive optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, Jim P; Dahele, Max; Peltola, Jarkko; Nord, Janne; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko FAR

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment planning for sites with many different organs-at-risk (OAR) is complex and labor-intensive, making it hard to obtain consistent plan quality. With the aim of addressing this, we developed a program (automatic interactive optimizer, AIO) designed to automate the manual interactive process for the Eclipse treatment planning system. We describe AIO and present initial evaluation data. Our current institutional volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) planning approach for head and neck tumors places 3-4 adjustable OAR optimization objectives along the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve that is displayed in the optimization window. AIO scans this window and uses color-coding to differentiate between the DVH-lines, allowing it to automatically adjust the location of the optimization objectives frequently and in a more consistent fashion. We compared RapidArc AIO plans (using 9 optimization objectives per OAR) with the clinical plans of 10 patients, and evaluated optimal AIO settings. AIO consistency was tested by replanning a single patient 5 times. Average V95&V107 of the boost planning target volume (PTV) and V95 of the elective PTV differed by ≤0.5%, while average elective PTV V107 improved by 1.5%. Averaged over all patients, AIO reduced mean doses to individual salivary structures by 0.9-1.6Gy and provided mean dose reductions of 5.6Gy and 3.9Gy to the composite swallowing structures and oral cavity, respectively. Re-running AIO five times, resulted in the aforementioned parameters differing by less than 3%. Using the same planning strategy as manually optimized head and neck plans, AIO can automate the interactive Eclipse treatment planning process and deliver dosimetric improvements over existing clinical plans

  15. Volumetric Physics of Polypeptide Coil-Helix Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krobath, Heinrich; Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2016-11-15

    Volumetric properties of proteins bear directly on their biological functions in hyperbaric environments and are useful in general as a biophysical probe. To gain insight into conformation-dependent protein volume, we developed an implicit-solvent atomic chain model that transparently embodies two physical origins of volume: (1) a fundamental geometric term capturing the van der Waals volume of the protein and the particulate, finite-size nature of the water molecules, modeled together by the volume encased by the protein's molecular surface, and (2) a physicochemical term for other solvation effects, accounted for by empirical proportionality relationships between experimental partial molar volumes and solvent-accessible surface areas of model compounds. We tested this construct by Langevin dynamics simulations of a 16-residue polyalanine. The simulated trajectories indicate an average volume decrease of 1.73 ± 0.1 Å 3 /residue for coil-helix transition, ∼80% of which is caused by a decrease in geometric void/cavity volume, and a robust positive activation volume for helical hydrogen bond formation originating from the transient void created by an approaching donor-acceptor pair and nearby atoms. These findings are consistent with prior experiments with alanine-rich peptides and offer an atomistic analysis of the observed overall volume changes. The results suggest, in general, that hydrostatic pressure likely stabilizes helical conformations of short peptides but slows the process of helix formation. In contrast, hydrostatic pressure is more likely to destabilize natural globular proteins because of the void volume entrapped in their folded structures. The conceptual framework of our model thus affords a coherent physical rationalization for experiments.

  16. Hepatosplenic volumetric assessment at MDCT for staging liver fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Malecki, Kyle; Hunt, Oliver F.; Beaumont, Claire; Kloke, John; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Lubner, Meghan G. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-07-15

    To investigate hepatosplenic volumetry at MDCT for non-invasive prediction of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatosplenic volume analysis in 624 patients (mean age, 48.8 years; 311 M/313 F) at MDCT was performed using dedicated software and compared against pathological fibrosis stage (F0 = 374; F1 = 48; F2 = 40; F3 = 65; F4 = 97). The liver segmental volume ratio (LSVR) was defined by Couinaud segments I-III over segments IV-VIII. All pre-cirrhotic fibrosis stages (METAVIR F1-F3) were based on liver biopsy within 1 year of MDCT. LSVR and total splenic volumes increased with stage of fibrosis, with mean(±SD) values of: F0: 0.26 ± 0.06 and 215.1 ± 88.5 mm{sup 3}; F1: 0.25 ± 0.08 and 294.8 ± 153.4 mm{sup 3}; F2: 0.331 ± 0.12 and 291.6 ± 197.1 mm{sup 3}; F3: 0.39 ± 0.15 and 509.6 ± 402.6 mm{sup 3}; F4: 0.56 ± 0.30 and 790.7 ± 450.3 mm{sup 3}, respectively. Total hepatic volumes showed poor discrimination (F0: 1674 ± 320 mm{sup 3}; F4: 1631 ± 691 mm{sup 3}). For discriminating advanced fibrosis (≥F3), the ROC AUC values for LSVR, total liver volume, splenic volume and LSVR/spleen combined were 0.863, 0.506, 0.890 and 0.947, respectively. Relative changes in segmental liver volumes and total splenic volume allow for non-invasive staging of hepatic fibrosis, whereas total liver volume is a poor predictor. Unlike liver biopsy or elastography, these CT volumetric biomarkers can be obtained retrospectively on routine scans obtained for other indications. (orig.)

  17. Fast and pure

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, Silvano

    2018-02-01

    Removing nuclear spins by means of isotopically purified silicon, and introducing magnetic field gradients by means of microfabricated ferromagnets yields electron spin qubits with enhanced fidelity and fast electrical control.

  18. Fast neutrons dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    A proton recoil technique has been developed for inducing thermoluminescence with incident fast neutrons. CaF 2 was used as the TL phosphor, and cane sugar and polyethylene were used as proton radiators. The phosphor and the hydrogeneous material powders were well mixed, encapsulated in glass tubes and exposed to Am-Be sources, resulting in recoils from incident fast neutrons of energy between 0,25 and 11,25 MeV. The intrinsic response of pure CaF 2 to fast neutrons without a hydrogeneous radiator was checked by using LiF (TLD-700). Glow curves were recorded from room temperature up to 350 0 C after different doses of neutrons and gamma rays of 60 Co. First collision dose due to fast neutrons in tissue like materials such as cane sugar and polyethylene was also calculated [pt

  19. Fast Optimal Motion Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computationally-efficient, fast and real-time, and provably-optimal motion planner for systems with highly nonlinear dynamics that can be extended for cooperative...

  20. CMS Fast Facts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a new quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. CMS Fast Facts includes summary information on total program...

  1. Brug af faste vendinger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Bjærge, Esben

    Ordbogen indelholder tekstproduktionsangivelser til ca. 17.000 idiomer, ordsprog, bevingede ord og andre faste vendinger. Det drejer sig bl.a. om angivelser til betydningen, grammatik, kollokationer, eksempler, synonymer og antonymer.......Ordbogen indelholder tekstproduktionsangivelser til ca. 17.000 idiomer, ordsprog, bevingede ord og andre faste vendinger. Det drejer sig bl.a. om angivelser til betydningen, grammatik, kollokationer, eksempler, synonymer og antonymer....

  2. Fast focus field calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Leutenegger, M.; Rao, R.; Leitgeb, R. A.; Lasser, T.

    2006-01-01

    We present a fast calculation of the electromagnetic field near the focus of an objective with a high numerical aperture (NA). Instead of direct integration, the vectorial Debye diffraction integral is evaluated with the fast Fourier transform for calculating the electromagnetic field in the entire focal region. We generalize this concept with the chirp z transform for obtaining a flexible sampling grid and an additional gain in computation speed. Under ...

  3. Fasting and Urinary Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting is considered as one of the most important practices of Islam, and according to Prophet Mohammad, fasting is obligatory upon Muslims. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of fasting on urinary stones. Materials and Methods: Very few studies have been carried out on urinary stones and the effect of Ramadan fasting. The sources of the present study are Medline and articles presented by local and Muslim researchers. Meanwhile, since we are acquainted with three well-known researchers in the field of urology, we contacted them via email and asked for their professional opinions. Results: The results of studies about the relationship of urinary stones and their incidence in Ramadan are not alike, and are even sometimes contradictory. Some believe that increased incidence of urinary stones in Ramadan is related not to fasting, but to the rise of weather temperature in hot months, and an increase in humidity. Conclusion: Numerous biological and behavioral changes occur in people who fast in Ramadan and some researchers believe that urinary stone increases during this month.

  4. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, M; Biederer, J; Jochens, A; Bornemann, L; Soza, G; Heller, M; Bolte, H

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST®) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1-5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable compromise for semi-automated volumetric analysis. Copyright

  5. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabel, M.; Biederer, J.; Jochens, A.; Bornemann, L.; Soza, G.; Heller, M.; Bolte, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Materials and methods: Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55 mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST ® ) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1–5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. Results: The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. Conclusion: The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3 mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable

  6. Volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D CMUT arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, A Sanli; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Johnson, Jeremy A; Karaman, Mustafa; Lee, Thomas H; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2003-11-01

    Recently, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have emerged as a candidate to overcome the difficulties in the realization of 2-D arrays for real-time 3-D imaging. In this paper, we present the first volumetric images obtained using a 2-D CMUT array. We have fabricated a 128 x 128-element 2-D CMUT array with through-wafer via interconnects and a 420-microm element pitch. As an experimental prototype, a 32 x 64-element portion of the 128 x 128-element array was diced and flip-chip bonded onto a glass fanout chip. This chip provides individual leads from a central 16 x 16-element portion of the array to surrounding bondpads. An 8 x 16-element portion of the array was used in the experiments along with a 128-channel data acquisition system. For imaging phantoms, we used a 2.37-mm diameter steel sphere located 10 mm from the array center and two 12-mm-thick Plexiglas plates located 20 mm and 60 mm from the array. A 4 x 4 group of elements in the middle of the 8 x 16-element array was used in transmit, and the remaining elements were used to receive the echo signals. The echo signal obtained from the spherical target presented a frequency spectrum centered at 4.37 MHz with a 100% fractional bandwidth, whereas the frequency spectrum for the echo signal from the parallel plate phantom was centered at 3.44 MHz with a 91% fractional bandwidth. The images were reconstructed by using RF beamforming and synthetic phased array approaches and visualized by surface rendering and multiplanar slicing techniques. The image of the spherical target has been used to approximate the point spread function of the system and is compared with theoretical expectations. This study experimentally demonstrates that 2-D CMUT arrays can be fabricated with high yield using silicon IC-fabrication processes, individual electrical connections can be provided using through-wafer vias, and flip-chip bonding can be used to integrate these dense 2-D arrays with electronic circuits for

  7. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  8. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Fluid Inclusions Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A.; Mulukutla, G.; Sahagian, D.; Bodnar, B.

    2009-05-01

    Fluid inclusions preserve valuable information regarding hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. The molar quantities of liquid and gaseous components in the inclusions can be estimated from their volumetric measurements at room temperatures combined with knowledge of the PVTX properties of the fluid and homogenization temperatures. Thus, accurate measurements of inclusion volumes and their two phase components are critical. One of the greatest advantages of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) in application to fluid inclsion analsyis is that it is affordable for large numbers of samples, given the appropriate software analysis tools and methodology. Our present work is directed toward developing those tools and methods. For the last decade LSCM has been considered as a potential method for inclusion volume measurements. Nevertheless, the adequate and accurate measurement by LSCM has not yet been successful for fluid inclusions containing non-fluorescing fluids due to many technical challenges in image analysis despite the fact that the cost of collecting raw LSCM imagery has dramatically decreased in recent years. These problems mostly relate to image analysis methodology and software tools that are needed for pre-processing and image segmentation, which enable solid, liquid and gaseous components to be delineated. Other challenges involve image quality and contrast, which is controlled by fluorescence of the material (most aqueous fluid inclusions do not fluoresce at the appropriate laser wavelengths), material optical properties, and application of transmitted and/or reflected confocal illumination. In this work we have identified the key problems of image analysis and propose some potential solutions. For instance, we found that better contrast of pseudo-confocal transmitted light images could be overlayed with poor-contrast true-confocal reflected light images within the same stack of z-ordered slices. This approach allows one to narrow

  9. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  10. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique to generate on-board volumetric-cine MRI (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI. Methods One phase of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4D-MRI based on principal-component-analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from four real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using Volume-Percent-Difference(VPD), Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest(ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was on average 8.43±1.52% and the COMS was on average 0.93±0.58mm across all time-steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR=20. For patient data, average tracking errors were less than 2 mm in all directions for all patients. Conclusions Preliminary studies demonstrated the

  11. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Wendy [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ren, Lei, E-mail: lei.ren@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  12. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  13. Incremental Volumetric Remapping Method: Analysis and Error Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, A. J.; Oliveira, M. C.; Rodrigues, D. M.; Menezes, L. F.; Alves, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the error associated with the remapping problem is analyzed. A range of numerical results that assess the performance of three different remapping strategies, applied to FE meshes that typically are used in sheet metal forming simulation, are evaluated. One of the selected strategies is the previously presented Incremental Volumetric Remapping method (IVR), which was implemented in the in-house code DD3TRIM. The IVR method fundaments consists on the premise that state variables in all points associated to a Gauss volume of a given element are equal to the state variable quantities placed in the correspondent Gauss point. Hence, given a typical remapping procedure between a donor and a target mesh, the variables to be associated to a target Gauss volume (and point) are determined by a weighted average. The weight function is the Gauss volume percentage of each donor element that is located inside the target Gauss volume. The calculus of the intersecting volumes between the donor and target Gauss volumes is attained incrementally, for each target Gauss volume, by means of a discrete approach. The other two remapping strategies selected are based in the interpolation/extrapolation of variables by using the finite element shape functions or moving least square interpolants. The performance of the three different remapping strategies is address with two tests. The first remapping test was taken from a literature work. The test consists in remapping successively a rotating symmetrical mesh, throughout N increments, in an angular span of 90 deg. The second remapping error evaluation test consists of remapping an irregular element shape target mesh from a given regular element shape donor mesh and proceed with the inverse operation. In this second test the computation effort is also measured. The results showed that the error level associated to IVR can be very low and with a stable evolution along the number of remapping procedures when compared with the

  14. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, A.E.; Reynolds, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    This book describes the major design features of fast breeder reactors and the methods used for their design and analysis. The foremost objective of this book is to fulfill the need for a textbook on Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) technology at the graduate level or the advanced undergraduate level. It is assumed that the reader has an introductory understanding of reactor theory, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The book is expected to be used most widely for a one-semester general course on fast breeder reactors, with the extent of material covered to vary according to the interest of the instructor. The book could also be used effectively for a two-quarter or a two-semester course. In addition, the book could serve as a text for a course on fast reactor safety since many topics other than those appearing in the safety chapters relate to FBR safety. Methodology in fast reactor design and analysis, together with physical descriptions of systems, is emphasized in this text more than numerical results. Analytical and design results continue to change with the ongoing evolution of FBR design whereas many design methods have remained fundamentally unchanged for a considerable time

  15. Fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakman, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the fast reactor research carried out by ECN during the period covering the year 1980. This research is mainly concerned with the cores of sodium-cooled breeders, in particular the SNR-300, and its related safety aspects. It comprises six items: A programme to determine relevant nuclear data of fission- and corrosion-products; A fuel performance programme comprising in-pile cladding failure experiments and a study of the consequences of loss-of-cooling and overpower; Basic research on fuel; Investigation of the changes in the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4948 due to fast neutron doses, this material has been used in the manufacture of the reactor vessel and its internal components; Study of aerosols which could be formed at the time of a fast reactor accident and their progressive behaviour on leaking through cracks in the concrete containment; Studies on heat transfer in a sodium-cooled fast reactor core. As fast breeders operate at high power densities, an accurate knowledge of the heat transfer phenomena under single-phase and two-phase conditions is sought. (Auth.)

  16. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Won-Jin; Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases.

  17. The fast code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads on a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good. (au)

  18. Adopting preoperative fasting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Comrie, Rhonda

    2009-07-01

    In 1999, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted preoperative fasting guidelines to enhance the quality and efficiency of patient care. Guidelines suggest that healthy, non-pregnant patients should fast six hours from solids and two hours from liquids. Although these guidelines are in place, studies suggest that providers are still using the blanket statement "NPO after midnight" without regard to patient characteristics, the procedure, or the time of the procedure. Using theory to help change provider's beliefs may help make change more successful. Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations can assist in changing long-time practice by laying the groundwork for an analysis of the benefits and disadvantages of proposed changes, such as changes to fasting orders, while helping initiate local protocols instead of additional national guidelines.

  19. A new method for calculating volumetric sweeps efficiency using streamline simulation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidrobo, E A

    2000-01-01

    One of the purposes of reservoir engineering is to quantify the volumetric sweep efficiency for optimizing reservoir management decisions. The estimation of this parameter has always been a difficult task. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations and calculations have been limited to mostly homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir becomes difficult due to inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. In this paper, a new method for computing volumetric sweep efficiency for any arbitrary heterogeneity and well configuration is presented. The proposed method is based on Datta-Gupta and King's formulation of streamline time-of-flight (1995). Given the fact that the time-of-flight reflects the fluid front propagation at various times, then the connectivity in the time-of-flight represents a direct measure of the volumetric sweep efficiency. The proposed approach has been applied to synthetic as well as field examples. Synthetic examples are used to validate the volumetric sweep efficiency calculations using the streamline time-of-flight connectivity criterion by comparison with analytic solutions and published correlations. The field example, which illustrates the feasibility of the approach for large-scale field applications, is from the north Robertson unit, a low permeability carbonate reservoir in west Texas

  20. Effect of capillary geometry on predicting electroosmotic volumetric flowrates in porous or fibrous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Jennifer; Oyanader, Mario; Arce, Pedro

    2012-07-15

    Electrokinetic-based methods are used in a variety of applications including drug delivery and separation of biomolecules, among others. Many of these applications feature a fibrous or a porous medium that can be modeled by using capillary bundle models to predict the behavior of the electroosmotic flow within the particular system. The role of geometry in predicting volumetric flowrates in porous media is investigated by modeling the electroosmotic flow in idealized capillaries of rectangular, cylindrical, and annular geometries. This is achieved by the coupling of electrostatics and continuum hydrodynamics to obtain analytical expressions that govern the electrokinetically - driven volumetric flow within these idealized capillary geometries. A previous study developed a model to compare the cylindrical and annular capillary geometries by utilizing two methods that compare the areas of the two geometries. The methods used in this previous work will also be used in the present contribution to compare the volumetric flowrates in the cylindrical and annular capillaries with a rectangular capillary. Illustrative results will be presented to aid in the understanding of the influence of the various geometrical and electrostatic parameters that arise from the analysis of these volumetric flowrates. It was found that the electroosmotic volumetric flowrates are significantly affected by the capillary geometry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A volumetric meter chip for point-of-care quantitative detection of bovine catalase for food safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Xingye; Hu, Jie; Choi, Jane Ru; Huang, Yalin; Wang, Xuemin; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A volumetric meter chip was developed for quantitative point-of-care (POC) analysis of bovine catalase, a bioindicator of bovine mastitis, in milk samples. The meter chip displays multiplexed quantitative results by presenting the distance of ink bar advancement that is detectable by the naked eye. The meter chip comprises a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer, a double-sided adhesive (DSA) layer and a glass slide layer fabricated by the laser-etching method, which is typically simple, rapid (∼3 min per chip), and cost effective (∼$0.2 per chip). Specially designed “U shape” reaction cells are covered by an adhesive tape that serves as an on-off switch, enabling the simple operation of the assay. As a proof of concept, we employed the developed meter chip for the quantification of bovine catalase in raw milk samples to detect catalase concentrations as low as 20 μg/mL. The meter chip has great potential to detect various target analytes for a wide range of POC applications. - Highlights: • The meter chip is a standalone point-of-care diagnostic tool with visible readouts of quantification results. • A fast and low cost fabrication protocol (~3 min and ~$0.2 per chip) of meter chip was proposed. • The chip may hold the potential for rapid scaning of bovine mastitis in cattle farms for food safety control.

  2. A volumetric meter chip for point-of-care quantitative detection of bovine catalase for food safety control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xingye; Hu, Jie; Choi, Jane Ru; Huang, Yalin; Wang, Xuemin [The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center (BEBC), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Lu, Tian Jian, E-mail: tjlu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center (BEBC), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Xu, Feng, E-mail: fengxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center (BEBC), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China)

    2016-09-07

    A volumetric meter chip was developed for quantitative point-of-care (POC) analysis of bovine catalase, a bioindicator of bovine mastitis, in milk samples. The meter chip displays multiplexed quantitative results by presenting the distance of ink bar advancement that is detectable by the naked eye. The meter chip comprises a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer, a double-sided adhesive (DSA) layer and a glass slide layer fabricated by the laser-etching method, which is typically simple, rapid (∼3 min per chip), and cost effective (∼$0.2 per chip). Specially designed “U shape” reaction cells are covered by an adhesive tape that serves as an on-off switch, enabling the simple operation of the assay. As a proof of concept, we employed the developed meter chip for the quantification of bovine catalase in raw milk samples to detect catalase concentrations as low as 20 μg/mL. The meter chip has great potential to detect various target analytes for a wide range of POC applications. - Highlights: • The meter chip is a standalone point-of-care diagnostic tool with visible readouts of quantification results. • A fast and low cost fabrication protocol (~3 min and ~$0.2 per chip) of meter chip was proposed. • The chip may hold the potential for rapid scaning of bovine mastitis in cattle farms for food safety control.

  3. Characterization of solid and liquid sorbent materials for biogas purification by using a new volumetric screening instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, J.; Fieback, T.; Seif, R.; Dreisbach, F.

    2012-05-01

    With the increasing utilization of biogas as an energy source the need for new materials and methods to purify and clean the corresponding gas mixtures is rising. In this regard, the application of ad- or absorptive gas purification methods has increased significantly over the last years. For fast and economic evaluation of the potential of different sorbent materials, a new volumetric screening instrument has been developed. First the measuring method and the new instrument design will be described. This instrument allows ad- and absorption, as well as desorption measurements in a technically relevant, wide pressure, and temperature range. It was used for the characterization of common sorbent materials such as activated carbons and zeolite molecular sieves. Additionally, new substances like metal-organic frameworks and ionic liquids were analyzed. Thereby the sorption of CO2, CH4, N2, and H2 was measured. The obtained data allow the direct comparison of the sorption properties of the different materials, the results of which will be presented in the second part of the paper.

  4. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  5. A Fast Hermite Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2008-12-17

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed.

  6. Fast breeder project (PSB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Activities performed during the 1st quarter of 1976 at or on behalf of the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe, within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project are given a survey. The following project subdivisions are dealt with: Fuel rod development; materials testing and developments; corrosion studies and coolant analyses; physical experiments; reactor theory; safety of fast breeders; instrumentation and signal processing for core monitoring; effects on the environment; sodium technology tests; thermodynamic and fluid flow tests in gas. (HR) [de

  7. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Research concentrated on three major areas during the last twelve months: (1) investigations of energy fluence and absorbed dose measurements using crystalline and hot pressed TLD materials exposes to ultrasoft beams of photons, (2) fast neutron kerma factor measurements for several important elements as well as NE-213 scintillation material response function determinations at the intense ''white'' source available at the WNR facility at LAMPF, and (3) kerma factor ratio determinations for carbon and oxygen to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic at the clinical fast neutron radiation facility at Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI. Progress summary reports of these efforts are given in this report

  8. Moms og fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    I artiklen gives et overblik over, hvorledes fast ejendom behandles momsmæssigt. Derfor findes en kort skitsering af reglerne for moms på byggearbejder, afgrænsningen mellem momspligtig og momsfri udlejning, muligheden for frivillig registrering af udlejning samt opgørelse af reguleringsforpligte......I artiklen gives et overblik over, hvorledes fast ejendom behandles momsmæssigt. Derfor findes en kort skitsering af reglerne for moms på byggearbejder, afgrænsningen mellem momspligtig og momsfri udlejning, muligheden for frivillig registrering af udlejning samt opgørelse af...

  9. Fast ejendom II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Fremstillingen påviser, at lov om forbrugerbeskyttelse ved erhvervelse af fast ejendom mv. lider af en række svagheder og at ankenævnspraksis bevæger sig væk fra retspraksis på en række områder.......Fremstillingen påviser, at lov om forbrugerbeskyttelse ved erhvervelse af fast ejendom mv. lider af en række svagheder og at ankenævnspraksis bevæger sig væk fra retspraksis på en række områder....

  10. Confidence in Assessment of Lumbar Spondylolysis Using Three-Dimensional Volumetric T2-Weighted MRI Compared With Limited Field of View, Decreased-Dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavan, Joshua Adam; Stence, Nicholas V; Mirsky, David M; Gralla, Jane; Fadell, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Limited z-axis-coverage computed tomography (CT) to evaluate for pediatric lumbar spondylolysis, altering the technique such that the dose to the patient is comparable or lower than radiographs, is currently used at our institution. The objective of the study was to determine whether volumetric 3-dimensional fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) can provide equal or greater diagnostic accuracy compared with limited CT in the diagnosis of pediatric lumbar spondylolysis without ionizing radiation. Volumetric 3D MRI can provide equal or greater diagnostic accuracy compared with low-dose CT for pediatric lumbar spondylolysis without ionizing radiation. Clinical review. Level 2. Three pediatric neuroradiologists evaluated 2-dimensional (2D) MRI, 2D + 3D MRI, and limited CT examinations in 42 pediatric patients who obtained imaging for low back pain and suspected spondylolysis. As there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of spondylolysis besides surgery, interobserver agreement and degree of confidence were compared to determine which modality is preferable. Decreased-dose CT provided a greater level of agreement than 2D MRI and 2D + 3D MRI. The kappa for rater agreement with 2D MRI, 2D + 3D MRI, and CT was 0.19, 0.32, and 1.0, respectively. All raters agreed in 31%, 40%, and 100% of cases with 2D MRI, 2D + 3D MRI, and CT. Lack of confidence was significantly lower with CT (0%) than with 2D MRI (30%) and 2D + 3D MRI (25%). For diagnosing spondylolysis, radiologist agreement and confidence trended toward improvement with the addition of a volumetric 3D MRI sequence to standard 2D MRI sequences compared with 2D MRI alone; however, agreement and confidence remain significantly greater using decreased-dose CT when compared with either MRI acquisition. Decreased-dose CT of the lumbar spine remains the optimal examination to confirm a high suspicion of spondylolysis, with dose essentially equivalent to radiographs. If clinical symptoms are not classic for

  11. Combination volumetric and gravimetric sorption instrument for high accuracy measurements of methane adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald; Troub, Brandon

    2017-05-01

    The accurate measurement of adsorbed gas up to high pressures (∼100 bars) is critical for the development of new materials for adsorbed gas storage. The typical Sievert-type volumetric method introduces accumulating errors that can become large at maximum pressures. Alternatively, gravimetric methods employing microbalances require careful buoyancy corrections. In this paper, we present a combination gravimetric and volumetric system for methane sorption measurements on samples between ∼0.5 and 1 g. The gravimetric method described requires no buoyancy corrections. The tandem use of the gravimetric method allows for a check on the highest uncertainty volumetric measurements. The sources and proper calculation of uncertainties are discussed. Results from methane measurements on activated carbon MSC-30 and metal-organic framework HKUST-1 are compared across methods and within the literature.

  12. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    *-model) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter......Modelling water distribution and flow in partially saturated soils requires knowledge of the soil-water characteristic (SWC). However, measurement of the SWC is challenging and time-consuming, and in some cases not feasible. This study introduces two predictive models (Xw-model and Xw...... (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p...

  13. Classification and volumetric analysis of temporal bone pneumatization using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Aniket B; Fellows, Douglas; Hand, Arthur R; Tadinada, Aditya; Lurie, Alan G

    2014-03-01

    This study performed volumetric analysis and classified different repeated patterns of temporal bone pneumatization in adults using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. A total of 155 temporal bones were retrospectively evaluated from 78 patients with no radiographic evidence of pathology. Two reference structures were used to classify temporal bone pneumatization into 3 groups. Volumetric analysis of the pneumatization was performed using a window thresholding procedure on multiplanar CBCT images. Correlation between direct communication of peritubal cells with the eustachian tube and the degree of pneumatization was also assessed. Using 2 reference structures, pneumatization pattern in the temporal bone can be classified into 3 groups. Statistically significant differences were present in their mean volumes between 3 groups. Statistically significant correlation was found between degree of pneumatization and presence of peritubal cells associated with ET. This study showed that CBCT can be effectively used for imaging temporal bone air cavities and for volumetric assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. NDE Technology Development Program for Non-Visual Volumetric Inspection Technology; Sensor Effectiveness Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Traci L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denslow, Kayte M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, hosted and administered Sensor Effectiveness Testing that allowed four different participants to demonstrate the NDE volumetric inspection technologies that were previously demonstrated during the Technology Screening session. This document provides a Sensor Effectiveness Testing report for the final part of Phase I of a three-phase NDE Technology Development Program designed to identify and mature a system or set of non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for Hanford DST primary liner bottom inspection. Phase I of the program will baseline the performance of current or emerging non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for their ability to detect and characterize primary liner bottom flaws, and identify candidate technologies for adaptation and maturation for Phase II of the program.

  15. Volumetric reach comparison of possible end-effectors for the articulated transporter and manipulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Hamel, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bills, K.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the performance of the Articulated Transporter and Manipulator System (ATMS) during various tasks relative to the choice of wrist/end-effector configuration. The approach taken was to generate computer graphics-aided three-dimensional interactive application (CATIA) system-based models of four wrist/end-effector combinations and consider the volumetric reach of each of these configurations based on the capacity of the ATMS. The results indicate that a simple, lightweight end-effector provides a greater volumetric reach. The greatest variation presented herein is {approximately}40% when comparing a 7-degree-of-freedom (DOF) dexterous arm with a simple 3-DOF arm; however, the benefit of increasing volumetric reach by only 40% by using a simple arm may be outweighed by the loss of dexterity. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. CMS Fast Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmat, Rahmat

    2012-01-01

    A framework for Fast Simulation of particle interactions in the CMS detector has been developed and implemented in the overall simulation, reconstruction and analysis framework of CMS. It produces data samples in the same format as the one used by the Geant4-based (henceforth Full) Simulation and Reconstruction chain; the output of the Fast Simulation of CMS can therefore be used in the analysis in the same way as other ones. The Fast Simulation has been used already for several physics analyses in CMS, in particular those requiring a generation of many samples to scan an extended parameter space of the physics model (e.g. SUSY). Other use cases dealt with by the Fast Simulation of CMS are those involving the generation of large cross-section backgrounds, and samples of manageable size can only be produced by events skimming based on the final reconstructed objects, or those for which in general a large computation time is foreseen. An important issue, related with the high luminosity achieved by the LHC acce...

  17. FAST compiler user's guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Glaser, Hugh; Wild, John

    1993-01-01

    The FAST compiler is a backend for compilers of lazy functional languages. There are two versions of the compiler: one that takes a rather simple lazy functional language as input and a second that accepts a language similar to Miranda. On output the compiler produces a set of macro calls that are

  18. Parallel Fast Legendre Transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves de Inda, M.; Bisseling, R.H.; Maslen, D.K.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a parallel implementation of a fast algorithm for the discrete polynomial Legendre transform We give an introduction to the DriscollHealy algorithm using polynomial arithmetic and present experimental results on the eciency and accuracy of our implementation The algorithms were

  19. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is recording data from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV since the spring of 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically ...

  20. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  1. [Preoperative fasting. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C D; Breuer, J P; Gust, R; Wichmann, M; Adolph, M; Senkal, M; Kampa, U; Weissauer, W; Schleppers, A; Soreide, E; Martin, E; Kaisers, U; Falke, K J; Haas, N; Kox, W J

    2003-11-01

    In Germany the predominant standard of preoperative care for elective surgery is fasting after midnight, with the aim of reducing the risk of pulmonary aspiration. However, for the past several years the scientific evidence supporting such a practice has been challenged. Experimental and clinical studies prove a reliable gastric emptying within 2 h suggesting that, particularly for limited intake of clear fluids up to 2 h preoperatively, there would be no increased risk for the patient. In addition, the general incidence of pulmonary aspiration during general anaesthesia (before induction, during surgery and during recovery) is extremely low, has a good prognosis and is more a consequence of insufficient airway protection and/or inadequate anaesthetic depth rather than due to the patient's fasting state. Therefore, primarily to decrease perioperative discomfort for patients, several national anaesthesia societies have changed their guidelines for preoperative fasting. They recommend a more liberal policy regarding per os intake of both liquid and solid food, with consideration of certain conditions and contraindications. The following article reviews the literature and gives an overview of the scientific background on which the national guidelines are based. The intention of this review is to propose recommendations for preoperative fasting regarding clear fluids for Germany as well.

  2. Integral Fast Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R ampersand D

  3. Handel med fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Hans Henrik

    Bogen tilstræber at give et overblik over nogle af de vigtigste generelle problemområder på markedet for ejendomshandel, der jo bliver mere og mere kompliceret. Værket er opdelt i følgende hovedafsnit: Ejendomsbegrebet. Indgåelse af aftale om salg af fast ejendom. Begrænsninger i adgangen til...

  4. Fast ejendom, I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    , værdiforringende forhold, der ligger uden for ejendommen og andre særlige tilfælde. Bogen uddyber andre emner omtalt i 1. udgave, eksempelvis erhvervelsesbetingelser, købsoptioner, ansvarsfraskrivelse, licitationssalg mv. Bogen er det første af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen...

  5. Fast Harmonic Chirp Summation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    -robust to noise, or very computationally inten- sive. In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm for the harmonic chirp summation method which has been demonstrated in the liter- ature to be accurate and robust to noise. The proposed algorithm is orders of magnitudes faster than previous algorithms which is also...

  6. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  8. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path

  9. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Calorie count - fast food URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/ ...

  10. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU...

  11. Fast Fourier orthogonalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ducas (Léo); T. Prest; S.A. Abramov; E.V. Zima; X-S. Gao

    2016-01-01

    htmlabstractThe classical fast Fourier transform (FFT) allows to compute in quasi-linear time the product of two polynomials, in the {\\em circular convolution ring} R[x]/(x^d−1) --- a task that naively requires quadratic time. Equivalently, it allows to accelerate matrix-vector products when the

  12. Automated MRI Volumetric Analysis in Epilepsy Patients with Rasmussen’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. Irene; Krishnan, Balu; Shattuck, David W; Leahy, Richard M; Moosa, Ahsan NV; Wyllie, Elaine; Burgess, Richard C; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Joshi, Anand A; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Mosher, John C; Udayasankar, Unni; Jones, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To apply automated quantitative volumetric MRI analyses to patients diagnosed with Rasmussen’s encephalitis (RE), to determine the predictive value of lobar volumetric measures, and to assess regional atrophy difference and monitor disease progression using these measures. Materials and Methods Nineteen patients (42 scans) with diagnosed RE were studied. Two control groups were used: one with 42 age- and gender-matched normal subjects; the other with 42 non-RE epilepsy patients with the same disease duration as RE patients. Volumetric analysis was performed on T1-weighted images using BrainSuite. Ratios of volumes from the affected hemisphere divided by those from the unaffected hemisphere were used as input to a logistic regression classifier, which was trained to discriminate patients from controls. Using the classifier, we compared the predictive accuracy of all the volumetric measures. These ratios were further used to assess regional atrophy difference and to correlate with epilepsy duration. Results Interhemispheric and frontal lobe ratios had the best prediction accuracy to separate RE patients from normal and non-RE epilepsy controls. The insula showed significantly more atrophy compared to all the other cortical regions. Patients with longitudinal scans showed progressive volume loss of the affected hemisphere. Atrophy of the frontal lobe and insula correlated significantly with epilepsy duration. Conclusions Automated quantitative volumetric analysis provides accurate separation of RE patients from normal controls and non-RE epilepsy patients, and thus may assist diagnosis of RE. Volumetric analysis could also be included as part of followup for RE patients to assess disease progression. PMID:27609620

  13. Modelling Machine Tools using Structure Integrated Sensors for Fast Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Montavon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the relative deviation between commanded and actual tool tip position, which limits the volumetric performance of the machine tool, enables the use of contemporary methods of compensation to reduce tolerance mismatch and the uncertainties of on-machine measurements. The development of a primarily optical sensor setup capable of being integrated into the machine structure without limiting its operating range is presented. The use of a frequency-modulating interferometer and photosensitive arrays in combination with a Gaussian laser beam allows for fast and automated online measurements of the axes’ motion errors and thermal conditions with comparable accuracy, lower cost, and smaller dimensions as compared to state-of-the-art optical measuring instruments for offline machine tool calibration. The development is tested through simulation of the sensor setup based on raytracing and Monte-Carlo techniques.

  14. Fast Torsional Artificial Muscles from NiTi Twisted Yarns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M; Hunter, Ian W

    2017-05-17

    Torsional artificial muscles made of multiwalled carbon nanotube/niobium nanowire yarns have shown remarkable torsional speed and gravimetric torque. The muscle structure consists of a twisted yarn with half of its length infiltrated with a stimuli-responsive guest material such as paraffin wax. The volumetric expansion of the guest material creates the torsional actuation in the yarn. In the present work, we show that this type of actuation is not unique to wax-infiltrated carbon multiwalled nanotube (MWCNT) or niobium nanowire yarns and that twisted yarn of NiTi alloy fibers also produces fast torsional actuation. By gold-plating half the length of a NiTi twisted yarn and Joule heating it, we achieved a fully reversible torsional actuation of up to 16°/mm with peak torsional speed of 10 500 rpm and gravimetric torque of 8 N·m/kg. These results favorably compare to those of MWCNTs and niobium nanowire yarns.

  15. Full-field pressure from snapshot and time-resolved volumetric PIV

    OpenAIRE

    Laskari, Angeliki; de Kat, Roeland; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with pressure estimation from snapshot and time-resolved three-component (3C) volumetric PIV data using Taylor’s hypothesis, an Eulerian and a pseudo-Lagrangian approach. The Taylor’s hypothesis approach has been shown to provide accurate results for pressure in the case of 3C planar PIV data with an appropriate choice of convection velocity (de Kat and Ganapathisubramani 2013), and here we extend its use on 3C volumetric velocity snapshots. Application of the techniques to s...

  16. Comparison between the volumetric flow rate and pressure distribution for different kinds of sliding thrust bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pourmehran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hydrodynamic journal sliding bearing, forming with two nonparallel surfaces that the lower surface moves with a unidirectional velocity and the upper surface is stationary shaped with exponential geometry is verified mathematically. The values of volumetric flow rate and distribution of pressure for incompressible lubricant flow between two supports in several conditions of velocity with different variables are determined. The results indicate that by increasing the amount of constant (m, the maximum oil pressure in the bearing will face an extreme decrease, and also by increasing the α coefficient, the rate of volumetric flow rate will decrease.

  17. Correlation Between Liver Volumetric Computed Tomography Results and Measured Liver Weight: A Tool for Preoperative Planning of Liver Transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnemans, L.J.; Hol, J.C.; Monshouwer, R.; Prokop, M.; Klein, W.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Before liver transplant, it is necessary to know the size of the organ in advance of the procedure. We studied the correlation between liver volumetric computed tomography results and liver weight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Postmortem volumetric computed tomography was conducted on cadavers

  18. Fast timing discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The processing of pulses with very fast risetimes for timing purposes involves many problems because of the large equivalent bandwidths involved. For pulses with risetimes in the 150 ps range (and full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of 400 ps) bandwidths in excess of 1GHz are required. Furthermore, these very narrow pulses with current amplitudes as small as 1 mA carry very small charges ( -12 coulomb), therefore, requiring very sensitive trigger circuits. The difficulty increases when timing characteristics in the picosecond range are sought especially when a wide input signal amplitude range causes a time-walk problem. The fast timing discriminator described has a time-walk of approximately +-75 ps over the input signal range from 80 mV to 3V. A schematic of the discriminator is included, and operation and performance are discussed

  19. Fast radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Industrial radiography can be performed with shorter exposure times, when instead of X-ray film with lead intensifying screens the radiographic paper with fluorescent screen is used. With paper radiography one can obtain lower material, equipment, and labor costs, shorter exposure and processing times, and easier radiation protection. The speed of the radiographic inspection can also be increased by the use of fluorometallic intensifying screens together with a special brand of X-ray film. Before accepting either of the two fast radiographic systems one must be sure that they can produce radiographs of adequate image quality. Therefore an investigation was performed on that subject using ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters. The radiographic image quality was tested for aluminium and steel up to 30 mm thick using various brands of radiographic paper and X-ray film with fluorometallic screens and comparing them with fast X-ray films with lead screens. Both systems give satisfactory results. (author)

  20. PHENIX Fast TOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Chiu, Mickey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mannel, Eric [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stoll, Sean [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lynch, Don [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Boose, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northacker, Dave [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alfred, Marcus [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Lindesay, James [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Chujo, Tatsuya [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Inaba, Motoi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Nonaka, Toshihiro [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Sato, Wataru [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Sakatani, Ikumi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, Masahiro [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Choi, Ihnjea [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of PHENIX Fast TOF group who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goals for this test beam experiment are to verify the timing performance of the two types of time-of-flight detector prototypes.

  1. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  3. ADT fast losses MD

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua Ferrando, BM; Sapinski, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The fast beam losses in the order of 1 ms are expected to be a potential major luminosity limitation for higher beam energies after the LHC long shutdown (LS1). Therefore a Quench Test is planned in the winter 2013 to estimate the quench limit in this timescale and revise the current models. This experiment was devoted to determination the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT) as a system for fast losses induction. A non-standard operation of the ADT was used to develop the beam oscillation instead of suppressing them. The sign flip method had allowed us to create the fast losses within several LHC turns at 450 GeV during the previous test (26th March 2012). Thus, the ADT could be potentially used for the studies of the UFO ("Unidentied Falling Object") impact on the cold magnets. Verification of the system capability and investigations of the disturbed beam properties were the main objectives of this MD. During the experiment, the pilot bunches of proton beam were excited independently in the horizontal and vertical ...

  4. Fast-scintillator measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.R.; Slaughter, D.R.; Lerche, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are investigating scintillators because their fast timing properties may be applied to the development of neutron diagnostics. Measuring the history of a target burn by direct observation of DT neutrons requires a time resolution of 20 ps. An instrument designed to measure the plasma ion temperature by neutron time of flight, when the flight path is less than or equal to 1m, requires a detector system with resolution of 60 to 100 ps. Fast plastic scintillators like NE111, BC-422, and SG180 typically have decay constants of about 1400 ps. With quenching, the decay constant can be decreased to about 700 ps - still to slow for the instruments that they would like to build. One yet-unexploited property of fast scintillators is their rise time. In 1984, they began experiments designed to measure scintillator rise times. For our application - the measurement of target burn histories - they are especially concerned with the temporal width of the sample excitation pulse, the temporal resolution of our measurement system, and the need to characterize the excitation pulse and the scintillator output simultaneously. Application of plastic scintillators to a neutron streak camera is described

  5. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  6. High-frame rate imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel using fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboray, R; Mor, I; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 ms exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and mean bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a lumped parametric model for scoping investigations of uncertainties in fast reactor probabilistic safety analysis. Progress report, October 10, 1974--October 10, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Luck, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the researh reported is to explore the possibility of the development of a novel reactor safety analysis methodology suitable for a parametric investigation of uncertainties in the progression of severe fast reactor accidents. The essential feature of this approach is a description of the reactor state by means of volumetric distributions (the distribution of volume of reactor materials, such as coolant, clad, and fuel, with temperature and in the case of fuel material, also with power). Stationary volumetric distributions are computed from detailed spatial temperature and power distributions of materials in the steady state reactor. Stationary volumetric distributions and other reactor physics quantities form the input for the reactor transient calculations in which the accident progression is described by the behavior of transient volumetric distributions. The report discusses the representation of spatial temperature distributions, the theory and calculation of stationary volumetric distributions, and includes examples of single subassembly and reactor distributions. The status of reactor neutronic code development and application is discussed and results are displayed

  8. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human-computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  9. The criticality of sieve size in asphaltic concrete mixes as measured by volumetric properties and stabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of deviations from the specified aggregate gradation on the stability and volumetric properties of the S-5 mix. The project involved two phases of experimental work. The first phase consisted o...

  10. Physically Based Modeling and Simulation with Dynamic Spherical Volumetric Simplex Splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yunhao; Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel computational modeling and simulation framework based on dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines. The framework can handle the modeling and simulation of genus-zero objects with real physical properties. In this framework, we first develop an accurate and efficient algorithm to reconstruct the high-fidelity digital model of a real-world object with spherical volumetric simplex splines which can represent with accuracy geometric, material, and other properties of the object simultaneously. With the tight coupling of Lagrangian mechanics, the dynamic volumetric simplex splines representing the object can accurately simulate its physical behavior because it can unify the geometric and material properties in the simulation. The visualization can be directly computed from the object’s geometric or physical representation based on the dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines during simulation without interpolation or resampling. We have applied the framework for biomechanic simulation of brain deformations, such as brain shifting during the surgery and brain injury under blunt impact. We have compared our simulation results with the ground truth obtained through intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging and the real biomechanic experiments. The evaluations demonstrate the excellent performance of our new technique. PMID:20161636

  11. Mathematical Model Defining Volumetric Losses of Hydraulic Oil Compression in a Variable Capacity Displacement Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paszota Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work is to develop the capability of evaluating the volumetric losses of hydraulic oil compression in the working chambers of high pressure variable capacity displacement pump. Volumetric losses of oil compression must be determined as functions of the same parameters, which the volumetric losses due to leakage, resulting from the quality of design solution of the pump, are evaluated as dependent on and also as function of the oil aeration coefficient Ɛ. A mathematical model has been developed describing the hydraulic oil compressibility coefficient klc|Δppi;Ɛ;v as a relation to the ratio ΔpPi/pn of indicated increase ΔpPi of pressure in the working chambers and the nominal pressure pn, to the pump capacity coefficient bP, to the oil aeration coefficient  and to the ratio v/vnof oil viscosity v and reference viscosity vn. A mathematical model is presented of volumetric losses qpvc|ΔpPi;bp;;vof hydraulic oil compression in the pump working chambers in the form allowing to use it in the model of power of losses and energy efficiency

  12. Computer-aided detection of early Barrett's neoplasia using volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swager, Anne-Fré; van der Sommen, Fons; Klomp, Sander R.; Zinger, Sveta; Meijer, Sybren L.; Schoon, Erik J.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; de With, Peter H.; Curvers, Wouter L.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) is an advanced imaging system that provides a near-microscopic resolution scan of the esophageal wall layers up to 3-mm deep. VLE has the potential to improve detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE). However, interpretation

  13. Large-scale volumetric pressure from tomographic PTV with HFSB tracers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous volumetric pressure in the near-wake of a truncated cylinder is measured by use of tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as tracers. The measurement volume is several orders of magnitude larger than that reported in tomographic

  14. Bridging PIV spatial and temporal resolution using governing equations and development of the coaxial volumetric velocimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.

    2017-01-01

    A series of techniques is proposed for volumetric air flow measurements that are based upon the principles of particle image velocimetry (PIV). The proposed techniques fall in two categories; part 1 of this dissertation considers measurement data processing using constitutive laws and part 2 focuses

  15. Theoretical characterization of annular array as a volumetric optoacoustic ultrasound handheld probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoran, Mohammad Azizian; Vray, Didier

    2018-02-01

    Optoacoustic ultrasound (OPUS) is a promising hybridized technique for simultaneous acquisition of functional and morphological data. The optical specificity of optoacoustic leverages the diagnostic aptitude of ultrasonography beyond anatomy. However, this integration has been rarely practiced for volumetric imaging. The challenge lies in the effective imaging probes that preserve the functionality of both modalities. The potentials of a sparse annular array for volumetric OPUS imaging are theoretically investigated. In order to evaluate and optimize the performance characteristics of the probe, series of analysis in the framework of system model matrix was carried out. The two criteria of voxel crosstalk and eigenanalysis have been employed to unveil information about the spatial sensitivity, aliasing, and number of definable spatial frequency components. Based on these benchmarks, the optimal parameters for volumetric handheld probe are determined. In particular, the number, size, and the arrangement of the elements and overall aperture dimension were investigated. The result of the numerical simulation suggests that the segmented-annular array of 128 negatively focused elements with 1λ × 20λ size, operating at 5-MHz central frequency showcases a good agreement with the physical requirement of both imaging systems. We hypothesize that these features enable a high-throughput volumetric passive/active ultrasonic imaging system with great potential for clinical applications.

  16. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME II: APPENDICES A-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    The program of experiments conducted at Griffiss Air Force Base was devised to expand the understanding of large underground storage tank behavior as it impacts the performance of volumetric leak detection testing. The report addresses three important questions about testing the ...

  17. Programmable segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy for respiratory coordination in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jian-Kuen; Wu, Chien-Jang; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    We programmably divided long-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) into split short arcs, each taking less than 30 s for respiratory coordination. The VMAT plans of five pancreatic cancer patients were modified; the short-arc plans had negligible dose differences and satisfied the 3%/3-mm gamma index on a MapCHECK-2 device.

  18. Real-time volumetric deformable models for surgery simulation using finite elements and condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Cotin, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of SD solid volumetric Finite Element models to surgery simulation. In particular it introduces three new ideas for solving the problem of achieving real-time performance for these models. The simulation system we have developed is described and we demonstrate...... real-time deformation using the methods developed in the paper....

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were...

  20. Volumetric 3-D Vector Flow Measurements using a 62+62 Row-Column Addressed Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results from volumetric 3-D vector flow measurements using a 62+62 row-column addressed (RCA) array are presented. A plane-by-plane steered transmit sequence and its post processing steps are described for obtaining 3-D vector flow in a volume. A modified version of the transverse...

  1. Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: Correlation Between Volumetric Changes and Local Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; De Ridder, Mark; Duchateau, Michael; Gevaert, Thierry; Engels, Benedikt; Schallier, Denis; Storme, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive or comparative value of volumetric changes, measured on daily megavoltage computed tomography during radiotherapy for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: We included 80 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was combined with concurrent chemotherapy, combined with induction chemotherapy, or given as primary treatment. Patients entered two parallel studies with moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy. Tumor volume contouring was done on the daily acquired images. A regression coefficient was derived from the volumetric changes on megavoltage computed tomography, and its predictive value was validated. Logarithmic or polynomial fits were applied to the intratreatment changes to compare the different treatment schedules radiobiologically. Results: Regardless of the treatment type, a high regression coefficient during radiotherapy predicted for a significantly prolonged cause-specific local progression free-survival (p = 0.05). Significant differences were found in the response during radiotherapy. The significant difference in volumetric treatment response between radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy plus induction chemotherapy translated to a superior long-term local progression-free survival for concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03). An enhancement ratio of 1.3 was measured for the used platinum/taxane doublet in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Contouring on daily megavoltage computed tomography images during radiotherapy enabled us to predict the efficacy of a given treatment. The significant differences in volumetric response between treatment strategies makes it a possible tool for future schedule comparison.

  2. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  3. A novel semi-automatic segmentation protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Nard G.; Schreurs, Ruud; Bittermann, Gerhard K.P.; Borstlap, Wilfred A.; Koole, Ronald; Meijer, Gert J.; Maal, Thomas J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures is presented. Eleven cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) datasets of patients who underwent secondary alveolar cleft reconstructive surgery for a unilateral alveolar cleft were evaluated by two investigators. Residual

  4. A novel semi-automatic segmentation protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, N.G.; Schreurs, R.; Bittermann, G.K.P.; Borstlap, W.A.; Koole, R.A.; Meijer, G.J.; Maal, T.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel protocol for volumetric assessment of alveolar cleft grafting procedures is presented. Eleven cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) datasets of patients who underwent secondary alveolar cleft reconstructive surgery for a unilateral alveolar cleft were evaluated by two investigators. Residual

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetric Analysis of the Putamen in Children with ADHD: Combined Type versus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Tasha McMahon; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Gregory, Amanda Louise; Murphy, Jennifer Mary; Lancaster, Jack Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Volumetric differences in the putamen of boys with ADHD combined subtype with psychopathic traits and controls are investigated. Method: The putamen in 24 archival magnetic resonance imaging scans of 12 boys in residential treatment with symptoms of ADHD and psychopathic traits and 12 community control boys are analyzed using Display…

  6. Comparison of techniques for volumetric analysis of the future liver remnant: implications for major hepatic resections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martel, Guillaume; Cieslak, Kasia P.; Huang, Ruiyao; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Wiggers, Jimme K.; Belblidia, Assia; Dagenais, Michel; Lapointe, Réal; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Vandenbroucke-Menu, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare measured and estimated volumetry prior to liver resection. Data for consecutive patients submitted to major liver resection for colorectal liver metastases at two centres during 2004-2012 were reviewed. All patients underwent volumetric analysis to define the

  7. Cognitive Strategies Used by Chemistry Students to Solve Volumetric Analysis Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anamuah-Mensah, J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an investigation of the strategies used by 47 high school students in solving volumetric analysis problems in chemistry. Reports that students in the high ability group mainly used the "formula" approach, while those in the low ability group tended to use the "proportional" approach to problem solving. (TW)

  8. Adsorption indicators in double precipitation volumetric. II. Use of radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnicero Tejerina, M. I.

    1961-01-01

    1 31I-fluorescein and 1 10Ag-silver sulphate have been used in order to check the role of adsorption indicators in the volumetric analysis of double precipitation reactions. It has been shown by using isotopes that adsorption of fluorescein on silver halides depends on the foreign cations present in the solution. (Author) 8 refs

  9. Area and 3-dimensional volumetric changes of periapical lesions after root canal treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Borden, W.G.; Wang, X.; Wu, M.K.; Shemesh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the changes in size of periapical lesions after root canal treatment as revealed by periapical radiography (PA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging using area and 3-dimensional volumetric measurements and assessed the outcome of the treatments based on

  10. Real-time volumetric deformable models for surgery simulation using finite elements and condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Cotin, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of SD solid volumetric Finite Element models to surgery simulation. In particular it introduces three new ideas for solving the problem of achieving real-time performance for these models. The simulation system we have developed is described and we demonstrate...

  11. 40 CFR 80.170 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (VAR), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements. 80.170 Section 80.170 Protection of... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.170 Volumetric additive reconciliation (VAR), equipment calibration, and... additized unless otherwise noted in supporting VAR records, and must be accounted for in VAR records. The...

  12. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and... additized, unless otherwise noted in supporting VAR records, and must be accounted for in VAR records. The VAR reconciliation standard is attained under this section when the actual concentration of detergent...

  13. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Duan, Jianghui [Medical School, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei [Department of Respiration Internal Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  14. VOLUMETRIC METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF BEACHES VARIABILITY BASED ON GIS-TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Dolotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In frame of cadastral beach evaluation the volumetric method of natural variability index is proposed. It base on spatial calculations with Cut-Fill method and volume accounting ofboththe common beach contour and specific areas for the each time.

  15. Development, Construction, and Operation of a Multisample Volumetric Apparatus for the Study of Gas Adsorption Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rui P. P. L.; Silva, Ricardo J. S.; Esteves, Isabel A. A. C.; Mota, Jose´ P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a simple volumetric adsorption apparatus is highlighted. The setup is inexpensive and provides a clear demonstration of gas phase adsorption concepts. The topic is suitable for undergraduate chemistry and chemical engineering students. Moreover, this unit can also provide quantitative data that can be used by young researchers…

  16. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-01-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person’s immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person’s perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence—Geographic Information Systems (GIS)—within that person’s neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant’s neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely

  17. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person's immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person's perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - within that person's neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant's neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely effective

  18. Fast reactors: potential for power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: basic facts about conventional and fast reactors; uranium economy; plutonium and fast reactors; cooling systems; sodium coolant; safety engineering; handling and recycling plutonium; safeguards; development of fast reactors in Britain and abroad; future progress. (U.K.)

  19. Hispanics in Fast Food Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined the employment of Hispanics in the fast-food industry. Data were obtained from a national survey of employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies in which 194 (4.2 percent) of the 4,660 respondents reported being Hispanic. Compared with the total sample, Hispanic fast-food employees were slightly less likely to be…

  20. Spatial and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas during pre-operative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Philip; Dickie, Colleen; Lee, David; Chung, Peter; O’Sullivan, Brian; Letourneau, Daniel; Xu, Wei; Swallow, Carol; Gladdy, Rebecca; Catton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the positional and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) during pre-operative external beam radiotherapy (PreRT). Material and methods: After excluding 2 patients who received chemotherapy prior to PreRT and 15 RPS that were larger than the field-of-view of cone-beam CT (CBCT), the positional and volumetric changes of RPS throughout PreRT were characterized in 19 patients treated with IMRT using CBCT image guidance. Analysis was performed on 118 CBCT images representing one image per week of those acquired daily during treatment. Intra-fraction breathing motions of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and kidneys were measured in 22 RPS patients simulated using 4D-CT. Fifteen other patients were excluded whose tumors were incompletely imaged on CBCT or who received pre-RT chemotherapy. Results: A GTV volumetric increase (mean: 6.6%, p = 0.035) during the first 2 weeks (CBCT1 vs. CBCT2) of treatment was followed by GTV volumetric decrease (mean: 4%, p = 0.009) by completion of radiotherapy (CBCT1 vs. CBCT6). Internal margins of 8.6, 15 and 15 mm in the lateral, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions would be required to account for inter-fraction displacements. The extent of GTV respiratory motion was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with more superiorly positioned tumors. Conclusion: Inter-fraction CBCT provides important volumetric and positional information of RPS which may improve PreRT quality and prompt re-planning. Planning target volume may be reduced using online soft-tissue matching to account for interfractional displacements of GTVs. Important breathing motion occurred in superiorly placed RPS supporting the utility of 4D-CT planning

  1. The fast encryption package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Matt

    1988-01-01

    The organization of some tools to help improve passwork security at a UNIX-based site is described along with how to install and use them. These tools and their associated library enable a site to force users to pick reasonably safe passwords (safe being site configurable) and to enable site management to try to crack existing passworks. The library contains various versions of a very fast implementation of the Data Encryption Standard and of the one-way encryption functions used to encryp the password.

  2. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad to 1000 rads or higher, if desired. 5 claims

  3. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period

  4. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollier, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first industrial-scale fast breeder reactor (FBR) is the Superphenix I at Crays-Melville. It was designed and built by Novatome, a French company, and Ansaldo, an Italian company. The advantages of FBRs are summarized. The status of Superphenix and the testing schedule is given. The stages in its power escalation in 1986 are given. The article is optimistic about the future for FBRs and expects FBRs to take over from PWRs at the beginning of the 21st Century. To achieve economic viability, European financial cooperation for the research and development programme is advocated. (UK)

  5. Fast quench reactor method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  6. The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3rd, 1986, two demonstrations of the inherent capability of sodium-cooled fast reactors to survive unprotected loss of cooling accidents were carried out on the experimental sodium-cooled power reactor, EBR-II, on the Idaho site of Argonne National Laboratory. Transients potentially of the most serious kind, one an unprotected loss of flow, the other an unprotected loss of heat sink, both initiated from full power. In both cases the reactor quietly shut itself down, without damage of any kind. These tests were a part of the on-going development program at Argonne to develop an advanced reactor with significant new inherent safety characteristics. Called the integral fast reactor, or IFR, the basic thrust is to develop everything that is needed for a complete nuclear power system - reactor, closed fuel cycle, and waste processing - as a single optimized entity, and, for simplicity in concept, as an integral part of a single plant. The particular selection of reactor materials emphasizes inherent safety characteristics also makes possible a simplified close fuel cycle and waste process improvements. The paper describes the IFR concept, the inherent safety, tests, and status of IFR development today

  7. Biomass fast pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgewater Anthony V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy is now accepted as having the potential to provide the major part of the projected renewable energy provisions of the future. Fast pyrolysis is one of the three main thermal routes, with gasification and combustion, to providing a useful and valuable biofuel. It is one of the most recent renewable energy processes to have been introduced and offers the advantages of a liquid product bio-oil that can be readily stored and trans ported, and used as a fuel, an energy carrier and a source of chemicals. Fast pyrolysis has now achieved commercial success for production of some chemicals, liquid fuel and electricity. Bio-oils have been success fully tested in engines turbines and boilers, and have been upgraded to high quality hydrocarbon fuels although at a presently unacceptable energetic and financial cost. This review concentrates on the technology of pyrolysis and applications for the liquid product. The basic pyrolysis process and the characteristics of the main liquid product bio-oil are first summarized followed by a review of applications for bio-oil. The main technical and non-technical barriers to implementation are identified.

  8. The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3rd, 1986, two dramatic demonstrations of the inherent capability of sodium-cooled fast reactors to survive unprotected loss of cooling accidents were carried out on the experimental sodium-cooled power reactor, EBR-II, on the Idaho site of Argonne National Laboratory. Transients potentially of the most serious kind, one an unprotected loss of flow, the other an unprotected loss of heat sink, both initiated from full power. In both cases the reactor quietly shut itself down, without damage of any kind. These tests were a part of the on-going development program at Argonne to develop an advanced reactor with significant new inherent safety characteristics. Called the Integral Fast Reactor, or IFR, the basic thrust is to develop everything that is needed for a complete nuclear power system - reactor, closed fuel cycle, and waste processing - as a single optimized entity, and, for simplicity in concept, as an integral part of a single plant. The particular selection of reactor materials emphasizes inherent safety characteristics and also makes possible a simplified closed fuel cycle and waste process improvements

  9. Chemistry of fast electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximoff, Sergey N; Head-Gordon, Martin P

    2009-07-14

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy approximately > 0.5-1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1-3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4-6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O(2) + deltae(-) --> O(delta(-)) (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, O(delta(-)) + CO --> CO(2)(delta-) --> CO(2) + deltae(-) (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO(2) reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces.

  10. Real-time volumetric relative dosimetry for magnetic resonance—image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah J.; Kadbi, Mo; Bosco, Gary; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2018-02-01

    The integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with linear accelerators (linac) has enabled the use of 3D MR-visible gel dosimeters for real-time verification of volumetric dose distributions. Several iron-based radiochromic 3D gels were created in-house then imaged and irradiated in a pre-clinical 1.5 T-7 MV MR-Linac. MR images were acquired using a range of balanced-fast field echo (b-FFE) sequences during irradiation to assess the contrast and dose response in irradiated regions and to minimize the presence of MR artifacts. Out of four radiochromic 3D gel formulations, the FOX 3D gel was found to provide superior MR contrast in the irradiated regions. The FOX gels responded linearly with respect to real-time dose and the signal remained stable post-irradiation for at least 20 min. The response of the FOX gel also was found to be unaffected by the radiofrequency and gradient fields created by the b-FFE sequence during irradiation. A reusable version of the FOX gel was used for b-FFE sequence optimization to reduce artifacts by increasing the number of averages at the expense of temporal resolution. Regardless of the real-time MR sequence used, the FOX 3D gels responded linearly to dose with minimal magnetic field effects due to the strong 1.5 T field or gradient fields present during imaging. These gels can easily be made in-house using non-reusable and reusable formulations depending on the needs of the clinic, and the results of this study encourage further applications of 3D gels for MR-IGRT applications.

  11. Influence of Cobb Angle and ISIS2 Surface Topography Volumetric Asymmetry on Scoliosis Research Society-22 Outcome Scores in Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul; Berryman, Fiona; Baker, De; Pynsent, Paul; Gardner, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Retrospective sequential patient series. To establish the relationship between the magnitude of the deformity in scoliosis and patients' perception of their condition, as measured with Scoliosis Research Society-22 scores. A total of 93 untreated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included retrospectively. The Cobb angle was measured from a plain radiograph, and volumetric asymmetry was measured by ISIS2 surface topography. The association between Scoliosis Research Society scores for function, pain, self-image, and mental health against Cobb angle and volumetric asymmetry was investigated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Correlation of both Cobb angle and volumetric asymmetry with function and pain was weak (all self-image, was higher, although still moderate (-.37 for Cobb angle and -.44 for volumetric asymmetry). Both were statistically significant (Cobb angle, p = .0002; volumetric asymmetry; p = .00001). Cobb angle contributed 13.8% to the linear relationship with self-image, whereas volumetric asymmetry contributed 19.3%. For mental health, correlation was statistically significant with Cobb angle (p = .011) and volumetric asymmetry (p = .0005), but the correlation was low to moderate (-.26 and -.35, respectively). Cobb angle contributed 6.9% to the linear relationship with mental health, whereas volumetric asymmetry contributed 12.4%. Volumetric asymmetry correlates better with both mental health and self-image compared with Cobb angle, but the correlation was only moderate. This study suggests that a patient's own perception of self-image and mental health is multifactorial and not completely explained through present objective measurements of the size of the deformity. This helps to explain the difficulties in any objective analysis of a problem with multifactorial perception issues. Further study is required to investigate other physical aspects of the deformity that may have a role in how patients view themselves. Copyright

  12. Breast Density Estimation with Fully Automated Volumetric Method: Comparison to Radiologists' Assessment by BI-RADS Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tulika; Sharma, Madhurima; Singla, Veenu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to calculate mammographic breast density with a fully automated volumetric breast density measurement method and to compare it to breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) breast density categories assigned by two radiologists. A total of 476 full-field digital mammography examinations with standard mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views were evaluated by two blinded radiologists and BI-RADS density categories were assigned. Using a fully automated software, mean fibroglandular tissue volume, mean breast volume, and mean volumetric breast density were calculated. Based on percentage volumetric breast density, a volumetric density grade was assigned from 1 to 4. The weighted overall kappa was 0.895 (almost perfect agreement) for the two radiologists' BI-RADS density estimates. A statistically significant difference was seen in mean volumetric breast density among the BI-RADS density categories. With increased BI-RADS density category, increase in mean volumetric breast density was also seen (P BI-RADS categories and volumetric density grading by fully automated software (ρ = 0.728, P BI-RADS density category by two observers showed fair agreement (κ = 0.398 and 0.388, respectively). In our study, a good correlation was seen between density grading using fully automated volumetric method and density grading using BI-RADS density categories assigned by the two radiologists. Thus, the fully automated volumetric method may be used to quantify breast density on routine mammography. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  14. Ramadan fasting, pregnancy and lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fasting and malnutrition during pregnancy is associated with deleterious consequences such as hypoglycemia, ketonemia, impaired fetal IQ, low birth weight and even abortion. Comparison of pregnancy length and year duration shows that about 75% of pregnancies coincided with Ramadan. Also, fasting during Ramadan is not equivalent to hunger and malnutrition, however, knowledge of the effects of Ramadan fasting on pregnancy outcome is important. In this review, the results of all studies related to the possible effects of Ramadan fasting in pregnancy and lactation have been collected. Material and Methods: Keywords such as "Ramadan", "Ramadan Fasting", "Islamic Fasting", "Fasting in Ramadan "and Fasting with words Pregnancy, Birth Weight, Lactation, Preterm, Milk Composition, Breast Milk were searched in PubMed Database, SID (Scientific Information Database, and some regional journals and 40 related articles (descriptive cross - sectional, cohort, clinical trial and review articles from 1968 to 2010 were studied. Results: Based on available information, if the maternal nutrition during Ramadan is good, the normal process of pregnancy will be maintained and Ramadan fasting would not have deleterious effects on fetal physical and mental growth. Conclusion: Considering nutritional tips, nursing mothers could also fast during Ramadan.

  15. Fast Food Jobs. National Study of Fast Food Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined employment in the fast-food industry. The national survey collected data from employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies. Female employees outnumbered males by two to one. The ages of those fast-food employees in the survey sample ranged from 14 to 71, with fully 70 percent being in the 16- to 20-year-old age…

  16. Test fast kicker pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhanf, S.Y.; Frey, W.W.; Bunicci, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, a test pulser of the Brookhaven AGS Booster extraction fast kicker is described. The pulser is projected for both proton and heavy ion operation. A load of total inductance 2.15 μH is used for the test pulser. The PFN voltage is required to be below 40 kV for operation in air. Rise time of the pulse for proton extraction operation is about 120ns up to 97% of full current (1000A), and, for heavy ion extraction, 160ns up to 98% of full current (1615A). R-C compensation networks are used for pulse front edge sharpening. The flexibility of operation is obtained basically by switching an energy dumping resistor to match or mismatch the PFN impedance. Some comments on stray capacitance and stray inductance effects are included. 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Fast ion atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, H.G.; Young, L.; Goodman, L.S.; Somerville, L.P.; Hardis, J.; Neek, D.

    1984-01-01

    We have set up two collinear fast beam/laser excitation systems, one at the Argonne Dynamitron Accelerator (0.5 to 5.0 MeV beam energy) and another at a small electrostatic accelerator (20 to 130 keV). Our objective is to study fine structure, hyperfine structure and QED effects in ions of a few electrons. Initial projects underway include studies of multi-excited transitions in Li/sup -/ and Li/sup 0/, and transitions to high Rydberg states in H/sup 0/ and He/sup 0/. We have simultaneously excited a sodium jet with a laser at the resonance wavelength (D/sub 1/ or D/sub 2/ lines) and a 1-MeV He/sup +/ beam to produce excitation to autoionizing Na and Na/sup +/ states. The Auger electron spectra are compared to spectra obtained without laser excitation, and indicate strong variations in final state populations. 17 references.

  18. Fast-neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iljunin, V.G.; Murogov, V.M.; Shmelev, A.N.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a fast-neutron reactor wherein the core and the surrounding lateral and axial blankets are made up of fuel element stacks. The walls of each stack have holes in the middle portion thereof with respect to the height of the core. Main and additional fuel elements are arranged respectively above and below the plane passing through the centers ofthe holes, inside each stack, the spacing between which fuel elements form, together with the holes, the inlet header of the coolant washing the fuel elements. The inlet header splits the coolant into two oppositely directed flows lead away by two outlet headers arranged above and below the upper and lower axial blankets

  19. Fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, E.K.

    1976-11-01

    Estimated reactivity effects of fission products in the SNR-300 fast breeder are given. Neutron cross sections of 127 I and 129 I are also given. Results of the in-pile canning failure experiments on fuel pins R54-F35 and F39 are discussed. Sinter experiments using mixed UC-UN powders are reported. Results of tensile tests on high-dose and low-dose irradiated specimens of 18Cr1 1Ni stainless steel (DIN 1.4948) used in the SNR-300 reactor vessel are given. It is shown that the aerosol behaviour in condensing sodium vapour can be described by the same MADCA model developed for the decay of aerosols in condensing water vapour. Results of heat transfer measurements in the electrically heated 28-rod bundle under liquid-phase and subsequently under two-phase conditions are commented on

  20. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past two years, scientists from Argonne have developed an advanced breeder reactor with a closed self contained fuel cycle. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a new reactor concept, adaptable to a variety of designs, that is based on a fuel cycle radically different from the CRBR line of breeder development. The essential features of the IFR are metal fuel, pool layout, and pyro- and electro-reprocessing in a facility integral with the reactor plant. The IFR shows promise to provide an inexhaustible, safe, economic, environmentally acceptable, and diversion resistant source of nuclear power. It shows potential for major improvement in all of the areas that have led to concern about nuclear power

  1. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paletou, Frederic; Leger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho [A novel iterative scheme for the very fast and accurate solution of non-LTE radiative transfer problems. Astrophys J 1995;455:646]; it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry

  2. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  3. Volumetric characteristics and compactability of asphalt rubber mixtures with organic warm mix asphalt additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Rodríguez-Alloza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA refers to technologies that reduce manufacturing and compaction temperatures of asphalt mixtures allowing lower energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from asphalt plants. These benefits, combined with the effective reuse of a solid waste product, make asphalt rubber (AR mixtures with WMA additives an excellent environmentally-friendly material for road construction. The effect of WMA additives on rubberized mixtures has not yet been established in detail and the lower mixing/compaction temperatures of these mixtures may result in insufficient compaction. In this sense, the present study uses a series of laboratory tests to evaluate the volumetric characteristics and compactability of AR mixtures with organic additives when production/compaction temperatures are decreased. The results of this study indicate that the additives selected can decrease the mixing/compaction temperatures without compromising the volumetric characteristics and compactability.

  4. Tunable Gravimetric and Volumetric Hydrogen Storage Capacities in Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Amol; Chiu, Cheng-Chau; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-09-28

    We study the hydrogen adsorption in porous frameworks composed of silsesquioxane cages linked via boron substituted aromatic structures by first-principles modeling. Such polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) frameworks can be further modified by decorating them with metal atoms binding to the ring structures of the linkers. We have considered Sc- and Ti-doped frameworks which bind H2 via so-called Kubas interaction between hydrogen molecules and transition metal atoms. It will be demonstrated that the maximum H2 gravimetric capacity can be improved to more than 7.5 wt % by using longer linkers with more ring structures. However, the maximum H2 volumetric capacity can be tuned to more than 70 g/L by varying the size of silsesquioxane cages. We are optimistic that by varying the building blocks, POSS frameworks can be modified to meet the targets for the gravimetric and volumetric capacities set by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Volumetric imaging using single chip integrated CMUT-on-CMOS IVUS array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Gurun, Gokce; Satir, Sarp; Xu, Toby; Hochman, Michael; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-01-01

    An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter that can provide forward viewing volumetric ultrasound images would be an invaluable clinical tool for guiding interventions. Single chip integration of front-end electronics with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is highly desirable to reduce the interconnection complexity and enable miniaturization in IVUS catheters. For this purpose we use the monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS integration where CMUTs are fabricated directly on top of pre-processed CMOS wafers. This minimizes parasitic capacitances associated with connection lines. We have recently implemented a system design including all the required electronics using 0.35-µm CMOS process integrated with a 1.4-mm diameter CMUT array. In this study, we present the experimental volumetric imaging results from an ex-vivo chicken heart phantom. The imaging results demonstrate that the single-chip forward looking IVUS (FL-IVUS) system with monolithically integrated electronics has potential to visualize the front view of coronary arteries.

  6. Very high frame rate volumetric integration of depth images on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Olaf; Adrian Prisacariu, Victor; Yuheng Ren, Carl; Sun, Xin; Torr, Philip; Murray, David

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric methods provide efficient, flexible and simple ways of integrating multiple depth images into a full 3D model. They provide dense and photorealistic 3D reconstructions, and parallelised implementations on GPUs achieve real-time performance on modern graphics hardware. To run such methods on mobile devices, providing users with freedom of movement and instantaneous reconstruction feedback, remains challenging however. In this paper we present a range of modifications to existing volumetric integration methods based on voxel block hashing, considerably improving their performance and making them applicable to tablet computer applications. We present (i) optimisations for the basic data structure, and its allocation and integration; (ii) a highly optimised raycasting pipeline; and (iii) extensions to the camera tracker to incorporate IMU data. In total, our system thus achieves frame rates up 47 Hz on a Nvidia Shield Tablet and 910 Hz on a Nvidia GTX Titan XGPU, or even beyond 1.1 kHz without visualisation.

  7. Volumetric characteristics and compactability of asphalt rubber mixtures with organic warm mix asphalt additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Alloza, A.M.; Gallego, J.

    2017-01-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) refers to technologies that reduce manufacturing and compaction temperatures of asphalt mixtures allowing lower energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from asphalt plants. These benefits, combined with the effective reuse of a solid waste product, make asphalt rubber (AR) mixtures with WMA additives an excellent environmentally-friendly material for road construction. The effect of WMA additives on rubberized mixtures has not yet been established in detail and the lower mixing/compaction temperatures of these mixtures may result in insufficient compaction. In this sense, the present study uses a series of laboratory tests to evaluate the volumetric characteristics and compactability of AR mixtures with organic additives when production/compaction temperatures are decreased. The results of this study indicate that the additives selected can decrease the mixing/compaction temperatures without compromising the volumetric characteristics and compactability. [es

  8. Volumetric analysis of complex lunar craters - Implications for basin ring formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, W. S.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The crater to basin transition in complex lunar craters is characterized by combining morphological and volumetric analyses of their central peaks with subsurface data from terrestrial complex impact structures which suggest that the amount of uplifted material, as judged from its depth of origin, continues to increase with increasing rim diameter. This latter phenomenon implies that a redistribution of uplifted material away from a centralized peak may occur in the larger craters. The morphological and volumetric changes described occur over a rim diameter range of 51-80 km, which is considerably lower than the previously proposed range for the crater to basin transition of 140-175 km. Evidence is given in support of a crater to basin transition which begins at 51-80 km, and is characterized by a relative reduction in central peak volume and a development of rings of floor roughening which may be precursors of peak ring development.

  9. Nanocellulose coupled flexible polypyrrole@graphene oxide composite paper electrodes with high volumetric capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2015-02-01

    A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes.A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07251k

  10. Fast mixed spectrum reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.J.C.; Fischer, G.J.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1979-04-01

    The Fast Mixed Spectrum Reactor is a highly promising concept for a fast reactor with improved features of proliferation resistance, and excellent utilization of uranium resources. In technology, it can be considered to be a branch of fast breeder development, though its operation and implications are different from those of FBR'S in important respects. Successful development programs are required in several areas to bring FMSR to reality, but the payoff from a successful program can be high

  11. Promotion and Fast Food Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy J. Richards; Luis Padilla

    2009-01-01

    Many believe that fast food promotion is a significant cause of the obesity epidemic in North America. Industry members argue that promotion only reallocates brand shares and does not increase overall demand. We study the effect of fast food promotion on market share and total demand by estimating a discrete / continuous model of fast food restaurant choice and food expenditure that explicitly accounts for both spatial and temporal determinants of demand. Estimates are obtained using a unique...

  12. A methodological evaluation of volumetric measurement techniques including three-dimensional imaging in breast surgery

    OpenAIRE

    HOEFFELIN, Harry; JACQUEMIN, Denise; Defaweux, Valérie; NIZET, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Breast surgery currently remains very subjective and each intervention depends on the ability and experience of the operator. To date, no objective measurement of this anatomical region can codify surgery. In this light, we wanted to compare and validate a new technique for 3D scanning (LifeViz 3D) and its clinical application. Materials and methods. - We tested the use of the 3D LifeViz system (Quantificare) to perform volumetric calculations in various settings ("in situ" in cadaveric di...

  13. A Methodological Evaluation of Volumetric Measurement Techniques including Three-Dimensional Imaging in Breast Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    H. Hoeffelin; D. Jacquemin; V. Defaweux; J L. Nizet

    2014-01-01

    Breast surgery currently remains very subjective and each intervention depends on the ability and experience of the operator. To date, no objective measurement of this anatomical region can codify surgery. In this light, we wanted to compare and validate a new technique for 3D scanning (LifeViz 3D) and its clinical application. We tested the use of the 3D LifeViz system (Quantificare) to perform volumetric calculations in various settings (in situ in cadaveric dissection, of control prosthese...

  14. Stereo vision for fully automatic volumetric flow measurement in urban drainage structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Pesic, Igor; Schwehn, Patrick; Song, Hyuk; Satzger, Matthias; Weingärtner, Dorothea; Sattler, Marcus; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2017-06-01

    Overflows in urban drainage structures, or sewers, must be prevented on time to avoid their undesirable consequences. An effective monitoring system able to measure volumetric flow in sewers is needed. Existing stateof-the-art technologies are not robust against harsh sewer conditions and, therefore, cause high maintenance expenses. Having the goal of fully automatic, robust and non-contact volumetric flow measurement in sewers, we came up with an original and innovative idea of a vision-based system for volumetric flow monitoring. On the contrast to existing video-based monitoring systems, we introduce a second camera to the setup and exploit stereo-vision aiming of automatic calibration to the real world. Depth of the flow is estimated as the difference between distances from the camera to the water surface and from the camera to the canal's bottom. Camerato-water distance is recovered automatically using large-scale stereo matching, while the distance to the canal's bottom is measured once upon installation. Surface velocity is calculated using cross-correlation template matching. Individual natural particles in the flow are detected and tracked throughout the sequence of images recorded over a fixed time interval. Having the water level and the surface velocity estimated and knowing the geometry of the canal we calculate the discharge. The preliminary evaluation has shown that the average error of depth computation was 3 cm, while the average error of surface velocity resulted in 5 cm/s. Due to the experimental design, these errors are rough estimates: at each acquisition session the reference depth value was measured only once, although the variation in volumetric flow and the gradual transitions between the automatically detected values indicated that the actual depth level has varied. We will address this issue in the next experimental session.

  15. Construction and calibration of TDR probes for volumetric water content estimation in a Distroferric Red Latosol

    OpenAIRE

    Soncela, Rosimaldo; Sampaio, Silvio C.; Vilas Boas, Marcio A.; Tavares, Maria H. F.; Smanhotto, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The determination of volumetric water content of soils is an important factor in irrigation management. Among the indirect methods for estimating, the time-domain reflectometry (TDR) technique has received a significant attention. Like any other technique, it has advantages and disadvantages, but its greatest disadvantage is the need of calibration and high cost of acquisition. The main goal of this study was to establish a calibration model for the TDR equipment, Trase System Model 6050X1, t...

  16. Simultaneously high gravimetric and volumetric methane uptake characteristics of the metal-organic framework NU-111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yang; Srinivas, Gadipelli; Wilmer, Christopher E; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-14

    We show that the MOF NU-111 exhibits equally high volumetric and gravimetric methane uptake values, both within ≈75% of the DOE targets at 300 K. Upon reducing the temperature to 270 K, the uptake increases to 0.5 g g(-1) and 284 cc(STP) per cc at 65 bar. Adsorption of CO2 and H2 is also reported. Simulated isotherms are in excellent agreement with those obtained from experiments.

  17. PEMODELAN OBYEK TIGA DIMENSI DARI GAMBAR SINTETIS DUA DIMENSI DENGAN PENDEKATAN VOLUMETRIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Adipranata

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we implemented 3D object modeling from 2D input images. Modeling is performed by using volumetric reconstruction approaches by using volumetric reconstruction approaches, the 3D space is tesselated into discrete volumes called voxels. We use voxel coloring method to reconstruct 3D object from synthetic input images by using voxel coloring, we can get photorealistic result and also has advantage to solve occlusion problem that occur in many case of 3D reconstruction. Photorealistic 3D object reconstruction is a challenging problem in computer graphics and still an active area nowadays. Many applications that make use the result of reconstruction, include virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D games, and another 3D applications. Voxel coloring considered the reconstruction problem as a color reconstruction problem, instead of shape reconstruction problem. This method works by discretizing scene space into voxels, then traversed and colored those voxels in special order. The result is photorealitstic 3D object. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan implementasi untuk pemodelan obyek tiga dimensi yang berasal dari gambar dua dimensi. Pemodelan ini dilakukan dengan menggunakan pendekatan volumetric. Dengan menggunakan pendekatan volumetric, ruang tiga dimensi dibagi menjadi bentuk diskrit yang disebut voxel. Kemudian pada voxel-voxel tersebut dilakukan metode pewarnaan voxel untuk mendapatkan hasil berupa obyek tiga dimensi yang bersifat photorealistic. Bagaimana memodelkan obyek tiga dimensi untuk menghasilkan hasil photorealistic merupakan masalah yang masih aktif di bidang komputer grafik. Banyak aplikasi lain yang dapat memanfaatkan hasil dari pemodelan tersebut seperti virtual reality, augmented reality dan lain-lain. Pewarnaan voxel merupakan pemodelan obyek tiga dimensi dengan melakukan rekonstruksi warna, bukan rekonstruksi bentuk. Metode ini bekerja dengan cara mendiskritkan obyek menjadi voxel dan

  18. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects after Oncologic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Romeo, Marco; Chae, Michael P; Hunter-Smith, David J; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction, in such cases, and demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning. Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600 cm 2 . Latissimus dorsi (LD)-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery (SA) was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications, and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland). An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. The clinical series of LD free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the SA as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead space. Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of the SA as a recipient in free flap sacral

  19. Parallel imaging: is GRAPPA a useful acquisition tool for MR imaging intended for volumetric brain analysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Anders

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work presented here investigates parallel imaging applied to T1-weighted high resolution imaging for use in longitudinal volumetric clinical studies involving Alzheimer's disease (AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI patients. This was in an effort to shorten acquisition times to minimise the risk of motion artefacts caused by patient discomfort and disorientation. The principle question is, "Can parallel imaging be used to acquire images at 1.5 T of sufficient quality to allow volumetric analysis of patient brains?" Methods Optimisation studies were performed on a young healthy volunteer and the selected protocol (including the use of two different parallel imaging acceleration factors was then tested on a cohort of 15 elderly volunteers including MCI and AD patients. In addition to automatic brain segmentation, hippocampus volumes were manually outlined and measured in all patients. The 15 patients were scanned on a second occasion approximately one week later using the same protocol and evaluated in the same manner to test repeatability of measurement using images acquired with the GRAPPA parallel imaging technique applied to the MPRAGE sequence. Results Intraclass correlation tests show that almost perfect agreement between repeated measurements of both segmented brain parenchyma fraction and regional measurement of hippocampi. The protocol is suitable for both global and regional volumetric measurement dementia patients. Conclusion In summary, these results indicate that parallel imaging can be used without detrimental effect to brain tissue segmentation and volumetric measurement and should be considered for both clinical and research studies where longitudinal measurements of brain tissue volumes are of interest.

  20. Determination of Mo in U-Mo alloy. EDTA volumetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Meiling; Wang Shu'an Hou Lieqi

    2005-10-01

    The determination methods of Mo are mentioned and EDTA volumetric method is proposed to determine the quantity of Mo in U-Mo alloy. According to the method, some condition experiments are done to confirm the quantity of some reagents. The results are satisfying. When the sample weight is 0.1-0.25 g, the precision is superior to 1% and the percent recovery is 99.2%-101.0%. (authors)

  1. Progressive Muscle Cell Delivery as a Solution for Volumetric Muscle Defect Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Hyun Kim; In Kap Ko; Anthony Atala; James J. Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing functional volumetric tissue in vivo following implantation remains a critical challenge facing cell-based approaches. Several pre-vascularization approaches have been developed to increase cell viability following implantation. Structural and functional restoration was achieved in a preclinical rodent tissue defect; however, the approach used in this model fails to repair larger (>mm) defects as observed in a clinical setting. We propose an effective cell delivery system utili...

  2. The pineal organ of bats: a comparative morphological and volumetric investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, K P; Frahm, H D; Stephan, H

    1986-01-01

    Bats are seasonal breeders and roost under a wide range of lighting conditions, from broad daylight to the total darkness of subterranean passageways and caves. Some are true hibernators. These characteristics and the paucity of information on their pineal organ prompted this investigation, which is based upon the pineals of 191 specimens of 88 species and 12 families of bats. Comparative morphological and volumetric observations have been made on serially sectioned brains of each species. Da...

  3. A Standardized Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury for the Development of Tissue Engineering Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Fig. 1D). Then, at the demarcated middle third the TA muscle, the TA and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) mus- cles were bluntly separated and the medial...0.05). VML, volumetric muscle loss; BW, body weight; MW, muscle weight; TA, tibialis anterior; EDL, extensor digitorum longus ; Po, peak iso- metric...tenotomy of the extensor digito- rum longus muscle (Ablation). abcLetters indicate that the value is significantly different from any different letter

  4. Volumetric Analysis from a Harmonized Multisite Brain MRI Study of a Single Subject with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, R T; Oh, J; Nair, G; Calabresi, P A; Davatzikos, C; Doshi, J; Henry, R G; Kim, G; Linn, K A; Papinutto, N; Pelletier, D; Pham, D L; Reich, D S; Rooney, W; Roy, S; Stern, W; Tummala, S; Yousuf, F; Zhu, A; Sicotte, N L; Bakshi, R

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging can be used to measure structural changes in the brains of individuals with multiple sclerosis and is essential for diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapy evaluation. The North American Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis Cooperative steering committee developed a uniform high-resolution 3T MR imaging protocol relevant to the quantification of cerebral lesions and atrophy and implemented it at 7 sites across the United States. To assess intersite variability in scan data, we imaged a volunteer with relapsing-remitting MS with a scan-rescan at each site. All imaging was acquired on Siemens scanners (4 Skyra, 2 Tim Trio, and 1 Verio). Expert segmentations were manually obtained for T1-hypointense and T2 (FLAIR) hyperintense lesions. Several automated lesion-detection and whole-brain, cortical, and deep gray matter volumetric pipelines were applied. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess variability across sites, as well as systematic biases in the volumetric measurements that were site-related. Systematic biases due to site differences in expert-traced lesion measurements were significant ( P 90% of the variation (range, 13.0-16.4 mL in T1 and 15.9-20.1 mL in T2) in lesion volumes. Site also explained >80% of the variation in most automated volumetric measurements. Output measures clustered according to scanner models, with similar results from the Skyra versus the other 2 units. Even in multicenter studies with consistent scanner field strength and manufacturer after protocol harmonization, systematic differences can lead to severe biases in volumetric analyses. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Three-dimensional segmented volumetric analysis of sporadic vestibular schwannomas: comparison of segmented and linear measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Patrick C; Bush, Matthew L; Robinett, Zachary; Kirsch, Claudia F E; Welling, D Bradley

    2012-10-01

    To compare 3-D segmented volumetric analysis of vestibular schwannomas (VS) with traditional linear tumor measurement on serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to assess volume and growth rates. Case series with retrospective chart review. Tertiary care medical center. This analysis identified 24 VS patients clinically followed with serial gadolinium enhanced images. Maximum linear dimensions (MLD) were obtained from gadolinium-contrasted T1 sequences from 3 serial MRI scans per RECIST guidelines. MLD was cubed (MLD(3)) and orthogonal analysis (OA) was carried out to provide volumetric estimates for comparison with segmented data. Segmented volumetric analysis (SVA) was performed with semi-automated 3-D conformal procedure. Tumor volume, percentage change in volume, and interval percentage change were compared using paired 2-tailed t tests. The average interval between MRIs was 2.6 years. Volume estimates differed significantly between SVA and OA and MLD(3) at all intervals. Linear growth measurements averaged 0.5 mm/y (5.4%). Volumetric growth was 50 mm(3)/y (22.8%) with SVA, 110 mm(3)/y (19.6%) with OA, and 210 mm(3)/y (14.4%) with MLD(3) estimates. Differences between MLD and both MLD(3) and SVA were significant, but significance between MLD(3) and SVA was only identified in interval analysis. Progression was identified in 75% more patients with SVA than OA, MLD(3), or MLD. VS assume complex configurations. Linear measurements inaccurately estimate tumor volume and growth compared with segmented analysis. SVA is a useful clinical tool that accurately assesses tumor volume. Use of outcomes such as tumor volume and percentage of volume change may be more sensitive in assessing tumor progression compared with linear measurements.

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Estimations of Volumetric Inductive Phase Shift in Breast Cancer Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Lozano, L. M.; Uscanga, M. C.; Silva, J. G.; Polo, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Impedance measurements based on magnetic induction for breast cancer detection has been proposed in some studies. This study evaluates theoretical and experimentally the use of a non-invasive technique based on magnetic induction for detection of patho-physiological conditions in breast cancer tissue associated to its volumetric electrical conductivity changes through inductive phase shift measurements. An induction coils-breast 3D pixel model was designed and tested. The model involves two circular coils coaxially centered and a human breast volume centrally placed with respect to the coils. A time-harmonic numerical simulation study addressed the effects of frequency-dependent electrical properties of tumoral tissue on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the breast model measured with the circular coils as inductor and sensor elements. Experimentally; five female volunteer patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma previously diagnosed by the radiology and oncology departments of the Specialty Clinic for Women of the Mexican Army were measured by an experimental inductive spectrometer and the use of an ergonomic inductor-sensor coil designed to estimate the volumetric inductive phase shift in human breast tissue. Theoretical and experimental inductive phase shift estimations were developed at four frequencies: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 MHz. The theoretical estimations were qualitatively in agreement with the experimental findings. Important increments in volumetric inductive phase shift measurements were evident at 0.01MHz in theoretical and experimental observations. The results suggest that the tested technique has the potential to detect pathological conditions in breast tissue associated to cancer by non-invasive monitoring. Further complementary studies are warranted to confirm the observations.

  7. V-Net: Fully Convolutional Neural Networks for Volumetric Medical Image Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Milletari, Fausto; Navab, Nassir; Ahmadi, Seyed-Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have been recently employed to solve problems from both the computer vision and medical image analysis fields. Despite their popularity, most approaches are only able to process 2D images while most medical data used in clinical practice consists of 3D volumes. In this work we propose an approach to 3D image segmentation based on a volumetric, fully convolutional, neural network. Our CNN is trained end-to-end on MRI volumes depicting prostate, and learns t...

  8. Headspace Volumetric Karl Fischer Titration for the Determination of Water Content in Finished Tobacco Products

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin N; Chardonnens F; Rotach M

    2014-01-01

    Because many physicochemical properties of tobacco are highly sensitive to its moisture content, the determination of water level is an important parameter for tobacco characterization. A headspace volumetric Karl Fischer titration (HS-V-KFT) method is presented for the quantification of water content in different finished tobacco materials. The parameters affecting the extraction of water from the tobacco materials were the sample size and the oven temperature which have been optimized. The ...

  9. A comparison of semi-automated volumetric vs linear measurement of small vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKeith, Samuel; Das, Tilak; Graves, Martin; Patterson, Andrew; Donnelly, Neil; Mannion, Richard; Axon, Patrick; Tysome, James

    2018-04-01

    Accurate and precise measurement of vestibular schwannoma (VS) size is key to clinical management decisions. Linear measurements are used in routine clinical practice but are prone to measurement error. This study aims to compare a semi-automated volume segmentation tool against standard linear method for measuring small VS. This study also examines whether oblique tumour orientation can contribute to linear measurement error. Experimental comparison of observer agreement using two measurement techniques. Tertiary skull base unit. Twenty-four patients with unilateral sporadic small (linear dimension following reformatting to correct for oblique orientation of VS. Intra-observer ICC was higher for semi-automated volumetric when compared with linear measurements, 0.998 (95% CI 0.994-0.999) vs 0.936 (95% CI 0.856-0.972), p linear measurements, 0.989 (95% CI 0.975-0.995) vs 0.946 (95% CI 0.880-0.976), p = 0.0045. The intra-observer %SDD was similar for volumetric and linear measurements, 9.9% vs 11.8%. However, the inter-observer %SDD was greater for volumetric than linear measurements, 20.1% vs 10.6%. Following oblique reformatting to correct tumour angulation, the mean increase in size was 1.14 mm (p = 0.04). Semi-automated volumetric measurements are more repeatable than linear measurements when measuring small VS and should be considered for use in clinical practice. Oblique orientation of VS may contribute to linear measurement error.

  10. Dose-volumetric parameters for predicting hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Young; Yu, Tosol; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate predictors affecting the development of hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, focusing on radiation dose-volumetric parameters, and to determine the appropriate radiation dose-volumetric threshold of radiation-induced hypothyroidism. A total of 114 patients with head and neck cancer whose radiotherapy fields included the thyroid gland were analysed. The purpose of the radiotherapy was either definitive (n=81) or post-operative (n=33). Thyroid function was monitored before starting radiotherapy and after completion of radiotherapy at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years. A diagnosis of hypothyroidism was based on a thyroid stimulating hormone value greater than the maximum value of laboratory range, regardless of symptoms. In all patients, dose volumetric parameters were analysed. Median follow-up duration was 25 months (range; 6-38). Forty-six percent of the patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism after a median time of 8 months (range; 1-24). There were no significant differences in the distribution of age, gender, surgery, radiotherapy technique and chemotherapy between the euthyroid group and the hypothyroid group. In univariate analysis, the mean dose and V35-V50 results were significantly associated with hypothyroidism. The V45 is the only variable that independently contributes to the prediction of hypothyroidism in multivariate analysis and V45 of 50% was a threshold value. If V45 was <50%, the cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism at 1 year was 22.8%, whereas the incidence was 56.1% if V45 was ≥50%. (P=0.034). The V45 may predict risk of developing hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and a V45 of 50% can be a useful dose-volumetric threshold of radiation-induced hypothyroidism. (author)

  11. Imaging-genomics reveals driving pathways of MRI derived volumetric tumor phenotype features in Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, Patrick; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. Jr; Holder, Chad A.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) tumors exhibit strong phenotypic differences that can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the underlying biological drivers of these imaging phenotypes remain largely unknown. An Imaging-Genomics analysis was performed to reveal the mechanistic associations between MRI derived quantitative volumetric tumor phenotype features and molecular pathways. One hundred fourty one patients with presurgery MRI and survival data were included in our analysis. Volumetric features were defined, including the necrotic core (NE), contrast-enhancement (CE), abnormal tumor volume assessed by post-contrast T1w (tumor bulk or TB), tumor-associated edema based on T2-FLAIR (ED), and total tumor volume (TV), as well as ratios of these tumor components. Based on gene expression where available (n = 91), pathway associations were assessed using a preranked gene set enrichment analysis. These results were put into context of molecular subtypes in GBM and prognostication. Volumetric features were significantly associated with diverse sets of biological processes (FDR < 0.05). While NE and TB were enriched for immune response pathways and apoptosis, CE was associated with signal transduction and protein folding processes. ED was mainly enriched for homeostasis and cell cycling pathways. ED was also the strongest predictor of molecular GBM subtypes (AUC = 0.61). CE was the strongest predictor of overall survival (C-index = 0.6; Noether test, p = 4x10 −4 ). GBM volumetric features extracted from MRI are significantly enriched for information about the biological state of a tumor that impacts patient outcomes. Clinical decision-support systems could exploit this information to develop personalized treatment strategies on the basis of noninvasive imaging. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2659-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated; Caracterizacion volumetrica y superficial de carbon activado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  13. Effect of consolidation pressure on volumetric composition and stiffness of unidirectional flax fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa; Mehmood, S.; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Unidirectional flax/polyethylene terephthalate composites are manufactured by filament winding, followed by compression moulding with low and high consolidation pressure, and with variable flax fibre content. The experimental data of volumetric composition and tensile stiffness are analysed...... assemblies. A characteristic microstructural feature is observed near the transition stage, the so-called local structural porosity, which is caused by the locally fully compacted fibres. At the transition fibre weight fraction, which determines the best possible combination of high fibre volume fraction...

  14. The Effect of Elevation on Volumetric Measurements of the Lower Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordial M. Gillette

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The empirical evidence for the use of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation has been questioned regarding its   clinical effectiveness. The component of RICE that has the least literature regarding its effectiveness is elevation. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if various positions of elevation result in volumetric changes of the lower extremity. Methodology: A randomized crossover design was used to determine the effects of the four following conditions on volumetric changes of the lower extremity: seated at the end of a table (seated, lying supine (flat, lying supine with the foot elevated 12 inches off the table (elevated, and lying prone with the knees bent to 90 degrees (prone. The conditions were randomized using a Latin Square. Each subject completed all conditions with at least 24 hours between each session. Pre and post volumetric measurements were taken using a volumetric tank. The subject was placed in one of the four described testing positions for 30 minutes. The change in weight of the displaced water was the main outcome measure. The data was analyzed using an ANOVA of the pre and post measurements with a Bonferroni post hoc analysis. The level of significance was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Results: The only statistically significant difference was between the gravity dependent position (seated and all other positions (p <.001. There was no significant difference between lying supine (flat, on a bolster (elevated, or prone with the knees flexed to 90 degrees (prone. Conclusions: From these results, the extent of elevation does not appear to have an effect on changes in low leg volume. Elevation above the heart did not significantly improve reduction in limb volume, but removing the limb from a gravity dependent position might be beneficial.

  15. A high frequency amplitude-steered array for real-time volumetric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Catherine H.; Hughes, W. Jack; O'Brien, William D.

    2002-12-01

    Real-time three-dimensional acoustic imaging is difficult in water or tissue because of the slow speed of sound in these media. Conventional pulse-echo data collection, which uses at least one transmit pulse per line in the image, does not allow for the real-time update of a volume of data at practical ranges. Recently, a linear amplitude-steered array was presented that allows the collection of a plane of data with a single transmit pulse by spatially separating frequencies in the lateral direction. Later, by using a linear array with frequency separation in the vertical direction and rotating the array in the horizontal direction, volumetric data were collected with a small number of transmit pulses. By expanding the linear array to a two-dimensional array, data can now be collected for volumetric imaging in real time. In this study, the amplitude-steered array at the heart of a real-time volumetric sonar imaging system is described, giving the design of the array and describing how data are collected and processed to form images. An analysis of lateral resolution in the vertical and horizontal directions shows that resolution is improved in the direction of frequency separation over systems that use a broad transmit beam. Images from simulated data are presented.

  16. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forde, Elizabeth, E-mail: eforde@tcd.ie [Discipline of Radiation Therapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Booth, Jeremy [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Leech, Michelle [Discipline of Radiation Therapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam's central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued.

  17. Flexible MXene/Graphene Films for Ultrafast Supercapacitors with Outstanding Volumetric Capacitance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China); Ren, Chang E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maleski, Kathleen [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hatter, Christine B. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Anasori, Babak [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Urbankowski, Patrick [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sarycheva, Asya [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    A strategy to prepare flexible and conductive MXene/graphene (reduced graphene oxide, rGO) supercapacitor electrodes by using electrostatic self-assembly between positively charged rGO modified with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and negatively charged titanium carbide MXene nanosheets is presented. After electrostatic assembly, rGO nanosheets are inserted in-between MXene layers. As a result, the self-restacking of MXene nanosheets is effectively prevented, leading to a considerably increased interlayer spacing. Accelerated diffusion of electrolyte ions enables more electroactive sites to become accessible. The freestanding MXene/rGO-5 wt% electrode displays a volumetric capacitance of 1040 F cm–3 at a scan rate of 2 mV s–1, an impressive rate capability with 61% capacitance retention at 1 V s–1 and long cycle life. Moreover, the fabricated binder-free symmetric supercapacitor shows an ultrahigh volumetric energy density of 32.6 Wh L–1, which is among the highest values reported for carbon and MXene based materials in aqueous electrolytes. Furthermore, this work provides fundamental insight into the effect of interlayer spacing on the electrochemical performance of 2D hybrid materials and sheds light on the design of next-generation flexible, portable and highly integrated supercapacitors with high volumetric and rate performances.

  18. Volumetric dimensional changes of dental light-cured dimethacrylate resins after sorption of water or ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M; Vouvoudi, Evagelia Ch

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of water and ethanol sorption on the volumetric dimensional changes of resins prepared by light curing of Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA or D(3)MA. The resin specimens (15mm diameterx1mm height) were immersed in water or ethanol 37+/-1 degrees C for 30 days. Volumetric changes of specimens were obtained via accurate mass measurements using Archimedes principle. The specimens were reconditioned by dry storage in an oven at 37+/-1 degrees C until constant mass was obtained and then immersed in water or ethanol for 30 days. The volumetric changes of specimens were determined and compared to those obtained from the first sorption. Resins showed similar volume increase during the first and second sorptions of water or ethanol. The volume increase due to water absorption is in the following order: poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-Bis-EMA>poly-D(3)MA. On the contrary, the order in ethanol is poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-EMA approximately poly-D(3)MA. The volume increase was found to depend linearly on the amount of water or ethanol absorbed. In the choice of monomers for preparation of composite resin matrix the volume increase in the resin after immersion in water or ethanol must be taken into account. Resins of Bis-EMA and D(3)MA showed the lowest values.

  19. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  20. A Solar Volumetric Receiver: Influence of Absorbing Cells Configuration on Device Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal performance of a solar volumetric receiver incorporating the different cell geometric configurations is investigated. Triangular, hexagonal, and rectangular absorbing cells are incorporated in the analysis. The fluid volume fraction, which is the ratio of the volume of the working fluid over the total volume of solar volumetric receiver, is introduced to assess the effect of cell size on the heat transfer rates in the receiver. In this case, reducing the fluid volume fraction corresponds to increasing cell size in the receiver. SiC is considered as the cell material, and air is used as the working fluid in the receiver. The Lambert's Beer law is incorporated to account for the solar absorption in the receiver. A finite element method is used to solve the governing equation of flow and heat transfer. It is found that the fluid volume fraction has significant effect on the flow field in the solar volumetric receiver, which also modifies thermal field in the working fluid. The triangular absorbing cell gives rise to improved effectiveness of the receiver and then follows the hexagonal and rectangular cells. The second law efficiency of the receiver remains high when hexagonal cells are used. This occurs for the fluid volume fraction ratio of 0.5.

  1. Dental volumetric tomographical evaluation of location and prevalence of maxillary sinus septa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Damlar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and location of maxillary sinus septa with the help of dental volumetric tomography. Methods: 760 patients’ 1520 maxillary sinus were evaluated by dental volumetric tomography for detecting maxillary sinus septa. Maxillary sinus was divided into 3 zones (anterior, middle and posterior zones while location of the maxillary sinus septa. Results: 47 of maxillary sinus septa existed in the anterior zone (24.7%, 35 of them in the middle zone (18.4% and 108 of them in the posterior region (56.8%. Conclusion: The formation of the maxillary sinus septa was affected by the existence or lack of the teeth. Correct detection of the presence of maxillary sinus septa was important prior to sinus lifting and dental implant surgery. Dental volumetric tomographical evaluation of maxillary sinus septa was more useful for a correct diagnosis and treatment planning. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 467-474

  2. VOLUMETRIC ERROR COMPENSATION IN FIVE-AXIS CNC MACHINING CENTER THROUGH KINEMATICS MODELING OF GEOMETRIC ERROR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooyan Vahidi Pashsaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy of a five-axis CNC machine tool is affected by a vast number of error sources. This paper investigates volumetric error modeling and its compensation to the basis for creation of new tool path for improvement of work pieces accuracy. The volumetric error model of a five-axis machine tool with the configuration RTTTR (tilting head B-axis and rotary table in work piece side A΄ was set up taking into consideration rigid body kinematics and homogeneous transformation matrix, in which 43 error components are included. Volumetric error comprises 43 error components that can separately reduce geometrical and dimensional accuracy of work pieces. The machining accuracy of work piece is guaranteed due to the position of the cutting tool center point (TCP relative to the work piece. The cutting tool is deviated from its ideal position relative to the work piece and machining error is experienced. For compensation process detection of the present tool path and analysis of the RTTTR five-axis CNC machine tools geometrical error, translating current position of component to compensated positions using the Kinematics error model, converting newly created component to new tool paths using the compensation algorithms and finally editing old G-codes using G-code generator algorithm have been employed.

  3. Three-dimensional linear and volumetric analysis of maxillary sinus pneumatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham M. Hamdy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the anatomical variability related to the maxillary sinus, its intimate relation to the maxillary posterior teeth and because of all the implications that pneumatization may possess, three-dimensional assessment of maxillary sinus pneumatization is of most usefulness. The aim of this study is to analyze the maxillary sinus dimensions both linearly and volumetrically using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT to assess the maxillary sinus pneumatization. Retrospective analysis of 30 maxillary sinuses belonging to 15 patients’ CBCT scans was performed. Linear and volumetric measurements were conducted and statistically analyzed. The maximum craniocaudal extension of the maxillary sinus was located around the 2nd molar in 93% of the sinuses, while the maximum mediolateral and antroposterior extensions of the maxillary sinus were located at the level of root of zygomatic complex in 90% of sinuses. There was a high correlation between the linear measurements of the right and left sides, where the antroposterior extension of the sinus at level of the nasal floor had the largest correlation (0.89. There was also a high correlation between the Simplant and geometric derived maxillary sinus volumes for both right and left sides (0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The relations of the sinus floor can be accurately assessed on the different orthogonal images obtained through 3D CBCT scan. The geometric method offered a much cheaper, easier, and less sophisticated substitute; therefore, with the availability of software, 3D volumetric measurements are more facilitated.

  4. The importance of accurate anatomic assessment for the volumetric analysis of the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bonilha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide range of values reported in volumetric studies of the amygdala. The use of single plane thick magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may prevent the correct visualization of anatomic landmarks and yield imprecise results. To assess whether there is a difference between volumetric analysis of the amygdala performed with single plane MRI 3-mm slices and with multiplanar analysis of MRI 1-mm slices, we studied healthy subjects and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We performed manual delineation of the amygdala on T1-weighted inversion recovery, 3-mm coronal slices and manual delineation of the amygdala on three-dimensional volumetric T1-weighted images with 1-mm slice thickness. The data were compared using a dependent t-test. There was a significant difference between the volumes obtained by the coronal plane-based measurements and the volumes obtained by three-dimensional analysis (P < 0.001. An incorrect estimate of the amygdala volume may preclude a correct analysis of the biological effects of alterations in amygdala volume. Three-dimensional analysis is preferred because it is based on more extensive anatomical assessment and the results are similar to those obtained in post-mortem studies.

  5. Brain stem and cerebellum volumetric analysis of Machado Joseph disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S T Camargos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3(MJD/SCA3, is the most frequent late onset spinocerebellar ataxia and results from a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 gene. Previous studies have found correlation between atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem with age and CAG repeats, although no such correlation has been found with disease duration and clinical manifestations. In this study we test the hypothesis that atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem in MJD/SCA3 is related to clinical severity, disease duration and CAG repeat length as well as to other variables such as age and ICARS (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Whole brain high resolution MRI and volumetric measurement with cranial volume normalization were obtained from 15 MJD/SCA3 patients and 15 normal, age and sex-matchedcontrols. We applied ICARS and compared the score with volumes and CAG number, disease duration and age. We found significant correlation of both brain stem and cerebellar atrophy with CAG repeat length, age, disease duration and degree of disability. The Spearman rank correlation was stronger with volumetric reduction of the cerebellum than with brain stem. Our data allow us to conclude that volumetric analysis might reveal progressive degeneration after disease onset, which in turn is linked to both age and number of CAG repeat expansions in SCA 3.

  6. Extent of Endoscopic Resection for Anterior Skull Base Tumors: An MRI-Based Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewski, Ian J; Avey, Gregory; Ahmed, Azam; Leonhard, Lucas; Hoffman, Matthew R; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-06-01

    Objective  To determine the volume of ventral skull base tumor removed following endoscopic endonasal (EEA) resection using MRI-based volumetric analysis and to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of such analysis. Design  Retrospective case series. Setting  Academic tertiary care hospital. Participants  EEA patients November 2012 to August 2015. Main Outcome Measures  Volumetric analysis of pre- and immediately postoperative MR imaging was performed independently by two investigators. The percentage of total tumor resected was evaluated according to resection goal and tumor type. Results  A total of 39 patients underwent resection. Intraclass correlation coefficients between the raters were 0.9988 for preoperative and 0.9819 for postoperative images. Tumors (and average percentage removed) included 17 nonsecreting pituitary adenomas (95.3%), 8 secreting pituitary adenomas (86.2%), 4 meningiomas (81.6%), 3 olfactory neuroblastomas (100%), 2 craniopharyngiomas (100%), 1 large B-cell lymphoma (90.5%), 1 germ cell neoplasm (48.3), 1 benign fibrous connective tissue mass (93.4%), 1 epidermoid cyst (68.4%), and 1 chordoma (100%). For tumors treated with intent for gross total resection, 96.9 ± 4.8% was removed. Conclusion  EEAs achieved tumor resection rates of ∼97% when total resection was attempted. The radiographic finding of residual tumor is of uncertain clinical significance. The volumetric analysis employed in this study demonstrated high inter-rater reliability and could facilitate further study.

  7. CT volumetric analysis of pleural effusions: a comparison with thoracentesis volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, David; Hanley, Michael; Olazagasti, Juan M

    2015-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare computed tomography (CT) volumetric analysis of pleural effusions with thoracentesis volumes. The secondary objective of this study was to compare subjective grading of pleural effusion size with thoracentesis volumes. This was a retrospective study of 67 patients with free-flowing pleural effusions who underwent therapeutic thoracentesis. CT volumetric analysis was performed on all patients; the CT volumes were compared with the thoracentesis volumes. In addition, the subjective grading of pleural effusion size was compared with the thoracentesis volumes. The average difference between CT volume and thoracentesis volume was 9.4 mL (1.3%) ± 290 mL (30%); these volumes were not statistically different (P = .79, paired two-tailed Student's t-test). The thoracentesis volume of a "small," "moderate," and "large" pleural effusion, as graded on chest CT, was found to be approximately 410 ± 260 cc, 770 ± 270 mL and 1370 ± 650 mL, respectively; the thoracentesis volume of a "small," "moderate," and "large" pleural effusion, as graded on chest radiograph, was found to be approximately 610 ± 320 mL, 1040 ± 460 mL, and 1530 ± 830 mL, respectively. CT volumetric analysis is an accessible tool that can be used to accurately quantify the size of pleural effusions. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative volumetric analysis of conventional MRI response in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Mischel, Paul S.; Pope, Whitney B.

    2011-01-01

    Although the effects of bevacizumab on magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are well documented, to our knowledge, no studies have explicitly quantified the volumetric changes resulting from initial treatment, nor have there been studies examining the ability for volumetric changes in conventional MRI to predict progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In the current study, we retrospectively examined volumetric changes on conventional MRI scans in 84 patients with recurrent GBM. MRIs were obtained before (mean, 11 days) and after (mean, 42 days) treatment with bevacizumab. The volume of abnormal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity, the volume of contrast enhancement, and the ratio of the 2 were quantified for each patient before and after initial treatment. Results demonstrated that initial treatment with bevacizumab resulted in a significant decrease in both the volume of abnormal FLAIR signal and the volume of contrast enhancement. Initial, residual, and change in FLAIR volume were not predictive of PFS or OS. Initial contrast-enhancing volume was predictive of PFS but not OS. The pretreatment relative nonenhancing tumor ratio, defined as the ratio of FLAIR to contrast-enhancing volume, was found to be predictive of both PFS and OS. PMID:21324937

  9. Crumpled Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Supercapacitors with High Gravimetric and Volumetric Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ding, Bing; Xu, Yunling; Shen, Laifa; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2015-10-14

    Graphene is considered a promising electrochemical capacitors electrode material due to its high surface area and high electrical conductivity. However, restacking interactions between graphene nanosheets significantly decrease the ion-accessible surface area and impede electronic and ionic transfer. This would, in turn, severely hinder the realization of high energy density. Herein, we report a strategy for preparation of few-layer graphene material with abundant crumples and high-level nitrogen doping. The two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (CNG) feature high ion-available surface area, excellent electronic and ion transfer properties, and high packing density, permitting the CNG electrode to exhibit excellent electrochemical performance. In ionic liquid electrolyte, the CNG electrode exhibits gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 128 F g(-1) and 98 F cm(-3), respectively, achieving gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 56 Wh kg(-1) and 43 Wh L(-1). The preparation strategy described here provides a new approach for developing a graphene-based supercapacitor with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities.

  10. Automatic left and right lung separation using free-formed surface fitting on volumetric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Joo; Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Park, Joo Young

    2014-08-01

    This study presents a completely automated method for separating the left and right lungs using free-formed surface fitting on volumetric computed tomography (CT). The left and right lungs are roughly divided using iterative 3-dimensional morphological operator and a Hessian matrix analysis. A point set traversing between the initial left and right lungs is then detected with a Euclidean distance transform to determine the optimal separating surface, which is then modeled from the point set using a free-formed surface-fitting algorithm. Subsequently, the left and right lung volumes are smoothly and directly separated using the separating surface. The performance of the proposed method was estimated by comparison with that of a human expert on 44 CT examinations. For all data sets, averages of the root mean square surface distance, maximum surface distance, and volumetric overlap error between the results of the automatic and the manual methods were 0.032 mm, 2.418 mm, and 0.017 %, respectively. Our study showed the feasibility of automatically separating the left and right lungs by identifying the 3D continuous separating surface on volumetric chest CT images.

  11. Rapid volumetric imaging with Bessel-Beam three-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingying; Huang, Xiaoshuai; Gou, Dongzhou; Zeng, Jianzhi; Chen, Guoqing; Pang, Meijun; Hu, Yanhui; Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhuan; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Heping; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chris; Li, Yulong; Chen, Liangyi; Wang, Aimin

    2018-01-01

    Owing to its tissue-penetration ability, multi-photon fluorescence microscopy allows for the high-resolution, non-invasive imaging of deep tissue in vivo; the recently developed three-photon microscopy (3PM) has extended the depth of high-resolution, non-invasive functional imaging of mouse brains to beyond 1.0 mm. However, the low repetition rate of femtosecond lasers that are normally used in 3PM limits the temporal resolution of point-scanning three-photon microscopy. To increase the volumetric imaging speed of 3PM, we propose a combination of an axially elongated needle-like Bessel-beam with three-photon excitation (3PE) to image biological samples with an extended depth of focus. We demonstrate the higher signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of the Bessel-beam 3PM compared to the two-photon version both theoretically and experimentally. Finally, we perform simultaneous calcium imaging of brain regions at different axial locations in live fruit flies and rapid volumetric imaging of neuronal structures in live mouse brains. These results highlight the unique advantage of conducting rapid volumetric imaging with a high SBR in the deep brain in vivo using scanning Bessel-3PM.

  12. Microfabricated pseudocapacitors using Ni(OH)2 electrodes exhibit remarkable volumetric capacitance and energy density

    KAUST Repository

    Kurra, Narendra

    2014-09-10

    Metal hydroxide based microfabricated pseudocapacitors with impressive volumetric stack capacitance and energy density are demonstrated. A combination of top-down photolithographic process and bottom-up chemical synthesis is employed to fabricate the micro-pseudocapacitors (μ-pseudocapacitors). The resulting Ni(OH)2-based devices show several excellent characteristics including high-rate redox activity up to 500 V s-1 and an areal cell capacitance of 16 mF cm-2 corresponding to a volumetric stack capacitance of 325 F cm-3. This volumetric capacitance is two-fold higher than carbon and metal oxide based μ-supercapacitors with interdigitated electrode architecture. Furthermore, these μ-pseudocapacitors show a maximum energy density of 21 mWh cm-3, which is superior to the Li-based thin film batteries. The heterogeneous growth of Ni(OH)2 over the Ni surface during the chemical bath deposition is found to be the key parameter in the formation of uniform monolithic Ni(OH)2 mesoporous nanosheets with vertical orientation, responsible for the remarkable properties of the fabricated devices. Additionally, functional tandem configurations of the μ-pseudocapacitors are shown to be capable of powering a light-emitting diode.

  13. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Elizabeth; Booth, Jeremy; Leech, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam׳s central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Volumetric MRI and MRS and early motor development of infants born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadin, Erlita; Lobo, Michele; Paul, David A; Sem, Kanik; Steiner, Karl V; Mackley, Amy; Anzilotti, Kert; Galloway, Cole

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in infants born less than 30 weeks gestation and early motor development at 6 months adjusted age. Twenty infants born preterm and 4 born at term (control) underwent MRI with volumetric analysis and MRS prior to neonatal intensive care unit discharge. Infants were assessed using the Bayley Scale of Infant Development at 6 months adjusted age. At 6 months, infants born preterm with low motor scores had a reduction in their subcortical gray matter. No differences were detected in other brain structures. N-acetylaspartate/choline correlated with white matter (R = 0.45, P = .03), gray matter (R = 0.43, P = .04), and cerebellar volume (R = 0.6, P = .002) but not with 6-month motor performance. There is an association between diminished subcortical gray matter volume and low motor scores. Our data suggest that volumetric MRI performed prior to hospital discharge may have some role in counseling parents about potential motor delays.

  15. Amphiphilic ligand exchange reaction-induced supercapacitor electrodes with high volumetric and scalable areal capacitances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Donghyeon; Heo, Yeongbeom; Cheong, Sanghyuk; Ko, Yongmin; Cho, Jinhan

    2018-05-01

    We introduce high-performance supercapacitor electrodes with ternary components prepared from consecutive amphiphilic ligand-exchange-based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly among amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NH2-MWCNTs) in alcohol, oleic acid-stabilized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (OA-Fe3O4 NPs) in toluene, and semiconducting polymers (PEDOT:PSS) in water. The periodic insertion of semiconducting polymers within the (OA-Fe3O4 NP/NH2-MWCNT)n multilayer-coated indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode enhanced the volumetric and areal capacitances up to 408 ± 4 F cm-3 and 8.79 ± 0.06 mF cm-2 at 5 mV s-1, respectively, allowing excellent cycling stability (98.8% of the initial capacitance after 5000 cycles) and good rate capability. These values were higher than those of the OA-Fe3O4 NP/NH2-MWCNT multilayered electrode without semiconducting polymer linkers (volumetric capacitance ∼241 ± 4 F cm-3 and areal capacitance ∼1.95 ± 0.03 mF cm-2) at the same scan rate. Furthermore, when the asymmetric supercapacitor cells (ASCs) were prepared using OA-Fe3O4 NP- and OA-MnO NP-based ternary component electrodes, they displayed high volumetric energy (0.36 mW h cm-3) and power densities (820 mW cm-3).

  16. Volumetric erosion rate reduction of Hall thruster channel wall during ion sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Daren; Li Yuquan

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of the volumetric erosion rate reduction of the channel wall were studied theoretically and numerically in order to explain the reasons why the volumetric erosion rate of Hall thruster channel decreases over time. The results of the theoretical analysis indicate that the variation of three sputtering conditions results from the increase in the tilt angle and the erosion depth of the channel wall erosion surface during the surface evolution process. The mass loss of the Hall thruster channel wall material is a reduction process due to which the ion flux divergent angle is smaller than the value that corresponds to the sufficient condition of the reduction process. The simulation results of the channel wall erosion process qualitatively agree well with the experimental results, and the numerical analysis of the reduction process shows that the magnitude orders of three sputtering condition variation effects on the volumetric erosion rate reduction are the same, and the reduction rate reaches its maximum value in the initial operation period when the ion radiation angle equals the optimum sputtering rate angle. This work provides theoretical fundamentals of the channel wall erosion reduction process and it can be used for the lifetime prediction and optimum design of the Hall thruster

  17. Fast Industrial Inspection of Optical Thin Film Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faizan Shirazi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An application of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT was demonstrated for a fast industrial inspection of an optical thin film panel. An optical thin film sample similar to a liquid crystal display (LCD panel was examined. Two identical SD-OCT systems were utilized for parallel scanning of a complete sample in half time. Dual OCT inspection heads were utilized for transverse (fast scanning, while a stable linear motorized translational stage was used for lateral (slow scanning. The cross-sectional and volumetric images of an optical thin film sample were acquired to detect the defects in glass and other layers that are difficult to observe using visual inspection methods. The rapid inspection enabled by this setup led to the early detection of product defects on the manufacturing line, resulting in a significant improvement in the quality assurance of industrial products.

  18. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  19. HF and VHF Spectra of Fast Breakdown Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Tilles, J.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Dwyer, J. R.; Brown, R. G.; Wilson, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    The recent discovery of fast positive breakdown (FPB) as the underlying process of narrow bipolar events (NBEs) or compact intracloud discharges [Rison et al., Nat. Commun., 7, 10721, 2016] is an important step towards understanding why NBEs radiate strongly in high frequency (HF, 3-30 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 30-300 MHz) bands. Rison et al. [2016] has further hypothesized that fast positive breakdown is a system of volumetrically distributed streamers. The current theory of radio emissions from streamers is based on the concept of accelerating and expanding streamers. An expanding streamer carries an exponentially increasing current, and its resulting electromagnetic radiation extends to HF and VHF bands, when the external electric field supporting its propagation varies from 0.5Ek to 1.5Ek at 9 km altitude, where Ek is the conventional breakdown threshold field [Shi et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121, 7284, 2016]. It should be noted that the spectrum of NBEs below 50 MHz is available in the literature [Willett et al., J. Geophys. Res., 94, 16255, 1989], but the spectrum beyond 50 MHz is not well known currently. The broadband, high-speed radio interferometer (INTF) used by Rison et al. [2016] was deployed at Kennedy Space Center, Florida to collect data from July to October in 2016. Many NBEs were recorded. The majority of the NBEs are caused by FPB, similar to those reported by Rison et al. [2016], but there exist a few cases, where the breakdown process propagates in the opposite direction expected of fast positive breakdown and is termed fast negative breakdown [Tilles et al., AE12A-03, AGU Fall Meeting, 2016]. In this talk, we will analyze the spectra of fast breakdown of both polarities in the frequency band of the INTF, 20-80 MHz, and compare the results with published NBE spectra. We will also apply the technique developed by Dwyer and Cummer [J. Geophys. Res., 118, 3769, 2013] to synthesize the radio pulse and spectrum of a system of streamers

  20. Medical students' cognitive load in volumetric image interpretation : Insights from human-computer interaction and eye movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijfzand, Bobby G.; Van Der Schaaf, Marieke F.; Kirschner, Femke C.; Ravesloot, Cécile J.; Van Der Gijp, Anouk; Vincken, Koen L.

    2016-01-01

    Medical image interpretation is moving from using 2D- to volumetric images, thereby changing the cognitive and perceptual processes involved. This is expected to affect medical students' experienced cognitive load, while learning image interpretation skills. With two studies this explorative

  1. Fast pitch softball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M C; Brown, B R; Bloom, J A

    2001-01-01

    The popularity of fast pitch softball in the US and throughout the world is well documented. Along with this popularity, there has been a concomitant increase in the number of injuries. Nearly 52% of cases qualify as major disabling injuries requiring 3 weeks or more of treatment and 2% require surgery. Interestingly, 75% of injuries occur during away games and approximately 31% of traumas occur during nonpositional and conditioning drills. Injuries range from contusions and tendinitis to ligamentous disorders and fractures. Although head and neck traumas account for 4 to 12% of cases, upper extremity traumas account for 23 to 47% of all injuries and up to 19% of cases involve the knee. Approximately 34 to 42% of injuries occur when the athlete collides with another individual or object. Other factors involved include the quality of playing surface, athlete's age and experience level, and the excessive physical demands associated with the sport. Nearly 24% of injuries involve base running and are due to poor judgement, sliding technique, current stationary base design, unorthodox joint and extremity position during ground impact and catching of cleats. The increasing prevalence of overtraining syndrome among athletes has been attributed to an unclear definition of an optimal training zone, poor communication between player and coach, and the limited ability of bone and connective tissue to quickly respond to match the demands of the sport. This has led routinely to arm, shoulder and lumbar instability, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and time loss injuries in 45% of pitching staff during a single season. Specific attention to a safer playing environment, coaching and player education, and sport-specific training and conditioning would reduce the risk, rate and severity of fast pitch traumas. Padding of walls, backstops, rails and dugout areas, as well as minimising use of indoor facilities, is suggested to decrease the number of collision

  2. Continuous assessment of carotid intima-media thickness applied to estimate a volumetric compliance using B-mode ultrasound sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascaner, A F; Craiem, D; Casciaro, M E; Graf, S; Danielo, R; Guevara, E

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that the carotid artery wall had significant movements not only in the radial but also in the longitudinal direction during the cardiac cycle. Accordingly, the idea that longitudinal elongations could be systematically neglected for compliance estimations became controversial. Assuming a dynamic change in vessel length, the standard measurement of cross-sectional compliance can be revised. In this work, we propose to estimate a volumetric compliance based on continuous measurements of carotid diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) from B-mode ultrasound sequences. Assuming the principle of conservation of the mass of wall volume (compressibility equals zero), a temporal longitudinal elongation can be calculated to estimate a volumetric compliance. Moreover, elongations can also be estimated allowing small compressibility factors to model some wall leakage. The cross-sectional and the volumetric compliance were estimated in 45 healthy volunteers and 19 asymptomatic patients. The standard measurement underestimated the volumetric compliance by 25% for young volunteers (p < 0.01) and 17% for patients (p < 0.05). When compressibility factors different from zero were allowed, volunteers and patients reached values of 9% and 4%, respectively. We conclude that a simultaneous assessment of carotid diameter and IMT can be employed to estimate a volumetric compliance incorporating a longitudinal elongation. The cross-sectional compliance, that neglects the change in vessel length, underestimates the volumetric compliance. (paper)

  3. Fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, E.K.

    1978-05-01

    Fast neutron capture cross section data of natural Mo are presented; a feasibility study on integral neutron spectrum measurements in the low-energy region of large LMFBR's is discussed. The post-irradiation examination results of the fuel pin of loss-of-cooling experiment R63-L18 and the progress made with preparations for the HFR-TOP transient overpower experiments on fuel pins under irradiation in the pool-side facility of the HFR are reported on. An exact determination of the thermochemical properties of uranyl halides is discussed. Results of mechanical tests on stainless steel DIN 1.4948 specimens are given. Aerosol leakages through blocks of concrete are determined. In the field of heat transfer and hydraulics, data on fully-developed turbulent flows in rod bundles have been obtained using the code VITESSE, results of Laser Doppler Anemometer measurements performed on water flowing through a square channel are given and progress is reported on the study of local boiling occurring behind a flow blockage in a 28-rod bundle. (Auth.)

  4. The ATLAS Fast Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, Guido; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The use of tracking information at the trigger level in the LHC Run II period is crucial for the trigger an data acquisition (TDAQ) system. The tracking precision is in fact important to identify specific decay products of the Higgs boson or new phenomena, a well as to distinguish the contributions coming from many contemporary collisions that occur at every bunch crossing. However, the track reconstruction is among the most demanding tasks performed by the TDAQ computing farm; in fact, full reconstruction at full Level-1 trigger accept rate (100 KHz) is not possible. In order to overcome this limitation, the ATLAS experiment is planning the installation of a specific processor: the Fast Tracker (FTK), which is aimed at achieving this goal. The FTK is a pipeline of high performance electronic, based on custom and commercial devices, which is expected to reconstruct, with high resolution, the trajectories of charged tracks with a transverse momentum above 1 GeV, using the ATLAS inner tracker information. Patte...

  5. Fast ignition breakeven scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2005-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations have been performed to determine scaling laws for fast ignition break even of a hot spot formed by energetic particles created by a short pulse laser. Hot spot break even is defined to be when the fusion yield is equal to the total energy deposited in the hot spot through both the initial compression and the subsequent heating. In these simulations, only a small portion of a previously compressed mass of deuterium-tritium fuel is heated on a short time scale, i.e., the hot spot is tamped by the cold dense fuel which surrounds it. The hot spot tamping reduces the minimum energy required to obtain break even as compared to the situation where the entire fuel mass is heated, as was assumed in a previous study [S. A. Slutz, R. A. Vesey, I. Shoemaker, T. A. Mehlhorn, and K. Cochrane, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3483 (2004)]. The minimum energy required to obtain hot spot break even is given approximately by the scaling law E T = 7.5(ρ/100) -1.87 kJ for tamped hot spots, as compared to the previously reported scaling of E UT = 15.3(ρ/100) -1.5 kJ for untamped hotspots. The size of the compressed fuel mass and the focusability of the particles generated by the short pulse laser determines which scaling law to use for an experiment designed to achieve hot spot break even

  6. Fast Aerial Video Stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly efficient and robust stitching of aerial video captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs is a challenging problem in the field of robot vision. Existing commercial image stitching systems have seen success with offline stitching tasks, but they cannot guarantee high-speed performance when dealing with online aerial video sequences. In this paper, we present a novel system which has an unique ability to stitch high-frame rate aerial video at a speed of 150 frames per second (FPS. In addition, rather than using a high-speed vision platform such as FPGA or CUDA, our system is running on a normal personal computer. To achieve this, after the careful comparison of the existing invariant features, we choose the FAST corner and binary descriptor for efficient feature extraction and representation, and present a spatial and temporal coherent filter to fuse the UAV motion information into the feature matching. The proposed filter can remove the majority of feature correspondence outliers and significantly increase the speed of robust feature matching by up to 20 times. To achieve a balance between robustness and efficiency, a dynamic key frame-based stitching framework is used to reduce the accumulation errors. Extensive experiments on challenging UAV datasets demonstrate that our approach can break through the speed limitation and generate an accurate stitching image for aerial video stitching tasks.

  7. Fast convolutions meet Montgomery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Preda

    2008-06-01

    Arithmetic in large ring and field extensions is an important problem of symbolic computation, and it consists essentially of the combination of one multiplication and one division in the underlying ring. Methods are known for replacing one division by two short multiplications in the underlying ring, which can be performed essentially by using convolutions. However, while using school-book multiplication, modular multiplication may be grouped into 2 mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) operations (where mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) denotes the number of operations of one multiplication in the underlying ring), the short multiplication problem is an important obstruction to convolution. It raises the costs in that case to 3 mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) . In this paper we give a method for understanding and bypassing this problem, thus reducing the costs of ring arithmetic to roughly 2mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) when also using fast convolutions. The algorithms have been implemented with results which fit well the theoretical prediction and which shall be presented in a separate paper.

  8. Fast breeder fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    This contribution is prepared for the answer to the questionnaire of working group 5, subgroup B. B.1. is the short review of the fast breeder fuel cycles based on the reference large commercial Japanese LMFBR. The LMFBRs are devided into two types. FBR-A is the reactor to be used before 2000, and its burnup and breeding ratio are relatively low. The reference fuel cycle requirement is calculated based on the FBR-A. FBR-B is the one to be used after 2000, and its burnup and breeding ratio are relatively high. B.2. is basic FBR fuel reprocessing scheme emphasizing the differences with LWR reprocessing. This scheme is based on the conceptual design and research and development work on the small scale LMFBR reprocessing facility of Japan. The facility adopts a conventional PUREX process except head end portions. The report also describes the effects of technical modifications of conventional reprocessing flow sheets, and the problems to be solved before the adoption of these alternatives

  9. Fast reactor programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... The FBR programme since 1985 till 2030 is highlighted focussing on the current status and future direction of fast breeder test reactor (FBTR), prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) and FBR-1 and 2. Design and technological challenges of PFBR and design and safety targets with means to achieve the ...

  10. Oil Analysis by Fast DSC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetten, I.A.; Herwaarden, A.W.; Splinter, R.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal analysis of Olive and Sunflower Oil is done by Fast DSC to evaluate its potential to replace DSC for adulteration detection. DSC measurements take hours, Fast DSC minutes. Peak temperatures of the crystallisation peak in cooling for different Olive and Sunflower Oils are both comparable to

  11. Fasting and nonfasting lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events.......Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events....

  12. Fast-prototyping of VLSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucier, G.; Read, E.

    1987-01-01

    Fast-prototyping will be a reality in the very near future if both straightforward design methods and fast manufacturing facilities are available. This book focuses, first, on the motivation for fast-prototyping. Economic aspects and market considerations are analysed by European and Japanese companies. In the second chapter, new design methods are identified, mainly for full custom circuits. Of course, silicon compilers play a key role and the introduction of artificial intelligence techniques sheds a new light on the subject. At present, fast-prototyping on gate arrays or on standard cells is the most conventional technique and the third chapter updates the state-of-the art in this area. The fourth chapter concentrates specifically on the e-beam direct-writing for submicron IC technologies. In the fifth chapter, a strategic point in fast-prototyping, namely the test problem is addressed. The design for testability and the interface to the test equipment are mandatory to fulfill the test requirement for fast-prototyping. Finally, the last chapter deals with the subject of education when many people complain about the lack of use of fast-prototyping in higher education for VLSI

  13. Characterization of three dimensional volumetric strain distribution during passive tension of the human tibialis anterior using Cine Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Murthy, Naveen S; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2016-10-03

    Intramuscular pressure correlates strongly with muscle tension and is a promising tool for quantifying individual muscle force. However, clinical application is impeded by measurement variability that is not fully understood. Previous studies point to regional differences in IMP, specifically increasing pressure with muscle depth. Based on conservation of mass, intramuscular pressure and volumetric strain distributions may be inversely related. Therefore, we hypothesized volumetric strain would decrease with muscle depth. To test this we quantified 3D volumetric strain in the tibialis anterior of 12 healthy subjects using Cine Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Cine Phase Contrast data were collected while a custom apparatus rotated the subjects' ankle continuously between neutral and plantarflexion. A T2-weighted image stack was used to define the resting tibials anterior position. Custom and commercial post-processing software were used to quantify the volumetric strain distribution. To characterize regional strain changes, the muscle was divided into superior-inferior sections and either medial-lateral or anterior-posterior slices. Mean volumetric strain was compared across the sections and slices. As hypothesized, volumetric strain demonstrated regional differences with a decreasing trend from the anterior (superficial) to the posterior (deep) muscle regions. Statistical tests showed significant main effects and interactions of superior-inferior and anterior-posterior position as well as superior-inferior and medial-lateral position on regional strain. These data support our hypothesis and imply a potential relationship between regional volumetric strain and intramuscular pressure. This finding may advance our understanding of intramuscular pressure variability sources and lead to more reliable measurement solutions in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The importance of volumetric canopy morphology when modelling drag around riparian vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetation has a significant impact on the hydraulic functioning of river systems. The bulk of past work concerned with modelling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple, and has generally neglected the complexity and porosity of natural plants, defined herein as the volumetric canopy morphology. However, the volumetric canopy morphology can influence the mean and turbulent properties of the flow, producing spatially heterogeneous downstream velocity fields. By explicitly accounting for this in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, and representing the plant as a porous blockage, complex flow structures and drag can be modelled. For a riparian species, Hebe odora, good agreement with flume measurements are found. Plant shear layer turbulence is shown to be dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Görtler-type vortices, generated through shear instability. Porous representations of the plants, that allow for flow to pass through the plant canopy interior, are compared against fully impermeable plant representations. Penetration of fluid through the canopy in the porous case resembles 'bleed-flow', and this results in a plant wake region that significantly differs from the impermeable case, which is characteristic of wake flow around a traditional bluff body. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the volumetric canopy morphology and porosity of natural plants has on the three-dimensional flow and in-stream drag, and enables a re-evaluation of vegetative flow resistance. The modelled results allow a species dependent Manning's n to be calculated, and this presents an opportunity to move away from the conventional methods of representing vegetation in hydraulic models, in favour of a more physically determined approach. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, and the increasing application of UAV imagery to map riparian vegetation, the numerical scheme developed here

  15. Comparing electronic probes for volumetric water content of low-density feathermoss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, P.P.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kane, D.L.; Harden, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - Feathermoss is ubiquitous in the boreal forest and across various land-cover types of the arctic and subarctic. A variety of affordable commercial sensors for soil moisture content measurement have recently become available and are in use in such regions, often in conjunction with fire-susceptibility or ecological studies. Few come supplied with calibrations suitable or suggested for soils high in organics. Aims to test seven of these sensors for use in feathermoss, seeking calibrations between sensor output and volumetric water content. Design/methodology/approach - Measurements from seven sensors installed in live, dead and burned feathermoss samples, drying in a controlled manner, were compared to moisture content measurements. Empirical calibrations of sensor output to water content were determined. Findings - Almost all of the sensors tested were suitable for measuring the moss sample water content, and a unique calibration for each sensor for this material is presented. Differences in sensor design lead to changes in sensitivity as a function of volumetric water content, affecting the spatial averaging over the soil measurement volume. Research limitations/implications - The wide range of electromagnetic sensors available include frequency and time domain designs with variations in wave guide and sensor geometry, the location of sensor electronics and operating frequency. Practical implications - This study provides information for extending the use of electromagnetic sensors to feathermoss. Originality/value - A comparison of volumetric water content sensor mechanics and design is of general interest to researchers measuring soil water content. In particular, researchers working in wetlands, boreal forests and tundra regions will be able to apply these results. ?? Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  16. Somatic mutations associated with MRI-derived volumetric features in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. [Emory University School of Medicine, Departments of Neurology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Biomedical Informatics, Atlanta, GA (United States); Grossmann, Patrick; Alexander, Brian M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Lee A.D. [Emory University School of Medicine, Biomedical Informatics, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Holder, Chad A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ligon, Keith L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Aerts, Hugo J.W.L. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Radiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    MR imaging can noninvasively visualize tumor phenotype characteristics at the macroscopic level. Here, we investigated whether somatic mutations are associated with and can be predicted by MRI-derived tumor imaging features of glioblastoma (GBM). Seventy-six GBM patients were identified from The Cancer Imaging Archive for whom preoperative T1-contrast (T1C) and T2-FLAIR MR images were available. For each tumor, a set of volumetric imaging features and their ratios were measured, including necrosis, contrast enhancing, and edema volumes. Imaging genomics analysis assessed the association of these features with mutation status of nine genes frequently altered in adult GBM. Finally, area under the curve (AUC) analysis was conducted to evaluate the predictive performance of imaging features for mutational status. Our results demonstrate that MR imaging features are strongly associated with mutation status. For example, TP53-mutated tumors had significantly smaller contrast enhancing and necrosis volumes (p = 0.012 and 0.017, respectively) and RB1-mutated tumors had significantly smaller edema volumes (p = 0.015) compared to wild-type tumors. MRI volumetric features were also found to significantly predict mutational status. For example, AUC analysis results indicated that TP53, RB1, NF1, EGFR, and PDGFRA mutations could each be significantly predicted by at least one imaging feature. MRI-derived volumetric features are significantly associated with and predictive of several cancer-relevant, drug-targetable DNA mutations in glioblastoma. These results may shed insight into unique growth characteristics of individual tumors at the macroscopic level resulting from molecular events as well as increase the use of noninvasive imaging in personalized medicine. (orig.)

  17. Esophageal-guided biopsy with volumetric laser endomicroscopy and laser cautery marking: a pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa J; Gora, Michalina J; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Arnason, Thomas; Sauk, Jenny; Gallagher, Kevin A; Kava, Lauren; Tan, Khay M; Soomro, Amna R; Gallagher, Timothy P; Gardecki, Joseph A; Bouma, Brett E; Rosenberg, Mireille; Nishioka, Norman S; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2014-06-01

    Biopsy surveillance protocols for the assessment of Barrett's esophagus can be subject to sampling errors, resulting in diagnostic uncertainty. Optical coherence tomography is a cross-sectional imaging technique that can be used to conduct volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) of the entire distal esophagus. We have developed a biopsy guidance platform that places endoscopically visible marks at VLE-determined biopsy sites. The objective of this study was to demonstrate in human participants the safety and feasibility of VLE-guided biopsy in vivo. A pilot feasibility study. Massachusetts General Hospital. A total of 22 participants were enrolled from January 2011 to June 2012 with a prior diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus. Twelve participants were used to optimize the laser marking parameters and the system platform. A total of 30 target sites were selected and marked in real-time by using the VLE-guided biopsy platform in the remaining 10 participants. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy. Endoscopic and VLE visibility, and accuracy of VLE diagnosis of the tissue between the laser cautery marks. There were no adverse events of VLE and laser marking. The optimal laser marking parameters were determined to be 2 seconds at 410 mW, with a mark separation of 6 mm. All marks made with these parameters were visible on endoscopy and VLE. The accuracies for diagnosing tissue in between the laser cautery marks by independent blinded readers for endoscopy were 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47%-83%), for VLE intent-to-biopsy images 93% (95% CI, 78%-99%), and for corrected VLE post-marking images 100% when compared with histopathology interpretations. This is a single-center feasibility study with a limited number of patients. Our results demonstrate that VLE-guided biopsy of the esophagus is safe and can be used to guide biopsy site selection based on the acquired volumetric optical coherence tomography imaging data. ( NCT01439633.). Copyright © 2014 American Society for

  18. Volumetric ultrasound image-forming using fully controllable 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bae-Hyung; Song, Jongkeun; Lee, Seunghun; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Youngil; Jeon, Taeho

    2013-03-01

    In real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers, a large number of the 2-D array elements pose challenges in fabricating and transferring signals from/into the system. This fabrication problem has been solved by using a silicon micromachining process for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays. For realtime 3-D ultrasound imaging, manipulating massive ultrasound data acquired from a large number of system channels is a challenge as is fabricating and interconnecting hundreds or thousands of elements of 2-D array with the imaging system's front-end (FE) electronics. Minimizing the number of transmitting and receiving elements and the firing events without degrading the image quality is one of the solutions to reduce the overall system complexity and improve the frame rate. We have been developing a real-time 3-D volumetric ultrasound imaging system using 2-D CMUT arrays by integrating FE electronics with a large number of 2-D array elements. Here, we explore a configuration method to design a scalable 2-D CMUT array and a new volumetric image-formation method to provide higher information rate of a volume image. In this paper, we present the 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays designed to reduce the overall system complexity, and a new volume scanning and image-forming method for real-time 3-D volumetric ultrasonic imaging using 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays. To evaluate our works, we performed from theoretical studies for point spread functions of the array configuration to phantom experiments with off-the-line images.

  19. Volumetric intake flow measurements of an IC engine using magnetic resonance velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenhammer, Daniel; Baum, Elias; Peterson, Brian; Böhm, Benjamin; Jung, Bernd; Grundmann, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements are performed in a 1:1 scale model of a single-cylinder optical engine to investigate the volumetric flow within the intake and cylinder geometry during flow induction. The model is a steady flow water analogue of the optical IC-engine with a fixed valve lift of mm to simulate the induction flow at crank-angle bTDC. This setup resembles a steady flow engine test bench configuration. MRV measurements are validated with phase-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed within the symmetry plane of the optical engine. Differences in experimental operating parameters between MRV and PIV measurements are well addressed. Comparison of MRV and PIV measurements is demonstrated using normalized mean velocity component profiles and showed excellent agreement in the upper portion of the cylinder chamber (i.e., mm). MRV measurements are further used to analyze the ensemble average volumetric flow within the 3D engine domain. Measurements are used to describe the 3D overflow and underflow behavior as the annular flow enters the cylinder chamber. Flow features such as the annular jet-like flows extending into the cylinder, their influence on large-scale in-cylinder flow motion, as well as flow recirculation zones are identified in 3D space. Inlet flow velocities are analyzed around the entire valve curtain perimeter to quantify percent mass flow rate entering the cylinder. Recirculation zones associated with the underflow are shown to reduce local mass flow rates up to 50 %. Recirculation zones are further analyzed in 3D space within the intake manifold and cylinder chamber. It is suggested that such recirculation zones can have large implications on cylinder charge filling and variations of the in-cylinder flow pattern. MRV is revealed to be an important diagnostic tool used to understand the volumetric induction flow within engine geometries and is potentially suited to evaluate flow changes due to intake

  20. Predicting clinical outcomes in chordoma patients receiving immunotherapy: a comparison between volumetric segmentation and RECIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenerty, Kathleen E.; Folio, Les R.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Marté, Jennifer L.; Gulley, James L.; Heery, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) are the current standard for evaluating disease progression or therapy response in patients with solid tumors. RECIST 1.1 calls for axial, longest-diameter (or perpendicular short axis of lymph nodes) measurements of a maximum of five tumors, which limits clinicians’ ability to adequately measure disease burden, especially in patients with irregularly shaped tumors. This is especially problematic in chordoma, a disease for which RECIST does not always adequately capture disease burden because chordoma tumors are typically irregularly shaped and slow-growing. Furthermore, primary chordoma tumors tend to be adjacent to vital structures in the skull or sacrum that, when compressed, lead to significant clinical consequences. Volumetric segmentation is a newer technology that allows tumor burden to be measured in three dimensions on either MR or CT. Here, we compared the ability of RECIST measurements and tumor volumes to predict clinical outcomes in a cohort of 21 chordoma patients receiving immunotherapy. There was a significant difference in radiologic time to progression Kaplan-Meier curves between clinical outcome groups using volumetric segmentation (P = 0.012) but not RECIST (P = 0.38). In several cases, changes in volume were earlier and more sensitive reflections of clinical status. RECIST is a useful evaluation method when obvious changes are occurring in patients with chordoma. However, in many cases, RECIST does not detect small changes, and volumetric assessment was capable of detecting changes and predicting clinical outcome earlier than RECIST. Although this study was small and retrospective, we believe our results warrant further research in this area

  1. Functional and Volumetric Analysis of the Pectoralis Major Muscle After Submuscular Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxo, Ana Claudia; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan; Pinheiro Rodrigues, Nadia Cristina; Salles, José Inácio; Amaral Cossich, Victor Rodrigues; de Castro, Claudio Cardoso; Aboudib, Jose Horacio; Marques, Ruy Garcia

    2017-06-01

    Dual plane breast augmentation is a technical variation of the submuscular plane described as a technique that reduces contour deformities due to contraction of the pectoralis major muscle and lower risk of double-bubble deformity associated with breast ptosis. Despite improvement in the aesthetic aspect, there is still no consensus whether this technique affects the function of the pectoralis major muscle. The aim of this study was to correlate functional with volumetric changes associated with dissection of the muscle origin in submuscular breast augmentation. Thirty women who desired to undergo breast augmentation were selected prospectively and randomly allocated to 2 groups: 10 patients in the control group and 20 patients in the interventional group, who underwent submuscular breast augmentation. Magnetic resonance imaging and volumetric software were used to assess muscle volume and isokinetic dynamometry was used to assess function of the pectoralis major muscle. Preoperative measurements were compared with those at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant decrease in muscle volume at 6 and 12 months follow-up. The isokinetic test conducted during adduction showed a significant difference in muscle strength between groups from baseline to the 12-month follow-up, and between the 3- and 12-month follow-up. No significant differences in muscle strength during abduction were observed from baseline to the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Submuscular breast augmentation reduced muscle strength during adduction 12 months after surgery, but without a significant correlation with volumetric muscle loss. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Correlation Between Aspirin Intake and Reduced Growth of Human Vestibular Schwannoma: Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandathil, Cherian K; Cunnane, Mary E; McKenna, Michael J; Curtin, Hugh D; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether people with sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) who take aspirin for unrelated medical reasons exhibit less tumor growth than nonaspirin users. We previously demonstrated the efficacy of salicylates in inhibiting VS growth in vitro, corroborating the results of our retrospective clinical study, which found halted VS growth (based on linear tumor measurements) in aspirin users. The current study evaluates this association using more accurate tumor volumetric measurements, and quantifies the degree of frequency-specific, VS-induced hearing loss. Retrospective analysis. Tertiary care hospital. Diagnosed with VS between 1980 and 2012, followed by serial magnetic resonance imaging for at least 1 year. Patient history of aspirin intake; change in VS volume over time of observation; frequency-specific, VS-induced audiometric threshold shifts. Of the 347 patients followed by serial magnetic resonance imaging scans, 86 had sequential scans available for 3D-segmented volumetric analysis for up to 11 years of follow-up (median 53 mo). Twenty-five (29%) had documented history of aspirin intake; 8 (32%) of these demonstrated VS growth. Of the 61 (71%) nonusers, 36 (59%) demonstrated growth. A significant inverse association was found among aspirin users and VS growth: odds ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.91. VS-induced audiometric thresholds shifts were larger above than below 2000 Hz. Our volumetric analysis of VS growth reaffirms the results of our linear analysis and suggests that aspirin may inhibit VS growth. The audiometric findings are consistent with the previously reported VS-induced predominantly high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

  3. Disorder-specific volumetric brain difference in adolescent major depressive disorder and bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P; Carrey, Normand; Langevin, Lisa Marie; Jaworska, Natalia; Crawford, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Structural abnormalities in frontal, limbic and subcortical regions have been noted in adults with both major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). In the current study, we examined regional brain morphology in youth with MDD and BD as compared to controls. Regional brain volumes were measured in 32 MDD subjects (15.7 ± 2.1 years), 14 BD subjects (16.0 ± 2.4 years) and 22 healthy controls (16.0 ± 2.8 years) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Regions of interest included the hippocampus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, putamen and thalamus. Volumetric differences between groups were significant (F26,80 = 1.80, p = 0.02). Post-hoc analyses indicated that individuals with MDD showed reduced left hippocampus volumes (p = 0.048) as well as right ACC white and gray matter volumes (p = 0.003; p = 0.01) compared to controls. BD participants also displayed reduced left hippocampal and right/left putamen volumes compared to controls (p < 0.001; p = 0.015; p = 0.046 respectively). Interestingly, right and left ACC white matter volumes were smaller in MDD than in BD participants (p = 0.019; p = 0.045 respectively). No volumetric group differences were observed for the DLPFC and thalamus. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify 81.0 % of subjects as having BD or as MDD based on imaging data. Confirmation and extension of our findings requires larger sample sizes. Our findings provide new evidence of distinct, specific regional brain volumetric differences between MDD and BD that may be used to distinguish the two disorders.

  4. Somatic mutations associated with MRI-derived volumetric features in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D.; Grossmann, Patrick; Alexander, Brian M.; Cooper, Lee A.D.; Holder, Chad A.; Ligon, Keith L.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2015-01-01

    MR imaging can noninvasively visualize tumor phenotype characteristics at the macroscopic level. Here, we investigated whether somatic mutations are associated with and can be predicted by MRI-derived tumor imaging features of glioblastoma (GBM). Seventy-six GBM patients were identified from The Cancer Imaging Archive for whom preoperative T1-contrast (T1C) and T2-FLAIR MR images were available. For each tumor, a set of volumetric imaging features and their ratios were measured, including necrosis, contrast enhancing, and edema volumes. Imaging genomics analysis assessed the association of these features with mutation status of nine genes frequently altered in adult GBM. Finally, area under the curve (AUC) analysis was conducted to evaluate the predictive performance of imaging features for mutational status. Our results demonstrate that MR imaging features are strongly associated with mutation status. For example, TP53-mutated tumors had significantly smaller contrast enhancing and necrosis volumes (p = 0.012 and 0.017, respectively) and RB1-mutated tumors had significantly smaller edema volumes (p = 0.015) compared to wild-type tumors. MRI volumetric features were also found to significantly predict mutational status. For example, AUC analysis results indicated that TP53, RB1, NF1, EGFR, and PDGFRA mutations could each be significantly predicted by at least one imaging feature. MRI-derived volumetric features are significantly associated with and predictive of several cancer-relevant, drug-targetable DNA mutations in glioblastoma. These results may shed insight into unique growth characteristics of individual tumors at the macroscopic level resulting from molecular events as well as increase the use of noninvasive imaging in personalized medicine. (orig.)

  5. Serial volumetric assessment of coronary fibroatheroma by optical frequency domain imaging: insights from the TROFI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos M; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Iqbal, Javaid; Muramatsu, Takashi; Nakatani, Shimpei; Dijkstra, Jouke; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-01-01

    Coronary lesions precursors of acute events remain elusive, since they undergo continuous changes and their temporal changes are not very well-characterized. In natural history studies, optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) has been used only to assess fibroatheromas as a 2D structure and sometimes in a single frame fashion. We aim at describing the serial volumetric modifications of the fibrous cap (FC) of the fibroatheromas as determined by OFDI over a 6-month follow-up period. In 49 patients, OFDI investigation was performed following treatment of culprit lesion and at 6-month follow-up in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). A fully automatic volumetric quantification of FC was done in all lipid-containing frames of non-culprit lesions in the infarct related artery. These lesions were matched at baseline and 6-month follow-up. A total of 58 non-culprit lipid rich lesions (34 TCFAs and 24 thick-cap fibroatheroma [ThCFA]) were found in 34 patients at baseline. Overall, there was a FC volume decrease of 1.57 (Inter-quartile Range [IQR] -4.13 to 0.54) mm3 at 6-months. 27% of the lesions changed their phenotype over time (TCFA or ThCFA). TCFAs that became ThCFAs at follow-up had smaller mean and maximal FC as compared with lesions that remained TCFAs (P = 0.01 for both). Non-culprit fibroatheromas located in the infarct related artery of patients with STEMI had a volumetric reduction of the FC after 6-month follow-up. Quantitative FC assessment was able to differentiate high-risk lesions that became ThCFAs. There was a considerable change of plaque phenotype (TCFAs or ThCFAs) over time.

  6. Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, G. Patrick [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Browne, Jolyon [Advanced Research & Applications Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The development of an Image Matrix Processor (IMP) was proposed that would provide an economical means to perform rapid ray-tracing processes on volume "Giga Voxel" data sets. This was a multi-phased project. The objective of the first phase of the IMP project was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a workstation-based Image Matrix Processor for use in volumetric reconstruction and rendering using hardware simulation techniques. Additionally, ARACOR and LLNL worked together to identify and pursue further funding sources to complete a second phase of this project.

  7. Cerebral volumetric changes induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure and whole-body exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Lamalle, Laurent; Warnking, Jan M; Millet, Guillaume Y; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Krainik, Alexandre; Verges, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the isolated and synergetic effects of hypoxic exposure and prolonged exercise on cerebral volume and subedema and symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Twelve healthy males performed three semirandomized blinded 11-hour sessions with (1) an inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 12% and 4-hour cycling, (2) FiO2=21% and 4-hour cycling, and (3) FiO2=8.5% to 12% at rest (matching arterial oxygen saturation measured during the first hypoxic session). Volumetric, ap...

  8. Microfluidic volumetric flow determination using optical coherence tomography speckle: An autocorrelation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pretto, Lucas R., E-mail: lucas.de.pretto@usp.br; Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Freitas, Anderson Z. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN–CNEN/SP, Avenida Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-04-28

    Functional modalities of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) based on speckle analysis are emerging in the literature. We propose a simple approach to the autocorrelation of OCT signal to enable volumetric flow rate differentiation, based on decorrelation time. Our results show that this technique could distinguish flows separated by 3 μl/min, limited by the acquisition speed of the system. We further perform a B-scan of gradient flow inside a microchannel, enabling the visualization of the drag effect on the walls.

  9. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects After Oncologic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Tutor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction in such cases, and demonstrate 3D haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning.Methods: Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600cm2. Latissimus dorsi-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland. An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. Results: The clinical series of latissimus dorsi free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the subcostal artery as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead-space.Conclusion: Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead-space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of

  10. High light extraction efficiency in bulk-GaN based volumetric violet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Aurelien, E-mail: adavid@soraa.com; Hurni, Christophe A.; Aldaz, Rafael I.; Cich, Michael J.; Ellis, Bryan; Huang, Kevin; Steranka, Frank M.; Krames, Michael R. [Soraa Inc., 6500 Kaiser Dr., Fremont, California 94555 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    We report on the light extraction efficiency of III-Nitride violet light-emitting diodes with a volumetric flip-chip architecture. We introduce an accurate optical model to account for light extraction. We fabricate a series of devices with varying optical configurations and fit their measured performance with our model. We show the importance of second-order optical effects like photon recycling and residual surface roughness to account for data. We conclude that our devices reach an extraction efficiency of 89%.

  11. Finite element analysis of volumetrically heated fluids in an axisymmetric enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartling, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    A general purpose finite element computer code has been used to analyze the steady state and transient response of a confined fluid that is heated volumetrically. The numerical procedure is demonstrated to be capable of resolving flow fields of considerable complexity without undue computational expense. Results are discussed for a Grashof number range (4.0 x 10/sup 4/ to 4.0 x 10/sup 6/) in which the flow varies from a steady, single cell configuration to a multiple cell configuration that includes a periodic interaction.

  12. 4-D PET-MR with Volumetric Navigators and Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Catana, Ciprian; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-01-01

    the acquisition deteriorates both the PET and the MR images. In this work we have developed an approach for tightly integrated PET-MR imaging, making use of volumetric MR navigators to inform, in real-time, both the MR acquisition and the PET reconstruction. The integrated imaging procedure that we describe...... exploits the simultaneity of MR and PET in hybrid PET-MR systems, producing inherently-aligned motion-free MR and PET images. We describe the system setup, the algorithm for motion-corrected reconstruction, an adaptive sinogram binning algorithm and software design decisions aimed at integrating tightly...

  13. WE-G-BRF-04: Robust Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Based On One Single Projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time volumetric imaging is highly desirable to provide instantaneous image guidance for lung radiation therapy. This study proposes a scheme to achieve this goal using one single projection by utilizing sparse learning and a principal component analysis (PCA) based lung motion model. Methods: A patient-specific PCA-based lung motion model is first constructed by analyzing deformable vector fields (DVFs) between a reference image and 4DCT images at each phase. At the training stage, we “learn” the relationship between the DVFs and the projection using sparse learning. Specifically, we first partition the projections into patches, and then apply sparse learning to automatically identify patches that best correlate with the principal components of the DVFs. Once the relationship is established, at the application stage, we first employ a patchbased intensity correction method to overcome the problem of different intensity scale between the calculated projection in the training stage and the measured projection in the application stage. The corrected projection image is then fed to the trained model to derive a DVF, which is applied to the reference image, yielding a volumetric image corresponding to the projection. We have validated our method through a NCAT phantom simulation case and one experiment case. Results: Sparse learning can automatically select those patches containing motion information, such as those around diaphragm. For the simulation case, over 98% of the lung region pass the generalized gamma test (10HU/1mm), indicating combined accuracy in both intensity and spatial domain. For the experimental case, the average tumor localization errors projected to the imager are 0.68 mm and 0.4 mm on the axial and tangential direction, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method is capable of accurately generating a volumetric image using one single projection. It will potentially offer real-time volumetric image guidance to facilitate lung

  14. Finite element analysis of volumetrically heated fluids in an axisymmetric enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartling, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    A general purpose finite element computer code has been used to analyze the steady state and transient response of a confined fluid that is heated volumetrically. The numerical procedure is demonstrated to be capable of resolving flow fields of considerable complexity without undue computational expense. Results are discussed for a Grashof number range (4.0 x 10 4 to 4.0 x 10 6 ) in which the flow varies from a steady, single cell configuration to a multiple cell configuration that includes a periodic interaction

  15. Simplified model of a volumetric direct nuclear pumped He-3-Ar laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model for the volumetric nuclear pumped He-3-Ar laser is described and the source terms arising from the He-3(n, p)H-3 reaction as well as the rate equations are given. Steady state solutions are derived for the densities of the species vs the fraction of argon. The dominant pumping mechanism is found to be collisional radiative recombination of the argon atomic ions and subsequent cascading into the upper laser level. The reactions following recombination are described and an expression is derived for the difference in densities of the argon 3d and 4p levels. Comparison with experiments shows good agreement.

  16. Expanding the reduced-current approach for thermoelectric generators to achieve higher volumetric power density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijesooriyage, Waruna Dissanayaka; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    current approach (RCA) for TE module design, where the same current is induced through the p and n legs of the thermoelectric generator (TEG). The current density of each element is manipulated by changing the area of both legs. This technique leads to a TE module architecture based on the most efficient...... configuration of both p and n legs. In the current paper, we apply an extended version of this technique, to show how a TE module with a higher volumetric power density can be designed, compared to the original RCA. Our studies indicate that for some combinations of p and n material properties, optima yielding...

  17. A comparison of substantia nigra T1 hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease dementia, Alzheimer's disease and age-matched controls: Volumetric analysis of neuromelanin imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Ju Yeon; Yun, Won Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Seol Heui; Kwak, Ki Chang; Lee, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases

  18. A comparison of substantia nigra T1 hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease dementia, Alzheimer's disease and age-matched controls: Volumetric analysis of neuromelanin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Ju Yeon; Yun, Won Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Ki Chang; Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases.

  19. Fast discriminative latent Dirichlet allocation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the code for fast discriminative latent Dirichlet allocation, which is an algorithm for topic modeling and text classification. The related paper is at...

  20. The price of fast fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The fashion industry has changed rapidly in recent years with the increased prevalence of fast fashion, impacting the environment. Efforts to green this polluting industry require action from businesses and consumers.

  1. Fast reactor programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-04

    economic via- bility of sodium fast reactor (SFR) for the commercial deployment in series. Further, demonstration of comprehensive closed fuel cycle technologies such as fuel fabrication, reprocessing, waste management and waste ...

  2. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaize, S.; Ailloud, J.; Mariani, J.; Millot, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    We have studied fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry through the recoil protons they produce in hydrogenated samples. In spectrometric, we used nuclear emulsions, in dosimetric, we used polyethylene coated with zinc sulphide and placed before a photomultiplier. (author) [fr

  3. Allegheny County Fast Food Establishments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Allegheny County Health Department has generated this list of fast food restaurants by exporting all chain restaurants without an alcohol permit from the...

  4. FastStats: Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Youth Aged 12–15, 2012 Caloric Intake From Fast Food Among Children and Adolescents: United States, 2011–2012 Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls With Serious ...

  5. Fast Food: Tips for Choosing Healthier Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make wise meal choices when going to a fast-food restaurant. By Mayo Clinic Staff Does following a ... or healthy diet mean you must swear off fast food? Not necessarily. An occasional stop for fast food ...

  6. Magnetic resonance volumetric analysis of hippocampi in children in the age group of 6-to-12 years: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulani, S.J.; Kothare, S.V.; Patkar, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    Atrophy of the mesial temporal structures, especially the hippocampus, has been implicated in temporal lobe epilepsy. However, to date, there is very scant data regarding normal volumes of the hippocampus in the pediatric population. This is a pilot study to estimate the normal volumetric data for the Indian pediatric population between 6 and 12 years of age. We have also tried to understand whether age and gender have an effect on the hippocampal volumes in this age group. The study group comprised 20 children, 6-12-years old without history of epilepsy or other neurological deficits. There were nine boys and 11 girls. All scans were performed on a 1.5T GE echo speed scanner. 3D fast SPGR sequence was prescribed in the coronal plane. The images were post-processed on an Advantage Windows 3.1 workstation. Using an automated program, the same observer calculated the hippocampal area, in cubic centimeters, clockwise and anticlockwise. The clockwise/anticlockwise data were subjected to correlation analysis for detecting intra-observer agreement. The mean and SD for left and right hippocampal volumes were estimated. The lower and upper limits for normal hippocampal volumes were determined using 95% (± 2SD) limits on either side of the mean. In order to understand the effect of age on various hippocampal volumes we performed regression analysis. Mann-Whitney's test was used to test the significance of differences for gender variations. Correlation analysis established that there was intra-observer agreement. In the Indian pediatric population we have found the mean right hippocampal volume (RHV) to be 2.75 cm 3 and mean left hippocampal volume (LHV) to be 2.49 cm 3 . Mean hippocampal volume was found to be 2.67 cm 3 (SD=0.42). The upper and lower limits for hippocampal volumes were 3.51 cm 3 and 1.83 cm 3 , respectively, based on 95% (± 2SD) limits on either side of the mean. There was no effect of age or gender on the hippocampal volumes. In the Indian pediatric

  7. A 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging volumetric analysis of the hippocampal formation: dependence on handedness and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, D; Stošić-Opinćal, T; Petronijević, N; Puškaš, L; Djulejić, V; Milić, I; Marinković, S

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is one of the most important parts of the brain in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric analysis in various domains, but not completely from all aspects, including the handedness. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible differences in the volume of the right and left HF among the healthy right-handed and left-handed subjects, and to determine whether the volume differences are age related. The MRI of this prospective study was performed using T1 fast field echo (FFE) sequence. The 124 subsequent coronal slices (thickness 1.5 mm) were performed in each participant. The obtained HF volumes were normalised and statistically compared. Volunteers comprised 30 persons aged 22.0 years, 12 of whom were the left-handed, and 30 persons aged 75.2 years on average, 9 of whom were the left-handed. The right and left HF volumes averaged 2.986 cm3 and 2.858 cm3 in the right-handed, and 2.879 cm³ and 3.020 cm³ in the left-handed young volunteers, as well as 2.728 cm³ and 2.650 cm³ in the right-handed, and 2.617 cm³ and 2.780 cm³ in the left-handed elderly persons. The HF volume ratios in the young left-handed participants showed a significant left-greater-than-right asymmetry. A significant difference was also noticed within the right-to-left volume ratios of the right- and left-handed young and elderly participants. The latter reduction in the HF volume within the aged group can be interpreted as a slight atrophy of the HF. There is a significant difference in the volumes of the left and right HF of the left-handed young participants. The age related HF volume differences were proven between the groups of the young and elderly volunteers. The obtained data should be included into the future MRI studies of the HF volumes in various clinical domains.

  8. Glycogenolysis in the fasting dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, J J; de Koster, P

    1983-01-01

    Glycogen concentrations were determined in liver-biopsy specimens which were taken from four dogs during five consecutive days of fasting. It was found that maximal depletion of liver glycogen occurred between the second and the third day. Starvation-induced glycogenolysis was much slower in the dog than in men and rats. Fuel fluxes are discussed and it is tentatively concluded that in the fasting dog larger amounts of glycerol are available for gluconeogenesis than in other species.

  9. Upgrading ATLAS Fast Calorimeter Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Matthew Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Producing the very large samples of simulated events required by many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Fast simulation tools are a useful way of reducing CPU requirements when detailed detector simulations are not needed. During the LHC Run-1, a fast calorimeter simulation (FastCaloSim) was successfully used in ATLAS. FastCaloSim provides a simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level, taking into account the detailed particle shower shapes and the correlations between the energy depositions in the various calorimeter layers. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and it can be tuned to data more easily than Geant4. Now an improved version of FastCaloSim is in development, incorporating the experience with the version used during Run-1. The new FastCaloSim aims to overcome some limitations of the first version by improving the description of s...

  10. Fast Calorimeter Simulation in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schaarschmidt, Jana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Producing the very large samples of simulated events required by many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Fast simulation tools are a useful way of reducing CPU requirements when detailed detector simulations are not needed. During the LHC Run-1, a fast calorimeter simulation (FastCaloSim) was successfully used in ATLAS. FastCaloSim provides a simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level, taking into account the detailed particle shower shapes and the correlations between the energy depositions in the various calorimeter layers. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and it can be tuned to data more easily than GEANT4. It is 500 times faster than full simulation in the calorimeter system. Now an improved version of FastCaloSim is in development, incorporating the experience with the version used during Run-1. The new FastCaloSim makes use of mach...

  11. Medical applications of fast 3D cameras in real-time image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shidong; Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic volumetric medical imaging (4DMI) has reduced motion artifacts, increased early diagnosis of small mobile tumors, and improved target definition for treatment planning. High speed cameras for video, X-ray, or other forms of sequential imaging allow a live tracking of external or internal movement useful for real-time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, none of 4DMI can track real-time organ motion and no camera has correlated with 4DMI to show volumetric changes. With a brief review of various IGRT techniques, we propose a fast 3D camera for live-video stereovision, an automatic surface-motion identifier to classify body or respiratory motion, a mechanical model for synchronizing the external surface movement with the internal target displacement by combination use of the real-time stereovision and pre-treatment 4DMI, and dynamic multi-leaf collimation for adaptive aiming the moving target. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the technique is feasible and efficient in IGRT of mobile targets. A clinical trial has been initiated for validation of its spatial and temporal accuracies and dosimetric impact for intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of any mobile tumors. The technique can be extended for surface-guided stereotactic needle insertion in biopsy of small lung nodules.

  12. Comparison Between Conventional Radiography and 3D Volumetric Imaging for Location of Mandibular Canal: In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakashree Chakraborty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the visibility and location of mandibular canal in the mandibular posteriors using orthopantomography and digitalized volumetric tomography. Material and Methods: Twenty-five patients were included in the study with mandibular posterior edentulous areas, where visibility and location of mandibular canal was assessed using orthopantomography and digitalized volumetric tomography. Both parameters were assessed at the mental foramen, at 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm posterior to mental foramen. Results: The results obtained showed that the mandibular canal was more clearly visible at the mental foramen at 1 cm and 2 cm posterior to the mental foramen using digitalized volumetric tomography, which was statistically significant (P = 0.000. At 3 cm posterior to the mental foramen the visibility of the mandibular canal did not differ among the techniques (P = 0.297. The location of the mandibular canal was obtained in superoinferior dimension in orthopantomography and superoinferior and buccolingual dimension was measured in digitalized volumetric tomography where the mandibular canal was located more inferiorly and lingually in mandible. Conclusion: Digitalized volumetric tomography ( DVT is advantageous than orthopantomography (OPG for visibility and location of mandibular canal. The precise location of the mandibular would help in planning for implant placement and other interventions in mandibular posteriors.

  13. Structural brain alterations of Down's syndrome in early childhood evaluation by DTI and volumetric analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunbey, Hediye Pinar; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Aslan, Kerim; Incesu, Lutfi; Has, Arzu Ceylan; Ogur, Methiye Gonul; Alhan, Aslihan

    2017-01-01

    To provide an initial assessment of white matter (WM) integrity with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the accompanying volumetric changes in WM and grey matter (GM) through volumetric analyses of young children with Down's syndrome (DS). Ten children with DS and eight healthy control subjects were included in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used in the DTI study for whole-brain voxelwise analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of WM. Volumetric analyses were performed with an automated segmentation method to obtain regional measurements of cortical volumes. Children with DS showed significantly reduced FA in association tracts of the fronto-temporo-occipital regions as well as the corpus callosum (CC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (p < 0.05). Volumetric reductions included total cortical GM, cerebellar GM and WM volume, basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem and CC in DS compared with controls (p < 0.05). These preliminary results suggest that DTI and volumetric analyses may reflect the earliest complementary changes of the neurodevelopmental delay in children with DS and can serve as surrogate biomarkers of the specific elements of WM and GM integrity for cognitive development. (orig.)

  14. Structural brain alterations of Down's syndrome in early childhood evaluation by DTI and volumetric analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunbey, Hediye Pinar; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Aslan, Kerim; Incesu, Lutfi [Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kurupelit, Samsun (Turkey); Has, Arzu Ceylan [Bilkent University, National Magnetic Resonance Research Center, Ankara (Turkey); Ogur, Methiye Gonul [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Genetics, Samsun (Turkey); Alhan, Aslihan [Ufuk University, Department of Statistics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-07-15

    To provide an initial assessment of white matter (WM) integrity with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the accompanying volumetric changes in WM and grey matter (GM) through volumetric analyses of young children with Down's syndrome (DS). Ten children with DS and eight healthy control subjects were included in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used in the DTI study for whole-brain voxelwise analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of WM. Volumetric analyses were performed with an automated segmentation method to obtain regional measurements of cortical volumes. Children with DS showed significantly reduced FA in association tracts of the fronto-temporo-occipital regions as well as the corpus callosum (CC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (p < 0.05). Volumetric reductions included total cortical GM, cerebellar GM and WM volume, basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem and CC in DS compared with controls (p < 0.05). These preliminary results suggest that DTI and volumetric analyses may reflect the earliest complementary changes of the neurodevelopmental delay in children with DS and can serve as surrogate biomarkers of the specific elements of WM and GM integrity for cognitive development. (orig.)

  15. Volumetric MRI and {sup 1}H MRS study of hippocampus in unilateral MCAO patients: Relationship between hippocampal secondary damage and cognitive disorder following stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiangyu; Wang, Chengyuan; Xia, Liming [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Jiefang Dadao 1095, Wuhan 430030 (China); Zhu, Wenhao [Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Jiefang Dadao 1095, Wuhan 430030 (China); Zhao, Lingyun [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Jiefang Dadao 1095, Wuhan 430030 (China); Zhu, Wenzhen, E-mail: zhuwenzhen@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Jiefang Dadao 1095, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To determine whether hippocampi alter in patients at the recovery stage of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and whether the changes of hippocampi involve in the cognitive impairment in such patients. Meterials and methods: Forty-four patients with unilateral infarction solely in MCAO territory and 44 age-, sex- and education background-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent 3-dimensional fast spoiled gradient-echo (3D FSPGR) and sing-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) protocols at a 1.5 T MR scanner. The ratios of n-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and myo-inositol/creatine (mI/Cr) were obtained by using software integrated in the MR scanner. The hippocampal volumes were estimated by manually measurement. Results: The volume and NAA/Cr ratio were found significantly decreased and mI/Cr ratio significantly increased in the hippocampus ipsilateral to occluded middle cerebral artery (MCA) as compared with values in the contralateral hippocampus or healthy control. A reduced NAA/Cr ratio was also observed in contralateral hippocampus compared to controls. The shrinkage ratio of hippocampus ipsilateral to MCAO was found related to the Mini–Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. Conclusion: Our study identified that the hippocampal secondary damage occurred in patients after MCAO, and it could be evaluated noninvasively by volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 1}H MRS. Moreover, the hippocampal secondary damage in MCAO patients indeed contributed to their cognitive impairment.

  16. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps with level set-based adaptive convolution in volumetric mucosa to advance CT colonography toward a screening modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Duan, Chaijie; Pickhardt, Perry; Wang, Su; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    As a promising second reader of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) screening, the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps has earned fast growing research interest. In this paper, we present a CAD scheme to automatically detect colonic polyps in CTC images. First, a thick colon wall representation, ie, a volumetric mucosa (VM) with several voxels wide in general, was segmented from CTC images by a partial-volume image segmentation algorithm. Based on the VM, we employed a level set-based adaptive convolution method for calculating the first- and second-order spatial derivatives more accurately to start the geometric analysis. Furthermore, to emphasize the correspondence among different layers in the VM, we introduced a middle-layer enhanced integration along the image gradient direction inside the VM to improve the operation of extracting the geometric information, like the principal curvatures. Initial polyp candidates (IPCs) were then determined by thresholding the geometric measurements. Based on IPCs, several features were extracted for each IPC, and fed into a support vector machine to reduce false positives (FPs). The final detections were displayed in a commercial system to provide second opinions for radiologists. The CAD scheme was applied to 26 patient CTC studies with 32 confirmed polyps by both optical and virtual colonoscopies. Compared to our previous work, all the polyps can be detected successfully with less FPs. At the 100% by polyp sensitivity, the new method yielded 3.5 FPs/dataset

  17. Predicting post-hepatectomy liver failure by combined volumetric, functional MR image and laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-Hsuan; Ou, Hsin-You; Lazo, Marirose Z; Chen, Chao-Long; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Weng, Ching-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Fan

    2017-10-07

    To assess the efficacy of functional MR image with volumetric, liver function test and indocyanine green clearance (ICG) in identifying the patients who are at risk of post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF). We retrospectively included 115 patients undergoing gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging before hepatectomy at one medical centre from January 2013 to December 2015. Contrast enhancement ratio (CER) between transitional and hepatobiliary phases (3 and 30 minutes post-contrast) was calculated. Total liver volume (TLV) and spleen volume (Sp) were measured. Post-operatively, the histological Ishak fibrosis score was collected. Potential risk factors for liver failure were analysed, and the performance was examined by receiver operating characteristic curve. Post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) occurred in 16 patients (13.9%). TLV/SLV, ADC value, CER HBP/TP and total liver contrast enhancement ratio (tCER) were associated with PHLF (P imaging with volumetric is a reliable method for evaluating functional liver volume and determining the risk of PHLF. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Recoverable Wire-Shaped Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Energy Density for Multifunctional Portable and Wearable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minjie; Yang, Cheng; Song, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Lian

    2017-05-24

    Wire-shaped supercapacitors (SCs) based on shape memory materials are of considerable interest for next-generation portable and wearable electronics. However, the bottleneck in this field is how to develop the devices with excellent electrochemical performance while well-maintaining recoverability and flexibility. Herein, a unique asymmetric electrode concept is put forward to fabricate smart wire-shaped SCs with ultrahigh energy density, which is realized by using porous carbon dodecahedra coated on NiTi alloy wire and flexible graphene fiber as yarn electrodes. Notably, the wire-shaped SCs not only exhibit high flexibility that can be readily woven into real clothing but also represent the available recoverable ability. When irreversible plastic deformations happen, the deformed shape of the devices can automatically resume the initial predesigned shape in a warm environment (about 35 °C). More importantly, the wire-shaped SCs act as efficient energy storage devices, which display high volumetric energy density (8.9 mWh/cm 3 ), volumetric power density (1080 mW/cm 3 ), strong durability in multiple mechanical states, and steady electrochemical behavior after repeated shape recovery processes. Considering their relative facile fabrication technology and excellent electrochemical performance, this asymmetric electrode strategy produced smart wire-shaped supercapacitors desirable for multifunctional portable and wearable electronics.

  19. Feature extraction, analysis, and 3D visualization of local lung regions in volumetric CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delegacz, Andrzej; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the work was to develop image functions for volumetric segmentation, feature extraction, and enhanced 3D visualization of local regions using CT datasets of human lungs. The system is aimed to assist the radiologist in the analysis of lung nodules. Volumetric datasets consisting of 30-50 thoracic helical low-dose CT slices were used in the study. The 3D topological characteristics of local structures including bronchi, blood vessels, and nodules were computed and evaluated. When a location of a region of interest is identified, the computer would automatically compute size, surface of the area, and normalized shape index of the suspected lesion. The developed system can also allow the user to perform interactive operation for evaluation of lung regions and structures through a user- friendly interface. These functions provide the user with a powerful tool to observe and investigate clinically interesting regions through unconventional radiographic viewings and analyses. The developed functions can also be used to view and analyze patient's lung abnormalities in surgical planning applications. Additionally, we see the possibility of using the system as a teaching tool for correlating anatomy of lungs.

  20. Physiologically based indices of volumetric capnography in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, P V; Lucangelo, U; Lopez Aguilar, J; Fernandez, R; Blanch, L

    1997-06-01

    Several indices of ventilatory heterogeneity can be identified from the expiratory CO2 partial pressure or CO2 elimination versus volume curves. The aims of this study were: 1) to analyse several computerizable indices of volumetric capnography in order to detect ventilatory disturbances; and 2) to establish the relationship between those indices and respiratory system mechanics in subjects with normal lungs and in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), both receiving mechanical ventilation. We studied six normal subjects and five patients with early ARDS mechanically ventilated at three levels of tidal volume (VT). Respiratory system mechanics were assessed by end-expiratory and end-inspiratory occlusion methods, respectively. We determined Phase III slopes, Fletcher's efficiency index, Bohr's dead space (VD,Bohr/VT), and the ratio of alveolar ejection volume to tidal volume (VAE/VT) from expiratory capnograms, as a function of expired volume. Differences between normal subjects and ARDS patients were significant both for capnographic and mechanical parameters. Changes in VT significantly altered capnographic indices in normal subjects, but failed to change ventilatory mechanics and VAE/VT in ARDS patients. After adjusting for breathing pattern, VAE/VT exhibited the best correlation with the mechanical parameters. In conclusion, volumetric capnography, and, specifically, the ratio of alveolar ejection volume to tidal volume allows evaluation and monitoring of ventilatory disturbances in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  1. Conjugate transient natural convection in a cylindrical enclosure with internal volumetric heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anil Kumar; Velusamy, K.; Balaji, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a numerical investigation of transient turbulent natural convection heat transfer from a volumetric energy generating source placed inside a cylindrical enclosure filled with low Prandtl number fluid (liquid sodium, Pr = 0.005). Two-dimensional conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved using a finite volume based discretisation method employing the SIMPLE algorithm for the pressure velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled using the k-ε model with physical boundary conditions. The study presents the transient features of confined turbulent natural convection, due to time varying generation of heat in the volumetric source. The intensity of heat source exponentially decays with time and the source is placed over circular plates with a central opening. Results obtained from the numerical model compare favorably with those reported in the literature for steady state natural convection. Numerical simulations are carried out to display the sequential evolution of flow and thermal fields and the maximum temperature reached in the source. The advantages of distributing the heat source on multi trays have been quantified

  2. Volumetric optoacoustic imaging feedback during endovenous laser therapy - an ex vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Endovenous laser therapy (ELT) was introduced in clinical practice for treating incompetent veins about fifteen years ago. Despite the considerable clinical evidence collected so far, no rigorous guidelines are yet available regarding the optimal energy deposition protocols while incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains variable among patients. Online monitoring and feedback-based control over the lesion progression may improve clinical outcomes. Yet the currently employed monitoring tools, such as Doppler ultrasound, often do not provide sufficient contrast as well as three-dimensional imaging capacity for accurate lesion assessment during thermal treatments. Here we investigate on the utility of volumetric optoacoustic tomography for real-time monitoring of the ELT procedures. Experiments performed in subcutaneous veins of an ox foot model revealed the accurate spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression and characteristics of the vessel wall. Optoacoustic images further correlated with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the coagulation spot and made it possible to track the position of the fiber tip during its pull back in real time and in all three dimensions. Overall, we showcase that volumetric optoacoustic tomography is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Using the features of the time and volumetric capnogram for classification and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Michael B

    2017-02-01

    Quantitative features derived from the time-based and volumetric capnogram such as respiratory rate, end-tidal PCO 2 , dead space, carbon dioxide production, and qualitative features such as the shape of capnogram are clinical metrics recognized as important for assessing respiratory function. Researchers are increasingly exploring these and other known physiologically relevant quantitative features, as well as new features derived from the time and volumetric capnogram or transformations of these waveforms, for: (a) real-time waveform classification/anomaly detection, (b) classification of a candidate capnogram into one of several disease classes, (c) estimation of the value of an inaccessible or invasively determined physiologic parameter, (d) prediction of the presence or absence of disease condition, (e) guiding the administration of therapy, and (f) prediction of the likely future morbidity or mortality of a patient with a presenting condition. The work to date with respect to these applications will be reviewed, the underlying algorithms and performance highlighted, and opportunities for the future noted.

  4. Volumetric Laser Endomicroscopy for Barrett's Esophagus - Looking at the Fine Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepanshu; Fatima, Sanna; Jain, Shilpa; Singhal, Shashideep

    2017-09-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition. The incidence of adenocarcinoma in BE has been reported to be between 0.1-3%. Dysplasia in BE is patchy and extensive biopsy sampling is labor intensive, low yield and does not eliminate the sampling error completely. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy (VLE) is expected to enable endoscopists to do targeted biopsy of dysplastic/cancerous lesions (not visible on white light endoscopy) among patients with BE. We reviewed 7 studies with a total of 62 subjects who had undergone VLE. Of 34 patients with available data, VLE correlated with histology in 17 subjects (50%). It missed the underlying diagnosis in one subject (2.9%). VLE led to inadvertent biopsy in 16 patients (47.1%), and led or would have led to upstaging of disease in 11 subjects (32.4%). In the entire cohort, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV) of VLE for diagnosis of dysplasia, buried Barrett's or intramucosal carcinoma was 92.3%, 23.8%, 42.9% and 83.3%, respectively. High sensitivity and NPV can potentially help space out the surveillance intervals. Low specificity does lead to a high number of biopsies, which are likely less than non targeted biopsies. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy is a safe and sensitive test to identify mucosal lesions in patients with BE which are invisible under standard white light endoscopy.

  5. Single camera volumetric velocimetry in aortic sinus with a percutaneous valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Chris; Thurow, Brian; Midha, Prem; Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac flows have long been understood to be highly three dimensional, yet traditional in vitro techniques used to capture these complexities are costly and cumbersome. Thus, two dimensional techniques are primarily used for heart valve flow diagnostics. The recent introduction of plenoptic camera technology allows for traditional cameras to capture both spatial and angular information from a light field through the addition of a microlens array in front of the image sensor. When combined with traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques, volumetric velocity data may be acquired with a single camera using off-the-shelf optics. Particle volume pairs are reconstructed from raw plenoptic images using a filtered refocusing scheme, followed by three-dimensional cross-correlation. This technique was applied to the sinus region (known for having highly three-dimensional flow structures) of an in vitro aortic model with a percutaneous valve. Phase-locked plenoptic PIV data was acquired at two cardiac outputs (2 and 5 L/min) and 7 phases of the cardiac cycle. The volumetric PIV data was compared to standard 2D-2C PIV. Flow features such as recirculation and stagnation were observed in the sinus region in both cases.

  6. Full-field pressure from snapshot and time-resolved volumetric PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskari, A.; de Kat, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with pressure estimation from snapshot and time-resolved three-component (3C) volumetric PIV data using Taylor's hypothesis, an Eulerian and a pseudo-Lagrangian approach. The Taylor's hypothesis approach has been shown to provide accurate results for pressure in the case of 3C planar PIV data with an appropriate choice of convection velocity (de Kat and Ganapathisubramani 2013), and here we extend its use on 3C volumetric velocity snapshots. Application of the techniques to synthetic data shows that the Taylor's hypothesis approach performs best using the streamwise mean as the convection velocity and is affected the least by noise, while the Eulerian approach suffers the most. In terms of resolution, the pseudo-Lagrangian approach is the most sensitive. Its accuracy can be improved by increasing the frame time-separation when computing the material derivative, at the expense of volume loss from fluid parcels leaving the FOV. Comparison of the techniques on turbulent boundary layer data with DNS supports these observations and shows that the Taylor's hypothesis approach is the only way we can get pressure when time information is not present.

  7. Volumetric localization of epileptic activities in tuberous sclerosis using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zheng; Xiang, Jing; Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester; Hunjan, Amrita; Sharma, Rohit; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a novel noninvasive technique for localizing epileptic zones. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is often associated with medically refractory epilepsy with multiple epileptic zones. Surgical treatment of TSC requires accurate localization of epileptogenic tubers. The objective of this study was to introduce a new MEG technique, synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM), to volumetrically localize irritable zones and clarify the correlations between SAM, dipole modeling and anatomical tubers. Eight pediatric patients with TSC confirmed by clinical and neuroimaging findings were retrospectively studied. MEG data were recorded using a whole-cortex CTF OMEGA system. Sleep deprivation was employed to provoke epileptiform activity. Irritable zones were localized using both dipole modeling and SAM. MRI detected 42 tubers in the eight patients. Dipole modeling localized 28 irritable zones, and 19 out of the 28 zones were near tubers (19/42, 45%). SAM found 51 irritable zones, and 31 out of the 51 zones were near tubers (31/42, 74%). Among the 51 irritable zones determined by SAM, thirty-five zones were in 1-35 Hz, nine zones were in 35-60 Hz, and seven zones were in 60-120 Hz. The new method, SAM, yielded very plausible equivalent sources for patients who showed anatomical tubers on MRI. Compared to conventional dipole modeling, SAM appeared to offer increased detection of irritable zones and beneficial volumetric and frequency descriptions. (orig.)

  8. What are the potential advantages and disadvantages of volumetric CT scanning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Szilard

    2009-01-01

    After the introduction and dissemination of 64-slice multislice computed tomography systems, cardiovascular CT has arrived at a crossroad, and different philosophies lead down different paths of technologic development. Increased number of detector rows in the z-axis led to the introduction of dynamic, volumetric scanning of the heart and allows for whole-organ imaging. Dynamic, volumetric "whole-organ" scanning significantly reduces image acquisition time; "single-beat whole-heart imaging" results in improved image quality and reduced radiation exposure and reduced contrast dose. It eliminates helical and pitch artifacts and allows for simultaneous imaging of the base and apex of the heart. Beyond coronary arterial luminal imaging, such innovations open up the opportunity for myocardial perfusion and viability imaging and coronary arterial plaque imaging. Dual-source technology with 2 x-ray tubes placed at 90-degree angles provides heart rate-independent temporal resolution and has the potential for tissue characterization on the basis of different attenuation values at different energy levels. Refined detector technology allows for improved low-contrast resolution and may be beneficial for more detailed evaluation of coronary arterial plaque composition. The clinical benefit of each of these technologies will have to be evaluated in carefully designed clinical trials and in everyday clinical practice. Such combined experience will probably show the relative benefit of each of these philosophies in different patient populations and in different clinical scenarios.

  9. Grain Boundary Conformed Volumetric Mesh Generation from a Three-Dimensional Voxellated Polycrystalline Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong-Jin; Jeon, Young-Ju; Son, Ga-Eun; Sung, Sihwa; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Heung Nam; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Jung, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sukbin

    2018-03-01

    We present a new comprehensive scheme for generating grain boundary conformed, volumetric mesh elements from a three-dimensional voxellated polycrystalline microstructure. From the voxellated image of a polycrystalline microstructure obtained from the Monte Carlo Potts model in the context of isotropic normal grain growth simulation, its grain boundary network is approximated as a curvature-maintained conformal triangular surface mesh using a set of in-house codes. In order to improve the surface mesh quality and to adjust mesh resolution, various re-meshing techniques in a commercial software are applied to the approximated grain boundary mesh. It is found that the aspect ratio, the minimum angle and the Jacobian value of the re-meshed surface triangular mesh are successfully improved. Using such an enhanced surface mesh, conformal volumetric tetrahedral elements of the polycrystalline microstructure are created using a commercial software, again. The resultant mesh seamlessly retains the short- and long-range curvature of grain boundaries and junctions as well as the realistic morphology of the grains inside the polycrystal. It is noted that the proposed scheme is the first to successfully generate three-dimensional mesh elements for polycrystals with high enough quality to be used for the microstructure-based finite element analysis, while the realistic characteristics of grain boundaries and grains are maintained from the corresponding voxellated microstructure image.

  10. Recommended volumetric capacity definitions and protocols for accurate, standardized and unambiguous metrics for hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parilla, Philip A.; Gross, Karl; Hurst, Katherine; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the hydrogen economy is the development of hydrogen storage systems that meet or exceed the US DOE's goals for onboard storage in hydrogen-powered vehicles. In order to develop new materials to meet these goals, it is extremely critical to accurately, uniformly and precisely measure materials' properties relevant to the specific goals. Without this assurance, such measurements are not reliable and, therefore, do not provide a benefit toward the work at hand. In particular, capacity measurements for hydrogen storage materials must be based on valid and accurate results to ensure proper identification of promising materials for further development. Volumetric capacity determinations are becoming increasingly important for identifying promising materials, yet there exists controversy on how such determinations are made and whether such determinations are valid due to differing methodologies to count the hydrogen content. These issues are discussed herein, and we show mathematically that capacity determinations can be made rigorously and unambiguously if the constituent volumes are well defined and measurable in practice. It is widely accepted that this occurs for excess capacity determinations and we show here that this can happen for the total capacity determination. Because the adsorption volume is undefined, the absolute capacity determination remains imprecise. Furthermore, we show that there is a direct relationship between determining the respective capacities and the calibration constants used for the manometric and gravimetric techniques. Several suggested volumetric capacity figure-of-merits are defined, discussed and reporting requirements recommended. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate these protocols and concepts.

  11. Volumetric solar absorption in a channel with presence of phase change material in a carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, O.K.; Yilbas, Bekir S.; Shuja, S.Z.; Wang, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal energy gain over the solar heat input is high for absorber plate location at bottom surface of channel. • Phase change particles increases performance parameter as compared to water only case. • Pump power loss parameter behaves similar for absorbing plate location at top and at the bottom of channel. - Abstract: A channel flow with a presence of phase change particles in the carrier fluid (water) is investigated for various Reynolds numbers in relation to a solar volumetric absorption system. The absorber plate is considered in the channel to resemble the selective surface in the solar volumetric absorbing system. The absorbing plate, which composes of a ZrN film deposited onto a thin silver plate, is placed at three different locations in the channel to enhance the absorption of the incident solar radiation. The performance parameter is defined to quantify the heat storage capacity of the working fluid. The pump power loss parameter is introduced to predict the pump power loss due to the different locations of the absorber plate in the channel. A radiation model is incorporated to account for the absorption of the solar radiation by the working fluid and the absorber plate in the channel. It is found that the performance parameter improves considerably for the absorbing plate located at the channel bottom. The pump power loss parameter becomes the highest for the absorber plate location at the mid-height of the channel.

  12. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; pHologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  13. Volumetric Evaluation of the Mammary Gland and Pectoralis Major Muscle following Subglandular and Submuscular Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxo, Ana Claudia Weck; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan; Salin, Renan; de Castro, Claudio Cardoso; Aboudib, Jose Horacio; Marques, Ruy Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Besides being a procedure with high level of patient satisfaction, one of the main causes for reoperation after breast augmentation is related to contour deformities and changes in breast volume. Few objective data are available on postoperative volumetric analysis following breast augmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate volume changes in the breast parenchyma and pectoralis major muscle after breast augmentation with the placement of silicone implants in the subglandular and submuscular planes. Fifty-eight women were randomly allocated either to the subglandular group (n = 24) or submuscular group (n = 24) and underwent breast augmentation in the subglandular or submuscular plane, respectively, or to a control group (n = 10) and received no intervention. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging was performed at inclusion in all participants and either after 6 and 12 months in the control group or at 6 and 12 months after surgery in the intervention groups. Twelve months after breast augmentation, only the subglandular group had a significant reduction in glandular volume (mean, 22.8 percent), while patients in the submuscular group were the only ones showing significant reduction in muscle volume (mean, 49.80 percent). Atrophy of the breast parenchyma occurred after subglandular breast augmentation, but not following submuscular breast augmentation. In contrast, submuscular breast augmentation caused atrophy of the pectoralis major muscle. Therapeutic, II.

  14. Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Versus Computerized Tomography in Fat Graft Volumetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshear, Charles Philip; Rector, Michael Anthony; Chung, Natalie Narie; Irizarry, Dre Michael; Flacco, John Stephen; Brett, Elizabeth Anne; Momeni, Arash; Lee, Gordon Kwanlyp; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2018-03-01

    Studies evaluating fat grafting in mice have frequently used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) as an accurate radiographic tool to measure longitudinal volume retention without killing the animal. Over the past decade, however, microultrasonography has emerged as an equally powerful preclinical imaging tool. Given their respective strengths in 3-dimensional reconstruction, there is no study to our knowledge that directly compares micro-CT with microultrasound in volumetric analysis. In this study, we compared the performance of micro-CT with microultrasound in the evaluation of adipose tissue graft volume in a murine model. Fifteen immunodeficient mice were given 200 μL of adipose tissue grafts. In vivo volumetric analysis of the grafts by micro-CT and microultrasound was conducted at discrete time points up to postoperative day 105. Three mice were killed at multiple time points, and explanted grafts were reimaged by CT and ultrasound, as mentioned previously. Analysis revealed that in vivo graft volumes measured by micro-CT do not differ significantly from those of microultrasound. Furthermore, both micro-CT and microultrasound were capable of accurately measuring fat grafts as in vivo volumes closely correlated with explanted volumes. Finally, ultrasound was found to yield improved soft tissue contrast compared with micro-CT. Therefore, either modality may be used, depending on experimental needs.

  15. Volumetric Analysis of 700 Mandibular Condyles Based Upon Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Ali-Farid; Kauke, Martin; Grandoch, Andrea; Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Zöller, Joachim E; Kreppel, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    The authors' aim was to provide volumetric data of mandibular condyles based upon cone beam computed tomography with the means of semiautomatic segmentation.Retrospective chart review of 350 patients (700 mandibular condyles) with cone beam computerized tomography between February 2007 and December 2016. Univariate analysis was performed to analyze associations between variables. P values <0.05 were considered significant. Volume measurement was performed in a semiautomatic segmentation method with the program "ITK-Snap."The mean volume was 2.443 cm for the right condyle and 2.278 cm for the left condyle. Bivariate analysis indicated a highly significant difference between the volume of the left and right condyles (P < 0.01). Female had a significant smaller condyle volume than male (P < 0.01 left condyle; P < 0.01 right condyle). Volume and age did not significantly correlate (P = 0.939 right condyle; P = 0.798 left condyle).A detailed assessment of the volume of mandibular condyles with cone beam computed tomography can help to assess pathophysiological alterations.Hence, the volumetric measurement may improve patient's individualized treatment.

  16. A novel segmentation algorithm for volumetric analysis of macular hole boundaries identified with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, David; Yuan, Alex; Kaiser, Peter K; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Rishi P; Sears, Jonathan E; Martin, Daniel F; Ehlers, Justis P

    2013-01-07

    To demonstrate a novel algorithm for macular hole (MH) segmentation and volumetric analysis. A computer algorithm was developed for automated MH segmentation in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Algorithm validation was performed by trained graders with performance characterized by absolute accuracy and intraclass correlation coefficient. A retrospective case series of 56 eyes of 55 patients with idiopathic MHs analyzed using the custom algorithm to measure MH volume, base area/diameter, top area/diameter, minimum diameter, and height-to-base diameter ratio. Five eyes were excluded due to poor signal quality (1), motion artifact (1), and failure of surgical closure (3) for a final cohort of 51 eyes. Preoperative MH measurements were correlated with clinical MH stage, baseline, and 6-month postoperative best-corrected Snellen visual acuity (BCVA). The algorithm achieved 96% absolute accuracy and an intraclass correlation of 0.994 compared to trained graders. In univariate analysis, MH volume, base area, base diameter, top area, top diameter, minimum diameter, and MH height were significantly correlated to baseline BCVA (P value from 0.0003-0.011). Volume, base area, base diameter, and height-to-base diameter ratio were significantly correlated to 6-month postoperative BCVA (P value from volumetric analysis of MH geometry and correlates with baseline and postoperative visual function. Further research is needed to better understand the algorithm's role in prognostication and clinical management.

  17. Volumetric Analysis of Nasopharyngectomy via Endoscopic Endonasal, Maxillary Transposition, and Lateral Temporal-Subtemporal Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Burak; Gun, Ramazan; Kirsch, Claudia; Meeks, Darlene; Otto, Bradley A; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    This project develops a computer model that allows volumetric analysis of the exposure afforded by an endonasal-endoscopic approach, maxillary transposition, and lateral temporal-subtemporal approaches during a nasopharyngectomy. The model will demonstrate idiosyncracies of these approaches, including sacrifice of normal tissues, ease of instrumentation, and gate of entry. Computed tomographic scans of an anatomic specimen were used to create computer simulations of the endoscopic endonasal, maxillary transposition, and lateral temporal-subtemporal approaches for T1and T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma; therefore, allowing assessment of their surgical corridor using Intuition, a software that allows a semiautomated computerized segmented volumetric analysis. The smallest volumes of tissue mobilization or removal were observed during the endoscopic-endonasal nasopharyngectomy. The volumes of tissue mobilization for the maxillary transposition approach were higher than those of lateral temporal-subtemporal approaches. This model adds to our understanding of select surgical corridors to the nasopharynx. It suggests that an endoscopic-endonasal approach requires less manipulation or resection of smaller volumes of normal tissue to expose a nasopharyngeal tumor than the lateral temporal-subtemporal and maxillary transposition approaches. It also, however, requires instrumentation through a smaller entry gate implying greater difficulty. Nonetheless, these factors should not be construed as superiority of one approach over the other. Factors that are important in the choosing of the surgical approach, such as surgeon's training and experience, invasion of neurovascular structures and method of reconstruction are not considered in this model.

  18. Deep learning for automatic localization, identification, and segmentation of vertebral bodies in volumetric MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzani, Amin; Rasoulian, Abtin; Seitel, Alexander; Fels, Sidney; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an automatic method for vertebra localization, labeling, and segmentation in multi-slice Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Prior work in this area on MR images mostly requires user interaction while our method is fully automatic. Cubic intensity-based features are extracted from image voxels. A deep learning approach is used for simultaneous localization and identification of vertebrae. The localized points are refined by local thresholding in the region of the detected vertebral column. Thereafter, a statistical multi-vertebrae model is initialized on the localized vertebrae. An iterative Expectation Maximization technique is used to register the vertebral body of the model to the image edges and obtain a segmentation of the lumbar vertebral bodies. The method is evaluated by applying to nine volumetric MR images of the spine. The results demonstrate 100% vertebra identification and a mean surface error of below 2.8 mm for 3D segmentation. Computation time is less than three minutes per high-resolution volumetric image.

  19. Integral transform solution of natural convection in a square cavity with volumetric heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. An

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The generalized integral transform technique (GITT is employed to obtain a hybrid numerical-analytical solution of natural convection in a cavity with volumetric heat generation. The hybrid nature of this approach allows for the establishment of benchmark results in the solution of non-linear partial differential equation systems, including the coupled set of heat and fluid flow equations that govern the steady natural convection problem under consideration. Through performing the GITT, the resulting transformed ODE system is then numerically solved by making use of the subroutine DBVPFD from the IMSL Library. Therefore, numerical results under user prescribed accuracy are obtained for different values of Rayleigh numbers, and the convergence behavior of the proposed eigenfunction expansions is illustrated. Critical comparisons against solutions produced by ANSYS CFX 12.0 are then conducted, which demonstrate excellent agreement. Several sets of reference results for natural convection with volumetric heat generation in a bi-dimensional square cavity are also provided for future verification of numerical results obtained by other researchers.

  20. Impact of Turbocharger Non-Adiabatic Operation on Engine Volumetric Efficiency and Turbo Lag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shaaban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbocharger performance significantly affects the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid at engine boundaries and hence engine performance. Heat transfer takes place under all circumstances during turbocharger operation. This heat transfer affects the power produced by the turbine, the power consumed by the compressor, and the engine volumetric efficiency. Therefore, non-adiabatic turbocharger performance can restrict the engine charging process and hence engine performance. The present research work investigates the effect of turbocharger non-adiabatic performance on the engine charging process and turbo lag. Two passenger car turbochargers are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The effect of turbine casing insulation is also explored. The present investigation shows that thermal energy is transferred to the compressor under all circumstances. At high rotational speeds, thermal energy is first transferred to the compressor and latter from the compressor to the ambient. Therefore, the compressor appears to be “adiabatic” at high rotational speeds despite the complex heat transfer processes inside the compressor. A tangible effect of turbocharger non-adiabatic performance on the charging process is identified at turbocharger part load operation. The turbine power is the most affected operating parameter, followed by the engine volumetric efficiency. Insulating the turbine is recommended for reducing the turbine size and the turbo lag.