WorldWideScience

Sample records for fast rotating stars

  1. FAST FOSSIL ROTATION OF NEUTRON STAR CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatos, A.

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) timescale, which can exceed ∼10 3 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g., by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  2. MACULA: Fast Modeling of Rotational Modulations of Spotty Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David

    2015-08-01

    Rotational modulations are frequently observed on stars observed by photometry surveys such as Kepler, with periodicities ranging from days to months and amplitudes of sub-parts-per-million to several percent. These variations may be studied to reveal important stellar properties such as rotational periods, inclinations and gradients of differential rotation. However, inverting the disk-integrated flux into a solution for spot number, sizes, contrasts, etc is highly degenerate and thereby necessitating an exhaustive search of the parameter space. In recognition of this, the software MACULA is designed to be a fast forward model of circular, grey spots on rotating stars, including effects such as differential rotation, spot evolution and even spot penumbra/umbra. MACULA seeks to achieve computational efficiency by using a wholly analytic description of the disk-integrated flux, which is described in Kipping (2012), leading to a computational improvement of three orders-of-magnitude over its numerical counterparts. As part of the hack day, I'll show how to simulate light curves with MACULA and provide examples with visualizations. I will also discuss the on-going development of the code, which will head towards modeling spot crossing events and radial velocity jitter and I encourage discussions amongst the participants on analytic methods to this end.

  3. Imprints of fast-rotating massive stars in the Galactic Bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Cristina; Frischknecht, Urs; Meynet, Georges; Hirschi, Raphael; Barbuy, Beatriz; Pignatari, Marco; Decressin, Thibaut; Maeder, André

    2011-04-28

    The first stars that formed after the Big Bang were probably massive, and they provided the Universe with the first elements heavier than helium ('metals'), which were incorporated into low-mass stars that have survived to the present. Eight stars in the oldest globular cluster in the Galaxy, NGC 6522, were found to have surface abundances consistent with the gas from which they formed being enriched by massive stars (that is, with higher α-element/Fe and Eu/Fe ratios than those of the Sun). However, the same stars have anomalously high abundances of Ba and La with respect to Fe, which usually arises through nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars (via the slow-neutron-capture process, or s-process). Recent theory suggests that metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars are able to boost the s-process yields by up to four orders of magnitude, which might provide a solution to this contradiction. Here we report a reanalysis of the earlier spectra, which reveals that Y and Sr are also overabundant with respect to Fe, showing a large scatter similar to that observed in extremely metal-poor stars, whereas C abundances are not enhanced. This pattern is best explained as originating in metal-poor fast-rotating massive stars, which might point to a common property of the first stellar generations and even of the 'first stars'.

  4. Fast Rotating solar-like stars using asteroseismic datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. García, R.; Ceillier, T.; Campante, T.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Kepler mission is providing an unprecedented set of asteroseismic data. In particular, short-cadence lightcurves (~60s samplings), allow us to study solar-like stars covering a wide range of masses, spectral types and evolutionary stages. Oscillations have been observed in around 600 out...

  5. Spectroscopic study of the extremely fast rotating star 44 Geminorum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Iliev, L.; Vennes, Stephane; Kawka, Adela; Kubát, Jiří; Németh, Péter; Borisov, G.; Kraus, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 12012 (2012), s. 20-28 ISSN 1313-2709 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300030908; GA AV ČR IAA301630901; GA ČR GAP209/10/0967 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Be stars * emission line * fundamental parameter Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  6. Spinning like a blue straggler: the population of fast rotating blue straggler stars in ω Centauri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Monaco, L. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-10

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ω Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ∼40 km s{sup –1} (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ∼200 km s{sup –1}. About 40% of the sample has v{sub e} sin i > 40 km s{sup –1} and about 20% has v{sub e} sin i > 70 km s{sup –1}. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ω Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ω Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments.

  7. The environment of the fast rotating star Achernar. III. Photospheric parameters revealed by the VLTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Kervella, P.; Moser Faes, D.; Dalla Vedova, G.; Mérand, A.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.; Bendjoya, P.; Carciofi, A. C.; Hadjara, M.; Millour, F.; Vakili, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Rotation significantly impacts on the structure and life of stars. In phases of high rotation velocity (close to critical), the photospheric structure can be highly modified, and present in particular geometrical deformation (rotation flattening) and latitudinal-dependent flux (gravity darkening). The fastest known rotators among the nondegenerate stars close to the main sequence, Be stars, are key targets for studying the effects of fast rotation on stellar photospheres. Aims: We seek to determine the purely photospheric parameters of Achernar based on observations recorded during an emission-free phase (normal B phase). Methods: Several recent works proved that optical/IR long-baseline interferometry is the only technique able to sufficiently spatially resolve and measure photospheric parameters of fast rotating stars. We thus analyzed ESO-VLTI (PIONIER and AMBER) interferometric observations of Achernar to measure its photospheric parameters by fitting our physical model CHARRON using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. This analysis was also complemented by spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations to investigate the status of the circumstellar environment of Achernar during the VLTI observations and to cross-check our model-fitting results. Results: Based on VLTI observations that partially resolve Achernar, we simultaneously measured five photospheric parameters of a Be star for the first time: equatorial radius (equatorial angular diameter), equatorial rotation velocity, polar inclination, position angle of the rotation axis projected on the sky, and the gravity darkening β coefficient (effective temperature distribution). The close circumstellar environment of Achernar was also investigated based on contemporaneous polarimetry, spectroscopy, and interferometry, including image reconstruction. This analysis did not reveal any important circumstellar contribution, so that Achernar was essentially in a normal B phase at least from mid

  8. Meridional flow and differential rotation by gravity darkening in fast rotating solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, G.; Küker, M.

    2002-04-01

    An explanation is presented for the rather strong total surface differential rotation of the observed very young solar-type stars like AB Dor and PZ Tel. Due to its rapid rotation, a non-uniform energy flux leaves the stellar core so that the outer convection zone is non-uniformly heated from below. Due to this ``gravity darkening'' of the equator, a meridional flow is created flowing equatorwards at the surface and thus accelerating the equatorial rotation. The effect linearly grows with the normalized pole-equator difference, epsilon , of the heat-flux at the bottom of the convection zone. A rotation rate of about 9 h leads to epsilon =0.1 for a solar-type star. In this case the resulting equator-pole differences of the angular velocity at the stellar surface, delta Omega , varies from unobservable 0.005 day-1 to the (desired) value of 0.03 day-1 when the dimensionless diffusivity factors cnu and cchi vary between 1 and 0.1 (standard value cnu =~ cchi =~ 0.3, see Table \\ref{tab1}). In all cases the related temperature differences between pole and equator at the surface are unobservably small. The (clockwise) meridional circulation which we obtain flows opposite to the (counterclockwise) circulation appearing as a byproduct in the Lambda -theory of the non-uniform rotation in outer convection zones. The consequences of this situation for those dynamo theories of stellar activity are discussed that work with the meridional circulation as the dominant magnetic-advection effect in latitude to produce the solar-like form of the butterfly diagram.

  9. Spinning Like a Blue Straggler: The Population of Fast Rotating Blue Straggler Stars in ω Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Monaco, L.

    2014-12-01

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ω Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ~40 km s-1 (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ~200 km s-1. About 40% of the sample has ve sin i > 40 km s-1 and about 20% has ve sin i > 70 km s-1. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ω Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ω Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments. Based on observations collected at the ESO-VLT under the programs 077.D-0696(A), 081.D-0356(A), and 089.D-0298(A).

  10. Chemical abundances of fast-rotating massive stars. I. Description of the methods and individual results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Constantin; Morel, Thierry; Nazé, Yaël; Rauw, Gregor; Semaan, Thierry; Daflon, Simone; Oey, M. S.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: Recent observations have challenged our understanding of rotational mixing in massive stars by revealing a population of fast-rotating objects with apparently normal surface nitrogen abundances. However, several questions have arisen because of a number of issues, which have rendered a reinvestigation necessary; these issues include the presence of numerous upper limits for the nitrogen abundance, unknown multiplicity status, and a mix of stars with different physical properties, such as their mass and evolutionary state, which are known to control the amount of rotational mixing. Methods: We have carefully selected a large sample of bright, fast-rotating early-type stars of our Galaxy (40 objects with spectral types between B0.5 and O4). Their high-quality, high-resolution optical spectra were then analysed with the stellar atmosphere modelling codes DETAIL/SURFACE or CMFGEN, depending on the temperature of the target. Several internal and external checks were performed to validate our methods; notably, we compared our results with literature data for some well-known objects, studied the effect of gravity darkening, or confronted the results provided by the two codes for stars amenable to both analyses. Furthermore, we studied the radial velocities of the stars to assess their binarity. Results: This first part of our study presents our methods and provides the derived stellar parameters, He, CNO abundances, and the multiplicity status of every star of the sample. It is the first time that He and CNO abundances of such a large number of Galactic massive fast rotators are determined in a homogeneous way. Based on observations obtained with the Heidelberg Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (HEROS) at the Telescopio Internacional de Guanajuato (TIGRE) with the SOPHIE échelle spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory (OHP; Institut Pytheas; CNRS, France), and with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph at the Magellan II Clay telescope

  11. An algorithm for computing the 2D structure of fast rotating stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieutord, Michel; Espinosa Lara, Francisco; Putigny, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Stars may be understood as self-gravitating masses of a compressible fluid whose radiative cooling is compensated by nuclear reactions or gravitational contraction. The understanding of their time evolution requires the use of detailed models that account for a complex microphysics including that of opacities, equation of state and nuclear reactions. The present stellar models are essentially one-dimensional, namely spherically symmetric. However, the interpretation of recent data like the surface abundances of elements or the distribution of internal rotation have reached the limits of validity of one-dimensional models because of their very simplified representation of large-scale fluid flows. In this article, we describe the ESTER code, which is the first code able to compute in a consistent way a two-dimensional model of a fast rotating star including its large-scale flows. Compared to classical 1D stellar evolution codes, many numerical innovations have been introduced to deal with this complex problem. First, the spectral discretization based on spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials is used to represent the 2D axisymmetric fields. A nonlinear mapping maps the spheroidal star and allows a smooth spectral representation of the fields. The properties of Picard and Newton iterations for solving the nonlinear partial differential equations of the problem are discussed. It turns out that the Picard scheme is efficient on the computation of the simple polytropic stars, but Newton algorithm is unsurpassed when stellar models include complex microphysics. Finally, we discuss the numerical efficiency of our solver of Newton iterations. This linear solver combines the iterative Conjugate Gradient Squared algorithm together with an LU-factorization serving as a preconditioner of the Jacobian matrix.

  12. NGC 1866: First Spectroscopic Detection of Fast-rotating Stars in a Young LMC Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I.; Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Bailey, J. I., III; Crane, J. D.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E. W.

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations were taken of 29 extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) stars in the young (˜200 Myr) Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) cluster, NGC 1866, using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay 6.5 m telescope. These spectra reveal the first direct detection of rapidly rotating stars whose presence has only been inferred from photometric studies. The eMSTO stars exhibit Hα emission (indicative of Be-star decretion disks), others have shallow broad Hα absorption (consistent with rotation ≳150 km s-1), or deep Hα core absorption signaling lower rotation velocities (≲150 km s-1). The spectra appear consistent with two populations of stars—one rapidly rotating, and the other, younger and slowly rotating.

  13. NGC 1866: First Spectroscopic Detection of Fast-rotating Stars in a Young LMC Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P. [Australian National University, The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bailey, J. I. III [Leiden Observatory, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Crane, J. D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Mateo, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Olszewski, E. W. [The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations were taken of 29 extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) stars in the young (∼200 Myr) Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) cluster, NGC 1866, using the Michigan/ Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan -Clay 6.5 m telescope. These spectra reveal the first direct detection of rapidly rotating stars whose presence has only been inferred from photometric studies. The eMSTO stars exhibit H α emission (indicative of Be-star decretion disks), others have shallow broad H α absorption (consistent with rotation ≳150 km s{sup −1}), or deep H α core absorption signaling lower rotation velocities (≲150 km s{sup −1}). The spectra appear consistent with two populations of stars—one rapidly rotating, and the other, younger and slowly rotating.

  14. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  15. BONA FIDE, STRONG-VARIABLE GALACTIC LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STARS ARE FAST ROTATORS: DETECTION OF A HIGH ROTATIONAL VELOCITY IN HR CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, J. H.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Teodoro, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Barba, R.; Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report optical observations of the luminous blue variable (LBV) HR Carinae which show that the star has reached a visual minimum phase in 2009. More importantly, we detected absorptions due to Si IV λλ4088-4116. To match their observed line profiles from 2009 May, a high rotational velocity of v rot ≅ 150 ± 20 km s -1 is needed (assuming an inclination angle of 30 deg.), implying that HR Car rotates at ≅0.88 ± 0.2 of its critical velocity for breakup (v crit ). Our results suggest that fast rotation is typical in all strong-variable, bona fide galactic LBVs, which present S-Dor-type variability. Strong-variable LBVs are located in a well-defined region of the HR diagram during visual minimum (the 'LBV minimum instability strip'). We suggest this region corresponds to where v crit is reached. To the left of this strip, a forbidden zone with v rot /v crit >1 is present, explaining why no LBVs are detected in this zone. Since dormant/ex LBVs like P Cygni and HD 168625 have low v rot , we propose that LBVs can be separated into two groups: fast-rotating, strong-variable stars showing S-Dor cycles (such as AG Car and HR Car) and slow-rotating stars with much less variability (such as P Cygni and HD 168625). We speculate that supernova (SN) progenitors which had S-Dor cycles before exploding (such as in SN 2001ig, SN 2003bg, and SN 2005gj) could have been fast rotators. We suggest that the potential difficulty of fast-rotating Galactic LBVs to lose angular momentum is additional evidence that such stars could explode during the LBV phase.

  16. Looking for Photometric Signatures of Fast Rotation in Intermediate-Age Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Recently, deep color-magnitude diagrams from HST data revealed that several massive intermediate-age star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds exhibit extended main-sequence turn-offs (eMSTOs). This discovery posed serious questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for the formation of massive globular clusters and their well-known multiple stellar populations. The nature of eMSTOs is a hotly debated topic of study. Several studies argued that the eMSTOs are caused by an age range of up to a few hundred Myr, while other studies indicate that eMSTOs can instead be caused by a coeval population in which the stars span a range of rotation velocities. Formal evidence to (dis-)prove either scenario still remains at large, in part because stellar tracks that incorporate the effects of rotation have so far only been available for masses > 1.7 Msun whereas the stars in the known eMSTOs of intermediate-age star clusters are less massive. In this proposal we aim to look for photometric signatures of fast rotators in eMSTO clusters that have been observed by HST in three passbands including (at least) F336W and F814W. We will study spreads in different stellar colors, testing against those predicted with the aid of von Zeipel's geometric study for a population of rotating stars with a significant spread in their inclination. Importantly, this spread due to the presence of rotation is predicted to occur along well-defined lines in color-color diagrams, in directions that are distinct from those in color-magnitude diagrams and distinct from the spread predicted for the age range scenario.

  17. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  18. Characterizing exo-ring systems around fast-rotating stars using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Watson, Christopher A.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary rings produce a distinct shape distortion in transit light curves. However, to accurately model such light curves the observations need to cover the entire transit, especially ingress and egress, as well as an out-of-transit baseline. Such observations can be challenging for long period planets, where the transits may last for over a day. Planetary rings will also impact the shape of absorption lines in the stellar spectrum, as the planet and rings cover different parts of the rotating star (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect). These line-profile distortions depend on the size, structure, opacity, obliquity and sky-projected angle of the ring system. For slow-rotating stars, this mainly impacts the amplitude of the induced velocity shift; however, for fast-rotating stars the large velocity gradient across the star allows the line distortion to be resolved, enabling direct determination of the ring parameters. We demonstrate that by modelling these distortions we can recover ring system parameters (sky-projected angle, obliquity and size) using only a small part of the transit. Substructure in the rings, e.g. gaps, can be recovered if the width of the features (δW) relative to the size of the star is similar to the intrinsic velocity resolution (set by the width of the local stellar profile, γ) relative to the stellar rotation velocity (v sini, i.e. δW/R* ≳ vsini/γ). This opens up a new way to study the ring systems around planets with long orbital periods, where observations of the full transit, covering the ingress and egress, are not always feasible.

  19. Why is there a dearth of close-in planets around fast-rotating stars?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teitler, Seth; Königl, Arieh

    2014-01-01

    We propose that the reported dearth of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) with orbital periods P orb ≲ 2-3 days around stars with rotation periods P rot ≲ 5-10 days can be attributed to tidal ingestion of close-in planets by their host stars. We show that the planet distribution in this region of the log P orb -log P rot plane is qualitatively reproduced with a model that incorporates tidal interaction and magnetic braking as well as the dependence on the stellar core-envelope coupling timescale. We demonstrate the consistency of this scenario with the inferred break in the P orb distribution of close-in KOIs and point out a potentially testable prediction of this interpretation.

  20. NuSTAR AND SWIFT Observations of the Fast Rotating Magnetized White Dwarf AE Aquarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Takao; An, Hongjun; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hayashi, Takayuki; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Rana, Vikram R.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; hide

    2014-01-01

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P(sub spin) = 33.08 s). Compared to many intermediate polars, AE Aquarii shows a soft X-ray spectrum with a very low luminosity (LX (is) approximately 10(exp 31) erg per second). We have analyzed overlapping observations of this system with the NuSTAR and the Swift X-ray observatories in 2012 September. We find the 0.5-30 keV spectra to be well fitted by either an optically thin thermal plasma model with three temperatures of 0.75(+0.18 / -0.45), 2.29(+0.96 / -0.82), and 9.33 (+6.07 / -2.18) keV, or an optically thin thermal plasma model with two temperatures of 1.00 (+0.34 / -0.23) and 4.64 (+1.58 / -0.84) keV plus a power-law component with photon index of 2.50 (+0.17 / -0.23). The pulse profile in the 3-20 keV band is broad and approximately sinusoidal, with a pulsed fraction of 16.6% +/- 2.3%. We do not find any evidence for a previously reported sharp feature in the pulse profile.

  1. Rotating relativistic neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1991-07-21

    Models of rotating neutron stars are constructed in the framework of Einstein's theory of general relativity. For this purpose a refined version of Hartle's method is applied. The properties of these objects, e.g. gravitational mass, equatorial and polar radius, eccentricity, red- and blueshift, quadrupole moment, are investigated for Kepler frequencies of 4000 s{sup {minus}1} {le} {Omega}{sub K} {le} 9000 s{sup {minus}1}. Therefore a self-consistency problem inherent in the determination of {Omega}{sub K} must be solved. The investigation is based on neutron star matter equations of state derived from the relativistic Martin-Schwinger hierarch of coupled Green's functions. By means of introducing the Hartree, Hartree-Fock, and ladder ({Lambda}) approximations, models of the equation of state derived. A special feature of the latter approximation scheme is the inclusion of dynamical two-particle correlations. These have been calculated from the relativistic T-matrix applying both the HEA and Bonn meson-exchange potentials of the nucleon-nucleon force. The nuclear forces of the former two treatments are those of the standard scalar-vector-isovector model of quantum hadron dynamics, with parameters adjusted to the nuclear matter data. An important aspect of this work consists in testing the compatibility of different competing models of the nuclear equation of state with data on pulsar periods. By this the fundamental problem of nuclear physics concerning the behavior of the equation of state at supernuclear densities can be treated.

  2. THE FAST-ROTATING, LOW-GRAVITY SUBDWARF B STAR EC 22081-1916: REMNANT OF A COMMON ENVELOPE MERGER EVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, S.; Classen, L.; Heber, U.

    2011-01-01

    Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes. In order to form an sdB, the progenitor has to lose almost all of its hydrogen envelope right at the tip of the red-giant branch. In binary systems, mass transfer to the companion provides the extraordinary mass loss required for their formation. However, apparently single sdBs exist as well and their formation has been unclear for decades. The merger of helium white dwarfs (He-WDs) leading to an ignition of core helium burning or the merger of a helium core and a low-mass star during the common envelope phase have been proposed as processes leading to sdB formation. Here we report the discovery of EC 22081-1916 as a fast-rotating, single sdB star of low gravity. Its atmospheric parameters indicate that the hydrogen envelope must be unusually thick, which is at variance with the He-WD merger scenario, but consistent with a common envelope merger of a low-mass, possibly substellar object with a red-giant core.

  3. Numerical study of rotating relativistic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of structure for rotating stars in general relativity are presented and put in a form suitable for computer calculations. The results of equilibrium calculations for supermassive stars, neutron stars, and magnetically supported stars are reported, as are calculations of collapsing, rotating, and magnetized stars in the slowly changing gravitational field approximation. (auth)

  4. Quark Deconfinement in Rotating Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Mellinger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use a three flavor non-local Nambu–Jona-Lasinio (NJL model, an improved effective model of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD at low energies, to investigate the existence of deconfined quarks in the cores of neutron stars. Particular emphasis is put on the possible existence of quark matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars (pulsars. In contrast to non-rotating neutron stars, whose particle compositions do not change with time (are frozen in, the type and structure of the matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars depends on the spin frequencies of these stars, which opens up a possible new window on the nature of matter deep in the cores of neutron stars. Our study shows that, depending on mass and rotational frequency, up to around 8% of the mass of a massive neutron star may be in the mixed quark-hadron phase, if the phase transition is treated as a Gibbs transition. We also find that the gravitational mass at which quark deconfinement occurs in rotating neutron stars varies quadratically with spin frequency, which can be fitted by a simple formula.

  5. Rotational properties of magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Hümmerich, S.; Bernhard, K.

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars of the upper main sequence exhibit strong and globally organized magnetic fields that are inclined to the rotational axis and facilitate the development of surface abundance inhomogeneities resulting in photometric and spectroscopic variability. Photometric time series data are much easier to obtain than spectroscopic/polarimetric data or are available from large surveys, thus the number of known rotational periods increased significantly during the last years. Furthermore, Gaia data allow us to place an unprecedentedly large sample of mCP stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and to investigate evolutionary effects. In this paper we review the rotational properties of mCP stars and discuss open issues of stellar rotation in the presence of strong magnetic fields.

  6. Triaxial instabilities in rapidly rotating Neutron Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Arkadip

    2018-03-01

    Viscosity driven bar mode secular instabilities of rapidly rotating neutron stars are studied using LORENE/Nrotstar code. These instabilities set a more rigorous limit to the rotation frequency of a neutron star than the Kepler frequency/mass-shedding limit. The procedure employed in the code comprises of perturbing an axisymmetric and stationary configuration of a neutron star and studying its evolution by constructing a series of triaxial quasi-equilibrium configurations. Symmetry breaking point was found out for Polytropic as well as 10 realistic Equations of states (EOS) from the CompOSE database. The concept of piecewise polytropic EOSs has been used to comprehend the rotational instability of Realistic EOSs and validated with 19 different Realistic EOSs from CompOSE. The possibility of detecting quasi-periodic gravitational waves from viscosity driven instability with ground-based LIGO/VIRGO interferometers is also discussed very briefly.

  7. Regolith on Super Fast Rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Lana, Diego Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2017-10-01

    The current understanding of small asteroids in the Solar System is that they are gravitational aggregates held together by gravitational, cohesive and adhesive forces. Results from the Hayabusa mission to Itokawa along with in situ, thermal and radar observations of asteroids have shown that they can be covered in a size distribution of grains that spans from microns to tens of meters. Before the Hayabusa mission, it was generally thought that smaller asteroids would likely be “regolith-free,” due to impact seismic shaking removing the loose covering. Given the regolith-rich surface of that body, it is now an open question whether even smaller bodies, down to a few meters in size, could also retain regolith covering. The question is especially compelling for the small-fast rotators, whose surface centripetal accelerations exceed their gravitational attraction. When the physical theory of cohesion is considered, it becomes possible for small-fast rotators to retain regolith.We use a Soft-Sphere discrete element method (SSDEM) code to simulate a longitudinal slice of a spherical monolith covered by cohesive regolith. The simulations are carried out in the body frame. Tensile strength is varied to span the observed strength of asteroids and spin rate is elevated in small steps until the majority of regolith is removed from the surface. The simulations show that under an increasing spin rate (such as due to the YORP effect), the regolith covering on an otherwise monolithic asteroid is preferentially lost across certain regions of the body. In general, regolith from the mid latitudes is the first to fail at high spin rates. This failure happens either by regolith flowing towards the equator or by detachment of large coherent chunks of material depending on the tensile strength of the regolith. Regolith from the equator region fails next, usually by the detachment of large pieces. Regolith from the poles stays in place unless the spin rates are extremely high. With

  8. Physics, Formation and Evolution of Rotating Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, André

    2009-01-01

    Rotation is ubiquitous at each step of stellar evolution, from star formation to the final stages, and it affects the course of evolution, the timescales and nucleosynthesis. Stellar rotation is also an essential prerequisite for the occurrence of Gamma-Ray Bursts. In this book the author thoroughly examines the basic mechanical and thermal effects of rotation, their influence on mass loss by stellar winds, the effects of differential rotation and its associated instabilities, the relation with magnetic fields and the evolution of the internal and surface rotation. Further, he discusses the numerous observational signatures of rotational effects obtained from spectroscopy and interferometric observations, as well as from chemical abundance determinations, helioseismology and asteroseismology, etc. On an introductory level, this book presents in a didactical way the basic concepts of stellar structure and evolution in "track 1" chapters. The other more specialized chapters form an advanced course on the gradua...

  9. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    1992-11-01

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M=1.442Msolar neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars.

  10. Limiting rotational period of neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-01-01

    We seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties in which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M=1.442M circle-dot neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). A still lower curve, based only on the structure of Einstein's equations, limits any star whatsoever to lie in the plane above it. Hypothetical stars such as strange stars, if the matter of which they are made is self-bound in bulk at a sufficiently large equilibrium energy density, can lie in the region above the general-relativistic forbidden region, and in the region forbidden to neutron stars

  11. Secular stability of rotating stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, J.N.; Friedman, J.L.; Durisen, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this work, we calculate the secular stability limits of rotating polytropes to nonaxisymmetric perturbations of low m. We consider polytropic indices ranging from 1 to 3 and several angular momentum distributions. Results are most conveniently presented in terms of the t-parameter, defined as the ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the absolute value of the gravitational energy of the fluid. Previous work on polytropes considered only the m = 2 mode, which is unstable for values of the t-parameter greater than 0.14 +- 0.01 for the n values n = 1.5 and 3 and the angular momentum distributions tested (see Durisen and Imamura 1981). The GRR secular stability limit of the m = 2 mode for the Maclaurin spheroids (n = O) was determined by Chandrasekhar (1970). GRR stability limits of higher m modes for the Maclaurin spheroids were located approximately by Comins (1979a,b) and more precisely by Friedman (1983)

  12. Rotation and magnetism in intermediate mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Léo G.; Tout, Christopher A.

    2018-03-01

    Rotation and magnetism are increasingly recognized as important phenomena in stellar evolution. Surface magnetic fields from a few to 20, 000 G have been observed and models have suggested that magnetohydrodynamic transport of angular momentum and chemical composition could explain the peculiar composition of some stars. Stellar remnants such as white dwarfs have been observed with fields from a few to more than 109 G. We investigate the origin of and the evolution, on thermal and nuclear rather than dynamical time-scales, of an averaged large-scale magnetic field throughout a star's life and its coupling to stellar rotation. Large-scale magnetic fields sustained until late stages of stellar evolution with conservation of magnetic flux could explain the very high fields observed in white dwarfs. We include these effects in the Cambridge stellar evolution code using three time-dependant advection-diffusion equations coupled to the structural and composition equations of stars to model the evolution of angular momentum and the two components of the magnetic field. We present the evolution in various cases for a 3 M_{⊙} star from the beginning to the late stages of its life. Our particular model assumes that turbulent motions, including convection, favour small-scale field at the expense of large-scale field. As a result the large-scale field concentrates in radiative zones of the star and so is exchanged between the core and the envelope of the star as it evolves. The field is sustained until the end of the asymptotic giant branch, when it concentrates in the degenerate core.

  13. Shoot the Stars--Focus on Earth's Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Provides background information on the equipment and knowledge necessary to do an astronomy activity on the earth's rotation. Details an activity in which students can measure the rotation of the earth using a camera and the stars. (CW)

  14. An investigation of the rotational properties of magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopil, Martin; Paunzen, Ernst; Hümmerich, Stefan; Bernhard, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    The magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars of the upper main sequence exhibit strong, globally organized magnetic fields that are inclined to the rotational axis and facilitate the development of surface abundance inhomogeneities resulting in photometric and spectroscopic variability. Therefore, mCP stars are perfectly suited for a direct measurement of the rotational period without the need for any additional calibrations. We have investigated the rotational properties of mCP stars based on an unprecedentedly large sample consisting of more than 500 objects with known rotational periods. Using precise parallaxes from the Hipparcos and Gaia satellite missions, well-established photometric calibrations and state-of-the-art evolutionary models, we have determined the location of our sample stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and derived astrophysical parameters such as stellar masses, effective temperature, radii, inclinations and critical rotational velocities. We have confirmed the conservation of angular momentum during the main sequence evolution; no signs of additional magnetic braking were found. The inclination angles of the rotational axes are randomly distributed, although an apparent excess of fast rotators with comparable inclination angles has been observed. We have found a rotation rate of υ/υcrit ≥ 0.5 for several stars, whose characteristics cannot be explained by current models. For the first time, we have derived the relationship between mass and rotation rate of mCP stars, and provide an analysis that links mass and rotation with magnetic field strength. Our sample is unique and offers crucial input for forthcoming evolutionary models that include the effects of magnetic fields for upper main sequence stars.

  15. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2M {sub CircleDot}). The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered. (orig.)

  16. Rotational velocity distribution of A stars: Searching for intrinsic slowly rotating normal A0-A1 stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, F.; Gebran, M.; Monier, R.; Caraty, Y.; Kiliçoğlu, T.; Pintado, O.; Adelman, S.; Smalley, B.; Reiners, A.; Hill, G.; Gulliver, A.

    2012-12-01

    Royer et al. (2007) showed that the distribution of rotational velocities for A0-A1 stars is bimodal although all known peculiar and/or binary stars had been excluded from their sample. We present here the preliminary results of the abundance analysis for 47 A0-A1 ``normal'' main sequence stars selected with v sin i slower than 65 kms. These high signal-to-noise spectra collected with ÉLODIE and SOPHIE (OHP) will allow us to obtain a clean sample of low v sin i normal A0-A1 stars and search for intrinsic slow rotators.

  17. 12000 rotation periods of Kepler stars (Nielsen+, 2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.

    2013-01-01

    Rotation periods of 12253 stars in the Kepler field. The periods are determined by the brightness variations, from star spots or active regions, in the light curves of the white light photometry obtained by the Kepler spacecraft. The median absolute deviation from the median (MAD) of the periods...

  18. Anelastic Models of Fully-Convective Stars: Differential Rotation, Meridional Circulation and Residual Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix; Browning, Matthew; Miesch, Mark; Featherstone, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    Low-Mass stars are typically fully convective, and as such their dynamics may differ significantly from sun-like stars. Here we present a series of 3D anelastic HD and MHD simulations of fully convective stars, designed to investigate how the meridional circulation, the differential rotation, and residual entropy are affected by both varying stellar parameters, such as the luminosity or the rotation rate, and by the presence of a magnetic field. We also investigate, more specifically, a theoretical model in which isorotation contours and residual entropy (σ‧ = σ ‑ σ(r)) are intrinsically linked via the thermal wind equation (as proposed in the Solar context by Balbus in 2009). We have selected our simulation parameters in such as way as to span the transition between Solar-like differential rotation (fast equator + slow poles) and ‘anti-Solar’ differential rotation (slow equator + fast poles), as characterised by the convective Rossby number and △Ω. We illustrate the transition from single-celled to multi-celled MC profiles, and from positive to negative latitudinal entropy gradients. We show that an extrapolation involving both TWB and the σ‧/Ω link provides a reasonable estimate for the interior profile of our fully convective stars. Finally, we also present a selection of MHD simulations which exhibit an almost unsuppressed differential rotation profile, with energy balances remaining dominated by kinetic components.

  19. ROTATING STARS FROM KEPLER OBSERVED WITH GAIA DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, James R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Astrometric data from the recent Gaia Data Release 1 have been matched against the sample of stars from Kepler with known rotation periods. A total of 1299 bright rotating stars were recovered from the subset of Gaia sources with good astrometric solutions, most with temperatures above 5000 K. From these sources, 894 were selected as lying near the main sequence using their absolute G -band magnitudes. These main-sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered roughly around a 600 Myr rotation isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler , but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiants. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting that the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within ∼300 pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. This work emphasizes the unique power for understanding stellar populations that is created by combining temporal monitoring from Kepler with astrometric data from Gaia .

  20. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-10-01

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - A convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX. The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1 × 1 × 3 mm 3 for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33.3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1.7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D 90 , HR-CTV D 100 , rectum D 2cc , sigmoid D 2cc , and bladder D 2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. For all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 s for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 s for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D 90 , organ at risk (OAR) D 2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Investigating the Magnetospheres of Rapidly Rotating B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, C. L.; Petit, V.; Nazé, Y.; Wade, G. A.; Townsend, R. H.; Owocki, S. P.; Cohen, D. H.; David-Uraz, A.; Shultz, M.

    2017-11-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.

  2. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  3. Asymmetric core collapse of rapidly rotating massive star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2018-02-01

    Non-axisymmetric features are found in the core collapse of a rapidly rotating massive star, which might have important implications for magnetic field amplification and production of a bipolar outflow that can explode the star, as well as for r-process nucleosynthesis and natal kicks. The collapse of an evolved rapidly rotating MZAMS = 54 M⊙ star is followed in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code with neutrino leakage. A rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) forms with a non-zero linear velocity. This can contribute to the natal kick of the remnant compact object. The PNS is surrounded by a turbulent medium, where high shearing is likely to amplify magnetic fields, which in turn can drive a bipolar outflow. Neutron-rich material in the PNS vicinity might induce strong r-process nucleosynthesis. The rapidly rotating PNS possesses a rotational energy of E_rot ≳ 10^{52} erg. Magnetar formation proceeding in a similar fashion will be able to deposit a portion of this energy later on in the supernova ejecta through a spin-down mechanism. These processes can be important for rare supernovae generated by rapidly rotating progenitors, even though a complete explosion is not simulated in the present study.

  4. Effects of rotation on the evolution of primordial stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, S.; Meynet, G.; Chiappini, C.; Hirschi, R.; Maeder, A.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Although still beyond our observational abilities, Population III stars are interesting objects from many perspectives. They are responsible for the re-ionisation of the inter-galactic medium. They also left their chemical imprint in the early Universe, which can be deciphered in the most metal-poor stars in the halo of our Galaxy. Aims: Rotation has been shown to play a determinant role at very low metallicity, bringing heavy mass loss where almost none was expected. Is this still true when the metallicity strictly equals zero? The aim of our study is to answer this question, and to determine how rotation changes the evolution and the chemical signature of the primordial stars. Methods: We have calculated seven differentially-rotating stellar models at zero metallicity, with masses between 9 and 200 M⊙. For each mass, we also calculated a corresponding model without rotation. The evolution is followed up to the pre-supernova stage. Results: We find that Z=0 models rotate with an internal profile Ω(r) close to local angular momentum conservation, because of a very weak core-envelope coupling. Rotational mixing drives an H-shell boost due to a sudden onset of the CNO cycle in the shell. This boost leads to a high 14N production, which can be as much as 106 times higher than the production of the non-rotating models. Generally, the rotating models produce much more metal than their non-rotating counterparts. The mass loss is very low, even for the models that reach critical velocity during the main sequence. It may however have an impact on the chemical enrichment of the Universe, because some of the stars are supposed to collapse directly into black holes. They would contribute to the enrichment only through their winds. While in that case non-rotating stars would not contribute at all, rotating stars may leave an imprint on their surrounding. Due to the low mass loss and the weak coupling, the core retains a high angular momentum at the end of the

  5. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the different quenching histories of fast and slow rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Masters, K. L.; Lintott, C. J.; Weijmans, A.; Merrifield, M.; Penny, S. J.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Brownstein, J.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D. R.; Nichol, R. C.

    2018-01-01

    Do the theorized different formation mechanisms of fast and slow rotators produce an observable difference in their star formation histories? To study this, we identify quenching slow rotators in the MaNGA sample by selecting those that lie below the star-forming sequence and identify a sample of quenching fast rotators that were matched in stellar mass. This results in a total sample of 194 kinematically classified galaxies, which is agnostic to visual morphology. We use u - r and NUV - u colours from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX and an existing inference package, STARPY, to conduct a first look at the onset time and exponentially declining rate of quenching of these galaxies. An Anderson-Darling test on the distribution of the inferred quenching rates across the two kinematic populations reveals they are statistically distinguishable (3.2σ). We find that fast rotators quench at a much wider range of rates than slow rotators, consistent with a wide variety of physical processes such as secular evolution, minor mergers, gas accretion and environmentally driven mechanisms. Quenching is more likely to occur at rapid rates (τ ≲ 1 Gyr) for slow rotators, in agreement with theories suggesting slow rotators are formed in dynamically fast processes, such as major mergers. Interestingly, we also find that a subset of the fast rotators quench at these same rapid rates as the bulk of the slow rotator sample. We therefore discuss how the total gas mass of a merger, rather than the merger mass ratio, may decide a galaxy's ultimate kinematic fate.

  6. Supersaturation and activity-rotation relation in PMS stars: the young cluster h Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Flaccomio, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Several studies showed that the magnetic activity of late-type main-sequence (MS) stars is characterized by different regimes and that their activity levels are well described by the Rossby number, Ro, defined as the ratio between the rotational period Prot and the convective turnover time. Very young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars show, similarly to MS stars, intense magnetic activity. However, they do not show clear activity-rotation trends, and it still debated which stellar parameters determine their magnetic activity levels. Aims: To bridge the gap between MS and PMS stars, we studied the activity-rotation relation in the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster, that contains both fast and slow rotators. The cluster members have ended their accretion phase and have developed a radiative core. It therefore offers us the opportunity of studying the activity level of intermediate-age PMS stars with different rotational velocities, excluding any interactions with the circumstellar environment. Methods: We constrained the magnetic activity levels of h Per members by measuring their X-ray emission from a Chandra observation, while rotational periods were obtained previously in the framework of the MONITOR project. By cross-correlating these data, we collected a final catalog of 414 h Per members with known rotational period, effective temperature, and mass. In 169 of these, X-ray emission has also been detected. Results: We found that h Per members with 1.0 M⊙fast rotators clearly show supersaturation, while slower rotators have activity levels compatible to the non-saturated regime. At 13 Myr, h Per is therefore the youngest cluster showing activity-rotation regimes analogous to those of MS stars, indicating that at this age, magnetic field production is most likely regulated by the αΩ type dynamo. Moreover, we observed that supersaturation is better described by Prot than Ro, and that the

  7. The triggered star formation in rotating disks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 281, 1-2 (2002), s. 101-104 ISSN 0004-640X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003705; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : star formation * interstellar medium Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.383, year: 2002

  8. Extended I-Love relations for slowly rotating neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Bischoff, Jérémie; Green, Stephen R.; Landry, Philippe; Ortiz, Néstor

    2018-03-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from inspiralling neutron star binaries—such as GW170817—can be used to constrain the nuclear equation of state by placing bounds on stellar tidal deformability. For slowly rotating neutron stars, the response to a weak quadrupolar tidal field is characterized by four internal-structure-dependent constants called "Love numbers." The tidal Love numbers k2el and k2mag measure the tides raised by the gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic components of the applied field, and the rotational-tidal Love numbers fo and ko measure those raised by couplings between the applied field and the neutron star spin. In this work, we compute these four Love numbers for perfect fluid neutron stars with realistic equations of state. We discover (nearly) equation-of-state independent relations between the rotational-tidal Love numbers and the moment of inertia, thereby extending the scope of I-Love-Q universality. We find that similar relations hold among the tidal and rotational-tidal Love numbers. These relations extend the applications of I-Love universality in gravitational-wave astronomy. As our findings differ from those reported in the literature, we derive general formulas for the rotational-tidal Love numbers in post-Newtonian theory and confirm numerically that they agree with our general-relativistic computations in the weak-field limit.

  9. for the internal rotation evolution of low-mass stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinçon Charly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler, noteworthy breakthroughs have been made in our understanding of stellar evolution, and in particular about the angular momentum redistribution in stellar interiors. Indeed, the high-precision seismic data provide with the measurement of the mean core rotation rate for thousands of low-mass stars from the subgiant branch to the red giant branch. All these observations exhibit much lower core rotation rates than expected by current stellar evolution codes and they emphasize the need for an additional transport process. In this framework, internal gravity waves (herefater, IGW could play a signifivative role since they are known to be able to transport angular momentum. In this work, we estimate the effciency of the transport by the IGW that are generated by penetrative convection at the interface between the convective and the radiative regions. As a first step, this study is based on the comparison between the timescale for the waves to modify a given rotation profile and the contraction/expansion timescale throughout the radiative zone of 1.3M⊙ stellar models. We show that IGW, on their own, are ineffcient to slow down the core rotation of stars on the red giant branch, where the radiative damping becomes strong enough and prevent the IGW from reaching the innermost layers. However, we find that IGW generated by penetrative convection could effciently modify the core rotation of subgiant stars as soon as the amplitude of the radial differential rotation between the core and the base of the convective zone is high enough, with typical values close to the observed rotation rates in these stars. This result argues for the necessity to account for IGW generated by penetrative convection in stellar modeling and in the angular momentum redistribution issue.

  10. Slowly rotating general relativistic superfluid neutron stars with relativistic entrainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comer, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron stars that are cold enough should have two or more superfluids or supercondutors in their inner crusts and cores. The implication of superfluidity or superconductivity for equilibrium and dynamical neutron star states is that each individual particle species that forms a condensate must have its own, independent number density current and equation of motion that determines that current. An important consequence of the quasiparticle nature of each condensate is the so-called entrainment effect; i.e., the momentum of a condensate is a linear combination of its own current and those of the other condensates. We present here the first fully relativistic modeling of slowly rotating superfluid neutron stars with entrainment that is accurate to the second-order in the rotation rates. The stars consist of superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons, and a highly degenerate, relativistic gas of electrons. We use a relativistic σ-ω mean field model for the equation of state of the matter and the entrainment. We determine the effect of a relative rotation between the neutrons and protons on a star's total mass, shape, and Kepler, mass-shedding limit

  11. Evidence from K2 for Rapid Rotation in the Descendant of an Intermediate-mass Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, J. J.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Bell, Keaton J.; Dunlap, B. H.; Montgomery, M. H.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Redfield, S.

    2017-05-01

    Using patterns in the oscillation frequencies of a white dwarf observed by K2, we have measured the fastest rotation rate (1.13 ± 0.02 hr) of any isolated pulsating white dwarf known to date. Balmer-line fits to follow-up spectroscopy from the SOAR telescope show that the star (SDSSJ0837+1856, EPIC 211914185) is a 13,590+/- 340 K, 0.87 ± 0.03 M ⊙ white dwarf. This is the highest mass measured for any pulsating white dwarf with known rotation, suggesting a possible link between high mass and fast rotation. If it is the product of single-star evolution, its progenitor was a roughly 4.0 M ⊙ main-sequence B star; we know very little about the angular momentum evolution of such intermediate-mass stars. We explore the possibility that this rapidly rotating white dwarf is the byproduct of a binary merger, which we conclude is unlikely given the pulsation periods observed.

  12. Three-hair relations for rotating stars: Nonrelativistic limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Leo C. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás, E-mail: leostein@astro.cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The gravitational field outside of astrophysical black holes is completely described by their mass and spin frequency, as expressed by the no-hair theorems. These theorems assume vacuum spacetimes, and thus they apply only to black holes and not to stars. Despite this, we analytically find that the gravitational potential of arbitrarily rapid, rigidly rotating stars can still be described completely by only their mass, spin angular momentum, and quadrupole moment. Although these results are obtained in the nonrelativistic limit (to leading order in a weak-field expansion of general relativity, GR), they are also consistent with fully relativistic numerical calculations of rotating neutron stars. This description of the gravitational potential outside the source in terms of just three quantities is approximately universal (independent of equation of state). Such universality may be used to break degeneracies in pulsar and future gravitational wave observations to extract more physics and test GR in the strong-field regime.

  13. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  14. Rotational energy conversion and thermal evolution of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cui; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Na

    2017-12-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, strongly magnetized neutron stars. Their electromagnetic dipole radiation is usually assumed to be at the expense of the rotational energy. In this work, we consider a new channel through which rotational energy could be radiated away directly via neutrinos. With this new energy conversion channel, we can improve the chemical heating mechanism that originates in the deviation from β equilibrium due to spin-down compression. The improved chemical and thermal evolution equations with different magnetic field strengths are solved numerically. The results show that the new energy conversion channel could raise the surface temperature of neutron stars, especially for weak field stars at later stages of their evolution. Moreover, our results indicate that the new energy conversion channel induced by the non-equilibrium reaction processes should be taken into account in the study of thermal evolution. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11373006) and the West Light Foundation of Chinese Academy of Sciences (ZD201302)

  15. macula: Rotational modulations in the photometry of spotted stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Photometric rotational modulations due to starspots remain the most common and accessible way to study stellar activity. Modelling rotational modulations allows one to invert the observations into several basic parameters, such as the rotation period, spot coverage, stellar inclination and differential rotation rate. The most widely used analytic model for this inversion comes from Budding (1977) and Dorren (1987), who considered circular, grey starspots for a linearly limb darkened star. That model is extended to be more suitable in the analysis of high precision photometry such as that by Kepler. Macula, a Fortran 90 code, provides several improvements, such as non-linear limb darkening of the star and spot, a single-domain analytic function, partial derivatives for all input parameters, temporal partial derivatives, diluted light compensation, instrumental offset normalisations, differential rotation, starspot evolution and predictions of transit depth variations due to unocculted spots. The inclusion of non-linear limb darkening means macula has a maximum photometric error an order-of-magnitude less than that of Dorren (1987) for Sun-like stars observed in the Kepler-bandpass. The code executes three orders-of-magnitude faster than comparable numerical codes making it well-suited for inference problems.

  16. The VLT FLAMES Survey of Massive Stars: Rotation and nitrogen enrichment as the key to understanding massive star evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, I.; Brott, I.; Lennon, D.J.; Langer, N.; Dufton, P.L.; Trundle, C.; Smartt, S.J.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C.J.; Ryans, R.S.I.

    2008-01-01

    Rotation has become an important element in evolutionary models of massive stars, specifically via the prediction of rotational mixing. Here we study a sample of stars, including rapid rotators, to constrain such models and use nitrogen enrichments as a probe of the mixing process. Chemical

  17. K2 spots rotation in the helium star HD144941

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, C. Simon; Ramsay, Gavin

    2018-02-01

    HD144941 is an evolved early-type metal-poor low-mass star with a hydrogen-poor surface. It is frequently associated with other intermediate helium-rich subdwarfs and extreme helium stars. Previous photometric studies have failed to detect any variability. New observations with the K2 mission show complex but periodic variations with a full amplitude of 4 parts per thousand. It is proposed that these are due to an inhomogeneous surface brightness distribution (spots) superimposed on a rotation period of 13.9 ± 0.2 d. The cause of the surface inhomogeneity is not identified, although an oblique dipolar magnetic field origin is plausible.

  18. K2 spots rotation in the helium star HD144941

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, C. Simon; Ramsay, Gavin

    2018-03-01

    HD144941 is an evolved early-type metal-poor low-mass star with a hydrogen-poor surface. It is frequently associated with other intermediate helium-rich subdwarfs and extreme helium stars. Previous photometric studies have failed to detect any variability. New observations with the K2 mission show complex but periodic variations with a full amplitude of 4 parts per thousand. It is proposed that these are due to an inhomogeneous surface brightness distribution (spots) superimposed on a rotation period of 13.9 ± 0.2 d. The cause of the surface inhomogeneity is not identified, although an oblique dipolar magnetic field origin is plausible.

  19. A catalog of rotational and radial velocities for evolved stars. V. Southern stars

    OpenAIRE

    {De Medeiros} J.~R.; {Alves} S.; {Udry} S.; {Andersen} J.; {Nordström}} B.; {Mayor} M.

    2014-01-01

    Rotational and radial velocities have been measured for 1589 evolved stars of spectral types F, G and K and luminosity classes IV, III, II and Ib, based on observations carried out with the CORAVEL spectrometers. The precision in radial velocity is better than 0.30 km/s per observation, whereas rotational velocity uncertainties are typically 1.0 km/s for subgiants and giants and 2.0 km/s for class II giants and Ib supergiants.

  20. Centrifugal instability in the regime of fast rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, R.; Rax, J. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-08-01

    Centrifugal instability, which stems from a difference between the azimuthal angular drift velocity of ions and electrons, is studied in the limit of fast rotation for which ions can rotate up to twice as fast as electrons. As the angular velocity approaches the so-called Brillouin limit, the growth rate for the centrifugal instability in a collisionless solid-body rotating plasma increases markedly and is proportional to the azimuthal mode number. For large wavenumbers, electron inertia effects set in and lead to a cut-off. Interestingly, conditions for the onset of this instability appear to overlap with the operating conditions envisioned for plasma mass separation devices.

  1. Rotation, activity, and lithium abundance in cool binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.; Järvinen, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have used two robotic telescopes to obtain time-series high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy and V I and/or by photometry for a sample of 60 active stars, mostly binaries. Orbital solutions are presented for 26 double-lined systems and for 19 single-lined systems, seven of them for the first time but all of them with unprecedented phase coverage and accuracy. Eighteen systems turned out to be single stars. The total of 6609 {R=55 000} échelle spectra are also used to systematically determine effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, rotational velocities, lithium abundances and absolute Hα-core fluxes as a function of time. The photometry is used to infer unspotted brightness, {V-I} and/or b-y colors, spot-induced brightness amplitudes and precise rotation periods. An extra 22 radial-velocity standard stars were monitored throughout the science observations and yield a new barycentric zero point for our STELLA/SES robotic system. Our data are complemented by literature data and are used to determine rotation-temperature-activity relations for active binary components. We also relate lithium abundance to rotation and surface temperature. We find that 74 % of all known rapidly-rotating active binary stars are synchronized and in circular orbits but 26 % (61 systems) are rotating asynchronously of which half have {P_rot>P_orb} and {e>0}. Because rotational synchronization is predicted to occur before orbital circularization active binaries should undergo an extra spin-down besides tidal dissipation. We suspect this to be due to a magnetically channeled wind with its subsequent braking torque. We find a steep increase of rotation period with decreasing effective temperature for active stars, P_rot ∝ T_eff-7, for both single and binaries, main sequence and evolved. For inactive, single giants with {P_rot>100} d, the relation is much weaker, {P_rot ∝ T_eff-1.12}. Our data also indicate a period-activity relation for Hα of the form {R_Hα ∝ P

  2. Slowly-rotating neutron stars in massive bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, A.; Yunes, N.

    2018-02-01

    We study slowly-rotating neutron stars in ghost-free massive bigravity. This theory modifies general relativity by introducing a second, auxiliary but dynamical tensor field that couples to matter through the physical metric tensor through non-linear interactions. We expand the field equations to linear order in slow rotation and numerically construct solutions in the interior and exterior of the star with a set of realistic equations of state. We calculate the physical mass function with respect to observer radius and find that, unlike in general relativity, this function does not remain constant outside the star; rather, it asymptotes to a constant a distance away from the surface, whose magnitude is controlled by the ratio of gravitational constants. The Vainshtein-like radius at which the physical and auxiliary mass functions asymptote to a constant is controlled by the graviton mass scaling parameter, and outside this radius, bigravity modifications are suppressed. We also calculate the frame-dragging metric function and find that bigravity modifications are typically small in the entire range of coupling parameters explored. We finally calculate both the mass-radius and the moment of inertia-mass relations for a wide range of coupling parameters and find that both the graviton mass scaling parameter and the ratio of the gravitational constants introduce large modifications to both. These results could be used to place future constraints on bigravity with electromagnetic and gravitational-wave observations of isolated and binary neutron stars.

  3. Differential rotation in solar-like stars from global simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, G.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Solar Physics, HEPL, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); Mansour, N. N., E-mail: gag@stanford.edu, E-mail: sasha@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: nagi.n.mansour@nasa.gov [NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94040 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    To explore the physics of large-scale flows in solar-like stars, we perform three-dimensional anelastic simulations of rotating convection for global models with stratification resembling the solar interior. The numerical method is based on an implicit large-eddy simulation approach designed to capture effects from non-resolved small scales. We obtain two regimes of differential rotation, with equatorial zonal flows accelerated either in the direction of rotation (solar-like) or in the opposite direction (anti-solar). While the models with the solar-like differential rotation tend to produce multiple cells of meridional circulation, the models with anti-solar differential rotation result in only one or two meridional cells. Our simulations indicate that the rotation and large-scale flow patterns critically depend on the ratio between buoyancy and Coriolis forces. By including a sub-adiabatic layer at the bottom of the domain, corresponding to the stratification of a radiative zone, we reproduce a layer of strong radial shear similar to the solar tachocline. Similarly, enhanced super-adiabaticity at the top results in a near-surface shear layer located mainly at lower latitudes. The models reveal a latitudinal entropy gradient localized at the base of the convection zone and in the stable region, which, however, does not propagate across the convection zone. In consequence, baroclinicity effects remain small, and the rotation isocontours align in cylinders along the rotation axis. Our results confirm the alignment of large convective cells along the rotation axis in the deep convection zone and suggest that such 'banana-cell' pattern can be hidden beneath the supergranulation layer.

  4. Li abundances in F stars: planets, rotation, and Galactic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Bertrán de Lis, S.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Sousa, S. G.; Figueira, P.; Mortier, A.; González Hernández, J. I.; Tsantaki, M.; Israelian, G.; Santos, N. C.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We aim, on the one hand, to study the possible differences of Li abundances between planet hosts and stars without detected planets at effective temperatures hotter than the Sun, and on the other hand, to explore the Li dip and the evolution of Li at high metallicities. Methods: We present lithium abundances for 353 main sequence stars with and without planets in the Teff range 5900-7200 K. We observed 265 stars of our sample with HARPS spectrograph during different planets search programs. We observed the remaining targets with a variety of high-resolution spectrographs. The abundances are derived by a standard local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using spectral synthesis with the code MOOG and a grid of Kurucz ATLAS9 atmospheres. Results: We find that hot jupiter host stars within the Teff range 5900-6300 K show lower Li abundances, by 0.14 dex, than stars without detected planets. This offset has a significance at the level 7σ, pointing to a stronger effect of planet formation on Li abundances when the planets are more massive and migrate close to the star. However, we also find that the average vsini of (a fraction of) stars with hot jupiters is higher on average than for single stars in the same Teff region, suggesting that rotational-induced mixing (and not the presence of planets) might be the cause for a greater depletion of Li. We confirm that the mass-metallicity dependence of the Li dip is extended towards [Fe/H] ~ 0.4 dex (beginning at [Fe/H] ~-0.4 dex for our stars) and that probably reflects the mass-metallicity correlation of stars of the same Teff on the main sequence. We find that for the youngest stars (FIES and SARG spectrographs at the 2.5 m NOT and the 3.6 m TNG, respectively, both at La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain).Tables 3-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Unveiling the Role of Galactic Rotation on Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utreras, José; Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala {{{Σ }}}{SFR}\\propto \\sqrt{G/L}{{{Σ }}}{gas}1.5. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk Ω for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of -1.9{{Ω }}{t}{ff}{ini}, where {t}{ff}{ini} is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala relations by 43%, 43%, and 35%, respectively.

  6. A Three-dimensional Simulation of a Magnetized Accretion Disk: Fast Funnel Accretion onto a Weakly Magnetized Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Tomida, Kengo; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of a global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation of an accretion disk with a rotating, weakly magnetized central star. The disk is threaded by a weak, large-scale poloidal magnetic field, and the central star has no strong stellar magnetosphere initially. Our simulation investigates the structure of the accretion flows from a turbulent accretion disk onto the star. The simulation reveals that fast accretion onto the star at high latitudes occurs even without a stellar magnetosphere. We find that the failed disk wind becomes the fast, high-latitude accretion as a result of angular momentum exchange mediated by magnetic fields well above the disk, where the Lorentz force that decelerates the rotational motion of gas can be comparable to the centrifugal force. Unlike the classical magnetospheric accretion scenario, fast accretion streams are not guided by magnetic fields of the stellar magnetosphere. Nevertheless, the accretion velocity reaches the free-fall velocity at the stellar surface due to the efficient angular momentum loss at a distant place from the star. This study provides a possible explanation why Herbig Ae/Be stars whose magnetic fields are generally not strong enough to form magnetospheres also show indications of fast accretion. A magnetically driven jet is not formed from the disk in our model. The differential rotation cannot generate sufficiently strong magnetic fields for the jet acceleration because the Parker instability interrupts the field amplification.

  7. How good a clock is rotation? The stellar rotation-mass-age relationship for old field stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2014-01-01

    The rotation-mass-age relationship offers a promising avenue for measuring the ages of field stars, assuming the attendant uncertainties to this technique can be well characterized. We model stellar angular momentum evolution starting with a rotation distribution from open cluster M37. Our predicted rotation-mass-age relationship shows significant zero-point offsets compared to an alternative angular momentum loss law and published gyrochronology relations. Systematic errors at the 30% level are permitted by current data, highlighting the need for empirical guidance. We identify two fundamental sources of uncertainty that limit the precision of rotation-based ages and quantify their impact. Stars are born with a range of rotation rates, which leads to an age range at fixed rotation period. We find that the inherent ambiguity from the initial conditions is important for all young stars, and remains large for old stars below 0.6 M ☉ . Latitudinal surface differential rotation also introduces a minimum uncertainty into rotation period measurements and, by extension, rotation-based ages. Both models and the data from binary star systems 61 Cyg and α Cen demonstrate that latitudinal differential rotation is the limiting factor for rotation-based age precision among old field stars, inducing uncertainties at the ∼2 Gyr level. We also examine the relationship between variability amplitude, rotation period, and age. Existing ground-based surveys can detect field populations with ages as old as 1-2 Gyr, while space missions can detect stars as old as the Galactic disk. In comparison with other techniques for measuring the ages of lower main sequence stars, including geometric parallax and asteroseismology, rotation-based ages have the potential to be the most precise chronometer for 0.6-1.0 M ☉ stars.

  8. Uniformly rotating, axisymmetric, and triaxial quark stars in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Enping; Tsokaros, Antonios; Rezzolla, Luciano; Xu, Renxin; Uryū, Kōji

    2018-01-01

    Quasiequilibrium models of uniformly rotating axisymmetric and triaxial quark stars are computed in a general-relativistic gravity scenario. The Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews (IWM) formulation is employed and the Compact Object Calculator (cocal) code is extended to treat rotating stars with finite surface density and new equations of state (EOSs). Besides the MIT bag model for quark matter which is composed of deconfined quarks, we examine a new EOS proposed by Lai and Xu that is based on quark clustering and results in a stiff EOS that can support masses up to 3.3 M⊙ in the case we considered. We perform convergence tests for our new code to evaluate the effect of finite surface density in the accuracy of our solutions and construct sequences of solutions for both small and high compactness. The onset of secular instability due to viscous dissipation is identified and possible implications are discussed. An estimate of the gravitational wave amplitude and luminosity based on quadrupole formulas is presented and comparison with neutron stars is discussed.

  9. The γ Dor stars as revealed by Kepler: A key to reveal deep-layer rotation in A and F stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon S. J. A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The γ Dor pulsating stars present high-order gravity modes, which make them important targets in the intermediate-and low-mass main-sequence region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Whilst we have only access to rotation in the envelope of the Sun, the g modes of γ Dor stars can in principle deliver us constraints on the inner layers. With the puzzling discovery of unexpectedly low rotation rates in the core of red giants, the γ Dor stars appear now as unique targets to explore internal angular momentum transport in the progenitors of red giants. Yet, the γ Dor pulsations remain hard to detect from the ground for their periods are close to 1 day. While the CoRoT space mission first revealed intriguing frequency spectra, the almost uninterrupted 4-year photometry from the Kepler mission eventually shed a new light on them. It revealed regularities in the spectra, expected to bear signature of physical processes, including rotation, in the shear layers close to the convective core. We present here the first results of our effort to derive exploitable seismic diagnosis for mid- to fast rotators among γ Dor stars. We confirm their potential to explore the rotation history of this early phase of stellar evolution.

  10. The γ Dor stars as revealed by Kepler: A key to reveal deep-layer rotation in A and F stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Ouazzani, R.-M.; Antoci, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Murphy, S. J.

    2017-09-01

    The γ Dor pulsating stars present high-order gravity modes, which make them important targets in the intermediate-and low-mass main-sequence region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Whilst we have only access to rotation in the envelope of the Sun, the g modes of γ Dor stars can in principle deliver us constraints on the inner layers. With the puzzling discovery of unexpectedly low rotation rates in the core of red giants, the γ Dor stars appear now as unique targets to explore internal angular momentum transport in the progenitors of red giants. Yet, the γ Dor pulsations remain hard to detect from the ground for their periods are close to 1 day. While the CoRoT space mission first revealed intriguing frequency spectra, the almost uninterrupted 4-year photometry from the Kepler mission eventually shed a new light on them. It revealed regularities in the spectra, expected to bear signature of physical processes, including rotation, in the shear layers close to the convective core. We present here the first results of our effort to derive exploitable seismic diagnosis for mid- to fast rotators among γ Dor stars. We confirm their potential to explore the rotation history of this early phase of stellar evolution.

  11. Triggered star formation: Rotation, magnetic fields and outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A.; Li, S.; Blackman, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Star formation can be triggered by compression from wind or supernova driven shock waves that sweep over molecular clouds. In a previous work we used Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation methods, including sink particles, to simulate the full collapse of a stable Bonnor-Ebert sphere subjected to a passing shock. We tracked the flow of cloud material after a star (a sink particle) had formed. For rotating clouds we observed the formation of disks which then interact with the post-shock flow. In this paper we take the next step forward in complexity, presenting first results of simulations that include a magnetized cloud. Our results show that after a disk is formed a collimated magneto-centrifugal outflow is launched. The outflow is bipolar but asymmetric, due to interactions with the shocked flow. We explore the influence of the outflows on the post-triggering collapse dynamics.

  12. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; V.S. Chan

    2001-01-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile

  13. Nuclear elasticity applied to giant resonances of fast rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Bouyssy, A.

    1987-06-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in fast rotating nuclei are investigated within the framework of nuclear elasticity by solving the equation of motion of elastic nuclear medium in a rotating frame of reference. Both Coriolis and centrifugal forces are taken into account. The nuclear rotation removes completely the azimuthal degeneracy of the giant resonance energies. Realistic large values of the angular velocity, which are still small as compared to the giant resonance frequencies, are briefly reviewed in relation to allowed high angular momenta. It is shown that for the A=150 region, the Coriolis force is dominating for small values (< ∼ 0.05) of the ratio of angular velocity to resonance frequency, whereas the centrifugal force plays a prominent part in the shift of the split resonance energies for larger values of the ratio. Typical examples of the resonance energies and their fragmentation due to both rotation and deformation are given

  14. THE WIND OF ROTATING B SUPERGIANTS. I. DOMAINS OF SLOW AND FAST SOLUTION REGIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venero, R. O. J.; Cidale, L. S. [Departamento de Espectroscopía, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), and Instituto de Astrofísica La Plata, CCT La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Curé, M.; Araya, I., E-mail: roberto@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Casilla 5030, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2016-05-01

    In the scenario of rotating radiation-driven wind theory for massive stars, three types of stationary hydrodynamic solutions are currently known: the classical ( fast ) m-CAK solution, the Ω- slow solution that arises for fast rotators, and the so-called δ - slow solution if high values of the δ line-force parameter are allowed independently of the rotation speed. Compared to the fast solution, both “ slow solutions” have lower terminal velocities. As the study of the parameter domain for the slow solution is still incomplete, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the distinctive flow regimes for B supergiants that emerge from a fine grid of rotation values, Ω, and various ionization conditions in the wind ( δ ) parameter. The wind ionization defines two domains: one for fast outflowing winds and the other for slow expanding flows. Both domains are clear-cut by a gap, where a kink/plateau structure of the velocity law could exist for a finite interval of δ . The location and width of the gap depend on T {sub eff} and Ω. There is a smooth and continuous transition between the Ω- slow and δ - slow regimes, a single Ω δ - slow regime. We discuss different situations where the slow solutions can be found and the possibility of a switch between fast and slow solutions in B supergiant winds. We compare the theoretical terminal velocity with observations of B and A supergiants and find that the fast regime prevails mostly for early B supergiants while the slow wind regime matches better for A and B mid- and late-type supergiants.

  15. Pinned vorticity in rotating superfluids, with application to neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.; Shaham, J.; Alpar, M.A.; Anderson, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic consequences of the existence of pinned vorticity in a rotating superfluid are studied by means of a simple model: the behavior of a rotating cylinder which contains a uniform region of either weakly or strongly pinned vorticity and which is being spun up or spun down by an external torque. It is shown that in the case of strong pinning, spin down can lead to periodic jumps (glitches) in the rotation frequency of the cylinder, followed by quasi-oscillatory relaxation, while in the case of weak pinning no glitches occur unless the cylinder is shaken so violently that vortices unpin. We conclude that the giant glitches and post-glitch behavior observed in the Vela pulsar may be explained by the sudden release of some 10% of the strongly pinned vortices in the neutron crust every few years as a result of pulsar spin down. We further suggest that the post-glitch behavior observed in the Crab pulsar can be explained if the macroglitches represent vorticity jumps induced by small starquakes in the weakly pinned vortex region expected in the crust of a young neutron star, and that the differences in ''glitch'' behavior of the Crab, Vela, and older pulsars may be explained on evolutionary grounds. (author)

  16. Gravity darkening in stars with surface differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorec, J.; Rieutord, M.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Frémat, Y.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Royer, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The interpretation of stellar apparent fundamental parameters (viewing-angle dependent) requires that they be treated consistently with the characteristics of their surface rotation law. Aims: We aim to develop a model to determine the distribution of the effective temperature and gravity, which explicitly depend on the surface differential rotation law and on the concomitant stellar external geometry. Methods: The basic assumptions in this model are: a) the external stellar layers are in radiative equilibrium; b) the emergent bolometric flux is anti-parallel with the effective gravity; c) the angular velocity in the surface obeys relations like Ω(θ) = Ωo [ 1 + αΥ(θ,k) ] where Υ(θ,k) = coskθ or sinkθ, and where (α,k) are free parameters. Results: The effective temperature varies with co-latitude θ, with amplitudes that depend on the differential-rotation law through the surface effective gravity and the gravity-darkening function (GDF). Although the derived expressions can be treated numerically, for some low integer values of k, analytical forms of the integral of characteristic curves, on which the determination of the GDF relies, are obtained. The effects of the quantities (η,α,k) (η = ratio between centrifugal and gravitational accelerations at the equator) on the determination of the Vsini parameter and on the gravity-darkening exponent are studied. Depending on the values of (η,α,k) the velocity V in the derived Vsini may strongly deviate from the equatorial rotational velocity. It is shown that the von Zeipel's-like gravity-darkening exponent β1 depends on all parameters (η,α,k) and that its value also depends on the viewing-angle I. Hence, there no unique interpretation of this exponent determined empirically in terms of (I,α). Conclusions: We stress that the data on rotating stars should be analyzed by taking into account the rotational effects through the GDF, by assuming k = 2 as a first approximation. Instead of the classic

  17. A universal relation for the propeller mechanisms in magnetic rotating stars at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio; Stella, Luigi; Mereghetti, Sandro; de Martino, Domitilla

    2018-02-01

    Accretion of matter onto a magnetic, rotating object can be strongly affected by the interaction with its magnetic field. This occurs in a variety of astrophysical settings involving young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and neutron stars. As matter is endowed with angular momentum, its inflow toward the star is often mediated by an accretion disc. The pressure of matter and that originating from the stellar magnetic field balance at the magnetospheric radius: at smaller distances the motion of matter is dominated by the magnetic field, and funnelling towards the magnetic poles ensues. However, if the star, and thus its magnetosphere, is fast spinning, most of the inflowing matter will be halted at the magnetospheric radius by centrifugal forces, resulting in a characteristic reduction of the accretion luminosity. The onset of this mechanism, called the propeller, has been widely adopted to interpret a distinctive knee in the decaying phase of the light curve of several transiently accreting X-ray pulsar systems. By comparing the observed luminosity at the knee for different classes of objects with the value predicted by accretion theory on the basis of the independently measured magnetic field, spin period, mass, and radius of the star, we disclose here a general relation for the onset of the propeller which spans about eight orders of magnitude in spin period and ten in magnetic moment. The parameter-dependence and normalisation constant that we determine are in agreement with basic accretion theory.

  18. Rotation invariant deep binary hashing for fast image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lai; Liu, Jianming; Jiang, Aiwen

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study how to compactly represent image's characteristics for fast image retrieval. We propose supervised rotation invariant compact discriminative binary descriptors through combining convolutional neural network with hashing. In the proposed network, binary codes are learned by employing a hidden layer for representing latent concepts that dominate on class labels. A loss function is proposed to minimize the difference between binary descriptors that describe reference image and the rotated one. Compared with some other supervised methods, the proposed network doesn't have to require pair-wised inputs for binary code learning. Experimental results show that our method is effective and achieves state-of-the-art results on the CIFAR-10 and MNIST datasets.

  19. Fast and Robust pointing and tracking using a second-generation star tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Pickles, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Second generation star trackers work by taking wide-angle optical pictures of star fields, correlating the image against a star catalogue in ROM, centroiding many stars to derive an accurate position and orientation. This paper describes a miniature instrument(10cm cube), fast and lightweight (850g...

  20. Stellar Rotation with Kepler and Gaia: Evidence for a Bimodal Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James

    2018-01-01

    Kepler stars with rotation periods measured via starspot modulations in their light curves have been matched against the astrometric data from Gaia Data Release 1. A total of 1,299 bright rotating stars were recovered, most with temperatures hotter than 5000 K. From these, 894 were selected as being near the main sequence. These main sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered around a ~600 Myr rotation-isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler, but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiant and binary stars. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within 300pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. I will discuss how the combination of Kepler/K2/TESS with Gaia will enable us to map the star formation history of our galactic neighborhood.

  1. NGC 5626: a massive fast rotator with a twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, S.; Sarzi, M.; Baes, M.; Puerari, I.

    2018-02-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the dust-lane elliptical NGC 5626 based on MUSE observations. These data allow us to robustly classify this galaxy as a fast rotator and to infer a virial mass of 1011.7 M⊙, making it one of the most massive fast rotators known. In addition, the depth and extent of the MUSE data reveal a strong kinematic twist in the stellar velocity field (by up to 45° beyond 1.5Re). A comparison with the ATLAS3D sample underlines the rareness of this system, although we show that such a large-scale kinematic twist could have been missed by the ATLAS3D data due to the limited spatial sampling of this survey (typically extending to 0.6Re for massive early-type galaxies). MUSE thus has the potential to unveil more examples of this type of galaxies. We discuss the environment and possible formation history of NGC 5626 and finally argue how a merger between the Milky Way and Andromeda could produce a galaxy of the same class as NGC 5626.

  2. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  3. Asteroseismic measurement of surface-to-core rotation in a main-sequence star*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtz Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have discovered rotationally split core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode triplets and quintuplets in a terminal age main-sequence A star, KIC 11145123, that shows both δ Sct p-mode pulsations and γ Dor g-mode pulsations. This gives the first robust determination of the rotation of the deep core and surface of a main-sequence star, essentially model-independently. We find its rotation to be nearly uniform with a period near 100 d, but we show with high confidence that the surface rotates slightly faster than the core. A strong angular momentum transfer mechanism must be operating to produce the nearly rigid rotation, and a mechanism other than viscosity must be operating to produce a more rapidly rotating surface than core. Our asteroseismic result, along with previous asteroseismic constraints on internal rotation in some B stars, and measurements of internal rotation in some subgiant, giant and white dwarf stars, has made angular momentum transport in stars throughout their lifetimes an observational science.

  4. Growth of black holes in the interior of rotating neutron stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, C.; Tinyakov, P.

    2014-01-01

    Mini-black holes made of dark matter that can potentially form in the interior of neutron stars always have been thought to grow by accreting the matter of the core of the star via a spherical Bondi accretion. However, neutron stars have sometimes significant angular velocities that can...... in principle stall the spherical accretion and potentially change the conclusions derived about the time it takes for black holes to destroy a star. We study the effect of the star rotation on the growth of such black holes and the evolution of the black hole spin. Assuming no mechanisms of angular momentum...... evacuation, we find that even moderate rotation rates can in fact destroy spherical accretion at the early stages of the black hole growth. However, we demonstrate that the viscosity of nuclear matter can alleviate the effect of rotation, making it possible for the black hole to maintain spherical accretion...

  5. Fast online replanning for interfraction rotation correction in prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, Charis; Bol, Gijsbert H; Kerkmeijer, Linda G W; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2017-10-01

    To enable fast online replanning for prostate radiotherapy with the inclusion of interfraction rotations and translations and investigate the possibility for margin reduction via this regime. Online daily replanning for a 35-fraction treatment for five prostate cases is simulated while accounting for anatomical transformations derived from fiducial marker data available in our clinic. Two online replanning strategies were simulated, compensating for: (a) rotation-only in combination with a couch shift and (b) both translation and rotation without a couch shift. They were compared against our current clinical protocol consisting of a single offline plan used over all fractions with daily couch repositioning (translations only). For every patient, the above methods were generated for several planning margins (0-8 mm with 2 mm increments) in order to assess the performance of online replanning in terms of target coverage and investigate the possible dosimetric benefit for the organs at risk. The daily DVHs for each treatment strategy were used for evaluation and the non tumor integral dose (NTID) for the different margins was calculated in order to quantify the overall reduction of the delivered energy to the patient. Our system is able to generate a daily automated prostate plan in less than 2 min. For every patient, the daily treatment plans produce similar dose distributions to the original approved plan (average CTV D99 relative difference: 0.2%). The inclusion of both shifts and rotations can be effectively compensated via replanning among all planning margins (average CTV D99 difference: 0.01 Gy between the two replanning regimes). Online replanning is able to maintain target coverage among all margins, while - as expected - the conventional treatment plan is increasingly affected by the interfraction rotations as the margins shrink (average CTV D99 decrease: 0.2 Gy at 8 mm to 2.9 Gy at 0 mm margin). The possible gain in total delivered energy to the patient was

  6. The magnetic early B-type stars I: magnetometry and rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D.; Monin, D.; Sikora, J.; MiMeS Collaboration; BinaMIcS Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    The rotational and magnetic properties of many magnetic hot stars are poorly characterized, therefore the Magnetism in Massive Stars and Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars collaborations have collected extensive high-dispersion spectropolarimetric data sets of these targets. We present longitudinal magnetic field measurements for 52 early B-type stars (B5-B0), with which we attempt to determine their rotational periods Prot. Supplemented with high-resolution spectroscopy, low-resolution Dominion Astrophysical Observatory circular spectropolarimetry, and archival Hipparcos photometry, we determined Prot for 10 stars, leaving only five stars for which Prot could not be determined. Rotational ephemerides for 14 stars were refined via comparison of new to historical magnetic measurements. The distribution of Prot is very similar to that observed for the cooler Ap/Bp stars. We also measured v sin i and vmac for all stars. Comparison to non-magnetic stars shows that v sin i is much lower for magnetic stars, an expected consequence of magnetic braking. We also find evidence that vmac is lower for magnetic stars. Least-squares deconvolution profiles extracted using single-element masks revealed widespread, systematic discrepancies in between different elements: this effect is apparent only for chemically peculiar stars, suggesting it is a consequence of chemical spots. Sinusoidal fits to H line measurements (which should be minimally affected by chemical spots), yielded evidence of surface magnetic fields more complex than simple dipoles in six stars for which this has not previously been reported; however, in all six cases, the second- and third-order amplitudes are small relative to the first-order (dipolar) amplitudes.

  7. A Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere Model for the Circumstellar Environments of Magnetic OB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, R.; Owocki, S.; Groote, D.

    2005-11-01

    We report on a new model for the circumstellar environments of rotating, magnetic hot stars. This model predicts the channeling of wind plasma into a corotating magnetosphere, where -- supported against gravity by centrifugal forces -- it can steadily accumulate over time. We apply the model to the B2p star σ Ori E, demonstrating that it can simultaneously reproduce the spectroscopic, photometric and magnetic variations exhibited by the star.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotational velocities of A-type stars. III. (Royer+, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, F.; Zorec, J.; Gomez, A. E.

    2006-11-01

    The total sample of stellar rotational velocities is presented. The 1541 stars are listed with their projected rotational velocity value (vsini), their spectral type, the subgroup in which they are classified according to their spectral type, and whether or not they are known to a chemically peculiar object (CP) and/or a close binary object (CB). (1 data file).

  9. Rotational periods of solar-mass young stars in Orion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marilli, E.; Frasca, A.; Covino, E.; Alcalá, J.M.; Catalano, S.; Fernández, M.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Rubio Herrera, E.A.; Spezzi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: The evolution of the angular momentum in young low-mass stars is still a debated issue. The stars presented here were discovered as X-ray sources in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) of the Orion complex and subsequently optically identified thanks to both low and high resolution

  10. GIANT CORONAL LOOPS DOMINATE THE QUIESCENT X-RAY EMISSION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING M STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O.; Yadav, R.; Garraffo, C.; Saar, S. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Pillitteri, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully convective M star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona, and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result, we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.

  11. Neutron stars, fast pulsars, supernovae and the equation of state of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendening, N.K.

    1989-06-01

    We discuss the prospects for obtaining constraints on the equation of state from astrophysical sources. Neutron star masses although few are known at present, provide a very direct constraint in as much as the connection to the equation of state involves only the assumption that Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct at the macroscopic scale. If the millisecond pulses briefly observed in the remnant of SN1987A can be attributed to uniform rotation of a pulsar, then a very severe constraint is placed on the equation of state. The theory again is very secure. The precise nature of the constraint is not yet understood, but it appears that the equation of state must be neither too soft nor stiff, and it may be that there is information not only on the stiffness of the equation of state but on its shape. Supernovae simulations involve such a plethora of physical processes including those involved in the evolution of the precollapse configuration, not all of them known or understood, that they provide no constraint at the present time. Not even the broad category of mechanism for the explosion is agreed upon (prompt shock, delayed shock, or nuclear explosion). In connection with very fast pulsars, we include some speculations on pure quark matter stars, and on possible scenarios for understanding the disappearance of the fast pulsar in SN1987A. 47 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Angular momentum transfer in primordial discs and the rotation of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Bromm, Volker

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc. Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfvén radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one. The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields. Considering a physically-motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy (≳ 0.14). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux-freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, ≃ 10-8.2 G, evaluated at a scale of nH = 1 cm-3, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values (˜10-15 G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.

  13. Angular momentum transfer in primordial discs and the rotation of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Bromm, Volker

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc. Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfvén radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one. The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields. Considering a physically motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy (≳ 0.14). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, ≃10-8.2 G, evaluated at a scale of nH = 1 cm-3, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values (˜10-15 G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.

  14. Stellar Rotation Periods of the Kepler Objects of Interest: A Dearth of Close-in Planets around Fast Rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a large sample of stellar rotation periods for Kepler Objects of Interest, based on three years of public Kepler data. These were measured by detecting periodic photometric modulation caused by star spots, using an algorithm based on the autocorrelation function of the light curve, developed recently by McQuillan, Aigrain & Mazeh (2013). Of the 1919 main-sequence exoplanet hosts analyzed, robust rotation periods were detected for 737. Comparing the detected stellar periods to the orbital periods of the innermost planet in each system reveals a notable lack of close-in planets around rapid rotators. It appears that only slowly spinning stars with rotation periods longer than 5-10 days host planets on orbits shorter than 2 or 3 days, although the mechanism(s) that lead(s) to this is not clear.

  15. Repeating and non-repeating fast radio bursts from binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2018-04-01

    Most fast radio bursts (FRB) do not show evidence of repetition, and such non-repeating FRBs may be produced at the time of a merger of binary neutron stars (BNS), provided that the BNS merger rate is close to the high end of the currently possible range. However, the merger environment is polluted by dynamical ejecta, which may prohibit the radio signal from propagating. We examine this by using a general-relativistic simulation of a BNS merger, and show that the ejecta appears about 1 ms after the rotation speed of the merged star becomes the maximum. Therefore there is a time window in which an FRB signal can reach outside, and the short duration of non-repeating FRBs can be explained by screening after ejecta formation. A fraction of BNS mergers may leave a rapidly rotating and stable neutron star, and such objects may be the origin of repeating FRBs like FRB 121102. We show that a merger remnant would appear as a repeating FRB on a time scale of ˜1-10 yr, and expected properties are consistent with the observations of FRB 121102. We construct an FRB rate evolution model that includes these two populations of repeating and non-repeating FRBs from BNS mergers, and show that the detection rate of repeating FRBs relative to non-repeating ones rapidly increases with improving search sensitivity. This may explain why only the repeating FRB 121102 was discovered by the most sensitive FRB search with Arecibo. Several predictions are made, including the appearance of a repeating FRB 1-10 yr after a BNS merger that is localized by gravitational waves and subsequent electromagnetic radiation.

  16. BREAKDOWN OF I-LOVE-Q UNIVERSALITY IN RAPIDLY ROTATING RELATIVISTIC STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    It was shown recently that normalized relations between the moment of inertia (I), the quadrupole moment (Q), and the tidal deformability (Love number) exist and for slowly rotating neutron stars they are almost independent of the equation of state (EOS). We extend the computation of the I-Q relation to models rotating up to the mass-shedding limit and show that the universality of the relations is lost. With increasing rotation rate, the normalized I-Q relation departs significantly from its slow-rotation limit, deviating up to 40% for neutron stars and up to 75% for strange stars. The deviation is also EOS dependent and for a broad set of hadronic and strange matter EOSs the spread due to rotation is comparable to the spread due to the EOS, if one considers sequences with fixed rotational frequency. Still, for a restricted sample of modern realistic EOSs one can parameterize the deviations from universality as a function of rotation only. The previously proposed I-Love-Q relations should thus be used with care, because they lose their universality in astrophysical situations involving compact objects rotating faster than a few hundred Hz

  17. Rotation, Emission, & Evolution of the Magnetic Early B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Neiner, C.; Kochukhov, O.; Alecian, E.

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of the first population study of 51 magnetic early B-type stars, based upon a large database of high-resolution spectropolarimetry assembled by the MiMeS and BinaMIcS collaborations. Utilizing these data, rotational periods were determined for all but 5 of the sample stars. This enabled us to determine dipole oblique rotator model parameters, rotational parameters, and magnetospheric parameters. We find that the ratio of the Alfvén radius to the Kepler corotation radius is highly predictive of whether or not a star displays Hα emission from a Centrifugal Magnetosphere (CM), as expected from theoretical considerations. We also find that CM host stars are systematically younger than the general population, as expected given that CM emission requires rapid rotation and a strong magnetic field, and a strong magnetic field will lead to rapid magnetic braking. We conclude that emission-line magnetic early B-type stars are, almost without exception, strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating, and young.

  18. Rotational mixing in carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars with s-process enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrozis, E.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with s-process enrichment (CEMP-s) are believed to be the products of mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companion, which has long since become a white dwarf. The surface abundances of CEMP-s stars are thus commonly assumed to reflect the nucleosynthesis output of the first AGB stars. We have previously shown that, for this to be the case, some physical mechanism must counter atomic diffusion (gravitational settling and radiative levitation) in these nearly fully radiative stars, which otherwise leads to surface abundance anomalies clearly inconsistent with observations. Here we take into account angular momentum accretion by these stars. We compute in detail the evolution of typical CEMP-s stars from the zero-age main sequence, through the mass accretion, and up the red giant branch for a wide range of specific angular momentum ja of the accreted material, corresponding to surface rotation velocities, vrot, between about 0.3 and 300 kms-1. We find that only for ja ≳ 1017 cm2s-1 (vrot > 20 kms-1, depending on mass accreted) angular momentum accretion directly causes chemical dilution of the accreted material. This could nevertheless be relevant to CEMP-s stars, which are observed to rotate more slowly, if they undergo continuous angular momentum loss akin to solar-like stars. In models with rotation velocities characteristic of CEMP-s stars, rotational mixing primarily serves to inhibit atomic diffusion, such that the maximal surface abundance variations (with respect to the composition of the accreted material) prior to first dredge-up remain within about 0.4 dex without thermohaline mixing or about 0.5-1.5 dex with thermohaline mixing. Even in models with the lowest rotation velocities (vrot ≲ 1 kms-1), rotational mixing is able to severely inhibit atomic diffusion, compared to non-rotating models. We thus conclude that it offers a natural solution to the problem posed by atomic diffusion and cannot be

  19. Rotation and magnetic activity of oscillating solar-like stars with the Kepler mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Savita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last few decades the investigation of stellar magnetic activity has been conducted through spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric surveys. This led not only to the detection of magnetic cycles in other stars but also to variable and magnetic activity. For the Sun, the magnetic activity is described as the interaction between convection, rotation, and magnetic field. To study magnetic activity of solar-like stars we need to have the knowledge of the surface rotation period, the properties of magnetic activity, and the structure of the stars. We present the results obtained from the studies of Kepler solarlike targets in terms of rotation periods, magnetic activity proxies and magnetic activity cycles detected. We can then combine this information with asteroseismic studies to have a broader picture of stellar magnetic activity.

  20. Rapidly Rotating, X-Ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Mason, Elena; Boyd, Patricia; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type F-K, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, which are evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  1. Rotation of the Mass Donors in High-mass X-ray Binaries and Symbiotic Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stoyanov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the tidal interaction in High-mass X-ray Binaries and Symbiotic stars in order to determine in which objects the rotation of the mass donors is synchronized or pseudosynchronized with the orbital motion of the compact companion. We find that the Be/X-ray binaries are not synchronized and the orbital periods of the systems are greater than the rotational periods of the mass donors. The giant and supergiant High-mass X-ray binaries and symbiotic stars are close to synchronization. We compare the rotation of mass donors in symbiotics with the projected rotational velocities of field giants and find that the M giants in S-type symbiotics rotate on average 1.5 times faster than the field M giants. We find that the projected rotational velocity of the red giant in symbiotic star MWC 560 is v sin i= 8.2±1.5 km.s−1, and estimate its rotational period to be Prot<>/sub = 144 - 306 days. Using the theoretical predictions of tidal interaction and pseudosynchronization, we estimate the orbital eccentricity e = 0.68 − 0.82.

  2. Secular instability of axisymmetric rotating stars to gravitational radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managan, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A generalization of the Eulerian variational principle derived by Ipser and Managan, for nonaxisymmetric neutral modes of axisymmetric fluid configurations, is developed. The principle provides a variational basis for calculating the frequencies of nonaxisymmetric normal modes proportional to e/sup i/(sigmat + mphi). A modified form of this principle, valid for sigma near 0, is also developed. The latter principle is used to locate the points where the frequency of a nonaxisymmetric normal mode of an axisymmetric rotating fluid configuration passes through zero. lt is at these points that the configuration becomes secularly unstable to gravitational radiation reaction (GRR). This is demonstrated directly by including the GRR potential and showing that the imaginary part of sigma passes through zero and becomes negative at these points. The imaginary part of the frequency is used to estimate the e-folding time of the mode. This variational principle is applied to sequences of rotating polytropes. The sequences are constructed using four rotation laws at each value of the polytropic index n = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0. The values of (T/W)/sub m/, the ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the magnitude of the gravitational potential energy at the onset of instability, and timescales for the modes with m = 2, 3, and 4 are estimated for each sequence. The value of (T/W) 2 is largely independent of the equation of state and rotation law. For m > 2, (T/W)/sub m/ decreases as the equation of state becomes softer, i.e., as the polytropic index n increases, and increases as the amount of differential rotation increases. The most striking result of this behavior occurs for uniform rotation

  3. Differential rotation, flares and coronae in A to M stars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balona, L. A.; Švanda, Michal; Karlický, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 463, č. 2 (2016), s. 1740-1750 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02112S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : stars * activity * flare Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  4. The early A type stars - Refined MK classification, confrontation with Stroemgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. O.; Garrison, R. F.

    1987-12-01

    The MK classification system for the early A-type stars is refined, and a parallel system of standards for the broad-lined stars is introduced. With this improved system, stars may be classified with significantly greater precision than before. It is shown that spectral types in this system are not systematically affected by rotational line broadening. A total of 372 early A-type stars are classified, and a confrontation of these spectral types with Stroemgren photometry reveals a number of systematic photometric effects of rotation. In particular, high v sin i stars are systematically redder than low v sin i stars of the same spectral type, and the beta index is weakened by rotation. It is concluded that precise spectral classification in conjunction with Stroemgren and H-beta photometry can potentially provide a valuable check and input to the theory of the atmospheres of rotating stars.

  5. PROJECTED ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF 136 EARLY B-TYPE STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmany, C. D.; Glaspey, J. W. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bragança, G. A.; Daflon, S.; Fernandes, M. Borges; Cunha, K. [Observatório Nacional-MCTI, Rua José Cristino, 77. CEP: 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oey, M. S. [University of Michigan, Department of Astronomy, 311 West Hall, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI: 48109-1107 (United States); Bensby, T., E-mail: garmany@noao.edu [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Box 43, SE-22100, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    We have determined projected rotational velocities, v sin i, from Magellan/MIKE echelle spectra for a sample of 136 early B-type stars having large Galactocentric distances. The target selection was done independently of their possible membership in clusters, associations or field stars. We subsequently examined the literature and assigned each star as Field, Association, or Cluster. Our v sin i results are consistent with a difference in aggregate v sin i with stellar density. We fit bimodal Maxwellian distributions to the Field, Association, and Cluster subsamples representing sharp-lined and broad-lined components. The first two distributions, in particular, for the Field and Association are consistent with strong bimodality in v sin i. Radial velocities are also presented, which are useful for further studies of binarity in B-type stars, and we also identify a sample of possible new double-lined spectroscopic binaries. In addition, we find 18 candidate Be stars showing emission at Hα.

  6. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, N.R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India); Siksha ' O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar (India); Mohanta, K.K. [Rairangpur College, Rairangpur, Odisha (India); Sahu, P.K. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2016-09-15

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field. (orig.)

  7. Electromagnetic radiation from a rapidly rotating magnetized star in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2016-02-01

    A general formula for the electromagnetic energy radiated by a rapidly rotating magnetic dipole in arbitrary motion is obtained. For a pulsar orbiting in a binary system, it is shown that the electromagnetic radiation produced by the orbital motion is usually weaker than the gravitational radiation, but not entirely negligible for general relativistic corrections.

  8. The rotational shear in pre-collapse cores of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Noa; Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam

    2018-02-01

    We evolve stellar models to study the rotational profiles of the pre-explosion cores of single massive stars that are progenitors of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and find large rotational shear above the iron core that might play an important role in the jet feedback explosion mechanism by amplifying magnetic fields before and after collapse. Initial masses of 15 and 30 M⊙ and various values of the initial rotation velocity are considered, as well as a reduced mass-loss rate along the evolution and the effect of core-envelope coupling through magnetic fields. We find that the rotation profiles just before core collapse differ between models, but share the following properties. (1) There are narrow zones of very large rotational shear adjacent to convective zones. (2) The rotation rate of the inner core is slower than required to form a Keplerian accretion disc. (3) The outer part of the core and the envelope have non-negligible specific angular momentum compared to the last stable orbit around a black hole (BH). Our results suggest the feasibility of magnetic field amplification which might aid a jet-driven explosion leaving behind a neutron star. Alternatively, if the inner core fails in exploding the star, an accretion disc from the outer parts of the core might form and lead to a jet-driven CCSN which leaves behind a BH.

  9. Fast radio bursts and their possible neutron star origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of the ‘Lorimer Burst’, a little over a decade ago, ignited renewed interest in searching for short-duration radio transients (Lorimer et al 2007 Science 318 777). This event is now considered to be the first established Fast Radio Burst (FRB), which is a class of millisecond-duration radio transients (Thornton et al 2013 Science 341 53). The large dispersive delays observed in FRBs distinguish them from the individual bright pulses from Galactic pulsars, and suggests that they originate deep in extragalactic space. Amazingly, FRBs are not rare: the implied event rate ranges up to many thousands of events per sky, per day (Champion et al 2016 MNRAS 460 L30). The fact that only two dozen FRBs have been discovered to date is a consequence of the limited sensitivity and field of view of current radio telescopes (Petroff et al 2016 PASA 33 e045). The precise localization of FRB 121102, the first and currently only FRB observed to repeat (Spitler et al 2014 ApJ 790 101; Spitler et al 2016 Nature 531 202; Scholz et al 2016 ApJ 833 177), has led to the unambiguous identification of its host galaxy and thus proven its extragalactic origin and large energy scale (Chatterjee et al 2017 Nature 541 58; Tendulkar et al 2017 ApJL 834 L7; Marcote et al 2017 ApJL 834 L8). It remains unclear, however, whether all FRBs are capable of repeating [many appear far less active (Petroff et al 2015 MNRAS 454 457)] or whether FRB 121102 implies that there are multiple sub-classes. Regardless, the repetitive nature of FRB 121102 and its localization to within a star-forming region in the host galaxy (Bassa et al 2017 ApJL 843 L8) imply that the bursts might originate from an exceptionally powerful neutron star - one necessarily quite unlike any we have observed in the Milky Way. In these proceedings, I give a very brief introduction to the FRB phenomenon and focus primarily on the insights that FRB 121102 has provided thus far.

  10. Line-profile tomography of exoplanet transits - II. A gas-giant planet transiting a rapidly rotating A5 star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier Cameron, A.; Guenther, E.; Smalley, B.; McDonald, I.; Hebb, L.; Andersen, J.; Augusteijn, Th.; Barros, S. C. C.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Fossey, S. J.; Hartmann, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Telting, J.; Waldmann, I. P.; West, R. G.

    2010-09-01

    Most of our knowledge of extrasolar planets rests on precise radial-velocity measurements, either for direct detection or for confirmation of the planetary origin of photometric transit signals. This has limited our exploration of the parameter space of exoplanet hosts to solar- and later-type, sharp-lined stars. Here we extend the realm of stars with known planetary companions to include hot, fast-rotating stars. Planet-like transits have previously been reported in the light curve obtained by the SuperWASP survey of the A5 star HD15082 (WASP-33 V = 8.3, v sini = 86 km s-1). Here we report further photometry and time-series spectroscopy through three separate transits, which we use to confirm the existence of a gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.22d in orbit around HD15082. From the photometry and the properties of the planet signal travelling through the spectral line profiles during the transit, we directly derive the size of the planet, the inclination and obliquity of its orbital plane and its retrograde orbital motion relative to the spin of the star. This kind of analysis opens the way to studying the formation of planets around a whole new class of young, early-type stars, hence under different physical conditions and generally in an earlier stage of formation than in sharp-lined late-type stars. The reflex orbital motion of the star caused by the transiting planet is small, yielding an upper mass limit of 4.1MJupiter on the planet. We also find evidence of a third body of substellar mass in the system, which may explain the unusual orbit of the transiting planet. In HD 15082, the stellar line profiles also show evidence of non-radial pulsations, clearly distinct from the planetary transit signal. This raises the intriguing possibility that tides raised by the close-in planet may excite or amplify the pulsations in such stars. Based on observations at Tautenburg Observatory, McDonald Observatory and the Nordic Optical Telescope. E-mail: acc4@st-and.ac.uk

  11. Large amplitude change in spot-induced rotational modulation of the Kepler Ap star KIC 2569073

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drury, Jason A.; Murphy, Simon J.; Derekas, Aliz

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of the 200 x 200 pixel 'superstamp' images of the centres of the open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 allows for the identification and study of many variable stars that were not included in the Kepler target list. KIC 2569073 (V= 14.22), is a particularly interesting variable Ap...... star that we discovered in the NGC 6791 superstamp. With a rotational period of 14.67 d and 0.034 mag variability, it has one of the largest peak-to-peak variations of any known Ap star. Colour photometry reveals an antiphase correlation between the B band, and the V, R and I bands. This Ap star...... is a rotational variable, also known as an alpha(2) CVn star, and is one of only a handful of Ap stars observed by Kepler. While no change in spot period or amplitude is observed within the 4 yr Kepler time series, the amplitude shows a large increase compared to ground-based photometry obtained two decades ago....

  12. Rapidly rotating second-generation progenitors for the 'blue hook' stars of ω Centauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailo, Marco; D'Antona, Francesca; Vesperini, Enrico; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; Ventura, Paolo; Milone, Antonino P; Bellini, Andrea; Dotter, Aaron; Decressin, Thibaut; D'Ercole, Annibale; Caloi, Vittoria; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2015-07-16

    Horizontal branch stars belong to an advanced stage in the evolution of the oldest stellar galactic population, occurring either as field halo stars or grouped in globular clusters. The discovery of multiple populations in clusters that were previously believed to have single populations gave rise to the currently accepted theory that the hottest horizontal branch members (the 'blue hook' stars, which had late helium-core flash ignition, followed by deep mixing) are the progeny of a helium-rich 'second generation' of stars. It is not known why such a supposedly rare event (a late flash followed by mixing) is so common that the blue hook of ω Centauri contains approximately 30 per cent of the horizontal branch stars in the cluster, or why the blue hook luminosity range in this massive cluster cannot be reproduced by models. Here we report that the presence of helium core masses up to about 0.04 solar masses larger than the core mass resulting from evolution is required to solve the luminosity range problem. We model this by taking into account the dispersion in rotation rates achieved by the progenitors, whose pre-main-sequence accretion disk suffered an early disruption in the dense environment of the cluster's central regions, where second-generation stars form. Rotation may also account for frequent late-flash-mixing events in massive globular clusters.

  13. Rotation Periods of 34,030 Kepler Main-sequence Stars: The Full Autocorrelation Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2014-04-01

    We analyzed three years of data from the Kepler space mission to derive rotation periods of main-sequence stars below 6500 K. Our automated autocorrelation-based method detected rotation periods between 0.2 and 70 days for 34,030 (25.6%) of the 133,030 main-sequence Kepler targets (excluding known eclipsing binaries and Kepler Objects of Interest), making this the largest sample of stellar rotation periods to date. In this paper we consider the detailed features of the now well-populated period-temperature distribution and demonstrate that the period bimodality, first seen by McQuillan et al. in the M-dwarf sample, persists to higher masses, becoming less visible above 0.6 M ⊙. We show that these results are globally consistent with the existing ground-based rotation-period data and find that the upper envelope of the period distribution is broadly consistent with a gyrochronological age of 4.5 Gyr, based on the isochrones of Barnes, Mamajek, & Hillenbrand and Meibom et al. We also performed a detailed comparison of our results to those of Reinhold et al. and Nielsen et al., who measured rotation periods of field stars observed by Kepler. We examined the amplitude of periodic variability for the stars with detection rotation periods, and found a typical range between ~950 ppm (5th percentile) and ~22,700 ppm (95th percentile), with a median of ~5600 ppm. We found typically higher amplitudes for shorter periods and lower effective temperatures, with an excess of low-amplitude stars above ~5400 K.

  14. Perceptual strategies of pigeons to detect a rotational centre--a hint for star compass learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Alert

    Full Text Available Birds can rely on a variety of cues for orientation during migration and homing. Celestial rotation provides the key information for the development of a functioning star and/or sun compass. This celestial compass seems to be the primary reference for calibrating the other orientation systems including the magnetic compass. Thus, detection of the celestial rotational axis is crucial for bird orientation. Here, we use operant conditioning to demonstrate that homing pigeons can principally learn to detect a rotational centre in a rotating dot pattern and we examine their behavioural response strategies in a series of experiments. Initially, most pigeons applied a strategy based on local stimulus information such as movement characteristics of single dots. One pigeon seemed to immediately ignore eccentric stationary dots. After special training, all pigeons could shift their attention to more global cues, which implies that pigeons can learn the concept of a rotational axis. In our experiments, the ability to precisely locate the rotational centre was strongly dependent on the rotational velocity of the dot pattern and it crashed at velocities that were still much faster than natural celestial rotation. We therefore suggest that the axis of the very slow, natural, celestial rotation could be perceived by birds through the movement itself, but that a time-delayed pattern comparison should also be considered as a very likely alternative strategy.

  15. Photometric Amplitude Distribution of Stellar Rotation of KOIs—Indication for Spin-Orbit Alignment of Cool Stars and High Obliquity for Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Perets, Hagai B.; McQuillan, Amy; Goldstein, Eyal S.

    2015-03-01

    The observed amplitude of the rotational photometric modulation of a star with spots should depend on the inclination of its rotational axis relative to our line of sight. Therefore, the distribution of observed rotational amplitudes of a large sample of stars depends on the distribution of their projected axes of rotation. Thus, comparison of the stellar rotational amplitudes of the Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) with those of Kepler single stars can provide a measure to indirectly infer the properties of the spin-orbit obliquity of Kepler planets. We apply this technique to the large samples of 993 KOIs and 33,614 single Kepler stars in temperature range of 3500-6500 K. We find with high significance that the amplitudes of cool KOIs are larger, on the order of 10%, than those of the single stars. In contrast, the amplitudes of hot KOIs are systematically lower. After correcting for an observational bias, we estimate that the amplitudes of the hot KOIs are smaller than the single stars by about the same factor of 10%. The border line between the relatively larger and smaller amplitudes, relative to the amplitudes of the single stars, occurs at about 6000 K. Our results suggest that the cool stars have their planets aligned with their stellar rotation, while the planets around hot stars have large obliquities, consistent with the findings of Winn et al. and Albrecht et al. We show that the low obliquity of the planets around cool stars extends up to at least 50 days, a feature that is not expected in the framework of a model that assumes the low obliquity is due to planet-star tidal realignment.

  16. Features of the mass transfer in magnetic cataclysmic variables with fast-rotating white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isakova Polina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow structure in magnetic cataclysmic variables was investigated taking into account the effects of strong magnetic field and fast rotation of the white dwarf. We modeled the AE Aqr system as a unique object that has the rotation period of the white dwarf is about 1000 times shorter than the orbital period of the binary system. Observations show that in spite of fast rotation of the white dwarf some part of the stream from the inner Lagrange point comes into the Roche lobe region. We analyzed possible mechanisms preventing material to outflow from the system.

  17. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA): PLANETS, OSCILLATIONS, ROTATION, AND MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Arras, Phil [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Dotter, Aaron [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Mankovich, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Townsend, Richard, E-mail: matteo@kitp.ucsb.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star

  18. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Planets, Oscillations, Rotation, and Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Arras, Phil; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Dotter, Aaron; Mankovich, Christopher; Montgomery, M. H.; Stello, Dennis; Timmes, F. X.; Townsend, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M ⊙ stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star results.

  19. Solar-stellar connection : A solar analogous behaviour by an active ultra fast rotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, Lalitha; Schmitt, Juergen; Pal Singh, Kulinder

    2015-08-01

    AB Dor is an ultra-fast rotating (Prot ~ 0.51 d) active young K dwarf with an age of ~40-50 Myr. Located as a foreground star towards large magellanic cloud (LMC), AB Dor has the advantage of being observed at all times by most of the X-ray satellites making it a favourite calibration target. AB Dor has been repeatedly observed for calibration by reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM- Newton over last decade. This gives an ideal opportunity to perform a detailed analysis of the coronal emission, and to compare the flare characteristics with the Sun, since the Sun is usually considered as a prototype of low mass stars. Flares are frequent in low mass active stars across the electromagnetic spectrum similar to the Sun. We will for the first time, present an analysis of 30 intense X-ray flares observed from AB Dor. These flares detected in XMM-Newton data show a rapid rise (500-3000 s) and a slow decay (1000-6000 s). The derived X-ray luminosity during the flares ranges between 30.20 ≤ log(Lx) ≤ 30.83 erg/s; the flare peak temperature lies between 30-80 MK and the emission measures for these flares are in the range of 52.3 ≤ log(EM) ≤ 53.5 cm^-3. Our studies suggest that the scaling law between the flare peak emission measure and the flare peak temperature for all the flares observed on AB Dor is very similar to the relationship followed by solar flares, despite the fact that the AB Dor flare emission is ~250 times higher than the solar flare emission. We also carried out a homogenous study of flare frequencies, energetics and its occurrence in AB Dor. The frequency distribution of flare energies is a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in a flare. Our results of this study indicate that the large flare (33 ≤ log(E) ≤ 34 erg) may not contribute to the heating of the corona. We will show the presence of a possible long-term cycle in AB Dor both from a photospheric and coronal point of view, similar to the 11-year

  20. Imperical relationship in the properties of static and rotating protoneutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Gulshan; Dhiman, Shashi K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the extended relativistic mean field (ERMF) model and its perametrizations BSR1- BSR21 are employed. The Lagrangian density, Lagrangian terms and the Euler-Lagrangian equations for ground state expectation values of the meson fields are same as earlier studies. At finite temperatures the baryon vector density, scalar density and charge density are as defined in earlier studies. The Keplerian configurations of rapidly rotating protoneutron stars have been computed in framework of general relativity by solving the Einstein eld equations for stationary axisymmetric space time and references therein. The numerical calculations have been performed by employing the Rotating Neutron Star (RNS) code. The perametrizations have been generated by varying the ω meson self-coupling ζ and neutron skin thickness Δr for the 208 Pb nucleus

  1. Plasma Magnetosphere of Oscillating and Rotating Neutron Stars in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Morozova, Viktoriya; Zanotti, Olindo

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a number of analytical studies, aimed at adding the influence of oscillations experienced by a pulsar/magnetar on its plasma magnetopshere. We show that particular modes of oscillations may considerably increase the pulsar/magnetar luminosity and apply the obtained theoretical results on the plasma magnetosphere of oscillating and rotating neutron stars i) to propose a qualitative model for the explanation of the phenomenology of intermittent part time pulsars, ii) to study the conditions for radio emission in rotating and oscillating magnetars by focusing on the main physical processes determining the position of their death lines, i.e. of those lines that separate the regions where the neutron star may be radio loud or radio quiet, iii) to explain the subpulse drift phenomena adopting the space-charge limited flow model and comparing the plasma drift velocity in the inner region of pulsar magnetospheres with the observed velocity of drifting subpulses.

  2. Universal relations for differentially rotating relativistic stars at the threshold to collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzola, Gabriele; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Bauswein, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    A binary neutron star merger produces a rapidly and differentially rotating compact remnant whose lifespan heavily affects the electromagnetic and gravitational emissions. Its stability depends on both the equation of state (EOS) and the rotation law and it is usually investigated through numerical simulations. Nevertheless, by means of a sufficient criterion for secular instability, equilibrium sequences can be used as a computational inexpensive way to estimate the onset of dynamical instability, which, in general, is close to the secular one. This method works well for uniform rotation and relies on the location of turning points: stellar models that are stationary points in a sequence of equilibrium solutions with constant rest mass or angular momentum. Here, we investigate differentially rotating models (using a large number of EOSs and different rotation laws) and find that several universal relations between properly scaled gravitational mass, rest mass and angular momentum of the turning-point models that are valid for uniform rotation are insensitive to the degree of differential rotation, to high accuracy.

  3. Evolution of the surface magnetic field of rotating proto-neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obergaulinger, M.; Aloy, M. Á.

    2017-12-01

    We study the evolution of the field on the surface of proto-neutron stars in the immediate aftermath of stellar core collapse by analyzing the results of self-consistent, axisymmetric simulations of the cores of rapidly rotating high-mass stars. To this end, we compare the field topology and the angular spectra of the poloidal and toroidal field components over a time of about one seconds for cores. Both components are characterized by a complex geometry with high power at intermediate angular scales. The structure is mostly the result of the accretion of magnetic flux embedded in the matter falling through the turbulent post-shock layer onto the PNS. Our results may help to guide further studies of the long-term magneto-thermal evolution of proto-neutron stars. We find that the accretion of stellar progenitor layers endowed with low or null magnetization bury the magnetic field on the PNS surface very effectively.

  4. Gamma-ray burst progenitors and the population of rotating Wolf-Rayet stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jorick S

    2013-06-13

    In our quest for gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors, it is relevant to consider the progenitor evolution of normal supernovae (SNe). This is largely dominated by mass loss. We discuss the mass-loss rate for very massive stars up to 300M⊙. These objects are in close proximity to the Eddington Γ limit. We describe the new concept of the transitional mass-loss rate, enabling us to calibrate wind mass loss. This allows us to consider the occurrence of pair-instability SNe in the local Universe. We also discuss luminous blue variables and their link to luminous SNe. Finally, we address the polarization properties of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, measuring their wind asphericities. We argue to have found a group of rotating WR stars that fulfil the required criteria to make long-duration GRBs.

  5. Search of Large Super-Fast Rotator between NEAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carbognani, A.; Pravec, Petr; Kušnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián; Monte, S.; Bertaina, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2016), s. 66-71 ISSN 0037-8720. [Italian national workshop of planetary sciences /12./. Bormio, 02.02.2015-06.02.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0229 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : minor planets * near Earth asteroids * rotation periods Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://sait.oat.ts.astro.it/MmSAI/87/PDF/66.pdf

  6. Beyond the classical paradigm of stellar winds: Investigating clumping, rotation and the weak wind problem in SMC O stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubeny, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    SMC O stars provide an unrivaled opportunity to probe star formation, evolution, and the feedback of massive stars in an environment similar to the epoch of the peak in star formation history. Two recent breakthroughs in the study of hot, massive stars have important consequences for understanding the chemical enrichment and buildup of stellar mass in the Universe. The first is the realization that rotation plays a major role in influencing the evolution of massive stars and their feedback on the surrounding environment. The second is a drastic downward revision of the mass loss rates of massive stars coming from an improved description of their winds. STIS spectroscopy of SMC O stars combined with state-of-the-art NLTE analyses has shed new light on these two topics. A majority of SMC O stars reveal CNO-cycle processed material brought at their surface by rotational mixing. Secondly, the FUV wind lines of early O stars provide strong indications of the clumped nature of their wind. Moreover, we first drew attention to some late-O dwarfs showing extremely weak wind signatures. Consequently, we have derived mass loss rates from STIS spectroscopy that are significantly lower than the current theoretical predictions used in evolutionary models. Because of the limited size of the current sample {and some clear bias toward stars with sharp-lined spectra}, these results must however be viewed as tentative. Thanks to the high efficiency of COS in the FUV range, we propose now to obtain high-resolution FUV spectra with COS of a larger sample of SMC O stars to study systematically rotation and wind properties of massive stars at low metallicity. The analysis of the FUV wind lines will be based on our 2D extension of CMFGEN to model axi-symmetric rotating winds.

  7. LARGE SUPER-FAST ROTATOR HUNTING USING THE INTERMEDIATE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Ip, Wing-Huen [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Levitan, David [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason, E-mail: rex@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In order to look for large super-fast rotators, in late 2014 and early 2015, five dedicated surveys covering ∼188 deg{sup 2} in the ecliptic plane have been carried out in the R -band, with ∼10 minute cadence using the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. Among 1029 reliable rotation periods obtained from the surveys, we discovered 1 new large super-fast rotator, (40511) 1999 RE88, and 18 other candidates. (40511) 1999 RE88 is an S-type inner main-belt asteroid with a diameter of D  = 1.9 ± 0.3 km, a rotation period of P  = 1.96 ± 0.01 hr, and a light curve amplitude of Δ m  ∼ 1.0 mag. To maintain such fast rotation, an internal cohesive strength of ∼780 Pa is required. Combining all known large super-fast rotators, their cohesive strengths all fall in the range of 100–1000 Pa of lunar regolith. However, the number of large super-fast rotators seems to be far less than the whole asteroid population. This might indicate a peculiar asteroid group for them. Although the detection efficiency for a long rotation period is greatly reduced due to our two-day observation time span, the spin-rate distributions of this work show consistent results with Chang et al. (2015), after considering the possible observational bias in our surveys. It shows a number decrease with an increase of spin rate for asteroids with a diameter of 3 ⩽  D  ⩽ 15 km, and a number drop at a spin rate of f  = 5 rev day{sup −1} for asteroids with D  ⩽ 3 km.

  8. The complex kinematics of rotating star clusters in a tidal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2018-03-01

    We broaden the investigation of the dynamical properties of tidally perturbed, rotating star clusters by relaxing the traditional assumptions of coplanarity, alignment, and synchronicity between the internal and orbital angular velocity vector of their initial conditions. We show that the interplay between the internal evolution of these systems and their interaction with the external tidal field naturally leads to the development of a number of evolutionary features in their three-dimensional velocity space, including a precession and nutation of the global rotation axis and a variation of its orientation with the distance from the cluster centre. In some cases, such a radial variation may manifest itself as a counter-rotation of the outermost regions relative to the inner ones. The projected morphology of these systems is characterized by a non-monotonic ellipticity profile and, depending on the initial inclination of the rotation axis, it may also show a twisting of the projected isodensity contours. These results provide guidance in the identification of non-trivial features which may emerge in upcoming investigations of star cluster kinematics and a dynamical framework to understand some of the complexities already hinted by recent observational studies.

  9. INTERNAL ROTATION OF THE RED-GIANT STAR KIC 4448777 BY MEANS OF ASTEROSEISMIC INVERSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Cardini, D. [INAF, IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Roma (Italy); Ventura, R.; Paternò, L. [INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of Catania, Catania (Italy); Stello, D. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Hekker, S. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Dziembowski, W. A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Beck, P. G.; De Smedt, K.; Tkachenko, A. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Bloemen, S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Davies, G. R.; Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Univ. Paris Diderot, IRFU/Sap, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Elsworth, Y. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mosser, B. [LESIA, PSL Research University, CNRS, Universitè Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon Cedex (France)

    2016-01-20

    We study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from Kepler observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates from a minimum of 8 to a maximum of 17 times faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al.), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of 0.001R and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation. The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly and provide evidence for an angular velocity gradient around the base of the hydrogen-burning shell; however, we do not succeed in characterizing the rotational slope, due to the intrinsic limits of the applied techniques. The angular velocity, from the edge of the core, appears to decrease with increasing distance from the center, reaching an average value in the convective envelope of 68 ± 22 nHz. We conclude that a set of data that includes only dipolar modes is sufficient to infer quite accurately the rotation of a red giant not only in the dense core but also, with a lower level of confidence, in part of the radiative region and in the convective envelope.

  10. Uniformly rotating neutron stars in the global and local charge neutrality cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvedere, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.belvedere@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Boshkayev, Kuantay, E-mail: kuantay@icra.it [Physical–Technical Faculty, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi ave. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Rueda, Jorge A., E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Ruffini, Remo, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); ICRANet, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Av. de Valrose, 06103 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-01-15

    In our previous treatment of neutron stars, we have developed the model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality. In order to implement such a model, we have shown the essential role by the Thomas–Fermi equations, duly generalized to the case of electromagnetic field equations in a general relativistic framework, forming a coupled system of equations that we have denominated Einstein–Maxwell–Thomas–Fermi (EMTF) equations. From the microphysical point of view, the weak interactions are accounted for by requesting the β stability of the system, and the strong interactions by using the σ–ω–ρ nuclear model, where σ, ω and ρ are the mediator massive vector mesons. Here we examine the equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating neutron stars by using the Hartle formalism in the case of the EMTF equations indicated above. We integrate these equations of equilibrium for different central densities ρ{sub c} and circular angular velocities Ω and compute the mass M, polar R{sub p} and equatorial R{sub eq} radii, angular momentum J, eccentricity ϵ, moment of inertia I, as well as quadrupole moment Q of the configurations. Both the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability are used to construct the new mass–radius relation. We compute the maximum and minimum masses and rotation frequencies of neutron stars. We compare and contrast all the results for the global and local charge neutrality cases.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotational velocities of A-type stars II. (Royer+, 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, F.; Grenier, S.; Baylac, M.-O.; Gomez, A. E.; Zorec, J.

    2002-10-01

    This work is the second part of the set of measurements of vsini for A-type stars, begun by Royer et al. (2002, Cat. ). Spectra of 249 B8 to F2-type stars brighter than V=7 have been collected at Observatoire de Haute- Provence (OHP). Fourier transforms of several line profiles in the range 4200-4600 A are used to derive vsini from the frequency of the first zero. Statistical analysis of the sample indicates that measurement error mainly depends on vsini and this relative error of the rotational velocity is found to be about 5% on average. The systematic shift with respect to standard values from Slettebak et al. (1975ApJS...29..137S), previously found in the first paper, is here confirmed. Comparisons with data from the literature agree with our findings: vsini values from Slettebak et al. are underestimated and the relation between both scales follows a linear law vsini(new)=1.03*vsini(old)+7.7. Finally, these data are combined with those from the previous paper (Royer et al., 2002, Cat. ), together with the catalogue of Abt & Morrell (1995ApJS...99..135A). The resulting sample includes some 2150 stars with homogenized rotational velocities. (2 data files).

  12. Hot subdwarf stars in close-up view. I. Rotational properties of subdwarf B stars in close binary systems and nature of their unseen companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Edelmann, H.; Napiwotzki, R.; Kupfer, T.; Müller, S.

    2010-09-01

    mass companions appears to be consistent with expectations, whereas a lack of high inclinations becomes obvious for the massive systems. We show that the formation of such systems can be explained with common envelope evolution and present an appropriate formation channel including two phases of unstable mass transfer and one supernova explosion. The sample also contains a candidate post-RGB star, which rotates fast despite its long orbital period. The post-RGB stars are expected to spin-up caused by their ongoing contraction. The age of the sdB is another important factor. If the EHB star is too young, the synchronisation process might not be finished yet. Estimating the ages of the target stars from their positions on the EHB band, we found PG 2345+318, which is known not to be synchronised, to lie near the zero-age extreme horizontal branch as are the massive candidates PG 1232-136, PG 1432+159 and PG 1101+249. These star may possibly be too young to have reached synchronisation. The derived large fraction of putative massive sdB binary systems in low inclination orbits is inconsistent with theoretical predictions. Even if we dismiss three candidates because they may be too young and assume that the other sdB primaries are of low mass, PG 1743+477 and, in particular, HE 0532-4503 remain as candidates whose companions may have masses close to or above the Chandrasekhar limit. X-ray observations and accurate photometry are suggested to clarify their nature. As high inclination systems must also exist, an appropriate survey has already been launched to find such binaries. Based on observations at the Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes number 165.H-0588(A), 167.D-0407(A), 068.D-0483(A), 069.D-0534(A), 070.D-0334(A), 071.D-0380(A), 071.D-0383(A) and 382.D-0841(A). Based on observations at the La Silla Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes number 073.D-0495(A), 074.B-0455(A) and 077.D-0515(A). Some of the data

  13. Photometric Variability of the mCP Star CS Vir: Evolution of the Rotation Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuyar, D.; Sener, H. T.; Stevens, I. R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to accurately calculate the rotational period of CS Vir by using STEREO observations and investigate a possible period variation of the star with the help of all accessible data. The STEREO data that cover 5-yr time interval between 2007 and 2011 are analysed by means of the Lomb-Scargle and Phase Dispersion Minimization methods. In order to obtain a reliable rotation period and its error value, computational algorithms such as the Levenberg-Marquardt and Monte Carlo simulation algorithms are applied to the data sets. Thus, the rotation period of CS Vir is improved to be 9.29572(12) d by using the 5-yr of combined data set. Also, the light elements are calculated as HJD max = 2454715.975(11) + 9d . 29572(12) × E + 9d . 78(1.13) × 10 - 8 × E 2 by means of the extremum times derived from the STEREO light curves and archives. Moreover, with this study, a period variation is revealed for the first time, and it is found that the period has lengthened by 0.66(8) s y-1, equivalent to 66 s per century. Additionally, a time-scale for a possible spin-down is calculated around τSD 106 yr. The differential rotation and magnetic braking are thought to be responsible of the mentioned rotational deceleration. It is deduced that the spin-down time-scale of the star is nearly three orders of magnitude shorter than its main-sequence lifetime (τMS 109 yr). It is, in return, suggested that the process of increase in the period might be reversible.

  14. Meridional circulation in rotating stars. VII. The effects of chemical inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoul, M.; Tassoul, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the effects of a gradient of mean molecular weight μ on the rotationally driven currents that pervade the radiative zone of a single, nonmagnetic, main-sequence star. Detailed numerical calculations are made for the hydrogen-burning core of a solar-type star, assuming that departures from spherical symmetry are not too large. It is found that meridional streaming virtually dies out from the center outward as the μ-gradient grows in a leisurely fashion. This prevents a substantial mixing of matter between the inner (inhomogeneous) and outer (homogeneous) regions in the radiative zone, although the inner region may be penetrated to some degree. To first order in the ratio of the centrifugal force to gravity at the equator, this pattern of circulation is independent of the mean angular velocity. To this order, then, there is no critical rotation rate above which unimpeded mixing may take place. These quantitative results are compared with diverse statements that can be found in the phenomenological literature on rotational mixing

  15. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters - II. Unbalanced and core evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieles, M.; Alexander, P.E.R.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.; Baumgardt, H.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce version two of the fast star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (emacss). The first version (Alexander and Gieles) assumed that cluster evolution is balanced for the majority of the life cycle, meaning that the rate of energy generation in the core of the cluster equals

  16. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan, E-mail: malo@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  17. Radiative-transfer models for explosions from rotating and non-rotating single WC stars. Implications for SN 1998bw and LGRB/SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2017-07-01

    Using 1D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium and time-dependent radiative transfer simulations, we study the ejecta properties required to match the early- and late-time photometric and spectroscopic properties of supernovae (SNe) associated with long-duration γ-ray bursts (LGRBs). Matching the short rise time, narrow light curve peak and extremely broad spectral lines of SN 1998bw requires a model with ≲3 M⊙ ejecta but a high explosion energy of a few 1052 erg and 0.5 M⊙ of 56Ni. The relatively high luminosity, presence of narrow spectral lines of intermediate mass elements, and low ionisation at the nebular stage, however, are matched with a more standard C-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star explosion, an ejecta of ≳10 M⊙, an explosion energy ≳1051 erg, and only 0.1 M⊙ of 56Ni. As the two models are mutually exclusive, the breaking of spherical symmetry is essential to match the early- and late-time photometric and spectroscopic properties of SN 1998bw. This conclusion confirms the notion that the ejecta of SN 1998bw is highly aspherical on large scales. More generally, with asphericity, the energetics and 56Ni masses of LGRB/SNe are reduced and their ejecta masses are increased, favouring a massive fast-rotating Wolf-Rayet star progenitor. Contrary to persisting claims in favour of the proto-magnetar model for LGRB/SNe, such progenitor/ejecta properties are compatible with collapsar formation. Ejecta properties of LGRB/SNe inferred from 1D radiative-transfer modelling are fundamentally flawed.

  18. FAST ROTATION AND TRAILING FRAGMENTS OF THE ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2012 F5 (GIBBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drahus, Michał; Waniak, Wacław [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Kraków (Poland); Tendulkar, Shriharsh [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Agarwal, Jessica [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Jewitt, David [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sheppard, Scott S., E-mail: drahus@oa.uj.edu.pl [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-20

    While having a comet-like appearance, P/2012 F5 (Gibbs) has an orbit native to the Main Asteroid Belt, and physically is a km-sized asteroid which recently (mid 2011) experienced an impulsive mass ejection event. Here we report new observations of this object obtained with the Keck II telescope on UT 2014 August 26. The data show previously undetected 200 m scale fragments of the main nucleus, and reveal a rapid nucleus spin with a rotation period of 3.24 ± 0.01 hr. The existence of large fragments and the fast nucleus spin are both consistent with rotational instability and partial disruption of the object. To date, many fast rotators have been identified among the minor bodies, which, however, do not eject detectable fragments at the present-day epoch, and also fragmentation events have been observed, but with no rotation period measured. P/2012 F5 is unique in that for the first time we detected fragments and quantified the rotation rate of one and the same object. The rapid spin rate of P/2012 F5 is very close to the spin rates of two other active asteroids in the Main Belt, 133P/Elst-Pizarro and (62412), confirming the existence of a population of fast rotators among these objects. But while P/2012 F5 shows impulsive ejection of dust and fragments, the mass loss from 133P is prolonged and recurrent. We believe that these two types of activity observed in the rapidly rotating active asteroids have a common origin in the rotational instability of the nucleus.

  19. The late A-type stars - Refined MK classification, confrontation with Stromgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. O.; Garrison, R. F.

    1989-07-01

    The MK spectral classification for late A-type stars is refined and the effects of rotation of spectral classification and uvby(beta) photometry for these stars are examined. It is found that, for A3 stars, the 4417/4481 A wavelength ratio produces results that are inconsistent with the Stark broadening of the H lines. It is suggested that this ratio is not useful as a luminosity criterion at any spectral type. Self-consistent sequences of narrow- and broadline standards are established. The results of the refined classification system are compared with Stromgren photometry, showing a set of low-v sin i A-type stars with anomalously large delta(c1) indices for their luminosity types. It is proposed that these stars are rapid rotators seen at fairly low inclination angles.

  20. Effectively universal behavior of rotating neutron stars in general relativity makes them even simpler than their Newtonian counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, George; Apostolatos, Theocharis A

    2014-03-28

    Recently, it was shown that slowly rotating neutron stars exhibit an interesting correlation between their moment of inertia I, their quadrupole moment Q, and their tidal deformation Love number λ (the I-Love-Q relations), independently of the equation of state of the compact object. In the present Letter a similar, more general, universality is shown to hold true for all rotating neutron stars within general relativity; the first four multipole moments of the neutron star are related in a way independent of the nuclear matter equation of state we assume. By exploiting this relation, we can describe quite accurately the geometry around a neutron star with fewer parameters, even if we don't know precisely the equation of state. Furthermore, this universal behavior displayed by neutron stars could promote them to a more promising class of candidates (next to black holes) for testing theories of gravity.

  1. Introduction to modeling convection in planets and stars magnetic field, density stratification, rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzmaier, Gary

    2013-01-01

    This book provides readers with the skills they need to write computer codes that simulate convection, internal gravity waves, and magnetic field generation in the interiors and atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. Using a teaching method perfected in the classroom, Gary Glatzmaier begins by offering a step-by-step guide on how to design codes for simulating nonlinear time-dependent thermal convection in a two-dimensional box using Fourier expansions in the horizontal direction and finite differences in the vertical direction. He then describes how to implement more efficient and accura

  2. ROTATING STARS AND THE FORMATION OF BIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE. II. TIDAL SPIN-UP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Segura, G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Km. 103 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Villaver, E. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Manchado, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Via Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Langer, N. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Yoon, S.-C., E-mail: ggs@astrosen.unam.mx [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    We present new binary stellar evolution models that include the effects of tidal forces, rotation, and magnetic torques with the goal of testing planetary nebulae (PNs) shaping via binary interaction. We explore whether tidal interaction with a companion can spin-up the asymptotic giant brach (AGB) envelope. To do so, we have selected binary systems with main-sequence masses of 2.5 M {sub ⊙} and 0.8 M {sub ⊙} and evolve them allowing initial separations of 5, 6, 7, and 8 au. The binary stellar evolution models have been computed all the way to the PNs formation phase or until Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) is reached, whatever happens first. We show that with initial separations of 7 and 8 au, the binary avoids entering into RLOF, and the AGB star reaches moderate rotational velocities at the surface (∼3.5 and ∼2 km s{sup −1}, respectively) during the inter-pulse phases, but after the thermal pulses it drops to a final rotational velocity of only ∼0.03 km s{sup −1}. For the closest binary separations explored, 5 and 6 au, the AGB star reaches rotational velocities of ∼6 and ∼4 km s{sup −1}, respectively, when the RLOF is initiated. We conclude that the detached binary models that avoid entering the RLOF phase during the AGB will not shape bipolar PNs, since the acquired angular momentum is lost via the wind during the last two thermal pulses. This study rules out tidal spin-up in non-contact binaries as a sufficient condition to form bipolar PNs.

  3. PROPAGATION OF RELATIVISTIC, HYDRODYNAMIC, INTERMITTENT JETS IN A ROTATING, COLLAPSING GRB PROGENITOR STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Jin-Jun [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Kuiper, Rolf, E-mail: gengjinjun@gmail.com, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2016-12-10

    The prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is characterized by rapid variabilities, which may be a direct reflection of the unsteady central engine. We perform a series of axisymmetric 2.5-dimensional simulations to study the propagation of relativistic, hydrodynamic, intermittent jets through the envelope of a GRB progenitor star. A realistic rapidly rotating star is incorporated as the background of jet propagation, and the star is allowed to collapse due to the gravity of the central black hole. By modeling the intermittent jets with constant-luminosity pulses with equal on and off durations, we investigate how the half period, T , affects the jet dynamics. For relatively small T values (e.g., 0.2 s), the jet breakout time t {sub bo} depends on the opening angle of the jet, with narrower jets more penetrating and reaching the surface at shorter times. For T  ≤ 1 s, the reverse shock (RS) crosses each pulse before the jet penetrates through the stellar envelope. As a result, after the breakout of the first group of pulses at t {sub bo}, several subsequent pulses vanish before penetrating the star, causing a quiescent gap. For larger half periods ( T = 2.0 and 4.0 s), all the pulses can successfully penetrate through the envelope, since each pulse can propagate through the star before the RS crosses the shell. Our results may interpret the existence of a weak precursor in some long GRBs, given that the GRB central engine injects intermittent pulses with a half period T  ≤ 1 s. The observational data seem to be consistent with such a possibility.

  4. Rotation and kinematics of the premain-sequence stars in Taurus-Auriga with Ca II emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.; Soderblom, David R.; Stauffer, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Radial velocities and v sin i values for the stars in the Taurus-Auriga region that were found to have strong Ca II H and K emission by Herbig, Vrba, and Rydgren 'HVR', (1986) are reported. Most of the velocities are determined to better than 2 km/s precision. The kinematic properties of the Ca II emission stars with strong Li are found to be indistinguishable from conventional T Tauris in Taurus-Auriga, contrary to HVR. These Li-rich stars also rotate like T Tauris. Most of the stars that lack Li are probable or possible members of the Hyades, in the foreground, and are among the brightest and most active stars in that cluster for their spectral types. It is suggested following Jones and Herbig (1979), that the apparent absence of low-mass stars older than 10 Myr in Taurus-Auriga is real, and is due to the finite lifetime of the cloud.

  5. Rotation and kinematics of the premain-sequence stars in Taurus-Auriga with CA II emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.; Soderblom, David R.; Stauffer, John R.

    1987-04-01

    The authors report radial velocities and v sin i values for the stars in the Taurus-Auriga region that were found to have strong Ca II H and K emission by Herbig, Vrba, and Rydgren (HVR). Most of the velocities are determined to better than 2 km s-1 precision. The authors find the kinematic properties of the Ca II emission stars with strong Li to be indistinguishable from conventional T Tauris in Taurus-Auriga, contrary to HVR. These Li-rich stars also rotate like T Tauris. Most of the stars that lack Li are probable or possible members of the Hyades, in the foreground, and are among the brightest and most active stars in that cluster for their spectral types. The authors suggest, following Jones and Herbig, that the apparent absence of low-mass stars older than 10 Myr in Taurus-Auriga is real, and is due to the finite lifetime of the cloud.

  6. 3D Realistic Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Moderate-Mass Star: Effects of Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent progress in stellar observations opens new perspectives in understanding stellar evolution and structure. However, complex interactions in the turbulent radiating plasma together with effects of magnetic fields and rotation make inferences of stellar properties uncertain. The standard 1D mixing-length-based evolutionary models are not able to capture many physical processes of stellar interior dynamics, but they provide an initial approximation of the stellar structure that can be used to initialize 3D time-dependent radiative hydrodynamics simulations, based on first physical principles, that take into account the effects of turbulence, radiation, and others. In this presentation we will show simulation results from a 3D realistic modeling of an F-type main-sequence star with mass 1.47 Msun, in which the computational domain includes the upper layers of the radiation zone, the entire convection zone, and the photosphere. The simulation results provide new insight into the formation and properties of the convective overshoot region, the dynamics of the near-surface, highly turbulent layer, the structure and dynamics of granulation, and the excitation of acoustic and gravity oscillations. We will discuss the thermodynamic structure, oscillations, and effects of rotation on the dynamics of the star across these layers.

  7. Golden-ratio rotated stack-of-stars acquisition for improved volumetric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Fei; Yan, Lirong; Wang, Danny J J; Hu, Peng

    2017-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an improved stack-of-stars radial sampling strategy for reducing streaking artifacts. The conventional stack-of-stars sampling strategy collects the same radial angle for every partition (slice) encoding. In an undersampled acquisition, such an aligned acquisition generates coherent aliasing patterns and introduces strong streaking artifacts. We show that by rotating the radial spokes in a golden-angle manner along the partition-encoding direction, the aliasing pattern is modified, resulting in improved image quality for gridding and more advanced reconstruction methods. Computer simulations were performed and phantom as well as in vivo images for three different applications were acquired. Simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments confirmed that the proposed method was able to generate images with less streaking artifact and sharper structures based on undersampled acquisitions in comparison with the conventional aligned approach at the same acceleration factors. By combining parallel imaging and compressed sensing in the reconstruction, streaking artifacts were mostly removed with improved delineation of fine structures using the proposed strategy. We present a simple method to reduce streaking artifacts and improve image quality in 3D stack-of-stars acquisitions by re-arranging the radial spoke angles in the 3D partition direction, which can be used for rapid volumetric imaging. Magn Reson Med 78:2290-2298, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Dynamics of Star Polymers in Fast Extensional Flow and Stress Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Agostini, Serena; Hengeller, Ludovica

    2016-01-01

    We confirm the observation from Ianniruberto and Marrucci [ Macromolecules 2013, 46, 267-275 ] that entangled melts of branched polystyrenes behave like linear polystyrenes in the steady state of fast extensional flow, by measuring a linear, an asymmetric star, and a symmetric star polystyrene wi...... they relax in a similar way, most likely via arm retraction, at short time, but behave differently at long time due to both the length of the arm and the branch point. The terminal relaxation is described by a Doi and Edwards based model, i.e., considering pure orientational relaxation....

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotation periods of M-dwarf stars (McQuillan+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, A.; Aigrain, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2014-07-01

    We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55M⊙. To derive the rotational period, we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor of ~30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37 to 69.7d, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0 to 140.8mmag. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~19 and ~33d, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of the Vaughan-Preston gap. The period-mass distribution of our sample shows no evidence of a transition at the fully convective boundary. On the other hand, the slope of the upper envelope of the period-mass relation changes sign around 0.55M⊙, below which period rises with decreasing mass. (4 data files).

  10. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating a star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day –1 (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day –1 in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  11. Chemical evolution with rotating massive star yields - I. The solar neighbourhood and the s-process elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantzos, N.; Abia, C.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.; Cristallo, S.

    2018-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance evolution of the elements from H to U in the Milky Way halo and local disc. We use a consistent chemical evolution model, metallicity-dependent isotopic yields from low and intermediate mass stars and yields from massive stars which include, for the first time, the combined effect of metallicity, mass loss, and rotation for a large grid of stellar masses and for all stages of stellar evolution. The yields of massive stars are weighted by a metallicity-dependent function of the rotational velocities, constrained by observations as to obtain a primary-like 14N behaviour at low metallicity and to avoid overproduction of s-elements at intermediate metallicities. We show that the Solar system isotopic composition can be reproduced to better than a factor of 2 for isotopes up to the Fe-peak, and at the 10 per cent level for most pure s-isotopes, both light ones (resulting from the weak s-process in rotating massive stars) and the heavy ones (resulting from the main s-process in low and intermediate mass stars). We conclude that the light element primary process (LEPP), invoked to explain the apparent abundance deficiency of the s-elements with A values of ^{12}C/^{13}C in halo red giants, which is rather due to internal processes in those stars.

  12. FIRST OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURE OF ROTATIONAL DECELERATION IN A MASSIVE, INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTER IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaohan [School of Physics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Deng, Licai, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-07-20

    While the extended main-sequence turnoffs (eMSTOs) found in almost all 1–2 Gyr old star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds are often explained by postulating extended star formation histories (SFHs), the tight subgiant branches (SGBs) seen in some clusters challenge this popular scenario. Puzzlingly, the SGB of the eMSTO cluster NGC 419 is significantly broader at bluer than at redder colors. We carefully assess and confirm the reality of this observational trend. If we would assume that the widths of the features in color–magnitude space were entirely owing to a range in stellar ages, the SFHs of the eMSTO stars and the blue SGB region would be significantly more prolonged than that of the red part of the SGB. This cannot be explained by assuming an internal age spread. We show that rotational deceleration of a population of rapidly rotating stars, a currently hotly debated alternative scenario, naturally explains the observed trend along the SGB. Our analysis shows that a “converging” SGB could be produced if the cluster is mostly composed of rapidly rotating stars that slow down over time owing to the conservation of angular momentum during their evolutionary expansion from main-sequence turnoff stars to red giants.

  13. Pelvic rotation torque during fast-pitch softball hitting under three ball height conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yoichi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kojima, Takeji

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relevance of hip joint angles to the production of the pelvic rotation torque in fast-pitch softball hitting and to examine the effect of ball height on this production. Thirteen advanced female softball players hit stationary balls at three different heights: high, middle, and low. The pelvic rotation torque, defined as the torque acting on the pelvis through the hip joints about the pelvic superior-inferior axis, was determined from the kinematic and force plate data using inverse dynamics. Irrespective of the ball heights, the rear hip extension, rear hip external rotation, front hip adduction, and front hip flexion torques contributed to the production of pelvic rotation torque. Although the contributions of the adduction and external rotation torques at each hip joint were significantly different among the ball heights, the contributions of the front and rear hip joint torques were similar among the three ball heights owing to cancelation of the two torque components. The timings of the peaks of the hip joint torque components were significantly different, suggesting that softball hitters may need to adjust the timings of the torque exertions fairly precisely to rotate the upper body effectively.

  14. Exoplanet dynamics. Asynchronous rotation of Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy; Wu, Hanbo; Menou, Kristen; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-06

    Planets in the habitable zone of lower-mass stars are often assumed to be in a state of tidally synchronized rotation, which would considerably affect their putative habitability. Although thermal tides cause Venus to rotate retrogradely, simple scaling arguments tend to attribute this peculiarity to the massive Venusian atmosphere. Using a global climate model, we show that even a relatively thin atmosphere can drive terrestrial planets' rotation away from synchronicity. We derive a more realistic atmospheric tide model that predicts four asynchronous equilibrium spin states, two being stable, when the amplitude of the thermal tide exceeds a threshold that is met for habitable Earth-like planets with a 1-bar atmosphere around stars more massive than ~0.5 to 0.7 solar mass. Thus, many recently discovered terrestrial planets could exhibit asynchronous spin-orbit rotation, even with a thin atmosphere. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Fast Traffic Sign Recognition with a Rotation Invariant Binary Pattern Based Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyi Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust and fast traffic sign recognition is very important but difficult for safe driving assistance systems. This study addresses fast and robust traffic sign recognition to enhance driving safety. The proposed method includes three stages. First, a typical Hough transformation is adopted to implement coarse-grained location of the candidate regions of traffic signs. Second, a RIBP (Rotation Invariant Binary Pattern based feature in the affine and Gaussian space is proposed to reduce the time of traffic sign detection and achieve robust traffic sign detection in terms of scale, rotation, and illumination. Third, the techniques of ANN (Artificial Neutral Network based feature dimension reduction and classification are designed to reduce the traffic sign recognition time. Compared with the current work, the experimental results in the public datasets show that this work achieves robustness in traffic sign recognition with comparable recognition accuracy and faster processing speed, including training speed and recognition speed.

  16. Fast traffic sign recognition with a rotation invariant binary pattern based feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shouyi; Ouyang, Peng; Liu, Leibo; Guo, Yike; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-19

    Robust and fast traffic sign recognition is very important but difficult for safe driving assistance systems. This study addresses fast and robust traffic sign recognition to enhance driving safety. The proposed method includes three stages. First, a typical Hough transformation is adopted to implement coarse-grained location of the candidate regions of traffic signs. Second, a RIBP (Rotation Invariant Binary Pattern) based feature in the affine and Gaussian space is proposed to reduce the time of traffic sign detection and achieve robust traffic sign detection in terms of scale, rotation, and illumination. Third, the techniques of ANN (Artificial Neutral Network) based feature dimension reduction and classification are designed to reduce the traffic sign recognition time. Compared with the current work, the experimental results in the public datasets show that this work achieves robustness in traffic sign recognition with comparable recognition accuracy and faster processing speed, including training speed and recognition speed.

  17. Digital Integrator for Fast Accurate Measurement of Magnetic Flux by Rotating Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, P.; Spiezia, G.

    2007-01-01

    A fast digital integrator (FDI) with dynamic accuracy and a trigger frequency higher than those of a portable digital integrator (PDI), which is a state-of-the-art instrument for magnetic measurements based on rotating coils, was developed for analyzing superconducting magnets in particle accelerators. Results of static and dynamic metrological characterization show how the FDI prototype is already capable of overcoming the dynamic performance of PDI as well as covering operating regions that used to be inaccessible

  18. Rotating Machinery Fault Diagnosis for Imbalanced Data Based on Fast Clustering Algorithm and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To diagnose rotating machinery fault for imbalanced data, a method based on fast clustering algorithm (FCA and support vector machine (SVM was proposed. Combined with variational mode decomposition (VMD and principal component analysis (PCA, sensitive features of the rotating machinery fault were obtained and constituted the imbalanced fault sample set. Next, a fast clustering algorithm was adopted to reduce the number of the majority data from the imbalanced fault sample set. Consequently, the balanced fault sample set consisted of the clustered data and the minority data from the imbalanced fault sample set. After that, SVM was trained with the balanced fault sample set and tested with the imbalanced fault sample set so the fault diagnosis model of the rotating machinery could be obtained. Finally, the gearbox fault data set and the rolling bearing fault data set were adopted to test the fault diagnosis model. The experimental results showed that the fault diagnosis model could effectively diagnose the rotating machinery fault for imbalanced data.

  19. Evolution of rotating star clusters at the inelastic-collision stage. II. Dynamics of a disk of gas and stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a gas--star disk embedded in a dense, mildly oblate (flattening epsilon-c or approx. =0.2--0.3 the stable disk will survive for at least half the cluster evolution time. The possibility of a thin disk of stars existing inside a dense star cluster is considered. For small epsilon-c and for disk member stars having > or approx. =0.04 the mass of the cluster members, collisions between cluster and disk stars will have no effect on the disk evolution prior to instability

  20. Realistic exact solution for the exterior field of a rotating neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachon, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Sanabria-Gomez, Jose D.

    2006-01-01

    A new six-parametric, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat exact solution of Einstein-Maxwell field equations having reflection symmetry is presented. It has arbitrary physical parameters of mass, angular momentum, mass-quadrupole moment, current octupole moment, electric charge, and magnetic dipole, so it can represent the exterior field of a rotating, deformed, magnetized, and charged object; some properties of the closed-form analytic solution such as its multipolar structure, electromagnetic fields, and singularities are also presented. In the vacuum case, this analytic solution is matched to some numerical interior solutions representing neutron stars, calculated by Berti and Stergioulas [E. Berti and N. Stergioulas, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 350, 1416 (2004)], imposing that the multipole moments be the same. As an independent test of accuracy of the solution to describe exterior fields of neutron stars, we present an extensive comparison of the radii of innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) obtained from the Berti and Stergioulas numerical solutions, the Kerr solution [R. P. Kerr, Phys. Rev. Lett. 11, 237 (1963)], the Hartle and Thorne solution [J. B. Hartle and K. S. Thorne, Astrophys. J. 153, 807 (1968)], an analytic series expansion derived by Shibata and Sasaki [M. Shibata and M. Sasaki, Phys. Rev. D 58, 104011 (1998)], and our exact solution. We found that radii of ISCOs from our solution fits better than others with realistic numerical interior solutions

  1. Flame propagation on the surfaces of rapidly rotating neutron stars during Type I X-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavecchi, Y.; Watts, A.; Braithwaite, J.; Levin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first vertically resolved hydrodynamic simulations of a laterally propagating, deflagrating flame in the thin helium ocean of a rotating accreting neutron star. We use a new hydrodynamics solver tailored to deal with the large discrepancy in horizontal and vertical length-scales

  2. Temperature measurements on fast-rotating objects using a thermographic camera with an optomechanical image derotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Bettina; Pape, Christian; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Increasing requirements concerning the quality and lifetime of machine components in industrial and automotive applications require comprehensive investigations of the components in conditions close to the application. Irregularities in heating of mechanical parts reveal regions with increased loading of pressure, draft or friction. In the long run this leads to damage and total failure of the machine. Thermographic measurements of rotating objects, e.g., rolling bearings, brakes, and clutches provide an approach to investigate those defects. However, it is challenging to measure fast-rotating objects accurately. Currently one contact-free approach is performing stroboscopic measurements using an infrared sensor. The data acquisition is triggered so that the image is taken once per revolution. This leads to a huge loss of information on the majority of the movement and to motion blur. The objective of this research is showing the potential of using an optomechanical image derotator together with a thermographic camera. The derotator follows the rotation of the measurement object so that quasi-stationary thermal images during motion can be acquired by the infrared sensor. Unlike conventional derotators which use a glass prism to achieve this effect, the derotator within this work is equipped with a sophisticated reflector assembly. These reflectors are made of aluminum to transfer infrared radiation emitted by the rotating object. Because of the resulting stationary thermal image, the operation can be monitored continuously even for fast-rotating objects. The field of view can also be set to a small off-axis region of interest which then can be investigated with higher resolution or frame rate. To depict the potential of this approach, thermographic measurements on a rolling bearings in different operating states are presented.

  3. Origin and Evolution of Magnetic Field in PMS Stars: Influence of Rotation and Structural Changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emeriau-Viard, Constance; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2017-01-01

    During stellar evolution, especially in the pre-main-sequence phase, stellar structure and rotation evolve significantly, causing major changes in the dynamics and global flows of the star. We wish to assess the consequences of these changes on stellar dynamo, internal magnetic field topology, and activity level. To do so, we have performed a series of 3D HD and MHD simulations with the ASH code. We choose five different models characterized by the radius of their radiative zone following an evolutionary track computed by a 1D stellar evolution code. These models characterized stellar evolution from 1 to 50 Myr. By introducing a seed magnetic field in the fully convective model and spreading its evolved state through all four remaining cases, we observe systematic variations in the dynamical properties and magnetic field amplitude and topology of the models. The five MHD simulations develop a strong dynamo field that can reach an equipartition state between the kinetic and magnetic energies and even superequipartition levels in the faster-rotating cases. We find that the magnetic field amplitude increases as it evolves toward the zero-age main sequence. Moreover, the magnetic field topology becomes more complex, with a decreasing axisymmetric component and a nonaxisymmetric one becoming predominant. The dipolar components decrease as the rotation rate and the size of the radiative core increase. The magnetic fields possess a mixed poloidal-toroidal topology with no obvious dominant component. Moreover, the relaxation of the vestige dynamo magnetic field within the radiative core is found to satisfy MHD stability criteria. Hence, it does not experience a global reconfiguration but slowly relaxes by retaining its mixed stable poloidal-toroidal topology.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Magnetic Field in PMS Stars: Influence of Rotation and Structural Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeriau-Viard, Constance; Brun, Allan Sacha, E-mail: constance.emeriau@cea.fr, E-mail: sacha.brun@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay CEA/DSM—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/DAp CEA Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-09-01

    During stellar evolution, especially in the pre-main-sequence phase, stellar structure and rotation evolve significantly, causing major changes in the dynamics and global flows of the star. We wish to assess the consequences of these changes on stellar dynamo, internal magnetic field topology, and activity level. To do so, we have performed a series of 3D HD and MHD simulations with the ASH code. We choose five different models characterized by the radius of their radiative zone following an evolutionary track computed by a 1D stellar evolution code. These models characterized stellar evolution from 1 to 50 Myr. By introducing a seed magnetic field in the fully convective model and spreading its evolved state through all four remaining cases, we observe systematic variations in the dynamical properties and magnetic field amplitude and topology of the models. The five MHD simulations develop a strong dynamo field that can reach an equipartition state between the kinetic and magnetic energies and even superequipartition levels in the faster-rotating cases. We find that the magnetic field amplitude increases as it evolves toward the zero-age main sequence. Moreover, the magnetic field topology becomes more complex, with a decreasing axisymmetric component and a nonaxisymmetric one becoming predominant. The dipolar components decrease as the rotation rate and the size of the radiative core increase. The magnetic fields possess a mixed poloidal-toroidal topology with no obvious dominant component. Moreover, the relaxation of the vestige dynamo magnetic field within the radiative core is found to satisfy MHD stability criteria. Hence, it does not experience a global reconfiguration but slowly relaxes by retaining its mixed stable poloidal-toroidal topology.

  5. License plate localization in complex scenes based on oriented FAST and rotated BRIEF feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Xia, Yuanchun; Wang, Guoyou; Tian, Jiangmin

    2015-09-01

    Within intelligent transportation systems, fast and robust license plate localization (LPL) in complex scenes is still a challenging task. Real-world scenes introduce complexities such as variation in license plate size and orientation, uneven illumination, background clutter, and nonplate objects. These complexities lead to poor performance using traditional LPL features, such as color, edge, and texture. Recently, state-of-the-art performance in LPL has been achieved by applying the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptor to LPL for visual matching. However, for applications that require fast processing, such as mobile phones, SIFT does not meet the efficiency requirement due to its relatively slow computational speed. To address this problem, a new approach for LPL, which uses the oriented FAST and rotated BRIEF (ORB) feature detector, is proposed. The feature extraction in ORB is much more efficient than in SIFT and is invariant to scale and grayscale as well as rotation changes, and hence is able to provide superior performance for LPL. The potential regions of a license plate are detected by considering spatial and color information simultaneously, which is different from previous approaches. The experimental results on a challenging dataset demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE NEARBY DWARF GALAXY NGC 5238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew T.; Teich, Yaron G., E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: amcnicho@nrao.edu, E-mail: yateich@gmail.com; and others

    2016-12-01

    We present new H i spectral-line images of the nearby low-mass galaxy NGC 5238, acquired with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Located at a distance of 4.51 ± 0.04 Mpc, NGC 5238 is an actively star-forming galaxy with widespread H α and ultraviolet (UV) continuum emission. The source is included in many ongoing and recent nearby galaxy surveys, but until this work the spatially resolved qualities of its neutral interstellar medium have remained unstudied. Our H i images resolve the disk on physical scales of ∼400 pc, allowing us to undertake a detailed comparative study of the gaseous and stellar components. The H i disk is asymmetric in the outer regions, and the areas of high H i mass surface density display a crescent-shaped morphology that is slightly offset from the center of the stellar populations. The H i column density exceeds 10{sup 21} cm{sup −2} in much of the disk. We quantify the degree of co-spatiality of dense H i gas and sites of ongoing star formation as traced by far-UV and H α emission. The neutral gas kinematics are complex; using a spatially resolved position–velocity analysis, we infer a rotational velocity of 31 ± 5 km s{sup −1}. We place NGC 5238 on the baryonic Tully–Fisher relation and contextualize the system among other low-mass galaxies.

  7. Fast Iris Segmentation by Rotation Average Analysis of Intensity-Inversed Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    Iris recognition is a reliable and accurate biometric technique used in modern personnel identification system. Segmentation of the effective iris region is the base of iris feature encoding and recognition. In this paper, a novel method is presented for fast iris segmentation. There are two steps to finish the iris segmentation. The first step is iris location, which is based on rotation average analysis of intensity-inversed image and non-linear circular regression. The second step is eyelid detection. A new method to detect the eyelids utilizing a simplified mathematical model of arc with three free parameters is implemented for quick fitting. Comparatively, the conventional model with four parameters is less optimal. Experiments were carried out on both self-collected images and CASIA database. The results show that our method is fast and robust in segmenting the effective iris region with high tolerance of noise and scaling.

  8. The Spin Distribution of Fast-spinning Neutron Stars in Low-mass X-Ray Binaries: Evidence for Two Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patruno, A.; Haskell, B.; Andersson, N.

    2017-11-01

    We study the current sample of rapidly rotating neutron stars in both accreting and non-accreting binaries in order to determine whether the spin distribution of accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) can be reconciled with current accretion torque models. We perform a statistical analysis of the spin distributions and show that there is evidence for two subpopulations among LMXBs, one at a relatively low spin frequency, with an average of ≈ 300 {Hz} and a broad spread, and a peaked population at higher frequency with an average spin frequency of ≈ 575 {Hz}. We show that the two subpopulations are separated by a cut-point at a frequency of ≈ 540 {Hz}. We also show that the spin frequency of radio millisecond pulsars (RMSPs) does not follow a log-normal distribution and shows no evidence for the existence of distinct subpopulations. We discuss the uncertainties of different accretion models and speculate that either the accreting neutron star cut-point marks the onset of gravitational waves as an efficient mechanism to remove angular momentum or some of the neutron stars in the fast subpopulation do not evolve into RMSPs.

  9. Do axes of rotation change during fast and slow motions of the dominant and non-dominate arms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Christopher

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The velocity-dependent change in rotational axes observed in the control of unconstrained 3D arm rotations for the dominant limb seems to conform to a minimum inertia resistance (MIR principle [4]. This is an efficient biomechanical solution that allows for the reduction of torques. We tested whether the MIR principle governs rotating movement when subjects were instructed to maintain the shoulder-elbow joint axis close to horizontal for both dominant and non dominant limbs. Subjects (n=12 performed externalinternal rotations of their arms in two angular positions (90° versus 150°, two angular velocities (slow (S versus fast (F, and in two sensory conditions (kinaesthetic (K versus visuo- kinaesthetic (VK. We expected more scattered displacements of the rotation axis employed for rotating the non dominant limb compared to the dominant limb. The results showed that the rotational axis of a multiarticulated limb coincided with SH-EL at S & F velocity for both arms.

  10. EXPORT: Spectral classification and projected rotational velocities of Vega-type and pre-main sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, A.; Merín, B.; Solano, E.; Montesinos, B.; de Winter, D.; Eiroa, C.; Ferlet, R.; Grady, C. A.; Davies, J. K.; Miranda, L. F.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Palacios, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Harris, A. W.; Rauer, H.; Collier Cameron, A.; Deeg, H. J.; Garzón, F.; Penny, A.; Schneider, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Wesselius, P. R.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive results extracted from the spectroscopic campaigns carried out by the EXPORT (EXoPlanetary Observational Research Team) consortium. During 1998-1999, EXPORT carried out an intensive observational effort in the framework of the origin and evolution of protoplanetary systems in order to obtain clues on the evolutionary path from the early stages of the pre-main sequence to stars with planets already formed. The spectral types of 70 stars, and the projected rotational velocities, v sin i, of 45 stars, mainly Vega-type and pre-main sequence, have been determined from intermediate- and high-resolution spectroscopy, respectively. The first part of the work is of fundamental importance in order to accurately place the stars in the HR diagram and determine the evolutionary sequences; the second part provides information on the kinematics and dynamics of the stars and the evolution of their angular momentum. The advantage of using the same observational configuration and methodology for all the stars is the homogeneity of the set of parameters obtained. Results from previous work are revised, leading in some cases to completely new determinations of spectral types and projected rotational velocities; for some stars no previous studies were available. Tables 1 and 2 are only, and Table 6 also, available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/378/116 Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton and the William Herschel telescopes operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  11. Non-radial oscillations of rotating stars and their relevance to the short-period oscillations of cataclysmic variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaloizou, J.; Pringle, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    The usual hypothesis, that the short-period coherent oscillations seen in cataclysmic variables are attributable to g modes in a slowly rotating white dwarf, is considered. It is shown that this hypothesis is untenable for three main reasons: (i) the observed periods are too short for reasonable white dwarf models, (ii) the observed variability of the oscillations is too rapid and (iii) the expected rotation of the white dwarf, due to accretion, invalidates the slow rotation assumption on which standard g-mode theory is based. The low-frequency spectrum of a rotating pulsating star is investigated taking the effects of rotation fully into account. In this case there are two sets of low-frequency modes, the g modes, and modes similar to Rossby waves in the Earth's atmosphere and oceans, which are designated r modes. Typical periods for such modes are 1/m times the rotation period of the white dwarfs outer layers (m is the aximuthal wavenumber). It is concluded that non-radial oscillations of rotating white dwarfs can account for the properties of the oscillations seen in dwarf novae. Application of these results to other systems is also discussed. (author)

  12. Thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing in low and intermediate mass stars: Consequences on global asteroseismic quantities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekström S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermohaline mixing has been recently identified as the probable dominating process that governs the photospheric composition of low-mass bright red giant stars. Here, we present the predictions of stellar models computed with the code STAREVOL including this process together with rotational mixing. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent observations, and discuss the effects of both mechanisms on asteroseismic diagnostics.

  13. Light or heavy supermassive black hole seeds: the role of internal rotation in the fate of supermassive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are a key ingredient of galaxy evolution. However, their origin is still highly debated. In one of the leading formation scenarios, a black hole of ˜100 M⊙ results from the collapse of the inner core of a supermassive star (≳104-5 M⊙), created by the rapid accumulation (≳0.1 M⊙ yr-1) of pristine gas at the centre of newly formed galaxies at z ˜ 15. The subsequent evolution is still speculative: the remaining gas in the supermassive star can either directly plunge into the nascent black hole or part of it can form a central accretion disc, whose luminosity sustains a surrounding, massive, and nearly hydrostatic envelope (a system called a `quasi-star'). To address this point, we consider the effect of rotation on a quasi-star, as angular momentum is inevitably transported towards the galactic nucleus by the accumulating gas. Using a model for the internal redistribution of angular momentum that qualitatively matches results from simulations of rotating convective stellar envelopes, we show that quasi-stars with an envelope mass greater than a few 105 M_{⊙} × (black hole mass/100 M_{⊙})^{0.82} have highly sub-Keplerian gas motion in their core, preventing gas circularization outside the black hole's horizon. Less massive quasi-stars could form but last for only ≲104 yr before the accretion luminosity unbinds the envelope, suppressing the black hole growth. We speculate that this might eventually lead to a dual black hole seed population: (I) massive (>104 M⊙) seeds formed in the most massive (>108 M⊙) and rare haloes; (II) lighter (˜102 M⊙) seeds to be found in less massive and therefore more common haloes.

  14. Triple system HD 201433 with a SPB star component seen by BRITE - Constellation: Pulsation, differential rotation, and angular momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W. W.; Beck, P. G.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Tkachenko, A.; Pakhomov, Y.; Ryabchikova, T.; Lüftinger, T.; Palle, , P. L.; Semenko, E.; Handler, G.; Koudelka, O.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Pablo, H.; Popowicz, A.; Rucinski, S.; Wade, G. A.; Zwintz, K.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive OB-type stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the Universe. It is therefore important to constrain the physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution of massive OB-type stars to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar internal rotation can be probed through asteroseismic studies of rotationally split non radial oscillations but such results are still quite rare, especially for stars more massive than the Sun. The slowly pulsating B9V star HD 201433 is known to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic triple system, with two low-mass companions orbiting with periods of about 3.3 and 154 days. Aims: Our goal is to measure the internal rotation profile of HD 201433 and investigate the tidal interaction with the close companion. Methods: We used probabilistic methods to analyse the BRITE - Constellation photometry and radial velocity measurements, to identify a representative stellar model, and to determine the internal rotation profile of the star. Results: Our results are based on photometric observations made by BRITE - Constellation and the Solar Mass Ejection Imager on board the Coriolis satellite, high-resolution spectroscopy, and more than 96 yr of radial velocity measurements. We identify a sequence of nine frequency doublets in the photometric time series, consistent with rotationally split dipole modes with a period spacing of about 5030 s. We establish that HD 201433 is in principle a solid-body rotator with a very slow rotation period of 297 ± 76 days. Tidal interaction with the inner companion has, however, significantly accelerated the spin of the surface layers by a factor of approximately one hundred. The angular momentum transfer onto the surface of HD 201433 is also reflected by the

  15. Optimal and fast rotational alignment of volumes with missing data in Fourier space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatsky, Maxim; Arbelaez, Pablo; Glaeser, Robert M; Brenner, Steven E

    2013-11-01

    Electron tomography of intact cells has the potential to reveal the entire cellular content at a resolution corresponding to individual macromolecular complexes. Characterization of macromolecular complexes in tomograms is nevertheless an extremely challenging task due to the high level of noise, and due to the limited tilt angle that results in missing data in Fourier space. By identifying particles of the same type and averaging their 3D volumes, it is possible to obtain a structure at a more useful resolution for biological interpretation. Currently, classification and averaging of sub-tomograms is limited by the speed of computational methods that optimize alignment between two sub-tomographic volumes. The alignment optimization is hampered by the fact that the missing data in Fourier space has to be taken into account during the rotational search. A similar problem appears in single particle electron microscopy where the random conical tilt procedure may require averaging of volumes with a missing cone in Fourier space. We present a fast implementation of a method guaranteed to find an optimal rotational alignment that maximizes the constrained cross-correlation function (cCCF) computed over the actual overlap of data in Fourier space. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Control of finger forces during fast, slow and moderate rotational hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Hamed; Kearney, Robert E; Milner, Theodore E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of speed on patterns of grip forces during twisting movement involving forearm supination against a torsional load (combined elastic and inertial load). For slow and moderate speed rotations, the grip force increased linearly with load torque. However, for fast rotations in which the contribution of the inertia to load torque was significantly greater than slower movements, the grip force-load torque relationship could be segmented into two phases: a linear ascending phase corresponding to the acceleration part of the movement followed by a plateau during deceleration. That is, during the acceleration phase, the grip force accurately tracked the combined elastic and inertial load. However, the coupling between grip force and load torque was not consistent during the deceleration phase of the movement. In addition, as speed increased, both the position and the force profiles became smoother. No differences in the baseline grip force, safety margin to secure the grasp during hold phase or the overall change in grip force were observed across different speeds.

  17. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, Jan E. [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Mahachie John, Jestinah M. [University of Hasselt, Centre for Statistics, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Gelin, Geert [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder. (orig.)

  18. Fast Variability in Selected Chromospherically Active Dwarf Stars and Observational Equipment for Their Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovski, Rumen G.

    2015-06-01

    The observations of variable stars, especially those which show fast changes in their brightness, require high speed and high precision photometry. In order to study events like low amplitude optical oscillations and small scale fluctuations in the light curves, synchronous observations are required. These observations have to be carried out simultaneously at two or more, preferably distant, sites (Romanyuk et al., 2001), which allows the identification and elimination of artifacts produced by the equipment and the atmospheric interferences. In this way the fine structure of the light curve is revealed with a significant certainty. In order to study these events a new high speed time synchronized photometric system had to be designed, which addresses the requirements of the observations of high frequency subtle phenomena during stellar flares. It provides remote automatedand centralized control of the photometric equipment over a computer network,as well as remotemonitoring. Furthermore, some preliminary data processing can be performed at the time the data is obtained.

  19. Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Grace

    2017-01-01

    This title will cover how stars form, different types of stars, their lifecycle, and the most important star to us--the Sun! Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Kids Jumbo is an imprint of Abdo Kids, a division of ABDO.

  20. Glimpses of stellar surfaces. I. Spot evolution and differential rotation of the planet host star Kepler-210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, P.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-10-01

    We use high accuracy photometric data obtained with the Kepler satellite to monitor the activity modulations of the Kepler-210 planet host star over a time span of more than four years. Following the phenomenology of the star's light curve in combination with a five spot model, we identify six different so-called spot seasons. A characteristic, which is common in the majority of the seasons, is the persistent appearance of spots in a specific range of longitudes on the stellar surface. The most prominent period of the observed activity modulations is different for each season and appears to evolve following a specific pattern, resembling the changes in the sunspot periods during the solar magnetic cycle. Under the hypothesis that the star exhibits solar-like differential rotation, we suggest differential rotation values of Kepler-210 that are similar to or smaller than that of the Sun. Finally, we estimate spot life times between ~60 days and ~90 days, taking into consideration the evolution of the total covered stellar surface computed from our model.

  1. Radiation-pressure-driven sub-Keplerian rotation of the disc around the AGB star L2 Pup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Booth, Richard A.; Homan, Ward; Decin, Leen; Clarke, Cathie J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2018-01-01

    We study the sub-Keplerian rotation and dust content of the circumstellar material around the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star L2 Puppis. We find that the thermal pressure gradient alone cannot explain the observed rotation profile. We find that there is a family of possible dust populations for which radiation pressure can drive the observed sub-Keplerian rotation. This set of solutions is further constrained by the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the system, and we find that a dust-to-gas mass ratio of ∼10-3 and a maximum grain size that decreases radially outwards can satisfy both the rotation curve and SED. These dust populations are dynamically tightly coupled to the gas azimuthally. However, grains larger than ∼ 0.5 μm are driven outwards radially by radiation pressure at velocities ∼5 km s-1, which implies a dust replenishment rate of ∼3 × 10-9 M⊙ yr-1. This replenishment rate is consistent with observational estimates to within uncertainties. Coupling between the radial motion of the dust and gas is weak and hence the gas does not share in this rapid outward motion. Overall, we conclude that radiation pressure is a capable and necessary mechanism to explain the observed rotation profile of L2 Pup, and offers other additional constraints on the dust properties.

  2. A comparison of the Health Star Rating system when used for restaurant fast foods and packaged foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Elizabeth K; Wu, Jason H Y; Wellard-Cole, Lyndal; Watson, Wendy; Crino, Michelle; Petersen, Kristina; Neal, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    In June 2014, the Australian government agreed to the voluntary implementation of an interpretive 'Health Star Rating' (HSR) front-of-pack labelling system for packaged foods. The aim of the system is to make it easier for consumers to compare the healthiness of products based on number of stars. With many Australians consuming fast food there is a strong rationale for extending the HSR system to include fast food items. To examine the performance of the HSR system when applied to fast foods. Nutrient content data for fast food menu items were collected from the websites of 13 large Australian fast-food chains. The HSR was calculated for each menu item. Statistics describing HSR values for fast foods were calculated and compared to results for comparable packaged foods. Data for 1529 fast food products were compared to data for 3810 packaged food products across 16 of 17 fast food product categories. The mean HSR for the fast foods was 2.5 and ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 and corresponding values for the comparator packaged foods were 2.6 and 0.5 to 5.0. Visual inspection of the data showed broadly comparable distributions of HSR values across the fast food and the packaged food categories, although statistically significant differences were apparent for seven categories (all p fast foods and packaged food, and in others it appeared to reflect primarily differences in the mix of product types within a category. These data support the idea that the HSR system could be extended to Australian fast foods. There are likely to be significant benefits to the community from the use of a single standardised signposting system for healthiness across all fresh, packaged and restaurant foods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Radius and Entropy of a Magnetized, Rotating, Fully Convective Star: Analysis with Depth-dependent Mixing Length Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Lewis G.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2018-04-01

    Some low-mass stars appear to have larger radii than predicted by standard 1D structure models; prior work has suggested that inefficient convective heat transport, due to rotation and/or magnetism, may ultimately be responsible. We examine this issue using 1D stellar models constructed using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). First, we consider standard models that do not explicitly include rotational/magnetic effects, with convective inhibition modeled by decreasing a depth-independent mixing length theory (MLT) parameter α MLT. We provide formulae linking changes in α MLT to changes in the interior specific entropy, and hence to the stellar radius. Next, we modify the MLT formulation in MESA to mimic explicitly the influence of rotation and magnetism, using formulations suggested by Stevenson and MacDonald & Mullan, respectively. We find rapid rotation in these models has a negligible impact on stellar structure, primarily because a star’s adiabat, and hence its radius, is predominantly affected by layers near the surface; convection is rapid and largely uninfluenced by rotation there. Magnetic fields, if they influenced convective transport in the manner described by MacDonald & Mullan, could lead to more noticeable radius inflation. Finally, we show that these non-standard effects on stellar structure can be fabricated using a depth-dependent α MLT: a non-magnetic, non-rotating model can be produced that is virtually indistinguishable from one that explicitly parameterizes rotation and/or magnetism using the two formulations above. We provide formulae linking the radially variable α MLT to these putative MLT reformulations.

  4. p-capture reaction cycles in rotating massive stars and their impact on elemental abundances in globular cluster stars: A case study of O, Na and Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Hiralal; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    Elemental abundance patterns of globular cluster stars can provide important clues for understanding cluster formation and early chemical evolution. The origin of the abundance patterns, however, still remains poorly understood. We have studied the impact of p-capture reaction cycles on the abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium considering nuclear reaction cycles of carbon-nitrogen-oxygen-fluorine, neon-sodium and magnesium-aluminium in massive stars in stellar conditions of temperature range 2×107 to 10×107 K and typical density of 102 gm cc-1. We have estimated abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium with respect to Fe, which are then assumed to be ejected from those stars because of rotation reaching a critical limit. These ejected abundances of elements are then compared with their counterparts that have been observed in some metal-poor evolved stars, mainly giants and red giants, of globular clusters M3, M4, M13 and NGC 6752. We observe an excellent agreement with [O/Fe] between the estimated and observed abundance values for globular clusters M3 and M4 with a correlation coefficient above 0.9 and a strong linear correlation for the remaining two clusters with a correlation coefficient above 0.7. The estimated [Na/Fe] is found to have a correlation coefficient above 0.7, thus implying a strong correlation for all four globular clusters. As far as [Al/Fe] is concerned, it also shows a strong correlation between the estimated abundance and the observed abundance for globular clusters M13 and NGC 6752, since here also the correlation coefficient is above 0.7 whereas for globular cluster M4 there is a moderate correlation found with a correlation coefficient above 0.6. Possible sources of these discrepancies are discussed.

  5. The extremely rapid rotational braking of the magnetic helium-strong star HD 37776

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulášek, Z.; Krtička, J.; Henry, G.W.; Zverko, J.; Žižňovský, J.; Bohlender, D.A.; Romanyuk, I.I.; Janík, J.; Božić, H.; Korčáková, Daniela; Zejda, M.; Iliev, I.K.; Škoda, Petr; Gráf, T.; Netolický, M.; Ceniga, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 485, č. 2 (2008), s. 585-597 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/0584; GA AV ČR KJB301630501 Grant - others:MVTS SR-ČR(SK) 10/15; VEGA(SK) 2/6036/6; NSF(BG) F-1403/2004; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/0217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : variables stars * chemically peculiar stars * early-type stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  6. Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kukla, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Climb Aboard! Explore planets and how they are formed! Meet key astronomers! Examine the history of mapping the stars! Investigate red giants, black and white dwarfs, neutron stars, supernovas, and black holes! See an infographic showing our solar system's statistics! Did You Know? facts and a Guidebook of the brightest stars complete your journey. Aligned to Common Core standards and correlated to state standards. Checkerboard Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fossati, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Balona, L. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Kurtz, D. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bohlender, D. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lenz, P. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th. [Institut fuer Astronphysik der Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  8. The High-Energy Polarization-Limiting Radius of Neutron Star Magnetospheres 1, Slowly Rotating Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heyl, J S; Lloyd, D; CERN. Geneva; Heyl, Jeremy S.; Shaviv, Nir J.; Lloyd, Don

    2003-01-01

    In the presence of strong magnetic fields, the vacuum becomes a birefringent medium. We show that this QED effect decouples the polarization modes of photons leaving the NS surface. Both the total intensity and the intensity in each of the two modes is preserved along a ray's path through the neutron-star magnetosphere. We analyze the consequences that this effect has on aligning the observed polarization vectors across the image of the stellar surface to generate large net polarizations. Counter to previous predictions, we show that the thermal radiation of NSs should be highly polarized even in the optical. When detected, this polarization will be the first demonstration of vacuum birefringence. It could be used as a tool to prove the high magnetic field nature of AXPs and it could also be used to constrain physical NS parameters, such as $R/M$, to which the net polarization is sensitive.

  9. Effect of rotational mixing and metallicity on the hot star wind mass-loss rates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 567, July (2014), A63/1-A63/7 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10589S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : stars: winds * outflows * stars: mass-loss Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  10. Torsional oscillations and observed rotational period variations in early-type stars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtička, J.; Mikulášek, Z.; Henry, G.W.; Kurfürst, P.; Karlický, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 464, č. 1 (2017), s. 933-939 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01116S; GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : MHD * chemically peculiar stars * early-type stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  11. Extended Main-sequence Turn-offs in Intermediate-age Star Clusters: Stellar Rotation Diminishes, but Does Not Eliminate, Age Spreads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Correnti, Matteo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Girardi, Léo, E-mail: goudfroo@stsci.edu [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2017-09-01

    Extended main-sequence turn-off (eMSTO) regions are a common feature in color–magnitude diagrams of young- and intermediate-age star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds. The nature of eMSTOs remains debated in the literature. The currently most popular scenarios are extended star formation activity and ranges of stellar rotation rates. Here we study details of differences in main-sequence turn-off (MSTO) morphology expected from spreads in age versus spreads in rotation rates, using Monte Carlo simulations with the Geneva syclist isochrone models that include the effects of stellar rotation. We confirm a recent finding of Niederhofer et al. that a distribution of stellar rotation velocities yields an MSTO extent that is proportional to the cluster age, as observed. However, we find that stellar rotation yields MSTO crosscut widths that are generally smaller than observed ones at a given age. We compare the simulations with high-quality Hubble Space Telescope data of NGC 1987 and NGC 2249, which are the two only relatively massive star clusters with an age of ∼1 Gyr for which such data is available. We find that the distribution of stars across the eMSTOs of these clusters cannot be explained solely by a distribution of stellar rotation velocities, unless the orientations of rapidly rotating stars are heavily biased toward an equator-on configuration. Under the assumption of random viewing angles, stellar rotation can account for ∼60% and ∼40% of the observed FWHM widths of the eMSTOs of NGC 1987 and NGC 2249, respectively. In contrast, a combination of distributions of stellar rotation velocities and stellar ages fits the observed eMSTO morphologies very well.

  12. KINEMATICS OF THE OUTFLOW FROM THE YOUNG STAR DG TAU B: ROTATION IN THE VICINITIES OF AN OPTICAL JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Tafoya, Daniel [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Mich. (Mexico); Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fernández-López, Manuel, E-mail: lzapata@crya.unam.mx [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We present {sup 12}CO(2-1) line and 1300 μm continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array of the young star DG Tau B. We find, in the continuum observations, emission arising from the circumstellar disk surrounding DG Tau B. The {sup 12}CO(2-1) line observations, on the other hand, revealed emission associated with the disk and the asymmetric outflow related with this source. Velocity asymmetries about the flow axis are found over the entire length of the flow. The amplitude of the velocity differences is of the order of 1-2 km s{sup –1} over distances of about 300-400 AU. We interpret them as a result of outflow rotation. The sense of the outflow and disk rotation is the same. Infalling gas from a rotating molecular core cannot explain the observed velocity gradient within the flow. Magneto-centrifugal disk winds or photoevaporated disk winds can produce the observed rotational speeds if they are ejected from a Keplerian disk at radii of several tens of AU. Nevertheless, these slow winds ejected from large radii are not very massive, and cannot account for the observed linear momentum and angular momentum rates of the molecular flow. Thus, the observed flow is probably entrained material from the parent cloud. DG Tau B is a good laboratory to model in detail the entrainment process and see if it can account for the observed angular momentum.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotational mixing in CEMP-s stars (Matrozis+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrozis, E.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2017-07-01

    Summary of all rotating models that reach an age of at least 10Gyr and do not reach critical rotation after relaxation following mass accretion. The table contains chiefly abundances at key points of evolution: after mass accretion, after thermohaline mixing, at the main-sequence turn-off, after first dredge-up, and near the tip of the RGB. (1 data file).

  14. Recent Chandra/HETGS and NuSTAR observations of the quasar PDS 456 and its Ultra-Fast Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissay Malaquin, Rozenn; Marshall, Herman L.; Nowak, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    Evidence is growing that the interaction between outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their surrounding medium may play an important role in galaxy evolution, i.e. in the regulation of star formation in galaxies, through AGN feedback processes. Indeed, powerful outflows, such as the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that can reach mildly relativistic velocities of 0.2-0.4c, could blow away a galaxy’s reservoir of star-forming gas and hence quench the star formation in host galaxies. The low-redshift (z=0.184) radio-quiet quasar PDS 456 has showed the presence of a strong and blueshifted absorption trough in the Fe K band above 7 keV, that has been associated with the signature of such a fast and highly ionized accretion disk wind of a velocity of 0.25-0.3c. This persistent and variable feature has been detected in many observations of PDS 456, in particular by XMM-Newton, Suzaku and NuSTAR, together with other blueshifted absorption lines in the soft energy band (e.g. Nardini et al. 2015, Reeves et al. 2016). I will present here the results of the analysis of recent and contemporaneous high-resolution Chandra/HETGS and NuSTAR observations of PDS 456, and compare them with the previous findings.

  15. Small-Scale Activity Above the Penumbra of a Fast-Rotating Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Rakesh, S.; Sobha, B.; Pandya, A.; Joshi, C.

    2018-03-01

    High-resolution observations of small-scale activity above the filamentary structure of a fast-rotating sunspot of NOAA Active Region 10930 are presented. The penumbral filament that intrudes into the umbra shows a central dark core and substructures. It almost approached another end of the umbra, like a light bridge. The chromospheric Ca ii H images show many jet-like structures with a bright leading edge above it. These bright jets move across the filament tips and show coordinated up and down motions. Transition region images also show brightening at the same location above the intrusion. Coronal 195 Å images suggest that one end of the bright coronal loop footpoints resides in this structure. The intrusion has opposite polarity with respect to the umbra. Strong downflows are observed at the edges along the length of the intrusion where the opposite-polarity field is enhanced. We also observe a counter-Evershed flow in the filamentary structure that also displays brightening and energy dissipation in the upper atmosphere. This scenario suggests that the jets and brightenings are caused by low-altitude reconnection driven by opposite-polarity fields and convective downflows above such structures.

  16. FAST RADIO BURSTS: COLLISIONS BETWEEN NEUTRON STARS AND ASTEROIDS/COMETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2015-08-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are newly discovered radio transient sources. Their high dispersion measures indicate an extragalactic origin. However, due to the lack of observational data in other wavelengths, their progenitors still remain unclear. Here we suggest that the collisions between neutron stars (NSs) and asteroids/comets are promising mechanisms for FRBs. During the impact process, a hot plasma fireball forms after the material of the small body penetrates into the NS surface. The ionized matter inside the fireball then expands along the magnetic field lines. Coherent radiation from the thin shell at the top of the fireball will account for the observed FRBs. Our scenario can reasonably explain the main features of FRBs, such as their durations, luminosities, and the event rate. We argue that for a single NS, FRBs are not likely to happen repeatedly in a forseeable timespan since such impacts are of low probability. We predict that faint remnant X-ray emissions should be associated with FRBs, but it may be too faint to be detected by detectors at work.

  17. NuSTAR and swift observations of the fast rotating magnetized white dwarf AE Aquarii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitaguchi, Takao; An, Hongjun; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-01-01

    model with two temperatures of 1.00(-0.23)(+0.34) and 4.64(-0.84)(+1.58) keV plus a power-law component with photon index of 2.50(-0.23)(+0.17). The pulse profile in the 3-20 keV band is broad and approximately sinusoidal, with a pulsed fraction of 16.6% +/- 2.3%. We do not find any evidence...

  18. Rotating plug size study for liquid-metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate possible rotating plug arrangements. The three-, two-, and one-rotating plug schemes were developed using a set of established restrictions and component sizes. The three-rotating plug configuration is the recommended reference design

  19. A magnetic confinement versus rotation classification of massive-star magnetospheres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petit, V.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G.A.; Cohen, D.H.; Sundqvist, J.O.; Gagne, M.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.M.; Oksala, Mary E.; Bohlender, D.A.; Rivinius, T.; Henrichs, H.F.; Alecian, E.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Ud-Doula, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 429, č. 1 (2013), s. 398-422 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1198 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : circumstellar matter * early-type stars * fundamental parameters Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.226, year: 2013

  20. Triple system HD 201433 with a SPB star component seen by BRITE -Constellation ⋆ : Pulsation, differential rotation, and angular momentum transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W.,; Beck, P.,; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Tkachenko, A.; Pakhomov, Y.; Ryabchikova, T.; Lüftinger, T.; Palle, P.L.; Semenko, E.; Handler, G.; Koudelka, O.; Matthews, J.M.; Moffat, A.F.J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive OB-type stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the Universe. It is therefore important to constrain the physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution of massive OB-type stars to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar inter...

  1. Monte Carlo problem and parallel computers, and how to do a fast particle mover on the STAR 100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinz, K.H.P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Particle simulation problems of the Monte Carlo type are widely believed to be intrinsically highly scalar problems. In the absence of a definitive mathematical theorem to the contrary, this belief is based on the very apparent programming difficulties encountered on a vector machine. This class of problem is therefore thought to be ill-suited to highly parallel and vectorized computers. However, it is demonstrated by several examples that a particle mover is fully vectorizable. In the case of the CDC STAR 100 it is found that the performance of such a particle mover is not hopeless but hopeful, and is in fact helpful. One of the several possible vectorizations is estimated to yield a gain of a factor of 15 on the STAR over good serial coding on the same machine. This falls far short of the STAR's peak vector performance of 30 to 70 times scalar rates because certain fast vector instructions are not available and have to be simulated. The current STAR algorithm outperforms the carefully handcoded 7600 by a factor of 3. This performance margin is achievable despite the 7600's fivefold superior scalar capability. A more generally vectorized particle mover will always substantially outperform scalar coding on any machine equipped with a properly chosen set of fast vector instructions. (U.S.)

  2. Turbulent transport stabilization by ICRH minority fast ions in low rotating JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Di Siena, A.; Delabie, E.; Giroud, C.; Johnson, T.; Lerche, E.; Menmuir, S.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    The first experimental demonstration that fast ion induced stabilization of thermal turbulent transport takes place also at low values of plasma toroidal rotation has been obtained in JET ILW (ITER-like wall) L-mode plasmas with high (3He)-D ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating) power. A reduction of the gyro-Bohm normalized ion heat flux and higher values of the normalized ion temperature gradient have been observed at high ICRH power and low NBI (neutral beam injection) power and plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic simulations indicate that ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence stabilization induced by the presence of high-energetic 3He ions is the key mechanism in order to explain the experimental observations. Two main mechanisms have been identified to be responsible for the turbulence stabilization: a linear electrostatic wave-fast particle resonance mechanism and a nonlinear electromagnetic mechanism. The dependence of the stabilization on the 3He distribution function has also been studied.

  3. General relativistic ray-tracing algorithm for the determination of the electron-positron energy deposition rate from neutrino pair annihilation around rotating neutron and quark stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Z.; Harko, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present a full general relativistic numerical code for estimating the energy-momentum deposition rate (EMDR) from neutrino pair annihilation (?). The source of the neutrinos is assumed to be a neutrino-cooled accretion disc around neutron and quark stars. We calculate the neutrino trajectories by using a ray-tracing algorithm with the general relativistic Hamilton's equations for neutrinos and derive the spatial distribution of the EMDR due to the annihilations of neutrinos and antineutrinos around rotating neutron and quark stars. We obtain the EMDR for several classes of rotating neutron stars, described by different equations of state of the neutron matter, and for quark stars, described by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model equation of state and in the colour-flavour-locked (CFL) phase. The distribution of the total annihilation rate of the neutrino-antineutrino pairs around rotating neutron and quark stars is studied for isothermal discs and accretion discs in thermodynamical equilibrium. We demonstrate both the differences in the equations of state for neutron and quark matter and rotation with the general relativistic effects significantly modify the EMDR of the electrons and positrons generated by the neutrino-antineutrino pair annihilation around compact stellar objects, as measured at infinity.

  4. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR—REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M.; Evans, C. J.; Brott, I.; Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.; De Koter, A.; Sana, H.; De Mink, S. E.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D.; Howarth, I. D.; Lennon, D. J.; Markova, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s –1 and probably as large as 600 km s –1 ; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s –1 from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  5. Magnetic field topology and chemical abundance distributions of the young, rapidly rotating, chemically peculiar star HR 5624

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.; Silvester, J.; Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The young, rapidly rotating Bp star HR 5624 (HD 133880) shows an unusually strong non-sinusoidal variability of its longitudinal magnetic field. This behaviour was previously interpreted as the signature of an exceptionally strong, quadrupole-dominated surface magnetic field geometry. Aims: We studied the magnetic field structure and chemical abundance distributions of HR 5624 with the aim to verify the unusual quadrupolar nature of its magnetic field and to investigate correlations between the field topology and chemical spots. Methods: We analysed high-resolution, time series Stokes parameter spectra of HR 5624 with the help of a magnetic Doppler imaging inversion code based on detailed polarised radiative transfer modelling of the line profiles. Results: We refined the stellar parameters, revised the rotational period, and obtained new longitudinal magnetic field measurements. Our magnetic Doppler inversions reveal that the field structure of HR 5624 is considerably simpler and the field strength is much lower than proposed by previous studies. We find a maximum local field strength of 12 kG and a mean field strength of 4 kG, which is about a factor of three weaker than predicted by quadrupolar field models. Our model implies that overall large-scale field topology of HR 5624 is better described as a distorted, asymmetric dipole rather than an axisymmetric quadrupole. The chemical abundance maps of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Nd obtained in our study are characterised by large-scale, high-contrast abundance patterns. These structures correlate weakly with the magnetic field geometry and, in particular, show no distinct element concentrations in the horizontal field regions predicted by theoretical atomic diffusion calculations. Conclusions: We conclude that the surface magnetic field topology of HR 5624 is not as unusual as previously proposed. Considering these results together with other recent magnetic mapping analyses of early-type stars suggests that

  6. Rotation and oblique pulsation in Kepler observations of the roAp star KIC 10483436

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Cunha, M. S.; Gruberbauer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Photometry of KIC 10483436 was obtained continuously with 1-min exposures over a 27-d period from the Kepler satellite. The light curve shows rotational variations from surface spots with a period of 4.303 ± 0.002 d, an amplitude of about 6 mmag and eight pulsation frequencies typical of roAp sta...

  7. Constraining the near-core rotation of the γ Doradus star 43 Cygni using BRITE-Constellation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwintz, K.; Van Reeth, T.; Tkachenko, A.; Gössl, S.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Handler, G.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Popowicz, A.; Wade, G.; Weiss, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Photometric time series of the γ Doradus star 43 Cyg obtained with the BRITE-Constellation nano-satellites allow us to study its pulsational properties in detail and to constrain its interior structure. Aims: We aim to find a g-mode period-spacing pattern that allows us to determine the near-core rotation rate of 43 Cyg and redetermine the star's fundamental atmospheric parameters and chemical composition. Methods: We conducted a frequency analysis using the 156-day long data set obtained with the BRITE-Toronto satellite and employed a suite of MESA/GYRE models to derive the mode identification, asymptotic period-spacing, and near-core rotation rate. We also used high-resolution spectroscopic data with high signal-to-noise ratio obtained at the 1.2 m Mercator telescope with the HERMES spectrograph to redetermine the fundamental atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of 43 Cyg using the software Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME). Results: We detected 43 intrinsic pulsation frequencies and identified 18 of them to be part of a period-spacing pattern consisting of prograde dipole modes with an asymptotic period-spacing ΔΠl = 1 of 2970-570+700 s. The near-core rotation rate was determined to be frot = 0.56-0.14+0.12 d-1. The atmosphere of 43 Cyg shows solar chemical composition at an effective temperature, Teff, of 7150 ± 150 K, a log g of 4.2 ± 0.6 dex, and a projected rotational velocity, υsini, of 44 ± 4 km s-1. Conclusions: The morphology of the observed period-spacing patterns shows indications of a significant chemical gradient in the stellar interior. Based on data collected by the BRITE Constellation satellite mission, designed, built, launched, operated and supported by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), the University of Vienna, the Technical University of Graz, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), the Foundation for Polish Science & Technology (FNiTP MNiSW), and

  8. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Neff, Susan Gale; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features.We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0".18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 micron [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution approx. 4 km/s: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  9. Properties of rotating protoneutron star within the extended field theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Gulshan; Dhiman, Shashi K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, BSR1, BSR3, BSR5, and BSR7 parameter set correspond to the value of ω-meson self-coupling ζ = 0.00, BSR8, BSR10, BSR12, and BSR14 parameter set correspond to the value of ω meson self-coupling ζ = 0.03, and BSR15, BSR17, BSR19, BSR21 parameter set correspond to the value of ω meson self-coupling ζ = 0.06, and for each parametrization set the value of neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb varies from 0.16 to 0.28 fm in intervals of 0.04 fm have been employed. The values of the maximum gravitational mass (M) and corresponding radius (R) of a rotating PNS rotating with Keplerian frequency, are presented as a function of the neutron skin thickness Δr in the 208 Pb nucleus

  10. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark

    2012-06-01

    We introduce the star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (EMACSS), a simple yet physically motivated computational model that describes the evolution of some fundamental properties of star clusters in static tidal fields. We base our prescription upon the flow of energy within the cluster, which is a constant fraction of the total energy per half-mass relaxation time. According to Hénon's predictions, this flow is independent of the precise mechanisms for energy production within the core, and therefore does not require a complete description of the many-body interactions therein. For a cluster of equal-mass stars, we use dynamical theory and analytic descriptions of escape mechanisms to construct a series of coupled differential equations expressing the evolution of cluster mass and radius. These equations are numerically solved using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration kernel, and the results benchmarked against a data base of direct N-body simulations. We use simulations containing a modest initial number of stars (1024 ≤N≤ 65 536) and point-mass tidal fields of various strengths. Our prescription is publicly available and reproduces the N-body results to within ˜10 per cent accuracy for the entire post-collapse evolution of star clusters.

  11. The IACOB project. I. Rotational velocities in northern Galactic O- and early B-type stars revisited. The impact of other sources of line-broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Herrero, A.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Stellar rotation is an important parameter in the evolution of massive stars. Accurate and reliable measurements of projected rotational velocities in large samples of OB stars are crucial to confront the predictions of stellar evolutionary models with observational constraints. Aims: We reassess previous determinations of projected rotational velocities (v sin i) in Galactic OB stars using a large, high-quality spectroscopic dataset and a strategy that accounts for other sources of line-broadening in addition to rotation. Methods: We present a versatile and user-friendly IDL tool - based on a combined Fourier transform (FT) + goodness-of-fit (GOF) methodology - for the line-broadening characterization in OB-type stars. We used this tool to (a) investigate the impact of macroturbulent and microturbulent broadenings on v sin i measurements, and (b) determine v sin i and the size of the macroturbulent broadening (vm) in a sample of ~200 Galactic OB-type stars. Results: We present observational evidence that illustrates the strengths and limitations of the proposed FT+GOF methodology for OB stars. We confirm previous statements (that were based on indirect arguments or smaller samples) that the macroturbulent broadening is ubiquitous in the massive-star domain. We compare the newly derived v sin i for O stars and early-B supergiants and giants (where the effect of macroturbulence was found to be stronger) with previous determinations that did not account for this additional line-broadening contribution, and show that cases with v sin i≤ 120 km s-1need to be systematically revised downward by ~25 (±20) km s-1. We suggest that microturbulence may impose an upper limit below which v sin i and vm may be incorrectly derived by means of the proposed methodology as it is currently used, and discuss the implications of this statement on the study of relatively narrow-line massive stars. Conclusions: An investigation of the impact of the revised v sin i

  12. Rotationally modulated variability and pulsations of the He-rich star CPD -62°2124 with an extraordinarily strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubrig, S.; Mikulášek, Z.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Scholz, R.-D.; Zejda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A longitudinal magnetic field with a strength of 5.2 kG was recently detected in CPD -62°2124, which has a fractional main-sequence lifetime of about 60 per cent. Strongly magnetic early-B type chemically peculiar stars in an advanced evolutionary state are of special interest to understand the evolution of the angular momentum and spin-down time-scales in the presence of a global magnetic field. We made use of 17 FORS 2 low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations and 844 ASAS3 photometric measurements for the determination of the rotation period, pulsationsand the magnetic field geometry of the star. We calculated periodograms and applied phenomenological models of photometric, spectral and spectropolarimetric variability. We found that all quantities studied, specifically equivalent widths, the mean longitudinal magnetic field 〈Bz〉 and the flux in the V filter, vary with the same period P = 2.628 d, which was identified as the rotation period. The observed variations can be fully explained by a rigidly rotating main-sequence star with an uneven distribution of chemical elements, photometric spots and a stable, nearly dipolar magnetic field with a polar field strength of about 21 kG, frozen into the body of the star. The magnetic field of CPD -62°2124 is tilted to the rotation axis by β = 28° ± 7°, while the inclination of the rotation axis towards the line of sight is only i = 20° ± 5°. In the acquired FORS 2 spectra, we detect short-term line profile variations indicating the presence of β Cephei type pulsations. As of today, no other pulsating star of this type is known to possess such a strong magnetic field.

  13. Choice of rotatable plug seals for prototype fast breeder reactor: Review of historical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Choice and arrangement of elastomeric inflatable and backup seals as primary and secondary barriers. • With survey (mid-1930s onwards) of reactor, sealing, R&D and rubber technology. • Load, reliability, safety, life and economy of seals and reactors are key factors. • PFBR blends concepts and experience of MOX fuelled FBRs with original solutions. • R&D indicates inflatable seal advanced fluoroelastomer pivotal in unifying nuclear sealing. - Abstract: Choice and arrangement of elastomeric primary inflatable and secondary backup seals for the rotatable plugs (RPs) of 500 MW (e), sodium cooled, pool type, 2-loop, mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is depicted with review of various historical perspectives. Static and dynamic operation, largest diameters (PFBR: ∼6.4 m, ∼4.2 m), widest gaps and variations (5 ± 2 mm) and demanding operating requirements make RP openings on top shield (TS) the most difficult to seal which necessitated extensive development from 1950s to early 1990s. Liquid metal freeze seals with life equivalent to reactor prevailed as primary barrier (France, Japan, U.S.S.R.) during pre-1980s in spite of bulk, cost and complexity due to the abilities to meet zero leakage and resist core disruptive accident (CDA). Redefinition of CDA as beyond design basis accident, tolerable leakage and enhanced economisation drive during post-1980s established elastomeric inflatable seal as primary barrier excepting in U.S.S.R. (MOX fuel, freeze seal) and U.S.A. (metallic fuel). Choice of inflatable seal for PFBR RPs considers these perspectives, inherent advantages of elastomers and those of inflatable seals which maximise seal life. Choice of elastomeric backup seal as secondary barrier was governed by reliability and minimisation as well as distribution of load (temperature, radiation, mist) to maximise seal life. The compact sealing combination brings the hanging RPs at about the same elevation to reduce

  14. Gyrochronology relating star age to rotational period is derived from first principles through a novel time dual for thermodynamics, named lingerdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Erlan H.

    2017-10-01

    Gyrochronology estimates the age of a low-mass star from its rotational period, which is found from changes in brightness caused by dark star spots. First revealed as an insight in (Skumanich, A. 1972, The Astrophysical Journal. 171: 565) it allows astronomers to find true sun-like stars that may harbor life in its planets (Meibom, S. et. al., Nature. 517: 589-591). Here a simple expression for the age of a star is derived through a novel linger thermo theory (LTT) integrating thermodynamics with its revealed time-dual, named lingerdynamics. This expression relates the star age to the ratio of past and present rotational period metrics (RPM) of lingerdynamics. LTT has been used earlier to derive a simple expression for the finding of the entropy of spherical-homogeneous mediums (Feria, E. H. Nov. 19, 2016, Linger Thermo Theory, IEEE Int’l Conf. on Smart Cloud, 18 pages, DOI 10.1109/SmartCloud.2016.57, Colombia Univ., N.Y., N.Y. and Feria, E. H. June 7th 2017, AAS 340th Meeting). In LTT the lifespan of system operation τ is given by: τ = (2Π /3v3)G2M2 x RPM where G is the gravitational constant, Π is the pace of mass-energy retention in s/m3 units (e.g., for our current sun it is given by 5 billion ‘future’ years over its volume), and v is the perpetual radial speed about the point-mass M. Since in LTT a star is modeled as a point mass at the center of its spherical volume, its RPM is not the same as the measured rotational period of an actual star. For instance, for our sun its equator rotational period is approximately 25.34 days, while in lingerdynamics it is a fraction of a day, i.e., 0.116 days, where this value is derived from the RPM expression 2πrsun/(GMsun / rsun)1/2 where 2πrsun is the circumference of the sun, (GMsun/rsun)1/2 is the perpetual radial speed v for our point-mass modeled sun, and rsun and Msun are the sun radius and point-mass, respectively. However, using conservation of angular momentum arguments it is assumed that the ratio of

  15. 3D shape and eccentricity measurements of fast rotating rough objects by two mutually tilted interference fringe systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarske, J. W.; Kuschmierz, R.; Günther, P.

    2013-06-01

    Precise measurements of distance, eccentricity and 3D-shape of fast moving objects such as turning parts of lathes, gear shafts, magnetic bearings, camshafts, crankshafts and rotors of vacuum pumps are on the one hand important tasks. On the other hand they are big challenges, since contactless precise measurement techniques are required. Optical techniques are well suitable for distance measurements of non-moving surfaces. However, measurements of laterally fast moving surfaces are still challenging. For such tasks the laser Doppler distance sensor technique was invented by the TU Dresden some years ago. This technique has been realized by two mutually tilted interference fringe systems, where the distance is coded in the phase difference between the generated interference signals. However, due to the speckle effect different random envelopes and phase jumps of the interference signals occur. They disturb the phase difference estimation between the interference signals. In this paper, we will report on a scientific breakthrough on the measurement uncertainty budget which has been achieved recently. Via matching of the illumination and receiving optics the measurement uncertainty of the displacement and distance can be reduced by about one magnitude. For displacement measurements of a recurring rough surface a standard deviation of 110 nm were attained at lateral velocities of 5 m / s. Due to the additionally measured lateral velocity and the rotational speed, the two-dimensional shape of rotating objects is calculated. The three-dimensional shape can be conducted by employment of a line camera. Since the measurement uncertainty of the displacement, vibration, distance, eccentricity, and shape is nearly independent of the lateral surface velocity, this technique is predestined for fast-rotating objects. Especially it can be advantageously used for the quality control of workpieces inside of a lathe towards the reduction of process tolerances, installation times and

  16. Spontaneous Formation of Anti-ferromagnetic Vortex Lattice in a Fast Rotating BEC with Dipole Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shijie; Feng Shiping; Wen Yuchuan; Yu Yue

    2007-01-01

    When a Bose-Einstein condensate is set to rotate, superfluid vortices will be formed, which finally condense into a vortex lattice as the rotation frequency further increases. We show that the dipole-dipole interactions renormalize the short-range interaction strength and result in a distinction between interactions of parallel-polarized atoms and interactions of antiparallel-polarized atoms. This effect may lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the rapidly rotating Bose condensate into a novel anti-ferromagnetic-like vortex lattice. The upward-polarized Bose condensate forms a vortex lattice, which is staggered against a downward-polarized vortex lattice. A phase diagram related to the coupling strength is obtained.

  17. On the symmetry of cylindrical implosions driven by a rotating beam of fast ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basko, M.M.; Schlegel, T.; Maruhn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense beams of heavy ions are one of the promising ways to create high energy density states in matter. To ensure the needed azimuthal symmetry of the beam energy deposition, it was proposed [Sharkov et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 1 (2001)] to rotate the ion beam around the target axis. Combining analytical calculations with two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, a lower limit is established on the frequency ν of the beam rotation dictated by the target hydrodynamics. This limit is shown to be directly proportional to the desired radial convergence ratio C r for stepwise beam power profiles, and to C r 1/2 for smooth pulses. With a smooth pulse, 6-10 beam revolutions per pulse should be sufficient to reach C r ≅30, while a stepwise pulse requires ≅100 revolutions. Also, the upper bound on the asymmetry of the elliptical focal spot of a rotating ion beam is calculated

  18. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10 6 . We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor

  19. Efficient computation of quasiperiodic oscillations in nonlinear systems with fast rotating parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilder, Frank; Rübel, Jan; Starke, Jens

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical method for the investigation of quasiperiodic oscillations in applications modeled by systems of ordinary differential equations. We focus on systems with parts that have a significant rotational speed. An important element of our approach is that it allows us to verify whe...

  20. Membership, binarity, and rotation of F-G-K stars in the open cluster Blanco 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermilliod, J.-C.; Platais, I.; James, D. J.; Grenon, M.; Cargile, P. A.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The nearby open cluster Blanco 1 is of considerable astrophysical interest for formation and evolution studies of open clusters because it is the third highest Galactic latitude cluster known. It has been observed often, but so far no definitive and comprehensive membership determination is readily available. Aims: An observing programme was carried out to study the stellar population of Blanco 1, and especially the membership and binary frequency of the F5-K0 dwarfs. Methods: We obtained radial-velocities with the CORAVEL spectrograph in the field of Blanco 1 for a sample of 148 F-G-K candidate stars in the magnitude range 10 rate reaches 40% (27/68) if one includes the photometric binaries. The cluster mean heliocentric radial velocity is +5.53 ± 0.11 km s-1 based on the most reliable 49 members. The V sin i distribution is similar to that of the Pleiades, confirming the age similarities between the two clusters. Conclusions: This study clearly demonstrates that, in spite of the cluster's high Galactic latitude, three membership criteria - radial velocity, proper motion, and photometry - are necessary for performing a reliable membership selection. Furthermore, even with accurate and extensive data, ambiguous cases still remain. Based on observations collected with the Danish 1.54-m and the Swiss telescopes at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, and with the old YALO 1-m telescope at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, Chile. Table [see full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee full textsee full text] is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/485/95

  1. Time-frequency analysis based on ensemble local mean decomposition and fast kurtogram for rotating machinery fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Zhiwen; Miao, Qiang; Zhang, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A time-frequency analysis method based on ensemble local mean decomposition (ELMD) and fast kurtogram (FK) is proposed for rotating machinery fault diagnosis. Local mean decomposition (LMD), as an adaptive non-stationary and nonlinear signal processing method, provides the capability to decompose multicomponent modulation signal into a series of demodulated mono-components. However, the occurring mode mixing is a serious drawback. To alleviate this, ELMD based on noise-assisted method was developed. Still, the existing environmental noise in the raw signal remains in corresponding PF with the component of interest. FK has good performance in impulse detection while strong environmental noise exists. But it is susceptible to non-Gaussian noise. The proposed method combines the merits of ELMD and FK to detect the fault for rotating machinery. Primarily, by applying ELMD the raw signal is decomposed into a set of product functions (PFs). Then, the PF which mostly characterizes fault information is selected according to kurtosis index. Finally, the selected PF signal is further filtered by an optimal band-pass filter based on FK to extract impulse signal. Fault identification can be deduced by the appearance of fault characteristic frequencies in the squared envelope spectrum of the filtered signal. The advantages of ELMD over LMD and EEMD are illustrated in the simulation analyses. Furthermore, the efficiency of the proposed method in fault diagnosis for rotating machinery is demonstrated on gearbox case and rolling bearing case analyses.

  2. Finite-time rotation number: A fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jds98@fisica.ufpr.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84033-240, Ponta Grossa, Paraná (Brazil); Schelin, A.B., E-mail: schelin@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 80230-901, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Caldas, I.L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, S.R., E-mail: lopes@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Viana, R.L., E-mail: rlv640@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2013-02-04

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate chaotic phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is by calculating finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for time-periodic systems by calculating finite-time rotation numbers, which are faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  3. Star Formation Quenching, How Fast And How Frequently? Inside-Out Or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Yan, Renbin; Blanton, Michael; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xu

    2017-06-01

    Star formation quenching is a critical process that drive galaxies evolving from blue star-forming to red passive stage. This rapid quenching process is necessary in galaxy evolution models to explain the galaxy distribution in NUV-optical colour-colour diagrams1,2 and the buildup of red-sequence from z = 1 to z = 03,4,5. Yet, the mechanism of this quenching process is not fully understood and is of hot debate. Many candidate scenarios, such as strangulation due to shock heating in massive halos, AGN feedback or gas stripping due to environmental effect, have been proposed. To differentiate these scenarios, more constraints on the quenching process and thus the potential physical mechanism are badly needed. The first result we show in this poster is the properties of quenching process we obtained from the galaxy distribution in NUV-optical colour-colour diagrams. Aside from the unclear integrated star formation history (SFH) of galaxies, how the SFH of galaxies varies internally is still poorly understood. One direct probe of the internal variation of SFH is the spatial distribution of colours, i.e. the colour gradient. In the second part of the results of this poster, we explicitly illustrate the definition of 'inside-out growth' and 'inside-out quenching' scenarios and utilize the galaxy distribution in the u-I colour gradients to see which one is more observationally favoured.

  4. Effects of metallicity, star-formation conditions, and evolution in B and Be stars. II. Small Magellanic Cloud, field of NGC 330

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martayan, C.; Frémat, Y.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.; Zorec, J.; Neiner, C.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We search for the effects of metallicity on B and Be stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) and in the Milky Way (MW), by extending our previous analysis of B and Be star populations in the LMC to the SMC. The rotational velocities of massive stars and the evolutionary status of Be stars are examined with respect to their environments. Methods: Spectroscopic observations of hot stars belonging to the young cluster SMC-NGC 330 and its surrounding region were obtained with the VLT-GIRAFFE facilities in MEDUSA mode. We determined fundamental parameters for B and Be stars with the GIRFIT code, taking the effect of fast rotation and the age of observed clusters into account. We compared the mean V sin i obtained by spectral type- and mass-selection for field and cluster B and Be stars in the SMC with the one in the LMC and MW. Results: We find that (i) B and Be stars rotate faster in the SMC than in the LMC and in the LMC than in the MW; (ii) at a given metallicity, Be stars begin their main sequence life with a higher initial rotational velocity than B stars. Consequently, only a fraction of the B stars that reach the ZAMS with a sufficiently high initial rotational velocity can become Be stars; (iii) the distributions of initial rotational velocities at the ZAMS for Be stars in the SMC, LMC, and MW are mass- and metallicity-dependent; (iv) the angular velocities of B and Be stars are higher in the SMC than in the LMC and MW; (v) in the SMC and LMC, massive Be stars appear in the second part of the main sequence, in contrast to massive Be stars in the MW. Tables 1-6, 8 and 11 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Rotational Spectral Modulations in a Low-mass, L-type Brown Dwarf Companion to a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjavacas, Elena; Apai, Dániel; Zhou, Yifan; Karalidi, Theodora; Lew, Ben W. P.; Schneider, Glenn; Cowan, Nicolas; Metchev, Stan; Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Bedin, Luigi R.; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Observations of rotational modulations of brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets allow the characterization of condensate cloud properties. As of now, rotational spectral modulations have only been seen in three L-type brown dwarfs. We report here the discovery of rotational spectral modulations in LP261-75B, an L6-type intermediate surface gravity companion to an M4.5 star. As a part of the Cloud Atlas Treasury program, we acquired time-resolved Wide Field Camera 3 grism spectroscopy (1.1–1.69 μm) of LP261-75B. We find gray spectral variations with the relative amplitude displaying only a weak wavelength dependence and no evidence for lower-amplitude modulations in the 1.4 μm water band than in the adjacent continuum. The likely rotational modulation period is 4.78 ± 0.95 hr, although the rotational phase is not well sampled. The minimum relative amplitude in the white light curve measured over the whole wavelength range is 2.41% ± 0.14%. We report an unusual light curve, which seems to have three peaks approximately evenly distributed in rotational phase. The spectral modulations suggests that the upper atmosphere cloud properties in LP261-75B are similar to two other mid-L dwarfs of typical infrared colors, but differ from that of the extremely red L-dwarf WISE0047.

  6. Mechanism of self-reinforcing YORP acceleration for fast-rotating asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, T.; Richardson, D.; Walsh, K.; Yu, Y.; Michel, P.

    2014-07-01

    The YORP effect is an important process that directly alters the spin states, and indirectly alters the orbits, of small Solar System bodies. It has been suggested that YORP may be able simultaneously to account for the high fraction of binaries among the near-Earth-asteroid (NEA) population, the frequent radar detections of objects shaped like child's tops, and the abundance of top-shaped asteroids with binary companions. In a compelling demonstration, Walsh et al. (2008, Nature 454, 188) simulated the evolution of idealized, gravitationally bound rubble piles, to which they continually added angular momentum. The centrifugal force caused material to move from mid-latitudes toward the equator, generating the characteristic top shape. Continued spin-up caused the equatorial ridge to shed material, which reaccreted in orbit to form a binary companion. But this mechanism rests on the assumption that YORP will provide all the angular momentum needed to form axisymmetric tops, accelerate them to the mass-shedding limit, and drive enough mass into orbit to form an observable companion. This assumption is problematic, as a truly axisymmetic body would experience no YORP effect at all, and small surface changes on an object with approximate large-scale axisymmetry can easily change the sign of the torque and decelerate the spin (Statler 2009, Icarus 202, 502). So the search is on for a mechanism that can ensure a continual increase in angular momentum to overcome the stochastic effect of topographic changes. One intriguing suggestion is ''tangential YORP'' (Golubov and Krugly 2012, ApJL 752, L11), which arises from asymmetric east-west heat conduction across small exposed structures, and always produces an eastward torque. But tangential YORP relies on structures at a preferred size scale, which shrinks to millimeters as the rotation rate approaches periods of a few hours. How the effects generated at these tiny scales are diluted by the mesoscale (meters to hectometers

  7. NuSTAR Reveals Relativistic Reflection But No Ultra-Fast Outflow in the Quasar Pg∼1211+143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments.

  8. NuSTAR REVEALS RELATIVISTIC REFLECTION BUT NO ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOW IN THE QUASAR PG 1211+143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Walton, D. J.; Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Reynolds, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space. National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhang, W. W., E-mail: abzoghbi@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments.

  9. NuSTAR REVEALS RELATIVISTIC REFLECTION BUT NO ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOW IN THE QUASAR PG 1211+143

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments

  10. Development of inflatable seals for the rotatable plugs of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. A review. Pt. I. Key areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Nilay K.; Raj, Baldev

    2013-01-01

    Identification of development areas and their implementation for rotatable plug (RP) inflatable seals of Na cooled, 500 Mw (e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and 40 MW (t) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) are described, largely based on a late 1990s survey of cover gas seal development (1950s - early 1990s) which defined a set of shortlisted design options and developmental strategy to minimize effort, cost and time. Comparative studies of top shield sealing and evolving FBR designs suggest suitability of inflatable seal as primary barrier in RPs. International experience identified choice and qualification of seal elastomer under synergistic degrading environment of reactor as the prime element of development. The low pressure, non-reinforced, unbeaded, PFBR inflatable seal (made of 50/50 blend of Viton registered GBL 200S/600S) developed for 10 y life provides a unification scheme for nuclear elastomeric sealing based on 5 peroxide cured fluoroelastomer blend formulations, 1 finite element analysis approach, 1 Teflon-like plasma coating technique and 2 manufacturing processes promising significant gains in standardization, economy and safety. Uniqueness was ab initio development in the absence of established industry or ready-made supply. Part I addresses key areas of design shortlisting, strategy, development and unification with a backdrop of international evolution. (orig.)

  11. Fast Rotation-Free Feature-Based Image Registration Using Improved N-SIFT and GMM-Based Parallel Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongdong; Yang, Feng; Yang, Caiyun; Leng, Chengcai; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yining; Tian, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Image registration is a key problem in a variety of applications, such as computer vision, medical image processing, pattern recognition, etc., while the application of registration is limited by time consumption and the accuracy in the case of large pose differences. Aimed at these two kinds of problems, we propose a fast rotation-free feature-based rigid registration method based on our proposed accelerated-NSIFT and GMM registration-based parallel optimization (PO-GMMREG). Our method is accelerated by using the GPU/CUDA programming and preserving only the location information without constructing the descriptor of each interest point, while its robustness to missing correspondences and outliers is improved by converting the interest point matching to Gaussian mixture model alignment. The accuracy in the case of large pose differences is settled by our proposed PO-GMMREG algorithm by constructing a set of initial transformations. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can fast rigidly register 3-D medical images and is reliable for aligning 3-D scans even when they exhibit a poor initialization.

  12. Remote high-definition rotating video enables fast spatial survey of marine underwater macrofauna and habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Dominique; Leleu, Kévin; Mallet, Delphine; Mou-Tham, Gérard; Hervé, Gilles; Boureau, Matthieu; Guilpart, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Observing spatial and temporal variations of marine biodiversity from non-destructive techniques is central for understanding ecosystem resilience, and for monitoring and assessing conservation strategies, e.g. Marine Protected Areas. Observations are generally obtained through Underwater Visual Censuses (UVC) conducted by divers. The problems inherent to the presence of divers have been discussed in several papers. Video techniques are increasingly used for observing underwater macrofauna and habitat. Most video techniques that do not need the presence of a diver use baited remote systems. In this paper, we present an original video technique which relies on a remote unbaited rotating remote system including a high definition camera. The system is set on the sea floor to record images. These are then analysed at the office to quantify biotic and abiotic sea bottom cover, and to identify and count fish species and other species like marine turtles. The technique was extensively tested in a highly diversified coral reef ecosystem in the South Lagoon of New Caledonia, based on a protocol covering both protected and unprotected areas in major lagoon habitats. The technique enabled to detect and identify a large number of species, and in particular fished species, which were not disturbed by the system. Habitat could easily be investigated through the images. A large number of observations could be carried out per day at sea. This study showed the strong potential of this non obtrusive technique for observing both macrofauna and habitat. It offers a unique spatial coverage and can be implemented at sea at a reasonable cost by non-expert staff. As such, this technique is particularly interesting for investigating and monitoring coastal biodiversity in the light of current conservation challenges and increasing monitoring needs.

  13. Remote high-definition rotating video enables fast spatial survey of marine underwater macrofauna and habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Pelletier

    Full Text Available Observing spatial and temporal variations of marine biodiversity from non-destructive techniques is central for understanding ecosystem resilience, and for monitoring and assessing conservation strategies, e.g. Marine Protected Areas. Observations are generally obtained through Underwater Visual Censuses (UVC conducted by divers. The problems inherent to the presence of divers have been discussed in several papers. Video techniques are increasingly used for observing underwater macrofauna and habitat. Most video techniques that do not need the presence of a diver use baited remote systems. In this paper, we present an original video technique which relies on a remote unbaited rotating remote system including a high definition camera. The system is set on the sea floor to record images. These are then analysed at the office to quantify biotic and abiotic sea bottom cover, and to identify and count fish species and other species like marine turtles. The technique was extensively tested in a highly diversified coral reef ecosystem in the South Lagoon of New Caledonia, based on a protocol covering both protected and unprotected areas in major lagoon habitats. The technique enabled to detect and identify a large number of species, and in particular fished species, which were not disturbed by the system. Habitat could easily be investigated through the images. A large number of observations could be carried out per day at sea. This study showed the strong potential of this non obtrusive technique for observing both macrofauna and habitat. It offers a unique spatial coverage and can be implemented at sea at a reasonable cost by non-expert staff. As such, this technique is particularly interesting for investigating and monitoring coastal biodiversity in the light of current conservation challenges and increasing monitoring needs.

  14. The ATLAS(3D) project : VIII. Modelling the formation and evolution of fast and slow rotator early-type galaxies within lambda CDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khochfar, Sadegh; Emsellem, Eric; Serra, Paolo; Bois, Maxime; Alatalo, Katherine; Bacon, R.; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple model for the origin of fast and slow rotator early-type galaxies (ETG) within the hierarchical Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) scenario, that is based on the assumption that the mass fraction of stellar discs in ETGs is a proxy for the specific angular momentum expressed

  15. The ATLAS3D project - VIII. Modelling the formation and evolution of fast and slow rotator early-type galaxies within ΛCDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khochfar, Sadegh; Emsellem, Eric; Serra, Paolo; Bois, Maxime; Alatalo, Katherine; Bacon, R.; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple model for the origin of fast and slow rotator early-type galaxies (ETG) within the hierarchical Λcold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario, that is based on the assumption that the mass fraction of stellar discs in ETGs is a proxy for the specific angular momentum expressed via λR. Within

  16. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  17. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  18. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  19. Exploring surface landscapes with molecules: rotationally induced diffraction of H2on LiF(001) under fast grazing incidence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Somers, M F; Kroes, G J; Díaz, C; Martín, F

    2017-06-28

    Atomic diffraction by surfaces under fast grazing incidence conditions has been used for almost a decade to characterize surface properties with more accuracy than with more traditional atomic diffraction methods. From six-dimensional solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that diffraction of H 2 molecules under fast grazing incidence conditions could be even more informative for the characterization of ionic surfaces, due to the large anisotropic electrostatic interaction between the quadrupole moment of the molecule and the electric field created by the ionic crystal. Using the LiF(001) surface as a benchmark, we show that fast grazing incidence diffraction of H 2 strongly depends on the initial rotational state of the molecule, while rotationally inelastic processes are irrelevant. We demonstrate that, as a result of the anisotropy of the impinging projectile, initial rotational excitation leads to an increase in intensity of high-order diffraction peaks at incidence directions that satisfy precise symmetry constraints, thus providing a more detailed information on the surface characteristics than that obtained from low-order atomic diffraction peaks under fast grazing incidence conditions. As quadrupole-ion surface potentials are expected to accurately represent the interaction between H 2 and any surface with a marked ionic character, our analysis should be of general applicability to any of such surfaces. Finally, we show that a density functional theory description of the molecule-ion surface potential catches the main features observed experimentally.

  20. Measurement of the radial velocity of the Sun as a star by means of a reflecting solar system body. The effect of the body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, A. F.; Molaro, P.

    2015-06-01

    Minor bodies of the solar system can be used to measure the spectrum of the Sun as a star by observing sunlight reflected by their surfaces. To perform an accurate measurement of the radial velocity of the Sun as a star by this method, it is necessary to take into account the Doppler shifts introduced by the motion of the reflecting body. Here we discuss the effect of its rotation. It gives a vanishing contribution only when the inclinations of the body rotation axis to the directions of the Sun and of the Earth observer are the same. When this is not the case, the perturbation of the radial velocity does not vanish and can reach up to ˜2.4 m/s for an asteroid such as 2 Pallas that has an inclination of the spin axis to the plane of the ecliptic of ˜30∘. We introduce a geometric model to compute the perturbation in the case of a uniformly reflecting body of spherical or triaxial ellipsoidal shape and provide general results to easily estimate the magnitude of the effect.

  1. NuSTAR detection of a cyclotron line in the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhalerao, Varun; Romano, Patrizia; Tomsick, John

    2015-01-01

    We present NuSTAR spectral and timing studies of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J17544-2619. The spectrum is well described by an  ∼ 1 keV blackbody and a hard continuum component, as expected from an accreting X-ray pulsar. We detect a cyclotron line at 17 keV, confirming...... that the compact object in IGR J17544-2619 is indeed a neutron star. This is the first measurement of the magnetic field in an SFXT. The inferred magnetic field strength, B = (1.45 +/- 0.03) x 1012 G (1 + z) is typical of neutron stars in X-ray binaries, and rules out a magnetar nature for the compact object. We...... do not find any significant pulsations in the source on time-scales of 1-2000 s....

  2. WASP-167b/KELT-13b: joint discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting a rapidly rotating F1V star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, L. Y.; Hellier, C.; Albrow, M. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Bayliss, D.; Beatty, T. G.; Bieryla, A.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cargile, P. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Collins, K. A.; Colón, K. D.; Curtis, I. A.; D'Ago, G.; Delrez, L.; Eastman, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gillon, M.; Gregorio, J.; James, D.; Jehin, E.; Joner, M. D.; Kielkopf, J. F.; Kuhn, R. B.; Labadie-Bartz, J.; Latham, D. W.; Lendl, M.; Lund, M. B.; Malpas, A. L.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Myers, G.; Oberst, T. E.; Pepe, F.; Pepper, J.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Ségransan, D.; Siverd, R. J.; Smalley, B.; Stassun, K. G.; Stevens, D. J.; Stockdale, C.; Tan, T. G.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Villanueva, S.; West, R. G.; Zhou, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report the joint WASP/KELT discovery of WASP-167b/KELT-13b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a 2.02-d orbit around a V = 10.5, F1V star with [Fe/H] = 0.1 ± 0.1. The 1.5 RJup planet was confirmed by Doppler tomography of the stellar line profiles during transit. We place a limit of orbit with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of λ = -165° ± 5°. This is in agreement with the known tendency for orbits around hotter stars to be more likely to be misaligned. WASP-167/KELT-13 is one of the few systems where the stellar rotation period is less than the planetary orbital period. We find evidence of non-radial stellar pulsations in the host star, making it a δ-Scuti or γ-Dor variable. The similarity to WASP-33, a previously known hot-Jupiter host with pulsations, adds to the suggestion that close-in planets might be able to excite stellar pulsations.

  3. Identification of Twenty-Six Rapid Rotators in the Local Galactic Halo Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Dicy Ann; Lepine, Sebastien; Jao, W.-C.

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of 39,325 high proper motion stars from the SUPERBLINK catalog that were monitored as part K2 campaigns C00-C13. We developed a combined auto-correlation function and fast Fourier transform algorithm to search for modulation of photometric light curves due to star spots. This technique identified 700 candidate rapid rotators. While the vast majority are local Galactic disk members, a reduced proper motion diagram of these rapid rotators identifies 26 of them as possible members of the local Galactic halo population. We present and examine the K2 light curves for these 26 objects. We find that at least three of the halo stars (and perhaps a fourth) also display eclipses from a stellar companion, which show that they are in fact close binary stars. We argue that all fast rotators in the halo are most likely to be old, interacting binaries.

  4. A CENSUS OF ROTATION AND VARIABILITY IN L1495: A UNIFORM ANALYSIS OF TRANS-ATLANTIC EXOPLANET SURVEY LIGHT CURVES FOR PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN TAURUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Hongyu; Covey, Kevin R.; Lloyd, James P.; Rebull, Luisa; Charbonneau, David; Mandushev, Georgi; O'Donovan, Francis; Slesnick, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    We analyze light curves obtained by the Trans-atlantic Exoplanet Survey (TrES) for a field centered on the L1495 dark cloud in Taurus. The Spitzer Taurus Legacy Survey catalog identifies 179 bona fide Taurus members within the TrES field; 48 of the known Taurus members are detected by TrES, as well as 26 candidate members identified by the Spitzer Legacy team. We quantify the variability of each star in our sample using the ratio of the standard deviation of the original light curve (σ orig. ) to the standard deviation of a light curve that has been smoothed by 9 or 1001 epochs (σ 9 and σ 1001 , respectively). Known Taurus members typically demonstrate (σ orig. /σ 9 ) orig. /σ 1001 ) orig. /σ 9 ) ∼ 3.0 and (σ orig. /σ 1001 ) ∼ 10, as expected for light curves dominated by unstructured white noise. Of the 74 Taurus members/candidates with TrES light curves, we detect significant variability in 49 sources. Adapting a quantitative metric originally developed to assess the reliability of transit detections, we measure the amount of red and white noise in each light curve and identify 18 known or candidate Taurus members with highly significant period measurements. These appear to be the first periods measured for four of these sources (HD 282276, CX Tau, FP Tau, TrES J042423+265008), and in two other cases, the first non-aliased periods (LkCa 21 and DK Tau AB). For the remainder, the TrES measurements typically agree very well (δP < 1%) with previously reported values. Including periods measured at lower confidence for 15 additional sources, we report periods for 11 objects where no previous periods were found, including 8 confirmed Taurus members. We also identify 10 of the 26 candidate Taurus members that demonstrate variability levels consistent with being bona fide T Tauri stars. A Kolomgorov-Smirnov (K-S) test confirms that these new periods confirm the distinction between the rotation period distributions of stars with and without circumstellar

  5. FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, R R; Daru, P; Barrera, A E; Mostofa Kamal, S M; Islam, S; Ul-Alam, M; Sultana, R; Rahman, M; Hossain, Md S; Lederer, P; Hurwitz, S; Chakraborty, K; Kak, N; Tierney, D B; Nardell, E

    2017-09-01

    National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka; Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Dhaka; and Chittagong Chest Disease Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. To present operational data and discuss the challenges of implementing FAST (Find cases Actively, Separate safely and Treat effectively) as a tuberculosis (TB) transmission control strategy. FAST was implemented sequentially at three hospitals. Using Xpert® MTB/RIF, 733/6028 (12.2%, 95%CI 11.4-13.0) patients were diagnosed with unsuspected TB. Patients with a history of TB who were admitted with other lung diseases had more than twice the odds of being diagnosed with unsuspected TB as those with no history of TB (OR 2.6, 95%CI 2.2-3.0, P stakeholder engagement and laboratory capacity are important for sustainability and scalability.

  6. The determination of the rotation period and magnetic field geometry of the strongly magnetic roAp star HD 154708

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubrig, S.; Mathys, G.; Kurtz, D.W.; Schöller, M.; Elkin, V.G.; Henrichs, H.F.

    2009-01-01

    We obtained 13 spectropolarimetric observations of the strongly magnetic rapidly oscillating Ap star HD 154708 over 3 months with the multimode instrument FORS 1, installed at the 8-m Kueyen telescope of the Very Large Telescope. These observations have been used for the determination of the

  7. Light or heavy supermassive black hole seeds : the role of internal rotation in the fate of supermassive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiacconi, D.; Rossi, E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Supermassive black holes are a key ingredient of galaxy evolution. However, their origin is still highly debated. In one of the leading formation scenarios, a black hole of ˜100 M⊙ results from the collapse of the inner core of a supermassive star (≳104-5 M⊙), created by the rapid accumulation (≳0.1

  8. Globular Cluster Formation at High Density: A Model for Elemental Enrichment with Fast Recycling of Massive-star Debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The self-enrichment of massive star clusters by p -processed elements is shown to increase significantly with increasing gas density as a result of enhanced star formation rates and stellar scatterings compared to the lifetime of a massive star. Considering the type of cloud core where a globular cluster (GC) might have formed, we follow the evolution and enrichment of the gas and the time dependence of stellar mass. A key assumption is that interactions between massive stars are important at high density, including interactions between massive stars and massive-star binaries that can shred stellar envelopes. Massive-star interactions should also scatter low-mass stars out of the cluster. Reasonable agreement with the observations is obtained for a cloud-core mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ⊙} and a density of ∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −3}. The results depend primarily on a few dimensionless parameters, including, most importantly, the ratio of the gas consumption time to the lifetime of a massive star, which has to be low, ∼10%, and the efficiency of scattering low-mass stars per unit dynamical time, which has to be relatively large, such as a few percent. Also for these conditions, the velocity dispersions of embedded GCs should be comparable to the high gas dispersions of galaxies at that time, so that stellar ejection by multistar interactions could cause low-mass stars to leave a dwarf galaxy host altogether. This could solve the problem of missing first-generation stars in the halos of Fornax and WLM.

  9. Spectroscopic twin to the hypervelocity sdO star US 708 and three fast sdB stars from the Hyper-MUCHFUSS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegerer, E.; Heber, U.; Geier, S.; Irrgang, A.; Kupfer, T.; Fürst, F.; Schaffenroth, J.

    2017-05-01

    Important tracers for the dark matter halo of the Galaxy are hypervelocity stars (HVSs), which are faster than the local escape velocity of the Galaxy and their slower counterparts, the high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo. Such HVSs are believed to be ejected from the Galactic centre (GC) through tidal disruption of a binary by the super-massive black hole (Hills mechanism). The Hyper-MUCHFUSS survey aims at finding high-velocity potentially unbound hot subdwarf stars. We present the spectroscopic and kinematical analyses of a He-sdO as well as three candidates among the sdB stars using optical Keck/ESI and VLT (X-shooter, FORS) spectroscopy. Proper motions are determined by combining positions from early-epoch photographic plates with those derived from modern digital sky surveys. The Galactic rest frame velocities range from 203 km s-1 to 660 km s-1, indicating that most likely all four stars are gravitationally bound to the Galaxy. With Teff = 47 000 K and a surface gravity of log g = 5.7, SDSS J205030.39-061957.8 (J2050) is a spectroscopic twin of the hypervelocity He-sdO US 708. As for the latter, the GC is excluded as a place of origin based on the kinematic analysis. Hence, the Hills mechanism can be excluded for J2050. The ejection velocity is much more moderate (385 ± 79 km s-1) than that of US 708 (998 ± 68 km s-1). The binary thermonuclear supernova scenario suggested for US 708 would explain the observed properties of J2050 very well without pushing the model parameters to their extreme limits, as required for US 708. Accordingly, the star would be the surviving donor of a type Ia supernova. Three sdB stars also showed extreme kinematics; one could be a HVS ejected from the GC, whereas the other two could be ejected from the Galactic disk through the binary supernova mechanism. Alternatively, they might be extreme halo stars.

  10. New BVI C Photometry of Low-Mass Pleiades Stars: Exploring the Effects of Rotation on Broadband Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    wide-field photometric 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is...statistical significance, the sug- gestion of Stauffer et al. (2003) that for K and early M dwarfs (1.0 < B−V < 1.45) in the Pleiades rapid rotation

  11. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having...

  12. Dark stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pnigouras, Pantelis; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2017-01-01

    to the formation of compact objects predominantly made of dark matter. Considering both fermionic and bosonic (scalar φ4) equations of state, we construct the equilibrium structure of rotating dark stars, focusing on their bulk properties and comparing them with baryonic neutron stars. We also show that these dark...... objects admit the I-Love-Q universal relations, which link their moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and quadrupole moments. Finally, we prove that stars built with a dark matter equation of state are not compact enough to mimic black holes in general relativity, thus making them distinguishable...

  13. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 3: Users' manual for STARS-2B, 2V, shell theory automated for rotational structures, 2 (buckling, vibrations), digital computer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalbonas, V.

    1973-01-01

    The User's manual for the shell theory automated for rotational structures (STARS) 2B and 2V (buckling, vibrations) is presented. Several features of the program are: (1) arbitrary branching of the shell meridians, (2) arbitrary boundary conditions, (3) minimum input requirements to describe a complex, practical shell of revolution structure, and (4) accurate analysis capability using a minimum number of degrees of freedom.

  14. The evolution of massive stars and their spectra. I. A non-rotating 60 M⊙ star from the zero-age main sequence to the pre-supernova stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia; Georgy, Cyril

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, the interior and spectroscopic evolution of a massive star is analyzed from the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) to the pre-supernova (SN) stage. For this purpose, we combined stellar evolution models using the Geneva code and stellar atmospheric/wind models using CMFGEN. With our approach, we were able to produce observables, such as a synthetic high-resolution spectrum and photometry, thereby aiding the comparison between evolution models and observed data. Here we analyze the evolution of a non-rotating 60 M⊙ star and its spectrum throughout its lifetime. Interestingly, the star has a supergiant appearance (luminosity class I) even at the ZAMS. We find the following evolutionary sequence of spectral types: O3 I (at the ZAMS), O4 I (middle of the H-core burning phase), B supergiant (BSG), B hypergiant (BHG), hot luminous blue variable (LBV; end of H-core burning), cool LBV (H-shell burning through the beginning of the He-core burning phase), rapid evolution through late WN and early WN, early WC (middle of He-core burning), and WO (end of He-core burning until core collapse). We find the following spectroscopic phase lifetimes: 3.22 × 106 yr for the O-type, 0.34 × 105 yr (BSG), 0.79 × 105 yr (BHG), 2.35 × 105 yr (LBV), 1.05 × 105 yr (WN), 2.57 × 105 yr (WC), and 3.80 × 104 yr (WO). Compared to previous studies, we find a much longer (shorter) duration for the early WN (late WN) phase, as well as a long-lived LBV phase. We show that LBVs arise naturally in single-star evolution models at the end of the MS when the mass-loss rate increases as a consequence of crossing the bistability limit. We discuss the evolution of the spectra, magnitudes, colors, and ionizing flux across the star's lifetime, and the way they are related to the evolution of the interior. We find that the absolute magnitude of the star typically changes by ~6 mag in optical filters across the evolution, with the star becoming significantly fainter in optical filters at

  15. NuSTAR Reveals Relativistic Reflection but no Ultra-fast Outflow in the Quasar PG1211+143

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow ( UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high...... a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We...

  16. The ATLAS(3D) project : XIX. The hot gas content of early-type galaxies: fast versus slow rotators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarzi, Marc; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Young, Lisa M.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    For early-type galaxies, the ability to sustain a corona of hot, X-ray-emitting gas could have played a key role in quenching their star formation history. A halo of hot gas may act as an effective shield against the acquisition of cold gas and can quickly absorb stellar mass loss material. Yet,

  17. The ATLAS3D project - XIX. The hot gas content of early-type galaxies: fast versus slow rotators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarzi, Marc; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Young, Lisa M.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    For early-type galaxies, the ability to sustain a corona of hot, X-ray-emitting gas could have played a key role in quenching their star formation history. A halo of hot gas may act as an effective shield against the acquisition of cold gas and can quickly absorb stellar mass loss material. Yet,

  18. Magnetism of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.

    2018-01-01

    Strong, stable, and organised magnetic fields are present at the surfaces of a small fraction of OBA stars. These "fossil fields" exhibit uniform characteristics in stars over a tremendous range of stellar mass, age, temperature, and rotation rate. In hot O- and B-type stars, these magnetic fields couple efficiently to the stellar radiatively driven winds, strongly influencing stellar mass loss and rotation. In this article we review the characteristics of the known magnetic hot stars, discuss recent discoveries and insights, and describe recent theoretical progress toward understanding basic field properties and the influence of magnetic fields on hot star evolution.

  19. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, , G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-tropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different latitudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable more cheap launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou is better than Baikonur). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a single rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature. But according to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with an opposing tendency also begin to act. At Earth the wide planetary long tropical zone is marked by destruction of the crust. It is demonstrated by development of numerous islands of the Malay Archipelago (the Sunda Isls., Maluku Isls, Philippines) between the Southeastern Asia and Australia. In Africa and South America huge depressions of the Congo and Amazon Rivers develops where the Archean crust is subsided to depths of more than 2 km. In the Pacific along the equator numerous islands of Micronesia occur. Subsidence of the basaltic oceanic crust is followed by an intensive folding and faulting of basalt and sedimentary layers (Fig. 1) as a larger mass must be held by a smaller space (a planetary radius is diminished). The central Atlantic is very demonstrative in this sense suffering huge transform fault

  20. THE H α EMISSION OF NEARBY M DWARFS AND ITS RELATION TO STELLAR ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Mink, Jessica [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The high-energy emission from low-mass stars is mediated by the magnetic dynamo. Although the mechanisms by which fully convective stars generate large-scale magnetic fields are not well understood, it is clear that, as for solar-type stars, stellar rotation plays a pivotal role. We present 270 new optical spectra of low-mass stars in the Solar Neighborhood. Combining our observations with those from the literature, our sample comprises 2202 measurements or non-detections of H α emission in nearby M dwarfs. This includes 466 with photometric rotation periods. Stars with masses between 0.1 and 0.6 M {sub ⊙} are well-represented in our sample, with fast and slow rotators of all masses. We observe a threshold in the mass–period plane that separates active and inactive M dwarfs. The threshold coincides with the fast-period edge of the slowly rotating population, at approximately the rotation period at which an era of rapid rotational evolution appears to cease. The well-defined active/inactive boundary indicates that H α activity is a useful diagnostic for stellar rotation period, e.g., for target selection for exoplanet surveys, and we present a mass-period relation for inactive M dwarfs. We also find a significant, moderate correlation between L{sub Hα} / L{sub bol} and variability amplitude: more active stars display higher levels of photometric variability. Consistent with previous work, our data show that rapid rotators maintain a saturated value of L{sub Hα} / L {sub bol}. Our data also show a clear power-law decay in L{sub Hα} / L{sub bol} with Rossby number for slow rotators, with an index of −1.7 ± 0.1.

  1. A detailed study of lithium in 107 CHEPS dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ivanyuk, O. M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Kaminsky, B. M.; Lyubchik, Yu. P.; Yakovina, L. A.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We report results from lithium abundance determinations using high resolution spectral analysis of the 107 metal-rich stars from the Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search programme. Aims: We aim to set out to understand the lithium distribution of the population of stars taken from this survey. Methods: The lithium abundance taking account of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium effects was determined from the fits to the Li I 6708 Å resonance doublet profiles in the observed spectra. Results: We find that a) fast rotators tend to have higher lithium abundances; b) log N(Li) is higher in more massive and hot stars; c) log N(Li) is higher in stars of lower log g; d) stars with the metallicities >0.25 dex do not show the lithium lines in their spectra; e) most of our planet hosts rotate slower; and f) a lower limit of lithium isotopic ratio is 7Li/6Li > 10 in the atmospheres of two stars with planets (SWP) and two non-SWP stars. Conclusions: Measurable lithium abundances were found in the atmospheres of 45 stars located at distances of 20-170 pc from the Sun, for the other 62 stars the upper limits of log N(Li) were computed. We found well defined dependences of lithium abundances on Teff, V sin i, and less pronounced for the log g. In case of V sin i we see two sequences of stars: with measurable lithium and with the upper limit of log N(Li). About 10% of our targets are known to host planets. Only two SWP have notable lithium abundances, so we found a lower proportion of stars with detectable Li among known planet hosts than among stars without planets. However, given the small sample size of our planet-host sample, our analysis does not show any statistically significant differences in the lithium abundance between SWP and stars without known planets.

  2. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  3. Effects of fast ions and an external inductive electric field on the neoclassical parallel flow, current, and rotation in general toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao.

    1992-05-01

    Effects of external momentum sources, i.e., fast ions produced by the neutral beam injection and an external inductive electric field, on the neoclassical ion parallel flow, current, and rotation are analytically investigated for a simple plasma in general toroidal systems. It is shown that the contribution of the external sources to the ion parallel flow becomes large as the collision frequency of thermal ions increases because of the momentum conservation of Coulomb collisions and sharply decreasing viscosity coefficients, with collision frequency. As a result, the beam-driven parallel flow of thermal ions becomes comparable to that of electrons in the Pfirsh-Schluter collisionality regime, whereas in the 1/μ or banana regime it is smaller than that of electrons by the order of √(m e /m i ) (m e and m i are electron and ion masses). This beam-driven ion parallel flow can not produce a large beam-driven current because of the cancellation with electron parallel flow, but produces a large toroidal rotation of ions. As both electrons and ions approach the Pfirsh-Schluter collisionality regime the contribution of thermodynamical forces becomes negligibly small and the large toroidal rotation of ions is predominated by the beam-driven component in the non-axisymmetric configuration with large helical ripples. (author)

  4. [Working time and sleep in nursing staff employed in "3 x 8" and "2 x 12" fast rotating shift schedules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, G; Anelli, M M; Punzi, S; Boari, P; Camerino, D; Costa, G

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at assessing, in 200 nurses shift workers, the impact on sleep of two different working areas ("emergency" and "hospitalization") having the same "3 x 8" shift system, and of two different shift schedules at quick rotation ("2 x 12" and "3 x 8") in the same working area ("emergency"). Night and morning shifts prove to interfere to a greater extent with sleep in relation to both "2 x 12" and "3 x 8" shift systems as well as to the two operative areas. Hence the importance to consider in shift work planning, the direction of shift rotation and the length of the duty period according to the type of activity.

  5. The ATLAS3D project - XXVI. H I discs in real and simulated fast and slow rotators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra, Paolo; Oser, Ludwig; Krajnović, Davor; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Morganti, Raffaella; Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric; Young, Lisa M.; Blitz, Leo; Davis, Timothy A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Hirschmann, Michaela; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of all nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) outside Virgo host a disc/ring of H I with size from a few to tens of kpc and mass up to ˜109 M⊙. Here we investigate whether this H I is related to the presence of a stellar disc within the host making use of the classification of ETGs in fast

  6. Energy production in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, Hans.

    1977-01-01

    Energy in stars is released partly by gravitation, partly by nuclear reactions. For ordinary stars like our sun, nuclear reactions predominate. However, at the end of the life of a star very large amounts of energy are released by gravitational collapse; this can amount to as much as 10 times the total energy released nuclear reactions. The rotational energy of pulsars is a small remnant of the energy of gravitation. The end stage of small stars is generally a white dwarf, of heavy stars a neutron star of possibly a black hole

  7. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A fast X-ray transient in the galactic plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J.; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Harrison, Fiona A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8σ in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between ∼0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Γ=4.1 −1.0 +1.5 (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2 ± 0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT=3.0 −1.2 +2.1 keV. The reduced-χ 2 values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with N H =(2.8 −1.4 +2.3 )×10 23 cm –2 , (9 −7 +15 )×10 22 cm –2 , and (1.7 −0.9 +1.7 )×10 23 cm –2 , for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >10 34 erg s –1 . Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  8. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A fast X-ray transient in the galactic plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grindlay, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Natalucci, Lorenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W., E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8σ in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between ∼0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Γ=4.1{sub −1.0}{sup +1.5} (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2 ± 0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT=3.0{sub −1.2}{sup +2.1} keV. The reduced-χ{sup 2} values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with N{sub H}=(2.8{sub −1.4}{sup +2.3})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, (9{sub −7}{sup +15})×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}, and (1.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.7})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}. Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  9. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having...... for between ~0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-IR imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5)(-1.0) (90% confidence errors......-2, and 1.7(+1.7)(-0.9)e23 cm-2, for the power-law, blackbody, and bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which...

  10. Flare Activity of Wide Binary Stars with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Riley W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity in wide binary stars using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. The target list contains a set of previously discovered wide binary star systems identified by proper motions in the Kepler field. We cross-matched these systems with estimates of flare activity for ∼200,000 stars in the Kepler field, allowing us to compare relative flare luminosity between stars in coeval binaries. From a sample of 184 previously known wide binaries in the Kepler field, we find 58 with detectable flare activity in at least 1 component, 33 of which are similar in mass (q > 0.8). Of these 33 equal-mass binaries, the majority display similar (±1 dex) flare luminosity between both stars, as expected for stars of equal mass and age. However, we find two equal-mass pairs where the secondary (lower mass) star is more active than its counterpart, and two equal-mass pairs where the primary star is more active. The stellar rotation periods are also anomalously fast for stars with elevated flare activity. Pairs with discrepant rotation and activity qualitatively seem to have lower mass ratios. These outliers may be due to tidal spin-up, indicating these wide binaries could be hierarchical triple systems. We additionally present high-resolution adaptive optics images for two wide binary systems to test this hypothesis. The demographics of stellar rotation and magnetic activity between stars in wide binaries may be useful indicators for discerning the formation scenarios of these systems.

  11. STAR-H2: a battery-type lead-cooled fast reactor for hydrogen manufacture in a sustainable hierarchical hub-spoke energy infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.; Doctor, R. D.; Peddicord, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor for Hydrogen production STAR-H2 is designed to fit into a sustainable global, mid-21st century hierarchical hub-spoke nuclear energy supply architecture based on nuclear fuel, hydrogen, and electricity energy carriers and having favorable energy security, ecological and nonproliferation features. It will produce hydrogen, oxygen and potable water to service cities and their surrounding regions under an assumed electrical generation network based on fuel cells and microturbines and an assumed transportation sector using hydrogen fueled vehicles. STAR-H2 is a long refueling interval (Battery) turnkey heat supply reactor intended for production of hydrogen by thermochemical water cracking. The reactor is a Pb-cooled, mixed U-TRU-Nitride-fueled, fast spectrum reactor delivering 400 MW th of heat at 800degC core outlet temperature. The primary coolant circulates by natural circulation; the 400 MW th heat rating is set by dual requirements for natural circulation; the 400 MW th heat rating is set by dual requirements for natural circulation and for rail shippability of the vessel. An intermediate low pressure He loop carries the heat to a Ca-Br thermochemical water cracking cycle for the manufacture of H 2 (and O 2 ). The water cracking cycle rejects heat at 550degC and that heat is used in a supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle turbogenerator to provide hotel load electricity. A thermal desalinisation plant receives discharge heat at 125degC from the Brayton cycle and the brine provides for ultimate heat rejection from the cascaded thermodynamic cycles. The modified UT-3 cycle used in STAR-H2, called the Ca-Br cycle, operates at atmospheric pressure and 750-725degC, uses solid/gas separation steps and achieves about 44% efficiency. Unlike UT-3, it employs a single-stage HBr-dissociation step based on a plasma chemistry technique operating near ambient conditions. The STAR-H2 power plant will operate on a 20 year refueling interval

  12. Development of inflatable seals for the rotatable plugs of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. Pt. II. R and D necessities and development across the world. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Nilay K.; Raj, Baldev

    2013-01-01

    Identification of development areas and their implementation for rotatable plug (RP) inflatable seals of Na cooled, 500 Mw (e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and 40 MW (t) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) are described, largely based on a late 1990s survey of cover gas seal development (1950s - early 1990s) which defined a set of shortlisted design options and developmental strategy to minimize effort, cost and time. Comparative study of top shield sealing and evolving FBR designs suggest suitability of inflatable seal as primary barrier in RPs. International experience identified choice and qualification of seal elastomer under synergistic degrading environment of reactor as the prime element of development. The low pressure, non-reinforced, unbeaded, PFBR inflatable seal (made of 50/50 blend of Viton registered GBL 200S/600S) developed for 10 y life provides a unification scheme for nuclear elastomeric sealing based on 5 peroxide cured fluoroelastomer blend formulations, 1 finite element analysis approach, 1 Teflon-like plasma coating technique and 2 manufacturing processes promising significant gains in standardization, economy and safety. Uniqueness was ab initio development in the absence of established industry or readymade supply. R and D necessities for inflatable seals and their development across the world are given closer look in Part II of the review in continuation of Part I. (orig.)

  13. Measuring Stellar Rotation Periods with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.

    2013-01-01

    We measure rotation periods for 12151 stars in the Kepler field, based on photometric variability caused by stellar activity. Our analysis returns stable rotation periods over at least six out of eight quarters of Kepler data. This large sample of stars enables us to study rotation periods...

  14. Effects of Metallicity, Star Formation Conditions and Evolution of B & Be stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martayan, C.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.; Neiner, C.; Frémat, Y.; Zorec, J.

    2007-03-01

    To study the effects of metallicity and evolution on the appearance of the Be phenomenon in the B stars population, we observed several fields in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) which have different metallicities. Thanks to the FLAMES-GIRAFFE multi-fibres spectrograph on the VLT-UT2, we obtained spectra of 520 stars in the LMC-NGC2004 and SMC-NGC330 regions. We used 2 settings at medium resolution: R=8600 for the red setting which contains Hα and R=6400 for the blue setting which contains Hγ, Hδ, He I 4026, 4388, 4471 Å. The latter setting was used to obtain fundamental parameters of the stars by fitting the observed spectrum with theoretical spectra. We used TLUSTY (Hubeny & Lanz 1995) to compute a grid of model atmospheres with abundance adopted from Korn et al. (2002) for the LMC and from Jasniewicz & Thévenin (1994) for the SMC. Thanks to the GIRFIT code (Frémat et al. 2005a), we obtained the fundamental parameters teff, log g, v sin i and radial velocity (RV) for each star of the samples.We took into account the effects of fast rotation (stellar flattening and gravitational darkening) for Be stars to correct their apparent fundamental parameters. Then we compared the rotational velocities between fields and clusters in the SMC and in the LMC respectively, between the LMC and the SMC, and between the MC and the Milky Way (MW). The results show an increase in Vsini with decreasing metallicity in B and Be stars populations. The evolutionary status and ages of Be stars were also investigated.

  15. GRAVITY-DARKENED SEASONS: INSOLATION AROUND RAPID ROTATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, John P. [Physics Department, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    I model the effect of rapid stellar rotation on a planet’s insolation. Fast-rotating stars have induced pole-to-equator temperature gradients (known as gravity darkening) of up to several thousand Kelvin that affect the star’s luminosity and peak emission wavelength as a function of latitude. When orbiting such a star, a planet’s annual insolation can strongly vary depending on its orbital inclination. Specifically, inclined orbits result in temporary exposure to the star’s hotter poles. I find that gravity darkening can drive changes in a planet’s equilibrium temperature of up to ∼15% due to increased irradiance near the stellar poles. This effect can also vary a planet’s exposure to UV radiation by up to ∼80% throughout its orbit as it is exposed to an irradiance spectrum corresponding to different stellar effective temperatures over time.

  16. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  17. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  18. The structure of protoplanetary disks surrounding three young intermediate mass stars: I. Resolving the disk rotation in the [OI] 6300 Å line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, G.; van den Ancker, M.E.; Fedele, D.; Acke, B.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Bouwman, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present high-spectral-resolution, optical spectra of three young, intermediate-mass stars, in all of which we spectrally resolve the 6300 Å [OI] emission line. Two of these have a double-peaked line-profile. We attempt to fit these data using a simple model of [OI] emission, which is generated by

  19. A path towards understanding the rotation-activity relation of M dwarfs with K2 mission, X-ray and UV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, B.; Damasso, M.; Scholz, A.; Matt, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the relation between stellar rotation and magnetic activity for a sample of 134 bright, nearby M dwarfs observed in the Kepler Two-Wheel (K2) mission during campaigns C0-C4. The K2 light curves yield photometrically derived rotation periods for 97 stars (79 of which without previous period measurement), as well as various measures for activity related to cool spots and flares. We find a clear difference between fast and slow rotators with a dividing line at a period of ˜10 d at which the activity level changes abruptly. All photometric diagnostics of activity (spot cycle amplitude, flare peak amplitude and residual variability after subtraction of spot and flare variations) display the same dichotomy, pointing to a quick transition between a high-activity mode for fast rotators and a low-activity mode for slow rotators. This unexplained behaviour is reminiscent of a dynamo mode-change seen in numerical simulations that separates a dipolar from a multipolar regime. A substantial number of the fast rotators are visual binaries. A tentative explanation is accelerated disc evolution in binaries leading to higher initial rotation rates on the main sequence and associated longer spin-down and activity lifetimes. We combine the K2 rotation periods with archival X-ray and UV data. X-ray, FUV and NUV detections are found for 26, 41, and 11 stars from our sample, respectively. Separating the fast from the slow rotators, we determine for the first time the X-ray saturation level separately for early- and for mid-M stars.

  20. A pulsation analysis of K2 observations of the subdwarf B star PG 1142-037 during Campaign 1: A subsynchronously rotating ellipsoidal variable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, M. D.; Baran, A. S.; Østensen, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new subdwarf B pulsator, PG 1142-037, discovered during the first full-length campaign of K2, the two-gyro mission of the Kepler space telescope. 14 periodicities have been detected between 0.9 and 2.5 hr with amplitudes below 0.35 parts-per-thousand. We have been able to associate al...... result is the detection of an ellipsoidal, tidally distorted variable with no indication of rotationally induced pulsation multiplets. This indicates that the rotation period is longer than 45 d, even though the binary period is near 13 h....

  1. A No-Go Theorem for Rotating Stars of a Perfect Fluid without Radial Motion in Projectable Hořava–Lifshitz Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Tsukamoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hořava–Lifshitz gravity has covariance only under the foliation-preserving diffeomorphism. This implies that the quantities on the constant-time hypersurfaces should be regular. In the original theory, the projectability condition, which strongly restricts the lapse function, is proposed. We assume that a star is filled with a perfect fluid with no-radial motion and that it has reflection symmetry about the equatorial plane. As a result, we find a no-go theorem for stationary and axisymmetric star solutions in projectable Hořava–Lifshitz  gravity under the physically reasonable assumptions in the matter sector. Since we do not use the gravitational action to prove it, our result also works out in other projectable theories and applies to not only strong gravitational fields, but also weak gravitational ones.

  2. The first stars: CEMP-no stars and signatures of spinstars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges; Chiappini, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Aims: The CEMP-no stars are "carbon-enhanced-metal-poor" stars that in principle show no evidence of s- and r-elements from neutron captures. We try to understand the origin and nucleosynthetic site of their peculiar CNO, Ne-Na, and Mg-Al abundances. Methods: We compare the observed abundances to the nucleosynthetic predictions of AGB models and of models of rotating massive stars with internal mixing and mass loss. We also analyze the different behaviors of α- and CNO-elements, as well the abundances of elements involved in the Ne-Na and Mg-Al cycles. Results: We show that CEMP-no stars exhibit products of He-burning that have gone through partial mixing and processing by the CNO cycle, producing low 12C/13C and a broad variety of [C/N] and [O/N] ratios. From a 12C/13C vs. [C/N] diagram, we conclude that neither the yields of AGB stars (in binaries or not) nor the yields of classic supernovae can fully account for the observed CNO abundances in CEMP-no stars. Better agreement is obtained once the chemical contribution by stellar winds of fast-rotating massive stars is taken into account, where partial mixing takes place, leading to various amounts of CNO being ejected. The [(C+N+O)/H] ratios of CEMP-no stars vary linearly with [Fe/H] above [Fe/H] = -4.0 indicating primary behavior by (C+N+O). Below [Fe/H] = -4.0, [(C+N+O)/H] is almost constant as a function of [Fe/H], implying very high [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios up to 4 dex. In view of the timescales, such abundance ratios reflect more individual nucleosynthetic properties, rather than an average chemical evolution. The high [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios (as well as the high [(C+N+O)/α-elements]) imply that stellar winds from partially mixed stars were the main source of these excesses of heavy elements now observed in CEMP-no stars. The ranges covered by the variations of [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Al/Fe] are much broader than for the α-elements (with an atomic mass number above 24) and are comparable to the wide ranges covered

  3. WASP-167b/KELT-13b : joint discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting a rapidly rotating F1V star

    OpenAIRE

    Temple, L. Y.; Hellier, C.; Albrow, M. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Bayliss, D.; Beatty, T. G.; Bieryla, A.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cargile, P. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Collins, K. A.; Colón, K. D.; Curtis, I. A.; D'Ago, G.; Delrez, L.

    2017-01-01

    We report the joint WASP/KELT discovery of WASP-167b/KELT-13b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a 2.02-d orbit around a $V$ = 10.5, F1V star with [Fe/H] = 0.1 $\\pm$ 0.1. The 1.5 R$_{\\rm Jup}$ planet was confirmed by Doppler tomography of the stellar line profiles during transit. We place a limit of $

  4. Rotational glitches in radio pulsars and magnetars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonopoulou, D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact known stars; their cores are of higher density than an atomic nucleus. Their rotation rates are generally very predictable, with a slow decrease over time. This spin-down is occasionally interrupted, however, by abrupt 'glitches' when the rotation rate increases

  5. Rotational properties of strange-pulsar models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H.

    1991-01-01

    We present a study of the rotational properties of strange pulsars: strange-matter stars capable of supporting glitches. It is shown that their differentiated internal structure implies a lower maximum rotational frequency than that of homogeneous strange stars. Nevertheless, they are able to fit the known pulsar properties

  6. Investigating stellar surface rotation using observations of starspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Heidi Helena

    2011-01-01

    Rapid rotation enhances the dynamo operating in stars, and thus also introduces significantly stronger magnetic activity than is seen in slower rotators. Many young cool stars still have the rapid, primordial rotation rates induced by the interstellar molecular cloud from which they were formed...... information on the rotation of the star. At times even information on the spot rotation at different stellar latitudes can be obtained, similarly to the solar surface differential rotation measurements using magnetic features as tracers. Here, I will review investigations of stellar rotation based...

  7. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  8. General Relativity and Compact Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-01-01

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10 14 times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed

  9. Discovering the Rotation of our own Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    stars, and clusters of stars, away from the plane of the. Milky Way. He showed that there were systematic red- ... stars and clusters that he used were not in rotation and symmetric around the true centre of the galaxy. They ... from a moving platform, i.e., the Sun itself. In addition to the Doppler effect, Oort used information ...

  10. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  11. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M ☉ main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M ☉ stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10 –6 yr –1 . These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  12. COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKAY, W.W.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; COURANT, E.D.; FISCHER, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VANZIEJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX

  13. A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION MODEL FOR THE FIR MID-J CO LADDER WITH UNIVERSAL ROTATIONAL TEMPERATURE IN STAR FORMING REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    A photon-dominated region (PDR) is one of the leading candidate mechanisms for the origin of warm CO gas with near universal ∼300 K rotational temperature inferred from the CO emission detected toward embedded protostars by Herschel/PACS. We have developed a PDR model in general coordinates, where we can use the most adequate coordinate system for an embedded protostar having outflow cavity walls, to solve chemistry and gas energetics self-consistently for given UV radiation fields with different spectral shapes. Simple one-dimensional tests and applications show that FIR mid-J (14 ≤ J ≤ 24) CO lines are emitted from close to the surface of a dense region exposed to high UV fluxes. We apply our model to HH46 and find that the UV-heated outflow cavity wall can reproduce the mid-J CO transitions observed by Herschel/PACS. A model with UV radiation corresponding to a blackbody of 10,000 K results in a rotational temperature lower than 300 K, while models with the Draine interstellar radiation field and the 15,000 K blackbody radiation field predict a rotational temperature similar to the observed one

  14. Dynamos in asymptotic-giant-branch stars as the origin of magnetic fields shaping planetary nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, E G; Frank, A; Markiel, J A; Thomas, J H; Van Horn, H M

    2001-01-25

    Planetary nebulae are thought to be formed when a slow wind from the progenitor giant star is overtaken by a subsequent fast wind generated as the star enters its white dwarf stage. A shock forms near the boundary between the winds, creating the relatively dense shell characteristic of a planetary nebula. A spherically symmetric wind will produce a spherically symmetric shell, yet over half of known planetary nebulae are not spherical; rather, they are elliptical or bipolar in shape. A magnetic field could launch and collimate a bipolar outflow, but the origin of such a field has hitherto been unclear, and some previous work has even suggested that a field could not be generated. Here we show that an asymptotic-giant-branch (AGB) star can indeed generate a strong magnetic field, having as its origin a dynamo at the interface between the rapidly rotating core and the more slowly rotating envelope of the star. The fields are strong enough to shape the bipolar outflows that produce the observed bipolar planetary nebulae. Magnetic braking of the stellar core during this process may also explain the puzzlingly slow rotation of most white dwarf stars.

  15. Net Reaction Rate and Neutrino Cooling Rate for the Urca Process in Departure from Chemical Equilibrium in the Crust of Fast-accreting Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xi; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    We discuss the effect of compression on Urca shells in the ocean and crust of accreting neutron stars, especially in superbursting sources. We find that Urca shells may be deviated from chemical equilibrium in neutron stars which accrete at several tenths of the local Eddington accretion rate. The deviation depends on the energy threshold of the parent and daughter nuclei, the transition strength, the temperature, and the local accretion rate. In a typical crust model of accreting neutron stars, the chemical departures range from a few tenths of kBT to tens of kBT for various Urca pairs. If the Urca shell can exist in crusts of accreting neutron stars, compression may enhance the net neutrino cooling rate by a factor of about 1-2 relative to the neutrino emissivity in chemical equilibrium. For some cases, such as Urca pairs with small energy thresholds and/or weak transition strength, the large chemical departure may result in net heating rather than cooling, although the released heat can be small. Strong Urca pairs in the deep crust are hard to be deviated even in neutron stars accreting at the local Eddington accretion rate.

  16. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  17. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  18. Rotation-supported Neutrino-driven Supernova Explosions in Three Dimensions and the Critical Luminosity Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We present the first self-consistent, 3D core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code for a rotating progenitor star. Besides using the angular momentum of the 15 M ⊙ model as obtained in the stellar evolution calculation with an angular frequency of ∼10‑3 rad s‑1 (spin period of more than 6000 s) at the Si/Si–O interface, we also computed 2D and 3D cases with no rotation and with a ∼300 times shorter rotation period and different angular resolutions. In 2D, only the nonrotating and slowly rotating models explode, while rapid rotation prevents an explosion within 500 ms after bounce because of lower radiated neutrino luminosities and mean energies and thus reduced neutrino heating. In contrast, only the fast-rotating model develops an explosion in 3D when the Si/Si–O interface collapses through the shock. The explosion becomes possible by the support of a powerful standing accretion shock instability spiral mode, which compensates for the reduced neutrino heating and pushes strong shock expansion in the equatorial plane. Fast rotation in 3D leads to a “two-dimensionalization” of the turbulent energy spectrum (yielding roughly a ‑3 instead of a ‑5/3 power-law slope at intermediate wavelengths) with enhanced kinetic energy on the largest spatial scales. We also introduce a generalization of the “universal critical luminosity condition” of Summa et al. to account for the effects of rotation, and we demonstrate its viability for a set of more than 40 core-collapse simulations, including 9 and 20 M ⊙ progenitors, as well as black-hole-forming cases of 40 and 75 M ⊙ stars to be discussed in forthcoming papers.

  19. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. III. Optical and UV Spectra of a Blue Kilonova from Fast Polar Ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Elias, J.; Briceño, C.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Brown, W.; Annis, J.; Bahramian, A.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H. -Y.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Dunlap, B.; Holz, D. E.; Marchesini, E.; Massaro, F.; Moskowitz, N.; Pelisoli, I.; Rest, A.; Ricci, F.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Strader, J.

    2017-10-16

    We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the SOAR and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope} at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly-fading blue component ($T\\approx5500$ K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than $\\gtrsim 4.5$ days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at $\\sim 7900$ \\AA\\ at $t\\lesssim 4.5$ days. The colours, rapid evolution and featureless spectrum are consistent with a "blue" kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light $r$-process nuclei with atomic mass number $A\\lesssim 140$. This indicates a sight-line within $\\theta_{\\rm obs}\\lesssim 45^{\\circ}$ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests $\\sim0.03$ M$_\\odot$ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of $\\sim 0.3c$. The required lanthanide fraction is $\\sim 10^{-4}$, but this drops to $<10^{-5}$ in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of $\\lesssim 12$ km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  20. A spectroscopic analysis of the chemically peculiar star HD 207561

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S.; Semenko, E.; Martinez, P.; Sachkov, M.; Joshi, Y. C.; Seetha, S.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Mary, D. L.; Girish, V.; Ashoka, B. N.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we present a high-resolution spectroscopic analysis of the chemically peculiar star HD 207561. During a survey programme to search for new rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars in the Northern hemisphere, Joshi et al. observed significant photometric variability on two consecutive nights in the year 2000. The amplitude spectra of the light curves obtained on these two nights showed oscillations with a frequency of 2.79 mHz (P ˜ 6 min). However, subsequent follow-up observations could not confirm any rapid variability. In order to determine the spectroscopic nature of HD 207561, high-resolution spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations were carried out. A reasonable fit of the calculated Hβ line profile to the observed one yields an effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) of 7300 K and 3.7 dex, respectively. The derived projected rotational velocity (v sin i) for HD 207561 is 74 km s-1, indicative of a relatively fast rotator. The position of HD 207561 in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram implies that this is slightly evolved from the main-sequence and located well within the δ-Scuti instability strip. The abundance analysis indicates the star has slight underabundances of Ca and Sc and mild overabundances of iron-peak elements. The spectropolarimetric study of HD 207561 shows that the effective magnetic field is within the observational error of 100 G. The spectroscopic analysis revealed that the star has most of the characteristics similar to an Am star, rather than an Ap star, and that it lies in the δ-Scuti instability strip; hence roAp pulsations are not expected in HD 207561, but low-overtone modes might be excited. The present work is based on the analysis of data collected with the Russian 6-m telescope BTA operated by the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS).

  1. Flares on a Bp Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    Two large X-ray flares have been reported from the direction of a magnetic B2p star (σ Ori E). Sanz-Forcada et al. have suggested that the flares did not occur on the B2p star but on a companion of late spectral type. A star which is a candidate for a late-type flare star near σ Ori E has recently been identified by Bouy et al. However, based on the properties of the flares, and based on a recent model of rotating magnetospheres, we argue that, rather than attributing the two flares to a late-type dwarf, it is a viable hypothesis that the flares were magnetic phenomena associated with the rotating magnetosphere of the B2p star itself.

  2. FLARES ON A Bp STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    Two large X-ray flares have been reported from the direction of a magnetic B2p star (σ Ori E). Sanz-Forcada et al. have suggested that the flares did not occur on the B2p star but on a companion of late spectral type. A star which is a candidate for a late-type flare star near σ Ori E has recently been identified by Bouy et al. However, based on the properties of the flares, and based on a recent model of rotating magnetospheres, we argue that, rather than attributing the two flares to a late-type dwarf, it is a viable hypothesis that the flares were magnetic phenomena associated with the rotating magnetosphere of the B2p star itself.

  3. Metal-Rich SX Phe Stars in the Kepler Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemec James M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution spectroscopic observations have been made for 32 of the 34 candidate SX Phe stars identified in the Kepler field by Balona & Nemec (2012. All available long-and short-cadence Q0-Q17 Kepler photometry has been analyzed for the 34 candidates. Radial velocities (RVs, space motions (U, V, W, projected rotation velocities (υ sin i, spectral types, and atmospheric characteristics (Teff, log g, [M/H], υmic, etc. were derived from ~ 160 spectra taken with the ESPaDOnS spectrograph on the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6-m telescope and with the ARCES spectrograph on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. Two thirds of the stars are fast rotators with υ sin i > 50 km/s, including four stars with υ sin i > 200 km/s. Three of the stars have (negative RVs > 250 km/s and retrograde space motions, and seven stars have total space motions > 400 km/s. All the spectroscopically measured SX Phe candidates have positions in a Toomre diagram that are consistent with being bona fide halo and thick-disk stars. Although several stars show a marked metal weakness, the mean [Fe/H] of the sample is near 0.0 dex (σ ~ 0.25 dex, which is considerably more metal-rich than is normally expected for a sample of Pop. II stars. Observed pulsation frequency modulations and optical time delays suggest that at least eight of the SX Phe stars are in binary systems, some of which show significant RV variations. Six of the time-delay binaries have secondary masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.70 M☉ and orbital periods in the range 9 to 1570 days. Another star appears to be an ellipsoidal variable with a 2.3-day orbital period; and two other systems have orbital periods longer than the ~ 4-year sampling interval of the Kepler data.

  4. Optical photometric variable stars towards the Galactic H II region NGC 2282

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Somnath; Mondal, Soumen; Joshi, Santosh; Jose, Jessy; Das, Ramkrishna; Ghosh, Supriyo

    2018-05-01

    We report here CCD I-band time series photometry of a young (2-5 Myr) cluster NGC 2282, in order to identify and understand the variability of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. The I-band photometry, down to ˜20.5 mag, enables us to probe the variability towards the lower mass end (˜0.1 M⊙) of PMS stars. From the light curves of 1627 stars, we identified 62 new photometric variable candidates. Their association with the region was established from H α emission and infrared (IR) excess. Among 62 variables, 30 young variables exhibit H α emission, near-IR (NIR)/mid-IR (MIR) excess or both and are candidate members of the cluster. Out of 62 variables, 41 are periodic variables, with a rotation rate ranging from 0.2-7 d. The period distribution exhibits a median period at ˜1 d, as in many young clusters (e.g. NGC 2264, ONC, etc.), but it follows a unimodal distribution, unlike others that have bimodality, with slow rotators peaking at ˜6-8 d. To investigate the rotation-disc and variability-disc connection, we derived the NIR excess from Δ(I - K) and the MIR excess from Spitzer [3.6]-[4.5] μm data. No conclusive evidence of slow rotation with the presence of discs around stars and fast rotation for discless stars is obtained from our periodic variables. A clear increasing trend of the variability amplitude with IR excess is found for all variables.

  5. Multiple stellar populations in Magellanic Cloud clusters. VI. A survey of multiple sequences and Be stars in young clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; D'Antona, F.; Bedin, L. R.; Da Costa, G.; Piotto, G.; Tailo, M.; Dotter, A.; Angeloni, R.; Anderson, J.; Jerjen, H.; Li, C.; Dupree, A.; Granata, V.; Lagioia, E. P.; Mackey, A. D.; Nardiello, D.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-03-01

    The split main sequences (MSs) and extended MS turnoffs (eMSTOs) detected in a few young clusters have demonstrated that these stellar systems host multiple populations differing in a number of properties such as rotation and, possibly, age. We analyze Hubble Space Telescope photometry for thirteen clusters with ages between ˜40 and ˜1000 Myrs and of different masses. Our goal is to investigate for the first time the occurrence of multiple populations in a large sample of young clusters. We find that all the clusters exhibit the eMSTO phenomenon and that MS stars more massive than ˜1.6 M_⊙ define a blue and red MS, with the latter hosting the majority of MS stars. The comparison between the observations and isochrones suggests that the blue MSs are made of slow-rotating stars, while the red MSs host stars with rotational velocities close to the breakup value. About half of the bright MS stars in the youngest clusters are H-alpha emitters. These Be stars populate the red MS and the reddest part of the eMSTO thus supporting the idea that the red MS is made of fast rotators. We conclude that the split MS and the eMSTO are a common feature of young clusters in both Magellanic Clouds. The phenomena of a split MS and an eMSTO occur for stars that are more massive than a specific threshold which is independent of the host-cluster mass. As a by-product, we report the serendipitous discovery of a young SMC cluster, GALFOR1.

  6. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  7. Stellar dynamics. The fastest unbound star in our Galaxy ejected by a thermonuclear supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S; Fürst, F; Ziegerer, E; Kupfer, T; Heber, U; Irrgang, A; Wang, B; Liu, Z; Han, Z; Sesar, B; Levitan, D; Kotak, R; Magnier, E; Smith, K; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2015-03-06

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with velocities so high that they exceed the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Several acceleration mechanisms have been discussed. Only one HVS (US 708, HVS 2) is a compact helium star. Here we present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of US 708. Traveling with a velocity of ~1200 kilometers per second, it is the fastest unbound star in our Galaxy. In reconstructing its trajectory, the Galactic center becomes very unlikely as an origin, which is hardly consistent with the most favored ejection mechanism for the other HVSs. Furthermore, we detected that US 708 is a fast rotator. According to our binary evolution model, it was spun-up by tidal interaction in a close binary and is likely to be the ejected donor remnant of a thermonuclear supernova. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Massive star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshavskij, V.I.; Tutukov, A.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Astronomicheskij Sovet)

    1975-01-01

    The structure and evolution of 16 (Sun mass), 32 (Sun mass), and 64 (Sun mass) stars with the initial chemical composition X=0.602, Y=0.354, and Z=0.044 (X 12 = 0.00619 and X 16 = 0.01847) are analyzed from the initial main sequence to a complete burnup of oxygen in the nucleus of a red supergiant. At the stage of helium buring in the nucleus the evolutionary track of the star is determined by the equilibrium condition in the zone of varying chemical composition, and at later stages by energy losses due to neutrino emission. In the absence of neutrino emission the external convective zone propagates into regions occupied by the former hydrogen and helium layer sources. This may lead to considerable anomalies in the chemical composition at the star surface and to the decrease of the carbon-oxygen nucleus mass. With regard to neutrino energy losses the structure of layer sources and of the star itself becomes more complicated, thereby increasing the evolution time. Estimation is made of the change in heli.um, carbon, and oxygen contents in the interstellar space over the Galaxy's lifetime as a result of the evolution of massive stars. Some consequences of rotation and meridional circulations are discussed. A study of the structure and evolution of hydrogen-helium massive stars before firing of carbon in the nucleus is made

  9. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  10. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  11. Molecular Star

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report describes the making of a self-assembled coordination architecture that is named as a 'molecular star' since it resembles the shape of a star; more specifically a five-pointed star. This work has been already published in Chemistry- A European Jour- nal in the September 2017 issue and was featured in the cover.

  12. Global rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1980-01-01

    Global rotation in cosmological models is defined on an observational basis. A theorem is proved saying that, for rigid motion, the global rotation is equal to the ordinary local vorticity. The global rotation is calculated in the space-time homogeneous class III models, with Godel's model as a special case. It is shown that, with the exception of Godel's model, the rotation in these models becomes infinite for finite affine parameter values. In some directions the rotation changes sign and becomes infinite in a direction opposite to the local vorticity. The points of infinite rotation are identified as conjugate points along the null geodesics. The physical interpretation of the infinite rotation is discussed, and a comparison with the behaviour of the area distance at conjugate points is given. (author)

  13. Dark stars in Starobinsky's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris; Lopes, Ilídio

    2018-01-01

    In the present work we study non-rotating dark stars in f (R ) modified theory of gravity. In particular, we have considered bosonic self-interacting dark matter modeled inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate, while as far as the modified theory of gravity is concerned we have assumed Starobinsky's model R +a R2. We solve the generalized structure equations numerically, and we obtain the mass-to-ratio relation for several different values of the parameter a , and for two different dark matter equation-of-states. Our results show that the dark matter stars become more compact in the R-squared gravity compared to general relativity, while at the same time the highest star mass is slightly increased in the modified gravitational theory. The numerical value of the highest star mass for each case has been reported.

  14. DYNAMICAL TIDES IN ROTATING PLANETS AND STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.; Lackner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets-hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters, because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of the core radius, and the implied tidal Q is of order ten million for nominal values of the planet's mass, radius, orbital period, and core size. We comment upon an alternative proposal by Wu for exciting inertial waves in an unstratified fluid body by means of compressibility rather than a core. We also find that even a core of rock is unlikely to be rigid. But Ogilvie and Lin's mechanism should still operate if the core is substantially denser than its immediate surroundings.

  15. The β Cephei star HD 167743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoci, V; Handler, G; Shobbrook, R R; Romero-Colmenero, E; Barmania, S; Spann, R

    2008-01-01

    The β Cephei star HD 167743 was observed from three different observatories in the years 2006 and 2007. The data sets were collected through the filters Johnson UBV and Stroemgren uvy. First analyses show six independent and five combination frequencies. We present mode identifications, which are simplified by the rather high amplitudes of the star. No evidence for rotational splitting was found yet.

  16. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    neutron star (see Sauls 1989 for a review). The rotation of the neutron star causes vortices in the neutron superfluid co-existing with the proton superconductor. Pin- ning and electromagnetic interaction are expected to exist between the neutron vor- tices and proton fluxoids, causing the fluxoids to be dragged out to the crust ...

  17. Mining the HST "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) - Hot Stars": The High Definition UV Spectrum of the Ap Star HR 465

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Ayres, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. V.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Adelman, S. J.; Cowley, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Hot Stars" is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 21 Treasury Program (GO-13346: Ayres PI). It is designed to collect a definitive set of representative, high-resolution ( 30,000-100,000), high signal/noise (S/N>100), and full UV coverage 1200 - 3000 A) spectra of 21 early-type stars, utilizing the high-performance Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The targets span the range of spectral types between early-O and early-A, including both main sequence and evolved stars, fast and slow rotators, as well as chemically peculiar (CP) and magnetic objects. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra will be available from the HST archive and, in post-processed and merged form, at http://casa.colorado.edu ayres/ASTRAL/. The UV "atlases" produced by this program will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years to come. We offer a first look at one of the earliest datasets to come out of this observing program, a "high definition" UV spectrum of the Ap star HR 465, which was chosen as a prototypical example of an A-type magnetic CP star. HR 465 has a global magnetic field of ~2200 Gauss. Earlier analyses of IUE spectra show strong iron-peak element lines, along with heavy elements such as Ga and Pt, while being deficient in the abundance of some ions of low atomic number, such as carbon. We demonstrate the high quality of the ASTRAL data and present the identification of spectral lines for a number of elements. By comparison of the observed spectra with calculated spectra, we also provide estimates of element abundances, emphasizing heavy elements, and place these measurements in the context of earlier results for this and other Ap stars.

  18. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  19. Relativistic MHD modeling of magnetized neutron stars, pulsar winds, and their nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zanna, L.; Pili, A. G.; Olmi, B.; Bucciantini, N.; Amato, E.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron stars are among the most fascinating astrophysical sources, being characterized by strong gravity, densities about the nuclear one or even above, and huge magnetic fields. Their observational signatures can be extremely diverse across the electromagnetic spectrum, ranging from the periodic and low-frequency signals of radio pulsars, up to the abrupt high-energy gamma-ray flares of magnetars, where energies of ∼ {10}46 {erg} are released in a few seconds. Fast-rotating and highly magnetized neutron stars are expected to launch powerful relativistic winds, whose interaction with the supernova remnants gives rise to the non-thermal emission of pulsar wind nebulae, which are known cosmic accelerators of electrons and positrons up to PeV energies. In the extreme cases of proto-magnetars (magnetic fields of ∼ {10}15 G and millisecond periods), a similar mechanism is likely to provide a viable engine for the still mysterious gamma-ray bursts. The key ingredient in all these spectacular manifestations of neutron stars is the presence of strong magnetic fields in their constituent plasma. Here we will present recent updates of a couple of state-of-the-art numerical investigations by the high-energy astrophysics group in Arcetri: a comprehensive modeling of the steady-state axisymmetric structure of rotating magnetized neutron stars in general relativity, and dynamical 3D MHD simulations of relativistic pulsar winds and their associated nebulae.

  20. Generalized investigation of the rotation-activity relation: favoring rotation period instead of Rossby number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, A.; Passegger, V. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic activity in Sun-like and low-mass stars causes X-ray coronal emission which is stronger for more rapidly rotating stars. This relation is often interpreted in terms of the Rossby number, i.e., the ratio of rotation period to convective overturn time. We reconsider this interpretation on the basis of the observed X-ray emission and rotation periods of 821 stars with masses below 1.4 M ☉ . A generalized analysis of the relation between X-ray luminosity normalized by bolometric luminosity, L X /L bol , and combinations of rotational period, P, and stellar radius, R, shows that the Rossby formulation does not provide the solution with minimal scatter. Instead, we find that the relation L X /L bol ∝P –2 R –4 optimally describes the non-saturated fraction of the stars. This relation is equivalent to L X ∝P –2 , indicating that the rotation period alone determines the total X-ray emission. Since L X is directly related to the magnetic flux at the stellar surface, this means that the surface flux is determined solely by the star's rotation and is independent of other stellar parameters. While a formulation in terms of a Rossby number would be consistent with these results if the convective overturn time scales exactly as L bol −1/2 , our generalized approach emphasizes the need to test a broader range of mechanisms for dynamo action in cool stars.

  1. Asteroid rotation. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Young, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The results from the year 1979 of an ongoing program of asteroid photometry at Table Mountain Observatory are presented. The results for 53 asteroids are summarized in a table, showing the number, name, opposition date, taxonomic class, diameter, absolute magnitude, mean absolute magnitude at zero phase angle and values of the absolute magnitude and linear phase coefficient derived from it, the rotation period in hours, peak-to-peak amplitude of variation, difference between mean and maximum brightness, and reliability index. Another table presents data on aspect and comparison stars, including brightness and distance data. Reliable rotation periods are reported for 22 asteroids for which no previous values are known. For seven asteroids, periods are reported which are revisions of previously reported values

  2. The VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, C.; Langer, N.; Brott, I.; Hunter, I.; Smartt, S.J.; Lennon, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive Stars was an ESO Large Programme to understand rotational mixing and stellar mass loss in different metallicity environments, in order to better constrain massive star evolution. We gathered high-quality spectra of over 800 stars in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic

  3. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  4. The rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva B. Vedel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle volume can be stereologically estimated using the nucleator principle. In the present paper, we discuss another principle for estimating mean particle volume, namely the rotator. The vertical rotator has already been previously described and is supplemented in the present paper ...

  5. Star Wreck

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A; Tinyakov, Peter G; Tkachev, Igor I; Kusenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Tkachev, Igor I.

    1998-01-01

    Electroweak models with low-energy supersymmetry breaking predict the existence of stable non-topological solitons, Q-balls, that can be produced in the early universe. The relic Q-balls can accumulate inside a neutron star and gradually absorb the baryons into the scalar condensate. This causes a slow reduction in the mass of the star. When the mass reaches a critical value, the neutron star becomes unstable and explodes. The cataclysmic destruction of the distant neutron stars may be the origin of the gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Can planetary nebulae rotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the inclination of spectral lines observed in a number of planetary nebulae when the spectrograph slit is placed along the major axis, which is presently ascribed to nonuniform expansion of the shells, actually may be due to rotation of the nebulae about their minor axes, as Campbell and Moore have suggested in their reports. It is assumed that the rotation of the central star (or, if the core is a binary system, circular motions of gas along quasi-Keplerian orbits) serves as the source of the original rotation of a protoplanetary nebula. The mechanism providing for strengthening of the original rotation in the process of expansion of the shell is the tangential pressure of L/sub α/ radiation due to the anisotropic properties of the medium and radiation field. The dynamic effect produced by them is evidently greatest in the epoch when the optical depth of the nebula in the L/sub c/ continuum becomes on the order of unity in the course of its expansion

  7. Development of a PIGE-Detection System for in-situ Inspection and Quality Assurance in the Evolution of Fast Rotating Parts in High Temperature Environment Manufactured from TiAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Neve

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic -titanium aluminides are a promising material in high temperature technologies. Their high specific strength at temperatures above 700°C offers the possibility for their use as components of aerospace and automotive industries. With a specific weight of 50% of that of the widely used Ni-based superalloys TiAl is very suitable as material for fast rotating parts like turbine blades in aircraft engines and land based power stations or turbocharger rotors. Thus lower mechanical stresses and a reduced fuel consumption and CO2-emission are expected. To overcome the insufficient oxidation protection the halogen effect offers an innovative way. After surface doping using F-implantation or liquid phase-treatment with an F-containing solution and subsequent oxidation at high temperatures the formation of a protective alumina scale can be achieved. By using non-destructive ion beam analyses (PIGE, RBS F was found at the metal/oxide interface. For analysis of large scale components a new vacuum chamber at the IKF was installed and became operative. With this prototype of in-situ quality assurance system for the F-doping of manufactured parts from TiAl some performance test measurements were done and presented in this paper

  8. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  9. Accurate Ray-tracing of Realistic Neutron Star Atmospheres for Constraining Their Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Frederic H.; Bejger, Michał; Różańska, Agata; Straub, Odele; Paumard, Thibaut; Fortin, Morgane; Madej, Jerzy; Majczyna, Agnieszka; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Haensel, Paweł; Zdunik, Leszek; Beldycki, Bartosz

    2018-03-01

    Thermal-dominated X-ray spectra of neutron stars in quiescent, transient X-ray binaries and neutron stars that undergo thermonuclear bursts are sensitive to mass and radius. The mass–radius relation of neutron stars depends on the equation of state (EoS) that governs their interior. Constraining this relation accurately is therefore of fundamental importance to understand the nature of dense matter. In this context, we introduce a pipeline to calculate realistic model spectra of rotating neutron stars with hydrogen and helium atmospheres. An arbitrarily fast-rotating neutron star with a given EoS generates the spacetime in which the atmosphere emits radiation. We use the LORENE/NROTSTAR code to compute the spacetime numerically and the ATM24 code to solve the radiative transfer equations self-consistently. Emerging specific intensity spectra are then ray-traced through the neutron star’s spacetime from the atmosphere to a distant observer with the GYOTO code. Here, we present and test our fully relativistic numerical pipeline. To discuss and illustrate the importance of realistic atmosphere models, we compare our model spectra to simpler models like the commonly used isotropic color-corrected blackbody emission. We highlight the importance of considering realistic model-atmosphere spectra together with relativistic ray-tracing to obtain accurate predictions. We also insist upon the crucial impact of the star’s rotation on the observables. Finally, we close a controversy that has been ongoing in the literature in the recent years, regarding the validity of the ATM24 code.

  10. Analog rotating black holes in a magnetohydrodynamic inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Sousuke; Nambu, Yasusada; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2017-05-01

    We present a model of the analog geometry in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow. For the MHD flow with magnetic pressure-dominated and gas pressure-dominated conditions, we obtain the magnetoacoustic metric for the fast MHD mode. For the slow MHD mode, on the other hand, the wave is governed by the advective-type equation without an isotropic dispersion term. Thus, the "distance" perpendicular to the wave propagation is not defined, and the magnetoacoustic metric cannot be introduced. To investigate the properties of the magnetoacoustic geometry for the fast mode, we prepare a two-dimensional axisymmetric inflow and examine the behavior of magnetoacoustic rays which is a counterpart of the MHD waves in the eikonal limit. We find that the magnetoacoustic geometry is classified into three types depending on two parameters characterizing the background flow: analog spacetimes of rotating black holes, ultra spinning stars with ergoregions, and spinning stars without ergoregions. We address the effects of the magnetic pressure on the effective geometries.

  11. Star Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  12. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  13. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  14. Longer rest periods for intensive rotational grazing limit diet quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Longer rest periods for intensive rotational grazing limit diet quality of sheep without enhancing environmental benefits. ... This experiment was established to compare three intensive rotational grazing strategies (fast rotation [FR], average 57-day rest; slow rotation [SR], average 114-day rest; and flexible grazing [FX], based ...

  15. Antisolar differential rotation with surface lithium enrichment on the single K-giant V1192 Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kővári, Zs.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T. A.; Oláh, K.; Kriskovics, L.; Kővári, E.; Kovács, O.; Vida, K.; Granzer, T.; Weber, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Stars with about 1-2 solar masses at the red giant branch (RGB) represent an intriguing period of stellar evolution, I.e. when the convective envelope interacts with the fast-rotating core. During these mixing episodes freshly synthesized lithium can come up to the stellar surface along with high angular momentum material. This high angular momentum may alter the surface rotation pattern. Aims: The single rapidly rotating K-giant V1192 Ori is revisited to determine its surface differential rotation, lithium abundance, and basic stellar properties such as a precise rotation period. The aim is to independently verify the antisolar differential rotation of the star and possibly find a connection to the surface lithium abundance. Methods: We applied time-series Doppler imaging to a new multi-epoch data set. Altogether we reconstructed 11 Doppler images from spectroscopic data collected with the STELLA robotic telescope between 2007-2016. We used our inversion code iMap to reconstruct all stellar surface maps. We extracted the differential rotation from these images by tracing systematic spot migration as a function of stellar latitude from consecutive image cross-correlations. Results: The position of V1192 Ori in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram suggests that the star is in the helium core-burning phase just leaving the RGB bump. We measure A(Li)NLTE = 1.27, I.e. a value close to the anticipated transition value of 1.5 from Li-normal to Li-rich giants. Doppler images reveal extended dark areas arranged quasi-evenly along an equatorial belt. No cool polar spot is found during the investigated epoch. Spot displacements clearly suggest antisolar surface differential rotation with α = - 0.11 ± 0.02 shear coefficient. Conclusions: The surface Li enrichment and the peculiar surface rotation pattern may indicate a common origin. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic observatory in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.

  16. On mechanisms separating stars into normal and chemically peculiar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    The paper argues in favor of the assumption that magnetic and non-magnetic protostars, from which CP stars were formed, are the objects that had rotation velocities of the parent cloud V smaller than a critical value V c . At V greater than the critical value, differential rotation emerges in the collapsing protostellar cloud, which twists magnetic lines of force into an' invisible' toroidal shape and disturbs the stability of the atmosphere. In magnetic protostars, the loss of angular momentum is due to magnetic braking, while in metallic protostars, the loss of rotation momentum occurs due to tidal interactions with a close component. HgMn stars are most likely not affected by some braking mechanism, but originated from the slowest protostellar rotators. The boundary of V c where the differential rotation occurs is not sharp. The slower the protostar rotates, the greater the probability of suppressing the differential rotation and the more likely the possibility of CP star birth.

  17. An extreme magneto-ionic environment associated with the fast radio burst source FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michilli, D.; Seymour, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Spitler, L. G.; Gajjar, V.; Archibald, A. M.; Bower, G. C.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Heald, G. H.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Sobey, C.; Adams, E. A. K.; Bassa, C. G.; Bogdanov, S.; Brinkman, C.; Demorest, P.; Fernandez, F.; Hellbourg, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lynch, R. S.; Maddox, N.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemion, A. P. V.; Tendulkar, S. P.; van Rooy, P.; Wharton, R. S.; Whitlow, D.

    2018-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration, extragalactic radio flashes of unknown physical origin. The only known repeating fast radio burst source—FRB 121102—has been localized to a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at redshift 0.193 and is spatially coincident with a compact, persistent radio source. The origin of the bursts, the nature of the persistent source and the properties of the local environment are still unclear. Here we report observations of FRB 121102 that show almost 100 per cent linearly polarized emission at a very high and variable Faraday rotation measure in the source frame (varying from +1.46 × 105 radians per square metre to +1.33 × 105 radians per square metre at epochs separated by seven months) and narrow (below 30 microseconds) temporal structure. The large and variable rotation measure demonstrates that FRB 121102 is in an extreme and dynamic magneto-ionic environment, and the short durations of the bursts suggest a neutron star origin. Such large rotation measures have hitherto been observed only in the vicinities of massive black holes (larger than about 10,000 solar masses). Indeed, the properties of the persistent radio source are compatible with those of a low-luminosity, accreting massive black hole. The bursts may therefore come from a neutron star in such an environment or could be explained by other models, such as a highly magnetized wind nebula or supernova remnant surrounding a young neutron star.

  18. Rapid Rotation of a Heavy White Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    New Kepler observations of a pulsating white dwarf have revealed clues about the rotation of intermediate-mass stars.Learning About ProgenitorsStars weighing in at under 8 solar masses generally end their lives as slowly cooling white dwarfs. By studying the rotation of white dwarfs, therefore, we are able to learn about the final stages of angular momentum evolution in these progenitor stars.Most isolated field white dwarfs cluster in mass around 0.62 solar masses, which corresponds to a progenitor mass of around 2.2 solar masses. This abundance means that weve already learned a good deal about the final rotation of low-mass (13 solar-mass) stars. Our knowledge about the angular momentum of intermediate-mass (38 solar-mass) stars, on the other hand, remains fairly limited.Fourier transform of the pulsations from SDSSJ0837+1856. The six frequencies of stellar variability, marked with red dots, reveal a rotation period of 1.13 hours. [Hermes et al. 2017]Record-Breaking FindA newly discovered white dwarf, SDSSJ0837+1856, is now helping to shed light on this mass range. SDSSJ0837+1856 appears to be unusually massive: its measured at 0.87 solar masses, which corresponds to a progenitor mass of roughly 4.0 solar masses. Determining the rotation of this white dwarf would therefore tell us about the final stages of angular momentum in an intermediate-mass star.In a new study led by J.J. Hermes (Hubble Fellow at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), a team of scientists presents a series of measurements of SDSSJ0837+1856 that suggest its the highest-mass and fastest-rotating isolated pulsating white dwarf known.Histogram of rotation rates determined from the asteroseismology of pulsating white dwarfs (marked in red). SDSSJ0837+1856 (indicated in black) is more massive and rotates faster than any other known pulsating white dwarf. [Hermes et al. 2017]Rotation from PulsationsWhy pulsating? In the absence of measurable spots and other surface features, the way we

  19. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  20. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  1. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  2. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  3. What Happens to Am Stars After They Leave the Main Sequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2017-04-01

    The Am, or “Metallic-line,” stars have too strong line strengths of the iron peak elements for their temperatures and too weak He, Ca, etc. Michaud showed that the A4-F2 V stars, which occur in the same area of the main sequence as the Am stars, have radiative zones below their photospheres where diffusion acts to push metals upward into the photospheres by radiation pressure and lets Ca, etc. sink downward, but only if the stars are slow rotators. Slow rotation can be caused by the formation of disks or by tidal interactions in binaries. The Am stars are rich in binaries with P 100 days; the rapidly rotation A4-F2 V stars have no such binaries. The special peculiarities do not occur in stars above the luminosity class V stars, except among the ρ Puppis stars, so the radiative zones must disappear and the atmospheres become well mixed with the interiors. The suggestion that the ρ Puppis stars are the descendents of the Am stars fails because there are too few ρ Puppis stars by a factor of about 100. Then by searching for binaries among evolved stars I conclude that the Am stars plus A4-F2 V normal stars evolve into A7-F9 IV stars and then into F2-F9 (or later) III stars with normal abundances.

  4. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  5. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  6. Photometric and Spectroscopic studies of Ap star Cyg V1584

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Z Jassur

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available   UBV photometric observations of Ap star Cyg V1584 have been presented. To find the rotational period of the star, a sinusoidal wave function has been fitted to the noramal points of UBV filters. Assuming that a circular hot spot located at the magnetic pole of the star is responsible for the observed light variations, both physical an geometrical parameters of the spot have been determined. Finally, the angle between the magnetic and the rotational axis has been calculated from combining the spectroscopic and photometric data and the magnetic structure of the star has been discussed.

  7. Gravity darkening in late-type stars. I. The Coriolis effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, R.; Rieutord, M.; Petitdemange, L.; Gastine, T.; Putigny, B.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Recent interferometric data have been used to constrain the brightness distribution at the surface of nearby stars, in particular the so-called gravity darkening that makes fast rotating stars brighter at their poles than at their equator. However, good models of gravity darkening are missing for stars that posses a convective envelope. Aim. In order to better understand how rotation affects the heat transfer in stellar convective envelopes, we focus on the heat flux distribution in latitude at the outer surface of numerical models. Methods: We carry out a systematic parameter study of three-dimensional, direct numerical simulations of anelastic convection in rotating spherical shells. As a first step, we neglect the centrifugal acceleration and retain only the Coriolis force. The fluid instability is driven by a fixed entropy drop between the inner and outer boundaries where stress-free boundary conditions are applied for the velocity field. Restricting our investigations to hydrodynamical models with a thermal Prandtl number fixed to unity, we consider both thick and thin (solar-like) shells, and vary the stratification over three orders of magnitude. We measure the heat transfer efficiency in terms of the Nusselt number, defined as the output luminosity normalised by the conductive state luminosity. Results: We report diverse Nusselt number profiles in latitude, ranging from brighter (usually at the onset of convection) to darker equator and uniform profiles. We find that the variations of the surface brightness are mainly controlled by the surface value of the local Rossby number: when the Coriolis force dominates the dynamics, the heat flux is weakened in the equatorial region by the zonal wind and enhanced at the poles by convective motions inside the tangent cylinder. In the presence of a strong background density stratification however, as expected in real stars, the increase of the local Rossby number in the outer layers leads to uniformisation of

  8. Theory and evidence of global Rossby waves in upper main-sequence stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kurtz, Donald W.; Murphy, Simon J.

    2018-01-01

    of upper main-sequence B, A, and F stars, we find that r modes are present in many gamma Dor stars (as first discovered by Van Reeth et al.), spotted stars, and so-called heartbeat stars, which are highly eccentric binary stars. We also find a signature of r modes in a frequently bursting Be star observed...... by Kepler. In the amplitude spectra of moderately to rapidly rotating gamma Dor stars, r-mode frequency groups appear at lower frequency than prograde g-mode frequency groups, while in the amplitude spectra of spotted early A to B stars, groups of symmetric (with respect to the equator) r-mode frequencies...

  9. Boundary layer control of rotating convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Stellmach, Stephan; Noir, Jerome; Hansen, Ulrich; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2009-01-15

    Turbulent rotating convection controls many observed features of stars and planets, such as magnetic fields, atmospheric jets and emitted heat flux patterns. It has long been argued that the influence of rotation on turbulent convection dynamics is governed by the ratio of the relevant global-scale forces: the Coriolis force and the buoyancy force. Here, however, we present results from laboratory and numerical experiments which exhibit transitions between rotationally dominated and non-rotating behaviour that are not determined by this global force balance. Instead, the transition is controlled by the relative thicknesses of the thermal (non-rotating) and Ekman (rotating) boundary layers. We formulate a predictive description of the transition between the two regimes on the basis of the competition between these two boundary layers. This transition scaling theory unifies the disparate results of an extensive array of previous experiments, and is broadly applicable to natural convection systems.

  10. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II. The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J.L.; Rydgren, A.E.; Vrba, F.; Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO; Computer Sciences Corp., El Segundo, CA; Naval Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a naked T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars. 49 references

  11. A Physical Model of Pulsars as Gravitational Shielding and Oscillating Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars are thought to be fast rotating neutron stars, synchronously emitting periodic Dirac-delta-shape radio-frequency pulses and Lorentzian-shape oscillating X-rays. The acceleration of charged particles along the magnetic field lines of neutron stars above the magnetic poles that deviate from the rotating axis initiates coherent beams of ra- dio emissions, which are viewed as pulses of radiation whenever the magnetic poles sweep the viewers. However, the conventional lighthouse model of pulsars is only con- ceptual. The mechanism through which particles are accelerated to produce coherent beams is still not fully understood. The process for periodically oscillating X-rays to emit from hot spots at the inner edge of accretion disks remains a mystery. In addition, a lack of reflecting X-rays of the pulsar by the Crab Nebula in the OFF phase does not support the lighthouse model as expected. In this study, we develop a physical model of pulsars to quantitatively interpret the emission characteristics of pulsars, in accor- dance with the author’s well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein gravitational shielding theory and the physics of thermal and accelerating charged par- ticle radiation. The results obtained from this study indicate that, with the significant gravitational shielding by scalar field, a neutron star nonlinearly oscillates and produces synchronous periodically Dirac-delta-shape radio-frequency pulses (emitted by the os- cillating or accelerating charged particles as well as periodically Lorentzian-shape os- cillating X-rays (as the thermal radiation of neutron stars whose temperature varies due to the oscillation. This physical model of pulsars broadens our understanding of neu- tron stars and develops an innovative mechanism to model the emissions of pulsars.

  12. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, V M [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2008-03-07

    Pulsar astrophysics has come a long way in the 40 years since the discovery of the first pulsar by Bell and Hewish. From humble beginnings as bits of 'scruff' on the Cambridge University group's chart recorder paper, the field of pulsars has blossomed into a major area of mainstream astrophysics, with an unparalleled diversity of astrophysical applications. These range from Nobel-celebrated testing of general relativity in the strong-field regime to constraining the equation-of-state of ultradense matter; from probing the winds of massive stars to globular cluster evolution. Previous notable books on the subject of pulsars have tended to focus on some particular topic in the field. The classic text Pulsars by Manchester and Taylor (1977 San Francisco, CA: Freeman) targeted almost exclusively rotation-powered radio pulsars, while the Meszaros book High-Energy Radiation from Magnetized Neutron Stars (1992 Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) considered both rotation- and accretion-powered neutron stars, but focused on their radiation at x-ray energies and above. The recent book Neutron Stars 1 by Haensel et al (2007 Berlin: Springer) considers only the equation of state and neutron-star structure. Into this context appears Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars, by Pranab Ghosh. In contrast to other books, here the author takes an encyclopedic approach and attempts to synthesize practically all of the major aspects of the two main types of neutron star. This is ambitious. The only comparable undertaking is the useful but more elementary Lyne and Graham-Smith text Pulsar Astronomy (1998 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), or Compact Stellar X-ray Sources (eds Lewin and van der Klis, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), an anthology of technical review articles that also includes black hole topics. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars thus fills a clear void in the field, providing a readable, graduate-level book that covers nearly

  13. Spectroscopy of λ Bootis stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiter, U.

    2000-05-01

    λ Bootis stars are defined as metal-poor Population I A- to F-type stars, which exhibit nearly solar element abundance for C, N, O and S (e.g. Paunzen E., Weiss W.W., Heiter U. and North P., 1997, A and AS 123, 93). The classification of λ Bootis stars based on photometric indices or low resolution spectra is not sufficient for a final decision concerning a membership to this group. A detailed spectroscopic investigation is necessary to rule out stars with similar classification spectra but different abundance patterns. Therefore a program on abundance analyses of λ Bootis candidates was established, which makes use of a software package that enables the analysis of high signal-to-noise spectra with high resolution (R = 30000 to 60000). The first part of the thesis deals with the effects of using several different codes for the model atmosphere calculation on the synthetic spectra of three stars with different atmospheric parameters and degrees of underabundance. It is shown that using opacity distribution functions (ODFs) calculated for individual abundance patterns instead of pretabulated solar scaled ODFs does not change the synthetic spectra significantly. On the other hand, for the coolest star the treatment of overshooting within the calculation of the convective flux has a non-negligible influence on the derived abundance. Taking these findings into account, the results of the application of the abundance analysis tools on eleven candidate λ Bootis stars are presented in the second part of the thesis. They are based on high resolution echelle spectra obtained by the author at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Asiago, Italy). Two of these stars were found to be spectroscopic binaries during the analysis. Particular consideration is given to the estimation of the errors of the derived abundance and the problems faced when examining stars with large differences in abundance of different elements and large rotational broadening of the spectral lines

  14. CHEMICAL AND KINEMATICAL PROPERTIES OF BLUE STRAGGLER STARS AND HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS IN NGC 6397

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovisi, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Gratton, R.

    2012-01-01

    We used three sets of high-resolution spectra acquired with the multifiber facility FLAMES at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory to investigate the chemical and kinematical properties of a sample of 42 horizontal branch (HB) stars, 18 blue straggler stars (BSSs), and 86 main-sequence (MS) turnoff (TO) and sub-giant branch stars in the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397. We measured rotational velocities and Fe, O, and Mg abundances. All of the unevolved stars in our sample have low rotational velocites (vsin i –1 ), while the HB stars and BSSs show a broad distribution, with values ranging from 0 to ∼70 km s –1 . For HB stars with T 8200 K and T > 10,500 K, respectively) also show significant deviations in their iron abundance with respect to the cluster metallicity (as traced by the unevolved stars, [Fe/H] = –2.12). While similar chemical patterns have already been observed in other hot HB stars, this is the first evidence ever collected for BSSs. We interpret these abundance anomalies as due to the metal radiative levitation, occurring in stars with shallow or no convective envelopes.

  15. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casiana Muñoz-Tuñon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is rmly  established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP galaxies, we identied tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample - nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and dicult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the star formation is driven by pristine gas falling into the galaxy disk. If conrmed, we could be unveiling, for the rst time, cool  ows in action in our nearby world. The tadpole class is relatively frequent at high redshift - 10% of resolvable galaxies in the Hubble UDF but less than 1% in the local Universe. They are systems that could track cool ows and test models of galaxy formation.

  16. Aryabha~a and Axial Rotation of Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    encourage youngsters to acquire some general know ledge of astronomy and make a deeper study of A.ryabhata's work using existing literatures and their own indepen- dent judgements. Rising and Setting of Stars. Recall that, due to rotation of the Earth, the so-called fixed stars appear to execute a daily revolut.ion around.

  17. Rotational discontinuities in anisotropic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic structure of rotational discontinuities (RDs) in anisotropic plasmas with T perpendicular /T parallel > 1 is investigated by using a one-dimensional electromagnetic hybrid code. To form the RD, a new approach is used where the plasma is injected from one boundary and reflected from the other, resulting in the generation of a traveling fast shock and an RD. Unlike the previously used methods, no a priori assumptions are made regarding the initial structure (i.e. width or sense of rotation) of the rotational discontinuity. The results show that across the RD both the magnetic field strength and direction, as well as the plasma density change. Given that such a change can also be associated with an intermediate shock, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are used to confirm that the observed structures are indeed RDs. It is found that the thickness of RDs is a few ion inertial lengths and is independent of the rotation angle. Also, the preferred sense of rotation is in the electron sense; however, RDs with a rotation angle larger than 180 degree are found to be unstable, changing their rotation to a stable ion sense

  18. High resolution interferometry of cool stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of results obtained in a program of infrared high resolution spectroscopy of cool stars. The nature of infrared stellar spectra is considered along with questions regarding astrophysics and stellar infrared spectroscopy. An abundance analysis for alpha Ori (Betelgeuse) is conducted. The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is examined and attention is given to the O-16/O-18 and O-16/O-17 abundance ratios. M stars and SiO vibration-rotation bands are discussed and questions regarding the characteristics of the molecular hydrogen quadrupole vibration-rotation lines are explored.

  19. AN INTERFEROMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE MULTIPLE STAR SYSTEM HD 193322

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Farrington, Christopher D.; Schaefer, Gail H.

    2011-01-01

    The star HD 193322 is a remarkable multiple system of massive stars that lies at the heart of the cluster Collinder 419. Here we report on new spectroscopic observations and radial velocities of the narrow-lined component Ab1 which we use to determine its orbital motion around a close companion Ab2 (P = 312 days) and around a distant third star Aa (P = 35 years). We have also obtained long baseline interferometry of the target in the K' band with the CHARA Array which we use in two ways. First, we combine published speckle interferometric measurements with CHARA separated fringe packet measurements to improve the visual orbit for the wide Aa,Ab binary. Second, we use measurements of the fringe packet from Aa to calibrate the visibility of the fringes of the Ab1,Ab2 binary, and we analyze these fringe visibilities to determine the visual orbit of the close system. The two most massive stars, Aa and Ab1, have masses of approximately 21 and 23 M sun , respectively, and their spectral line broadening indicates that they represent extremes of fast and slow projected rotational velocity, respectively.

  20. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 753-756. Hybrid stars. AsHOK GOYAL. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract. Recently there have been important developments in the determination of neutron ... be composed of normal nuclear matter with hyperons and/or condensed mesons. The matter at ...

  1. Star Conquest

    OpenAIRE

    Porrino Serrano, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Star Conquest es un juego de mesa "print n play" de estrategia por turnos para dos o tres jugadores. Éste proyecto consiste en tomar el juego de mesa original y desarrollar una adaptación en forma de videojuego para distintas plataformas

  2. Hybrid stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid stars. AsHOK GOYAL. Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Abstract. Recently there have been important developments in the determination of neutron ... number and the electric charge. ... available to the system to rearrange concentration of charges for a given fraction of.

  3. Pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Catelan, M?rcio

    2014-01-01

    The most recent and comprehensive book on pulsating stars which ties the observations to our present understanding of stellar pulsation and evolution theory.  Written by experienced researchers and authors in the field, this book includes the latest observational results and is valuable reading for astronomers, graduate students, nuclear physicists and high energy physicists.

  4. Carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzopardi, M.; Lequeux, J.; Rebeirot, E.

    1985-01-01

    Several stars of this type have just been detected in galaxies where they were not suspected and where they reveal a recent activity not really corresponding to current ideas. Data given by these observations allow the astrophysicists to improve the galaxy evolution models, in particular the evolution model of our galaxy [fr

  5. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  6. The Diversity of Atomic Hydrogen in Slow Rotator Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lisa M.; Serra, Paolo; Krajnović, Davor; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2018-02-01

    We present interferometric observations of H I in nine slow rotator early-type galaxies of the ATLAS3D sample. With these data, we now have sensitive H I searches in 34 of the 36 slow rotators. The aggregate detection rate is 32% ± 8%, consistent with previous work; however, we find two detections with extremely high H I masses, whose gas kinematics are substantially different from what was previously known about H I in slow rotators. These two cases (NGC 1222 and NGC 4191) broaden the known diversity of H I properties in slow rotators. NGC 1222 is a merger remnant with prolate-like rotation and, if it is indeed prolate in shape, an equatorial gas disc; NGC 4191 has two counterrotating stellar discs and an unusually large H I disc. We comment on the implications of this disc for the formation of 2σ galaxies. In general, the H I detection rate, the incidence of relaxed H I discs, and the H I/stellar mass ratios of slow rotators are indistinguishable from those of fast rotators. These broad similarities suggest that the H I we are detecting now is unrelated to the galaxies' formation processes and was often acquired after their stars were mostly in place. We also discuss the H I nondetections; some of these galaxies that are undetected in H I or CO are detected in other tracers (e.g. FIR fine structure lines and dust). The question of whether there is cold gas in massive galaxies' scoured nuclear cores still needs work. Finally, we discuss an unusual isolated H I cloud with a surprisingly faint (undetected) optical counterpart.

  7. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-07

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms.

  8. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms. PMID:26198233

  9. Star Products and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, Mari; Yoshioka, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Star products parametrized by complex matrices are defined. Especially commutative associative star products are treated, and star exponentials with respect to these star products are considered. Jacobi's theta functions are given as infinite sums of star exponentials. As application, several concrete identities are obtained by properties of the star exponentials.

  10. Cartography of the sun and the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, Coralie

    2016-01-01

    The mapping of the surface of stars requires diverse skills, analysis techniques and advanced modeling, i.e. the collaboration of scientists in various specialties. This volume gives insights into new techniques allowing for the first time to obtain resolved images of stars. It takes stock of what has been achieved so far in Chile, on the ESO VLTI instrument or, in the States, on the CHARA instrument. In recent times interferometry, combined with adaptive optics has allowed to reconstruct images of stars. Besides the Sun (of course) by now five stars have been resolved in detail. In addition to interferometry, this book highlights techniques used for mapping the surfaces of stars using photometry made by space observatories; Zeeman- and Doppler Imaging; mapping the surface element abundances via spectroscopy. This book will also take stock of the best images of the  solar surface, made by connecting the differential rotation to the underlying physical parameters derived from helioseismology. Recent measureme...

  11. Polarized bow shocks reveal features of the winds and environments of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manisha

    2018-01-01

    Massive stars strongly affect their surroundings through their energetic stellar winds and deaths as supernovae. The bow shock structures created by fast-moving massive stars contain important information about the winds and ultimate fates of these stars as well as their local interstellar medium (ISM). Since bow shocks are aspherical, the light scattered in the dense shock material becomes polarized. Analyzing this polarization reveals details of the bow shock geometry as well as the composition, velocity, density, and albedo of the scattering material. With these quantities, we can constrain the properties of the stellar wind and thus the evolutionary state of the star, as well as the dust composition of the local ISM.In my dissertation research, I use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that I optimized to simulate the polarization signatures produced by both resolved and unresolved stellar wind bow shocks (SWBS) illuminated by a central star and by shock emission. I derive bow shock shapes and densities from published analytical calculations and smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) models. In the case of the analytical SWBS and electron scattering, I find that higher optical depths produce higher polarization and position angle rotations at specific viewing angles compared to theoretical predictions for low optical depths. This is due to the geometrical properties of the bow shock combined with multiple scattering effects. For dust scattering, the polarization signature is strongly affected by wavelength, dust grain properties, and viewing angle. The behavior of the polarization as a function of wavelength in these cases can distinguish among different dust models for the local ISM. In the case of SPH density structures, I investigate how the polarization changes as a function of the evolutionary phase of the SWBS. My dissertation compares these simulations with polarization data from Betelgeuse and other massive stars with bow shocks. I discuss the

  12. ROTATION PERIODS OF YOUNG BROWN DWARFS: K2 SURVEY IN UPPER SCORPIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, Alexander [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Kostov, Veselin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Jayawardhana, Ray [Faculty of Science, York University, 355 Lumbers Building, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P2 (Canada); Mužić, Koraljka, E-mail: as110@st-andrews.ac.uk [Nucleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-08-20

    We report rotational periods for 16 young brown dwarfs in the nearby Upper Scorpius association, based on 72 days of high-cadence, high-precision photometry from the Keplerspace telescope’s K2 mission. The periods range from a few hours to two days (plus one outlier at five days), with a median just above one day, confirming that brown dwarfs, except at the very youngest ages, are fast rotators. Interestingly, four of the slowest rotators in our sample exhibit mid-infrared excess emission from disks; at least two also show signs of disk eclipses and accretion in the light curves. Comparing these new periods with those for two other young clusters and simple angular momentum evolution tracks, we find little or no rotational braking in brown dwarfs between 1–10 Myr, in contrast to low-mass stars. Our findings show that disk braking, while still at work, is inefficient in the substellar regime, thus providing an important constraint on the mass dependence of the braking mechanism.

  13. THE CHANDRA VARIABLE GUIDE STAR CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Lauer, Jennifer L.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Henden, Arne A.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Martin, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Variable stars have been identified among the optical-wavelength light curves of guide stars used for pointing control of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We present a catalog of these variable stars along with their light curves and ancillary data. Variability was detected to a lower limit of 0.02 mag amplitude in the 4000-10000 A range using the photometrically stable Aspect Camera on board the Chandra spacecraft. The Chandra Variable Guide Star Catalog (VGUIDE) contains 827 stars, of which 586 are classified as definitely variable and 241 are identified as possibly variable. Of the 586 definite variable stars, we believe 319 are new variable star identifications. Types of variables in the catalog include eclipsing binaries, pulsating stars, and rotating stars. The variability was detected during the course of normal verification of each Chandra pointing and results from analysis of over 75,000 guide star light curves from the Chandra mission. The VGUIDE catalog represents data from only about 9 years of the Chandra mission. Future releases of VGUIDE will include newly identified variable guide stars as the mission proceeds. An important advantage of the use of space data to identify and analyze variable stars is the relatively long observations that are available. The Chandra orbit allows for observations up to 2 days in length. Also, guide stars were often used multiple times for Chandra observations, so many of the stars in the VGUIDE catalog have multiple light curves available from various times in the mission. The catalog is presented as both online data associated with this paper and as a public Web interface. Light curves with data at the instrumental time resolution of about 2 s, overplotted with the data binned at 1 ks, can be viewed on the public Web interface and downloaded for further analysis. VGUIDE is a unique project using data collected during the mission that would otherwise be ignored. The stars available for use as Chandra guide stars are

  14. The heterogeneity of surfaces of magnetic Ap stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, M.

    1977-01-01

    The observations of spectrum-variability and light-variability of Ap stars are reviewed. It is shown that these variations are interpretable as due to the changing aspect of the spotted surface as the star rotates. It is stressed that the geometry of the phenomenon is understood fairly well but the physics is very far from being understood. (Auth.)

  15. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  16. Strangeon Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiguang; Xu, Renxin

    Stable micro-nucleus is 2-flavored (u and d), whereas stable macro-nucleus could be 3-flavored (u, d, and s) if the light flavor symmetry restores there. Nucleons are the constituent of a nucleus, while strangeons are named as the constituent of 3-flavored baryonic matter. Gravity-compressed baryonic object created after core-collapse supernova could be strangeon star if the energy scale (˜0.5 GeV) cannot be high enough for quark deconfinement and if there occurs 3-flavor symmetry restoration. Strangeon stars are explained here, including their formation and manifestation/identification. Much work, coupled with effective micro-model of strangeon matter, is needed to take advantage of the unique opportunities advanced facilities will provide.

  17. Thermohaline mixing in evolved low-mass stars

    OpenAIRE

    Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.

    2010-01-01

    Thermohaline mixing has recently been proposed to occur in low-mass red giants, with large consequence for the chemical yields of low-mass stars. We investigate the role of thermohaline mixing during the evolution of stars between 1Msun and 3Msun, in comparison to other mixing processes acting in these stars. We use a stellar evolution code which includes rotational mixing, internal magnetic fields and thermohaline mixing. We confirm that during the red giant stage, thermohaline mixing has th...

  18. How rotation affects masses and ages of classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard I.; Ekström, Sylvia; Georgy, Cyril; Meynet, Georges; Saio, Hideyuki

    2017-09-01

    Classical Cepheid variable stars are both sensitive astrophysical laboratories and accurate cosmic distance tracers. We have recently investigated how the evolutionary effects of rotation impact the properties of these important stars and here provide an accessible overview of some key elements as well as two important consequences. Firstly, rotation resolves the long-standing Cepheid mass discrepancy problem. Second, rotation increases main sequence lifetimes, i.e, Cepheids are approximately twice as old as previously thought. Finally, we highlight the importance of the short-period ends of Cepheid period distributions as indicators for model adequacy.

  19. Rotational scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.; Amplatz, K.

    1981-01-01

    With rotational scanography contrast and resolution of X-ray images are improved. The technique bases on the principle of a narrow X-ray passing along an object, thus exposing the whole film. The X-ray is limited by a primary shield next to the X-ray tube. A second shield between object and film prevents that scattered rays spoil the film. The X-ray tube is turned around a horizontal axis, whilst the shield is shifted so that the irradiation intensity remains constant and the smallest projected focal size is obtained. This technique permits to enlarge the X-ray images by 3 or 6 times its size. Thus, films up to a length of 96 cm can be exposed. Main advantages of rotary scanography are reduced exposure to radiation of patient and applicant, improved contrast and resolution of the X-ray image, and a larger play of exposure for the X-ray technique. Disadvantages are a longer exposure time and the consequently increased demands on X-ray generator and treatment head. When a multi-slit shield is used, the patient must be cooperative in order to prevent movement artifacts. This imaging technique is highly sensitive to artifacts, particularly if the tube voltage provides large fluctuations. Supplementary units are necessary. The significance of the rotational scanography is that it permits the reduction of the radiation dose, whilst contrast and resolution of the images are improved. This can be illustrated by X-ray images of a CT-phantom and of pelvic, hand and gastrointenstinal phantoms. (orig./MG) [de

  20. THE CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER B-STAR VARIABLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McKeever, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The light curves of 252 B-star candidates in the Kepler database are analyzed in a similar fashion to that done by Balona et al. to further characterize B-star variability, increase the sample of variable B stars for future study, and to identify stars whose power spectra include particularly interesting features such as frequency groupings. Stars are classified as either constant light emitters, β Cep stars, slowly pulsating B stars (SPBs), hybrid pulsators, binaries or stars whose light curves are dominated by rotation (Bin/Rot), hot subdwarfs, or white dwarfs. One-hundred stars in our sample were found to be either light constants or to be variable at a level of less than 0.02 mmag. We increase the number of candidate B-star variables found in the Kepler database by Balona et al. in the following fashion: β Cep stars from 0 to 10, SPBs from eight to 54, hybrid pulsators from seven to 21, and Bin/Rot stars from 23 to 82. For comparison purposes, approximately 51 SPBs and six hybrids had been known prior to 2007. The number of β Cep stars known prior to 2004 was 93. A secondary result of this study is the identification of an additional 11 pulsating white dwarf candidates, four of which possess frequency groupings.

  1. Modeling Gyrosynchrotron Coronae of Radio-Loud Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast gyrosynchrotron codes are used to model the emission in close, active binary star systems. Multiple magnetic field topologies, plasma densities, and scale heights for the emitting plasma are tested for in an attempt to duplicate the emission characteristics detected using high-resolution VLBI imaging of the close active binaries UX Arietis and Algol. Also included are effects of occlusion by the companion star. It is found that a co-orbiting coronal loop oriented toward the companion star with its feet anchored on the poles of the active star is consistent with the observed emission from these two radio-loud stars.

  2. Accretion funnels onto weakly magnetized young stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessolaz, N.; Zanni, C.; Ferreira, J.; Keppens, R.; Bouvier, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We re-examine the conditions required to steadily deviate an accretion flow from a circumstellar disc into a magnetospheric funnel flow onto a slow rotating young forming star. Methods. New analytical constraints on the formation of accretion funnels flows due to the presence of a dipolar

  3. On the angular momentum in star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horedt, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the rotation of interstellar clouds which are in a stage immediately before star formation. Cloud collisions seem to be the principal cause of the observed rotation of interstellar clouds. The rotational motion of the clouds is strongly influenced by turbulence. Theories dealing with the resolution of the angular momentum problem in star formation are classified into five major groups. The old idea that the angular momentum of an interstellar cloud passes during star formation into the angular momentum of double star systems and/or circumstellar clouds, is developed. It is suggested that a rotating gas cloud contracts into a ring-like structure which fragments into self-gravitating subcondensations. By collisions and gas accretion these subcondensations accrete into binary systems surrounded by circumstellar clouds. Using some rough approximations the authors find analytical expressions for the semi-major axis of the binary system and for the density of the circumstellar clouds as a function of the initial density and of the initial angular velocity of an interstellar cloud. The obtained values are well within the observational limits. (Auth.)

  4. The rotation of spiral galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, V C

    1983-06-24

    There is accumulating evidence that as much as 90 percent of the mass of the universe is nonluminous and is clumped, halo-like, around individual galaxies. The gravitational force of this dark matter is presumed to be responsible for the high rotational velocities of stars and gas in the disks of spiral galaxie. At present, the form of the dark matter is unknown. Possible candidates span a range in mass of 10(70), from non-zero-mass neutrinos to massive black holes.

  5. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. III. Effect of the initial helium spread on the position of stars in a synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Globular clusters host multiple populations of long-lived low-mass stars whose origin remains an open question. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the associated photometric and spectroscopic peculiarities. They differ, for instance, in the maximum helium enrichment they predict for stars of the second population, which these stars can inherit at birth as the result of the internal pollution of the cluster by different types of stars of the first population. Aims: We present the distribution of helium-rich stars in present-day globular clusters as it is expected in the original framework of the fast-rotating massive stars scenario (FRMS) as first-population polluters. We focus on NGC 6752. Methods: We completed a grid of 330 stellar evolution models for globular cluster low-mass stars computed with different initial chemical compositions corresponding to the predictions of the original FRMS scenario for [Fe/H] = -1.75. Starting from the initial helium-sodium relation that allows reproducing the currently observed distribution of sodium in NGC 6752, we deduce the helium distribution expected in that cluster at ages equal to 9 and 13 Gyr. We distinguish the stars that are moderately enriched in helium from those that are very helium-rich (initial helium mass fraction below and above 0.4, respectively), and compare the predictions of the FRMS framework with other scenarios for globular cluster enrichment. Results: The effect of helium enrichment on the stellar lifetime and evolution reduces the total number of very helium-rich stars that remain in the cluster at 9 and 13 Gyr to only 12% and 10%, respectively, from an initial fraction of 21%. Within this age range, most of the stars still burn their hydrogen in their core, which widens the MS band significantly in effective temperature. The fraction of very helium-rich stars drops in the more advanced evolution phases, where the associated spread in effective temperature strongly decreases. These

  6. Unsupervised classification of variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Lucas; Pichara, Karim

    2018-03-01

    During the past 10 years, a considerable amount of effort has been made to develop algorithms for automatic classification of variable stars. That has been primarily achieved by applying machine learning methods to photometric data sets where objects are represented as light curves. Classifiers require training sets to learn the underlying patterns that allow the separation among classes. Unfortunately, building training sets is an expensive process that demands a lot of human efforts. Every time data come from new surveys; the only available training instances are the ones that have a cross-match with previously labelled objects, consequently generating insufficient training sets compared with the large amounts of unlabelled sources. In this work, we present an algorithm that performs unsupervised classification of variable stars, relying only on the similarity among light curves. We tackle the unsupervised classification problem by proposing an untraditional approach. Instead of trying to match classes of stars with clusters found by a clustering algorithm, we propose a query-based method where astronomers can find groups of variable stars ranked by similarity. We also develop a fast similarity function specific for light curves, based on a novel data structure that allows scaling the search over the entire data set of unlabelled objects. Experiments show that our unsupervised model achieves high accuracy in the classification of different types of variable stars and that the proposed algorithm scales up to massive amounts of light curves.

  7. Cooling of hypernuclear compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raduta, Adriana R.; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2018-04-01

    We study the thermal evolution of hypernuclear compact stars constructed from covariant density functional theory of hypernuclear matter and parametrizations which produce sequences of stars containing two-solar-mass objects. For the input in the simulations, we solve the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap equations in the hyperonic sector and obtain the gaps in the spectra of Λ, Ξ0, and Ξ- hyperons. For the models with masses M/M⊙ ≥ 1.5 the neutrino cooling is dominated by hyperonic direct Urca processes in general. In the low-mass stars the (Λp) plus leptons channel is the dominant direct Urca process, whereas for more massive stars the purely hyperonic channels (Σ-Λ) and (Ξ-Λ) are dominant. Hyperonic pairing strongly suppresses the processes on Ξ-s and to a lesser degree on Λs. We find that intermediate-mass 1.5 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 1.8 models have surface temperatures which lie within the range inferred from thermally emitting neutron stars, if the hyperonic pairing is taken into account. Most massive models with M/M⊙ ≃ 2 may cool very fast via the direct Urca process through the (Λp) channel because they develop inner cores where the S-wave pairing of Λs and proton is absent.

  8. Observations and models of centrifugally supported magnetospheres in massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksala, Mary Elizabeth

    Magnetic massive stars, via their strong magnetic fields and radiation-driven winds, strongly influence the dynamical and chemical evolution of their surroundings. The interaction between these two intrinsic stellar properties can produce dynamic circumstellar structures, and, in the case of rapidly rotating stars, centrifugally supported magnetospheres. This thesis uses new observations to confront current magnetosphere models, testing their predictive power using photometry and spectropolarimetry of the prototypical magnetic B2Vp star sigma Ori E. In addition, we present the discovery of a magnetic field in a second rapidly rotating massive star. At the time of its discovery, this star was the most rapidly rotating non-degenerate magnetic star. We begin with an overview of magnetism in massive stars and wind-field interactions (Chapter 2) and the observational techniques involved in their study (Chapter 3), and summarize historical studies of sigma Ori E (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 describes the detection of rotational braking in sigma Ori E. We find a 77 ms yr-1 lengthening of the rotational period, corresponding to a spindown time of 1.34+0.10 -0.09 Myr. This observed period change agrees well with theoretical predictions for angular momentum loss in a magnetically channeled, line-driven wind. Next we present new spectropolarimetric observations of sigma Ori E (Chapter 6). The observed Halpha variability matches the predictions from a rigidly rotating magnetosphere (RRM) model with an offset dipole magnetic field configuration. However, our new, precise longitudinal magnetic field measurements reveal significant discrepancies with respect to the RRM model, challenging the current form as applied to sigma Ori E and suggesting that the field configuration of this star is more complex than a simple dipole. Chapter 7 describes the first detection of a magnetic field in the B2Vn star HR 7355. From analyzing photometric data, we find a 0.5214404(6) d rotational period

  9. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    to achieve a reasonable photometric accuracy. However, the eclipse only lasts a few minutes and it would only be possible to exposure and read-out a few, normal exposures from the CCD camera, not enough to fully characterize the light curve at minimum. Reinhold Häfner decided to use another method. By having the telescope perform a controlled change of position on the sky ("drift") during the exposure, the light from NN Ser before, during and after the eclipse will not be registered on the same spot of the camera detector, but rather along a line. He carefully chose a direction in which this line would not cross those of other stars in the neighbourhood of NN Ser . This was ensured by rotating FORS1 to a predetermined position angle. The drift rate was fixed as one pixel (0.20 arcsec) per 3 seconds of time, a compromise between the necessary integration time and desired time resolution that would give the best chance to document the exact shape of the light-curve . In theory, this would then allow the measurement of the intensity along the recorded trail of NN Ser and hence its brightness at any given time during the eclipse. But how deep would the eclipse be? Would the resulting exposure on each pixel at minimum light be long enough to register a measurable signal? Seeing the light from the cool star! ESO PR Photo 30b/99 ESO PR Photo 30b/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 464 pix - 156k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 927 pix - 584k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2292 x 2662 pix - 4.1M] ESO PR Photo 30c/99 ESO PR Photo 30c/99 [Preview - JPEG: 472 x 400 pix - 48k] [Normal - JPEG: 943 x 800 pix - 96k] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30b/99 : 18.5-min "drift" exposure with VLT ANTU and FORS1 of the sky field around the variable stellar system NN Ser (indicated with an arrow). The telescope moved 1 pixel (0.20 arcsec) every 3 seconds so that the images of the stars in the field are trailed from left to right. After some minutes, the very deep eclipse of NN Ser begins when the brightness drops dramatically

  10. Another Possibility for Boyajian's Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    2017]Foukal recognized that this phenomenon may also provide an explanation for Boyajians star. He modeled how this might occur for Boyajians star, demonstrating that if its flux is somehow blocked from reaching the surface and stored in a shallow convective zone, this can account for the 20% dips seen in the stars light curve.In addition, these sporadic flux-blocking events would cause Boyajians star to constantly be relaxing from the post-blockage enhanced luminosity. This decay which occurs at rates of 0.11% brightness per year for convective-zone depths of tens of thousands of kilometers would nicely account for the long-term, gradual dimming observed.Whats blocking the flux? Foukal postulates a few options, including magnetic activity (as with the Sun), differential rotation, sporadic changes in photospheric abundances, and simply random variation in convective efficiency.Strangely UniqueBoyajians stars flux in May and June shows some brand new dips. Note that the team now names them! [Tabetha Boyajian and team]So why have we only found one star with light curves like Boyajians? If these are inherently natural processes in the star, we would expect to have seen more than one such object. This may be selection effect Boyajians star lies at the hot end of the range of stars that Kepler observes or it may be that the star is reaching the end of its convective lifetime.Until we discover more cases, the best we can hope for is more data from Boyajians star itself. Conveniently, it has continued to keep us on our toes, with new dips in May and June. Perhaps our continued observations will finally reveal the answer to this mystery.CitationPeter Foukal 2017 ApJL 842 L3. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa740f

  11. Discriminating strange star mergers from neutron star mergers by gravitational-wave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauswein, A.; Oechslin, R.; Janka, H.-T.

    2010-01-01

    We perform three-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of the coalescence of strange stars and explore the possibility to decide on the strange matter hypothesis by means of gravitational-wave measurements. Self-binding of strange quark matter and the generally more compact stars yield features that clearly distinguish strange star from neutron star mergers, e.g. hampering tidal disruption during the plunge of quark stars. Furthermore, instead of forming dilute halo structures around the remnant as in the case of neutron star mergers, the coalescence of strange stars results in a differentially rotating hypermassive object with a sharp surface layer surrounded by a geometrically thin, clumpy high-density strange quark matter disk. We also investigate the importance of including nonzero temperature equations of state in neutron star and strange star merger simulations. In both cases we find a crucial sensitivity of the dynamics and outcome of the coalescence to thermal effects, e.g. the outer remnant structure and the delay time of the dense remnant core to black hole collapse depend on the inclusion of nonzero temperature effects. For comparing and classifying the gravitational-wave signals, we use a number of characteristic quantities like the maximum frequency during inspiral or the dominant frequency of oscillations of the postmerger remnant. In general, these frequencies are higher for strange star mergers. Only for particular choices of the equation of state the frequencies of neutron star and strange star mergers are similar. In such cases additional features of the gravitational-wave luminosity spectrum like the ratio of energy emitted during the inspiral phase to the energy radiated away in the postmerger stage may help to discriminate coalescence events of the different types. If such characteristic quantities could be extracted from gravitational-wave signals, for instance with the upcoming gravitational-wave detectors, a decision on the

  12. Period Changes and Evolution in Pulsating Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, H. R.; Percy, J. R.; Smith, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    We review ways in which observations of the changing periods of pulsating variable stars can be used to detect and directly measure their evolution. We briefly describe the two main techniques of analysis-(O-C) analysis and wavelet analysis - and results for pulsating variable star types which are reasonably periodic: type I and II Cepheids, RR Lyrae stars, beta Cephei stars, and Mira stars. We comment briefly on delta Scuti stars and pulsating white dwarfs. For some of these variable star types, observations agree approximately with the predictions of evolutionary models, but there still exist significant areas of disagreement that challenge future models of stellar evolution. There may be a need, for instance, to include processes such as rotation, mass loss, and magnetic fields. There may also be non-evolutionary processes which are contributing to the period changes.

  13. Rotary fast tool servo system and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesanti, Richard C [Cambridge, MA; Trumper, David L [Plaistow, NH; Kirtley, Jr., James L. (Brookline, MA)

    2009-08-18

    A high bandwidth rotary fast tool servo provides tool motion in a direction nominally parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. Three or more flexure blades having all ends fixed are used to form an axis of rotation for a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from the axis of rotation. An actuator rotates a swing arm assembly such that a cutting tool is moved in and away from the lathe-mounted, rotating workpiece in a rapid and controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. One or more position sensors provides rotation and position information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in-feed slide of a precision lathe.

  14. Rotary fast tool servo system and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesanti, Richard C. (Cambridge, MA); Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH)

    2007-10-02

    A high bandwidth rotary fast tool servo provides tool motion in a direction nominally parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. Three or more flexure blades having all ends fixed are used to form an axis of rotation for a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from the axis of rotation. An actuator rotates a swing arm assembly such that a cutting tool is moved in and away from the lathe-mounted, rotating workpiece in a rapid and controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. A pair of position sensors provides rotation and position information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in-feed slide of a precision lathe.

  15. Anomalous effects of dense matter under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Nishimura, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2018-02-01

    We study the anomaly induced effects of dense baryonic matter under rotation. We derive the anomalous terms that account for the chiral vortical effect in the low-energy effective theory for light Nambu-Goldstone modes. The anomalous terms lead to new physical consequences, such as the anomalous Hall energy current and spontaneous generation of angular momentum in a magnetic field (or spontaneous magnetization by rotation). In particular, we show that, due to the presence of such anomalous terms, the ground state of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under sufficiently fast rotation becomes the "chiral soliton lattice" of neutral pions that has lower energy than the QCD vacuum and nuclear matter. We briefly discuss the possible realization of the chiral soliton lattice induced by a fast rotation in noncentral heavy ion collisions.

  16. The evolution of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loore, C. de

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of stars with masses between 15 M 0 and 100 M 0 is considered. Stars in this mass range lose a considerable fraction of their matter during their evolution. The treatment of convection, semi-convection and the influence of mass loss by stellar winds at different evolutionary phases are analysed as well as the adopted opacities. Evolutionary sequences computed by various groups are examined and compared with observations, and the advanced evolution of a 15 M 0 and a 25 M 0 star from zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) through iron collapse is discussed. The effect of centrifugal forces on stellar wind mass loss and the influence of rotation on evolutionary models is examined. As a consequence of the outflow of matter deeper layers show up and when the mass loss rates are large enough layers with changed composition, due to interior nuclear reactions, appear on the surface. The evolution of massive close binaries as well during the phase of mass loss by stellar wind as during the mass exchange and mass loss phase due to Roche lobe overflow is treated in detail, and the value of the parameters governing mass and angular momentum losses are discussed. The problem of the Wolf-Rayet stars, their origin and the possibilities of their production either as single stars or as massive binaries is examined. Finally, the origin of X-ray binaries is discussed and the scenario for the formation of these objects (starting from massive ZAMS close binaries, through Wolf-Rayet binaries leading to OB-stars with a compact companion after a supernova explosion) is reviewed and completed, including stellar wind mass loss. (orig.)

  17. B fields in OB stars (BOB): Detection of a magnetic field in the He-strong star CPD -57° 3509

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybilla, N.; Fossati, L.; Hubrig, S.; Nieva, M.-F.; Järvinen, S. P.; Castro, N.; Schöller, M.; Ilyin, I.; Butler, K.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Oskinova, L. M.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; de Koter, A.; BOB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We report the detection of a magnetic field in the helium-strong star CPD -57° 3509 (B2 IV), a member of the Galactic open cluster NGC 3293, and characterise the star's atmospheric and fundamental parameters. Methods: Spectropolarimetric observations with FORS2 and HARPSpol are analysed using two independent approaches to quantify the magnetic field strength. A high-S/N FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrum is analysed using a hybrid non-LTE model atmosphere technique. Comparison with stellar evolution models constrains the fundamental parameters of the star. Results: We obtain a firm detection of a surface averaged longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum amplitude of about 1 kG. Assuming a dipolar configuration of the magnetic field, this implies a dipolar field strength larger than 3.3 kG. Moreover, the large amplitude and fast variation (within about 1 day) of the longitudinal magnetic field implies that CPD -57° 3509 is spinning very fast despite its apparently slow projected rotational velocity. The star should be able to support a centrifugal magnetosphere, yet the spectrum shows no sign of magnetically confined material; in particular, emission in Hα is not observed. Apparently, the wind is either not strong enough for enough material to accumulate in the magnetosphere to become observable or, alternatively, some leakage process leads to loss of material from the magnetosphere. The quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the star yields an effective temperature and a logarithmic surface gravity of 23 750 ± 250 K and 4.05 ± 0.10, respectively, and a surface helium fraction of 0.28 ± 0.02 by number. The surface abundances of C, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar are compatible with the cosmic abundance standard, whereas Mg, Al, Si, and Fe are depleted by about a factor of 2. This abundance pattern can be understood as the consequence of a fractionated stellar wind. CPD -57° 3509 is one of the most evolved He-strong stars known with an independent age constraint due to its

  18. Observed Beating in Modes of Hydrodynamic Simulations of Protoplanetary Star-disk Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Attila; Hadley, Kathryn; Imamura, James

    2018-01-01

    We perform linear hydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary star-disk systems and analyze characteristic eigenmodes that depend on the geometry, velocity field, and star to disk mass ratio of the equilibrium model. Many modes arise when the equilibrium system is perturbed and typically the fastest growing mode will dominate the system early in the evolution of the model. On the thresholds between modal types such as Jeans-like modes, P modes and intermediate I modes we observe a phenomenon that resembles beating between two waves. We investigate this hypothesis using Fourier methods to decompose the time history of the perturbed amplitude of the eigenfunction into characteristic frequencies. We then show that we can reconstruct the beating waveforms by adding component waves. Our analysis shows this beating behavior can be understood as a superposition of modes across the threshold of the I- and I+ intermediate modes. I- modes are fast waves characterized by co-rotation near the inner edge of the disk, while I+ plus modes are slow waves characterized by co-rotation near the outer edge of the disk. We will present data showing correlation between the modes that arise in the numerical simulation and those constructed in our Fourier analysis. We find a correlation between the harmonics of models across the threshold and investigate the effects of the resonance between the inherent modes.

  19. Rotational equilibria by Lagrangian variational principle: towards multidimensional stellar evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Fujisawa, Kotaro; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a new formulation to obtain self-gravitating, axisymmetric configurations in permanent rotation. The formulation is based on the Lagrangian variational principle with a triangulated mesh. It treats not only barotropic but also baroclinic equations of state. We compare the various stellar equilibria obtained by our new scheme with those by Hachisu's self-consistent field scheme for the barotropic case, and those by Fujisawa's self-consistent field scheme for the baroclinic case. Included in these rotational configurations are those with shellular-type rotations, which are commonly assumed in the evolution calculation of rotating stars. Although radiation processes, convections and meridional flows have not been taken into account in this study, we have in mind the application of this method to the two-dimensional evolution calculations of rotating stars, for which the Lagrangian formulation is best suited.

  20. Impact of rotation-driven particle repopulation on the thermal evolution of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo; Schramm, Stefan; Weber, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    Driven by the loss of energy, isolated rotating neutron stars (pulsars) are gradually slowing down to lower frequencies, which increases the tremendous compression of the matter inside of them. This increase in compression changes both the global properties of rotating neutron stars as well as their hadronic core compositions. Both effects may register themselves observationally in the thermal evolution of such stars, as demonstrated in this Letter. The rotation-driven particle process which we consider here is the direct Urca (DU) process, which is known to become operative in neutron stars if the number of protons in the stellar core exceeds a critical limit of around 11% to 15%. We find that neutron stars spinning down from moderately high rotation rates of a few hundred Hertz may be creating just the right conditions where the DU process becomes operative, leading to an observable effect (enhanced cooling) in the temperature evolution of such neutron stars. As it turns out, the rotation-driven DU process could explain the unusual temperature evolution observed for the neutron star in Cas A, provided the mass of this neutron star lies in the range of 1.5 to 1.9M⊙ and its rotational frequency at birth was between 40 (400 Hz) and 70% (800 Hz) of the Kepler (mass shedding) frequency, respectively.

  1. The Kepler characterization of the variability among A- and F-type stars. I. General overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Moya, A.; Grigahcène, A.

    2011-01-01

    candidate A-F type stars, and observationally investigate the relation between γ Doradus (γ Dor), δ Scuti (δ Sct), and hybrid stars. Methods: We compile a database of physical parameters for the sample stars from the literature and new ground-based observations. We analyse the Kepler light curve of each...... main groups to describe the observed variety in pulsating A-F type stars: γ Dor, δ Sct, and hybrid stars. We assign 63% of our sample to one of the three groups, and identify the remaining part as rotationally modulated/active stars, binaries, stars of different spectral type, or stars that show...... pulsation amplitudes. The majority of hybrid stars show frequencies with all kinds of periodicities within the γ Dor and δ Sct range, also between 5 and 10 d-1, which is a challenge for the current models. We find indications for the existence of δ Sct and γ Dor stars beyond the edges of the current...

  2. Novel approach to improve the attitude update rate of a star tracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Xing, Fei; Sun, Ting; You, Zheng; Wei, Minsong

    2018-03-05

    The star tracker is widely used in attitude control systems of spacecraft for attitude measurement. The attitude update rate of a star tracker is important to guarantee the attitude control performance. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to improve the attitude update rate of a star tracker. The electronic Rolling Shutter (RS) imaging mode of the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor in the star tracker is applied to acquire star images in which the star spots are exposed with row-to-row time offsets, thereby reflecting the rotation of star tracker at different times. The attitude estimation method with a single star spot is developed to realize the multiple attitude updates by a star image, so as to reach a high update rate. The simulation and experiment are performed to verify the proposed approaches. The test results demonstrate that the proposed approach is effective and the attitude update rate of a star tracker is increased significantly.

  3. Massive stars, successes and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynet, Georges; Maeder, André; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Eggenberger, Patrick; Barblan, Fabio; Song, Han Feng

    2017-11-01

    We give a brief overview of where we stand with respect to some old and new questions bearing on how massive stars evolve and end their lifetime. We focus on the following key points that are further discussed by other contributions during this conference: convection, mass losses, rotation, magnetic field and multiplicity. For purpose of clarity, each of these processes are discussed on its own but we have to keep in mind that they are all interacting between them offering a large variety of outputs, some of them still to be discovered.

  4. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating cavitation,...

  5. Dwarf Star Erupts in Giant Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This movie taken by NASA'S Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows one of the largest flares, or star eruptions, ever recorded at ultraviolet wavelengths. The star, called GJ 3685A, just happened to be in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's field of view while the telescope was busy observing galaxies. As the movie demonstrates, the seemingly serene star suddenly exploded once, then even more intensely a second time, pouring out in total about one million times more energy than a typical flare from our Sun. The second blast of light constituted an increase in brightness by a factor of at least 10,000. Flares are huge explosions of energy stemming from a single location on a star's surface. They are caused by the brief destruction of a star's magnetic fields. Many types of stars experience them, though old, small, rapidly rotating 'red dwarfs' like GJ 3685A tend to flare more frequently and dramatically. These stars, called flare stars, can experience powerful eruptions as often as every few hours. Younger stars, in general, also erupt more often. One of the reasons astronomers study flare stars is to gain a better picture and history of flare events taking place on the Sun. A preliminary analysis of the GJ 3685A flare shows that the mechanisms underlying stellar eruptions may be more complex than previously believed. Evidence for the two most popular flare theories was found. Though this movie has been sped up (the actual flare lasted about 20 minutes), time-resolved data exist for each one-hundredth of a second. These observations were taken at 2 p.m. Pacific time, April 24, 2004. In the still image, the time sequence starts in the upper left panel, continues in the upper right, then moves to the lower left and ends in the lower right. The circular and linear features that appear below and to the right of GJ 3685A during the flare event are detector artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the flare.

  6. Formation of a contact binary star system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, E.F.F.

    1974-01-01

    The process of forming a contact binary star system is investigated in the light of current knowledge of the W Ursae Majoris type eclipsing binaries and the current rotational braking theories for contracting stars. A preliminary stage of mass transfer is proposed and studied through the use of a computer program which calculates evolutionary model sequences. The detailed development of both stars is followed in these calculations, and findings regarding the internal structure of the star which is receiving the mass are presented. Relaxation of the mass-gaining star is also studied; for these stars of low mass and essentially zero age, the star eventually settles to a state very similar to a zero-age main sequence star of the new mass. A contact system was formed through these calculations; it exhibits the general properties of a W Ursae Majoris system. The initial masses selected for the calculation were 1.29 M/sub solar mass/ and 0.56 M/sub solar mass/. An initial mass transfer rate of about 10 -10 solar masses per year gradually increased to about 10 -8 solar masses per year. After about 2.5 x 10 7 years, the less massive star filled its Roche lobe and an initial contact system was obtained. The final masses were 1.01359 M/sub solar mass/ and 0.83641 M/sub solar mass/. The internal structure of the secondary component is considerably different from that of a main sequence star of the same mass

  7. Observational Tests of Magnetospheric Accretion Models in Young Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns–Krull Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically controlled accretion of disk material onto the surface of Classical T Tauri stars is the dominant paradigm in our understanding of how these young stars interact with their surrounding disks. These stars provide a powerful test of magnetically controlled accretion models since all of the relevant parameters, including the magnetic field strength and geometry, are in principle measureable. Both the strength and the field geometry are key for understanding how these stars interact with their disks. This talk will focus on recent advances in magnetic field measurements on a large number of T Tauri stars, as well as very recent studies of the accretion rates onto a sample of young stars in NGC 2264 with known rotation periods. We discuss how these observations provide critical tests of magnetospheric accretion models which predict a rotational equilibrium is reached. We find good support for the model predictions once the complex geometry of the stellar magnetic field is taken into account. We will also explore how the observations of the accretion properties of the 2264 cluster stars can be used to test emerging ideas on how magnetic fields on young stars are generated and organized as a function of their internal structure (i.e. the presence of a radiative core. We do not find support for the hypothesis that large changes in the magentic field geometry occur when a radiative core appears in these young stars.

  8. Fragmentation during primordial star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    Understanding the physics of the very first stars in the universe, the so-called Population III (or Pop III) stars, is crucial in determining how the universe evolved into what we observe today. In the standard model of Pop III star formation, the baryonic matter, mainly atomic hydrogen, collapses gravitationally into small Dark Matter (DM) minihalos. However, so far there is little understanding on how the thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of the primordial gas depend on the initial configuration of the minihalos (for example, rotation of the unstable clumps inside minihalos, turbulence, formation of molecular hydrogen and cosmic variance of the minihalos). We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. Unlike some earlier cosmological calculations, the implementation of sink particles allows us to follow the evolution of the accretion disk that builds up in the centre of each minihalo and fragments. We find that the fragmentation behavior depends on the adopted choice of three-body H2 formation rate coefficient. The increasing cooling rate during rapid conversion of the atomic to molecular hydrogen is offset by the heating due to gas contraction. We propose that the H2 cooling, the heating due to H2 formation and compressional heating together set a density and temperature structure in the disk that favors fragmentation. We also find that the cloud's initial degree of rotation has a significant effect on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the collapsing gas. Clouds with higher rotation exhibit spiral-arm-like structures that become gravitationally unstable to fragmentation on several scales. These type of clouds tend to fragment more and have lower accretion rates compared to their slowly rotating counterparts. In addition, we find that the distribution of specific angular

  9. Spectroscopic survey of Kepler stars - II. FIES/NOT observations of A- and F-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczura, E.; Polińska, M.; Murphy, S. J.; Smalley, B.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Lykke, J. M.; Triviño Hage, A.; Michalska, G.

    2017-09-01

    We have analysed high-resolution spectra of 28 A and 22 F stars in the Kepler field, observed using the Fibre-Fed Échelle Spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We provide spectral types, atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for 50 stars. Balmer, Fe I and Fe II lines were used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities and microturbulent velocities. We determined chemical abundances and projected rotational velocities using a spectrum synthesis technique. Effective temperatures calculated by spectral energy distribution fitting are in good agreement with those determined from the spectral line analysis. The stars analysed include chemically peculiar stars of the Am and λ Boo types, as well as stars with approximately solar chemical abundances. The wide distribution of projected rotational velocity, vsin I, is typical for A and F stars. The microturbulence velocities obtained are typical for stars in the observed temperature and surface gravity ranges. Moreover, we affirm the results of Niemczura et al. that Am stars do not have systematically higher microturbulent velocities than normal stars of the same temperature.

  10. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  11. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.

  12. Possible Reasons for the Slow Rotation of BF Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S. G.

    2016-03-01

    Possible reasons for the very low projected rotation velocity of BF Ori compared to other UX Ori stars are discussed. The hypothesis of a close companion that slows down the star's rotation by a tidal interaction is examined. Based on a theory of synchronization and modern models of evolution, the interaction is calculated numerically for different masses of the companion and values of the semi-major axis. It is shown that in order to obtain the projected velocity observed for BF Ori, the companion must have a mass greater than 0.5M⊙ . Such a large companion should have been discovered observationally. It is suggested that the low rotation velocity of BF Ori is more likely to be related to the distribution of the angular momentum of a protostellar cloud between the angular momentum of the star and the orbital angular momentum of a low-mass companion.

  13. Residual HCRF rotation relative to the inertial coordinate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    VLBI measurements of the absolute proper motions of 23 radio stars have been collected from published data. These are stars with maser emission, or very young stars, or asymptotic-giant-branch stars. By comparing these measurements with the stellar proper motions from the optical catalogs of the Hipparcos Celestial Reference Frame (HCRF), we have found the components of the residual rotation vector of this frame relative to the inertial coordinate system: ( ω x , ω y , ω z ) = (-0.39, -0.51, -1.25) ± (0.58, 0.57, 0.56) mas yr-1. Based on all the available data, we have determined new values of the components of the residual rotation vector for the optical realization of the HCRF relative to the inertial coordinate system: ( ω x , ω y , ω z ) = (-0.15, +0.24,-0.53) ± (0.11, 0.10, 0.13) mas yr-1.

  14. ROTATION PERIODS OF WIDE BINARIES IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a search of proper motion catalogs for common proper motion stars in the field of the Kepler spacecraft I identified 93 likely binary systems. A comparison of their rotation periods is a test of the gyrochronology concept. To find their periods I calculated the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Kepler mission photometry for each star. In most systems for which good periods can be found, the cooler star has a longer period than the hotter component, in general agreement with models. However, there is a wide range in the gradients of lines connecting binary pairs in a period–color diagram. Furthermore, near the solar color, only a few stars have longer periods than the Sun, suggesting that they, and their cooler companions, are not much older than the Sun. In addition, there is an apparent gap at intermediate periods in the period distribution of the late K and early M stars. Either star formation in this direction has been variable, or stars evolve in period at a non-uniform rate, or some stars evolve more rapidly than others at the same mass. Finally, using the ACF as a measure of the activity level, I found that while the F, G, and early K stars become less active as their periods increase, there is no correlation between period and activity for the mid K to early M stars.

  15. ROTATION PERIODS OF WIDE BINARIES IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janes, K. A. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    In a search of proper motion catalogs for common proper motion stars in the field of the Kepler spacecraft I identified 93 likely binary systems. A comparison of their rotation periods is a test of the gyrochronology concept. To find their periods I calculated the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Kepler mission photometry for each star. In most systems for which good periods can be found, the cooler star has a longer period than the hotter component, in general agreement with models. However, there is a wide range in the gradients of lines connecting binary pairs in a period–color diagram. Furthermore, near the solar color, only a few stars have longer periods than the Sun, suggesting that they, and their cooler companions, are not much older than the Sun. In addition, there is an apparent gap at intermediate periods in the period distribution of the late K and early M stars. Either star formation in this direction has been variable, or stars evolve in period at a non-uniform rate, or some stars evolve more rapidly than others at the same mass. Finally, using the ACF as a measure of the activity level, I found that while the F, G, and early K stars become less active as their periods increase, there is no correlation between period and activity for the mid K to early M stars.

  16. Ages of evolved low mass stars: Central stars of planetary nebulae and white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa R.D.D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed several methods to estimate the ages of central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN, which are based either on observed nebular properties or on data from the stars themselves. Our goal is to derive the age distribution of these stars and compare the results with empirical distributions for CSPN and white dwarfs. We have initially developed three methods based on nebular abundances, using (i an age-metallicity relation which is also a function of the galactocentric distance; (ii an age-metallicity relation obtained for the galactic disk, and (iii the central star masses derived from the observed nitrogen abundances. In this work we present two new, more accurate methods, which are based on kinematic properties: (I in this method, the expected rotation velocities of the nebulae around the galactic centre at their galactocentric distances are compared with the predicted values for the galactic rotation curve, and the differences are attributed to the different ages of the evolved stars; (II we determine directly the U, V, W, velocity components of the stars, as well as the velocity dispersions, and use the dispersion-age relation by the Geneva-Copenhagen survey. These methods were applied to two large samples of galactic CSPN. We conclude that most CSPN in the galactic disk have ages under 5 Gyr, and that the age distribution is peaked around 1 to 3 Gyr.

  17. UPSO three channel fast photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Sagar, R.; Joshi, S.; Ashoka, B. N.; Babu, V. C.; Seetha, S.; Girish, V.

    2001-09-01

    The design and performance of a modular portable three channel fast photometer is described. It can be disassembled as single individual channels such that the system can also be used as a single channel photometer. The instrument is put into operation since November 1999 on the 1-m UPSO telescope at Nainital. Since then, it is used extensively for the survey of roAp stars in the northern sky at UPSO. The discoveries made using this new photometer are also mentioned.

  18. Rapidly rotating polytropes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1994-01-01

    We construct an extensive set of equilibrium sequences of rotating polytropes in general relativity. We determine a number of important physical parameters of such stars, including maximum mass and maximum spin rate. The stability of the configurations against quasi-radial perturbations is diagnosed. Two classes of evolutionary sequences of fixed rest mass and entropy are explored: normal sequences which behave very much like Newtonian evolutionary sequences, and supramassive sequences which exist solely because of relativistic effects. Dissipation leading to loss of angular momentum causes a star to evolve in a quasi-stationary fashion along an evolutionary sequence. Supramassive sequences evolve towards eventual catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Prior to collapse, the star must spin up as it loses angular momentum, an effect which may provide an observational precursor to gravitational collapse to a black hole.

  19. Are blue supergiants descendants of magnetic main sequence stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Ilka; Langer, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Red and blue supergiants are, together with luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars, evolved phases of massive (OB) stars. The position of blue supergiants (BSG) near the main sequence band cannot be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. However, the assumption of a reduced convective core mass during the main sequence (MS) due to strong internal magnetic fields, established in roughly 10% of all stars on the upper MS, can recover this BSG population. For our calculations of the (non-rotating) massive stars at solar metallicity we used the 1D stellar evolution code MESA and compare their evolutionary tracks with positions from stars obtained from the VLT Flames survey of massive stars.

  20. Can neutron stars have auroras ? : electromagnetic coupling process between neutron star and magnetized accretion disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Iwakiri, W. B.; Enoto, T.; Wada, T.; Tao, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the binary neutron star system, angular momentum transfer from accretion disk to a star is essential process for spin-up/down of stars. The angular momentum transfer has been well formulated for the accretion disk strongly magnetized by the neutron star [e.g., Ghosh and Lamb, 1978, 1979a, b]. However, the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the neutron star and accretion disk has not been self-consistently solved in the previous studies although the magnetic field lines from the star are strongly tied with the accretion disk. In this study, we applied the planet-magnetosphere coupling process established for Jupiter [Hill, 1979] to the binary neutron star system. Angular momentum distribution is solved based on the torque balance between the neutron star's surface and accretion disk coupled by the magnetic field tensions. We found the EM coupling can transfer significantly larger fraction of the angular momentum from the magnetized accretion disk to the star than the unmagnetized case. The resultant spin-up rate is estimated to ~10^-14 [sec/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters, which is comparable with or larger than the other common spin-down/up processes: e.g., the magnetic dipole radiation spin-down. The Joule heating energy dissipated in the EM coupling is estimated to be up to ~10^36 [erg/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters. The release is comparable to that of gravitation energy directly caused by the matters accreting onto the neutron star. This suggests the EM coupling at the neutron star can accompany the observable radiation as auroras with a similar manner to those at the rotating planetary magnetospheres like Jupiter, Saturn, and other gas giants.

  1. Two Populations of Sunspots: Differential Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Osipova, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the differential rotation of sunspot groups using the Greenwich data, we propose an approach based on a statistical analysis of the histograms of particular longitudinal velocities in different latitude intervals. The general statistical velocity distributions for all such intervals are shown to be described by two rather than one normal distribution, so that two fundamental rotation modes exist simultaneously: fast and slow. The differentiality of rotation for the modes is the same: the coefficient at sin2 in Faye's law is 2.87-2.88 deg/day, while the equatorial rotation rates differ significantly, 0.27 deg/day. On the other hand, an analysis of the longitudinal velocities for the previously revealed two differing populations of sunspot groups has shown that small short-lived groups (SSGs) are associated with the fast rotation mode, while large long-lived groups (LLGs) are associated with both fast and slow modes. The results obtained not only suggest a real physical difference between the two populations of sunspots but also give new empirical data for the development of a dynamo theory, in particular, for the theory of a spatially distributed dynamo.

  2. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  3. The evolution of CNO isotopes: a new window on cosmic star formation history and the stellar IMF in the age of ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, D.; Matteucci, F.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Ivison, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use state-of-the-art chemical models to track the cosmic evolution of the CNO isotopes in the interstellar medium of galaxies, yielding powerful constraints on their stellar initial mass function (IMF). We re-assess the relative roles of massive stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and novae in the production of rare isotopes such as 13C, 15N, 17O and 18O, along with 12C, 14N and 16O. The CNO isotope yields of super-AGB stars, novae and fast-rotating massive stars are included. Having reproduced the available isotope enrichment data in the solar neighbourhood, and across the Galaxy, and having assessed the sensitivity of our models to the remaining uncertainties, e.g. nova yields and star formation history, we show that we can meaningfully constrain the stellar IMF in galaxies using C, O and N isotope abundance ratios. In starburst galaxies, where data for multiple isotopologue lines are available, we find compelling new evidence for a top-heavy stellar IMF, with profound implications for their star formation rates and efficiencies, perhaps also their stellar masses. Neither chemical fractionation nor selective photodissociation can significantly perturb globally averaged isotopologue abundance ratios away from the corresponding isotope ones, as both these processes will typically affect only small mass fractions of molecular clouds in galaxies. Thus, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array now stands ready to probe the stellar IMF, and even the ages of specific starburst events in star-forming galaxies across cosmic time unaffected by the dust obscuration effects that plague optical/near-infrared studies.

  4. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  5. X-ray sources in stars formation areas: T Tauri stars and proto-stars in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    This thesis studies from large to small scales, X-ray sources in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud. After some background on the formation of the low-mass young stars (Chapter 1), Chapter 2 takes an interest in the T Tauri star population. Chapter 3 tackles the search of the magnetic activity at the younger stage of protostar, presenting a powerful X-ray emission from an IR protostar, called YLW15, during a flare, and a quasi-periodic flare of the same source; as well as a new detection of another IR protostar in the ROSAT archives. It ends with a review of protostar detections. Some IR protostar flares show a very long increasing phase. Chapter 4 links this behaviour with a modulation by the central star rotation. The standard model of jet emission assumes that the central star rotates at the same speed that the inner edge of its accretion disk. This chapter shows that the observation of the YLW15 quasi-periodic flare suggests rather that the forming star rotates faster than its accretion disk, at the break up limit. The synchronism with the accretion disk, observed on T Tauri stars, must be reach progressively by magnetic breaking during the IR protostar stage, and more or less rapidly depending on the forming star mass. Recent studies have shown that T Tauri star X-ray emission could ionize the circumstellar disk, and play a role in the instability development, as well as stimulate the accretion. The protostar X-ray emission might be higher than the T Tauri star one, Chapter 5 presents a millimetric interferometric observation dedicated to measure this effect on YLW15. Finally, Chapter 6 reassembles conclusions and perspectives of this work. (author) [fr

  6. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Magnetic Activity in the Galactic Centre Region - Fast Downflows along Rising Magnetic Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Kensuke; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Enokiya, Rei; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2018-03-01

    We studied roles of the magnetic field on the gas dynamics in the Galactic bulge by a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamical simulation data, particularly focusing on vertical flows that are ubiquitously excited by magnetic activity. In local regions where the magnetic field is stronger, it is frequently seen that fast downflows slide along inclined magnetic field lines that are associated with buoyantly rising magnetic loops. The vertical velocity of these downflows reaches ˜100 km s-1 near the footpoint of the loops by the gravitational acceleration toward the Galactic plane. The two footpoints of rising magnetic loops are generally located at different radial locations and the field lines are deformed by the differential rotation. The angular momentum is transported along the field lines, and the radial force balance breaks down. As a result, a fast downflow is often observed only at the one footpoint located at the inner radial position. The fast downflow compresses the gas to form a dense region near the footpoint, which will be important in star formation afterward. Furthermore, the horizontal components of the velocity are also fast near the footpoint because the downflow is accelerated along the magnetic sliding slope. As a result, the high-velocity flow creates various characteristic features in a simulated position-velocity diagram, depending on the viewing angle.

  8. Generalization of stochastic visuomotor rotations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo L Fernandes

    Full Text Available Generalization studies examine the influence of perturbations imposed on one movement onto other movements. The strength of generalization is traditionally interpreted as a reflection of the similarity of the underlying neural representations. Uncertainty fundamentally affects both sensory integration and learning and is at the heart of many theories of neural representation. However, little is known about how uncertainty, resulting from variability in the environment, affects generalization curves. Here we extend standard movement generalization experiments to ask how uncertainty affects the generalization of visuomotor rotations. We find that although uncertainty affects how fast subjects learn, the perturbation generalizes independently of uncertainty.

  9. Statistical and dynamical aspects in fission process: The rotational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... In the final phases of fission process, there are fast collective rotational degrees of freedom, which can exert a force on the slower tilting rotational degree. Experimental observations that lead to this realization and theoretical studies that account for dynamics of the processes are discussed briefly.

  10. X-rays from stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2004-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies available from Chandra and XMM-Newton play a pivotal part in the understanding of the physical processes in stellar (magnetic and non-magnetic) atmospheres. It is now routinely possible to derive densities and to study the influence of ultraviolet radiation fields, both of which can be used to infer the geometry of the radiating sources. Line profiles provide important information on bulk mass motions and attenuation by neutral matter, e.g. in stellar winds. The increased sensitivity has revealed new types of X-ray sources in systems that were thought to be unlikely places for X-rays: flaring brown dwarfs, including rather old, non-accreting objects, and terminal shocks in jets of young stars are important examples. New clues concerning the role of stellar high-energy processes in the modification of the stellar environment (ionization, spallation, etc.) contribute significantly to our understanding of the "astro-ecology" in forming planetary systems. Technological limitations are evident. The spectral resolution has not reached the level where bulk mass motions in cool stars become easily measurable. Higher resolution would also be important to perform X-ray "Doppler imaging" in order to reconstruct the 3-D distribution of the X-ray sources around a rotating star. Higher sensitivity will be required to perform high-resolution spectroscopy of weak sources such as brown dwarfs or embedded pre-main-sequence sources. A new generation of satellites such as Constellation-X or XEUS should pursue these goals.

  11. Gravitational waves from remnant massive neutron stars of binary neutron star merger: Viscous hydrodynamics effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2017-06-01

    Employing a simplified version of the Israel-Stewart formalism of general-relativistic shear-viscous hydrodynamics, we explore the evolution of a remnant massive neutron star of binary neutron star merger and pay special attention to the resulting gravitational waveforms. We find that for the plausible values of the so-called viscous alpha parameter of the order 10-2 the degree of the differential rotation in the remnant massive neutron star is significantly reduced in the viscous time scale, ≲5 ms . Associated with this, the degree of nonaxisymmetric deformation is also reduced quickly, and as a consequence, the amplitude of quasiperiodic gravitational waves emitted also decays in the viscous time scale. Our results indicate that for modeling the evolution of the merger remnants of binary neutron stars we would have to take into account magnetohydrodynamics effects, which in nature could provide the viscous effects.

  12. The impact of Hipparcos star-fixing extends to life's evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Telescope. Radio astronomers will henceforward be able to correct any mismatch, by comparing nearby radio sources in the Hipparcos Catalogue with the positions of distant quasars. Jean Kovalevsky of the CJte d'Azur Observatory in Grasse, France, coordinated this work of uniting Hipparcos results with the cosmos in general. He is also the leader of the consortium called FAST (Fundamental Astronomy by Space Techniques) which is one of two multinational teams that worked in parallel to generate the basic Hipparcos Catalogue. "We have related the stars of Hipparcos to the whole Universe of galaxies and quasars, to better than two tenths of a millionth of a degree," Kovalevsky reports. "We have also got rid of a possible rotation of the system of Hipparcos stars, to more than twice that precision. And the wide Universe gives us a more reliable reference frame for the sky and the stars than our spinning, wobbling and orbiting planet has ever provided." Among the astronomical space missions already adopting Hipparcos data for better aiming is ESA's Infrared Space Observatory ISO. The forthcoming X-ray astronomy missions, NASA's AXAF and ESA's XMM, will rely on Hipparcos when searching the sky. Hipparcos stars will also guide deep space probes, including the NASA-ESA Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan, and ESA's Rosetta mission to Comet Wirtanen. The Tycho project progresses from 1,000,000 to 3,000,000 stars The Tycho Catalogue gives the positions of many more stars, so although its accuracy is about one-tenth as good as the Hipparcos Catalogue's, it is the more generous source of greatly improved data for the world's astronomers. Plotting and characterizing eight times as many stars as the Hipparcos Catalogue, the Tycho Catalogue offers a comprehensive survey of the stars around the Sun. It includes 99.9 per cent of stars down to magnitude 10, which means stars 100 times fainter than the unaided human eye can normally see. Russian and German astronomers are now comparing

  13. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  14. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  15. Electromagnetic multipole fields of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    A formalism is developed for treating general multipole electromagnetic fields of neutron stars. The electric multipoles induced in a neutron star by its rotation with an arbitrary magnetic multipole at its center are presented. It is shown how to express a family of off-centered multipoles having the same l weight as an infinite array of centered multipoles of increasing l weight referred to the rotational axis. General expressions are given for the linear momentum present in the superposition of arbitrary multipole fields, and the results are combined to compute the radiation rate of linear momentum by an off-centered dipole to zeroth order in the parameter Omega x R/c. The general Deutsch (1955) solution is then rederived in a clear consistent manner, and some minor additions and corrections are provided.

  16. M Dwarf Rotation from the K2 Young Clusters to the Field. I. A Mass-Rotation Correlation at 10 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Garrett; Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Cody, Ann Marie; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of the low-mass (0.1-0.6 {M}⊙ ) rotation distributions of the Pleiades and Praesepe clusters have revealed a ubiquitous correlation between mass and rotation, such that late M dwarfs rotate an order-of-magnitude faster than early M dwarfs. In this paper, we demonstrate that this mass-rotation correlation is present in the 10 Myr Upper Scorpius association, as revealed by new K2 rotation measurements. Using rotational evolution models, we show that the low-mass rotation distribution of the 125 Myr Pleiades cluster can only be produced if it hosted an equally strong mass-rotation correlation at 10 Myr. This suggests that physical processes important in the early pre-main sequence (PMS; star formation, accretion, disk-locking) are primarily responsible for the M dwarf rotation morphology, and not quirks of later angular momentum (AM) evolution. Such early mass trends must be taken into account when constructing initial conditions for future studies of stellar rotation. Finally, we show that the average M star loses ˜25%-40% of its AM between 10 and 125 Myr, a figure accurately and generically predicted by modern solar-calibrated wind models. Their success rules out a lossless PMS and validates the extrapolation of magnetic wind laws designed for solar-type stars to the low-mass regime at early times.

  17. THE MASS-DEPENDENCE OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN SUN-LIKE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matt, Sean P.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles; Brun, A. Sacha; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the observed distributions of the rotation rate and magnetic activity of Sun-like and low-mass stars, we derive a physically motivated scaling for the dependence of the stellar wind torque on the Rossby number. The torque also contains an empirically derived scaling with stellar mass (and radius), which provides new insight into the mass-dependence of stellar magnetic and wind properties. We demonstrate that this new formulation explains why the lowest mass stars are observed to maintain rapid rotation for much longer than solar-mass stars, and simultaneously why older populations exhibit a sequence of slowly rotating stars, in which the low-mass stars rotate more slowly than solar-mass stars. The model also reproduces some previously unexplained features in the period-mass diagram for the Kepler field, notably: the particular shape of the ''upper envelope'' of the distribution, suggesting that ∼95% of Kepler field stars with measured rotation periods are younger than ∼4 Gyr; and the shape of the ''lower envelope'', corresponding to the location where stars transition between magnetically saturated and unsaturated regimes

  18. Rotating swings—a theme with variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Rotating swing rides can be found in many amusement parks, in many different versions. The ‘wave swinger’ ride, which introduces a wave motion by tilting the roof, is among the classical amusement rides that are found in many different parks, in different sizes, from a number of different makes and names, and varying thematization. The ‘StarFlyer’ is a more recent version, adding the thrill of lifting the riders 60 m or more over the ground. These rotating swing rides involve beautiful physics, often surprising, but easily observed, when brought to attention. The rides can be used for student worksheet tasks and assignments of different degrees of difficulty, across many math and physics topics. This paper presents a number of variations of student tasks relating to the theme of rotating swing rides.

  19. Regular Generalized Star Star closed sets in Bitopological Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    K. Kannan; D. Narasimhan; K. Chandrasekhara Rao; R. Ravikumar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the concepts of τ1τ2-regular generalized star star closed sets , τ1τ2-regular generalized star star open sets and study their basic properties in bitopological spaces.

  20. Looking for imprints of the first stellar generations in metal-poor bulge field stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Chiappini, C.; Barbuy, B.; Freeman, K.; Ness, M.; Depagne, E.; Cantelli, E.; Pignatari, M.; Hirschi, R.; Frischknecht, U.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.

    2016-09-01

    detected in our sample. The heavy elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, and Eu also exhibit oversolar abundances. Three out of the five stars analysed here show slightly enhanced [Y/Ba] ratios similar to those found in other metal-poor bulge globular clusters (NGC 6522 and M 62). Conclusions: This sample shows enhancement in the first-to-second peak abundance ratios of heavy elements, as well as dominantly s-process element excesses. This can be explained by different nucleosynthesis scenarios: (a) the main r-process plus extra mechanisms, such as the weak r-process; (b) mass transfer from asymptotic giant branch stars in binary systems; (c) an early generation of fast-rotating massive stars. Larger samples of moderately metal-poor bulge stars, with detailed chemical abundances, are needed to better constrain the source of dominantly s-process elements in the early Universe. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO), under programmes 089.B-0208(A).

  1. X-rays from Magnetic B-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Corinne; Petit, Véronique; Caballero-Nieves, Saida Maria; Nazé, Yaël; Owocki, Stan; Wade, Gregg; Cohen, David; Townsend, Richard; David-Uraz, Alexandre; Shultz, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Recent surveys have found that ~10% of OB-type stars host strong (~1kG), mostly dipolar magnetic fields. The prominent idea describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock model. In this model, the ionized wind material is forced to move along the closed magnetic field loops and collides at the magnetic equator creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some of these magnetic B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, which could lead to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this question from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere model, developed for slow rotators and implement the physics of rapid rotation. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA’s XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role an added centrifugal acceleration plays in the magnetospheres of these stars.

  2. Equilibrium and stability of a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The author considers the equilibrium and stability of a rotating plasma. The kinetic equations for ions and electrons supplemented with the Maxwell equations and the appropriate boundary conditions are used. Two different models for the rotating plasma are considered: the equilibrium of a 'fast' rotating plasma (Magneto Hydrodynamic ordering) and the stability of a slowly rotating, 'weakly' unstable plasma (Finite Larmor Radius ordering). A striking difference between these orderings is the fact that, regarding the stability of the plasma, for a F.L.R. plasma viscosity effects due to the finite Larmor radius are important, whereas in a M.H.D. plasma they are negligible (at least to the required order). (Auth.)

  3. Inferring probabilistic stellar rotation periods using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Ruth; Morton, Timothy; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rajpaul, Vinesh

    2018-02-01

    Variability in the light curves of spotted, rotating stars is often non-sinusoidal and quasi-periodic - spots move on the stellar surface and have finite lifetimes, causing stellar flux variations to slowly shift in phase. A strictly periodic sinusoid therefore cannot accurately model a rotationally modulated stellar light curve. Physical models of stellar surfaces have many drawbacks preventing effective inference, such as highly degenerate or high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this work, we test an appropriate effective model: a Gaussian Process with a quasi-periodic covariance kernel function. This highly flexible model allows sampling of the posterior probability density function of the periodic parameter, marginalizing over the other kernel hyperparameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. To test the effectiveness of this method, we infer rotation periods from 333 simulated stellar light curves, demonstrating that the Gaussian process method produces periods that are more accurate than both a sine-fitting periodogram and an autocorrelation function method. We also demonstrate that it works well on real data, by inferring rotation periods for 275 Kepler stars with previously measured periods. We provide a table of rotation periods for these and many more, altogether 1102 Kepler objects of interest, and their posterior probability density function samples. Because this method delivers posterior probability density functions, it will enable hierarchical studies involving stellar rotation, particularly those involving population modelling, such as inferring stellar ages, obliquities in exoplanet systems, or characterizing star-planet interactions. The code used to implement this method is available online.

  4. PULSAR.MAKING VISIBLE THE SOUND OF STARS

    OpenAIRE

    Lega, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Pulsar, making visible the sound of stars is a comunication based on a sound Installation raised as a site-specific project to show the hidden abilities of sound to generate images and patterns on the matter, using the acoustic science of cymatics. The objective of this communication will show people how through abstract and intangible sounds from celestial orbs of cosmos (radio waves generated by electromagnetic pulses from the rotation of neutrón stars), we can create ar...

  5. Quark core stars, quark stars and strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A recent one flavor quark matter equation of state is generalized to several flavors. It is shown that quarks undergo a first order phase transition. In addition, this equation of state depends on just one parameter in the two flavor case, two parameters in the three flavor case, and these parameters are constrained by phenomenology. This equation of state is then applied to the hadron-quark transition in neutron stars and the determination of quark star stability, the investigation of strange matter stability and possible strange star existence. 43 refs., 6 figs

  6. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity dedicated to the study of the extraordinary gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear-physics environments embodied by neutron stars. Scheduled to be launched in 2016 as an International Space Station payload, NICER will explore the exotic states of matter, using rotation-resolved spectroscopy of the thermal and non-thermal emissions of neutron stars in the soft (0.2-12 keV) X-ray band. Grazing-incidence "concentrator" optics coupled with silicon drift detectors, actively pointed for a full hemisphere of sky coverage, will provide photon-counting spectroscopy and timing registered to GPS time and position, with high throughput and relatively low background. The NICER project plans to implement a Guest Observer Program, which includes competitively selected user targets after the first year of flight operations. I will describe NICER and discuss ideas for potential Be/X-ray binary science.

  7. Towards age/rotation/magnetic activity relation with seismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Savita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of stellar ages directly impacts the characterization of a planetary system as it puts strong constraints on the moment when the system was born. Unfortunately, the determination of precise stellar ages is a very difficult task. Different methods can be used to do so (based on isochrones or chemical element abundances but they usually provide large uncertainties. During its evolution a star goes through processes leading to loss of angular momentum but also changes in its magnetic activity. Building rotation, magnetic, age relations would be an asset to infer stellar ages model independently. Several attempts to build empirical relations between rotation and age (namely gyrochronology were made with a focus on cluster stars where the age determination is easier and for young stars on the main sequence. For field stars, we can now take advantage of high-precision photometric observations where we can perform asteroseismic analyses to improve the accuracy of stellar ages. Furthermore, the variability in the light curves allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar rotation and magnetic activity. By combining these precise measurements, we are on the way of understanding and improving relations between magnetic activity, rotation, and age, in particular at different stages of stellar evolution. I will review the status on gyrochronology relationships based on observations of young cluster stars. Then I will focus on solar-like stars and describe the inferences on stellar ages, rotation, and magnetism that can be provided by high-quality photometric observations such as the ones of the Kepler mission, in particular through asteroseismic analyses.

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Televisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Televisions that are effective as of October 30,...

  9. mSTAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mini-STAR (mSTAR) is a small satellite mission concept to test the hypothesis that the velocity of light is independent of the velocity and orientation of the...

  10. ENERGY STAR Certified Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Boilers that are effective as of October 1,...

  11. Observations of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Difficulties occurring in the observation of central stars of planetary nebulae are reviewed with emphasis on spectral classifications and population types, and temperature determination. Binary and peculiar central stars are discussed. (U.M.G.)

  12. ENERGY STAR Certified Computers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 6.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Computers that are effective as of June 2, 2014....

  13. ENERGY STAR Certified Furnaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Furnaces that are effective as of February 1,...

  14. ENERGY STAR Certified Telephones

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Telephony (cordless telephones and VoIP...

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Dehumidifiers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers that are effective as of October...

  16. Triggered star formation and its consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shule; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Star formation can be triggered by compression from wind or supernova-driven shock waves that sweep over molecular clouds. Because these shocks will likely contain processed elements, triggered star formation has been proposed as an explanation for short-lived radioactive isotopes (SLRIs) in the Solar system. Previous studies have tracked the triggering event to the earliest phases of collapse and have focused on the shock properties required for both successful star formation and mixing of SLRIs. In this paper, we use adaptive mesh refinement simulation methods, including sink particles, to simulate the full collapse and subsequent evolution of a stable Bonnor- Ebert sphere subjected to a shock and post-shock wind. We track the flow of the cloud material after a star (a sink particle) has formed. For non-rotating clouds, we find robust triggered collapse and little bound circumstellar material remaining around the post-shock collapsed core. When we add initial cloud rotation, we observe the formation of discs around the collapsed core which then interact with the post-shock flow. Our results indicate that these circumstellar discs are massive enough to form planets and are long lived, in spite of the ablation driven by post-shock-flow ram pressure. As a function of the initial conditions, we also track the time evolution of the accretion rates and particle mixing between the ambient wind and cloud material. The latter is maximized for cases of highest Mach number.

  17. Observations of fast variable objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, G.N.

    1978-01-01

    A problem on studying fast variable astronomic objects is considered. The basis of the method used in the experiment is a detailed photoelectric study of a fast variableness along with spectroscopy of a high time resolution. Power spectrum of the SS Cyg brightness oscillations and autocorrelation function of the AX Mon brightness are analyzed as an example. To provide a reliable identification of parameters of star active regions responsible for the fast variableness, an experiment is proposed, the ''synchronous spectroscopy'' method being used. The method is based on the supposition about temporary stationarity of occasional processes within the limits of the time scale of several hours. The block diagram of the experiment is described

  18. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  19. Interactions between exoplanets and the winds of young stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidotto A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The topology of the magnetic field of young stars is important not only for the investigation of magnetospheric accretion, but also responsible in shaping the large-scale structure of stellar winds, which are crucial for regulating the rotation evolution of stars. Because winds of young stars are believed to have enhanced mass-loss rates compared to those of cool, main-sequence stars, the interaction of winds with newborn exoplanets might affect the early evolution of planetary systems. This interaction can also give rise to observational signatures which could be used as a way to detect young planets, while simultaneously probing for the presence of their still elusive magnetic fields. Here, we investigate the interaction between winds of young stars and hypothetical planets. For that, we model the stellar winds by means of 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Although these models adopt simplified topologies of the stellar magnetic field (dipolar fields that are misaligned with the rotation axis of the star, we show that asymmetric field topologies can lead to an enhancement of the stellar wind power, resulting not only in an enhancement of angular momentum losses, but also intensifying and rotationally modulating the wind interactions with exoplanets.

  20. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  1. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  2. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  3. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  4. Parameterization of rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunmei; Liu Tong

    1992-01-01

    The rotational spectra of the strongly deformed nuclei with low rotational frequencies and weak band mixture are analyzed. The strongly deformed nuclei are commonly encountered in the rare-earth region (e. g., 150 220). A lot of rotational band knowledge are presented

  5. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  6. Two Coexisting Families of Compact Stars: Observational Implications for Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico; Thampan, Arun V.

    2017-10-01

    It is usually thought that a single equation of state (EoS) model “correctly” represents cores of all compact stars. Here we emphasize that two families of compact stars, viz., neutron stars and strange stars, can coexist in nature, and that neutron stars can get converted to strange stars through the nucleation process of quark matter in the stellar center. From our fully general relativistic numerical computations of the structures of fast-spinning compact stars, known as millisecond pulsars, we find that such a stellar conversion causes a simultaneous spin-up and decrease in gravitational mass of these stars. This is a new type of millisecond pulsar evolution through a new mechanism, which gives rise to relatively lower mass compact stars with higher spin rates. This could have an implication for the observed mass and spin distributions of millisecond pulsars. Such a stellar conversion can also rescue some massive, spin-supported millisecond pulsars from collapsing into black holes. Besides, we extend the concept of critical mass {M}{cr} for the neutron star sequence to the case of fast-spinning neutron stars, and point out that neutron star EoS models cannot be ruled out by the stellar mass measurement alone. Finally, we emphasize the additional complexity for constraining EoS models, for example, by stellar radius measurements using X-ray observations, if two families of compact stars coexist.

  7. FAST scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anna

    FAST-skanning er en metode, der har til formål at hurtigt diagnosticere fri væske i bughulen hos traumapatienter og andre akutte patienter. Denne skanningsteknik blev først introduceret til hunde i 2004, og omfatter ultralydsskanning af specifikke punkter i bughulen, hvor der er stor chance....../sorte) områder. I dag bruges FAST-skanning meget hyppigt indenfor human og veterinær akutmedicin. Det kan ses som et værktøj for dyrlæger som ikke arbejder med ultralyd til daglig. FAST-skanning har mange fordele; proceduren er effektiv og kan tage under 3 minutter, men har alligevel høj diagnostisk værdi. Det...... nødvendigt. Det skal dog understreges, at de abdominale organer ikke undersøges specifikt. Det kan være svært at skelne mellem væske i peritonealhulen og i det retroperitoneale rum. Man kan heller ikke karakterisere væsken og derved skelne mellem f.eks. blod, pus eller urin. Siden FAST-skanning blev...

  8. Fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Peter

    Bogen omfatter en gennemgang af lovgivning, praksis og teori vedrørende køb af fast ejendom og offentligretlig og privatretlig regulering. Bogen belyser bl.a. de privatretlige emner: købers misligholdelsesbeføjelser, servitutter, naboret, hævd og erstatningsansvar for miljøskader samt den...

  9. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  10. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  11. Viscous Effects on the Interaction between the Coplanar Decretion Disc and the Neutron Star in Be/X-Ray Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Okazaki, A. T.; Bate, M. R.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Pringle, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    We study the viscous effects on the interaction between the coplanar Be-star disc and the neutron star in Be/X-ray binaries, using a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. For simplicity, we assume the Be disc to be isothermal at the temperature of half the stellar effective temperature. In order to mimic the gas ejection process from the Be star, we inject particles with the Keplerian rotation velocity at a radius just outside the star. Both Be star and neutron star are tre...

  12. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN A CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SOLAR-TYPE STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Miesch, Mark S.; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2011-01-01

    Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an Ω-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple α-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate in the

  13. Tides in differentially rotating convective envelopes. II. The tidal coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    The tidal coupling between a star with an extended, differentially rotating convective envelope, and its companion in a close binary system, is calculated from the tidal velocity field derived in Paper I. The derived coupling torque can be tested using observations of RS Canum Venaticorum systems, for which a photometric wave in the light curve provides an accurate stellar rotation rate, and for which observed orbital period changes require the stars in the systems to be coupled. The coupling torque is sufficient to explain the nearly synchronous rotation of the active star in RS CVn systems, despite the observed orbital period changes, but may not be able to explain the extreme tightness of the coupling implied by the very long periods for the migration of the photometric waves in the systems. This conclusion depends on the origin of the orbital period changes, but not on the nature of the wave or the wave migration. When the coupling torque vanishes, a specific latitude at the surface of the convective star will exactly corotate with the binary system: this corotation latitude is calculated. Finally, it is shown that the additional viscous terms introduced by tides should not suppress differential rotation in binary systems with RS Cvn parameters

  14. HR 8844: A New Transition Object between the Am Stars and the HgMn Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.; Kilicoglu, T.; Frémat, Y.

    2018-02-01

    While monitoring a sample of apparently slowly rotating superficially normal early-A stars, we have discovered that HR 8844 (A0 V) is actually a new chemically peculiar star. We first compared the high-resolution spectrum of HR 8844 with that of four slow rotators near A0V (ν Cap, ν Cnc, Sirius A, and HD 72660) to highlight similarities and differences. The lines of Ti II, Cr II, Sr II, and Ba II are conspicuous features in the high-resolution high signal-to-noise SOPHIE spectra of HR 8844 and much stronger than in the spectra of the normal star ν Cap. The Hg II line at 3983.93 Å is also present in a 3.5% blend. Selected unblended lines of 31 chemical elements from He up to Hg have been synthesized using model atmospheres computed with ATLAS9 and the spectrum synthesis code SYNSPEC48 including hyperfine structure of various isotopes when relevant. These synthetic spectra have been adjusted to the mean SOPHIE spectrum of HR 8844, and high-resolution spectra of the comparison stars. Chi-squares were minimized to derive abundances or upper limits to the abundances of these elements for HR 8844 and the comparison stars. HR 8844 is found to have underabundances of He, C, O, Mg, Ca, and Sc, mild enhancements of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and distinct enhancements of the heavy elements Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Pr, Sm, Eu, and Hg, the overabundances increasing steadily with atomic number. This chemical pattern suggests that HR 8844 may actually be a new transition object between the coolest HgMn stars and the Am stars.

  15. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    will be selected is shown in Fig. 1. This sample falls into two principal classes of stars: (1) Hot luminous H-burning stars (O to F stars). Analyses of OB star variability have the potential to help solve two outstanding problems: the sizes of convective (mixed) cores in massive stars and the influence of rapid rotation on their structure and evolution. (2) Cool luminous stars (AGB stars, cool giants and cool supergiants). Measurements of the time scales involved in surface granulation and differential rotation will constrain turbulent convection models. Mass loss from these stars (especially the massive supernova progenitors) is a major contributor to the evolution of the interstellar medium, so in a sense, this sample dominates cosmic ``ecology'' in terms of future generations of star formation. The massive stars are believed to share many characteristics of the lower mass range of the first generation of stars ever formed (although the original examples are of course long gone). BRITE observations will also be used to detect some Jupiter- and even Neptune-sized planets around bright host stars via transits, as expected on the basis of statistics from the Kepler exoplanet mission. Detecting planets around such very bright stars will greatly facilitate their subsequent characterization. BRITE will also use surface spots to investigate stellar rotation. The following Table summarizes launch and orbit parameters of BRITE-Constellation components. The full version of this paper describing in more detail BRITE-Constellation will be published separately in a journal. The symposium presentation is available at http://iaus301.astro.uni.wroc.pl/program.php

  16. Spots and activity of Pleiades stars from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope (K2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    Observations of the K2 continuation of Kepler Space Telescope program are used to estimate the spot coverage S (the fractional spotted area on the surface of an active star) for stars of the Pleiades cluster. The analysis is based on data on photometric variations of 759 confirmed clustermembers, together with their atmospheric parameters, masses, and rotation periods. The relationship between the activity ( S) of these Pleiades stars and their effective temperatures shows considerable change in S for stars with temperatures T eff less than 6100 K (this can be considered the limiting value for which spot formation activity begins) and a monotonic increase in S for cooler objects (a change in the slope for stars with Teff 3700 K). The scatter in this parameter ΔS about its mean dependence on the (V -Ks)0 color index remains approximately the same over the entire ( V- K s )0 range, including cool, fully convective dwarfs. The computated S values do not indicate differences between slowly rotating and rapidly rotating stars with color indices 1.1 activity of a large number of stars having the same age (759 members of the Pleiades cluster), resulting in the first determination of the relationship between the spot-forming activity and masses of stars. For 27 stars with masses differing from the solarmass by nomore than 0.1 M⊙, themean spot coverage is S = 0.031±0.003, suggesting that the activity of candidate young Suns is more pronounced than that of the present-day Sun. These stars rotate considerably faster than the Sun, with an average rotation period of 4.3d. The results of this study of cool, low-mass dwarfs of the Pleiades cluster are compared to results from an earlier study of 1570 M stars.

  17. THE FIRST STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Whalen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pop III stars are the key to the character of primeval galaxies, the first heavy elements, the onset of cosmological reionization, and the seeds of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their increasing sophistication, numerical models of Pop III star formation cannot yet predict the masses of the first stars. Because they also lie at the edge of the observable universe, individual Pop III stars will remain beyond the reach of observatories for decades to come, and so their properties are unknown. However, it will soon be possible to constrain their masses by direct detection of their supernovae, and by reconciling their nucleosynthetic yields to the chemical abundances measured in ancient metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo, some of which may bear the ashes of the first stars. Here, I review the state of the art in numerical simulations of primordial stars and attempts to directly and indirectly constrain their properties.

  18. Ponderable soliton stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  19. Synchronization of coupled active rotators by common noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatova, Anastasiya V.; Goldobin, Denis S.; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2017-12-01

    We study the effect of common noise on coupled active rotators. While such a noise always facilitates synchrony, coupling may be attractive (synchronizing) or repulsive (desynchronizing). We develop an analytical approach based on a transformation to approximate angle-action variables and averaging over fast rotations. For identical rotators, we describe a transition from full to partial synchrony at a critical value of repulsive coupling. For nonidentical rotators, the most nontrivial effect occurs at moderate repulsive coupling, where a juxtaposition of phase locking with frequency repulsion (anti-entrainment) is observed. We show that the frequency repulsion obeys a nontrivial power law.

  20. Multiperiodicity in the newly discovered mid-late Be star V2104 Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Poretti, E.; Rodríguez, E.; De Cat, P.; Mathias, P.; Telting, J. H.; Costa, V.; Miglio, A.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We obtained the first long, homogenous time-series of V2104 Cyg, consisting of 679 datapoints, with the uvbyβ photometers of the Sierra Nevada and San Pedro Mártir Observatories. Our aim was to detect and subsequently interpret the intrinsic frequencies of this previously unstudied variable star, which turned out to be a Be star. We evaluate its place among the variable B stars on the upper Main Sequence. To obtain additional information on physical parameters we collected a few spectra with the Elodie and FIES instruments. Methods: We searched for frequencies in the uvby passbands using 2 different frequency analysis methods and used the S/N > 4 criterion to select the significant periodicities. We obtained an estimate of the physical parameters of the underlying B star of spectral type between B5 and B7, by correcting for the presence of a circumstellar disk using a formalism based on the strength of the Hα line emission. Results: We detected 3 independent frequencies with amplitudes below 0.01 mag, ν1 = 4.7126 d-1 , ν2 = 2.2342 d-1 and ν3 = 4.671 d-1 , and discovered that V2104 Cyg is a Be star. The fast rotation (vsin i = 290±10 km s-1, and 27°< i < 45°) hampered the investigation of the associated pulsational parameters ell. Conclusions: The most plausible explanation for the observed variability of this mid-late type Be star is a non-radial pulsation model. Based on observations obtained at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional San Pedro Mártir (Mexico), Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (Spain) and Observatoire de Haute Provence (France), and on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Modelling the ionosphere of gas-giant exoplanets irradiated by low-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadney, J.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y.; Koskinen, T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-10-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmosphere of Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star from soft X-rays to Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) (0.1-10 nm). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age [1]. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages. XUV spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model [2]. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric [3] and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation is included through photo-ionisation and electronimpact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model [4]. Planets orbiting far from the star are found to undergo Jeans escape, whereas close-orbiting planets undergo hydrodynamic escape. The critical orbital distance of transition between the two regimes is dependent on the level of stellar activity. We also find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected (eps Eri, AD Leo, AU Mic) are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets in the Jeans escape regime also have a layer in which H3 + is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3 + undergo significant diurnal variations, their peak value being determined by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and their value is determined by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3 + peak in EGPs in the hydrodynamic escape regime under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g., hydrocarbons, water). Infrared emissions from H3 + shall also be discussed, as well as the impact of stellar

  2. The Neutron Star Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not

  3. Black holes, white dwarfs and neutron stars: The physics of compact objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The contents include: Star deaths and the formation of compact objects; White dwarfs; Rotation and magnetic fields; Cold equation of state above neutron drip; Pulsars; Accretion onto black holes; Supermassive stars and black holes; Appendices; and Indexes. This book discusses one aspect, compact objects, of astronomy and provides information of astrophysics or general relativity

  4. CIRCUMSTELLAR MOLECULAR LINE ABSORPTION AND EMISSION IN THE OPTICAL-SPECTRA OF POST-AGB STARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAKKER, EJ; LAMERS, HJGLM; WATERS, LBFM; SCHOENMAKER, T

    We present a list of post-AGB stars showing molecular line absorption and emission in the optical spectrum. Two objects show CH+, one in emission and one in absorption, and 10 stars show C-2 and CN in absorption. The Doppler velocities of the C-2 lines and the rotational temperatures indicate that

  5. Searching for gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    produce asymmetry due to the magnetic pressure. ¯. 10- is possible by this type .... ometrical picture [23,24], the signal is a vector in the vector space of data trains and the. Ж-parameter family of signals ... denote time averages defined as follows: For a function (Ш) defined on the data train. [0 М], the time average of is. = 1. М.

  6. Searching for gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    noise ratio (SNR) for ensuring detection. ... self astrophysically in globular clusters in our galaxy. There are about 200 such .... the signal manifold which is related to the fractional loss in the signal to noise ratio when there is a mismatch of ...

  7. The Evolution of Massive Stars: a Selection of Facts and Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    In the present paper we discuss a selection of facts and questions related to observations and evolutionary calculations of massive single stars and massive stars in interacting binaries. We focus on the surface chemical abundances, the role of stellar winds, the early Be-stars, the high mass X-ray binaries and the effects of rotation on stellar evolution. Finally, we present an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) of WR binaries in dense stellar environments.

  8. Gravito-inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirouh Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While many intermediate- and high-mass main sequence stars are rapidly and differentially rotating, the effects of rotation on oscillation modes are poorly known. In this communication we present a first study of axisymmetric gravito-inertial modes in the radiative zone of a differentially rotating star. We consider a simplified model where the radiative zone of the star is a linearly stratified rotating fluid within a spherical shell, with differential rotation due to baroclinic effects. We solve the eigenvalue problem with high-resolution spectral computations and determine the propagation domain of the waves through the theory of characteristics. We explore the propagation properties of two kinds of modes: those that can propagate in the entire shell and those that are restricted to a sub-domain. Some of the modes that we find concentrate kinetic energy around short-period shear layers known as attractors. We describe various geometries for the propagation domains, conditioning the surface visibility of the corresponding modes.

  9. On the kinematics of a runaway Be star population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubert, D.; Evans, N. W.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the hypothesis that B type emission-line stars (Be stars) have their origin in mass-transfer binaries by measuring the fraction of runaway Be stars. We assemble the largest-to-date catalogue of 632 Be stars with 6D kinematics, exploiting the precise astrometry of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) from the first Gaia Data Release. Using binary stellar evolution simulations, we make predictions for the runaway and equatorial rotation velocities of a runaway Be star population. Accounting for observational biases, we calculate that if all classical Be stars originated through mass transfer in binaries, then 17.5% of the Be stars in our catalogue should be runaways. The remaining 82.5% should be in binaries with subdwarfs, white dwarfs or neutron stars, because those systems either remained bound post-supernova or avoided the supernova entirely. Using a Bayesian methodology, we compare the hypothesis that each Be star in our catalogue is a runaway to the null hypothesis that it is a member of the Milky Way disc. We find that 13.1^{+2.6}_{-2.4}% of the Be stars in our catalogue are runaways, and identify a subset of 40 high-probability runaways. We argue that deficiencies in our understanding of binary stellar evolution, as well as the degeneracy between velocity dispersion and number of runaway stars, can explain the slightly lower runaway fraction. We thus conclude that all Be stars could be explained by an origin in mass-transfer binaries. This conclusion is testable with the second Gaia data release (DR2).

  10. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic development of miktoarm star polymers since 2000. At the present time, the almost all types of multiarmed and multicomponent miktoarm star polymers have become feasible by using recently developed iterative strategy. For example, the following well-defined stars have been successfully synthesized: 3-arm ABC, 4-arm ABCD, 5-arm ABCDE, 6-arm ABCDEF, 7-arm ABCDEFG, 6-arm ABC, 9-arm ABC, 12-arm ABC, 13-arm ABCD, 9-arm AB, 17-arm AB, 33-arm AB, 7-arm ABC, 15-arm ABCD, and 31-arm ABCDE miktoarm star polymers, most of which are quite new and difficult to synthesize by the end of the 1990s. Several new specialty functional star polymers composed of vinyl polymer segments and rigid rodlike poly(acetylene) arms, helical polypeptide, or helical poly(hexyl isocyanate) arms are introduced.

  11. Dark stars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  12. The Betelgeuse Project: constraints from rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Nance, S.; Diaz, M.; Smith, S. G.; Hickey, J.; Zhou, L.; Koutoulaki, M.; Sullivan, J. M.; Fowler, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    In order to constrain the evolutionary state of the red supergiant Betelgeuse (α Orionis), we have produced a suite of models with zero-age main sequence masses from 15 to 25 M⊙ in intervals of 1 M⊙ including the effects of rotation. The models were computed with the stellar evolutionary code MESA. For non-rotating models, we find results that are similar to other work. It is somewhat difficult to find models that agree within 1σ of the observed values of R, Teff and L, but modestly easy within 3σ uncertainty. Incorporating the nominal observed rotational velocity, ∼15 km s-1, yields significantly different and challenging constraints. This velocity constraint is only matched when the models first approach the base of the red supergiant branch (RSB), having crossed the Hertzsprung gap, but not yet having ascended the RSB and most violate even generous error bars on R, Teff and L. Models at the tip of the RSB typically rotate at only ∼0.1 km s-1, independent of any reasonable choice of initial rotation. We discuss the possible uncertainties in our modelling and the observations, including the distance to Betelgeuse, the rotation velocity and model parameters. We summarize various options to account for the rotational velocity and suggest that one possibility is that Betelgeuse merged with a companion star of about 1 M⊙ as it ascended the RSB, in the process producing the ring structure observed at about 7 arcmin away. A past coalescence would complicate attempts to understand the evolutionary history and future of Betelgeuse.

  13. Rotator cuff tear: A detailed update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear has been a known entity for orthopaedic surgeons for more than two hundred years. Although the exact pathogenesis is controversial, a combination of intrinsic factors proposed by Codman and extrinsic factors theorized by Neer is likely responsible for most rotator cuff tears. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, but the emergence of ultrasound has revolutionized the diagnostic capability. Even though mini-open rotator cuff repair is still commonly performed, and results are comparable to arthroscopic repair, all-arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear is now fast becoming a standard care for rotator cuff repair. Appropriate knowledge of pathology and healing pattern of cuff, strong and biological repair techniques, better suture anchors, and gradual rehabilitation of postcuff repair have led to good to excellent outcome after repair. As the healing of degenerative cuff tear remains unpredictable, the role of biological agents such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cells for postcuff repair augmentation is still under evaluation. The role of scaffolds in massive cuff tear is also being probed.

  14. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, E

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  16. ARCHEOLOGY OF AN ANCIENT STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrmann, K.; Chini, R.; Haas, M.; Hackstein, M.; Ramolla, M. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Bernkopf, J., E-mail: klaus@ing.iac.es [University of Applied Sciences Augsburg, An der Hochschule 1, D-86161 Augsburg (Germany)

    2012-12-20

    We report on the bright and late F-type star HR 3138, which, with respect to its chemistry in the [Mg/H]-[Fe/Mg] abundance plane, we identify as an old Population II member. Evolutionary tracks are, however, in conflict with this finding and instead imply an age of only {tau} = 5.6{sup -1.8}{sub +{sub 2.2}} Gyr (2{sigma}) for HR 3138. We discuss this controversy in light of existing high-precision radial velocity surveys that mostly exclude the case of a blue straggler primary and a white dwarf secondary. While it is realized that a stellar merger can principally solve the issue and there is indeed observational evidence for mass accretion on HR 3138 from the absence of lithium in its photosphere, we also consider the interesting circumstance that HR 3138 lies in the direction to the 350 pc distant, young open cluster NGC 2516. We point to the possibility that the progenitor cloud of this cluster may likewise account for former mass accretion and we argue in particular for a dynamical friction with this cloud as a plausible cause for the strikingly common Galactic rotational velocity of the field star and open cluster.

  17. Star clusters and K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jessie; Barentsen, Geert; Cody, Ann Marie

    2018-01-01

    The K2 survey has expanded the Kepler legacy by using the repurposed spacecraft to observe over 20 star clusters. The sample includes open and globular clusters at all ages, including very young (1-10 Myr, e.g. Taurus, Upper Sco, NGC 6530), moderately young (0.1-1 Gyr, e.g. M35, M44, Pleiades, Hyades), middle-aged (e.g. M67, Ruprecht 147, NGC 2158), and old globular clusters (e.g. M9, M19, Terzan 5). K2 observations of stellar clusters are exploring the rotation period-mass relationship to significantly lower masses than was previously possible, shedding light on the angular momentum budget and its dependence on mass and circumstellar disk properties, and illuminating the role of multiplicity in stellar angular momentum. Exoplanets discovered by K2 in stellar clusters provides planetary systems ripe for modeling given the extensive information available about their ages and environment. I will review the star clusters sampled by K2 across 16 fields so far, highlighting several characteristics, caveats, and unexplored uses of the public data set along the way. With fuel expected to run out in 2018, I will discuss the closing Campaigns, highlight the final target selection opportunities, and explain the data archive and TESS-compatible software tools the K2 mission intends to leave behind for posterity.

  18. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  19. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF THE CLASSICAL T TAURI STAR BP TAU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei; Johns-Krull, Christopher M., E-mail: wc2@rice.edu, E-mail: cmj@rice.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    We implement a least-squares deconvolution (LSD) code to study magnetic fields on cool stars. We first apply our code to high-resolution optical echelle spectra of 53 Cam (a magnetic Ap star) and three well-studied cool stars (Arcturus, 61 Cyg A, and ξ Boo A) as well as the Sun (by observing the asteroid Vesta) as tests of the code and the instrumentation. Our analysis is based on several hundred photospheric lines spanning the wavelength range 5000 Å to 9000 Å. We then apply our LSD code to six nights of data on the Classical T Tauri Star BP Tau. A maximum longitudinal field of 370 ± 80 G is detected from the photospheric lines on BP Tau. A 1.8 kG dipole tilted at 129° with respect to the rotation axis and a 1.4 kG octupole tilted at 104° with respect to the rotation axis, both with a filling factor of 0.25, best fit our LSD Stokes V profiles. Measurements of several emission lines (He I 5876 Å, Ca II 8498 Å, and 8542 Å) show the presence of strong magnetic fields in the line formation regions of these lines, which are believed to be the base of the accretion footpoints. The field strength measured from these lines shows night-to-night variability consistent with rotation of the star.